WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology hands-on activities

  1. A New Two-Step Approach for Hands-On Teaching of Gene Technology: Effects on Students' Activities During Experimentation in an Outreach Gene Technology Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2011-08-01

    Emphasis on improving higher level biology education continues. A new two-step approach to the experimental phases within an outreach gene technology lab, derived from cognitive load theory, is presented. We compared our approach using a quasi-experimental design with the conventional one-step mode. The difference consisted of additional focused discussions combined with students writing down their ideas (step one) prior to starting any experimental procedure (step two). We monitored students' activities during the experimental phases by continuously videotaping 20 work groups within each approach ( N = 131). Subsequent classification of students' activities yielded 10 categories (with well-fitting intra- and inter-observer scores with respect to reliability). Based on the students' individual time budgets, we evaluated students' roles during experimentation from their prevalent activities (by independently using two cluster analysis methods). Independently of the approach, two common clusters emerged, which we labeled as `all-rounders' and as `passive students', and two clusters specific to each approach: `observers' as well as `high-experimenters' were identified only within the one-step approach whereas under the two-step conditions `managers' and `scribes' were identified. Potential changes in group-leadership style during experimentation are discussed, and conclusions for optimizing science teaching are drawn.

  2. Promoting Female Students' Learning Motivation towards Science by Exercising Hands-On Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-jin, Kuo; Chia-ju, Liu; Shi-an, Leou

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to design different hands-on science activities and investigate which activities could better promote female students' learning motivation towards science. This study conducted three types of science activities which contains nine hands-on activities, an experience scale and a learning motivation scale for data…

  3. How can the curation of hands-on STEM activities power successful mobile apps and websites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcello, D.; Peticolas, L. M.; Schwerin, T. G.

    2015-12-01

    The Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) is University of California, Berkeley's public science center. Over the last decade, the Center for Technology Innovation at LHS has partnered with many institutions to establish a strong track record of developing successful technology solutions to support STEM teaching and learning within informal environments. Curation by subject-matter experts has been at the heart of many educational technology products from LHS and its partners that are directed at educators and families. This work includes: (1) popular digital libraries for inquiry-based activities at Howtosmile.org (NSF DRL #0735007) and NASA Earth and Space science education resources at NASAwavelength.org; and novel mobile apps like DIY Sun Science (NASA NNX10AE05G) and DIY Human Body (NIH 5R25OD010543) designed to scaffold exploration of STEM phenomena at home. Both NASA Wavelength and DIY Sun Science arose out of long-term collaborations with the Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley, Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES), and other NASA-funded organizations, in partnership with NASA through cooperative agreements. This session will review the development, formative evaluation, and usage metrics for these two Earth and Space science-themed educational technology products directly relevant to the AGU community. Questions reviewed by presenters will include: What makes a good hands-on activity, and what essential information do educators depend on when searching for programming additions? What content and connections do families need to explore hands-on activities? How can technology help incorporate educational standards into the discovery process for learning experiences online? How do all these components drive the design and user experience of websites and apps that showcase STEM content?

  4. Alignment of Hands-on STEM Engagement Activities with Positive STEM Dispositions in Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald; Tyler-Wood, Tandra

    2015-12-01

    This study examines positive dispositions reported by middle school and high school students participating in programs that feature STEM-related activities. Middle school students participating in school-to-home hands-on energy monitoring activities are compared to middle school and high school students in a different project taking part in activities such as an after-school robotics program. Both groups are compared and contrasted with a third group of high school students admitted at the eleventh grade to an academy of mathematics and science. All students were assessed using the same science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) dispositions instrument. Findings indicate that the after-school group whose participants self-selected STEM engagement activities, and the self-selected academy of mathematics and science group, each had highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to those of STEM professionals, while a subset of the middle school whole-classroom energy monitoring group that reported high interest in STEM as a career, also possessed highly positive STEM dispositions comparable to the STEM Professionals group. The authors conclude that several different kinds of hands-on STEM engagement activities are likely to foster or maintain positive STEM dispositions at the middle school and high school levels, and that these highly positive levels of dispositions can be viewed as a target toward which projects seeking to interest mainstream secondary students in STEM majors in college and STEM careers, can hope to aspire. Gender findings regarding STEM dispositions are also reported for these groups.

  5. The public's rapport with hands-on activities An evaluation of "Explore-At-Bristol"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conti Francesca

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In the summer of 2003, a survey was carried out at the At-Bristol Science Centre (UK to determine the effectiveness of the hands-on activities of “Explore”. The section evaluated included 43 interactive experiences divided into two themes. The first, “Get Connected”, consisted of examples of the latest digital technologies, such as a television studio, virtual volleyball, and radars. The second, “Curiosity Zone”, was dedicated to natural phenomena and subdivided into three additional groups: “Natural Forces” which presented various forces of nature, “Focus on Light”, which dealt with the wonder of light, and “Sound Space”, reserved for the science of sound. The survey was divided into two phases: the first consisted in observing the public’s interaction with the hands-on activities; the second, in consulting the staff. The methods adopted helped determine the effectiveness of the exhibitdesign and the evaluation itself highlighted the role of a promoter of science as an evaluator.

  6. Hands-on experience with active appearance models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thodberg, Hans Henrik

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work is to explore the performance of Active Appearance Models (AAMs) in reconstruction and interpretation of bones in hand radiographs. AAM is a generative approach that unifies image segmentation and image understanding. Initial locations for the AAM search are generated...... is used (1) to define a measure of fit that allows the models to self-evaluate and chose between the multiple found solutions, (2) to overcome obstacles in the image in the form of rings by predicting the missing part, and (3) to detect anomalies, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis. The shape scores are used...

  7. Atmosphere Kits: Hands-On Learning Activities with a Foundation in NASA Earth Science Missions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teige, V.; McCrea, S.; Damadeo, K.; Taylor, J.; Lewis, P. M., Jr.; Chambers, L. H.

    2016-12-01

    The Science Directorate (SD) at NASA Langley Research Center provides many opportunities to involve students, faculty, researchers, and the citizen science community in real world science. The SD Education Team collaborates with the education community to bring authentic Earth science practices and real-world data into the classroom, provide the public with unique NASA experiences, engaging activities, and advanced technology, and provide products developed and reviewed by science and education experts. Our goals include inspiring the next generation of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) professionals and improving STEM literacy by providing innovative participation pathways for educators, students, and the public. The SD Education Team has developed Atmosphere activity kits featuring cloud and aerosol learning activities with a foundation in NASA Earth Science Missions, the Next Generation Science Standards, and The GLOBE Program's Elementary Storybooks. Through cloud kit activities, students will learn how to make estimates from observations and how to categorize and classify specific cloud properties, including cloud height, cloud cover, and basic cloud types. The purpose of the aerosol kit is to introduce students to aerosols and how they can affect the colors we see in the sky. Students will engage in active observation and reporting, explore properties of light, and model the effects of changing amounts/sizes or aerosols on sky color and visibility. Learning activity extensions include participation in ground data collection of environmental conditions and comparison and analysis to related NASA data sets, including but not limited to CERES, CALIPSO, CloudSat, and SAGE III on ISS. This presentation will provide an overview of multiple K-6 NASA Earth Science hands-on activities and free resources will be available.

  8. Pi in the Sky: Hands-on Mathematical Activities for Teaching Astronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethoud, Robert

    This book of activities was designed to provide students with the opportunity to create mental models of concepts in astronomy while using simple, homemade tools. In addition, these sequential, hands-on activities are to help students see how scientific knowledge is obtained. The introduction describes the rationale for the book and describes the…

  9. Enhancing team-based active learning through hands-on experience with nicotine replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, Andrea S

    2013-08-12

    To enhance tobacco cessation active-learning in an ambulatory care elective course by adding hands-on experience with nicotine replacement therapy to a team-based learning (TBL) session. A hands-on experience that included students chewing a piece of nicotine gum was added to a TBL class session. Student pairs used a skills checklist to evaluate and give peer feedback on appropriate counseling and gum use. Students' scores on a tobacco cessation examination were higher than those of students enrolled in the previous course in which TBL alone had been used. Based on pre- and post-experience survey responses, students' perceptions regarding their abilities to provide tobacco cessation counseling improved. Subjective student comments regarding the experience were positive. Participating in a TBL session that incorporated hands-on experience with nicotine gum in an ambulatory care elective course increased students' confidence in their ability to provide tobacco cessation counseling and provided a unique perspective on the product's characteristics.

  10. Of Heart & Kidneys: Hands-On Activities for Demonstrating Organ Function & Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in teaching organ development and disease is deconstructing a complex choreography of molecular and cellular changes over time into a linear stepwise process for students. As an entry toward learning developmental concepts, I propose two inexpensive hands-on activities to help facilitate learning of (1) how to identify defects in…

  11. Of Heart & Kidneys: Hands-On Activities for Demonstrating Organ Function & Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in teaching organ development and disease is deconstructing a complex choreography of molecular and cellular changes over time into a linear stepwise process for students. As an entry toward learning developmental concepts, I propose two inexpensive hands-on activities to help facilitate learning of (1) how to identify defects in…

  12. At-risk children's use of reflection and revision in hands-on experimental activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosino, Anthony J., Jr.

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of incorporating opportunities for reflection and revision in hands-on science instruction which emphasized experimentation using model rockets. The participants were low achieving sixth grade summer school students (n = 23) designated as at-risk for school failure by their district. The group was asked a series of interview questions based on work by Schauble et al. (1995) relating to experimentation. The interviews took place over three distinct time points corresponding to a "hands-on only" condition, a "hands-on with reflection and revision" condition and a "hands-on with repeated reflection and revision" condition. A Friedman's Two-Way Analysis of Variance by Ranks indicate students score low at first with traditional hands-on instruction but improve significantly with opportunities to reflect and revise their experiments. In addition, a sociocultural analysis was conducted during the summer school session to assess the model rocket activity as an apprenticeship, as guided participation and as participatory appropriation using a framework established by Rogoff (1994). Finally, a survey (the Classroom Environment Survey) was administered to the students measuring five constructs consistent with a constructivist classroom: participation, autonomy, relevance, commitment to learning and disruptions to learning. Analysis indicate students in the summer school model rocket intervention experienced a greater sense of constructivist principles during the activity than a similar comparison group utilizing reform minded instruction but not including opportunities for reflection and revision cycles. This research provides important evidence that, like scientists, students in school can learn effectively from extended practice in a varied context. Importantly, the data indicate that hands-on instruction is best utilized when opportunities for reflection and revision are made explicit. Implications are discussed related

  13. Developing Physics Concepts through Hands-On Problem Solving: A Perspective on a Technological Project Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Chen, Mei-Yung; Wong, Ashley; Hsu, Tsui-Fang; Peng, Chih-Chi

    2012-01-01

    In a contest featuring hands-on projects, college students were required to design a simple crawling worm using planning, self-monitoring and self-evaluation processes to solve contradictive problems. To enhance the efficiency of problem solving, one needs to practice meta-cognition based on an application of related scientific concepts. The…

  14. Teaching hands-on science activities: Variables that moderate attitude-behavior consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koballa, Thomas R., Jr.

    The relationship between prospective elementary teachers' attitudes, subjective norms, and intentions to teach science using hands-on activities at least twice a week during their first year of employment was investigated. The findings suggest that measuring prospective teachers' attitudes toward science cannot adequately predict nor provide a satisfactory explanation of their science teaching behaviors. The findings also provide clear support for two hypotheses derived from Fishbein and Ajzen's theory of reasoned action regarding the predictability of prospective teachers' intentions to teach science from their attitudes and subjective norms.Received: 25 October 1985

  15. Blast a Biofilm: A Hands-On Activity for School Children and Members of the Public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L. Marlow

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biofilms are very common in nature and have both detrimental and beneficial effects on everyday life. Practical and hands-on activities have been shown to achieve greater learning and engagement with science by young people (1, 4, 5. We describe an interactive activity, developed to introduce microbes and biofilms to school age children and members of the public. Biofilms are common in nature and, as the favored mode of growth for microbes, biofilms affect many parts ofeveryday life. This hands-on activity highlights the key  concepts of biofilms by allowing participants to first build, then attempt to ‘blast,’ a biofilm, thus enabling the robust nature of biofilms to become apparent. We developed the blast-a-biofilm activity as part of our two-day Magnificent Microbes event, which took place at the Dundee Science Centre-Sensation in May 2010 (6. This public engagement event was run by scientists from the Division of Molecular Microbiology at the University of Dundee. The purpose of the event was to use fun and interesting activities to make both children and adults think about how fascinating microbes are. Additionally, we aimed to develop interactive resources that could be used in future events and learning environments, of which the blast-a-biofilm activity is one such resource. Scientists and policy makers in the UK believe engaging the public with research ensures that the work of universities and research institutes is relevant to society and wider social concerns and can also help scientists actively contribute to positive social change (2. The activity is aimed at junior school age children (9–11 years and adults with little or no knowledge of microbiology. The activity is suitable for use at science festivals, science clubs, and also in the classroom, where it can serve as a tool to enrich and enhance the school curriculum.

  16. A Case Study for Comparing the Effectiveness of a Computer Simulation and a Hands-on Activity on Learning Electric Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Adem; Gulacar, Ozcan

    2015-01-01

    Science education reform emphasizes innovative and constructivist views of science teaching and learning that promotes active learning environments, dynamic instructions, and authentic science experiments. Technology-based and hands-on instructional designs are among innovative science teaching and learning methods. Research shows that these two…

  17. Hands-on workshops as an effective means of learning advanced technologies including genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisdorph, Nichole; Stearman, Robert; Kechris, Katerina; Phang, Tzu Lip; Reisdorph, Richard; Prenni, Jessica; Erle, David J; Coldren, Christopher; Schey, Kevin; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Geraci, Mark

    2013-12-01

    Genomics and proteomics have emerged as key technologies in biomedical research, resulting in a surge of interest in training by investigators keen to incorporate these technologies into their research. At least two types of training can be envisioned in order to produce meaningful results, quality publications and successful grant applications: (1) immediate short-term training workshops and (2) long-term graduate education or visiting scientist programs. We aimed to fill the former need by providing a comprehensive hands-on training course in genomics, proteomics and informatics in a coherent, experimentally-based framework. This was accomplished through a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)-sponsored 10-day Genomics and Proteomics Hands-on Workshop held at National Jewish Health (NJH) and the University of Colorado School of Medicine (UCD). The course content included comprehensive lectures and laboratories in mass spectrometry and genomics technologies, extensive hands-on experience with instrumentation and software, video demonstrations, optional workshops, online sessions, invited keynote speakers, and local and national guest faculty. Here we describe the detailed curriculum and present the results of short- and long-term evaluations from course attendees. Our educational program consistently received positive reviews from participants and had a substantial impact on grant writing and review, manuscript submissions and publications.

  18. A hands-on activity for teaching product-process matrix: roadmap and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Costa Santos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The product-process matrix is a well-known framework proposed by Hayes and Wheelwright (1979 that is commonly used to identify processes types and to analyze the alignment of these processes with the products of a company. For didactic purposes, the matrix helps undergraduates beginners from Production Engineering to understand the logic of production systems, providing knowledge that will be essential for various course subjects. Considering the high level of abstraction of the concepts underlying the product-process matrix, this paper presents a way to facilitate the learning of them through the application of a hands-on activity which relies on the active learning philosophy. The proposed dynamic uses colored plastic sheets and PVC pipes as main materials, differing from the original proposal of Penlesky and Treleven (2005 . In addition to presenting an extremely simple exercise, which encourages its application in the classroom, another contribution of this paper is to define a complete roadmap for conducting the activity. This roadmap describes the assembly of fictitious products in customization and standardization scenarios for the comparison of two processes types of product-process matrix, job shop and assembly line. The activity revealed very successful after its application to two groups of Production Engineering undergraduates, confirmed with positive feedback from the students surveyed.

  19. Using robots in "Hands-on" academic activities: a case study examining speech-generating device use and required skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kim; Cook, Al

    2016-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl, Emily, with complex communication needs and severe physical limitations, controlled a Lego robot from a speech-generating device (SGD) to do various "hands-on" academic activities. Emily's teacher and assistive technology (AT) team thought that controlling a robot would motivate Emily to "use her SGD more". A descriptive case study was used because the integration of communication and manipulation technologies is not yet understood. Target activities and goals were chosen by Emily's teacher and AT team. Emily performed several manipulative math activities and engaged in an "acting" activity aimed at increasing her message length. The competency skills needed to control a robot from the SGD were examined, as well as stakeholder satisfaction with the robot system. Emily generated up to 0.4 communication events and 7 robot commands per minute in the activities. Her length of utterance was usually one-word long, but she generated two- and three-word utterances during some activities. Observations of Emily informed a framework to describe the competency skills needed to use SGDs to control robots. Emily and her teacher expressed satisfaction with robot use. Robot use could motivate students to build SGD operational skills and learn educational concepts. Implications for Rehabilitation Controlling a robot from a speech-generating device (SGD) could increase students' motivation, engagement and understanding in learning educational concepts, because of the hands-on enactive approach. The robot and SGD system was acceptable to the participant and teacher and elicited positive comments from classmates. Thus, it may provide a way for children with disabilities to link with the curriculum and with other students in the classroom. Controlling a robot via SGD presents opportunities to improve augmentative and alternative communication operational, linguistic, social and strategic skills. Careful choice of activities will ensure that the activity requirements

  20. PEMBELAJARAN FISIKA BERBASIS HANDS ON ACTIVITIES UNTUK MENUMBUHKAN KEMAMPUAN BERPIKIR KRITIS DAN MENINGKATKAN HASIL BELAJAR SISWA SMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Yuliati

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian tindakan kelas ini bertujuan untuk mendeskripsikan model pembelajaran berbasis Hands on Activities, menumbuhkankemampuan berpikir kritis serta meningkatkan hasil belajar siswa SMP kelas VIII. Penelitian ini dilaksanakan dalam tiga siklus.Setiap siklus terdiri dari empat tahap yaitu perencanaan, pelaksanaan tindakan, pengamatan dan refleksi. Data kemampuanberpikir kritis, hasil belajar afektif dan psikomotorik diperoleh dari lembar observasi, hasil belajar kognitif diperoleh melalui tes.Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa nilai kemampuan berpikir kritis meningkat secara signifikan disertai dengan peningkatanjumlah siswa yang termasuk kategori kritis maupun sangat kritis. Selain itu nilai rata-rata hasil belajar juga mengalami peningkatansecara signifikan sehingga dapat disimpulkan bahwa penerapan pembelajaran fisika berbasis Hands on Activities dapatmenumbuhkan kemampuan berpikir kritis serta meningkatkan hasil belajar siswa. The goals of this three-cycles classroom action research are to describe Hands on Activities based learning model, grow criticalthinking ability and increase learning achievement of JHS student-grade VIII. The data of critical thinking ability, affective andpsychomotor learning achievement are derived from observation sheet, while those of cognitive learning achievement was takenfrom test. The result shows that there is a significant increase of critical thinking ability and average of learning achievement leadingto the conclusion that Hands on Activities based learning model, grow critical thinking ability and increase learning achievement ofJHS.Keywords: critical thinking; Hands on activities (HOA; classroom action research

  1. Broaden Engineering Technology students' knowledge through hands-on with motion robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The skills and knowledge that employers value most are not always well-aligned with undergraduate engineering technology programs. With the support of a federal grant, we identify and propose to broaden the undergraduate student experience to include training in transferable skills with agricultura...

  2. The Healthy Heart Race: A Short-Duration, Hands-on Activity in Cardiovascular Physiology for Museums and Science Festivals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Thomas A.; Limson, Melvin; Byse, Miranda; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2011-01-01

    The "Healthy Heart Race" activity provides a hands-on demonstration of cardiovascular function suitable for lay audiences. It was field tested during the United States of America Science and Engineering Festival held in Washington, DC, in October 2010. The basic equipment for the activity consisted of lengths of plastic tubing, a hand pump,…

  3. The Healthy Heart Race: A Short-Duration, Hands-on Activity in Cardiovascular Physiology for Museums and Science Festivals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Thomas A.; Limson, Melvin; Byse, Miranda; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2011-01-01

    The "Healthy Heart Race" activity provides a hands-on demonstration of cardiovascular function suitable for lay audiences. It was field tested during the United States of America Science and Engineering Festival held in Washington, DC, in October 2010. The basic equipment for the activity consisted of lengths of plastic tubing, a hand…

  4. Do Predators Always Win? Starfish versus Limpets: A Hands-On Activity Examining Predator-Prey Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Claudia; Boaventura, Diana; Galvao, Cecilia; Chagas, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    In this article we propose a hands-on experimental activity about predator-prey interactions that can be performed both in a research laboratory and in the classroom. The activity, which engages students in a real scientific experiment, can be explored not only to improve students' understanding about the diversity of anti-predator behaviors but…

  5. Do Predators Always Win? Starfish versus Limpets: A Hands-On Activity Examining Predator-Prey Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Claudia; Boaventura, Diana; Galvao, Cecilia; Chagas, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    In this article we propose a hands-on experimental activity about predator-prey interactions that can be performed both in a research laboratory and in the classroom. The activity, which engages students in a real scientific experiment, can be explored not only to improve students' understanding about the diversity of anti-predator behaviors but…

  6. Student Responses to a Hands-On Kinesthetic Lecture Activity for Learning about the Oxygen Carrying Capacity of Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckler, Jennifer; Yu, Justin R.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a new hands-on, or "kinesthetic," activity for use in a physiology lecture hall to help students comprehend an important concept in cardiopulmonary physiology known as oxygen carrying capacity. One impetus for designing this activity was to address the needs of students who have a preference for kinesthetic…

  7. An Educational Device for a Hands-on Activity to Visualize the Effect of Atherosclerosis on Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, J. P. P. G. L.; de Lima, J. L. M. P.

    2013-01-01

    An educational device was created to develop a hands-on activity to illustrate how atherosclerosis can dramatically reduce blood flow in human vessels. The device was conceived, designed, and built at the University of Coimbra, in response to a request from the Exploratorio Infante D. Henrique Science Centre Museum, where it is presently…

  8. The Use of Molecular Modeling as "Pseudoexperimental" Data for Teaching VSEPR as a Hands-On General Chemistry Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher B.; Vandehoef, Crissie; Cook, Allison

    2015-01-01

    A hands-on activity appropriate for first-semester general chemistry students is presented that combines traditional VSEPR methods of predicting molecular geometries with introductory use of molecular modeling. Students analyze a series of previously calculated output files consisting of several molecules each in various geometries. Each structure…

  9. The Use of Molecular Modeling as "Pseudoexperimental" Data for Teaching VSEPR as a Hands-On General Chemistry Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher B.; Vandehoef, Crissie; Cook, Allison

    2015-01-01

    A hands-on activity appropriate for first-semester general chemistry students is presented that combines traditional VSEPR methods of predicting molecular geometries with introductory use of molecular modeling. Students analyze a series of previously calculated output files consisting of several molecules each in various geometries. Each structure…

  10. Using a Hands-On Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition Activity to Teach Catalysis Concepts to K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-01-01

    A versatile and transportable laboratory apparatus was developed for middle and high school (6th-12th grade) students as part of a hands-on outreach activity to estimate catalytic rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition from oxygen evolution rates measured by using a volumetric displacement method. The apparatus was constructed with inherent…

  11. Square Wheels and Other Easy-To-Build Hands-On Science Activities. An Exploratorium Science Snackbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathjen, Don; Doherty, Paul

    This book, part of The Exploratorium science "snackbook" series, explains science with a hands-on approach. Activities include: (1) "3-D Shadow"; (2) "Bits and Bytes"; (3) "Circuit Workbench"; (4) "Diamagnetic Repulsion"; (5) "Film Can Racer"; (6) "Fractal Patterns"; (7) "Hoop Nightmares"; (8) "Hydraulic Arm"; (9) "Hyperbolic Slot"; (10) "Light…

  12. Music Library Association Conference 2013: Incorporating Faculty Collaboration, Active Learning, and Hands-On Experience into Music Library Instruction to Improve Student Learning Outcomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shaw, Misti

    2013-01-01

    .... One session focused on music librarian experiences with incorporating faculty collaboration, in-class activities, active learning, and hands-on experience into library classroom instruction in order...

  13. Access to hands-on mathematics measurement activities using robots controlled via speech generating devices: three case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kim; Cook, Al

    2014-07-01

    To examine how using a robot controlled via a speech generating device (SGD) influences the ways students with physical and communication limitations can demonstrate their knowledge in math measurement activities. Three children with severe physical disabilities and complex communication needs used the robot and SGD system to perform four math measurement lessons in comparing, sorting and ordering objects. The performance of the participants was measured and the process of using the system was described in terms of manipulation and communication events. Stakeholder opinions were solicited regarding robot use. Robot use revealed some gaps in the procedural knowledge of the participants. Access to both the robot and SGD was shown to provide several benefits. Stakeholders thought the intervention was important and feasible for a classroom environment. The participants were able to participate actively in the hands-on and communicative measurement activities and thus meet the demands of current math instruction methods. Current mathematics pedagogy encourages doing hands-on activities while communicating about concepts. Adapted Lego robots enabled children with severe physical disabilities to perform hands-on length measurement activities. Controlling the robots from speech generating devices (SGD) enabled the children, who also had complex communication needs, to reflect and report on results during the activities. By using the robots combined with SGDs, children both exhibited their knowledge of and experienced the concepts of mathematical measurements.

  14. The mobile GeoBus outreach project: hands-on Earth and Mars activities for secondary schools in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ruth; Pike, Charlotte; Roper, Kathryn

    2015-04-01

    GeoBus (www.geobus.org.uk) is an educational outreach project that was developed in 2012 by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of St Andrews, and it is sponsored jointly by industry and the UK Research Councils (NERC and EPSRC). The aims of GeoBus are to support the teaching of Earth Science in secondary schools by providing teaching resources that are not readily available to educators, to inspire young learners by incorporating new science research outcomes in teaching activities, and to provide a bridge between industry, higher education institutions, research councils and schools. Since its launch, GeoBus has visited over 160 different schools across the length and breadth of Scotland. Just under 35,000 pupils have been involved in practical hands-on Earth science learning activities since the project began in 2012, including many in remote and disadvantaged regions. The resources that GeoBus brings to schools include all the materials and equipment needed to run 50 - 80 minute workshops, and half- or whole-day Enterprise Challenges and field excursions. Workshops are aimed at a class of up to 30 pupils and topics include minerals, rocks, fossils, geological time, natural resources, climate change, volcanoes, earthquakes, and geological mapping. As with all GeoBus activities, the inclusion of equipment and technology otherwise unavailable to schools substantially increases the engagement of pupils in workshops. Field excursions are increasingly popular, as many teachers have little or no field trainng and feel unable to lead this type of activity. The excursions comprise half or full day sessions for up to 30 pupils and are tailored to cover the local geology or geomorphology. Enterprise Challenge are half or full day sessions for up to 100 pupils. Topics include "Journey to Mars", "Scotland's Rocks", "Drilling for Oil", and "Renewable Energy". Both of the energy Enterprise Challenges were designed to incorporates ideas and

  15. Could hands-on activities and smartphone in science CLIL teaching foster motivation and positive attitudes in students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolino, Immacolata; Maraffi, Sabina; Sacerdoti, Francesco M.

    2016-04-01

    Motivating students is one of the most challenging things we do as educators. We know that students need to be engaged to fully appreciate and learn what has been taught; the secret consists in nurturing student engagement. One of the newer ways to involve students and foster motivation in their Science learning consists in focusing on their usage and on applying knowledge and skills in their real-life. Students usually are engaged in authentic teaching pathway. Learning focusing on the experience helps teachers to improve classroom management by gathering students around a common organized activity. Hands-on activities support problem-based approaches to learning by focusing on the experience and process of investigating, proposing and creating solutions developing critical thinking skills and enlarge student's scientific glossary. We utilized in our classroom some lab activities that we learned at an ESA/GTTP Teacher training Workshop 2014 program at the Lorentz Center Leiden, Netherlands. "Cooking a comet - Ingredients for life" "Demonstration of the second Kepler's law using marbles" New media equipment, as student's own smartphones, can increase the teaching impact speaking the same language used by the students every day. They can measure magnetic fields, their GPS coordinates (longitude and latitude), and so on. In this way we can measure distances as parallax using mobile devices and simulating distance measurements in the classroom, on the school campus. The smartphone is the device with which the students answer questions, take decisions, and solve quests. Students infact can observe the Universe from their classroom and scientifically they can watch the Sun with "Google sky map" or "Star walk" are excellent tools to learn your way around the night sky .As teachers we used these apps in the classroom when Sun goes through the constellations so our students don't believe in horoscopes. This paper is focused on hands on activities and the effects of the

  16. Progress of Systematic Hands on Devices for Active Learning Methods by Visualizing ICT Tools in Physics with Milliseconds Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Akizo; Okiharu, Fumiko

    We are developing various systematic hands on devices for progress of active learning (AL) to improve students' conceptual understanding in physics laws. We are promoting AL methods in physics education for getting deeper conceptual understanding by using various ICT-based hands on devices and using visualizing ICT tools with milliseconds resolution. Here we investigate AL modules on collisions of big balloon pendulum with another known mass pendulum to get directly the air mass in the big balloon. We also discuss on Newton's laws of blowgun darts systems by using tapioca straws where we get definite works and energy just proportional to the length of the pipes of connected tapioca straws. These AL plans by using modules of big balloon system and blowgun-darts system are shown to be very effective for deeper conceptual understanding of Newton's Laws in almost frictionless worlds.

  17. Hands-On Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

    2004-01-01

    A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

  18. Hands-On Hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Catherine E.; Monroe, Louise Nelson

    2004-01-01

    A professional school and university collaboration enables elementary students and their teachers to explore hydrology concepts and realize the beneficial functions of wetlands. Hands-on experiences involve young students in determining water quality at field sites after laying the groundwork with activities related to the hydrologic cycle,…

  19. Examining the Use of Adaptive Technologies to Increase the Hands-On Participation of Students with Blindness or Low Vision in Secondary-School Chemistry and Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supalo, Cary A.; Humphrey, Jennifer R.; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Wohlers, H. David; Carlsen, William S.

    2016-01-01

    To determine whether a suite of audible adaptive technologies would increase the hands-on participation of high school students with blindness or low vision in chemistry and physics courses, data were examined from a multi-year field study conducted with students in mainstream classrooms at secondary schools across the United States. The students…

  20. A Hands-On Activity to Introduce the Effects of Transmission by an Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Barbara Jean

    2013-01-01

    This activity engages students to better understand the impact of transmission by invasive species. Using dice, poker chips, and paper plates, an entire class mimics the spread of an invasive species within a geographic region. The activity can be modified and conducted at the K-16 levels.

  1. How-to-Do-It: Hands-on Activities that Relate Mendelian Genetics to Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Heather R.; Gibson, Linda S.

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an activity designed to connect Mendelian laws with the physical processes of cell division. Included are materials production, procedures and worksheets for the meiosis-mitosis game and a genetics game. (CW)

  2. Robotics-Control Technology. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This document contains the materials required for presenting an 8-day competency-based technology learning activity (TLA) designed to introduce students in grades 6-10 to advances and career opportunities in the field of robotics-control technology. The guide uses hands-on exploratory experiences into which activities to help students develop…

  3. Experiments and hands-on activities for geoscience observing and measuring by using low-priced instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S. S.; Lin, Y. Y.; Tang-Iunn, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    In this presentation, we will introduce five experiments and hands-on activities for geoscience observing and measuring by using low-priced and small-sized commercial instruments. The Black Box for Environmental Measuring (BBEM) system is based on Arduino platform, low-power consumption sensors are employed to measure meteorological and environmental parameters. Commercial GPS receiver is used to observe the influence of geomagnetic storms on GPS system. Webcam is an accessible instrument which is suitable for detecting and recording sprites, thunders, and the development of cumulonimbus. Real-time flight trackers and websites are employed to determine the altitude of cloud base. A simple VLF receiver is built by using the audio interface on computer, and the observed signals showed the variations of the D-region of the ionosphere. All these experiments and activities are practical and have been applied in classroom and science outreach in Taiwan.

  4. The healthy heart race: a short-duration, hands-on activity in cardiovascular physiology for museums and science festivals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Thomas A; Limson, Melvin; Byse, Miranda; Matyas, Marsha Lakes

    2011-09-01

    The "Healthy Heart Race" activity provides a hands-on demonstration of cardiovascular function suitable for lay audiences. It was field tested during the United States of America Science and Engineering Festival held in Washington, DC, in October 2010. The basic equipment for the activity consisted of lengths of plastic tubing, a hand pump, collection containers, clamps, and simulated blood prepared by tinting water with red food coloring. Student participants were first asked to experience the effort required to pump through an unaltered tube. A presenter then applied a strong clamp that pinched each tube downstream from the pump, and students were asked to pump against the increased resistance. The students' observations were then used as the basis for discussions of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease with the presenters. Distribution of informative postcards during the 2 days of the festival indicated that at least 2,500 students completed the Healthy Heart Race activity. Our experiences to date suggest that the Healthy Heart Race activity can be accomplished effectively in the high-volume, high-distraction environment of a science fair or museum.

  5. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  6. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  7. What's Up in the Atmosphere? Exploring How Aerosols Impact Sky Color Through Hands-on Activities with Elementary GLOBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damadeo, K.; Taylor, J.

    2015-12-01

    What color is the sky today? The GLOBE Kids - Anita, Simon, and Dennis want to know why the sky isn't always the same shade of blue and sometimes isn't even blue. Through the new Elementary GLOBE Aerosols Storybook and Learning Activities, the GLOBE Kids learn that there's a lot more than air in the atmosphere, which can affect the colors we see in the sky. There are four hands-on activities in this unit: 1) Sky Observers - Students make observations of the sky, record their findings and share their observation reports with their peers. The activity promotes active observation and recording skills to help students observe sky color, and recognize that sky color changes; 2) Why (Not) So Blue? - Students make predictions about how drops of milk will affect color and visibility in cups of water representing the atmosphere to help them understand that aerosols in the atmosphere have an effect on sky conditions, including sky color and visibility. The activity also introduces the classification categories for daytime sky color and visibility; 3) See the Light - Students use prisms and glue sticks to explore the properties of light. The activity demonstrates that white light is made up of seven colors that represent different wavelengths, and illustrates why the sky is blue during the day and red at sunset; 4) Up in the Air - Students work in groups to make an aerosol sampler, a simple adhesive tool that allows students to collect data and estimate the extent of aerosols present at their school, understanding that, in fact, there are particles in the air we breathe. NGSS Alignment includes: Disciplinary Core Ideas- ESS2.D: Weather and Climate, ESS3.C: Human Impacts on Earth Systems, PS4.B: Electromagnetic Radiation, ESS3.A: Natural Resources; Science and Engineering Practices- Asking Questions and Defining Problems, Planning and Carrying Out an Investigation, Analyzing and Interpreting Data, Engaging in Argument from Evidence, Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating

  8. Hands-On Activities: A New Instructional Method for a Fluid Mechanics Course---Never Underestimate the Teaching Power of Jell-O RTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Lynn Alwine

    Background In order to eliminate the fear-factor associated with learning FluidMechanics, a new instructional method was created. The new method is neatly packaged into hands-on activities (as defined in this dissertation) in order to ease implementation and dissemination into an engineering class. Because of variations in learning and teaching styles of students and lecturers [34], the hands-on activities are designed to help the lecturer communicate key concepts to a wider spectrum of students. Typically engineering lectures are biased towards intuitive, verbal, reflective and sequential learners whereas few engineering students fall into these categories. [35] The hands-on activities are meant to bridge the communication gap resulting in a positive educational experience. Purpose In order to assess the impact of the new instructional method, a new engineering education experimental design was created. Engineering Education research is very interdisciplinary in nature and therefore requires cooperation from multiple Colleges including, but not limited to, Engineering, Education, and Science (Statistics). Design/Method Two groups of engineering students were allocated to test the hypothesis, "Does being exposed to hands-on activities (a new instructional method) in a section of MAE 308 - Fluid Mechanics result in higher student achievement?" Comparison of the quiz results between the control group and experimental group assessed the effectiveness of the hands-on activities. The problems within each quiz correlated to a level of Bloom's Taxonomy. A comparison of the results on the problems assessed which level of Bloom's were impacted. NHST was performed to determine statistical significance while the effect size was calculated to determine practical significance. Results The hands-on activities have a positive effect on learning. 3.30% more students per class perform better on each problem on each quiz. The hands-on activity, Rainbow Layer Cake, was a superstar

  9. Simple Protocol for Secondary School Hands-On Activity: Electrophoresis of Pre-Stained Nucleic Acids on Agar-Agar Borate Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britos, Leticia; Goyenola, Guillermo; Orono, Silvia Umpierrez

    2004-01-01

    An extremely simple, inexpensive, and safe method is presented, which emulates nucleic acids isolation and electrophoretic analysis as performed in a research environment, in the context of a secondary school hands-on activity. The protocol is amenable to an interdisciplinary approach, taking into consideration the electrical and chemical…

  10. Exploring the Solar System Activities Outline: Hands-On Planetary Science for Formal Education K-14 and Informal Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Lindstrom, M. L.

    2003-01-01

    Activities by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. The wealth of activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to the exploring the solar system allows educators to choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. With these NASA developed activities students experience recent mission information about our solar system such as Mars geology and the search for life using Mars meteorites and robotic data. The Johnson Space Center ARES Education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic outline useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the outline annotation is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. Within formal education at the primary level some of the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest and arouse curiosity. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered are appropriate for the upper levels of high school and early college in that they require students to use and analyze data.

  11. Hands-on Activities for Exploring the Solar System in K-14 Formal and Informal Education Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.

    2004-12-01

    Introduction: Activities developed by NASA scientists and teachers focus on integrating Planetary Science activities with existing Earth science, math, and language arts curriculum. Educators may choose activities that fit a particular concept or theme within their curriculum from activities that highlight missions and research pertaining to exploring the solar system. Most of the activities use simple, inexpensive techniques that help students understand the how and why of what scientists are learning about comets, asteroids, meteorites, moons and planets. The web sites for the activities contain current information so students experience recent mission information such as data from Mars rovers or the status of Stardust sample return. The Johnson Space Center Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science education team has compiled a variety of NASA solar system activities to produce an annotated thematic syllabus useful to classroom educators and informal educators as they teach space science. An important aspect of the syllabus is that it highlights appropriate science content information and key science and math concepts so educators can easily identify activities that will enhance curriculum development. The outline contains URLs for the activities and NASA educator guides as well as links to NASA mission science and technology. In the informal setting, educators can use solar system exploration activities to reinforce learning in association with thematic displays, planetarium programs, youth group gatherings, or community events. In both the informal and the primary education levels the activities are appropriately designed to excite interest, arouse curiosity and easily take the participants from pre-awareness to the awareness stage. Middle school educators will find activities that enhance thematic science and encourage students to think about the scientific process of investigation. Some of the activities offered may easily be adapted for the upper

  12. Active ageing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    the elderly. As part of this rearticulation of old age, many new technologies take form. This paper uses a wide concept of technologies (devices, regimes, strategies and ways of doing) and argues that technologies form active aging subjectivities, and on the other hand, that these subjectivities...... ‘sites of active aging’ in Denmark. By presenting three technologies of active aging (billiards at an activity center for elderly persons, dancing tiles for rehabilitation after falls and an online fitness community for elderly persons) the paper suggests that active aging is more than regimes...

  13. It's More Fun than It Sounds--Enhancing Science Concepts through Hands-on Activities for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Smita

    2012-01-01

    To teach young children, teachers choose topics in science that children are curious about. Children's inquisitive nature is reflected through the activities as they make repetitive sounds to find the cause and effect relationship. Teachers can make best use of those invaluable moments by incorporating those activities into science lessons on…

  14. Extravehicular activity technology discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webbon, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on extravehicular activity technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: extravehicular mobility unit; airlock and EMU support equipment; tools, mobility aids, and workstations; and telerobotic work aids interfaces.

  15. Hands-on keyboard: The multifunctional tutorial for teaching and practical training of space-technology at the Berlin University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, R.; Johenning, B.; Laβmann, J.; Leppich, J.; He, Tian; Thierschmann, M.

    1995-05-01

    The multifunctional tutorial for teaching and practical training of space technology at the Aerospace Institute of Berlin University of Technology (BUT) is a research project designed to exploit certain features of expert systems for the management of a complex space education and information system. This paper describes this new approach to computer aided teaching and research. The system comprises databases, a complex of modelling features, a large technical library and files of the lectures presented during courses. The databases include a complete inventory of international launch vehicles and all major conceptual vehicle designs and their parameters (presently 125 systems) and details of rocket launches since 1957 (presently 3508 launches). Another base contains all major data of about 340 rocket motors and thrusters; yet another holds more than 700 data sheets concerning published data of cost and prices of the development, production and operation of launchers, stages, subsystems and related infrastructure. This paper presents the structure of the tutorial which is in accordance with the lectures offered and assures easy use accomplished by self-explanatory graphical menu-guidance and pictograms, visual representation of choices and a help-system based on practical experience. The structure of simulation and modelling has a wide range of degrees of freedom with strict separation between input parameters and derived values, strict indication of limitations (range of valid inputs) and with intelligent monitoring of inputs for possible contradictions.

  16. A Hands-On Activity to Build Mastery of Intermolecular Forces and Its Impacts on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Laura B.

    2016-01-01

    The intermolecular forces activity presented in this article is designed to foster concept-building through students' use of concrete, manipulative objects, and it was developed to be pedagogically sound. Data analysis via pre- and posttesting and subsequent exam questions indicated that students who had the opportunity to participate in the…

  17. Hands-on optics and photonics outreach in Riga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesina, Natalija; Spigulis, Janis

    2014-07-01

    A long-term exposition focused on optics and photonics was created in Institute of Atomic Physics and Spectroscopy at University of Latvia in 2010. Considering unpopularity of science in Latvia and lack of broadly accessible hands-on outreach activities for school children, as well as rapid development of advanced photonic technologies, this exposition was meant to involve more students to the natural sciences and modern technologies. Exposition covers 10 topics of optics - colors, diffraction, interference, polarization, reflection, liquid crystals, gas discharge, lasers, fluorescence, infrared and ultraviolet radiation. Students' visits are organized as an exciting adventure, which differs from ordinary school lessons. The visit mainly includes own actions with hands-on exhibits, lecturer's explanations about the most difficult topics and some demonstrations shown by the lecturer. The main accent is made on hands-on experiments due to the fact that students, who had performed hands-on experiments, will be emboldened to choose their career in the field of science and technologies. The exposition now is running and is part of Riga Photonics Center. Nearly 300 students from the 8th till 12th grades visited it during academic years 2011/2012 and 2012/2013 and their generally positive feedback has been analyzed.

  18. Are all hands-on activities equally effective? Effect of using plastic models, organ dissections, and virtual dissections on student learning and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Sara A; Hicks, Reimi E; Thompson, Katerina V; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or plastic models). Each group received a 15-min lecture followed by a 45-min activity with one of the treatments. Immediately after the lesson and then 2 mo later, students were tested on anatomy and physiology knowledge and completed an attitude survey. Students who used plastic models achieved significantly higher overall scores on both the initial and followup exams than students who performed organ or virtual dissections. On the initial exam, students in the plastic model and organ dissection treatments scored higher on anatomy questions than students who performed virtual dissections. Students in the plastic model group scored higher than students who performed organ dissections on physiology questions. On the followup exam, when asked anatomy questions, students in the plastic model group scored higher than dissection students and virtual dissection students. On attitude surveys, organ dissections had higher perceived value and were requested for inclusion in curricula twice as often as any other activity. Students who performed organ dissections were more likely than the other treatment groups to agree with the statement that "science is fun," suggesting that organ dissections may promote positive attitudes toward science. The findings of this study provide evidence for the importance of multiple types of hands-on activities in anatomy laboratory courses.

  19. `Didn't Get Expected Answer, Rectify It.': Teaching science content in an elementary science classroom using hands-on activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Aik-Ling; Wong, Hwei-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The call for inquiry science to be a part of the school science curriculum is popular in many parts of the world. While some research in this area revealed success stories of students' learning when they are engaged in student-directed, open-ended scientific inquiry activities, others are more sceptical about how these activities impact students' learning in and of science. Using the microanalysis of classroom talk in a grade-six science classroom dealing with the conversion of energy, we illustrate the dilemma in communicative approach used by a teacher when using an inductive hands-on activity to teach canonical science content. We unravel the complexity between dialogic-authoritative approaches in establishing learning as well as the need to fulfil the teaching purposes set for each lesson. Here we illustrate how the use of fine grain analysis of classroom talk and interaction can reveal the details of classroom learning, such as mismatch of teaching purposes and adopting appropriate approach to fulfil the intended teaching purpose.

  20. The Impacts of Hydraulic Fracturing in the Eagle Ford Shale Region, South Texas: Hands-On Activities for Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmeyer, C.; Loisel, J.; Schade, G. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Eagle Ford Shale (EFS) region of south-central Texas is strongly affected by a rapid increase in unconventional oil and gas production, and it ranks amongst the top production regions of the country. Across the EFS region and elsewhere, the fracking boom has been causing large emissions of methane (CH4) and non-methane hydrocarbons to the atmosphere, with direct consequences on atmospheric GHG concentration and air quality. An increase in seismic activity has also been reported in the area. Since these effects were initially underestimated, fracking operations remain largely unmitigated by regulation. As a result, large-scale oil and gas operations are found in close geographical proximity to rural communities who are uninformed and/or not accustomed to such operations and their effects on the environment and human health. Here we present a few hands-on activities that are being developed to educate middle and high school students on hydraulic fracturing and associated land-use change, water and air pollution, and seismicity induced by deep well injection. Modules on the carbon cycle (with an emphasis on CO2 and CH4), global environmental change, and human energy consumption around the world and main energy sources are also under development. Each activity is either based on scientific data gathered by students or information that is freely available; mapping exercises and time series analysis are included. For example, students will implement a geographic information system (GIS) to study local land-use change using satellite imagery analysis. These activities will be implemented in Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 in at least one Independent School District of the Eagle Ford Shale area. A broadly applicable educational booklet/teaching module on atmospheric CH4 emissions, with an emphasis on the environmental impacts of the oil and gas industry as the dominant source of emissions and land use change in shale areas, will be published.

  1. Population Growth, Energy Use, and Pollution: Understanding the Driving Forces of Global Change. Hands-On! Developing Active Learning Modules on the Human Dimensions of Global Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuby, Michael

    Since the beginning of the scientific revolution in the 1700s, the absolute scale of the human economy has increased many times over, and, with it, the impact on the natural environment. This learning module's activities introduce the student to linkages among population growth, energy use, level of economic and technological development and their…

  2. Hands-On Bulletin Boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Dawn

    1984-01-01

    Patterns and directions are given for making bulletin boards that teach language arts and mathematics skills through hands-on student involvement. The boards help teach multiplication tables, word contractions, letter sounds, homonyms, compound words, alphabetization, and other skills. (PP)

  3. Hands-On Bulletin Boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneman, Dawn

    1984-01-01

    Patterns and directions are given for making bulletin boards that teach language arts and mathematics skills through hands-on student involvement. The boards help teach multiplication tables, word contractions, letter sounds, homonyms, compound words, alphabetization, and other skills. (PP)

  4. Evaluating and prioritizing technologies for adaptation to climate change. A hands on guidance to multi criteria analysis (MCA) and the identification and assessment of related criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trærup, Sara Lærke Meltofte; Bakkegaard, Riyong Kim

    The objective of this guidance is to guide consultants, decision makers and technical experts on how to facilitate discussions for prioritizing adaptation technologies, and to support the stakeholders in identifying appropriate criteria for this analysis.......The objective of this guidance is to guide consultants, decision makers and technical experts on how to facilitate discussions for prioritizing adaptation technologies, and to support the stakeholders in identifying appropriate criteria for this analysis....

  5. Learning Specific Content in Technology Education: Learning Study as a Collaborative Method in Swedish Preschool Class Using Hands-On Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbrink, Nina; Bjurulf, Veronica; Blomberg, Ingela; Heidkamp, Anja; Hollsten, Ann-Christin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the process of a learning study conducted in technology education in a Swedish preschool class. The learning study method used in this study is a collaborative method, where researchers and teachers work together as a team concerning teaching and learning about a specific learning object. The object of learning in this study…

  6. Learning Specific Content in Technology Education: Learning Study as a Collaborative Method in Swedish Preschool Class Using Hands-On Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbrink, Nina; Bjurulf, Veronica; Blomberg, Ingela; Heidkamp, Anja; Hollsten, Ann-Christin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the process of a learning study conducted in technology education in a Swedish preschool class. The learning study method used in this study is a collaborative method, where researchers and teachers work together as a team concerning teaching and learning about a specific learning object. The object of learning in this study…

  7. Hands-On Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science is an important topic in terms of its application to power generation, medical diagnostics and treatment, and national defense. Unfortunately, the subatomic domain is far removed from daily experience, and few learning aids are available to teachers. What follows describes a low-tech, hands-on method to teach important concepts in…

  8. Hands-On Nuclear Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear science is an important topic in terms of its application to power generation, medical diagnostics and treatment, and national defense. Unfortunately, the subatomic domain is far removed from daily experience, and few learning aids are available to teachers. What follows describes a low-tech, hands-on method to teach important concepts in…

  9. 不同範例展示及實作經驗對國中生科技創造力的影響 Effects of Exemplars and Hands-on Experiences on Technological Creativity of Junior High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    張玉山 Yu-Shan Chang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available 本研究旨在探討不同創意層級的範例展示及實作經驗對國中生科技創造力的影響。研究方法採用二因子實驗設計之準實驗研究,研究對象為231 位臺北縣國中生活科技課程的學生。主要研究工具為產品創意量表,內容包括整體評分、主題設定、色彩變化、造型變化、材料種類、外加機能、組合方法共七項。研究結果顯示,實作經驗對學生作品的造型設計與外加機能設計,有顯著的創意效果;高級與中級創意成品範例對學生作品的整體評分、主題設定、色彩變化、造型變化及外加機能,都有正面的創意效果;但是在材料種類與組合方法方面,不同創意層級的範例展示及實作經驗會有交互影響。 The purpose of this study was to discuss effects of exemplars and hands-on experiences on technological creativity of junior high school students. A quasi-experimental and two-factor research design was adapted to teaching experiment in Living-Technology curriculum. There were 231 junior high school students in Taipei county participating in this study. A product creativity scale, which included items of holistic view, subject matter, color design, styling design, material diversity, function design, and structure combination, was used to collect data. Results of this study indicated that significant creativity effects on styling design and function design caused by factors of hands-on experiences. Moreover, high creative and medium creative exemplars showed positive effects on holistic view, subject matter, color design, styling design, and function design. Nevertheless, there were interactive effects between hands-on experiences and creative exemplars on material diversity and structure combination.

  10. Hands-on Virtual Clay

    OpenAIRE

    Pihuit, Adeline; Kry, Paul; Cani, Marie-Paule

    2008-01-01

    poster; International audience; This paper presents a new interaction system designed for hands-on 3D shape modeling and deformation through natural hand gestures. Our system is made of a Phantom haptic device coupled with a deformable foam ball that supports pressure sensors. These sensors detect forces exerted by the user's fingertips, and are used to control the configuration of a compliant virtual hand that is modeling soft virtual clay. During interaction, the user is provided both passi...

  11. Introducing Computational Thinking through Hands-on Projects Using R with Applications to Calculus, Probability and Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benakli, Nadia; Kostadinov, Boyan; Satyanarayana, Ashwin; Singh, Satyanand

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to promote computational thinking among mathematics, engineering, science and technology students, through hands-on computer experiments. These activities have the potential to empower students to learn, create and invent with technology, and they engage computational thinking through simulations, visualizations and data…

  12. Introducing Computational Thinking through Hands-on Projects Using R with Applications to Calculus, Probability and Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benakli, Nadia; Kostadinov, Boyan; Satyanarayana, Ashwin; Singh, Satyanand

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to promote computational thinking among mathematics, engineering, science and technology students, through hands-on computer experiments. These activities have the potential to empower students to learn, create and invent with technology, and they engage computational thinking through simulations, visualizations and data…

  13. Hands-On Research School in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, Harry L.

    2010-10-01

    A UNESCO/ICTP-sponsored ``Hands-On Research in Complex Systems'' school was held 1-12 August 2010 in Cameroon for young science faculty in Africa (see handsonresearch.org). Fifty participants from 17 African countries were selected from a pool of more than three hundred applicants. The goal of the school was for the participants to learn to use modern inexpensive instrumentation (such as webcams) and computational techniques to study diverse phenomena in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. The hands-on laboratory sessions were led by 12 senior faculty (most from the US); each faculty member brought a graduate student to assist with the teaching. In addition to the laboratory and computational activities, the participants also learned peer instruction teaching methods, developed oral communication skills in interactive sessions, and learned how to do simple inexpensive classroom demonstrations. This talk will show pictures from the Cameroon Hands-On School and will present plans for similar schools in developing countries in Asia, Latin America, and the Mideast.

  14. Hands-on Activities Designed to Familiarize Users with Data from ABI on GOES-R and AHI on Himawari-8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, S. S.; Schmit, T.; Gerth, J.; Gunshor, M. M.; Mooney, M. E.; Whittaker, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    Recent and ongoing launches of next-generation geostationary satellites offer a challenge to familiarize National Weather Service (and other) forecasters with the new capabilities of different spectral channels sensed by the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on GOES-R and the Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) on Himawari-8. Hands on HTML5-based applets developed at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies allow for quick comparisons of reflectance in the visible (0.4 to 0.7 um) and near-infrared channels (0.86 to 2.2 um) and brightness temperatures in the infrared (3.9 to 13.3 um). The web apps to explore the different channels on ABI and AHI are at http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/webapps/bandapp/; those that offer guidance on how to produce Red/Green/Blue composites are at http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/goes/webapps/satrgb/overview.html. This talk will briefly discuss highlights from both websites, and suggest ways the applications can be used to educate forecasters and the general public.

  15. Physics Education Technology (PhET) Virtual Lab Activities for Distance Learning Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    The Physics Education Technology (PhET) simulations offer a great set of tools to present simulations of physics phenomena in the classroom. This presentation describes the use of PhET to develop virtual lab assignments that supplement hands-on lab activities for a distance learning class in conceptual physics.

  16. Japanese activities in refrigeration technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T.; Ohtsuka, T.; Ishizaki, Y.

    This paper reviews recent activities in refrigeration technology in Japan. The projects described are stimulated by growing industrial needs or form part of large national projects. The JNR project on the MAGLEV train is currently the most powerful activity and it demands knowledge in all the different disciplines of cryogenics in particular on various scales of refrigeration. Research activities are also directed towards the development of Stirling cycle and magnetic refrigerators for applications in a wider area.

  17. Technology, Mathematics and Activity Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    This article describes 11 papers in which the authors report their research on technology as enhancement in the teaching and learning of mathematics, in the context of the application of activity theory for design and/or analysis. There is considerable diversity across the papers in how the authors have interpreted their task and in particular how…

  18. The Effect of Hands-on '"Energy-Saving House" Learning Activities on Elementary School Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behavior Regarding Energy Saving and Carbon-Emissions Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Kuen-Yi; Guu, Yunn-Horng; Chang, Liang-Te; Lai, Chih-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Energy saving and carbon-emissions reduction (ESCER) are widely regarded as important issues for progress towards ensuring sustainable forms of economic development. This Taiwanese study focuses on the effects of a series of educational activities about ESCER on students' knowledge, attitudes and behavior. Sixty fifth-grade students from two…

  19. Are All Hands-On Activities Equally Effective? Effect of Using Plastic Models, Organ Dissections, and Virtual Dissections on Student Learning and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Sara A.; Hicks, Reimi E.; Thompson, Katerina V.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or…

  20. Are All Hands-On Activities Equally Effective? Effect of Using Plastic Models, Organ Dissections, and Virtual Dissections on Student Learning and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Sara A.; Hicks, Reimi E.; Thompson, Katerina V.; Marbach-Ad, Gili

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of three commonly used cardiovascular model-assisted activities on student learning and student attitudes and perspectives about science. College students enrolled in a Human Anatomy and Physiology course were randomly assigned to one of three experimental groups (organ dissections, virtual dissections, or…

  1. Hands-on Universe - Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlet, R.

    2006-08-01

    The EU-HOU project aims at re-awakening the interest for science through astronomy and new technologies, by challenging middle and high schools pupils. It relies on real observations acquired through an internet-based network of robotic optical and radio telescopes or with didactical tools such as Webcam. Pupils manipulate and measure images in the classroom environment, using the specifically designed software SalsaJ, within pedagogical trans-disciplinary resources constructed in close collaboration between researchers and teachers. Gathering eight European countries coordinated in France, EU-HOU is partly funded by the European Union. All its outputs are freely available on the Web, in English and the other languages involved. A European network of teachers is being developed through training sessions.

  2. 2nd Portuguese science fair “Hands-on Science”

    OpenAIRE

    Esteves, Zita; Costa, Manuel F. M.

    2012-01-01

    Sciences fairs are activities with great pedagogical potential, in particular when in some way connect to the school in-classroom teaching/learning activities. Two year ago the Science Fair “Hands-on Science” was established focus on upper basic and secondary school levels. In May 2011 the second edition of the hands-on science network science fair was organized, in Braga, Portugal. In this communication we intend to show the evolution experienced in organizing this event over the last two...

  3. Developing hands-on ergonomics lessons for youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2006-02-22

    By the time students are ready to enter the workforce they have been exposed to up to 20 years of ergonomics risk factors. As technology evolves, it provides more opportunities for intensive repetitive motion and with computers, cell phones, personal digital assistants (PDAs), and electronic games. The average student engages in fewer active physical activities, sit stationary in mismatched furniture in schools for hours and carry heavy backpacks. While long-term effects remain to be identified, increasingly ergonomists and others concerned with musculoskeletal health and wellness, see a need for early ergonomics education. This interactive session provides a hands-on approach to introducing ergonomics to students. Although different approaches may effectively introduce ergonomics at even early stages of development, this program was designed for youth at the middle to high school age. Attendees will participate in four activities designed to introduce ergonomics at an experiential level. The modules focus on grip strength, effective breathing, optimizing your chair, and backpack safety. The workshop will include presentation and worksheets designed for use by teachers with minimal ergonomics training. Feedback from the participants will be sought for further refining the usability and safety of the training package.

  4. Hands-On Skills for Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A + A You are here Home Hands-On Skills for Caregivers Printer-friendly version When you’re ... therapist who can help you develop your transferring skills. Allow for their reality Remember to accept your ...

  5. "Hands-On Mechatronics": Problem-Based Learning for Mechatronics

    OpenAIRE

    Piguet, Yves; Mondada, Francesco; Siegwart, Roland

    2002-01-01

    The project "Hands-On Mechatronics" aims to develop a problem-based learning environment for mechatronics. This environment is based on four specific aspects: a mobile robot competition as motivation factor, a WEB environment as framework for all student, the SmartEASE robot as experimental platform and a good software environment for design and fast prototyping. The actual status of this concept is applied at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL) with participants comi...

  6. The Influence of Hands On Physics Experiments on Scientific Process Skills According to Prospective Teachers' Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirça, Necati

    2013-01-01

    In this study, relationship between prospective science and technology teachers' experiences in conducting Hands on physics experiments and their physics lab I achievement was investigated. Survey model was utilized and the study was carried out in the 2012 spring semester. Seven Hands on physics experiments were conducted with 28 prospective…

  7. Cosmetic devices based on active transdermal technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jessica A; Banga, Ajay K

    2015-01-01

    Active transdermal technology, commonly associated with drug delivery, has been used in recent years by the cosmetic industry for the aesthetic restoration of skin and delivery of cosmetic agents. In this article, we provide an overview of the skin's structure, various skin types, skin's self-repair mechanisms that are stimulated from the usage of cosmetic devices and discuss cosmetic applications. Summaries of the most common active transdermal technologies such as microneedles, iontophoresis, sonophoresis, lasers and microdermabrasion will be provided, in relation to the marketed cosmetic devices available that incorporate these technologies. Lastly, we cover combinations of active technologies that allow for more enhanced cosmetic results, and the current limitations of cosmetic devices.

  8. Data Grid tutorials with hands-on experience

    CERN Document Server

    Donno, Flavia; Puccinelli, Roberto; Stockinger, Kurt; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2004-01-01

    Grid technologies are more and more used in scientific as well as in industrial environments but often documentation and the correct usage are either not sufficient or not too well understood. Comprehensive training with hands-on experience helps people first to understand the technology and second to use it in a correct and efficient way. We have organised and run several training sessions in different locations all over the world and provide our experience. The major factors of success are a solid base of theoretical lectures and, more dominantly, a facility that allows for practical Grid exercises during and possibly after tutorial sessions.

  9. The Impact of Hands-On Simulation Laboratories on Teaching of Wireless Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Te-Shun Chou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: To prepare students with both theoretical knowledge and practical skills in the field of wireless communications. Background: Teaching wireless communications and networking is not an easy task because it involves broad subjects and abstract content. Methodology: A pedagogical method that combined lectures, labs, assignments, exams, and readings was applied in a course of wireless communications. Contribution: Five wireless networking labs, related to wireless local networks, wireless security, and wireless sensor networks, were developed for students to complete all of the required hands-on lab activities. Findings: Both development and implementation of the labs achieved a successful outcome and provided students with a very effective learning experience. Students expressed that they had a better understanding of different wireless network technologies after finishing the labs. Recommendations for Practitioners: Detailed instructional lab manuals should be developed so that students can carry out hands-on activities in a step-by-step fashion. Recommendation for Researchers: Hands-on lab exercises can not only help students understand the abstract technical terms in a meaningful way, but also provide them with hands-on learning experience in terms of wireless network configuration, implementation, and evaluation. Impact on Society: With the help of a wireless network simulator, students have successfully enhanced their practical skills and it would benefit them should they decide to pursue a career in wireless network design or implementation. Future Research: Continuous revision of the labs will be made according to the feedback from students. Based on the experience, more wireless networking labs and network issues could be studied in the future.

  10. Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Technology Development Status and Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chullen, Cinda; Westheimer, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Beginning in Fiscal Year (FY) 2011, Extravehicular activity (EVA) technology development became a technology foundational domain under a new program Enabling Technology Development and Demonstration. The goal of the EVA technology effort is to further develop technologies that will be used to demonstrate a robust EVA system that has application for a variety of future missions including microgravity and surface EVA. Overall the objectives will be reduce system mass, reduce consumables and maintenance, increase EVA hardware robustness and life, increase crew member efficiency and autonomy, and enable rapid vehicle egress and ingress. Over the past several years, NASA realized a tremendous increase in EVA system development as part of the Exploration Technology Development Program and the Constellation Program. The evident demand for efficient and reliable EVA technologies, particularly regenerable technologies was apparent under these former programs and will continue to be needed as future mission opportunities arise. The technological need for EVA in space has been realized over the last several decades by the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Space Shuttle, and the International Space Station (ISS) programs. EVAs were critical to the success of these programs. Now with the ISS extension to 2028 in conjunction with a current forecasted need of at least eight EVAs per year, the EVA technology life and limited availability of the EMUs will become a critical issue eventually. The current Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) has vastly served EVA demands by performing critical operations to assemble the ISS and provide repairs of satellites such as the Hubble Space Telescope. However, as the life of ISS and the vision for future mission opportunities are realized, a new EVA systems capability could be an option for the future mission applications building off of the technology development over the last several years. Besides ISS, potential mission applications include EVAs for

  11. Extravehicular Activity Technology Development Status and Forecast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chullen, Cinda; Westheimer, David T.

    2011-01-01

    EVA capability for these types of missions enables in-space construction of complex vehicles or satellites, hands on exploration of new parts of our solar system, and engages the public through the inspiration of knowing that humans are exploring places that they have never been before. This paper offers insight into what is currently being developed and what the potential opportunities are in the forecast.

  12. Marshall Space Flight Center ECLSS technology activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) technology activities are presented. Topics covered include: analytical development; ECLSS modeling approach; example of water reclamation modeling needs; and hardware development and testing.

  13. Technology transfer and technological learning through CERN's procurement activity

    CERN Document Server

    Autio, Erkko; Hameri, Ari-Pekka; CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    This report analyses the technological learning and innovation benefits derived from CERN's procurement activity during the period 1997-2001. The base population of our study, the technology-intensive suppliers to CERN, consisted of 629 companies out of 6806 companies during the same period, representing 1197 MCHF in procurement. The main findings from the study can be summarized as follows: the various learning and innovation benefits (e.g., technological learning, organizational capability development, market learning) tend to occur together. Learning and innovation benefits appear to be regulated by the quality of the supplier's relationship with CERN: the greater the amount of social capital built into the relationship, the greater the learning and innovation benefits. Regardless of relationship quality, virtually all suppliers derived significant marketing reference benefits from CERN. Many corollary benefits are associated with procurement activity. As an example, as many as 38% of the respondents devel...

  14. Hands on with ASP.NET MVC covering MVC 6

    CERN Document Server

    Sahay, Rahul

    2014-01-01

    MVC (Model-View-Controller) is the popular Microsoft technology which enables you to build dynamic, data-driven, mobile websites, TDD site. Hands-On with ASP.NET MVC is not only written for those who are going to have affair with MVC for the 1st time, rather it is written in such a way that even experienced professional will love reading this book. This book covers all the tiny steps on using MVC at its best. With complete practical tutorials to illustrate the concepts, you will step by step build one End to End application which covers below mentioned techniques - Controllers, Views, Models,

  15. NASDA's activities on vibration isolation technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The National Space Development Agency's (NASDA) activities in providing various vibration isolation technologies for the Space Station Mission are covered in viewgraph form. Technologies covered include an active vibration isolation system for extra sensitive missions in the low frequency range, a passive damping system consisting of a damping rack for the reduction of resonance amplification, and an isolator for vibration isolation from low frequencies. Information is given in viewgraph form on the active vibration isolation concept, voice coil type electromagnetic suspension, a profile of an active vibration isolation system, a three degree of freedom ground experiment, and acceleration feedback.

  16. A Hands-On Approach To Teaching Microcontroller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che Fai Yeong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Practice and application-oriented approach in education is important, and some research on active learning and cooperative problem-solving have shown that a student will learn faster and develop communication skill, leadership and team work through these methods. This paper presents a study of student preference and performance while learning the microcontroller subject with a 2-day curriculum that emphasized on hands-on approach. The curriculum uses the PIC16F877A microcontroller and participants learned to develop basic circuits and several other applications. Programming was completed on the MPLAB platform. Results show that participants had better understanding in this subject after attending the hands-on course.

  17. Hands-on lessons in ergonomics for youth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C; Alexandre, M; Jacobs, K

    2005-09-29

    Ergonomics risk factors apply to everybody. Numerous adults have experienced disabling injuries related to use of computers and other forms of technology. Now children are using technology even more than adults. Increasingly ergonomics risk factors are being recognized as present in the world of children. Outreach to schools and the surrounding community by employers may help protect the future work force. A growing body of researchers believe that children can benefit from the early introduction of ergonomics awareness and preventative measures. While individual representatives of the educational system may embrace the concept of introducing ergonomics into the classroom, a number of barriers can prevent implementation of integrated programs. Some of the barriers to introducing ergonomics in schools have been absence of a tie to educational standards, the existing demands on teaching hours, and the absence of easily executable lesson plans. Ergonomics is rarely included in teacher training and professional ergonomics expertise is needed for the development of a class-based program. As part of Strategic Vision plan for 2025, a National Laboratory identified community outreach and the future workforces as key areas for initiatives. A series of hands-on interactive modules have been developed by professional ergonomics specialists. They are being tested with elementary, middle and high school students. Where possible, the content has been tied to the educational standards in the State of California in the USA. Currently the modules include grip strength, effective breathing, optimal keyboard and mouse positions, optimizing chairs, posture and movement, backpack safety and safe lifting. Each module takes the students through a related activity or experience. An individual worksheet asks them questions about the experience and guides them to consider implications in their activities of daily living. A module on hearing is under development. The goal is to have a

  18. Information Technologies In Transformation Of Marketing Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Ilarionova

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the paper is to provide a comprehensive review of marketing issues influenced by information technologies. The macro-environment of marketing activity, strategic issues like marketing philosophy, marketing research and segmentation as well as marketing mix were analysed. The main findings are the following: IT advances do change every element of marketing activity of any company, offering both opportunities and threats.

  19. NASA's Microgravity Technology Report: Summary of Activities 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Dan

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the 1997 NASA Microgravity Technology Report is to update the Microgravity Research Program's technology development policy and to present and assess current technology related activities and requirements identified within its research and technology disciplines.

  20. Teaching radio astrophysics the hand-on way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Bhal Chandra

    Astronomy and space sciences have always been instrumental in attracting young students to physical sciences. While the lectures/demonstrations and exhibitions pertaining to space sci-ences capture the imagination of young students, these alone are not sufficient to induce them to join scientific research. In countries like India, where a large number of students take to physical sciences for under-graduate education, complex sociological factors are key issues in translating this large body of students to potential researchers. While lectures and exhibition lead to an increase in scientific awareness for these students, these do not give a feel for scien-tific research and bridge the gap between high school/college science education and high end research. In this context, a hands-on approach to astronomy education, in science research environments or closely connected to scientific institutions, offers a promising alternative. This approach has been used in optical astronomy, where inexpensive small telescopes are available, often coupling a vast network of amateur astronomy clubs to leading astronomy institutes. The non-visual and relatively more technical nature of radio astronomy has limited a similar approach in past for connecting students to space sciences using radio waveband. The tech-nological explosion in communication industry and radio connectivity in the last decade along with an expansion in engineering education makes this possible now using a hands-on approach in teaching radio astrophysics. In this presentation, the sociological factors affecting the student choice are discussed followed by a review of the efforts to bridge the above mentioned gap by various groups in the world in the last decade with a view to enumerate the best practices in a hands-on approach. A program using this approach at National Center for Radio Astrophysics is described, where the students are exposed to simple hands-on radio astronomy experiments such as spectral line

  1. Positive Developments in Hands-On Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennypacker, C. R.; Hands-On Universe; Yerkes Observatory; START Collaboration Team

    2004-12-01

    Over the past decade, with generous support from Elementary, Secondary and Informal Science Education program of the NSF, Hands-On Universe (HOU), has developed and continues to develop small telescopes, user friendly image-processing software, XML-tools for image request within a telescope network, curricula for secondary schools,, teacher training materials and workshops,. HOU curricula should be published within a year, and we are developing HOU Centers across America and the World, to be on-going and self-sustained sites for teachers to learn how to teach and undertake astronomy in their classrooms. HOU is currently developing museum kiosks for image acquisition and processing in science centers, using an on site robotic telescope, and 0.35 meter telescopes around the world in real time. Over 700 teachers around the United States and another 700 teachers from around the world have taken HOU workshops, and about 2/3 use it in their classrooms. A particularly important development is the HOU collaboration with Johns Hopkins University as part of the usage of National Virtual Observatory and SDSS images and data for education. Such data systems are beginning to result in a flood of data, which will soon overwhelm students and teachers, unless we prepare for this onslaught carefully. HOU has met resonance with other astronomers and educators around the world. Global HOU is thriving, and next years Global HOU meeting will be held at NAOC in Beijing, China. We seek astronomers at this meeting who would be happy to help coach a few students on a paper, using our Collaboratory system!

  2. Guidance manual for conducting technology demonstration activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolley, Robert L.; Morris, Michael I.; Singh, Suman P.N.

    1991-12-01

    This demonstration guidance manual has been prepared to assist Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), staff in conducting demonstrations. It is prepared in checklist style to facilitate its use and assumes that Energy Systems personnel have project management responsibility. In addition to a detailed step-by-step listing of procedural considerations, a general checklist, logic flow diagram, and several examples of necessary plans are included to assist the user in developing an understanding of the many complex activities required to manage technology demonstrations. Demonstrations are pilot-scale applications of often innovative technologies to determine the commercial viability of the technologies to perform their designed function. Demonstrations are generally conducted on well-defined problems for which existing technologies or processes are less than satisfactory in terms of effectiveness, cost, and/or regulatory compliance. Critically important issues in demonstration management include, but are not limited to, such factors as communications with line and matrix management and with the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Systems staff responsible for management oversight, budgetary and schedule requirements, regulatory compliance, and safety.

  3. The effects of hands-on-science instruction on the science achievement of middle school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Felita

    Student achievement in the Twenty First Century demands a new rigor in student science knowledge, since advances in science and technology require students to think and act like scientists. As a result, students must acquire proficient levels of knowledge and skills to support a knowledge base that is expanding exponentially with new scientific advances. This study examined the effects of hands-on-science instruction on the science achievement of middle school students. More specifically, this study was concerned with the influence of hands-on science instruction versus traditional science instruction on the science test scores of middle school students. The subjects in this study were one hundred and twenty sixth-grade students in six classes. Instruction involved lecture/discussion and hands-on activities carried out for a three week period. Specifically, the study ascertained the influence of the variables gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on the science test scores of middle school students. Additionally, this study assessed the effect of the variables gender, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status on the attitudes of sixth grade students toward science. The two instruments used to collect data for this study were the Prentice Hall unit ecosystem test and the Scientific Work Experience Programs for Teachers Study (SWEPT) student's attitude survey. Moreover, the data for the study was treated using the One-Way Analysis of Covariance and the One-Way Analysis of Variance. The following findings were made based on the results: (1) A statistically significant difference existed in the science performance of middle school students exposed to hands-on science instruction. These students had significantly higher scores than the science performance of middle school students exposed to traditional instruction. (2) A statistically significant difference did not exist between the science scores of male and female middle school students. (3) A statistically

  4. STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P.

    2010-12-01

    Science and technology are widely recognized as major drivers of innovation and industry (e.g. Rising above the Gathering Storm, 2006). While the focus for education reform is on school improvement, there is considerable research that supports the role that out-of-school experiences can play in student achievement and public understanding of STEM disciplines. Libraries provide an untapped resource for engaging underserved youth and their families in fostering an appreciation and deeper understanding of science and technology topics. Designed spaces, like libraries, allow lifelong, life-wide, and life-deep learning to take place though the research basis for learning in libraries is not as developed as other informal settings like science centers. The Space Science Institute’s National Center for Interactive Learning (NCIL) in partnership with the American Library Association (ALA), the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), and the National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) have received funding from NSF to develop a national education project called the STAR Library Education Network: a hands-on learning program for libraries and their communities (or STAR-Net for short). STAR stands for Science-Technology, Activities and Resources. The overarching goal of the project is to reach underserved youth and their families with informal STEM learning experiences. This project will deepen our knowledge of informal/lifelong learning that takes place in libraries and establish a learning model that can be compared to the more established free-choice learning model for science centers and museums. The project includes the development of two STEM hands-on exhibits on topics that are of interest to library staff and their patrons: Discover Earth and Discover Tech. In addition, the project will produce resources and inquiry-based activities that libraries can use to enrich the exhibit experience. Additional resources will be provided through partnerships with relevant

  5. Enhancing Students' Interest in Science and Technology through Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration and Active Learning Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Donna M.; Malloy, Alisha D.; Hollowell, Gail P.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-nine rising high school 12th grade students participated in a 4-week summer program designed to increase their interest in science and technology. The program was a blend of hands-on biology, chemistry, and technology modules that addressed the global issue of obesity. Student groups developed websites to address obesity in one of five…

  6. Hands on applied finite element analysis application with ANSYS

    CERN Document Server

    Arslan, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    Hands on Applied Finite Element Analysis Application with Ansys is truly an extraordinary book that offers practical ways of tackling FEA problems in machine design and analysis. In this book, 35 good selection of example problems have been presented, offering students the opportunity to apply their knowledge to real engineering FEA problem solutions by guiding them with real life hands on experience.

  7. Does Hands-On Science Practices Make an Impact on Achievement in Science? A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglak, Serdar

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate to what extent the use of hands-on science activities influences on students? academic achievement in science. Review of literature revealed several research studies focusing upon such aim and thus, a meta-analysis of these researches was carried out to obtain an overall effect size estimate of hands-on science…

  8. NASA's Microgravity Technology Report, 1996: Summary of Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierk, Isabella

    1996-01-01

    This report covers technology development and technology transfer activities within the Microgravity Science Research Programs during FY 1996. It also describes the recent major tasks under the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program and identifies current technology requirements. This document is consistent with NASA,s Enteprise for the Human Exploration and development of Space (HEDS) Strategic Plan. This annual update reflects changes in the Microgravity Science Research Program's new technology activities and requirements. Appendix A. FY 1996 Advanced Technology Development. Program and Project Descriptions. Appendix B. Technology Development.

  9. FSA future directions: FSA technology activities in FY86

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leipold, M. H.

    1985-01-01

    The silicon material, advanced silicon sheet, device research, and process research activities are explained. There will be no new initiatives. Many activities are targeted for completion and the emphasis will then be on technology transfer. Industrial development of the fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) deposition technology is proceeding. Technology transfer and industry funding of sheet development are continuing.

  10. PBL, Hands-On/ Digital resources in Geology, (Teaching/ Learning)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rosa; Santos, Cátia; Carvalho, Sara

    2015-04-01

    The present study reports the elaboration, application and evaluation of a problem-based learning (PBL) program that aims to evaluate the effectiveness in students learning the Rock Cycle theme. Prior research on both PBL and Rock Cycle was conducted within the context of science education so as to elaborate and construct the intervention program. Findings from these studies indicated both the PBL methodology and Rock Cycle as helpful for teachers and students. PBL methodology has been adopted in this study since it is logically incorporated in a constructivism philosophy application and it was expected that this approach would assist students towards achieving a specific set of competencies. PBL is a student-centered method based on the principle of using problems as the starting point for the acquisition of new knowledge. Problems are based on complex real-world situations. All information needed to solve the problem is initially not given. Students will identify, find, and use appropriate resources to complete the exercise. They work permanently in small groups, developing self-directed activities and increasing participation in discussions. Teacher based guidance allows students to be fully engaged in knowledge building. That way, the learning process is active, integrated, cumulative, and connected. Theme "Rock Cycle" was introduced using a problematic situation, which outlined the geological processes highlighted in "Foz do Douro" the next coastline of the school where the study was developed. The questions proposed by the students were solved, using strategies that involved the use of hands-on activities and virtual labs in Geology. The systematization of the selected theme was performed in a field excursion, implemented according to the organizational model of Nir Orion, to The "Foz do Douro" metamorphic complex. In the evaluation of the learning process, data were obtained on students' development of knowledge and competencies through the application of

  11. Hands-On Experiences in Deploying Cost-Effective Ambient-Assisted Living Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Dasios

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Older adults’ preferences to remain independent in their own homes along with the high costs of nursing home care have motivated the development of Ambient Assisted Living (AAL technologies which aim at improving the safety, health conditions and wellness of the elderly. This paper reports hands-on experiences in designing, implementing and operating UbiCare, an AAL based prototype system for elderly home care monitoring. The monitoring is based on the recording of environmental parameters like temperature and light intensity as well as micro-level incidents which allows one to infer daily activities like moving, sitting, sleeping, usage of electrical appliances and plumbing components. The prototype is built upon inexpensive, off-the-shelf hardware (e.g., various sensors, Arduino microcontrollers, ZigBee-compatible wireless communication modules and license-free software, thereby ensuring low system deployment costs. The network comprises nodes placed in a house’s main rooms or mounted on furniture, one wearable node, one actuator node and a centralized processing element (coordinator. Upon detecting significant deviations from the ordinary activity patterns of individuals and/or sudden falls, the system issues automated alarms which may be forwarded to authorized caregivers via a variety of communication channels. Furthermore, measured environmental parameters and activity incidents may be monitored through standard web interfaces.

  12. 1st Hands-on Science Science Fair

    OpenAIRE

    Esteves, Zita; Costa, Manuel F. M.

    2011-01-01

    In school learning of science through investigative hands-on experiments is in the core of the Hands-on Science Network vision. However informal and non-formal contexts may also provide valuable paths for implementing this strategy aiming a better e!ective science education. In May 2011, a "rst country wide “Hands-on Science’ Science Fair” was organized in Portugal with the participation of 131 students that presented 38 projects in all "elds of Science. In this communication we will pr...

  13. HANDS-ON MATERIALS AS INVITATION TO A FANTASY WORLD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye

    them practices for the learning and teaching of arithmetic and number systems. My project is to investigate the mathematical learning opportunities that the bears and their fantasy world open up for the students. Hand-on materials are often used to investigate and to do experiments to develop......In this article I wish to introduce an innovative use of hands-on-materials, developed by Peter Müller, a Danish elementary school teacher. The hands-on material itself consists of a collection of small plastic bears in different colors and sizes, which can be used for many different purposes among...... the cognitive part in mathematics. Here I describe, in the form of a case study, how the use of hands-on materials in first grade may also have an emotional influence through the narrative mode. My interest is in explicating the conditions that the bears' environment offers for the learning of arithmetic both...

  14. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  15. Determinants of Foreign Technological Activity in German Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dettmann, Eva; Lacasa, Iciar Dominguez; Günther, Jutta;

    This paper analyses the determinants of spatial distribution of foreign technological activity across 96 German regions (1996-2009). We identify foreign inventive activity by applying the ‘cross-border-ownership concept’ to transnational patent applications. The descriptive analysis shows...... that foreign technological activity more than doubled during the observation period with persistent spatial heterogeneity in Germany. Using a pooled count data model, we estimate the effect of various sources for externalities on the extent of foreign technological activity across regions. Our results show...... that foreign technological activity is attracted by technologically specialised sectors of regions. In contrast to existing findings this effect applies both to foreign as well as domestic sources of specialisation. We show that the relation between specialization and foreign technological activity is non...

  16. The Hands-On Optics Project: a demonstration of module 3-magnificent magnifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, Robert T.; Walker, Constance E.

    2014-07-01

    The Hands-On Optics project offers an example of a set of instructional modules that foster active prolonged engagement. Developed by SPIE, OSA, and NOAO through funding from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the modules were originally designed for afterschool settings and museums. However, because they were based on national standards in mathematics, science, and technology, they were easily adapted for use in classrooms. The philosophy and implementation strategies of the six modules will be described as well as lessons learned in training educators. The modules were implementing with the help of optics industry professionals who served as expert volunteers to assist educators. A key element of the modules was that they were developed around an understanding of optics misconceptions and used culminating activities in each module as a form of authentic assessment. Thus student achievement could be measured by evaluating the actual product created by each student in applying key concepts, tools, and applications together at the end of each module. The program used a progression of disciplinary core concepts to build an integrated sequence and crosscutting ideas and practices to infuse the principles of the modern electro-optical field into the modules. Whenever possible, students were encouraged to experiment and to create, and to pursue inquiry-based approaches. The result was a program that had high appeal to regular as well as gifted students.

  17. A low-cost, hands-on module to characterize antimicrobial compounds using an interdisciplinary, biophysical approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karishma S Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a hands-on experimental module that combines biology experiments with a physics-based analytical model in order to characterize antimicrobial compounds. To understand antibiotic resistance, participants perform a disc diffusion assay to test the antimicrobial activity of different compounds and then apply a diffusion-based analytical model to gain insights into the behavior of the active antimicrobial component. In our experience, this module was robust, reproducible, and cost-effective, suggesting that it could be implemented in diverse settings such as undergraduate research, STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math camps, school programs, and laboratory training workshops. By providing valuable interdisciplinary research experience in science outreach and education initiatives, this module addresses the paucity of structured training or education programs that integrate diverse scientific fields. Its low-cost requirements make it especially suitable for use in resource-limited settings.

  18. A Low Cost Implementation of an Existing Hands-on Laboratory Experiment in Electronic Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Onime

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In engineering the pedagogical content of most formative programmes includes a significant amount of practical laboratory hands-on activity designed to deliver knowledge acquisition from actual experience alongside traditional face-to-face classroom based lectures and tutorials; this hands-on aspect is not always adequately addressed by current e-learning platforms. An innovative approach to e-learning in engineering, named computer aided engineering education (CAEE is about the use of computer aids for the enhanced, interactive delivery of educational materials in different fields of engineering through two separate but related components; one for classroom and another for practical hands-on laboratory work. The component for hands-on laboratory practical work focuses on the use of mixed reality (video-based augmented reality tools on mobile devices/platforms. This paper presents the computer aided engineering education (CAEE implementation of a laboratory experiment in micro-electronics that highlights some features such as the ability to closely implement an existing laboratory based hands-on experiment with lower associated costs and the ability to conduct the experiment off-line while maintaining existing pedagogical contents and standards.

  19. An Evaluation of Two Hands-On Lab Styles for Plant Biodiversity in Undergraduate Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basey, John M.; Maines, Anastasia P.; Francis, Clinton D.; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice…

  20. Build a Band Hands-on Challenge: Investigate Sound with PBS's "Design Squad Nation"[TM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    This article describes "Build a Band" hands-on activity from "Design Squad Nation," which allows kids to use simple materials to build a four-stringed instrument, then tune it and play a song. Kids explore frequency, pitch, and sound energy while following the steps of the engineering design process. By weaving "Design Squad Nation" episodes,…

  1. Teachers' Purposeful Design of Effective Technology Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John Andrew Kerlin

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to explore how exemplary teachers design learning activities that incorporate the use of technology. Teachers at three schools in a school district in Southern California were solicited for a survey regarding their use of technology in the classroom. Based on the surveys, high and low technology implementers were…

  2. Future Technology Workshop: A Collaborative Method for the Design of New Learning Technologies and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavoula, Giasemi N.; Sharples, Mike

    2007-01-01

    We describe the future technology workshop (FTW), a method whereby people with everyday knowledge or experience in a specific area of technology use (such as using digital cameras) envision and design the interactions between current and future technology and activity. Through a series of structured workshop sessions, participants collaborate to…

  3. NASA's Spaceliner Investment Area Technology Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueter, Uwe; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goals for the third generation launch system are to significantly reduce cost and improve safety over current conditions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Spaceliner Investment Area, third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframes, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), avionics, power, operations, and range. The ASTP program will mature these technologies through both ground and flight system testing. The Spaceliner Investment Area plans to mature vehicle technologies to reduce the implementation risks for future commercially developed reusable launch vehicles (RLV). The plan is to substantially increase the design and operating margins of the third generation RLV (the Space Shuttle is the first generation) by incorporating advanced technologies in propulsion, materials, structures, thermal protection systems, avionics, and power. Advancements in design tools and better characterization of the operational environment will allow improvements in design margins. Improvements in operational efficiencies will be provided through use of advanced integrated health management, operations, and range technologies. The increase in margins will allow components to operate well below their design points resulting in improved component operating life, reliability, and safety which in turn reduces both maintenance and refurbishment costs. These technologies have the potential of enabling horizontal takeoff by reducing the takeoff weight and achieving the goal of airline-like operation. These factors in conjunction with increased flight rates from an expanding market will result in significant improvements in safety

  4. E-Collaboration Technologies in Teaching/Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascerinska, Jelena; Ahrens, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    A proper use of e-collaboration technologies in the teaching/learning process is provided by varied cooperative networks, which penetrate teachers' and students' activity more thoroughly with the availability of broadband services. However, the successful use of e-collaboration technologies in teaching/learning activity within a multicultural…

  5. Exploring quantum physics through hands-on projects

    CERN Document Server

    Prutchi, David

    2012-01-01

    Build an intuitive understanding of the principles behind quantum mechanics through practical construction and replication of original experiments With easy-to-acquire, low-cost materials and basic knowledge of algebra and trigonometry, Exploring Quantum Physics through Hands-on Projects takes readers step by step through the process of re-creating scientific experiments that played an essential role in the creation and development of quantum mechanics. From simple measurements of Planck's constant to testing violations of Bell's inequalities using entangled photons, Exploring Quantum Physics through Hands-on Projects not only immerses readers in the process of quantum mechanics, it provides insight into the history of the field--how the theories and discoveries apply to our world not only today, but also tomorrow. By immersing readers in groundbreaking experiments that can be performed at home, school, or in the lab, this first-ever, hands-on book successfully demystifies the world of quantum physics for...

  6. NASA's Spaceliner 100 Investment Area Technology Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueter, Uwe; Lyles, Garry M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA's has established long term goals for access-to-space. The third generation launch systems are to be fully reusable and operational around 2025. The goals for the third generation launch system are to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current conditions. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL has the agency lead to develop space transportation technologies. Within ASTP, under the Spaceliner100 Investment Area, third generation technologies are being pursued in the areas of propulsion, airframes, integrated vehicle health management (IVHM), launch systems, and operations and range. The ASTP program will mature these technologies through ground system testing. Flight testing where required, will be advocated on a case by case basis.

  7. LDR structural technology activities at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Ben

    1988-01-01

    The status of the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) technology requirements and the availability of that technology in the next few years are summarized. The research efforts at JPL related to these technology needs are also discussed. LDR requires that a large and relatively stiff truss-type backup structure have a surface accurate to 100 microns in space (initial position with thermal distortions) and the dynamic characteristics predictable and/or measurable by on-orbit system identification for micron level motion. This motion may result from the excitation of the lower modes or from wave-type motions. It is also assumed that the LDR structure can be ground tested to validate its ability to meet mission requirements. No program manager will commit a structural design based solely on analysis, unless the analysis is backed by a validation test program.

  8. Network attacks and defenses a hands-on approach

    CERN Document Server

    Trabelsi, Zouheir; Al Braiki, Arwa; Mathew, Sujith Samuel

    2012-01-01

    The attacks on computers and business networks are growing daily, and the need for security professionals who understand how malfeasants perform attacks and compromise networks is a growing requirement to counter the threat. Network security education generally lacks appropriate textbooks with detailed, hands-on exercises that include both offensive and defensive techniques. Using step-by-step processes to build and generate attacks using offensive techniques, Network Attacks and Defenses: A Hands-on Approach enables students to implement appropriate network security solutions within a laborat

  9. Geographic Information Technologies as an outreach activity in geo-scientific education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maman, Shimrit; Isaacson, Sivan; Blumberg, Dan G.

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, a decline in the rates of examinees in the academic track that were entitled to an enhanced matriculation certificate in scientific-technological education was reported in Israel. To confront this problem the Earth and Planetary Image Facility (EPIF) at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev fosters interdisciplinary exploration through educational programs that make use of the facility and its equipment and enable the empowerment of the community by understanding and appreciating science and technology. This is achieved by using Geographic Information Technologies (GIT) such as remote sensing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for geo-physical sciences in activities that combine theoretical background with hands-on activities. Monitoring Earth from space by satellites, digital atlases and virtual-based positioning applications are examples for fusion of spatial information (geographic) and technology that the activity is based on. GIT opens a new chapter and a recent history of Cartography starting from the collection of spatial data to its presentation and analysis. GIS have replaced the use of classical atlas books and offer a variety of Web-based applications that provide maps and display up-to-date imagery. The purpose of this workshop is to expose teachers and students to GITs which are applicable in every classroom. The activity imparts free geographic information systems that exist in cyberspace and accessible to single users as the Israeli national GIS and Google earth, which are based on a spatial data and long term local and global satellite imagery coverage. In this paper, our "Think global-Map Local" activity is presented. The activity uses GIS and change detection technologies as means to encourage students to explore environmental issues both around the globe and close to their surroundings. The students detect changes by comparing multi temporal images of a chosen site and learn how to map the alterations and produce change

  10. Molecular Biology for the Environment: an EC-US hands-on Course in Environmental Biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Victor de Lorenzo; Juan Luis Ramos; Jerome Kukor; Gerben J. Zylstra

    2004-02-15

    One of the central goals of this activity is to bring together young scientists (at the late Ph.D. or early postdoctoral stages of their careers) in a forum that should result in future collaborations. The course is designed to give scientists hands-on experience in modern, up-to-date biotechnological methods at the interface between molecular biology and environmental biotechnology for the analysis of microorganisms and their activities with regard to the remediation of pollutants in the environment.

  11. Teaching Hands-On Linux Host Computer Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumba, Rose

    2006-01-01

    In the summer of 2003, a project to augment and improve the teaching of information assurance courses was started at IUP. Thus far, ten hands-on exercises have been developed. The exercises described in this article, and presented in the appendix, are based on actions required to secure a Linux host. Publicly available resources were used to…

  12. Hands on CERN: A Well-Used Physics Education Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The "Hands on CERN" education project makes it possible for students and teachers to get close to the forefront of scientific research. The project confronts the students with contemporary physics at its most fundamental level with the help of particle collisions from the DELPHI particle physics experiment at CERN. It now exists in 14 languages…

  13. CORD Applied Mathematics: Hands-On Learning in Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrotti, Leon S.; Chamberlain, John D.

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Occupational Research and Development (CORD) developed an applied mathematics course that integrates algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and other strands; centers around hands-on laboratory experiences; and uses real-world problems found in the world of work. (MKR)

  14. Enhancing Lean Manufacturing Learning Experience through Hands-On Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadawi, Isam; McWilliams, Douglas L.; Tetteh, Edem G.

    2010-01-01

    Finding appropriate interactive exercises to increase students' learning in technical topic courses is always challenging to educators. In this study, several paper plane hands-on simulation exercises were developed, used, and tested in a lean manufacturing course for beginning college students. A pretest and posttest was used to assess the…

  15. Google Earth for Landowners: Insights from Hands-on Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Google Earth is an accessible, user-friendly GIS that can help landowners in their management planning. I offered hands-on Google Earth workshops to landowners to teach skills, including mapmaking, length and area measurement, and database management. Workshop participants were surveyed at least 6 months following workshop completion, and learning…

  16. Google Earth for Landowners: Insights from Hands-on Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    Google Earth is an accessible, user-friendly GIS that can help landowners in their management planning. I offered hands-on Google Earth workshops to landowners to teach skills, including mapmaking, length and area measurement, and database management. Workshop participants were surveyed at least 6 months following workshop completion, and learning…

  17. Enhancing Lean Manufacturing Learning Experience through Hands-On Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbadawi, Isam; McWilliams, Douglas L.; Tetteh, Edem G.

    2010-01-01

    Finding appropriate interactive exercises to increase students' learning in technical topic courses is always challenging to educators. In this study, several paper plane hands-on simulation exercises were developed, used, and tested in a lean manufacturing course for beginning college students. A pretest and posttest was used to assess the…

  18. Communicate science: an example of food related hands-on laboratory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Addezio, Giuliana; Marsili, Antonella; Vallocchia, Massimiliano

    2014-05-01

    The Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV's Educational and Outreach Laboratory) organized activity with kids to convey scientific knowledge and to promote research on Earth Science, focusing on volcanic and seismic hazard. The combination of games and learning in educational activity can be a valuable tool for study of complex phenomena. Hands-on activity may help in engage kids in a learning process through direct participation that significantly improves the learning performance of children. Making learning fun motivate audience to pay attention on and stay focused on the subject. We present the experience of the hand-on laboratory "Laboratorio goloso per bambini curiosi di scienza (a delicious hands-on laboratory for kids curious about science)", performed in Frascati during the 2013 European Researchers' Night, promoted by the European Commission, as part of the program organized by the Laboratorio Didattica e Divulgazione Scientifica in the framework of Associazione Frascati Scienza (http://www.frascatiscienza.it/). The hand-on activity were designed for primary schools to create enjoyable and unusual tools for learning Earth Science. During this activity kids are involved with something related to everyday life, such as food, through manipulation, construction and implementation of simple experiments related to Earth dynamics. Children become familiar with scientific concepts such as composition of the Earth, plates tectonic, earthquakes and seismic waves propagation and experience the effect of earthquakes on buildings, exploring their important implications for seismic hazard. During the activity, composed of several steps, participants were able to learn about Earth inner structure, fragile lithosphere, waves propagations, impact of waves on building ecc.., dealing with eggs, cookies, honey, sugar, polenta, flour, chocolate, candies, liquorice sticks, bread, pudding and sweets. The

  19. The Analysis of Activated Carbon Regeneration Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚芳

    2014-01-01

    A series of methods for activated carbon regeneration were briefly introduced.Such as thermal regeneration,chemical regeneration,biochemical regeneration,and newly supercritical fluid regeneration, electrochemical regeneration,light-catalyzed regeneration,and microwave radiation method,and the developing trend of activated carbon regeneration was predicted.

  20. Culturelogical senses of activity in anthropic technologies of higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriev S.V.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Technology of the educational teaching motive actions is examined in a theory and practice of higher education. The role of modern educational technologies is rotined in professional preparation of students. «Humanism conversion» of educational technologies is offered. It is rotined that authentic sense of educational activity of man is finding by him itself (achievement of authenticness with itself. On the basis of it is creative realization in professional labour.

  1. MO-AB-210-02: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammet, S. [University of Chicago Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  2. MO-AB-210-01: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [University of Chicago (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  3. 3"H"s Education: Examining Hands-On, Heads-On and Hearts-On Early Childhood Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inan, Hatice Zeynep; Inan, Taskin

    2015-01-01

    Active engagement has become the focus of many early childhood science education curricula and standards. However, active engagement usually emphasizes getting children engaged with science solely through hands-on activities. Active engagement by way of hands, heads, and hearts are kept separate and rarely discussed in terms of getting all to work…

  4. Promoting Technology-Assisted Active Learning in Computer Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinzhu; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes specific active learning strategies for teaching computer science, integrating both instructional technologies and non-technology-based strategies shown to be effective in the literature. The theoretical learning components addressed include an intentional method to help students build metacognitive abilities, as well as…

  5. Seafloor Science and Remotely Operated Vehicle (SSROV) Day Camp: A Week-Long, Hands-On STEM Summer Camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, C. G.; Fournier, T.; Monahan, K.; Paul, C.

    2015-12-01

    RETINA (Robotic Exploration Technologies IN Astrobiology) has developed a program geared towards stimulating our youth with innovative and relevant hands-on learning modules under a STEM umbrella. Given the breadth of potential science and engineering topics that excite children, the RETINA Program focuses on interactive participation in the design and development of simple robotic and sensor systems, providing a range of challenges to engage students through project-based learning (PBL). Thus, young students experience scientific discovery through the use and understanding of technology. This groundwork serves as the foundation for SSROV Camp, a week-long, summer day camp for 6th-8th grade students. The camp is centered on the sensors and platforms that guide seafloor exploration and discovery and builds upon the notion that transformative discoveries in the deep sea result from either sampling new environments or making new measurements with sensors adapted to this extreme environment. These technical and scientific needs are folded into the curriculum. Each of the first four days of the camp includes four team-based, hands-on technical challenges, communication among peer groups, and competition. The fifth day includes additional activities, culminating in camper-led presentations to describe a planned mission based on a given geologic setting. Presentations include hypotheses, operational requirements and expected data products. SSROV Camp was initiated last summer for three sessions, two in Monterey, CA and one in Oxford, MS. Campers from both regions grasped key elements of the program, based on written responses to questions before and after the camp. On average, 32% of the pre-test questions were answered correctly compared with 80% of the post-test questions. Additional confirmation of gains in campers' knowledge, skills, and critical thinking on environmental issues and engineering problems were apparent during the "jeopardy" competition, nightly homework

  6. Determinants of Foreign Technological Activity in German Regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dettmann, Eva; Lacasa, Iciar Dominguez; Günther, Jutta

    This paper analyses the determinants of spatial distribution of foreign technological activity across 96 German regions (1996-2009). We identify foreign inventive activity by applying the ‘cross-border-ownership concept’ to transnational patent applications. The descriptive analysis shows......-linear and that it is influenced by sectoral heterogeneity. Externalities related to technological diversification attract foreign R&D only into ‘higher order’ regions....

  7. Technology to promote and increase physical activity in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Nina C

    2015-01-01

    Regular physical activity is firmly recommended as part of a multifaceted approach to heart failure (HF) self-management. Unfortunately, research indicates that most patients are less likely to engage in and adhere to such activities. The widespread use of information and communication technology tools and resources offers an innovative and potentially beneficial avenue for increasing physical activity levels in HF patients. This article presents specific ways in which advances in information and communication technologies, including Internet- and mobile-based communications, social media platforms, and self-monitoring health devices, can serve as a means to broadly promote increasing levels of physical activity to improve health outcomes in the HF population.

  8. IT release management a hands-on guide

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Dave

    2011-01-01

    When implemented correctly, release management can help ensure that quality is integrated throughout the development, implementation, and delivery of services, applications, and infrastructure. This holistic, total cost of ownership approach allows for higher levels of system availability, is more cost effective to maintain, and increases overall stability, maintainability, and reliability. Filled with practical insights, IT Release Management: A Hands-on Guide clearly illustrates the effective implementation of a release process in the real world. It examines the similarities and differences

  9. Active, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Homeland Defense

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James L. Jones

    2003-06-01

    Active, non-intrusive inspection or interrogation technologies have been used for 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. During the last 50 years, various active interrogation systems have been investigated and most have revealed many unique and interesting capabilities and advantages that have already benefited the general public. Unfortunately, except for medical and specific industrial applications, these unique capabilities have not been widely adopted, largely due to the complexity of the technology, the overconfident reliance on passive detection systems to handle most challenges, and the unrealistic public concerns regarding radiation safety issues for a given active inspection deployment. The unique homeland security challenges facing the United States today are inviting more "out-of-the-box" solutions and are demanding the effective technological solutions that only active interrogation systems can provide. While revolutionary new solutions are always desired, these technology advancements are rare, and when found, usually take a long time to fully understand and implement for a given application. What's becoming more evident is that focusing on under-developed, but well-understood, active inspection technologies can provide many of the needed "out-of-the-box" solutions. This paper presents a brief historical overview of active interrogation. It identifies some of the major homeland defense challenges being confronted and the commercial and research technologies presently available and being pursued. Finally, the paper addresses the role of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and its partner, the Idaho Accelerator Center at Idaho State University, in promoting and developing active inspection technologies for homeland defense.

  10. [Fifth EVF HOW: Hands-on Workshop on Venous Disease (Limassol, Cyprus) 30 October - 1 November 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaidakov, E V; Porembskaya, O Ya

    2015-01-01

    The fifth Hands-on Workshop on Venous Diseases of the European Venous Forum was held from October 30 to November 1, 2014 in Limassol, Cyprus. Leading specialists from European countries for three days delivered reports concerning modern trends in diagnosis and treatment of venous diseases. The participants of the hands-on workshop had a unique possibility to learn first-hand the latest recommendations concerning diagnosis and treatment of varicose disease, acute venous thromboses, post-thrombotic disease, to know about advanced technologies being just introduced into clinical practice.

  11. Robotic Mission to Mars: Hands-on, minds-on, web-based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathers, Naomi; Goktogen, Ali; Rankin, John; Anderson, Marion

    2012-11-01

    Problem-based learning has been demonstrated as an effective methodology for developing analytical skills and critical thinking. The use of scenario-based learning incorporates problem-based learning whilst encouraging students to collaborate with their colleagues and dynamically adapt to their environment. This increased interaction stimulates a deeper understanding and the generation of new knowledge. The Victorian Space Science Education Centre (VSSEC) uses scenario-based learning in its Mission to Mars, Mission to the Orbiting Space Laboratory and Primary Expedition to the M.A.R.S. Base programs. These programs utilize methodologies such as hands-on applications, immersive-learning, integrated technologies, critical thinking and mentoring to engage students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) and highlight potential career paths in science and engineering. The immersive nature of the programs demands specialist environments such as a simulated Mars environment, Mission Control and Space Laboratory, thus restricting these programs to a physical location and limiting student access to the programs. To move beyond these limitations, VSSEC worked with its university partners to develop a web-based mission that delivered the benefits of scenario-based learning within a school environment. The Robotic Mission to Mars allows students to remotely control a real rover, developed by the Australian Centre for Field Robotics (ACFR), on the VSSEC Mars surface. After completing a pre-mission training program and site selection activity, students take on the roles of scientists and engineers in Mission Control to complete a mission and collect data for further analysis. Mission Control is established using software developed by the ACRI Games Technology Lab at La Trobe University using the principles of serious gaming. The software allows students to control the rover, monitor its systems and collect scientific data for analysis. This program encourages

  12. Introduction to engineering a starter's guide with hands-on analog multimedia explorations

    CERN Document Server

    Karam, Lina

    2008-01-01

    This lecture provides a hands-on glimpse of the field of electrical engineering. The introduced applications utilize the NI ELVIS hardware and software platform to explore concepts such as circuits, power, analog sensing, and introductory analog signal processing such as signal generation, analog filtering, and audio and music processing. These principals and technologies are introduced in a very practical way and are fundamental to many of the electronic devices we use today. Some examples include photodetection, analog signal (audio, light, temperature) level meter, and analog music equalize

  13. Active magnetic regenerator refrigeration with rotary multi-bed technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Dan

    Magnetic refrigeration is an emerging cooling technology with potential ad- vantages over conventional vapor compression, the most important being higher efficiency. This thesis presents experimental and theoretical research into the possibilities of realizing this potential with actual active...... with a thermal storage is introduced and demonstrated experimentally. Furthermore, a novel shunt valve technology, which was developed as a spin-off from the magnetic refrigeration research, is presented....

  14. An Activity Systems Theory Approach to Agent Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Peng; Bai, Guohua

    2005-01-01

    In the last decade, Activity Theory has been discussed a lot in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Activity Theory was used both theoretically as an analytical method and practically as a development framework for Information Systems. Meanwhile, there is a new trench from Artificial Intelligence. Artificial Intelligence researchers find that the fruit from Activity Theory study may contribute, especially to Agent Technology, with socio-psychologic...

  15. Discovering SQL A Hands-On Guide for Beginners

    CERN Document Server

    Kriegel, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Teaching the SQL skills that businesses demand when hiring programmers If you're a SQL beginner, you don't just want to learn SQL basics, you also want to get some practical SQL skills you can use in the job market. This book gives you both. Covering the basics through intermediate topics with clear explanations, hands-on exercises, and helpful solutions, this book is the perfect introduction to SQL. Topics include both the current SQL:2008 standards, the upcoming SQL:2011 standards, and also how to use SQL against current releases of the most popular commercial SQL databases, such as Oracle,

  16. Automated entry technologies for confined space work activities: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Lucia; Ferrari, Emilio; Mora, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    Work in confined spaces poses a significant risk to workers and rescuers involved in the emergency response when an accident occurs. Despite several standards and regulations define the safety requirements for such activities, injuries, and fatalities still occur. Furthermore, the on-site inspections after accidents often reveal that both employers and employees fail to implement safe entry procedures. Removing the risk is possible by avoiding the worker entry, but many activities require the presence of the operator inside the confined space to perform manual tasks. The following study investigates the available technologies for hazardous confined space work activities, e.g., cleaning, inspecting, and maintenance tasks. The aim is to provide a systematic review of the automated solutions for high-risk activities in confined spaces, considering the non-man entry as the most effective confined space safety strategy. Second, this survey aims to provide suggestions for future research addressing the design of new technologies. The survey consists of about 60 papers concerning innovative technologies for confined space work activities. The document review shows that several solutions have been developed and automation can replace the workers for a limited number of hazardous tasks. Several activities still require the manual intervention due to the complex characteristics of confined spaces, e.g., to remove the remains of the automatic cleaning process from the bottom of a tank. The results show that available technologies require more flexibility to adapt to such occupational environments and further research is needed.

  17. Using the Hands-On Optics ``Terrific Telescopes'' Kit in the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.; Sparks, R. T.

    2008-06-01

    Hands-On Optics (HOO) is a collaborative four-year program to create and sustain a unique, national, informal science education program to excite students about science by actively engaging them in optics activities. The standards based activities and demonstrations have been successfully used in a variety of settings including formal classrooms, after school clubs, and science centers. One of the themes for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) is "Looking Through a Telescope". We intend to use HOO activities in conjunction with the IYA to reinforce this important area. In this workshop, participants completed a series of activities involving refraction, lenses, telescopes, and ultraviolet light and took home a kit containing all the materials required to do the activities with a small group of students. Participants explored the basic properties of positive lenses to create images through the use of hands-on activities, exciting experiments, and educator-lead demonstrations, culminating with the building of a small refracting telescope. Several prototype telescopes were examined in the workshop for use in the International Year of Astronomy.

  18. Hands-On Parenting May Curb Teen Drug Use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭小菲

    2001-01-01

    我的儿子10多岁了,因为工作紧张,丈夫又常年在外,我们基本上是属于Hand-off parent。在网上读到此文,不禁心里一跳!父母对子女是handoff,还是hand on,对孩子的影响实在太大了!本文堪称儿童心理研究的佳作!虽然我们的孩子还没有美国青少年所面临的吸毒问题,但是,影响孩子健康成长的问题并不少!初读此文,我曾经为文中反复出现的substance abuse所烦,词典也帮不了忙,后来反复读了两遍,我便确信,文中的substance abuse就是druguse,就是marijuana use。读者朋友,你是否认为这是一种新的euphemism呢?此外,hand-off parent和hand-on parent用得何等简洁明了!我试将它们直译成“放手”/“不放手”父母,不知是否能得到读者的认可。

  19. Developing an Innovative and Creative Hands-on Lean Six Sigma Manufacturing Experiments for Engineering Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Badawi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop an innovative and creative hands-on project based on Lean Six Sigma experiments for engineering education at the College of Engineering at the University of Hail. The exercises were designed using junction box assembly to meet the following learning outcomes: 1-to provide students with solid experience on waste elimination and variation reduction and 2-to engage students in exercises related to assembly line mass production and motion study. To achieve these objectives, students were introduced to the principles of Lean manufacturing and Six Sigma through various pedagogical activities such as classroom instruction, laboratory experiments, hands-on exercises, and interactive group work. In addition, Minitab 17 statistical package and Quality Companion 3 software were used to facilitate The Lean Six Sigma exercises. The software application and hands-on manufacturing assembly were found to be extremely valuable in giving students the chance to identify which variables to control in order to minimize variation and eliminate waste. This research was funded by a grant from the Deanship of Academic Research at University of Hail for project number E-26-IC, and under the umbrella of Ministry of Education within the framework of the National Initiative on Creativity and Innovation in Saudi Universities at University of Hail.

  20. Getting Their Hands Dirty: Qualitative Study on Hands-on Learning for Architectural Students in Design-build Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunaibi B. Abdullah

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study provides an in-depth perspective of hands-on learning through the observation and analysis of architectural students' views in a design-build program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln during the fall semester of 2008. Qualitative data was gathered from 14 participants involved in the construction of a low energy double-storey house in the city of Lincoln, Nebraska. The study inventoried the requisite characteristics of a design-build course. Participants' views and activities were studied to ascribe the qualitative benefits of hands-on learning. In addition, students' motivation towards hands-on activities were evaluated in reference to student confidence and independence levels towards their future career as architects, designers or other design-build professionals. The findings showed the design-build course could offer a specific knowledge that link between theoretical subjects and the practical expect of building contractions.

  1. Reasoning about tasks, activities and technology to support collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, L A; Monk, A F

    1998-11-01

    An aspect of collaboration described as 'semi-synchronized activity' is discussed as a particular challenge for the task analysis (TA) of collaborative work. TA typically involves the decomposition of work systems into essentially independent component processes between which commodities (information or materials) pass. In collaborative work, people routinely violate the condition of independence by moving seemlessly in and out of synchronization with one another, allowing for both independent and varying levels of conjoint activity. The shift between joint and independent projects is not fixed but managed through more or less explicit awareness of the other people over time. A number of case studies of the effect of communication technologies in telemedical consultation are drawn upon to illustrate the relationship between awareness and synchronization in collaborative work. They show that an analysis of collaborative activity requires a consideration of: (1) the activities constituting work; (2) the interactions between participants required to carry out the activities; (3) who else has access to these activities besides the primary participants in the ongoing work; (4) the contemporaneity of activities; (5) the locations/environments in which the activities are carried out; and (6) the constraints that apply to accessibility and participation within and between these environments. The Comms Usage Diagram is described as a framing notation incorporating these characteristics for a broad, communications-level analysis of collaborative activity. It shows how particular technologies relate to particular phases of work, indexing their effects to collaborative activities in those contexts.

  2. A status of the Turbine Technology Team activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Lisa W.

    1992-01-01

    The recent activities of the Turbine Technology Team of the Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology is presented. The team consists of members from the government, industry, and universities. The goal of this team is to demonstrate the benefits to the turbine design process attainable through the application of CFD. This goal is to be achieved by enhancing and validating turbine design tools for improved loading and flowfield definition and loss prediction, and transferring the advanced technology to the turbine design process. In order to demonstrate the advantages of using CFD early in the design phase, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) turbines for the National Launch System (NLS) were chosen on which to focus the team's efforts. The Turbine Team activities run parallel to the STME design work.

  3. Integrating Physical Activity Data Technologies into Elementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victor R.; Thomas, Jonathan M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes an iteration of a design-based research project that involved integrating commercial physical activity data (PAD) sensors, such as heart rate monitors and pedometers, as technologies that could be used in two fifth grade classrooms. By working in partnership with two participating teachers and seeking out immediate resources…

  4. The technology - activities of daily living questionnaire: a version with a technology-related subscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Neira, Carlos; López, Oscar L; Riveros, Rodrigo; Núñez-Huasaf, Javier; Flores, Patricia; Slachevsky, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has become an increasingly important part of daily life. The ability to use technology is becoming essential for autonomous functioning in society. Current functional scales for patients with cognitive impairment do not evaluate the use of technology. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a new version of the Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADLQ) that incorporates an ICT subscale. A new technology-based subscale was incorporated into the Spanish version of the ADLQ (SV-ADLQ), entitled the Technology version of the ADLQ (T-ADLQ). The T-ADLQ was administered to 63 caregivers of dementia patients, 21 proxies of mild cognitive impairment patients and 44 proxies of normal elderly subjects (mean age of the sample ± SD: 73.5 ± 8.30 years). We analysed the convergent validity, internal consistency, reliability cut-off point, sensitivity and specificity of the T-ADLQ. The results of the T-ADLQ were compared to the SV-ADLQ. The T-ADLQ showed significant correlations with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB) as well as other measures of functional impairment and dementia severity (MMSE: r = -0.70; FAB: r = -0.65; Functional Assessment Questionnaire: r = 0.77; Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale: r = -0.75; Clinical Dementia Rating Scale: r = 0.72; p technology items in the T-ADLQ did not improve the performance of the scale, which may reflect the lack of widespread use of technology by elderly individuals. Thus, although it appeared reasonable to add technology use questions to the ADLQ, our experience suggested that this has to be done cautiously, since the sensitivity of these additional items could vary in different populations. The T-ADLQ needs to be validated in a different population of dementia subjects. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Active noise control technology. Active soon seigyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eguchi, M.; Kokubo, F.; Tanaka, S.; Yao, K. (Sharp Corp., Osaka (Japan))

    1994-05-10

    The signal processing method of the Active Noise Control (ANC) system was studied. The principle of ANC is to output secondary sound waves having opposite phase, identical amplitude from the control point of the sound wave of the primary sound source, and eliminate the noise by interference. As application fields, there are air conditioner ducts and compressors as one dimensional noise source, and automobile and axial fan as three dimensional noise source. In order to improve the stability of coefficient renewal algorithm of Adaptive Digital Filter (ADF), for generation of opposite phase noise, DC-LMS algorithm which can control the rise in gain of specified frequency zone was proposed. Furthermore, with the purpose of reducing the amount of operation, the introduction of lattice type AR filter was tested for the stability of the filter in IIR-ADF (Infinite Impulse Response Adaptive Digital Filter) and its application process. The applicability studies of these improved methods on the noise inside of ducts were actually measured, and the effect was verified. For the multi-channel control of 3 dimensional noise source, reference scanning method to reduce the filter operation was proposed. In the partial space noise eliminating experiment, it was made clear that it possesses equivalent effect to error scanning method. 11 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Geneva University: Experiments in Physics: Hands-on Creative Processes

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92   Lundi 3 octobre 2011, 17h00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg «Experiments in Physics : Hands-on Creative Processes» Prof. Manfred Euler Leibniz-Institute for Mathematics and Science Education (IPN) University of Kiel, Deutschland Experiments play a variety of different roles in knowledge generation. The lecture will focus on the function of experiments as engines of intuition that foster insights into complex processes. The experimental presentations consider self-organization phenomena in various domains that range from the nanomechanics of biomolecules to perception and cognition. The inherent universality contributes to elucidating the enigmatic phenomenon of creativity. Une verrée en compagnie du conférencier sera offerte après le colloque.       &...

  7. Becoming Familiar with other Disciplines Through Hands-on Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Transitioning to a new discipline can be challenging because of the need to quickly assimilate new skills and knowledge that others brought up in the field took years to develop. While reading and taking classes help to add knowledge, hands-on experience is key to developing your new skill set. Fieldwork is one obvious way to gain experience. Fieldwork provides intimate knowledge of your new found discipline, which is one component of your skill set. However, fieldwork is normally for a short period of time and very focused, which does not quickly provide the second component of your skill set, that is, insight into how your discipline fits in the big picture of solving problems. Academic workshops and internships can help provide the additional experience to bring any young researcher into this higher level of understanding. As a specific example, I'll talk about a summer workshop I recently attended called CIDER (Cooperative Institute for Dynamic Earth Research), which is open for students to apply for every year. This workshop provided the opportunity to learn a working knowledge of other disciplines in geology, and helped to expand my view of geophysics' place in solving real problems. The workshop is a month long, the first two weeks of which were lectures and tutorials of every discipline represented. The second two weeks consisted of new research on projects that were proposed by the attendees. The attendees select which of those projects to participate in, and join a team to work vigorously for two weeks. Teams may continue work after the CIDER workshop for presentations at AGU (as in my case) and has potential for publication later. Why this workshop succeeds in advancing young researchers' understanding is that different disciplines work side by side on their research project. Students need to be made aware of this workshop, and other workshops and internships like it, to provide this added hands-on experience.

  8. The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI): Science Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Niu, A; Haubold, H J; Doi, T

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI) aims at promoting international cooperation in human spaceflight and space exploration-related activities; creating awareness among countries on the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications; and building capacity in microgravity education and research. HSTI has been conducting various scientific activities to promote microgravity education and research. The primary science activity is called 'Zero-gravity Instrument Distribution Project', in which one-axis clinostats will be distributed worldwide. The distribution project will provide unique opportunities for students and researchers to observe the growth of indigenous plants in their countries in a simulated microgravity condition and is expected to create a huge dataset of plant species with their responses to gravity.

  9. The activities of HPPA technology related to ADS in China

    CERN Document Server

    Guan Xia Ling; Ding Da Zhao; Fang Jia Xun; Fang Shou Xian; Fu Shin Ian; Guo, Z Y; Jiang Wei; Li Jie Quan; Luo Zi Hua; Ouyang Hua Fu; Peng Chao Hua; Xu Tao Guang; Xu Wen Wu; Yu Qi; Zhang Zong Hua; Zhao Sheng Chu

    2001-01-01

    High Power Proton Accelerator (HPPA) is being studied all over world for numerous applications, which includes the waste transmutation, spallation neutron source and material irradiation facilities. In China, a multi-purpose verification system as a first phase of Chinese ADS program consists of a low energy accelerator (150 MeV/3 mA proton linac) and a swimming pool light water sub-critical reactor. The activities of HPPA technology related to ADS in China, which includes the intense proton ECR source, the RFQ accelerator and some other technology of HPPA, are described

  10. Designing Technology for Active Spectator Experiences at Sporting Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veerasawmy, Rune; Ludvigsen, Martin

    2010-01-01

    behaviour in the context. The work presented also argues for a need to overcome the inclination to designing technological systems that imitate or compete with the experience of watching the television broadcast of the game. Experiments such as the presented BannerBattle are cornerstones in our exploratory......This paper explores the active spectator experience at sporting events, by presenting and reflecting upon a design experiment carried out at a number of football1 events. The initial hypothesis of the design process, leading to the design experiment has been that the spectator experience...... research-through-design approach to designing technologies for social experiences....

  11. The impact of a hands-on approach to learning visible spectrometry upon students' performance, motivation, and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtacnik, Margareta; Gros, Natasa

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of introducing visible spectrometry concepts through hands-on laboratory work upon student learning within four vocational programs are discussed. All together, 118 students, average 18.6 years old, participated in the study. The results showed no correlation between students' motivational components (intrinsic, regulated, and controlled), chemistry self-concept and their achievement on an experiential knowledge test and knowledge gained from this hands-on approach. Statistically significant differences were found for academic achievement among students in a biotechnology technical program (School 1), food processing program (School 2), laboratory biomedicine program (School 3), and a biotechnology general program (School 4). Differences in academic achievement are further reflected in students' perception of particular knowledge gained through their hands-on experiences and in their expressed attitude toward different didactical characteristics. All students, regardless of their study program, highly evaluated the relaxed atmosphere that contributed to their self-confidence in completing their laboratory activities.

  12. IN SITU REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS - ACTIVE CAPPING TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, A.; Roberts, J.; Paller, M.; Reible, D.

    2010-09-02

    Active capping is a relatively new approach for treating contaminated sediments. It involves applying chemically reactive amendments to the sediment surface. The main role of active caps is to stabilize contaminants in contaminated sediments, lower the bioavailable pool of contaminants, and reduce the release of contaminants to the water column. Metals are common contaminants in many marine and fresh water environments as a result of industrial and military activities. The mobile, soluble forms of metals are generally considered toxic. Induced chemical precipitation of these metals can shift toxic metals from the aqueous phase to a solid, precipitated phase which is often less bioavailable. This approach can be achieved through application of sequestering agents such as rock phosphates, organoclays, zeolites, clay minerals, and biopolymers (e.g., chitosan) in active capping technology. Active capping holds great potential for a more permanent solution that avoids residual risks resulting from contaminant migration through the cap or breaching of the cap. In addition to identifying superior active capping agents, research is needed to optimize application techniques, application rates, and amendment combinations that maximize sequestration of contaminants. A selected set of active capping treatment technologies has been demonstrated at a few sites, including a field demonstration at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC. This demonstration has provided useful information on the effects of sequestering agents on metal immobilization, bioavailability, toxicity, and resistance to mechanical disturbance.

  13. [The NAS system: Nursing Activities Score in mobile technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Silveira, Denise Tolfo; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado; Borges, Gilberto Cabral de Mello

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to present the computerized structure that enables the use of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) in mobile technology. It is a project for the development of technology production based on software engineering, founded on the theory of systems development life cycle. The NAS system was built in two modules: the search module, which is accessed using a personal computer (PC), and Data Collection module, which is accessed through a mobile device (Smartphone). The NAS system was constructed to allow other forms, in addition to the NAS tool, to be included in the future. Thus, it is understood that the development of the NAS will bring nurses closer to mobile technology and facilitate their accessibility to the data of the instrument relating to patients, thus assisting in decision-making and in staffing to provide nursing care.

  14. From Maxwell to Millikan: A Little History and a Little Hands-on with the Photoelectric Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipps, John

    1993-01-01

    Provides an historical chronology of events related to understanding the photoelectric effect. Focuses on the early history, the mystery of the photoelectric effect, the contributions of Albert Einstein and Robert Millikan to the field, and hands-on activities that demonstrate the phenomenon to students. (DDR)

  15. Enhancing the Connection to Undergraduate Engineering Students: A Hands-On and Team-Based Approach to Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tie; Ford, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the integration of innovative hands-on activities within a sophomore-level Fluid Mechanics course at New Mexico Tech. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with emphasis on teaching key equations and methods of analysis for solving real-world problems. Strategies and examples…

  16. A Study on Using Hands-On Science Inquiries to Promote the Geology Learning of Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-San

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the geology learning performance of preservice teachers. A total of 31 sophomores (including 11 preservice teachers) from an educational university in Taiwan participated in this study. The course arrangements include class teaching and hands-on science inquiry activities. The study searches both quantitative and…

  17. Introducing Chemical Reactions Concepts in K-6 through a Hands-On Food Spherification and Spaghetti-Fication Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anju; Hill, Nicole; Valenzuela, Patricia; Johnson, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Recruiting students in STEM majors to fill the gap in STEM workforce is a continued challenge, which can be addressed by introducing scientific principles through hand-on activities to the students at an early stage. This paper presents the design, implementation and assessment of a chemistry-related workshop for sixth grade students that were…

  18. Enhancing the Connection to Undergraduate Engineering Students: A Hands-On and Team-Based Approach to Fluid Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tie; Ford, Julie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides information about the integration of innovative hands-on activities within a sophomore-level Fluid Mechanics course at New Mexico Tech. The course introduces students to the fundamentals of fluid mechanics with emphasis on teaching key equations and methods of analysis for solving real-world problems. Strategies and examples…

  19. Development of a Hands-On Survey Course in the Physics of Living Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Megan; Goldman, Daniel I.

    Due to the widespread availability and technological capabilities of modern smartphones, many biophysical systems can be investigated using easily accessible, low-cost, and/or ``homemade'' equipment. Our survey course is structured to provide students with an overview of research in the physics of living systems, emphasizing the interplay between measurement, mechanism, and modeling required to understand principles at the intersection of physics and biology. The course proceeds through seven modules each consisting of one week of lectures and one week of hands-on experiments, called ``microlabs''. Using smartphones, Arduinos, and 3D printed materials students create their own laboratory equipment, including a 150X van Leeuwenhoek microscope, a shaking incubator, and an oscilloscope, and then use them to study biological systems ranging in length scales from nanometers to meters. These systems include population dynamics of rotifer/algae cultures, experimental evolution of multicellularity in budding yeast, and the bio- & neuromechanics involved in animal locomotion, among others. In each module, students are introduced to fundamental biological and physical concepts as well as theoretical and computational tools (nonlinear dynamics, molecular dynamics simulation, and statistical mechanics). At the end of the course, students apply these concepts and tools to the creation of their own microlab that integrates hands-on experimentation and modeling in the study of their chosen biophysical system.

  20. Dynamic positioning system based on active disturbance rejection technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhengling; Guo, Chen; Fan, Yunsheng

    2015-08-01

    A dynamically positioned vessel, by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the certifying class societies (DNV, ABS, LR, etc.), is defined as a vessel that maintains its position and heading (fixed location or pre-determined track) exclusively by means of active thrusters. The development of control technology promotes the upgrading of dynamic positioning (DP) systems. Today there are two different DP systems solutions available on the market: DP system based on PID regulator and that based on model-based control. Both systems have limited disturbance rejection capability due to their design principle. In this paper, a new DP system solution is proposed based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) technology. This technology is composed of Tracking-Differentiator (TD), Extended State Observer (ESO) and Nonlinear Feedback Combination. On one hand, both TD and ESO can act as filters and can be used in place of conventional filters; on the other hand, the total disturbance of the system can be estimated and compensated by ESO, which therefore enhances the system's disturbance rejection capability. This technology's advantages over other methods lie in two aspects: 1) This method itself can not only achieve control objectives but also filter noisy measurements without other specialized filters; 2) This method offers a new useful approach to suppress the ocean disturbance. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  1. The effect of inquiry-based, hands-on labs on achievement in middle school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Donna Kaye Green

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to measure the difference in science achievement between students who had been taught with an inquiry-based, hands-on pedagogical approach and those who had not. Improving student academic achievement and standardized test scores is the major objective of teachers, parents, school administrators, government entities, and students themselves. One major barrier to this academic success in Georgia, and the entire United States, has been the paucity of success in middle level science classes. Many studies have been conducted to determine the learning approaches that will best enable students to not only acquire a deeper understanding of science concepts, but to equip them to apply that new knowledge in their daily activities. Inquiry-based, hands-on learning involves students participating in activities that reflect methods of scientific investigation. The effective utilization of the inquiry-based learning approach demands inclusion of learners in a self-directed learning environment, the ability to think critically, and an understanding of how to reflect and reason scientifically. The treatment group using an inquiry-based, hands-on program did score slightly higher on the CRCT. However, the results revealed that there was not a significant difference in student achievement. This study showed that the traditionally instructed control group had slightly higher interest in science than the inquiry-based treatment group. The findings of this research study indicated that the NCLB mandates might need to be altered if there are no significant academic gains that result from the use of inquiry-based strategies.

  2. Hands-on Physics Education of Residents in Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Hardy, Peter A; DiSantis, David J; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2017-06-01

    The American Board of Radiology Core Examination integrates assessment of physics knowledge into its overall testing of clinical radiology, with an emphasis on understanding image quality and artifacts, radiation dose, and patient safety for each modality or subspecialty organ system. Accordingly, achieving a holistic approach to physics education of radiology residents is a huge challenge. The traditional teaching of radiological physics-simply through didactic lectures-was not designed for such a holistic approach. Admittedly, time constraints and clinical demands can make incorporation of physics teaching into clinical practice problematic. We created and implemented a week-long, intensive physics rotation for fledgling radiology residents and evaluated its effectiveness. The dedicated physics rotation is held for 1 week during the first month of radiology residency. It comprises three components: introductory lectures, hands-on practical clinical physics operations, and observation of clinical image production. A brief introduction of the physics pertinent to each modality is given at the beginning of each session. Hands-on experimental demonstrations are emphasized, receiving the greatest allotment of time. The residents perform experiments such as measuring radiation dose, studying the relationship between patient dose and clinical practice (eg, fluoroscopy technique), investigating the influence of acquisition parameters (kV, mAs) on radiographs, and evaluating image quality using computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound, and gamma camera/single-photon emission computed tomography/positron emission tomography phantoms. Quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of the rotation is based on an examination that tests the residents' grasp of basic medical physics concepts along with written course evaluations provided by each resident. The pre- and post-rotation tests show that after the physics rotation, the average correct score of 25

  3. The 'Technology - Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire': a version with a technology-related subscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Neira, Carlos; López, Oscar L.; Riveros, Rodrigo; Nuñez-Huasaf, Javier; Flores, Patricia; Slachevsky, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background Information and communication technology (ICT) has become an increasingly important part of daily life. The ability to use technology is becoming essential for autonomous functioning in society. Current functional scales for patients with cognitive impairment do not evaluate the use of technology. The objective of this study was to develop and validate a new version of the Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADLQ) that incorporates an ICT subscale. Method A new technology-based subscale was incorporated into the Spanish Version of the ADLQ (SV-ADLQ), entitled The Technology Version of the ADLQ (T-ADLQ). The T-ADLQ was administered to 63 caregivers of dementia patients, 21 proxies of mild cognitive impairment patients and 44 proxies of normal elderly subjects (mean age of the sample ± SD: 73.5 ± 8.30). We analysed the convergent validity, internal consistency, reliability cut-off point, sensitivity and specificity of the T-ADLQ. The results of the T-ADLQ were compared to the SV-ADLQ. Results The T-ADLQ showed significant correlations with the Mini-mental Test (MMSE), the Frontal Assesment Battery (FAB) as well as other measures of functional impairment and dementia severity (MMSE: r = −0.70; FAB: r = −0.65; Functional Assessment Questionnaire: r = 0.77; Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale: r = −0.75; Clinical Dementia Rating Scale: r = 0.72; p<0.001). The T-ADLQ showed a good reliability with a relatively high Cronbach’s alpha coefficient (Cronbach’s alpha = 0.861). When considering a functional impairment cut-off point greater than 29.25%, the sensitivity and specificity of the T-ADLQ were 82% and 90%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) was 0.937 for the T-ADLQ and 0.932 for the original version of the test. Conclusions The T-ADLQ revealed adequate indicators of validity and reliability for the functional assessment of activities of daily living in dementia patients. However, the inclusion of technology items in

  4. [Studies on purgative activity of rhubarb extracts by different technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhihua; Zhu, Chenchen; Gui, Shuhua; Lin, Chaozhan

    2002-08-01

    To study on purgative activity of rhubarb extracts by solvent extraction, SFE-CO2 and SFE-CO2 & residue resin purification. The effects of the extracts by the three technologies on creepage of mouse small intestine and rat large intestine were studied by injecting charcoal ink into the intestines. And the volume of the mouse small intestine was observed. The effects of the extracts were also studied on water absorption of mouse small intestine and large intestine by weighing the intestines. The purgative activity of the extracts by the three technologies was SFE-CO2 & residue resin purification > solvent extraction > SFE-CO2. Extracting different polar components separately might get a good result.

  5. Designing Technology for Active Spectator Experiences at Sporting Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veerasawmy, Rune; Ludvigsen, Martin

    is not merely an experience of receiving and consuming entertainment. It is also heavily reliant on the active participation of the spectator in creating the atmosphere of the entire event. The BannerBattle experiment provides interactive technology in sport arenas with a form of interaction based on existing......This paper explores the active spectator experience at sporting events, by presenting and reflecting upon a design experiment carried out at a number of football1 events. The initial hypothesis of the design process, leading to the design experiment has been that the spectator experience...... behaviour in the context. The work presented also argues for a need to overcome the inclination to designing technological systems that imitate or compete with the experience of watching the television broadcast of the game. Experiments such as the presented BannerBattle are cornerstones in our exploratory...

  6. Active magnetic radiation shielding system analysis and key technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, S A; Blattnig, S R; Singleterry, R C; Westover, S C

    2015-01-01

    Many active magnetic shielding designs have been proposed in order to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on long duration, deep space missions. While these designs are promising, they pose significant engineering challenges. This work presents a survey of the major systems required for such unconfined magnetic field design, allowing the identification of key technologies for future development. Basic mass calculations are developed for each system and are used to determine the resulting galactic cosmic radiation exposure for a generic solenoid design, using a range of magnetic field strength and thickness values, allowing some of the basic characteristics of such a design to be observed. This study focuses on a solenoid shaped, active magnetic shield design; however, many of the principles discussed are applicable regardless of the exact design configuration, particularly the key technologies cited.

  7. Joint research center activity in thermonuclear fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.; Rocco, P. (Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre)

    1984-04-01

    A review of the activities in progress in the field of thermonuclear fusion technology at the Joint Research Centre of the European Communities is presented. The research areas are: (I) reactor studies, including conceptual design studies of experimental Tokamak reactors (INTOR/NET) and safety analyses; (II) experimental investigation on first wall and blanket materials and components. Emphasis has been given to those topics which are not reported in detail in the following articles of the issue.

  8. Process technology activities at the Software Engineering Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christie, A.M. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper provides a brief overview of the rationale for, and direction of the software process technology work being pursued at the Software Engineering Institute. The paper then describes some of the activities that the SEI has recently been involved in. Finally, it relates in more detail an example of one specific effort; namely the development of a process modeling formalism and its use in process simulation.

  9. Characteristics of Hands-On Simulations with Added Value for Innovative Secondary and Higher Vocational Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Anne; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; van der Wel, Marjan; Mulder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The intentions with which hands-on simulations are used in vocational education are not always clear. Also, pedagogical-didactic approaches in hands-on simulations are not well conceptualised from a learning theory perspective. This makes it difficult to pinpoint the added value that hands-on simulations can have in an innovative vocational…

  10. Characteristics of hands-on simulations with added value for innovative secondary and higher vocational education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaled, A.E.; Gulikers, J.T.M.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Wel, van der M.; Mulder, M.

    2014-01-01

    The intentions with which hands-on simulations are used in vocational education are not always clear. Also, pedagogical-didactic approaches in hands-on simulations are not well conceptualised from a learning theory perspective. This makes it difficult to pinpoint the added value that hands-on simula

  11. An Educational Model for Hands-On Hydrology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    AghaKouchak, A.; Nakhjiri, N.; Habib, E. H.

    2014-12-01

    This presentation provides an overview of a hands-on modeling tool developed for students in civil engineering and earth science disciplines to help them learn the fundamentals of hydrologic processes, model calibration, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty assessment, and practice conceptual thinking in solving engineering problems. The toolbox includes two simplified hydrologic models, namely HBV-EDU and HBV-Ensemble, designed as a complement to theoretical hydrology lectures. The models provide an interdisciplinary application-oriented learning environment that introduces the hydrologic phenomena through the use of a simplified conceptual hydrologic model. The toolbox can be used for in-class lab practices and homework assignments, and assessment of students' understanding of hydrological processes. Using this modeling toolbox, students can gain more insights into how hydrological processes (e.g., precipitation, snowmelt and snow accumulation, soil moisture, evapotranspiration and runoff generation) are interconnected. The educational toolbox includes a MATLAB Graphical User Interface (GUI) and an ensemble simulation scheme that can be used for teaching more advanced topics including uncertainty analysis, and ensemble simulation. Both models have been administered in a class for both in-class instruction and a final project, and students submitted their feedback about the toolbox. The results indicate that this educational software had a positive impact on students understanding and knowledge of hydrology.

  12. Impact of active controls technology on structural integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Thomas; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the findings of The Technical Cooperation Program to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting the loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle. The potential for active controls to adversely affect structural integrity is described, and load predictions obtained using two state-of-the-art analytical methods are given.

  13. Kids Making Sense of Air Quality Around Them Through a Hands-On, STEM-Based Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, T.

    2015-12-01

    Air pollution in many parts of the world is harming millions of people, shortening lives, and taking a toll on our ecosystem. Cities in India, China, and even the United States frequently exceed air quality standards. The use of localized data is a powerful enhancement to regulatory monitoring site data. Learning about air quality at a local level is a powerful driver for change. The Kids Making Sense program unites Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education with a complete measurement and environmental education system that teaches youth about air pollution and empowers them to drive positive change in their communities. With this program, youth learn about particle pollution, its sources, and health effects. A half-day lecture is followed by hands-on activity using handheld air sensors paired with an app on smartphones. Students make measurements around schools to discover pollution sources and cleaner areas. Next, the data they collect are crowdsourced on a website for guided discussion and data interpretation. This program meets Next Generation Science Standards, encourages project-based learning and deep understanding of applied science, and allows students to practice science like real scientists. The program has been successfully implemented in several schools in the United States and Asia, including New York City, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Sacramento in the United States, and Taipei and Taichung in Taiwan. During this talk, we'll provide an overview of the program, discuss some of the challenges, and lay out the next steps for Kids Making Sense.

  14. Hands-On Universe A Global Program for Education and Public Outreach in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Boër, M; Pennypacker, C; Melchior, A L; Faye, S; Ebisuzaki, T

    2001-01-01

    Hands-On Universe (HOU) is an educational program that enables students to investigate the Universe while applying tools and concepts from science, math, and technology. Using the Internet, HOU participants around the world request observations from an automated telescope, download images from a large image archive, and analyze them with the aid of user-friendly image processing software. This program is developing now in many countries, including the USA, France, Germany, Sweden, Japan, Australia, and others. A network of telescopes has been established among these countries, many of them remotely operated, as shown in the accompanying demo. Using this feature, students in the classroom are able to make night observations during the day, using a telescope placed in another country. An archive of images taken on large telescopes is also accessible, as well as resources for teachers. Students are also dealing with real research projects, e.g. the search for asteroids, which resulted in the discovery of a Kuipe...

  15. Teachers' Perspectives on Online Virtual Labs vs. Hands-On Labs in High School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Teresa M.

    This study of online science teachers' opinions addressed the use of virtual labs in online courses. A growing number of schools use virtual labs that must meet mandated laboratory standards to ensure they provide learning experiences comparable to hands-on labs, which are an integral part of science curricula. The purpose of this qualitative case study was to examine teachers' perceptions of the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs. The theoretical foundation was constructivism, as labs provide student-centered activities for problem solving, inquiry, and exploration of phenomena. The research questions focused on experienced teachers' perceptions of the quality of virtual vs. hands-on labs. Data were collected through survey questions derived from the lab objectives of The Next Generation Science Standards . Eighteen teachers rated the degree of importance of each objective and also rated how they felt virtual labs met these objectives; these ratings were reported using descriptive statistics. Responses to open-ended questions were few and served to illustrate the numerical results. Many teachers stated that virtual labs are valuable supplements but could not completely replace hands-on experiences. Studies on the quality and effectiveness of high school virtual labs are limited despite widespread use. Comprehensive studies will ensure that online students have equal access to quality labs. School districts need to define lab requirements, and colleges need to specify the lab experience they require. This study has potential to inspire positive social change by assisting science educators, including those in the local school district, in evaluating and selecting courseware designed to promote higher order thinking skills, real-world problem solving, and development of strong inquiry skills, thereby improving science instruction for all high school students.

  16. Hands-on-Entropy, Energy Balance with Biological Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Entropy changes underlie the physics that dominates biological interactions. Indeed, introductory biology courses often begin with an exploration of the qualities of water that are important to living systems. However, one idea that is not explicitly addressed in most introductory physics or biology textbooks is important contribution of the entropy in driving fundamental biological processes towards equilibrium. From diffusion to cell-membrane formation, to electrostatic binding in protein folding, to the functioning of nerve cells, entropic effects often act to counterbalance deterministic forces such as electrostatic attraction and in so doing, allow for effective molecular signaling. A small group of biology, biophysics and computer science faculty have worked together for the past five years to develop curricular modules (based on SCALEUP pedagogy). This has enabled students to create models of stochastic and deterministic processes. Our students are first-year engineering and science students in the calculus-based physics course and they are not expected to know biology beyond the high-school level. In our class, they learn to reduce complex biological processes and structures in order model them mathematically to account for both deterministic and probabilistic processes. The students test these models in simulations and in laboratory experiments that are biologically relevant such as diffusion, ionic transport, and ligand-receptor binding. Moreover, the students confront random forces and traditional forces in problems, simulations, and in laboratory exploration throughout the year-long course as they move from traditional kinematics through thermodynamics to electrostatic interactions. This talk will present a number of these exercises, with particular focus on the hands-on experiments done by the students, and will give examples of the tangible material that our students work with throughout the two-semester sequence of their course on introductory

  17. SERS-active nanoparticle aggregate technology for tags and seals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Leif O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Velma M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Doorn, Stephen K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-06-03

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to create a modern tagging and sealing technology for international safeguards application. Our passive tagging methods are based on SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates; SERS: Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering). These SANAs offer robust spectral barcoding capability in an inexpensive tag/seal, with the possibility of rapid in-field verification that requires no human input. At INMM 2009, we introduced SANAs, and showed approaches to integrating our technology with tags under development at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Here, we will focus on recent LANL development work, as well as adding additional dimensionality to the barcoding technique. The field of international safeguards employs a broad array of tags, seals, and tamper-indicating devices to assist with identification, tracking, and verification of components and materials. These devices each have unique strengths suited to specific applications, and span a range of technologies from passive metal cup seals and adhesive seals to active, remotely monitored fiber optic seals. Regardless of the technology employed, essential characteristics center around security, environmental and temporal stability, ease of use, and the ability to provide confidence to all parties. Here, we present a new inexpensive tagging technology that will deliver these attributes, while forming the basis of either a new seal, or as a secure layer added to many existing devices. Our approach uses the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) response from SANAs (SERS-Active Nanoparticle Aggregates, Figure 1) to provide a unique identifier or signature for tagging applications. SANAs are formed from gold or silver nanoparticles in the 40-80 nm size range. A chemical dye is installed on the nanoparticle surface, and the nanoparticles are then aggregated into ensembles of {approx}100 to 500 nm diameter, prior to being coated with silica. The silica shell protects the finished SANA from

  18. Promoting Physical Activity through Hand-Held Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Abby C.; Ahn, David K.; Oliveira, Brian M.; Atienza, Audie A.; Castro, Cynthia M.; Gardner, Christopher D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Efforts to achieve population-wide increases in walking and similar moderate-intensity physical activities potentially can be enhanced through relevant applications of state-of-the-art interactive communication technologies. Yet few systematic efforts to evaluate the efficacy of hand-held computers and similar devices for enhancing physical activity levels have occurred. The purpose of this first-generation study was to evaluate the efficacy of a hand-held computer (i.e., personal digital assistant [PDA]) for increasing moderate intensity or more vigorous (MOD+) physical activity levels over 8 weeks in mid-life and older adults relative to a standard information control arm. Design Randomized, controlled 8-week experiment. Data were collected in 2005 and analyzed in 2006-2007. Setting/Participants Community-based study of 37 healthy, initially underactive adults aged 50 years and older who were randomized and completed the 8-week study (intervention=19, control=18). Intervention Participants received an instructional session and a PDA programmed to monitor their physical activity levels twice per day and provide daily and weekly individualized feedback, goal setting, and support. Controls received standard, age-appropriate written physical activity educational materials. Main Outcome Measure Physical activity was assessed via the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) questionnaire at baseline and 8 weeks. Results Relative to controls, intervention participants reported significantly greater 8-week mean estimated caloric expenditure levels and minutes per week in MOD+ activity (p<0.04). Satisfaction with the PDA was reasonably high in this largely PDA-naive sample. Conclusions Results from this first-generation study indicate that hand-held computers may be effective tools for increasing initial physical activity levels among underactive adults. PMID:18201644

  19. Promoting physical activity through hand-held computer technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Abby C; Ahn, David K; Oliveira, Brian M; Atienza, Audie A; Castro, Cynthia M; Gardner, Christopher D

    2008-02-01

    Efforts to achieve population-wide increases in walking and similar moderate-intensity physical activities potentially can be enhanced through relevant applications of state-of-the-art interactive communication technologies. Yet few systematic efforts to evaluate the efficacy of hand-held computers and similar devices for enhancing physical activity levels have occurred. The purpose of this first-generation study was to evaluate the efficacy of a hand-held computer (i.e., personal digital assistant [PDA]) for increasing moderate intensity or more vigorous (MOD+) physical activity levels over 8 weeks in mid-life and older adults relative to a standard information control arm. Randomized, controlled 8-week experiment. Data were collected in 2005 and analyzed in 2006-2007. Community-based study of 37 healthy, initially underactive adults aged 50 years and older who were randomized and completed the 8-week study (intervention=19, control=18). Participants received an instructional session and a PDA programmed to monitor their physical activity levels twice per day and provide daily and weekly individualized feedback, goal setting, and support. Controls received standard, age-appropriate written physical activity educational materials. Physical activity was assessed via the Community Healthy Activities Model Program for Seniors (CHAMPS) questionnaire at baseline and 8 weeks. Relative to controls, intervention participants reported significantly greater 8-week mean estimated caloric expenditure levels and minutes per week in MOD+ activity (pfirst-generation study indicate that hand-held computers may be effective tools for increasing initial physical activity levels among underactive adults.

  20. Active Shop Scheduling Of Production Process Based On RFID Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuihua Chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In industry 4.0 environment, intelligent technology is almost applied to all parts of the manufacturing process, such as process design, job shop scheduling, etc.. This paper presents an efficient approach to job shop scheduling actively by using RFID to collect real-time manufacturing data. Identified the workpiece by RFID which needs to be machined, it can “ask for” the resource actively for the following process. With these active asking-for strategy, a double genetically encoded improved genetic algorithm is proposed for achieving active job shop scheduling solution during the actual manufacturing process. A case was used to evaluate its effectiveness. Meanwhile, , it can effectively and actively carry out job shop scheduling and has much better convergence effect comparing with basic genetic algorithm. And the job shop scheduler in management center can use the proposed algorithm to get the satisfied scheduling result timely by reducing waiting time and making begin time earlier during transmission between manufacturing process, which makes the scheduling result feasible and accurate.

  1. CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-04

    Targeted modulation of transcription is necessary for understanding complex gene networks and has great potential for medical and industrial applications. CRISPR is emerging as a powerful system for targeted genome activation and repression, in addition to its use in genome editing. This protocol describes how to design, construct, and experimentally validate the function of sequence-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for sequence-specific repression (CRISPRi) or activation (CRISPRa) of transcription in mammalian cells. In this technology, the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is catalytically deactivated (dCas9) to provide a general platform for RNA-guided DNA targeting of any locus in the genome. Fusion of dCas9 to effector domains with distinct regulatory functions enables stable and efficient transcriptional repression or activation in mammalian cells. Delivery of multiple sgRNAs further enables activation or repression of multiple genes. By using scaffold RNAs (scRNAs), different effectors can be recruited to different genes for simultaneous activation of some and repression of others. The CRISPRi and CRISPRa methods provide powerful tools for sequence-specific control of gene expression on a genome-wide scale to aid understanding gene functions and for engineering genetic regulatory systems.

  2. The development of enabling technologies for producing active interrogation beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Morgado, Richard E.; Wang, Tai-Sen F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Vodolaga, B.; Terekhin, V. [All-Russia Scientific Research Institute of Technical Physics, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation); Onischenko, L. M.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.; Samsonov, E. V.; Vorozhtsov, A. S.; Alenitsky, Yu. G.; Perpelkin, E. E.; Glazov, A. A.; Novikov, D. L. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Vostrikov, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Av. Lavrent' ev, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Mashinin, V. A.; Fedotov, S. N.; Minayev, S. A. [Research Firm IFI, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    A U.S./Russian collaboration of accelerator scientists was directed to the development of high averaged-current ({approx}1 mA) and high-quality (emittance {approx}15 {pi}mm mrad; energy spread {approx}0.1%) 1.75 MeV proton beams to produce active interrogation beams that could be applied to counterterrorism. Several accelerator technologies were investigated. These included an electrostatic tandem accelerator of novel design, a compact cyclotron, and a storage ring with energy compensation and electron cooling. Production targets capable of withstanding the beam power levels were designed, fabricated, and tested. The cyclotron/storage-ring system was theoretically studied and computationally designed, and the electrostatic vacuum tandem accelerator at BINP was demonstrated for its potential in active interrogation of explosives and special nuclear materials.

  3. Development of HANARO Activation Analysis System and Utilization Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. S.; Moon, J. H.; Cho, H. J. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    1. Establishment of evaluation system using a data for a neutron activation analysis : Improvement of NAA measurement system and its identification, Development of combined data evaluation code of NAA/PGAA, International technical cooperation project 2. Development of technique for a industrial application of high precision gamma nuclide spectroscopic analysis : Analytical quality control, Development of industrial application techniques and its identification 3. Industrial application research for a prompt gamma-ray activation analysis : Improvement of Compton suppression counting system (PGAA), Development of applied technology using a PGAA system 4. Establishment of NAA user supporting system and KOLAS management : Development and validation of KOLAS/ISO accreditation testing and identification method, Cooperation researches for a industrial application, Establishment of integrated user analytical supporting system, Accomplishment of sample irradiation facility.

  4. Using the Hands-On Optics Terrific Telescopes Kit in the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Walker, C. E.

    2008-11-01

    The Hands-On Optics (HOO) program has developed a kit called Terrific Telescopes for use in educational outreach. Workshop participants will learn how to effectively use the activities in a variety of educational settings and will receive their own Terrific Telescopes kit. The kit focuses on activities involving refraction, lenses, image formation, and telescopes. The kit contains a laser, a variety of lenses, velum screens, and several build- your-own telescope kits. The workshop will impart the skills necessary for participants to lead activities as part of the International Year of Astronomy (IYA). Our workshop will give participants a series of activities they can use at their home institution to lead activities for the public and students where they can learn how a telescope works and build their own small telescopes. The activities we present are suitable for use in a variety of settings including museums, planetariums, schools, university outreach efforts, and astronomy club events. We will also have a variety of small telescopes on hand for participants to test. Workshop participants will evaluate the design and image quality of a variety of telescopes and compare the image quality of different eyepieces. Participants in this workshop will have an opportunity to lead further IYA activities and to receive additional kits and materials. The goal of IYA is to sites around the country to lead optics activities where people learn about light and build their own telescopes.

  5. Converging technologies and de-perimeterisation: towards risky active insulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, Wolter

    In converging technologies (Roco and Bainbridge, 2003), boundaries between previously separated technologies become permeable. A similar process is also taking place within information technology. In what is called de-perimeterisation (Jericho Forum, 2005), the boundaries of the information

  6. Converging technologies and de-perimeterisation: towards risky active insulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieters, W.

    2009-01-01

    In converging technologies (Roco and Bainbridge, 2003), boundaries between previously separated technologies become permeable. A similar process is also taking place within information technology. In what is called de-perimeterisation (Jericho Forum, 2005), the boundaries of the information infrastr

  7. Conducting Original, Hands-On Astronomical Research in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corneau, M. J.

    2009-12-01

    teachers to convey moderately complex computer science, optical, geographic, mathematical, informational and physical principles through hands-on telescope operations. In addition to the general studies aspects of classroom internet-based astronomy, Tzec Maun supports real science by enabling operators precisely point telescopes and acquire extremely faint, magnitude 19+ CCD images. Thanks to the creative Team of Photometrica (photometrica.org), my teams now have the ability to process and analyze images online and produce results in short order. Normally, astronomical data analysis packages cost greater than thousands of dollars for single license operations. Free to my team members, Photometrica allows students to upload their data to a cloud computing server and read precise photometric and/or astrometric results. I’m indebted to Michael and Geir for their support. The efficacy of student-based research is well documented. The Council on Undergraduate Research defines student research as, "an inquiry or investigation conducted by an undergraduate that makes an original intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline." (http://serc.carleton.edu/introgeo/studentresearch/What. Teaching from Tzec Maun in the classroom is the most original teaching research I can imagine. I very much look forward to presenting this program to the convened body.

  8. Maximum length sequence and Bessel diffusers using active technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Trevor J.; Avis, Mark R.; Xiao, Lejun

    2006-02-01

    Active technologies can enable room acoustic diffusers to operate over a wider bandwidth than passive devices, by extending the bass response. Active impedance control can be used to generate surface impedance distributions which cause wavefront dispersion, as opposed to the more normal absorptive or pressure-cancelling target functions. This paper details the development of two new types of active diffusers which are difficult, if not impossible, to make as passive wide-band structures. The first type is a maximum length sequence diffuser where the well depths are designed to be frequency dependent to avoid the critical frequencies present in the passive device, and so achieve performance over a finite-bandwidth. The second is a Bessel diffuser, which exploits concepts developed for transducer arrays to form a hybrid absorber-diffuser. Details of the designs are given, and measurements of scattering and impedance used to show that the active diffusers are operating correctly over a bandwidth of about 100 Hz to 1.1 kHz. Boundary element method simulation is used to show how more application-realistic arrays of these devices would behave.

  9. Interactive Learning through Hands-on Practice using Electronic Mini - Lab (EML): a Case Study

    CERN Document Server

    Dongre, Vikas J; Mankar, Vijay H

    2012-01-01

    -- In this paper, a new approach to impart practical skill based technical education is presented in comprehensive manner. An Electronic Mini-Lab (EML) is devised containing basic design and test instruments with electronic components, ICs, connecting wires and battery. Using the EML, students perform various formal and informal digital and analog circuit practicals as well as design prototype of projects. This gives them a hands-on experience, sense of belonging and sense of cooperation. The EML is useful for performing many practicals of various subjects. The EML also reduces the workload of college laboratories. Students have their own individual EML at their disposal anytime, which can be used to design hobby projects as a fun too. This will make them skilled engineers. This provides tremendous benefits in teaching learning process. It also boosted the interest, confidence of students and teachers. Incorporating active/ cooperative learning into traditional instruction can be a useful pedagogical tool to ...

  10. Performance of active vibration control technology: the ACTEX flight experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, T. W.; Manning, R. A.; Qassim, K.

    1999-12-01

    This paper discusses the development and results of two intelligent structures space-flight experiments, each of which could affect architecture designs of future spacecraft. The first, the advanced controls technology experiment I (ACTEX I), is a variable stiffness tripod structure riding as a secondary payload on a classified spacecraft. It has been operating well past its expected life since becoming operational in 1996. Over 60 on-orbit experiments have been run on the ACTEX I flight experiment. These experiments form the basis for in-space controller design problems and for concluding lifetime/reliability data on the active control components. Transfer functions taken during the life of ACTEX I have shown consistent predictability and stability in structural behavior, including consistency with those measurements taken on the ground prior to a three year storage period and the launch event. ACTEX I can change its modal characteristics by employing its dynamic change mechanism that varies preloads in portions of its structure. Active control experiments have demonstrated maximum vibration reductions of 29 dB and 16 dB in the first two variable modes of the system, while operating over a remarkable on-orbit temperature range of -80 °C to 129 °C. The second experiment, ACTEX II, was successfully designed, ground-tested, and integrated on an experimental Department of Defense satellite prior to its loss during a launch vehicle failure in 1995. ACTEX II also had variable modal behavior by virtue of a two-axis gimbal and added challenges of structural flexibility by being a large deployable appendage. Although the loss of ACTEX II did not provide space environment experience, ground testing resulted in space qualifying the hardware and demonstrated 21 dB, 14 dB, and 8 dB reductions in amplitude of the first three primary structural modes. ACTEX II could use either active and/or passive techniques to affect vibration suppression. Both experiments trailblazed

  11. Technological Innovation, R & D Activities and Innovation System Between Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Pedro Fabris

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical paper aimed to explicit, through the rescue of theoretical assumptions, the innovation, the innovation system, and the research and development (R & D activities. The innovation, especially technological innovation, is now seen as essential in differentiation strategies, competitiveness and growth in a greater number of businesses. Innovation is not only the result of financial investments by companies. For it to exist, it is necessary the existence of innovative capacity that should be present at all stages of the innovation process, and a favorable institutional environment and, increasingly, of specific incentive policies. That is, there are internal and external factors to companies and other institutions involved in the process. Innovation systems were discovered to resolve the variations in the degree of competitiveness of different economies and, above all, in relation to the technological performance and the ability to innovate these economies face the growing importance of international markets for high-tech products. Thus, it was found that successful innovators are not successful just because of their personal qualities and actions but as a result of their interaction with research and innovation systems that inhabit the quality of such systems.

  12. Passive and Active Sensing Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Richard

    A combination of passive and active sensing technologies is proposed as a structural health monitoring solution for several applications. Passive sensing is differentiated from active sensing in that with the former, no energy is intentionally imparted into the structure under test; sensors are deployed in a pure detection mode for collecting data mined for structural health monitoring purposes. In this thesis, passive sensing using embedded fiber Bragg grating optical strain gages was used to detect varying degrees of impact damage using two different classes of features drawn from traditional spectral analysis and auto-regressive time series modeling. The two feature classes were compared in detail through receiver operating curve performance analysis. The passive detection problem was then augmented with an active sensing system using ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs). This thesis considered two main challenges associated with UGW SHM including in-situ wave propagation property determination and thermal corruption of data. Regarding determination of wave propagation properties, of which dispersion characteristics are the most important, a new dispersion curve extraction method called sparse wavenumber analysis (SWA) was experimentally validated. Also, because UGWs are extremely sensitive to ambient temperature changes on the structure, it significantly affects the wave propagation properties by causing large errors in the residual error in the processing of the UGWs from an array. This thesis presented a novel method that compensates for uniform temperature change by considering the magnitude and phase of the signal separately and applying a scalable transformation.

  13. NASA'S information technology activities for the 90's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Lee; Erickson, Dan

    1991-01-01

    The Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) is completing an extensive assessment of its nearly five hundred million dollars of proposed space technology development work. The budget is divided into four segments which are as follows: (1) the base research and technology program; (2) the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI); (3) the Exploration Technology Program (ETP); and (4) the High Performance Computing Initiative (HPCI). The programs are briefly discussed in the context of Astrotech 21.

  14. Practices of Technology Parks Supporting Innovative Activities: Evidence from Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Wójcik-Karpacz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to reveal the role of technology parks (TP in the creation of new businesses and the expansion of existing ones. This issue is part of a study aimed at finding an answer to the question of whether there is a link between the creation of new businesses and the development of existing ones, and regional environment factors. The analysis is carried out through the identification of activity of TPS functioning in Poland. The results of the study may also be the starting point for the diagnosis on behaviours of TPS as environmental factors in a specific region and an indication of the desired directions of its changes. The subject undertaken by us draws attention to the fact that the management of existing competences and creating new ones could allow TPS to compete outside of their current arenas of competition.

  15. Comparison of Exams for Active Learning Technologies vs. Traditional Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornstra, Andrew; Djordjevic, Branislav; Dworzecka, Maria

    2017-01-01

    George Mason University has first semester (PHYS-160) and second semester (PHYS-260) physics course which consist of two sections. One is a traditional lecture style format (TRAD) and the other is a newer format which is a take on the ``flipped'' classroom. This newer style is referred to as Active Learning with Technologies (ALT). This course style has been in place for several years and has been studied before within George Mason University for final grade differences. These studies suggested that the ALT sections performed better, but grade weighting consistency, test time, and test content were not strictly controlled. The purpose of this study is to cross-examine the performance of students in these different class formats during Fall 2016 (PHYS-260) and Spring 2015 (PHYS-160) on very nearly identical exams over identical test times while controlling for almost every variable.

  16. A first thermodynamic interpretation of the technology transfer activities

    CERN Document Server

    Ripandelli, S

    2016-01-01

    In the last years new interdisciplinary approaches to economics and social science have been developed. A Thermodynamic approach to socio-economics has brought to a new interdisciplinary scientific field called econophysics. Why thermodynamic? Thermodynamic is a statistical theory for large atomic system under constraints of energy[1] and the economy can be considered a large system governed by complex rules. The present job proposes a new application, starting from econophysic, passing throughout the thermodynamic laws to interpret and to described the Technology Transfer (TT) activities. Using the definition of economy (i.e. economy[dictionary def.] = the process or system by which goods and services are produced, sold, and bought in a country or region) the TT can be considered an important sub-domain of the economy and a transversal new area of the scientific research. The TT is the process of transferring knowledge, that uses the results from the research to produce innovation and to ensure that scientif...

  17. Using Scientific Detective Videos to Support the Design of Technology Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kuang-Chao; Fan, Szu-Chun; Tsai, Fu-Hsing; Chu, Yih-hsien

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effect of scientific detective video as a vehicle to support the design of technology activities by technology teachers. Ten graduate students, including current and future technology teachers, participated in a required technology graduate course that used scientific detective videos as a pedagogical tool to motivate…

  18. Using Scientific Detective Videos to Support the Design of Technology Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kuang-Chao; Fan, Szu-Chun; Tsai, Fu-Hsing; Chu, Yih-hsien

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the effect of scientific detective video as a vehicle to support the design of technology activities by technology teachers. Ten graduate students, including current and future technology teachers, participated in a required technology graduate course that used scientific detective videos as a pedagogical tool to motivate…

  19. Agricultural Science and Technology Teachers' Perceptions of iPod and Mp3 Technology Integration into Curricular and Cocurricular Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Miller, Kimberly A.; Roberts, T. Grady

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe agricultural science and technology teachers' reaction to iPod and mp3 technology use and potential use in both curricular and cocurricular activities. A total of 112 unique respondents provided written responses to open-ended questions. Study findings reveal that agricultural science and technology…

  20. Discovering Fossils--A Hands-on Lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Describes fossil investigations developed and provided by the Falls of the Ohio State Park near Louisville, Kentucky. The Devonian shale beds contain representatives of over 600 species including corals, sponges, brachiopods, mollusks, and echinoderms. Rather than focusing on identification, the activities emphasize the past ecological…

  1. Chaos in the Kitchen: A Hands-On Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe-Dale, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines a class activity where students prepare croissants to get an intuitive feeling for the nature of a strange attractor. In particular during the preparation of the pastry dough, students investigate the effects of stretching and folding. These physical processes force trajectories (in this case the pastry dough) to remain…

  2. Student Content Knowledge Increases after Participation in a Hands-on Biotechnology Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Amber M.; Hanegan, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Implementing biotechnology education through hands-on teaching methods should be considered by secondary biology teachers. This study is an experimental research design to examine increased student content knowledge in biotechnology after a hands-on biotechnology intervention. The teachers from both school groups participated in, Project Crawfish,…

  3. Student Content Knowledge Increases after Participation in a Hands-on Biotechnology Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Amber M.; Hanegan, Nikki L.

    2011-01-01

    Implementing biotechnology education through hands-on teaching methods should be considered by secondary biology teachers. This study is an experimental research design to examine increased student content knowledge in biotechnology after a hands-on biotechnology intervention. The teachers from both school groups participated in, Project Crawfish,…

  4. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for emergent literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning outc

  5. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning outco

  6. Teachers as Co-Designers of Technology-Rich Learning Activities for Early Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning outcomes. A case-study method was used to investigate:…

  7. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning outco

  8. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for emergent literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning outc

  9. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning

  10. Teachers as co-designers of technology-rich learning activities for emergent literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    Although kindergarten teachers often struggle with implementing technology, they are rarely involved in co-designing technology-rich learning activities. This study involved teachers in the co-design of technology-rich learning activities and sought to explore implementation and pupil learning

  11. Information Technology and Aesthetics: Passive and Active Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Haynes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with examining and recognizing aesthetics in an Information System (an organization incorporating both humans and information technology. Aesthetics emerge from the wholeness of things, not from specific parts or components. As such, aesthetics may naturally be considered in “systems”, and we propose that an effective manner of thinking of aesthetics is to think in terms of “themes”. Humans have an extraordinary capacity to capture events thematically. In other words, human beings have a natural sense of aesthetics. To examine aesthetics in an information systems context, we argue that one must consider not only aesthetics that may be perceived by the senses (a passive dimension, but also aesthetics that may be conceived in the mind (an active dimension. This paper draws the conclusion that the benefits of aesthetics in relation to the study of Information Systems, has characteristics similar to the nature and importance of ethics in IS. Also, the study of aesthetics in IS has greater implications than simply recognizing and appreciating beauty and art. The very human capacity for recognizing and appreciating beauty and art is also the same capacity for effective creativity and happiness: the active aesthetic dimension. It follows that if an information system encouraged and provided the enabling circumstances for the human capacity of thematic recognition (as found in the human appreciation of art and beauty it thereby also provides the ground and the necessary thematically recognizable stimulus for effective creative and visionary organizational management.

  12. The Bohr Model and the Fifth Grade: A New Standards-Based Hands-On Physics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Jeff; Springer, Russell; Goldberg, Bennett

    2004-03-01

    A semester-long, standards-based, hands-on physics curriculum appropriate for the fifth grade was developed. Previously available curricula were successful in using hands-on activities to teach basic fifth-grade physics skills and concepts, but did not attempt to foster understanding of the fundamental underlying physics. We expanded the role of inquiry-based instruction to expose students to the fundamental physics behind electricity, forces, energy, light and sound. Central to the course, the Bohr model of the atom was used as a key tool both to motivate exploration of these topics as well as to develop basic conceptual understanding of fundamental ideas in quantum and electromagnetic physics. The curriculum was designed to be compatible with both district and state-mandated standards in a high-stakes test environment. This work was supported by NSF grant DGE-0231909.

  13. 75 FR 33631 - Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... SECURITY Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Request for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and... Security's (DHS's) Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate to provide information, resources...

  14. Windows 7 A quick, hands-on introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Wei-Meng

    2009-01-01

    This compact book offers the quickest path for Windows users to get started with Microsoft's Windows 7 operating system. You get the essential information you need to upgrade or install the system and configure it to fit your activities, along with a tour of Windows 7's features and built-in applications. Microsoft has learned from the mistakes of Windows Vista, and Windows 7 shows it-this new OS is much faster and more stable. With Windows 7: Up and Running, you'll learn what's new and what's changed from XP and Vista, and get advice on ways to use this system for work, entertainment, inst

  15. Educational Technology as a Subversive Activity: Questioning Assumptions Related to Teaching and Leading with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger-Ross, Matthew J.; Holcomb, Lori B.

    2012-01-01

    The use of educational technologies is grounded in the assumptions of teachers, learners, and administrators. Assumptions are choices that structure our understandings and help us make meaning. Current advances in Web 2.0 and social media technologies challenge our assumptions about teaching and learning. The intersection of technology and…

  16. Cultural Earth Science in Hawai`i: Hands-on Place-Based Investigations that Merge Traditional Knowledge with Earth Science Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxey, L.; Dias, R. K.; Legaspi, E.

    2011-12-01

    During the summer of 2011, the Mālama Ke Ahupua`a (to care of our watershed) GEARUP summer program provided 25 under-served and under-represented minority public high school students (Hawaiian, part-Hawaiian, Filipino, Pacific Islanders) from Farrington High School (Kalihi, Honolulu) with a hands-on place-based multidiscipline course located within Manoa Valley (Ahupua`a O Kona) with the objective of engaging participants in scientific environmental investigations while exploring Hawaii's linkages between traditional knowledge, culture and science. The 4-week field program enabled students to collect samples along the perennial Manoa Stream and conduct water quality assessments throughout the Manoa watershed. Students collected science quality data from eight different sampling stations by means of field- and laboratory-based quantitative water quality testing equipment and GPS/GIS technology. While earning Hawaii DOE academic credits, students were able to document changes along the stream as related to pollution and urbanization. While conducting the various scientific investigations, students also participated in cultural fieldtrips and activities that highlighted the linkages between historical sustainable watershed uses by native Hawaiian communities, and their connections with natural earth processes. Additionally, students also participated in environmental service-learning projects that highlight the Hawaiian values of laulima (teamwork), mālama (to care for), and imi `ike (to seek knowledge). By contextualizing and merging hands-on place-based earth science inquiry with native Hawaiian traditional knowledge, students experienced the natural-cultural significance of their ahupua`a (watershed). This highlighted the advantages for promoting environmental literacy and geoscience education to under-served and under-represented minority populations in Hawaii from a rich native Hawaiian cultural framework.

  17. Improving chemical education from high school to college using a more hands-on approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddick, Kristie Winfield

    In this work, various alternative teaching methods and activities for chemical education are developed, presented, and evaluated. In the first study, an original hands-on activity using LEGO® blocks to model ionic chemical formulas is presented together with quantitative and qualitative data regarding its educational effectiveness. Students explore cation to anion ratios using LEGO® blocks to represent trivalent, divalent and monovalent cations and anions. High school chemistry students who participated in the LEGO® lab showed significantly higher post-test scores than other students. The second study grows out of the creation of a computational lab module that is shown to significantly increase student learning in the subject of molecular orbital theory in first semester college General Chemistry. The third and final study presented is a course redesign project for college CHEM 1100, Preparation for General Chemistry. In this project the classroom is “flipped”. Students watch video lectures at home, and spend class time working with peers and the instructor on problem solving activities. The results presented here are one of the first quantitative studies showing the effectiveness of “flipping the classroom”. Students who were taught using the Reverse-Instruction (RI) method had significantly higher success in both the Preparation for General Chemistry course and traditionally taught General Chemistry I the following semester.

  18. Engineering and Technology Challenges for Active Debris Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jer-Chyi

    2011-01-01

    After more than fifty years of space activities, the near-Earth environment is polluted with man-made orbital debris. The collision between Cosmos 2251 and the operational Iridium 33 in 2009 signaled a potential collision cascade effect, also known as the "Kessler Syndrome", in the environment. Various modelling studies have suggested that the commonly-adopted mitigation measures will not be sufficient to stabilize the future debris population. Active debris removal must be considered to remediate the environment. This paper summarizes the key issues associated with debris removal and describes the technology and engineering challenges to move forward. Fifty-four years after the launch of Sputnik 1, satellites have become an integral part of human society. Unfortunately, the ongoing space activities have left behind an undesirable byproduct orbital debris. This environment problem is threatening the current and future space activities. On average, two Shuttle window panels are replaced after every mission due to damage by micrometeoroid or orbital debris impacts. More than 100 collision avoidance maneuvers were conducted by satellite operators in 2010 to reduce the impact risks of their satellites with respect to objects in the U.S. Space Surveillance Network (SSN) catalog. Of the four known accident collisions between objects in the SSN catalog, the last one, collision between Cosmos 2251 and the operational Iridium 33 in 2009, was the most significant. It was the first ever accidental catastrophic destruction of an operational satellite by another satellite. It also signaled the potential collision cascade effect in the environment, commonly known as the "Kessler Syndrome," predicted by Kessler and Cour-Palais in 1978 [1]. Figure 1 shows the historical increase of objects in the SSN catalog. The majority of the catalog objects are 10 cm and larger. As of April 2011, the total objects tracked by the SSN sensors were more than 22,000. However, approximately 6000 of

  19. How to change GEBCO outreach activities with Information technologies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E.; Park, K.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1995, when National Geographic Information Project began, we have great advance in mapping itself and information service on the earth surface in Korea whether paper maps or online service map. By reviewing geological and mine-related information service in current and comparisons of demands, GEBCO outreach master plan has been prepared. Information service cannot be separated from data production and on dissemination policies. We suggest the potential impact of the changes in information technologies such as mobile service and data fusion, and big data on GEBCO maps based. Less cost and high performance in data service will stimulate more information service; therefore it is necessary to have more customer-oriented manipulation on the data. By inquiring questionnaire, we can draw the potential needs on GEBCO products in various aspects: such as education, accessibility. The gap between experts and non-experts will decrease by digital service from the private and public organizations such as international academic societies since research funds and policies tend to pursue "openness" and "interoperability" among the domains. Some background why and how to prepare outreach activities in GEBCO will be shown.

  20. Science &Language Teaching in Hands-on Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlert, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    As announced in the paper presented in Toulouse, a trinational teacher training program addressing school teachers from France, Germany and Italy on teaching foreign languages together with science and history through Space related projects has been implemented and launched successfully. Supported by the French Ministry of Education (Académie de Nice), the bigovernmental French-German Youth Office (Office franco- allemand pour la Jeunesse) and the European Space Agency the first session was held in Cannes in October 2001 and brought together 36 language, science and history teachers, 12 from each country. Through different workshops, presentations and visits this five-day training encounter initiated the participants with Space activities and exploration as well as offering them back-up information on astronomy. It gave them furthermore the opportunity of improving their linguistic skills and of exchanging their teaching experience. The program was highly welcomed by all the participants who will meet this year in Germany for the second session devoted to establishing together bi- or trinational projects for future class encounters based on the same subjects. My paper will deal with the results of the program which have been beyond expectation and will encourage us to continue this pluridisciplinary approach of language &science teaching and extend it to other language combinations.

  1. The Teacher as Re-Designer of Technology Integrated Activities for an Early Literacy Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2013-01-01

    Though popular among children outside of school, Dutch teachers often struggle to offer technology integrated activities in the kindergarten classroom. Because involving teachers in development of technology integrated activities can support their implementation, this study examines teachers in the role of re-designing such activities. Two case…

  2. Advanced Power Technology Development Activities for Small Satellite Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piszczor, Michael F.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Miller, Thomas B.; Taylor, Linda M.; Hernandez-Lugo, Dionne; Raffaelle, Ryne; Landi, Brian; Hubbard, Seth; Schauerman, Christopher; Ganter, Mathew; hide

    2017-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has a long history related to the development of advanced power technology for space applications. This expertise covers the breadth of energy generation (photovoltaics, thermal energy conversion, etc.), energy storage (batteries, fuel cell technology, etc.), power management and distribution, and power systems architecture and analysis. Such advanced technology is now being developed for small satellite and cubesat applications and could have a significant impact on the longevity and capabilities of these missions. A presentation during the Pre-Conference Workshop will focus on various advanced power technologies being developed and demonstrated by NASA, and their possible application within the small satellite community.

  3. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Rogers, Adam Zachary; Simmons, R. F.; Palethorpe, S. J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  4. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program, FY-98 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; Rogers, A.Z.; McCray, J.A.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethorpe, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  5. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program, FY-98 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; Rogers, A.Z.; McCray, J.A.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethorpe, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  6. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Rogers, A.Z.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethrope, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  7. Active and Passive Technology Integration: A Novel Approach for Managing Technology's Influence on Learning Experiences in Context-Aware Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Teemu H.; Nygren, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Technology integration is the process of overcoming different barriers that hinder efficient utilisation of learning technologies. The authors divide technology integration into two components based on technology's role in the integration process. In active integration, the technology integrates learning resources into a learning space, making it…

  8. Teachers' Activities in Technology-Based Mathematics Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, John

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on high school mathematics teachers and what they do when they use digital technology in their lessons. It is essentially a discursive paper but it uses data from a project on teachers using technology to illustrate points. The main aim of the paper is to present an holistic account of factors influencing teachers' practice. A…

  9. TRIZ TECHNOLOGY FORECASTING AS QFD INPUT WITHIN THE NPD ACTIVITIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Coulibaly Solomani; Hua Zhongsheng; Shi Qin; Wang Wei

    2004-01-01

    As a result of the fierceness of business competition,companies,to remain competitive,have to charm their customers by anticipating their needs and being able to rapidly develop exciting new products for them.To overcome this challenge,technology forecasting is considered as a powerful tool in today's business environment,while there are as many success stories as there are failures,a good application of this method will give a good result.A methodology of integration of patterns or lines of technology evolution in TRIZ parlance is presented,which is also known as TRIZ technology forecasting,as input to the QFD process to design a new product.For this purpose,TRIZ technology forecasting,one of the TRIZ major tools,is discussed and some benefits compared to the traditional forecasting techniques are highlighted.Then a methodology to integrate TRIZ technology forecasting and QFD process is highlighted.

  10. Technology of remote monitoring for nuclear activity monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwack, Ehn Ho; Kim, Jong Soo; Yoon, Wan Ki; Park, Sung Sik; Na, Won Woo; An, Jin Soo; Cha, Hong Ryul; Kim, Jung Soo

    2000-05-01

    In a view of safeguards monitoring at nuclear facilities, the monitoring is changing to remote method so that this report is described to remote monitoring(RM) applying on commercial NPP in Korea. To enhance IAEA safeguards efficiency and effectiveness, IAEA is taking into account of remote monitoring system(RMS) and testing as a field trial. IRMP(International Remote Monitoring Project) in participating many nations for development of RMS is proceeding their project such as technical exchange and research etc. In case of our country are carrying out the research relevant RM since acceptance RMS at 7th ROK-IAEA safeguards implementation review meeting. With a view to enhancement the RMS, installation location and element technology of the RM equipment are evaluated in a view of safeguards in Korea LWRs, and proposed a procedure for national inspection application through remote data evaluation from Younggwang-3 NPP. These results are large valuable to use of national inspection at time point extending installation to all Korea PWR NPP. In case of CANDU, neutron, gamma measurement and basic concept of network using optical fiber scintillating detector as remote verification method for dry storage canister are described. Also RM basic design of spent fuel transfer campaign is described that unattended RM without inspector instead of performing in participating together with IAEA and national inspector. The transfer campaign means the spent fuel storage pond to dry storage canister for about two months every year. Therefore, positively participation of IAEA strength safeguards project will be increased transparency for our nuclear activity as well as contributed to national relevant industry.

  11. How Does Technology-Enabled Active Learning Affect Undergraduate Students' Understanding of Electromagnetism Concepts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dori, Yehudit Judy; Belcher, John

    2005-01-01

    Educational technology supports meaningful learning and enables the presentation of spatial and dynamic images, which portray relationships among complex concepts. The Technology-Enabled Active Learning (TEAL) Project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) involves media-rich software for simulation and visualization in freshman…

  12. A Review of Technology Education in Ireland; a Changing Technological Environment Promoting Design Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Keelin; Phelan, Pat

    2014-01-01

    In Ireland, Technology Education's structure and organisation across the levels of education is not delivered or governed in a coherent manner. Technology Education in primary level education, for students between 5 and 12 years of age, does not explicitly exist as a separate subject. In primary level education, Social, Environmental and…

  13. A Review of Technology Education in Ireland; a Changing Technological Environment Promoting Design Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Keelin; Phelan, Pat

    2014-01-01

    In Ireland, Technology Education's structure and organisation across the levels of education is not delivered or governed in a coherent manner. Technology Education in primary level education, for students between 5 and 12 years of age, does not explicitly exist as a separate subject. In primary level education, Social, Environmental and…

  14. Mobile satellite communications technology - A summary of NASA activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutzi, E. J.; Knouse, G. H.

    1986-01-01

    Studies in recent years indicate that future high-capacity mobile satellite systems are viable only if certain high-risk enabling technologies are developed. Accordingly, NASA has structured an advanced technology development program aimed at efficient utilization of orbit, spectrum, and power. Over the last two years, studies have concentrated on developing concepts and identifying cost drivers and other issues associated with the major technical areas of emphasis: vehicle antennas, speech compression, bandwidth-efficient digital modems, network architecture, mobile satellite channel characterization, and selected space segment technology. The program is now entering the next phase - breadboarding, development, and field experimentation.

  15. TECHNOLOGIES OF INITIATING STUDENTS INTO INDEPENDENT (SELF-GUIDED ACTIVITY IN SUPPLEMENTARY DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Abakumova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research in question investigates the technologies of initiating independent activity within the framework of distance learning and their psychological aspects. The authors’ classification of educational technologies of initiating students into independent cognitive activity is presented. Such technologies utilize various psychological mechanisms of exciting students’ cognitive interest, intensifying cognitive processes, developing independent activity skills, and, as a result, increase motivation for independent activity and learning on the whole. These include such types of technologies as developmental technologies, interactive technologies, technologies of information transfer, technologies of meaning-making initiation. The research of the attitude of distance learning educators to independent activity of students and the content of the academic courses were done at Moodle-based education programs. The findings show the differences in retention rate among distance learning educators whose competence in terms of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity varies. It’s emphasized that interactive lectures, videoconferences, audio-visual aids, interactive seminars, glossaries, interactive tests are considered the most efficient technologies in initiating students into independent (self-guided activity. The obtained results have made it possible to stress the developmental effect of distance learning technologies and the technologies of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity in various psychic spheres of students: cognitive, individual, emotional. We mention the changes in motivational sphere of students and their meaning-making activity. In the course of correct development of distance learning we notice the development of voluntary and nonvoluntary cognitive activity. A student starts actively participating in educational process, he becomes the creator of his own world.

  16. Technology station in electronics at the Tshwane University of Technology: strengthening technological innovation activities amongst SMEs and students

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, SJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on how the competence and capacity within the Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment, specifically the electronic/electrical discipline, at the Tshwane University of Technology is utilised to support Small Medium...

  17. Forecasting of innovative activity on the basis of application of technology of Foresight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarova Natalia Leonidovna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In article the basic questions of forecasting of innovative activity of economic systems are considered. Forsyte's bases are considered. Necessity, importance, success of application of technology of Forsyte for forecasting of innovative activity are proved.

  18. TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION IN HUMAN ACTIVITY OF THE INFORMATION AGE: INFORMATION CHALLENGES AND TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Yu. Burov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available It is discussed the role of technology development, especially in connection with social transformation and transition of humanity to the era of information/knowledge, analyzed the trend accelerating technological change and its relation to civil and military changes in society. It is emphasized the fundamental novelty of the information age, namely the transition of mankind from the production of material products mainly to intangible (information, knowledge, human cognitive processes. It is emphasized that ICT gain not only growing importance, but become a driving force of human civilization. The basic features of education in the information age, including ICT educational purpose out technology for distance education are described.

  19. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    1999-10-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  20. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. K. Herbst; J. A. McCray; R. J. Kirkham; J. Pao; S. H. Hinckley

    1999-09-30

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  1. Oil atlas: National Petroleum Technology Office activities across the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiedemann, H.A.

    1998-03-01

    Petroleum imports account for the largest share of the US trade deficit. Over one-third of the 1996 merchandise trade deficit is attributed to imported oil. The good news is that substantial domestic oil resources, both existing and yet-to-be-discovered, can be recovered using advanced petroleum technologies. The Energy Information Agency estimates that advanced technologies can yield 10 billion additional barrels, equal to $240 billion in import offsets. The US Department of Energy`s National Petroleum Technology Office works with industry to develop advanced petroleum technologies and to transfer successful technologies to domestic oil producers. This publication shows the locations of these important technology development efforts and lists DOE`s partners in this critical venture. The National Petroleum Technology Office has 369 active technology development projects grouped into six product lines: Advanced Diagnostics and Imaging Systems; Advanced Drilling, Completion, and Stimulation; Reservoir Life Extension and Management; Emerging Processing Technology Applications; Effective Environmental Protection; and Crosscutting Program Areas.

  2. Hands-On TAROT Intercontinental use of the TAROT for Education and Public Outreach

    CERN Document Server

    Boër, M; Klotz, A H; Buchholtz, G; Melchior, A L; Pennypacker, C; Ebisuzaki, T

    2001-01-01

    The TAROT telescope has for primary goal the search for the prompt optical counterpart of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts. It is a completely autonomous 25cm telescope installed near Nice (France), able to point any location of the sky within 1-2 seconds. The control, scheduling, and data processing activities are completely automated, so the instrument is completely autonomous. In addition to its un-manned modes, we added recently the possibility to remotely control the telescope, as a request of the "Hands-On Universe" (HOU) program for exchange of time within automatic telescopes for the education and public outreach. To this purpose we developed a simple control interface. A webcam was installed to visualize the telescope. Access to the data is possible through a web interface. The images can be processed by the HOU software, a program specially suited for use within the classroom. We experienced these feature during the open days of the University of California Berkeley and the Astronomy Festival of Fleurance (F...

  3. PILOTing Undergraduate Students to Hands-On Teaching and Research Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Borgon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate research can make a positive impact on science education. Unfortunately, the one studentone mentor paradigm of undergraduate research generates a wide range of variability in the student’s experience and further limits its availability to a select few students. In contrast, a single faculty member can offer multiple undergraduate teaching positions that provide a consistent experience for the student. We attempted to combine the undergraduate research and teaching experiences in an internship practicum called Peer Instruction and Laboratory Occupational Training (PILOT. Students enrolled in PILOT served as teaching assistants for the upper division Quantitative Biological Methods (QBM laboratory course. In addition, PILOT students worked on an independent lab project that provided them with hands-on training and supported the QBM course. The development of presentation and teaching skills was also emphasized in PILOT. These activities were designed to improve student communication skills, lab skills, and knowledge of molecular biology content. Here, we describe the PILOT curriculum and report the results of an anonymous assessment survey administered to 75 students who had completed PILOT in the previous five semesters. Our data indicate that PILOT provides an effective format to expand undergraduate opportunities for research and teaching experiences.

  4. An evaluation of two hands-on lab styles for plant biodiversity in undergraduate biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basey, John M; Maines, Anastasia P; Francis, Clinton D; Melbourne, Brett

    2014-01-01

    We compared learning cycle and expository formats for teaching about plant biodiversity in an inquiry-oriented university biology lab class (n = 465). Both formats had preparatory lab activities, a hands-on lab, and a postlab with reflection and argumentation. Learning was assessed with a lab report, a practical quiz in lab, and a multiple-choice exam in the concurrent lecture. Attitudes toward biology and treatments were also assessed. We used linear mixed-effect models to determine impacts of lab style on lower-order cognition (LO) and higher-order cognition (HO) based on Bloom's taxonomy. Relative to the expository treatment, the learning cycle treatment had a positive effect on HO and a negative effect on LO included in lab reports; a positive effect on transfer of LO from the lab report to the quiz; negative impacts on LO quiz performance and on attitudes toward the lab; and a higher degree of perceived difficulty. The learning cycle treatment had no influence on transfer of HO from lab report to quiz or exam; quiz performance on HO questions; exam performance on LO and HO questions; and attitudes toward biology as a science. The importance of LO as a foundation for HO relative to these lab styles is addressed.

  5. Interactive and Hands-on Methods for Professional Development of Undergraduate Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, S. N.; LeBeau, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    Professional development workshops for undergraduate research programs can range from communicating science (i.e. oral, technical writing, poster presentations), applying for fellowships and scholarships, applying to graduate school, and learning about careers, among others. Novel methods of presenting the information on the above topics can result in positive outcomes beyond the obvious of transferring knowledge. Examples of innovative methods to present professional development information include 1) An interactive session on how to write an abstract where students are given an opportunity to draft an abstract from a short technical article, followed by discussion amongst a group of peers, and comparison with the "published" abstract. 2) Using the Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) method to evaluate and critique a research poster. 3) Inviting "experts" such as a Fulbright scholar graduate student to present on applying for fellowships and scholarships. These innovative methods of delivery provide more hands-on activities that engage the students, and in some cases (abstract writing) provide practice for the student. The methods also require that students develop team work skills, communicate amongst their peers, and develop networks with their cohort. All of these are essential non-technical skills needed for success in any career. Feedback from students on these sessions are positive and most importantly, the students walk out of the session with a smile on their face saying how much fun it was. Evaluating the impact of these sessions is more challenging and under investigation currently.

  6. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) GEM Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; J. Schroeder; S. T. Beck

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer and tester. Using the SAPHIRE analysis engine and relational database is a complementary program called GEM. GEM has been designed to simplify using existing PRA analysis for activities such as the NRC’s Accident Sequence Precursor program. In this report, the theoretical framework behind GEM-type calculations are discussed in addition to providing guidance and examples for performing evaluations when using the GEM software. As part of this analysis framework, the two types of GEM analysis are outlined, specifically initiating event (where an initiator occurs) and condition (where a component is failed for some length of time) assessments.

  7. Empowering elderly women with osteoarthritis through hands-on exploration of adaptive equipment concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, Sharon R; Sanders, Elizabeth B-N; Yen, Wei-Ting; Sommerich, Carolyn M; Lavender, Steven A

    2013-12-01

    The study investigated the participation experiences of elderly women with hand limitations in a maketools-inspired activity for improving bottle openability and verified the usefulness of the results from this approach. Participatory design was used to stimulate participants' hands-on fabrication of new bottle lid concepts. Air-dry modeling clay, Crayola Model Magic® (Crayola LLC, 1100 Church Lane Easton, PA 18044-0431), clay modeling tools sets and empty bottles were the tools used to explore feasible and user-envisioned ideal lids that could potentially reduce hand pain and improve function when opening bottles. Twenty-five elderly women fully participated in the study. They generated 36 bottle lid design concepts. Qualitative analysis identified inclusion of four primary design features as follows: 1) surface texture; 2) increased leverage through lid shape or diameters; 3) increased contact surface with palm/fingers through lid shape or height; and 4) facilitation of alternative grip types. The major limitations of the study were inclusion of only women participants and healthier persons living in a retirement community. Future research is needed to investigate the bottle lid preferences of men and persons with more severe hand function living in places other than independent living communities. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. "Optics 4 every1", the hands-on optics outreach program of the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera-González, Perla M.; Sánchez-Guerrero, Guillermo E.

    2016-09-01

    The Fisica Pato2 (Physics 4 every1) outreach group started as a need of hands-on activities and active Science demonstrations in the education for kids, teenagers and basic education teachers in Nuevo Leffon maintaining a main objective of spread the word about the importance of Optics and Photonics; for accomplish this objective, since November 2013 several outreach events are organized every year by the group. The program Optics 4 every1 is supported by the Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas of the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon and the International Society for Optics and Photonics and consist in quick hands-on activities and Optics demonstrations designed for teach basic optical phenomena related with light and its application in everyday life. During 2015, with the purpose of celebrate the International Year of Light 2015, the outreach group was involved in 13 different events and reached more than 8,000 people. The present work explains the activities done and the outcome obtained with this program.

  9. Increasing awareness about antibiotic use and resistance: a hands-on project for high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Maria João; Santos, Catarina L; Costa, Patrício; Lencastre, Leonor; Tavares, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    importance of judicious antibiotic use. The findings inform about the educational benefits of incorporating hands-on activities in science education programs.

  10. Technology, Active Learning, and Retention in General Education Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Inessa; Chahine, Iman; Garrett, Lauretta; Wang, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Difficulties in general education mathematics courses may be attributed to many factors, primarily low proficiency in symbol manipulation, a perception that mathematics is an area which eludes mastery, a lack of engagement and effective practice. Educational technology can be a powerful aid in overcoming these factors. This work describes the…

  11. Situation awareness of active distribution network: roadmap, technologies, and bottlenecks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Jin; Wan, Can; Song, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    that operators are aware of operation states and potential risks. Current solutions in distribution supervisory control and data acquisition (DSCADA) as well as the distribution automation system (DAS) generally are not able to meet the technology requirements of SA. In this paper, the authors’ participation...

  12. Key Technologies in Mobile Visual Search and MPEG Standardization Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling- Yu Duan; Jie Chen; Chunyu Wang; Rongrong Ji; Tiejun Huang; Wen Gao

    2012-01-01

    Visual search has been a long-standing problem in applications such as location recognition and product search. Much research has been done on image representation, matching, indexing, and retrieval. Key component technologies for visual search have been developed, and numerous real-world applications are emerging. To ensure application interoperability, the Moving Picture Experts Group (MPEG) has begun standardizing visuaJ search technologies and is developing the compact descriptors for visua) search (CDVS) standard. MPEG seeks to develop a collaborative platform for evaluating existing visual search technologies. Peking University has participated in this standardization since the 94th MPEG meeting, and significant progress has been made with the various proposals. A test model (TM) has been selected to determine the basic pipeline and key components of visual search. However, the first-version TM has high computational complexity and imperfect retrieval and matching. Core experiments have therefore been set up to improve TM. In this article, we summarize key technologies for visual search and report the progress of MPEG CDVS. We discuss Peking University' s efforts in CDVS and also discuss unresolved issues.

  13. Positive Affect Relevant to Epistemic Curiosity to Reflect Continuance Intention to Join a Hands-On Making Contest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Szeto, Elson; Tai, Kai-Hsin; Tsai, Chi-Ruei

    2016-01-01

    Hands-on making (e.g., "Maker") has become prevalent in current educational settings. To understand the role that students' epistemic curiosity plays in hands-on making contests, this study explored its correlation to students' positive affect and continuance intention to participate in a hands-on making contest called…

  14. Connecting the Public to Natural Hazards Through a Hands-on Museum Exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.; Rowe, S. M.; Hanshumaker, W.; Farley, M.

    2014-12-01

    Communities along the coast of Oregon, Washington, and northern California live with the threat of potentially devastating subduction zone earthquakes and subsequent tsunami that could happen at any time. Both residents and visitors to the coast need to be aware of the potential impacts such hazards can have on their lives as well as what to do during an earthquake and before a tsunami hits. To raise awareness of both natural hazards and the technologies used to monitor them, UNAVCO designed and installed a museum exhibit on display at Oregon State University's Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) Visitor Center in Newport, Oregon. The objectives for the exhibit are to increase familiarization with the natural hazards of earthquakes and tsunamis in the Cascadia region, to explain the connection between the crust's movement and compression over time with the potential strength of a subduction-zone earthquake, and to inform visitors about high-precision, high-rate GPS technology. The exhibit includes multiple hands-on models and an authentic GPS monitoring station. Additionally, panels explain the science behind the models, potential impacts of a great earthquake to society, and actions visitors can take to practice earthquake safety through the Great ShakeOut earthquake drill. Over the past year that the exhibit has been open to the public, it has been visited by over 100,000 people including students, family and senior groups, and the general public. Anecdotal evidence indicates that two components of the exhibit create the most visitor impact providing visitors with 'ah ha moments': a real-scale tape measure showing the approximate 12 foot distance the coast has compressed over the past 300+ years, and a flexible map illustrating that the coastal areas are compressing the most compared to areas further inland. Through HMSC's NSF-funded Cyberlab automated visitor data collection system, we have been able to document and analyze a variety of visitor characteristics

  15. The Search for signals of technological activities in the galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemarchand, Guillermo A

    2010-01-01

    In this article an analysis of the fundamentals used to search for extraterrestrial artificial signals in the galaxy, which have been developing for more than five decades, is presented. It is shown that the key factor for the success of these research projects is given by the technological civilizations lifetimes. Assuming the Principle of Mediocrity, estimations are made to determine the minimum number of civilizations that may co-exist in the galaxy and the probability of detecting a signal from them.

  16. The Search for signals of technological activities in the galaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Lemarchand, Guillermo A.

    2010-01-01

    In this article an analysis of the fundamentals used to search for extraterrestrial artificial signals in the galaxy, which have been developing for more than five decades, is presented. It is shown that the key factor for the success of these research projects is given by the technological civilizations lifetimes. Assuming the Principle of Mediocrity, estimations are made to determine the minimum number of civilizations that may co-exist in the galaxy and the probability of detecting a signa...

  17. Space-Based Astronomy: An Educator Guide with Activities for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Gregory L.

    2001-01-01

    If you go to the country, far from city lights, you can see about 3,000 stars on a clear night. If your eyes were bigger, you could see many more stars. With a pair of binoculars, an optical device that effectively enlarges the pupil of your eye by about 30 times, the number of stars you can see increases to the tens of thousands. With a medium-sized telescope with a light-collecting mirror 30 centimeters in diameter, you can see hundreds of thousands of stars. With a large observatory telescope, millions of stars become visible. This curriculum guide uses hands-on activities to help students and teachers understand the significance of space-based astronomy--astronomical observations made from outer space. It is not intended to serve as a curriculum. Instead, teachers should select activities from this guide that support and extend existing study. The guide contains few of the traditional activities found in many astronomy guides such as constellation studies, lunar phases, and planetary orbits. It tells, rather, the story of why it is important to observe celestial objects from outer space and how to study the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Teachers are encouraged to adapt these activities for the particular needs of their students. When selected activities from this guide are used in conjunction with traditional astronomy curricula, students benefit from a more complete experience.

  18. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Argyle, Mark Don; Lauerhass, Lance; Bendixsen, Carl Lee; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    2000-11-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  19. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Kirkham, R.J.; Pao, J.; Argyle, M.D.; Lauerhass, L.; Bendixsen, C.L.; Hinckley, S.H.

    2000-10-31

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  20. Teaching critical management skills to senior nursing students: videotaped or interactive hands-on instruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Pamela; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori; Landeen, Janet; Norman, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    This study examined and compared the effectiveness of videotape training versus hands-on instruction in preparing senior nursing students to respond to emergency clinical situations. Fourth year nursing students (n=27) were randomly assigned to one of three groups; one group received videotaped instruction, one group engaged in a hands-on experience, and one group, a control, received no instruction. Students were evaluated using a three-station objective structured clinical examination that involved high-fidelity simulations. Differences between the control and the two instructional groups were significant (p = .007); however, there was no significant difference between the two types of instruction. It was concluded that instruction on crisis management with a high-fidelity simulator, using either video or hands-on instruction, can result in a significant improvement in performance.

  1. Good, Better, Best: Using Universal Design and Digital Technology to Develop Great Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauke, Beth; Story, Mary Follette; Ostroff, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    Industrial design and technology are lab-based disciplines with highly visual products, hands-on activities, and frequent interactions between faculty and students. As a result, the ways that online resources are used in these courses tend to be different from other subject areas with more lecture-oriented modes of learning. This article addresses…

  2. Networking activities in technology-based entrepreneurial teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Helle

    2005-01-01

    Based on social network theoy, this article investigates the distribution of networking roles and responsibilities in entrepreneurial founding teams. Its focus is on the team as a collection of individuals, thus allowing the research to address differences in networking patterns. It identifies six...... central networking activities and shows that not all founding team members are equally active 'networkers'. The analyses show that team members prioritize different networking activities and that one member in particular has extensive networking activities whereas other memebrs of the team are more...

  3. Hands-on learning in the classroom with Org-mode

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Devon

    2016-01-01

    Learning engineering concepts without hands-on examples can be a difficult task for some students. Traditionally in the classroom, concepts are taught and examples are given, but working with them is left as a homework exercise. This method misses out on the opportunity to use programming in the classroom as a supplemental teaching tool for hands-on learning. Org-mode in Emacs solves this problem by allowing an instructor to contain lecture material and executable code inside a single documen...

  4. Open source EMR software: profiling, insights and hands-on analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiah, M L M; Haiqi, Ahmed; Zaidan, B B; Zaidan, A A

    2014-11-01

    The use of open source software in health informatics is increasingly advocated by authors in the literature. Although there is no clear evidence of the superiority of the current open source applications in the healthcare field, the number of available open source applications online is growing and they are gaining greater prominence. This repertoire of open source options is of a great value for any future-planner interested in adopting an electronic medical/health record system, whether selecting an existent application or building a new one. The following questions arise. How do the available open source options compare to each other with respect to functionality, usability and security? Can an implementer of an open source application find sufficient support both as a user and as a developer, and to what extent? Does the available literature provide adequate answers to such questions? This review attempts to shed some light on these aspects. The objective of this study is to provide more comprehensive guidance from an implementer perspective toward the available alternatives of open source healthcare software, particularly in the field of electronic medical/health records. The design of this study is twofold. In the first part, we profile the published literature on a sample of existent and active open source software in the healthcare area. The purpose of this part is to provide a summary of the available guides and studies relative to the sampled systems, and to identify any gaps in the published literature with respect to our research questions. In the second part, we investigate those alternative systems relative to a set of metrics, by actually installing the software and reporting a hands-on experience of the installation process, usability, as well as other factors. The literature covers many aspects of open source software implementation and utilization in healthcare practice. Roughly, those aspects could be distilled into a basic taxonomy, making the

  5. English language learning activity using spoken language and intelligent computer-assisted technologies

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents work in progress on language technologies applied to secondary school education. The application presented integrates several state-of-the-art technologies related to spoken language and intelligent computer-assisted language learning. We envision to show that the technology has reached a level of maturity that suggests that the time may be right to use it to second language learning. To achieve this objective, an activity was designed to be tested at several Spanish...

  6. Using videos, apps and hands-on experience in undergraduate hydrology teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Loon, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological sciences teaching always needs to make a link between the classroom and the outside world. This can be done with fieldwork and excursions, but the increasing availability of open educational resources gives more-and-more other options to make theory more understandable and applicable. In the undergraduate teaching of hydrology at the University of Birmingham we make use of a number of tools to enhance the hydrology 'experience' of students. Firstly, we add hydrological science videos available in the public domain to our explanations of theory. These are both visualisations of concepts and recorded demonstrations in the field or the lab. One example is the concept of catchments and travel times which has been excellently visualised by MetEd. Secondly, we use a number of mobile phone apps, which provide virtual reality information and real-time monitoring information. We use the MySoil App (by Natural Environment Research Council (NERC), British Geological Survey (BGS) and Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (CEH)) and iGeology / iGeology3D (by BGS) to let students explore soil properties and hydrogeology of an area of interest. And we use the River Levels App (by OGL based on Environment Agency real time data) for exploring real time river levels and investigating spatial variability. Finally, we developed small hands-on projects for students to apply the theory outside the classroom. We for instance let them do simple infiltration experiments and ask them to them design a measurement plan. Evaluations have shown that students enjoy these activities and that it helps their learning. In this presentation we hope to share our experience so that the options for using open (educational) resources for hydrology teaching become more used in linking the classroom to the outside world.

  7. USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EDUCATIONAL EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES IN HIGHER TOURIST INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliia O. Matviyiv-Lozynska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with extracurricular educational activities in higher educational establishment of tourism profile with information technologies usage. It is known that extracurricular activities of higher educational establishment has an impact on the professional activities of future specialists in the tourism industry, as is in the process of extracurricular activities students can put into practice the obtained knowledge and skills. The task of teachers is to build a learning process, in particular activities outside classrooms as its component, so that the students were interested in it. In the modern world of tourism prosperity it is very difficult to do without the usage of multimedia technologies (internet, media, etc.

  8. R&D activities of tritium technologies on Broader Approach in Phase 2-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, Kanetsugu, E-mail: isobe.kanetsugu@jaea.go.jp; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Iwai, Yasunori; Oyaidzu, Makoto; Nakamura, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Takumi; Yamada, Masayuki; Edao, Yuki; Kurata, Rie; Hayashi, Takumi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • R&D activities of tritium technology on BA were introduced. • Representative results in each task were explained. • Future plan of this activity was introduced. - Abstract: Activities on Broader Approach (BA) were started in 2007. In Phase 2-2, many R&Ds, development of tritium accountancy technology, development of basic tritium safety research and tritium durability test, were implemented successfully by JAEA and Japanese Universities. In Phase 2-3, new collaborative study for tritium measurement and new R&D activities for JET ILW are started. R&D activities on BA have continued in Phase 2-3 (2014–2016).

  9. A brief review of JPL's electric propulsion technology activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, John W.; Chopra, Ann; Deininger, William D.; Garner, Charles E.; Pivirotto, Thomas J.; Sercel, Joel C.

    1989-01-01

    Near-term objectives and recent technological progress of JPL's electric propulsion program are discussed. Particular attention is given to accomplishments for ion, magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD), electron-cyclotron resonance (ECR), and arcjet thrusters. Xenon ion thruster erosion tests indicate a 15-fold reduction in tantalum baffle erosion when nitrogen is added to the xenon propellant and steady-state cylindrical MPD thruster tests at powers up to 72 kW show distinct self-constricted and diffuse discharge modes. An ECR thruster was operated at up to 7 kW with plasma acceleration at energies up to 7 kW; there was plasma acceleration at energies approaching 100 electron volts.

  10. Working Group 5: Measurements technology and active experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, E.; Barfield, J. N.; Faelthammar, C.-G.; Feynman, J.; Quinn, J. N.; Roberts, W.; Stone, N.; Taylor, W. L.

    1986-01-01

    Technology issues identified by working groups 5 are listed. (1) New instruments are needed to upgrade the ability to measure plasma properties in space. (2) Facilities should be developed for conducting a broad range of plasma experiments in space. (3) The ability to predict plasma weather within magnetospheres should be improved and a capability to modify plasma weather developed. (4) Methods of control of plasma spacecraft and spacecraft plasma interference should be upgraded. (5) The space station laboratory facilities should be designed with attention to problems of flexibility to allow for future growth. These issues are discussed.

  11. Shaping old age: Innovation partnerships, senior centres and billiards tables as active ageing technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Aske Juul

    2017-01-01

    During the past decade active ageing has been positioned as a solution to the problem of global ageing. While the scientific, economic and even moral arguments for pursuing a more active old age has been many, the integration of active ageing in everyday practices face challenges. This chapter...... explores the ways that active ageing policies become part of everyday practices, by proposing the concept of active ageing technologies. Active ageing technologies are material and immaterial condensations of knowledge that form old age in specific ways. Through the cases of an innovation partnership, two...... activity centres and a billiards table, the author explores how active ageing policies are transformed in practice. The chapter draws on an ethnographic study of active ageing conducted at the two activity centres, as well as the author’s participation in the innovation partnership. The author uses...

  12. Out-of-School Activities Related to Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Vázquez Alonso

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Artificial and natural environments constitute an extensive educational resource in whose framework the basic experiences that contribute to the development process of human beings occur. These experiences are the source of previous knowledge that students bring to school and that are key for building scientific school learning. This article reports the results of a study that addresses out-of-school experiences related to science and technology, through the application of an inventory list to a sample of students who were in their last year of compulsory education. The results show a relatively low overall frequency of experiences, characterized by some qualitative and quantitative differences according to a few grouping variables such as gender, the choice of an elective science subject, and different scientific topics and disciplines. In spite of its importance for learning, the school curriculum often ignores students’ previous experiences. Finally, we discuss the relevance of these results for developing a more equitable science and technology curriculum, from a perspective of a universal, humanistic science education.

  13. Synthesizing Technology Adoption and Learners' Approaches towards Active Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin; Cheung, George; Wan, Kelvin; Brown, Ian; Luk, Green

    2015-01-01

    In understanding how active and blended learning approaches with learning technologies engagement in undergraduate education, current research models tend to undermine the effect of learners' variations, particularly regarding their styles and approaches to learning, on intention and use of learning technologies. This study contributes to further…

  14. 78 FR 70567 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ...] Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final Programmatic... Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) for the Nationwide Use of High Frequency (HF) and Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Sound Navigation and Ranging (SONAR) Technology and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI...

  15. Emplotment, Embodiment, Engagement: Narrative Technology in Support of Physical Education, Sport and Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Tony

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on a keynote lecture delivered at the International Association of Physical Education in Higher Education 2011 Conference, University of Limerick, on the sub theme: "Technologies in Support of Physical Education, Sport, and Physical Activity." The paper outlines and illustrates a framework: narrative technology, which can be…

  16. CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MINWALL HJ

    2011-04-08

    Cast stone technology is being evaluated for potential application in the treatment and immobilization of Hanford low-activity waste. The purpose of this document is to provide background information on cast stone technology. The information provided in the report is mainly based on a pre-conceptual design completed in 2003.

  17. Activity Theory as a Conceptual Framework for Understanding Teacher Approaches to Information and Communication Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasavvidis, Ilias

    2009-01-01

    While the issue of teachers' perspectives on the barriers to technology use has received considerable attention, teacher concerns have not been studied in a systematic and holistic way. The present paper examines teacher concerns regarding a proposed technology-based innovation using Activity Theory as a theoretical framework. Fifty-one teachers…

  18. Technology Transfer Activities of NASA/MSFC: Enhancing the Southeast Region's Production Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivoli, George W.

    1998-01-01

    The researcher was charged with the task of developing a simplified model to illustrate the impact of how NASA/MSFC technology transfer activities contribute to shifting outward the Southeast region's and the nation's productive capacity. The report is a background of the impact of technological growth on the nation's production possibility frontier (ppf).

  19. 75 FR 53705 - Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ...-53706] [FR Doc No: 2010-21783] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0073] Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Request for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Protected...

  20. 75 FR 53706 - Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate: Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ...-53707] [FR Doc No: 2010-21786] DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0072] Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate: Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Request for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology TechSolutions...

  1. Utilizing Technology to Improve the Administration of Instructional Physical Activity Programs in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Bridget; Burdette, Trey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide examples of how technology is being used in one university to increase the organization and effectiveness of instructional physical activity programs (IPAPs). The article outlines ways in which technology can organize materials for students, instructors, and programs. Additionally, the article describes…

  2. The Potential of Using Virtual Reality Technology in Physical Activity Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, Denis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality technology has been successfully used for learning purposes. The purposes of the article are to examine current research on the role of virtual reality in physical activity settings and discuss potential application of using virtual reality technology to enhance learning in physical education. The article starts…

  3. 75 FR 44063 - Designation of the National Science and Technology Council to Coordinate Certain Activities Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    ... Science and Technology Council to Coordinate Certain Activities Under the Arctic Research and Policy Act of 1984 Memorandum for the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy By the authority... 107 and 108 of the Act to the Interagency Arctic Research Policy Committee, including...

  4. The Potential of Using Virtual Reality Technology in Physical Activity Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, Denis

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, virtual reality technology has been successfully used for learning purposes. The purposes of the article are to examine current research on the role of virtual reality in physical activity settings and discuss potential application of using virtual reality technology to enhance learning in physical education. The article starts…

  5. Application of active powders at fluidised bed heat treatment technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Babul, T.; Kucharieva, N.

    2014-01-01

    The paper describes the principles and conditions of carrying out of a new type of fluidised bed thermochemical treatment in chemically active powders with different ways of fluidisation. These new fluidised bed thermochemical treatments in chemically active powders are primarily for the formation of surface diffusion layers on parts made of constructional and tool steel. This method can be used for sherardising, alitising, carbonitriding, nitrocarburising, carburising or boronising. Chara...

  6. Methods for Evaluating Learner Activities with New Technologies: Guidelines for the Lab@Future Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanza-Simwami, Daisy; Engestrom, Yrjo; Amon, Tomaz

    2009-01-01

    The task of evaluating learner activities with new technologies is becoming increasingly complex because traditional evaluation strategies do not adequately consider the unique and often dynamic characteristics of learners and activities carried out. Learner activities are largely driven by motives and relationships that exist in the context in…

  7. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with

  8. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Code Reference Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer. However, the INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users comprised of a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events, quantify associated damage outcome frequencies, and identify important contributors to this damage (Level 1 PRA) and to analyze containment performance during a severe accident and quantify radioactive releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA evaluating a variety of operating conditions, for example, for a nuclear reactor at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, SAPHIRE can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for ansforming models built for internal event analysis to models for external event analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to both the public and the environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM provides a highly specialized user interface with SAPHIRE that automates SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events in a very efficient and expeditious manner. This reference guide will introduce the SAPHIRE Version 7.0 software. A brief discussion of the purpose and history of the software is included along with

  9. Physical activity and situational interest in mobile technology integrated physical education: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xihe Zhu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobile technology permeates every aspect of student lives. The question is whether mobile technology integration can produce desirable effects in the gymnasium. Objective: This preliminary study aimed to investigate the effects of mobile technology integration on student situational interest and physical activity fluctuation in physical education lessons.Methods: Sixth grade students (N = 53 were randomly placed into either an experiment group by class that utilized mobile technology-integrated resources (iPad and applications, or a comparison group that did not utilize technology. Both groups received five identical physical education lessons. Student physical activity was tracked with accelerometers, and they completed the Situational Interest Scale at the end of each lesson. The researchers analyzed the data using descriptive statistics, correlation analysis and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA with repeated measures. Results: Students in the experiment group reported significantly lower physical activity and situational interest than their counterparts in the comparison group. A group × lesson interaction suggested that student step/min steadily increased throughout the lessons in the experiment group while remaining relative stable in the comparison group. Conclusions: Mobile technologies such as iPad and applications with no direct physical activity prompt had little effect on increasing physical activity or situational interest in the short term. It is important to consider the classroom dynamics to realistically evaluate the constraints and strengths that mobile technology-integrated physical education lessons may pose in a traditional physical education environment.

  10. International Space Station: 6-8 Hands-on Science and Math Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Pat

    These lesson plans, designed for grades 6-8, have been developed to provide a guide to hands-on experience in science and math. They focus on an International Space Station and are designed for use with students working in groups. The three lesson plans highlighting the importance of the scientific method are: (1) International Space Station…

  11. International Space Station: K-5 Hands-on Science and Math Lesson Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeing Co., Huntsville, AL.

    The Space Station is already capturing the imaginations of American students, encouraging them to pursue careers in the sciences. The idea of living and working in space continues to spark this renewed interest. The material in this guide was developed to provide hands-on experiences in science and math in the context of an International Space…

  12. Job Performance Tests for U/AH-1 Helicopter Mechanics. Volume 1: Hands- On Performance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Hands-on performance tests and job knowledge tests were developed for MOS 6114 (U/AH-1 helicopter mechanic) as part of the Marine Corps Job ... Performance Measurement Project. The purpose of this information memorandum is to disseminate these performance measures to Marine Corps personnel managers

  13. Learning to Solve a Business Problem: "Hands-On" Can Get Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeson, Robyn; Billington, Leo; Barrett, Rowena

    2007-01-01

    Small business training can facilitate business growth. The authors show that a "hands-on" approach can have a direct impact on a business owner's current situation. They consider this in relation to the problem of being unable to find the right staff, demonstrating that a program such as the one they describe enables learning and addresses the…

  14. Hands-On Parent Support in Positive Guidance: Early Childhood Professionals as Mentors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland-Piazza, Laura; Saunders, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    This study reports findings from a follow-up study involving mothers and early childhood professionals who completed participation in a 12-week, hands-on parent education program in the United States. In this program, mothers learned about positive guidance in a weekly seminar, and additionally practised implementing positive guidance in an early…

  15. Introduction to Density Functional Theory: Calculations by Hand on the Helium Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseden, Kyle A.; Tye, Jesse W.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a type of electronic structure calculation that has rapidly gained popularity. In this article, we provide a step-by-step demonstration of a DFT calculation by hand on the helium atom using Slater's X-Alpha exchange functional on a single Gaussian-type orbital to represent the atomic wave function. This DFT…

  16. Students Doing Chemistry: A Hand-On Experience for K-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selco, Jodye I.; Bruno, Mary; Chan, Sue

    2012-01-01

    A hands-on, minds-on inquiry chemistry experiment was developed for use in K-12 schools that enables students to combine the chemicals of their choice and observe the results. The chemistry involved is water based and builds upon acid-base, double displacement, and iodometric detection of starch reactions. Chemicals readily available in the…

  17. Three Simple Hands-On Soil Exercises Extension Professionals Can Incorporate into Natural Sciences Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinschmidt, Andy

    2011-01-01

    The importance of healthy soil and of conveying the importance of soils starts by conveying a few basic concepts of soil science cannot be overstated. This article provides three hands-on exercises Extension professionals can add to natural resources or Master Gardener education curricula. These natural sciences exercises are easy to prepare for…

  18. "The Hands-On Model of the Internet": Engaging Diverse Groups of Visitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Based on ethnographic field research at the Miraikan National Museum of Emerging Science and Innovation in Tokyo, this article uses the "Hands-on Model of the Internet" in the Future, Innovation, and Society section of the museum as a case study in the various issues related to effective public engagement in science museums. Museum…

  19. Hands-On Teaching through a Student Field Project in Applied Geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasner, John Samuel; Crockett, Jeffrey Jon; Horton, Kimberly Beth; Poe, Michele Daun; Wollert, Matthew Todd

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Proffit Mountain project, part of a senior-level class in applied geophysics that provides students with hands-on experience in applying principles and techniques learned in class. Students conduct magnetic, gravity, and radiometric studies over a diabase body which intrudes rhyolite at Proffitt Mountain in southeast Missouri.…

  20. Hands-on Summer Camp to Attract K-12 Students to Engineering Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Muhittin; Ren, Jianhong; Custer, Sheryl; Coleman, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    This paper explains the organization and execution of a summer engineering outreach camp designed to attract and motivate high school students as well as increase their awareness of various engineering fields. The camp curriculum included hands-on, competitive design-oriented engineering projects from several disciplines: the electrical,…

  1. Visualizing the Transition State: A Hands-On Approach to the Arrhenius Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.; Swanson, Matthew S.; Sayers, Deborah K.

    2007-01-01

    An exercise is presented in which the kinetics of the irreversible "reaction" of pennies in the heads-up state to pennies in the tails-up state is simulated by a hands-on, Monte Carlo approach. In addition, the exercise incorporates a second simulation in which the irreversible "reaction" of dice with a red face uppermost to a blue face uppermost…

  2. Introduction to Density Functional Theory: Calculations by Hand on the Helium Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseden, Kyle A.; Tye, Jesse W.

    2014-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) is a type of electronic structure calculation that has rapidly gained popularity. In this article, we provide a step-by-step demonstration of a DFT calculation by hand on the helium atom using Slater's X-Alpha exchange functional on a single Gaussian-type orbital to represent the atomic wave function. This DFT…

  3. Convoy Active Safety Technology - Environmental Understanding and Navigation With Use of Low Cost Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    program, which was created to design a low cost, optionally manned vehicle ( OMV ) solution for tactical wheeled vehicle (TWV) fleet. This paper will...Active Safety Technology (CAST) development program sought to develop a low cost, optionally manned vehicle ( OMV ) solution. An objective of the CAST...Active Safety Technology (CAST) program, which was created to design a low cost, optionally manned vehicle ( OMV ) solution for tactical wheeled vehicle (TWV

  4. Innovative activity of high-technology companies as assessment and forecasting object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Sklyarov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovation activities, as well as innovations, are closely related meanings, and like many others economical definitions, have a broad range of meanings. Main characteristics and attributes of innovation involves new or significantly improved product, that’s being used, or in other words, found its application, and innovative activitiesactivities focused on realization of innovations. In this article, innovations are mainly considered in terms of high-technology production, evidence from Russian space industry. There are 5 basic stages of lifecycle of innovative project in considered industry: initiation, development, realization, expansion, consumption. Practically, third or fourth, or even both of these stages, often missing because there is no need of them. R&D activities, or even further serial production, based on previous developments, is an innovation activity, because these activities are stages of innovative projects lifecycle itself. Then it seems legit, to draw a conclusion, that in terms of high-technology production, company’s primary activity equals innovative activity. Basic characteristics of innovative activity of high-technology companies as assessment and forecasting object involves high level of uncertainty at every stage of projects lifecycle, high dependency on funding level of this activity, and high level and erratic structure of risk. All the above mentioned, means that assessment and forecasting of innovative activity of high-technology companies, needs development of its own methodological tools for each industry.

  5. ECUT: Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies program - Biocatalysis research activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, R.

    1984-01-01

    The activities of the Biocatalysis Research Activity are organized into the Biocatalysis and Molecular Modeling work elements and a supporting planning and analysis function. In the Biocatalysis work element, progress is made in developing a method for stabilizing genetically engineered traits in microorganisms, refining a technique for monitoring cells that are genetically engineered, and identifying strains of fungi for highly efficient preprocessing of biomass for optimizing the efficiency of bioreactors. In the Molecular Modeling work element, a preliminary model of the behavior of enzymes is developed. A preliminary investigation of the potential for synthesizing enzymes for use in electrochemical processes is completed. Contact with industry and universities is made to define key biocatalysis technical issues and to broaden the range of potential participants in the activity. Analyses are conducted to identify and evaluate potential concepts for future research funding.

  6. Radar activities of the DFVLR Institute for Radio Frequency Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keydel, W.

    1983-01-01

    Aerospace research and the respective applications microwave tasks with respect to remote sensing, position finding and communication are discussed. The radar activities are directed at point targets, area targets and volume targets; they center around signature research for earth and ocean remote sensing, target recognition, reconnaissance and camouflage and imaging and area observation radar techniques (SAR and SLAR). The radar activities cover a frequency range from 1 GHz up to 94 GHz. The radar program is oriented to four possible application levels: ground, air, shuttle orbits and satellite orbits. Ground based studies and measurements, airborne scatterometers and imaging radars, a space shuttle radar, the MRSE, and follow on experiments are considered.

  7. [MEDICAL SOCIAL MODELING TECHNOLOGIES FOR ACTIVE AGING IN KAZAKHSTAN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benberin, V V; Akhetov, A A; Tanbaeva, G Z

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses a new model for active ageing in Republic of Kazakhstan with participation the state, population and medical social services. Achieving active longevity will lead to positive trends in the development of human capital of the state, because it enables to use experience and knowledge of senior generation in enhancing the effectiveness of socio-economic transformation in health care. The study was carried out on the base of the Central clinical hospital of the President's affairs administration in Republic of Kazakhstan, with the participation of 147 admitted patients of elderly and senile age.

  8. Radar activities of the DFVLR Institute for Radio Frequency Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keydel, W.

    1983-01-01

    Aerospace research and the respective applications microwave tasks with respect to remote sensing, position finding and communication are discussed. The radar activities are directed at point targets, area targets and volume targets; they center around signature research for earth and ocean remote sensing, target recognition, reconnaissance and camouflage and imaging and area observation radar techniques (SAR and SLAR). The radar activities cover a frequency range from 1 GHz up to 94 GHz. The radar program is oriented to four possible application levels: ground, air, shuttle orbits and satellite orbits. Ground based studies and measurements, airborne scatterometers and imaging radars, a space shuttle radar, the MRSE, and follow on experiments are considered.

  9. Use of cellphone technology in activity and travel data collection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Krygsman, S

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Data needs of developing countries, particularly in terms of activity and travel data collection, are explored in this poster. This proof-of-concept study revealed that it is indeed possible to obtain detailed individual travel behaviour data from...

  10. Using Technology to Increase Physical Activity in Health Profession Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann Stark

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Health profession students may need help establishing and maintaining positive health behaviors when they are in college. This study explored the effectiveness of text messaging as an innovative method for promoting an increase in daily physical activity. A convenience sample (N = 134 was recruited from students at a college of Health and Human Services in Michigan. The participants were randomized into an intervention or control group (n = 67 each. The intervention group received daily affective text messages encouraging more physical activity by taking more steps. The control group received only messages reminding them to report their number of steps. All of the participants received a pedometer, completed a demographics and daily habits questionnaire, and completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS. There was no significant difference between the intervention and control groups in their number of daily steps. However, the most inactive participants had a significant increase in steps during the study period. Health profession students’ lifestyle behaviors have consequences, as they become caregivers in our dynamic, demanding health-care system. For those with the greatest need for physical activity, encouraging such activity via text messaging may improve their ability to care for themselves and their clients.

  11. Pro-active Management of Traffic Incidents Using Novel Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nitsche, P.; Olstam, J.; Taylor, N.; Reinthaler, M.; Ponweiser, W.; Bernhardsson, V.; Mocanu, I.; Uittenbogaard, J.; Dam, E. van

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of the assessment phase of the project PRIMA (Pro-Active Incident Management), where the benefits, costs and risks of novel traffic incident management techniques are investigated. The project targets the enhancement of current state-of-the-art measures for handling

  12. Route activity tracking and management using available technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Yousef Khoury

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Small organizations that maintain their own fleet and make their own deliveries are responsible for ensuring their drivers are utilizing the most efficient routes while delivering products to their customers. Furthermore, efficient delivery requires that drivers spend as little time as possible dropping off and picking up products, since these activities are referred to as “non-value added activities,” although they are necessary tasks in the order cycle process. To aid in reducing order cycle times, large organizations that can afford it have employed transportation management systems. Unfortunately, small organizations with limited resources are less likely to adopt transportation management systems, despite the need for such automation. One solution is to use available productivity software to track and manage driver route activity in an effort to improve and maintain driver productivity by reducing non-value time and identifying optimal routes. This paper will outline how office productivity software such as Microsoft® Access can meet the needs of small organizations with limited resources by describing the development and use of a route activity database that employs an easy-to-use multi-user interface. This paper also includes the details of the underlying infrastructure and the user interface.

  13. An Introduction to Cochlear Implant Technology, Activation, and Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jan A.; Teagle, Holly F. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides information about the hardware components and speech-processing strategies of cochlear implant systems. The use of assistive listening devices with cochlear implants is also discussed. A brief description of surgical procedures and the initial activation of the device are also presented, along with programming considerations.…

  14. Student tutors for hands-on training in focused emergency echocardiography – a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühl Matthias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Focused emergency echocardiography performed by non-cardiologists has been shown to be feasible and effective in emergency situations. During resuscitation a short focused emergency echocardiography has been shown to narrow down potential differential diagnoses and to improve patient survival. Quite a large proportion of physicians are eligible to learn focused emergency echocardiography. Training in focused emergency echocardiography usually comprises a lecture, hands-on trainings in very small groups, and a practice phase. There is a shortage of experienced echocardiographers who can supervise the second step, the hands-on training. We thus investigated whether student tutors can perform the hands-on training for focused emergency echocardiography. Methods A total of 30 volunteer 4th and 5th year students were randomly assigned to a twelve-hour basic echocardiography course comprising a lecture followed by a hands-on training in small groups taught either by an expert cardiographer (EC or by a student tutor (ST. Using a pre-post-design, the students were evaluated by an OSCE. The students had to generate two still frames with the apical five-chamber view and the parasternal long axis in five minutes and to correctly mark twelve anatomical cardiac structures. Two blinded expert cardiographers rated the students’ performance using a standardized checklist. Students could achieve a maximum of 25 points. Results Both groups showed significant improvement after the training (p Conclusions Hands-on training by student tutors led to a significant gain in echocardiography skills, although inferior to teaching by an expert cardiographer.

  15. Visual Sensor Technology for Advanced Surveillance Systems: Historical View, Technological Aspects and Research Activities in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Snidaro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a survey of the main technological aspects of advanced visual-based surveillance systems. A brief historical view of such systems from the origins to nowadays is given together with a short description of the main research projects in Italy on surveillance applications in the last twenty years. The paper then describes the main characteristics of an advanced visual sensor network that (a directly processes locally acquired digital data, (b automatically modifies intrinsic (focus, iris and extrinsic (pan, tilt, zoom parameters to increase the quality of acquired data and (c automatically selects the best subset of sensors in order to monitor a given moving object in the observed environment.

  16. Promoting Active Learning in Technology-Infused TILE Classrooms at the University of Iowa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Van Horne

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, the authors describe the successful implementation of technology-infused TILE classrooms at the University of Iowa. A successful collaboration among campus units devoted to instructional technologies and teacher development, the TILE Initiative has provided instructors with a new set of tools to support active learning. The authors detail the implementation of the TILE classrooms, the process of training instructors to design effective instruction for these classrooms, and an assessment project that helps improve the process of ensuring faculty can successfully facilitate learning activities in a technology-infused learning environment.

  17. Modern and prospective technologies for weather modification activities: A look at integrating unmanned aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axisa, Duncan; DeFelice, Tom P.

    2016-09-01

    Present-day weather modification technologies are scientifically based and have made controlled technological advances since the late 1990s, early 2000s. The technological advances directly related to weather modification have primarily been in the decision support and evaluation based software and modeling areas. However, there have been some technological advances in other fields that might now be advanced enough to start considering their usefulness for improving weather modification operational efficiency and evaluation accuracy. We consider the programmatic aspects underlying the development of new technologies for use in weather modification activities, identifying their potential benefits and limitations. We provide context and initial guidance for operators that might integrate unmanned aircraft systems technology in future weather modification operations.

  18. NASA Activities as they Relate to Microwave Technology for Aerospace Communications Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation discusses current NASA activities and plans as they relate to microwave technology for aerospace communications. The presentations discusses some examples of the aforementioned technology within the context of the existing and future communications architectures and technology development roadmaps. Examples of the evolution of key technology from idea to deployment are provided as well as the challenges that lay ahead regarding advancing microwave technology to ensure that future NASA missions are not constrained by lack of communication or navigation capabilities. The presentation closes with some examples of emerging ongoing opportunities for establishing collaborative efforts between NASA, Industry, and Academia to encourage the development, demonstration and insertion of communications technology in pertinent aerospace systems.

  19. MO-AB-210-00: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Control and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Hands-On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  20. Keys to active ageing: new communication technologies and lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-López, M Del Pilar; López-Liria, Remedios; Aguilar-Parra, José M; Padilla-Góngora, David

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the creation and implementation of an ICT education program for the elderly in various Active Participation Centers in Almería (Spain), assessing its impact on quality of life. From a randomized sample of 200 individuals over the age of 55. Results reveal a high degree of participant satisfaction (76.6 %), as well as improvements in quality of life as compared to the control group after the 3 month program health factor: p = 0.004; leisure and activity factor: p = 0.001; Satisfaction with Life Factor: p higher scores) and gender (the males). This study may serve to facilitate similar works that promotes on-going education in different locations and across the lifespan.

  1. Improving Physical Activity and Health with Information Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Koskivaara, Eija

    2014-01-01

    Part 2: Digital Society; International audience; Physical inactivity and overweight/obesity kill 6 million people yearly [1]. Regular physical activity (PA) such as walking, cycling, or participating in sports has significant benefits for health and weight-loss maintenance. It reduces of the risk of diseases, e.g. diabetes, depression, or helps weight controlling. This one year case study explores how daily monitoring of objective PA and weight effects on body mass index (BMI) -value when the...

  2. The Scanning Theremin Microscope: A Model Scanning Probe Instrument for Hands-On Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quardokus, Rebecca C.; Wasio, Natalie A.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2014-01-01

    A model scanning probe microscope, designed using similar principles of operation to research instruments, is described. Proximity sensing is done using a capacitance probe, and a mechanical linkage is used to scan this probe across surfaces. The signal is transduced as an audio tone using a heterodyne detection circuit analogous to that used in…

  3. A Hands-on Activity for Teaching the Poisson Distribution Using the Stock Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Mickey; Studstill, Sharyn

    2014-01-01

    The number of increases a particular stock makes over a fixed period follows a Poisson distribution. This article discusses using this easily-found data as an opportunity to let students become involved in the data collection and analysis process.

  4. Art Activities about Mesopotamia, Egypt and Islam. Hands-On Ancient People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Yvonne Y.

    This book features objects of the Mesopotamian, the Egyptian, and Islamic cultures. In exploring important contributions in ancient art, the book presents visuals that are interpretations of authentic artifacts, usually in museum collections, or illustrations from archaeological publications and articles. Historical items (n=55+) have been adapted…

  5. Art Activities about Vikings, Woodland Indians and Early Colonists. Hands-On America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Yvonne Y.

    This is the first book in a series that features folk art and everyday crafts for each century in the history of the United States. The book covers the period from 1598-1697. Based on museum and private collection artifacts, the book's objects are interpreted in paper and other accessible materials creating quality art projects for the camp,…

  6. The Scanning Theremin Microscope: A Model Scanning Probe Instrument for Hands-On Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quardokus, Rebecca C.; Wasio, Natalie A.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2014-01-01

    A model scanning probe microscope, designed using similar principles of operation to research instruments, is described. Proximity sensing is done using a capacitance probe, and a mechanical linkage is used to scan this probe across surfaces. The signal is transduced as an audio tone using a heterodyne detection circuit analogous to that used in…

  7. Art Activities about Mesopotamia, Egypt and Islam. Hands-On Ancient People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Yvonne Y.

    This book features objects of the Mesopotamian, the Egyptian, and Islamic cultures. In exploring important contributions in ancient art, the book presents visuals that are interpretations of authentic artifacts, usually in museum collections, or illustrations from archaeological publications and articles. Historical items (n=55+) have been adapted…

  8. A Hands-on Activity for Teaching the Poisson Distribution Using the Stock Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, Mickey; Studstill, Sharyn

    2014-01-01

    The number of increases a particular stock makes over a fixed period follows a Poisson distribution. This article discusses using this easily-found data as an opportunity to let students become involved in the data collection and analysis process.

  9. A Hands-On Activity to Raise Awareness about Healthy Sun Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    João Fonseca, Maria; Costa, Patrício; Lencastre, Leonor; Tavares, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation causes sunburn and has been consistently associated with increased susceptibility to melanoma and skin ageing. Acknowledging the need to promote healthy sun exposure habits, numerous educational initiatives have been developed to raise public awareness towards this issue. However, studies…

  10. Management of female handball players' activity applying interactive technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frolova L.S.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of developed methods for the control of female handball players' readiness to competitive activity was determined. The opportunities of team management regarding the specification of playing role, the formation of the starting line of players and the replacement according to game priorities in attack or defense were considered. The availability of the adequate zone of handball players' mobilizing readiness that allows to have a significant influence on individual effectiveness in the conditions of optimal management and to increase the quality of team game was determined.

  11. 新技术在幼儿科学活动教学中的应用%Application of New Technology in Children’s Scientific Activity Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢爱芬

    2016-01-01

    Visual perception,hands-on exploration,repeated experience and discovery are important ways of children’s scientific activity.However,in actual teaching,we may always meet some problems like insufficient resource support,the less feasibility of research ways,finiteness of technological support and inelasticity of personal scientific literacy,etc.Combining the actual teaching,from three aspects,namely,natural scientific activity,mathematic learning and the promotion of the interestingness of scientific activity,this paper expounds the advantages of new technology presented in the application like simple and convenient,efficient,and focusing on children’s development,etc.Suggests a prospect that new technology teaching resource base has the ability to cover completely the scientific activities of all grades,radiate to five big fields of children development,apply to automatic activities,and further realize kindergarten-based curriculum of new technology resource base,which provide strong support to children’s learning and development and promote deepened cooperation among kindergarten,family and community.%直观感知、动手探究、反复体验和发现是幼儿科学活动的重要方式。但实际教学中往往会面临资源支持不足、探究方式的可行性、技术支持的有限性和自身科学素养的不适应性等问题。本文结合实际课例从自然科学活动、数学学习和科学活动趣味性的提升三方面阐述了新技术在应用中所体现的简便、高效、注重幼儿发展等优势,展望了新技术教学资源库可以全面覆盖到各年段科学活动,辐射到幼儿发展五大领域里,应用到自主活动中,进而实现新技术资源库的园本化,给幼儿学习和发展提供强力的支持,并促进幼儿园、家庭、社区的深化合作。

  12. Oil and gas technology transfer activities and potential in eight major producing states. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    In 1990, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (the Compact) performed a study that identified the structure and deficiencies of the system by which oil and gas producers receive information about the potential of new technologies and communicate their problems and technology needs back to the research community. The conclusions of that work were that major integrated companies have significantly more and better sources of technology information than independent producers. The majors also have significantly better mechanisms for communicating problems to the research and development (R&D) community. As a consequence, the Compact recommended analyzing potential mechanisms to improve technology transfer channels for independents and to accelerate independents acceptance and use of existing and emerging technologies. Building on this work, the Compact, with a grant from the US Department Energy, has reviewed specific technology transfer organizations in each of eight major oil producing states to identify specific R&D and technology transfer organizations, characterize their existing activities, and identify potential future activities that could be performed to enhance technology transfer to oil and gas producers. The profiles were developed based on information received from organizations,follow-up interviews, site visit and conversations, and participation in their sponsored technology transfer activities. The results of this effort are reported in this volume. In addition, the Compact has also developed a framework for the development of evaluation methodologies to determine the effectiveness of technology transfer programs in performing their intended functions and in achieving desired impacts impacts in the producing community. The results of that work are provided in a separate volume.

  13. Technology Development Report: CDDF, Dual Use Partnerships, SBIR/STTR: Fiscal Year 2003 Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, John W.

    2004-01-01

    The FY2003 NASA John C. Stennis Stennis Space Center (SSC) Technology Development Report provides an integrated report of all technology development activities at SSC. This report actually combines three annual reports: the Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) Program Report, Dual Use Program Report, and the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)/Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program Report. These reports are integrated in one document to summarize all technology development activities underway in support of the NASA missions assigned to SSC. The Dual Use Program Report provides a summary review of the results and status of the nine (9) Dual Use technology development partnership projects funded and managed at SSC during FY2003. The objective of these partnership projects is to develop or enhance technologies that will meet the technology needs of the two NASA SSC Mission Areas: Propulsion Test and Earth Science Applications. During FY2003, the TDTO managed twenty (20) SBIR Phase II Projects and two (2) STTR Phase II Projects. The SBIR contracts support low TRL technology development that supports both the Propulsion Test and the Earth Science Application missions. These projects are shown in the SBIR/STTR Report. In addition to the Phase II contracts, the TDTO managed ten (10) SBIR Phase I contracts which are fixed price, six month feasibility study contracts. These are not listed in this report. Together, the Dual Use Projects and the SBIR/STTR Projects constitute a technology development partnership approach that has demonstrated that success can be achieved through the identification of the technical needs of the NASA mission and using various available partnership techniques to maximize resource utilization to achieve mutual technology goals. Greater use of these partnership techniques and the resource leveraging they provide, is a goal of the TDTO, providing more support to meet the technology development needs of the mission areas at

  14. Effects of a Physical Education Supportive Curriculum and Technological Devices on Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Emily Dean; Sullivan, Eileen C.; Ciccomascolo, Lori E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a physical education supportive curriculum and technological devices, heart rate monitor (HRM) and pedometer (PED), on physical activity. A single-subject ABAB research design was used to examine amount and level of participation in physical activity among 106 suburban fourth and fifth…

  15. BULK VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ARD KE

    2011-04-11

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper is intended to provide the reader with general understanding of Bulk Vitrification and how it might be applied to immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste.

  16. Science and Technology Librarians: User Engagement and Outreach Activities in the Area of Scholarly Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Lutishoor; Speer, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This paper highlights the findings of a survey completed by ACRL/STS [Association of College and Research Libraries/Science and Technology Section] members on scholarly communication issues. In particular it identifies the percentage of their daily activities that are spent in support of scholarly communication activities; extent of change of job…

  17. Effects of a Physical Education Supportive Curriculum and Technological Devices on Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapham, Emily Dean; Sullivan, Eileen C.; Ciccomascolo, Lori E.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a physical education supportive curriculum and technological devices, heart rate monitor (HRM) and pedometer (PED), on physical activity. A single-subject ABAB research design was used to examine amount and level of participation in physical activity among 106 suburban fourth and fifth…

  18. A JOULE-HEATED MELTER TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KELLY SE

    2011-04-07

    This report is one of four reports written to provide background information regarding immobilization technologies remaining under consideration for supplemental immobilization of Hanford's low-activity waste. This paper provides the reader a general understanding of joule-heated ceramic lined melters and their application to Hanford's low-activity waste.

  19. Exploration of Tensions in a Mobile-Technology Supported Fieldtrip: An Activity Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chih-Hung; Chen, Fei-Ching; Yang, Jie-Chi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze how mobile technologies were incorporated and implemented in an outdoor learning activity. Two classes of primary school students participated in the experiment. Using activity theory as an analytical framework, it is found that underlying tensions provided rich insights into system dynamics and that…

  20. [Construction of a healthcare-related information technology education praxis for graduate school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Jefferson Paixão; Rosa, Valéria Argolo; Lopes, Claudia Ribeiro Santos; Vilela, Alba Benemérita Alves; de Santana, Aurisan Souza; da Silva, Sandro Tonini

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an information technology education practice for healthcare practitioners in graduate school. Based on hands-on experience of the Information Technology Applied to Healthcare classes at the Jequié Campus of the Southeast Bahia State University (UESB) for the Nursing and Physiotherapy courses, an experience is reported that stresses the importance of teaching information technology by establishing links between Information and Communications Technologies and the praxis of the healthcare practitioners, enhancing the educational process and allowing students to 'visualize' how such technologies could be used for producing and qualifying impacts on their professional activities.

  1. A simulator application of a 'hands-on throttle and stick' concept to a transport pilot/autopilot interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets, A. M.; Parrish, R. V.; Hogge, T. W.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the initial experiences garnered in applying a multifunction control strategy, based on the U.S. Air Force's 'Hands-On Throttle-and-Stick' concept for fighter aircraft to a transport aircraft simulator. The multifunction control strategy involves the activation of various flight system/subsystem operations (such as guidance and control, communication, and navigation functions) by use of menu displays and throttle and stick switches. The initial application of this multifunction control (MFC) concept was developed around a pilot/autopilot interface, contrasting a conventional, dedicated autopilot interface to an MFC implementation. The simulator characteristics and autopilot functions, as well as the conventional interface and MFC hardware/software, which were utilized in the application, are described herein. Initial pilot reaction and suggested improvements to this particular implementation are discussed. The paper terminates with a glance at plans for improvements and future applications based on the outcome of this initial study.

  2. Hollow mesoporous titania microspheres: New technology and enhanced photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhenliang; Wei, Wenrui; Wang, Litong; Hong, Ruoyu

    2015-12-01

    Hollow titania microspheres (HTS) were fabricated via a sol-gel process by coating the hydrolysis product of titanium tetrabutoxide (TBOT) onto the amino (-NH2) modified porous polystyrene cross-linked divinyl benzene (PS-DVB) microspheres under changing atmospheric pressure, followed by calcination in nitrogen and air atmosphere. Particularly, the atmospheric pressure was continuously and regularly changed during the formation process of PS-DVB@TiO2 microspheres. Then the TiO2 particles were absorbed into the pores and onto the surface of PS-DVB as well. The resultant HTS (around 2 μm in diameter) featured a high specific surface area (84.37 m2/g), anatase crystal and stable hollow microsphere structure, which led to high photocatalysis activity. The photocatalytic degradation of malachite green (MG) organic dye solution was conducted under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, which showed a high photocatalytic ability (81% of MG was degraded after UV irradiation for 88 min). Therefore, it could be potentially applied for the treatment of wastewater contaminated by organic pollutants.

  3. Establishing CAD/CAM in Preclinical Dental Education: Evaluation of a Hands-On Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindling, Franz Sebastian; Deisenhofer, Ulrich Karl; Porsche, Monika; Rammelsberg, Peter; Kappel, Stefanie; Stober, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a hands-on computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) module in a preclinical dental course in restorative dentistry. A controlled trial was conducted by dividing a class of 56 third-year dental students in Germany into study and control groups; allocation to the two groups depended on student schedules. Prior information about CAD/CAM-based restorations was provided for all students by means of lectures, preparation exercises, and production of gypsum casts of prepared resin teeth. The study group (32 students) then participated in a hands-on CAD/CAM module in small groups, digitizing their casts and designing zirconia frameworks for single crowns. The digitization process was introduced to the control group (24 students) solely by means of a video-supported lecture. To assess the knowledge gained, a 20-question written examination was administered; 48 students took the exam. The results were analyzed with Student's t-tests at a significance level of 0.05. The results on the examination showed a significant difference between the two groups: the mean scores were 16.8 (SD 1.7, range 13-19) for the study group and 12.5 (SD 3, range 4-18) for the control group. After the control group had also experienced the hands-on module, a total of 48 students from both groups completed a questionnaire with 13 rating-scale and three open-ended questions evaluating the module. Those results showed that the module was highly regarded by the students. This study supports the idea that small-group hands-on courses are helpful for instruction in digital restoration design. These students' knowledge gained and satisfaction seemed to justify the time, effort, and equipment needed.

  4. Learner portfolios and hands-on workshop to facilitate and evaluate nurses' learning in obstetric ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Anthony; Blackburn, Mary

    2011-01-01

    Over the past three decades, ultrasound has played an increasing role in perinatal nursing. In obstetric triage, many clients present with indications for ultrasound. In one institution's triage unit, restrictive policies, lack of opportunities for learning skills, and an unstructured method of verifying competence created barriers to nurses learning ultrasound. A revised approach using learner portfolios and a hands-on workshop resulted in improved acquisition of skills, learner confidence, and increased accessibility of ultrasound to clients.

  5. Supporting the upper body with the hand on the thigh reduces back loading during lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingma, Idsart; Faber, Gert S; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2016-04-11

    When picking objects from the floor, low back pain patients often tend to support the upper body by leaning with one hand on a thigh. While this strategy may reduce back load, this has not yet been assessed, probably due to the difficulty of measuring the forces between hand and thigh. Ten healthy male subjects lifted a pencil and a crate from the floor, with four lifting techniques (free, squat, stoop and a Weight Lifters Technique (WLT)), each of which was performed with and without supporting with one hand on the thigh. A six Degrees of Freedom force transducer, with a comfortable surface to support the hand on, was mounted just above the subject׳s left knee. Hand forces, ground reaction forces, full body kinematics, and trunk EMG were measured. Using inverse dynamics and taking the forces between hand and thigh into account, we calculated 3D L5S1 joint moments, and subsequently estimated spine forces using an EMG-assisted trunk model. For lifting a pencil, hand support reduced average peak total moments by 17-25%, dependent on lifting technique. For crate lifting, hand support reduced total moments by 13-19% compared with one-handed lifting and by 14-26% compared to two-handed lifting. Hand support slightly increased asymmetric motions and caused a substantial increase in asymmetric moments in crate lifting. For compression forces, reductions (up to 28%) were seen in all techniques except in stoop lifts. It is concluded that leaning with a hand on the thigh can lead to substantial reductions of low back loading during lifting.

  6. Comparing hands-on and video training for postpartum hemorrhage management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Cecilia; Sørensen, Bjarke Lund; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to compare two teaching methods for postpartum hemorrhage management: interactive hands-on training and non-interactive video training. In a controlled intervention study at a secondary health care center in Kenya, the two training methods, based on the Advanced Life Support...... to overcome the outreach gap in sub-Saharan Africa's rural areas, where peripheral health facilities are generally difficult to reach with conventional training programs....

  7. Oracle SOA BPEL PM 11g R1 a hands-on tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Saraswathi, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    This hands-on, example-driven guide is a practical getting started tutorial with plenty of step-by-step instructions for beginner to intermediate level readers working with BPEL PM in Oracle SOA SuiteWritten for SOA developers, administrators, architects, and engineers who want to get started with Oracle BPEL PM 11g. No previous experience with BPEL PM is required, but an understanding of SOA and web services is assumed

  8. HandNavigator: Hands-on Interaction for Desktop Virtual Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Kry, Paul; Pihuit, Adeline; Bernhardt, Adrien; Cani, Marie-Paule

    2008-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a novel interaction system, aimed at hands-on manipulation of digital models through natural hand gestures. Our system is composed of a new physical interaction device coupled with a simulated compliant virtual hand model. The physical interface consists of a SpaceNavigator, augmented with pressure sensors to detect directional forces applied by the user's fingertips. This information controls the position, orientation, and posture of the virtual ha...

  9. Managing Social Activity and Participation in Large Classes with Mobile Phone Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Thatcher

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the context of a developing country, suchas South Africa, access to technology is severely limited.However, most South Africans have relatively good access tomobile phone technology in relation to other portable andmobile technology. In this initiative, students wereencouraged to use mobile phone text messaging to sendquestions to the lecturer during classes or between classes. Atotal of 86 text messages were sent to the lecturer during a 7-week, second year psychology course. At the end of thecourse 136 responses to questionnaire distributed in classwas obtained. This data was analysed using activity theoryas a framework for the discussion. The results indicated thatstudents had strongly favorable perceptions of this initiativeand respondents had spontaneously suggested other uses ofmobile phone technology to enhance the learningexperience. Activity theory provided a useful framework forevaluating the use of mobile phone text messages to enhancestudent participation and learning.

  10. The Role of Technology in Science Teaching Activities: Web Based Teaching Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma ALKAN

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available 2015 Abstract In this research the attitudes of pre-service teachers studying at Hacettepe University, Division of Science Education towards the importance of technological equipment in chemistry education activities and how effective they find technology in teaching different skills and applications have been examined. Pre-test/post-test control group design has been used in the research. In the experimental group Titrimetric Analysis has been conducted with simulations supported web based instruction and in the control group with teacher-centered instruction. In general, it has been found out that the attitudes of pre-service teachers in experiment group towards the importance of technological equipment as a teaching tool in chemistry are more positive than those in control group. In other words, statistically significant differences have occurred in attitudes of pre-service teachers in both experiment and control group towards the role of technology in chemistry teaching activities after web based teaching.

  11. The impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Austin, Edward; Donley, Shawn; Graham, George; Harris, Terry; Kaynes, Ian; Lee, Ben; Sparrow, James

    1993-01-01

    The findings of an investigation conducted under the auspices of The Technical Cooperation Program (TTCP) to assess the impact of active controls technology on the structural integrity of aeronautical vehicles and to evaluate the present state-of-the-art for predicting loads caused by a flight-control system modification and the resulting change in the fatigue life of the flight vehicle are summarized. Important points concerning structural technology considerations implicit in applying active controls technology in new aircraft are summarized. These points are well founded and based upon information received from within the aerospace industry and government laboratories, acquired by sponsoring workshops which brought together experts from contributing and interacting technical disciplines, and obtained by conducting a case study to independently assess the state of the technology. The paper concludes that communication between technical disciplines is absolutely essential in the design of future high performance aircraft.

  12. School of Rock: An Ocean-going, Hands-on Research Expedition for Earth and Ocean Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peart, L.; Niemitz, M.; Klaus, A.; Leckie, M.; Houpt, D.; Hamlin, B.; Crowder, L.; Firth, J.; Weiss, P.; Peng, C.; Slough, S.

    2005-12-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) - United States Implementing Organization (USIO) took advantage of a 16-day break between scientific operations to carry out a seagoing pilot educator workshop on board the JOIDES Resolution during a transit from Victoria, B.C., Canada, to Acapulco, Mexico. During this workshop, 10 educators from all across the United States were mentored and taught by scientists who are actively engaged in IODP research, the USIO Education Director, and staff. In addition, shipboard technical staff provided guidance and content related to hands-on laboratory activities. The pilot program provided the educators with an opportunity to participate in a seagoing experience on a scientific drilling research vessel and conduct a series of research activities similar to those that take place during regular scientific drilling expeditions. The workshop allowed educators to increase their knowledge of IODP and scientific methods as borne out through ocean drilling (proposals, drilling, lab analysis, data acquisition, postcruise activities) as well as knowledge of mid-ocean ridges, composition and structure of the oceanic crust, seafloor spreading, paleoceanography, paleomagnetism, and sedimentology. The workshop participants translated the scientific results into useful teaching resources by developing a suite of new discovery-based activities related to ocean drilling research that will undergo classroom testing by workshop participants. Over the school year the educators will help disseminate IODP science education by conducting at least two teacher workshops based on this seagoing experience, enhanced scientific knowledge gained from participating in the workshop, and the new activities developed en route.

  13. Comparing hands-on and video training for postpartum hemorrhage management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Cecilia; Sørensen, Bjarke Lund; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2014-05-01

    The objective was to compare two teaching methods for postpartum hemorrhage management: interactive hands-on training and non-interactive video training. In a controlled intervention study at a secondary health care center in Kenya, the two training methods, based on the Advanced Life Support in Obstetrics curriculum, were evaluated utilizing structured observation of a standardized scenario before and after training. Both intervention groups significantly increased in performance scores after receiving hands-on training: 40% (95% CI 29.5-47.0) and video training: 34.5% (95% CI 25.0-42.0); likewise, pass rates improved significantly. No significant differences in performance score or pass rates were found between the two methods. The findings indicate that postpartum hemorrhage management training by mobile media might be just as effective as conventional hands-on training and a feasible way to overcome the outreach gap in sub-Saharan Africa's rural areas, where peripheral health facilities are generally difficult to reach with conventional training programs. © 2014 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. NASA's Advanced Propulsion Technology Activities for Third Generation Fully Reusable Launch Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueter, Uwe

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Office of Aeronautics and Space Transportation Technology (OASTT) established the following three major goals, referred to as "The Three Pillars for Success": Global Civil Aviation, Revolutionary Technology Leaps, and Access to Space. The Advanced Space Transportation Program Office (ASTP) at the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. focuses on future space transportation technologies under the "Access to Space" pillar. The Propulsion Projects within ASTP under the investment area of Spaceliner100, focus on the earth-to-orbit (ETO) third generation reusable launch vehicle technologies. The goals of Spaceliner 100 is to reduce cost by a factor of 100 and improve safety by a factor of 10,000 over current conditions. The ETO Propulsion Projects in ASTP, are actively developing combination/combined-cycle propulsion technologies that utilized airbreathing propulsion during a major portion of the trajectory. System integration, components, materials and advanced rocket technologies are also being pursued. Over the last several years, one of the main thrusts has been to develop rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) technologies. The focus has been on conducting ground tests of several engine designs to establish the RBCC flowpaths performance. Flowpath testing of three different RBCC engine designs is progressing. Additionally, vehicle system studies are being conducted to assess potential operational space access vehicles utilizing combined-cycle propulsion systems. The design, manufacturing, and ground testing of a scale flight-type engine are planned. The first flight demonstration of an airbreathing combined cycle propulsion system is envisioned around 2005. The paper will describe the advanced propulsion technologies that are being being developed under the ETO activities in the ASTP program. Progress, findings, and future activities for the propulsion technologies will be discussed.

  15. Harpoon technology development for the active removal of space debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudziak, Roger; Tuttle, Sean; Barraclough, Simon

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the results of preliminary empirical testing and numerical modelling carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of using a harpoon in an ADR application. Empirical testing involving the impact of blunt and conical shaped steel tips into 3 mm Al plate showed that the ballistic limit varies in proportion to the tip circumference, with conical shapes resulting in a higher relative ballistic limit due to the additional energy required for petaling. The creation of secondary debris was also monitored. It was found that blunt shapes created a plug during penetration as a result of shearing around the periphery of the projectile, whilst conical tips resulted in minor spalling and fragmentation. Preliminary oblique impact testing with conical and blunt tips showed that the ballistic limit increases with obliquity at a greater rate for blunt tips than conical ones. Impact testing of 3 mm Al plate with conical projectiles at low temperatures showed a more brittle fracture mode when compared with targets impacted at room temperature. As such, the fragmentation and spalling evident in room temperature targets was absent. The energy required to perforate the cooled plates also increased. Impact testing of Al panel obstructed with fixed heat pipes showed that the harpoon could successfully penetrate a target panel with such an obstruction due to shearing of the pipe flange. Testing of two lock on mechanisms showed that both a spring activated and integrated toggle could reliably open upon impact. This testing also used a tensile testing machine to show that both designs could withstand the force expected during deorbiting manoeuvres after impact with Al H/C panels. A parametric simulation comparing the diameter of conical tips with ballistic limits showed a good agreement with the predictions of De Marre's formula for normal impact. This suggests that the ballistic limit of plates impacted by conical projectiles can be successfully extrapolated with limited

  16. Promoting Active Learning in Technology-Infused TILE Classrooms at the University of Iowa

    OpenAIRE

    Sam Van Horne; Cecilia Murniati; Jon D. H. Gaffney; Maggie Jesse

    2012-01-01

    In this case study, the authors describe the successful implementation of technology-infused TILE classrooms at the University of Iowa. A successful collaboration among campus units devoted to instructional technologies and teacher development, the TILE Initiative has provided instructors with a new set of tools to support active learning. The authors detail the implementation of the TILE classrooms, the process of training instructors to design effective instruction for these classrooms, and...

  17. The use of a hands-on model in learning the regulation of an inducible operon and the development of a gene regulation concept inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanski, Katherine M.

    A central concept in genetics is the regulation of gene expression. Inducible gene expression is often taught in undergraduate biology courses using the lac operon of Escherichia coli (E. coli ). With national calls for reform in undergraduate biology education and a body of literature that supports the use of active learning techniques including hands-on learning and analogies we were motivated to develop a hands-on analogous model of the lac operon. The model was developed over two iterations and was administered to genetics students. To determine the model's worth as a learning tool a concept inventory (CI) was developed using rigorous protocols. Concept inventories are valuable tools which can be used to assess students' understanding of a topic and pinpoint commonly held misconceptions as well as the value of educational tools. Through in-class testing (n =115) the lac operon concept inventory (LOCI) was demonstrated to be valid, predictive, and reliable (? coefficient = 0.994). LOCI scores for students who participated in the hands-on activity (n = 67) were 7.5% higher (t = -2.281, P operon. We were able to determine the efficacy of the activity and identify misconceptions held by students about the lac operon because of the use of a valid and reliable CI.

  18. Cognitive Achievement and Motivation in Hands-On and Teacher-Centred Science Classes: Does an Additional Hands-On Consolidation Phase (Concept Mapping) Optimise Cognitive Learning at Work Stations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner, Sabine; Bogner, Franz X.

    2010-01-01

    Our study monitored the cognitive and motivational effects within different educational instruction schemes: On the one hand, teacher-centred versus hands-on instruction; on the other hand, hands-on instruction with and without a knowledge consolidation phase (concept mapping). All the instructions dealt with the same content. For all…

  19. Activity Theory as a Framework for Investigating District-Classroom System Interactions and Their Influences on Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Anika Ball

    2012-01-01

    Technology implementation research indicates that teachers' beliefs and knowledge, as well as a host of institutional factors, can influence technology integration. Drawing on third-generation activity theory, this article conceptualizes technology implementation as a network of planning and integration activities carried out by technology…

  20. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Intergrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Summary Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). INL's primary role in this project is that of software developer and tester. However, INL also plays an important role in technology transfer by interfacing and supporting SAPHIRE users, who constitute a wide range of PRA practitioners from the NRC, national laboratories, the private sector, and foreign countries. SAPHIRE can be used to model a complex system’s response to initiating events and quantify associated consequential outcome frequencies. Specifically, for nuclear power plant applications, SAPHIRE can identify important contributors to core damage (Level 1 PRA) and containment failure during a severe accident which lead to releases (Level 2 PRA). It can be used for a PRA where the reactor is at full power, low power, or at shutdown conditions. Furthermore, it can be used to analyze both internal and external initiating events and has special features for transforming an internal events model to a model for external events, such as flooding and fire analysis. It can also be used in a limited manner to quantify risk in terms of release consequences to the public and environment (Level 3 PRA). SAPHIRE also includes a separate module called the Graphical Evaluation Module (GEM). GEM is a special user interface linked to SAPHIRE that automates the SAPHIRE process steps for evaluating operational events at commercial nuclear power plants. Using GEM, an analyst can estimate the risk associated with operational events (for example, to calculate a conditional core damage probability) very efficiently and expeditiously. This report provides an overview of the functions

  1. Alternate particle removal technologies for the Airborne Activity Confinement System at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, J.E.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Gelbard, F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1991-09-01

    This report presents a review of the filtration technologies available for the removal of particulate material from a gas stream. It was undertaken to identify alternate filtration technologies that may be employed in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. This report is organized into six sections: (1) a discussion of the aerosol source term and its definition, (2) a short discussion of particle and gaseous contaminant removal mechanisms, (3) a brief overview of particle removal technologies, (4) a discussion of the existing AACS and its potential shortcomings, (5) an enumeration of issues to be addressed in upgrading the AACS, and, (6) a detailed discussion of the identified technologies. The purpose of this report is to identity available options to the existing particle removal system. This system is in continuous operation during routine operation of the reactor. As will be seen, there are a number of options and the selection of any technology or combination of technologies will depend on the design aerosol source term (yet to be appropriately defined) as well as the flow requirements and configuration. This report does not select a specific technology. It focuses on particulate removal and qualitatively on the removal of radio-iodine and mist elimination. Candidate technologies have been selected from industrial and nuclear gas cleaning applications.

  2. Alternate particle removal technologies for the Airborne Activity Confinement System at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brockmann, J.E.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Gelbard, F. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1991-09-01

    This report presents a review of the filtration technologies available for the removal of particulate material from a gas stream. It was undertaken to identify alternate filtration technologies that may be employed in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. This report is organized into six sections: (1) a discussion of the aerosol source term and its definition, (2) a short discussion of particle and gaseous contaminant removal mechanisms, (3) a brief overview of particle removal technologies, (4) a discussion of the existing AACS and its potential shortcomings, (5) an enumeration of issues to be addressed in upgrading the AACS, and, (6) a detailed discussion of the identified technologies. The purpose of this report is to identity available options to the existing particle removal system. This system is in continuous operation during routine operation of the reactor. As will be seen, there are a number of options and the selection of any technology or combination of technologies will depend on the design aerosol source term (yet to be appropriately defined) as well as the flow requirements and configuration. This report does not select a specific technology. It focuses on particulate removal and qualitatively on the removal of radio-iodine and mist elimination. Candidate technologies have been selected from industrial and nuclear gas cleaning applications.

  3. Active assistance technology for health-related behavior change: an interdisciplinary review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Catriona M; Powell, John; Payne, Thomas H; Ainsworth, John; Boyd, Alan; Buchan, Iain

    2012-06-14

    Information technology can help individuals to change their health behaviors. This is due to its potential for dynamic and unbiased information processing enabling users to monitor their own progress and be informed about risks and opportunities specific to evolving contexts and motivations. However, in many behavior change interventions, information technology is underused by treating it as a passive medium focused on efficient transmission of information and a positive user experience. To conduct an interdisciplinary literature review to determine the extent to which the active technological capabilities of dynamic and adaptive information processing are being applied in behavior change interventions and to identify their role in these interventions. We defined key categories of active technology such as semantic information processing, pattern recognition, and adaptation. We conducted the literature search using keywords derived from the categories and included studies that indicated a significant role for an active technology in health-related behavior change. In the data extraction, we looked specifically for the following technology roles: (1) dynamic adaptive tailoring of messages depending on context, (2) interactive education, (3) support for client self-monitoring of behavior change progress, and (4) novel ways in which interventions are grounded in behavior change theories using active technology. The search returned 228 potentially relevant articles, of which 41 satisfied the inclusion criteria. We found that significant research was focused on dialog systems, embodied conversational agents, and activity recognition. The most covered health topic was physical activity. The majority of the studies were early-stage research. Only 6 were randomized controlled trials, of which 4 were positive for behavior change and 5 were positive for acceptability. Empathy and relational behavior were significant research themes in dialog systems for behavior change, with

  4. Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands- on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Mailloux, B. J.; Martin, S.; Kelsey, R.; Bower, P.

    2008-12-01

    Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands-on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College T. C. Kenna, S. Pfirman, B. J. Mailloux, M. Stute, R. Kelsey, and P. Bower By adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program (SEA semester) to the typical college format of classes, we are improving the technical and quantitative skills of undergraduate women and minorities in environmental science and improving their critical thinking and problem-solving by exposing our students to open-ended real-world environmental issues. Our approach uses the Hudson River Estuary as a natural laboratory. In a series of hands-on inquiry-based activities, students use advanced equipment to collect data and samples. Each class session introduces new analytical and data analysis techniques. All classes have the connecting theme of the river. Working with real data is open-ended. Our major findings as indicated by surveys as well as journaling throughout the semester are that the field- based experience significantly contributed to student learning and engagement. Journaling responses indicated that nearly all students discussed the importance and excitement of an authentic research experience. Some students were frustrated with data irregularities, uncertainty in methods and data, and the general challenge of a curriculum with inherent ambiguity. The majority were satisfied with the aims of the course to provide an integrative experience. All students demonstrated transfer of learned skills. This project has had a significant impact on our undergraduate female students: several students have pursued senior thesis projects stemming from grant activities, stating that the field activities were the highlight of their semester. Some students love the experience and want more. Others decide that they want to pursue a different career. All learn how science is conducted and have a better foundation to understand concepts such

  5. Current Research Activities in Drive System Technology in Support of the NASA Rotorcraft Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Drive system technology is a key area for improving rotorcraft performance, noise/vibration reduction, and reducing operational and manufacturing costs. An overview of current research areas that support the NASA Rotorcraft Program will be provided. Work in drive system technology is mainly focused within three research areas: advanced components, thermal behavior/emergency lubrication system operation, and diagnostics/prognostics (also known as Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS)). Current research activities in each of these activities will be presented. Also, an overview of the conceptual drive system requirements and possible arrangements for the Heavy Lift Rotorcraft program will be reviewed.

  6. A Hands-On Course for Five Hundred Students: Introduction to Engineering I at PUC-Rio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza da Costa, Therezinha; Alberto dos Reis Parise, Jose; Azevedo da Silveira, Marcos; Scavarda do Carmo, Luiz Carlos

    This paper is a report on the teaching experiment conducted in the Introduction to Engineering I course at PUC-Rio's Technical-Scientific Center (CTC) during the two terms of 1997. The idea was to test and develop hands-on teaching methodology as set forth in "Hands-on Teaching and Concurrent Teaching: Relations and Difficulties" (Carmo…

  7. How Authenticity and Self-Directedness and Student Perceptions Thereof Predict Competence Development in Hands-On Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Anne; Gulikers, Judith; Biemans, Harm; Mulder, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hands-on simulations are increasingly used in vocational oriented curricula to create meaningful, occupation-related learning experiences. However, more insight is required about precisely what characteristics in hands-on simulations enhance outcomes that students need for their future occupation, such as competencies. This study aims to examine…

  8. Implementation of a Modular Hands-on Learning Pedagogy: Student Attitudes in a Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgher, J. K.; Finkel, D.; Adesope, O. O.; Van Wie, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a within-subjects experimental design to compare the effects of learning with lecture and hands-on desktop learning modules (DLMs) in a fluid mechanics and heat transfer class. The hands-on DLM implementation included the use of worksheets and one of two heat exchangers: an evaporative cooling device and a shell and tube heat…

  9. Embedding Hands-On Mini Laboratory Experiences in a Core Undergraduate Fluid Mechanics Course: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Duanduan; Ugaz, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Three self-contained mini-labs were integrated into a core undergraduate fluid mechanics course, with the goal of delivering hands-on content in a manner scalable to large class sizes. These mini-labs supported learning objectives involving friction loss in pipes, flow measurement, and centrifugal pump analysis. The hands-on experiments were…

  10. Implementation of a Modular Hands-on Learning Pedagogy: Student Attitudes in a Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgher, J. K.; Finkel, D.; Adesope, O. O.; Van Wie, B. J.

    2015-01-01

    This study used a within-subjects experimental design to compare the effects of learning with lecture and hands-on desktop learning modules (DLMs) in a fluid mechanics and heat transfer class. The hands-on DLM implementation included the use of worksheets and one of two heat exchangers: an evaporative cooling device and a shell and tube heat…

  11. Twenty-first century skills for students: hands-on learning after school builds school and life success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Leide

    2006-01-01

    At the core of the movement for twenty-first century skills are students. The growing efforts to increase programs leveraging out-of-school time are focused on giving American youth everything they need to compete in this increasingly complex world. The author is one of many students who have been well served by initiatives imparting twenty-first century skills during after-school hours. Now a senior at Boston Latin School, the author has been helped along the way by Citizen Schools, an after-school education program focused on hands-on learning apprenticeships and homework help. While enrolled in the program as a middle school student, the author took part in projects that exemplified hands-on, inquiry-based learning that helped her develop twenty-first century skills. For example, along with dozens of other students, she advanced her data analysis skills by analyzing statistics about Boston Public high schools, which also helped her select and enroll in one of the city's premier exam schools. Also, she and her peers worked with corporate attorneys who served as writing coaches and whose expertise the author drew from in producing a published essay and greatly improving her writing skills. The author now finds that the public speaking, leadership, organizational, social, and management abilities she built through her participation in Citizen Schools are a great asset to her in high school. The confidence with which she tackles her responsibilities can also be traced back to her experiences in the program. As she looks toward college, the author reflects and realizes that being actively involved in a quality after-school program put her on track for a successful future.

  12. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  13. Development of an Interdisciplinary STEM Classroom Activity for Radio Receiver Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of a mini STEM-based classroom activity designed to integrate these two fields into one project for middle school aged students is presented here. This lesson involves small groups of students constructing a small AM radio receivers. The lesson surrounding the activity focuses on both the physical nature of electromagnetic and AC waves, circuit design, practical applications to AM radio broadcasting, and research applications of radio telescopes. These tools have shown a significant increase in the lesson's primary concept understanding among 6th grade students, as well as net positive STEM awareness and enthusiasm.Content The primary teaching point for the students to consider and learn during this lesson is 'How does scientific application influence engineering design, and vice versa?' The lesson surrounds the hands-on activity of having students construct their own AM radio receiver. Wave theory and the use of radio instruments for astronomy research are also taught in a traditional lecture format. The activity is designed to complement middle school curriculum, although it has been tested and found suitable for high school and older students as well as the general public.Evaluation and ImpactThe evaluation tool that used for the student groups in this project was a Fryer chart, which is a four panel chart with the main topic listed in the center and a single question in each of the four panels. The students are asked to answer the questions in the chart before and after they participate in the lesson activity, each time in a different colored pencil so that the scores can be given to each student before and after they participated in the activity. Student scores improved from 4.5 to 17.9 out of a total of 20 possible points. This is an overall increase of 67% of the total possible points. The questions asked on the quiz cover the range of wave theory, circuit design, and scientific explanation. This factor of improvement shows that

  14. ACTIVATED SLUDGE TECHNOLOGY COMBINED WITH HYDROPONIC LAGOON AS A TECHNOLOGY SUITABLE FOR TREATMENT OF WASTEWATER DELIVERED BY SLURRY TANKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Bawiec

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents information related to the use of hydrophytic technology combined with traditional activated sludge solution for wastewater treatment in areas without central sewage system. The analyzed wastewater treatment plant (WWTP was operated in activated sludge technology with hybrid activated sludge reactor where biomass is kept in settled and suspended form. Treatment system was completed with hydroponic lagoon. Hydroponic lagoon has been used as tertiary treatment, in which the self-cleaning processes with the participation of the plant has come to an additional reduction of nutrients. Analyzed three stage treatment plant is located in the municipality of Nowa Sól. Only domestic wastewater delivered by slurry tanks are treated there in amount of 60 m3/d. During the observation high average concentrations of total nitrogen (201.0 mgN/dm3 was observed and organic matter expressed by COD reaching 1341.5 mgO2/dm3 and BOD5 on the level of 246.3 mgO2/dm3 were noted. A characteristic feature of an object designed for wastewater treatment delivered by slurry tanks is high irregularity of wastewater supply and high instantaneous loads of pollutants (the system does not provide expansion tank. The biggest inequality factor of the flow to the reactor was observed in December 2014 (Nd=3.9. During the observations also occurred days with no inflow of sewage. The study shows the dynamics of changes in the amount of delivered domestic wastewater and sewage flowing out of treatment plant including inequality factor. Information about quality of wastewater was used to determine the reduction of concentrations of pollutants like organic matter, suspended solids, nitrogen and phosphorus.

  15. Recommendations for Technology Development and Validation Activities in Support of the Origins Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capps, Richard W. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The Office of Space Science (OSS) has initiated mission concept studies and associated technology roadmapping activities for future large space optical systems. The scientific motivation for these systems is the study of the origins of galaxies, stars, planetary systems and, ultimately, life. Collectively, these studies are part of the 'Astronomical Search for Origins and Planetary Systems Program' or 'Origins Program'. A series of at least three science missions and associated technology validation flights is currently envisioned in the time frame between the year 1999 and approximately 2020. These would be the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM), a 10-meter baseline Michelson stellar interferometer; the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST), a space-based infrared optimized telescope with aperture diameter larger than four meters; and the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF), an 80-meter baseline-nulling Michelson interferometer described in the Exploration of Neighboring Planetary Systems (ExNPS) Study. While all of these missions include significant technological challenges, preliminary studies indicate that the technological requirements are achievable. However, immediate and aggressive technology development is needed. The Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT) is the primary sponsor of NASA-unique technology for missions such as the Origins series. For some time, the OSAT Space Technology Program has been developing technologies for large space optical systems, including both interferometers and large-aperture telescopes. In addition, technology investments have been made by other NASA programs, including OSS; other government agencies, particularly the Department of Defense; and by the aerospace industrial community. This basis of prior technology investment provides much of the rationale for confidence in the feasibility of the advanced Origins missions. In response to the enhanced interest of both the user community and senior NASA management in large

  16. Local correlations for flap gap oscillatory blowing active flow control technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin NAE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Active technology for oscillatory blowing in the flap gap has been tested at INCAS subsonic wind tunnel in order to evaluate this technology for usage in high lift systems with active flow control. The main goal for this investigation was to validate TRL level 4 for this technology and to extend towards flight testing. CFD analysis was performed in order to identify local correlations with experimental data and to better formulate a design criteria so that a maximum increase in lift is possible under given geometrical constraints. Reference to a proposed metric for noise evaluation is also given. This includes basic 2D flow cases and also 2.5D configurations. In 2.5D test cases this work has been extended so that the proposed system may be selected as a mature technology in the JTI Clean Sky, Smart Fixed Wing Aircraft ITD. Complex post-processing of the experimental and CFD data was mainly oriented towards system efficiency and TRL evaluation for this active technology.

  17. eHealth technologies to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in diabetes self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollo, Megan E; Aguiar, Elroy J; Williams, Rebecca L; Wynne, Katie; Kriss, Michelle; Callister, Robin; Collins, Clare E

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake and physical activity are key diabetes self-management (DSM) behaviors that require tailored education and support. Electronic health (eHealth) technologies have a demonstrated potential for assisting individuals with DSM behaviors. This review provides examples of technologies used to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in the context of DSM. Technologies covered include those widely used for DSM, such as web-based programs and mobile phone and smartphone applications. In addition, examples of novel tools such as virtual and augmented reality, video games, computer vision for dietary carbohydrate monitoring, and wearable devices are provided. The challenges to, and facilitators for, the use of eHealth technologies in DSM are discussed. Strategies to support the implementation of eHealth technologies within practice and suggestions for future research to enhance nutrition and physical activity behaviors as a part of broader DSM are provided.

  18. eHealth technologies to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in diabetes self-management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollo, Megan E; Aguiar, Elroy J; Williams, Rebecca L; Wynne, Katie; Kriss, Michelle; Callister, Robin; Collins, Clare E

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake and physical activity are key diabetes self-management (DSM) behaviors that require tailored education and support. Electronic health (eHealth) technologies have a demonstrated potential for assisting individuals with DSM behaviors. This review provides examples of technologies used to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in the context of DSM. Technologies covered include those widely used for DSM, such as web-based programs and mobile phone and smartphone applications. In addition, examples of novel tools such as virtual and augmented reality, video games, computer vision for dietary carbohydrate monitoring, and wearable devices are provided. The challenges to, and facilitators for, the use of eHealth technologies in DSM are discussed. Strategies to support the implementation of eHealth technologies within practice and suggestions for future research to enhance nutrition and physical activity behaviors as a part of broader DSM are provided. PMID:27853384

  19. Driving technology for improving motion quality of active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongbin; Kim, Minkoo; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Seung-Ryeol; Lee, Seung-Woo

    2014-09-01

    This paper reports transient response characteristics of active-matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) displays for mobile applications. This work reports that the rising responses look like saw-tooth waveform and are not always faster than those of liquid crystal displays. Thus, a driving technology is proposed to improve the rising transient responses of AMOLED based on the overdrive (OD) technology. We modified the OD technology by combining it with a dithering method because the conventional OD method cannot successfully enhance all the rising responses. Our method can improve all the transitions of AMOLED without modifying the conventional gamma architecture of drivers. A new artifact is found when OD is applied to certain transitions. We propose an optimum OD selection method to mitigate the artifact. The implementation results show the proposed technology can successfully improve motion quality of scrolling texts as well as moving pictures in AMOLED displays.

  20. Business cycle and innovation activity in medium-high and high technology industry in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzikowski Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article examines differences in an impact of business cycle phases on innovation activity in medium-high and high technology industry in Poland. It is assumed that each business cycle phase influences innovation activity in the same fashion, but its impact varies and it depends on the firm’s innovation activity. The higher innovation activity the less impact of business cycle. The scope of the survey relates to innovation in MHT and HT industry in Poland. The data concerns the innovation at the firm level and the diffusion “new for the company”. Innovation activity is defined by the following activities: (1 expenditure on research and development and investments in fixed assets not used so far such as: abuildings, premises and land; b machinery and equipment, c computer software; (2 implementation of new products and technological processes and (3 innovation cooperation. The methodological part of the analysis includes a logit modeling. The survey includes 1355 companies. Business cycle has a great influence on innovation activity in MTH and HT industry in Poland. The influence of recovery phase is positive whereas both stagnation and recession phases decrease the probability of innovation activity. The character of influence depends on the propensity to take innovation activity. The higher level of innovation activity the enterprises present the less influence of business cycle they get.

  1. [Effects of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection's activated carbon adsorption technology on officinal components].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, En-li; Wang, Ren-jie; Li, Miao; Wang, Wei; Xu, Dian-hong; Hu, Yang; Wang, Zhen-zhong; Bi, Yu-an; Xiao, Wei

    2015-10-01

    With the diversion rate of ginkgolide A, B, K as comprehensive evaluation indexes, the amount of activated carbon, ad- sorption time, mix rate, and adsorption temperature were selected as factors, orthogonal design which based on the evaluation method of information entropy was used to optimize activated carbon adsorption technology of ginkgo diterpene lactones meglumine injection. Opti- mized adsorption conditions were as follows: adsorbed 30 min with 0.2% activated carbon in 25 °C, 40 r ·min⁻¹, validation test re- sult display. The optimum extraction condition was stable and feasible, it will provide a basis for ginkgo diterpene lactone meglumine injection' activated carbon adsorption process.

  2. Future role and significance of space activities in reflection of global social, technological and economic trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Andreas; Richarz, Hans.-Peter

    The paper describes the interrelation of space activities and global socio-economic trends like "globalisation of markets" and "renaissance of fine arts". The interrelation reveals the economic strategic, technological and scientific dimension of space activities and their benefits to mankind. Then, the significance and perspectives of space activities in these dimensions are examined in more detail. The paper calls (1) for a more visible initiative to employ space activities to tackle urgent questions of global change and development, and (2) for a stronger impetus to secure European economic position in space sector as a key industry of the 21st century.

  3. An Introduction to CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-04

    CRISPR interference/activation (CRISPRi/a) technology provides a simple and efficient approach for targeted repression or activation of gene expression in the mammalian genome. It is highly flexible and programmable, using an RNA-guided nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) protein fused with transcriptional regulators for targeting specific genes to effect their regulation. Multiple studies have shown how this method is an effective way to achieve efficient and specific transcriptional repression or activation of single or multiple genes. Sustained transcriptional modulation can be obtained by stable expression of CRISPR components, which enables directed reprogramming of cell fate. Here, we introduce the basics of CRISPRi/a technology for genome repression or activation.

  4. eHealth technologies to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in diabetes self-management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rollo ME

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Megan E Rollo,1 Elroy J Aguiar,2 Rebecca L Williams,1 Katie Wynne,3 Michelle Kriss,3 Robin Callister,4 Clare E Collins1 1School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia; 2Department of Kinesiology, School of Public Health and Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA; 3Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, John Hunter Hospital, Hunter New England Health, New Lambton, NSW, Australia;\t4School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health and Medicine, Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia Abstract: Diabetes is a chronic, complex condition requiring sound knowledge and self-management skills to optimize glycemic control and health outcomes. Dietary intake and physical activity are key diabetes self-management (DSM behaviors that require tailored education and support. Electronic health (eHealth technologies have a demonstrated potential for assisting individuals with DSM behaviors. This review provides examples of technologies used to support nutrition and physical activity behaviors in the context of DSM. Technologies covered include those widely used for DSM, such as web-based programs and mobile phone and smartphone applications. In addition, examples of novel tools such as virtual and augmented reality, video games, computer vision for dietary carbohydrate monitoring, and wearable devices are provided. The challenges to, and facilitators for, the use of eHealth technologies in DSM are discussed. Strategies to support the implementation of eHealth technologies within practice and suggestions for future research to enhance nutrition and physical activity behaviors as a part of broader DSM are provided. Keywords: diabetes self-management, eHealth, nutrition, physical activity, smartphones, wearables

  5. Count like an egyptian a hands-on introduction to ancient mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Reimer, David

    2014-01-01

    The mathematics of ancient Egypt was fundamentally different from our math today. Contrary to what people might think, it wasn't a primitive forerunner of modern mathematics. In fact, it can't be understood using our current computational methods. Count Like an Egyptian provides a fun, hands-on introduction to the intuitive and often-surprising art of ancient Egyptian math. David Reimer guides you step-by-step through addition, subtraction, multiplication, and more. He even shows you how fractions and decimals may have been calculated-they technically didn't exist in the land of the pharaohs.

  6. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Quality Assurance Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; R. Nims; K. J. Kvarfordt; C. Wharton

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The role of the INL in this project is that of software developer and tester. This development takes place using formal software development procedures and is subject to quality assurance (QA) processes. The purpose of this document is to describe how the SAPHIRE software QA is performed for Version 6 and 7, what constitutes its parts, and limitations of those processes.

  7. Getting started with Oracle SOA B2B Integration a hands-on tutorial

    CERN Document Server

    Bhatia, Krishnaprem; Perlovsky, Alan

    2013-01-01

    This hands on tutorial gives you the best possible start you could hope for with Oracle B2B. Learn using real life scenarios and examples to give you a solid footing of B2B.This book is for B2B architects, consultants and developers who would like to design and develop B2B integrations using Oracle B2B. This book assumes no prior knowledge of Oracle B2B and explains all concepts from scratch using illustrations, real world examples and step-by-step instructions. The book covers enough depth and details to be useful for both beginner and advanced B2B users.

  8. Thermal Technology Development Activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center - 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Dan

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of thermal technology development activities carried out at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center during 2001. Specific topics covered include: two-phase systems (heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, vapor compression systems and phase change materials), variable emittance systems, advanced coatings, high conductivity materials and electrohydrodynamic (EHD) thermal coatings. The application of these activities to specific space missions is also discussed.

  9. Tasks and activities to enhance technological Pedagogical Mathematical Content Knowledge of teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Arthur B.

    2016-01-01

    From a sociocultural perspective, we examine activities generated by genres of tasks to understand how the tasks shape teachers knowledge of technology and mathematical content for teaching. The tasks and activities come from a professional development project that engages the cyberlearning system, Virtual Math Teams with GeoGebra. Working in teams, teachers enhance their understanding of dynamic geometry and how to engage in productive mathematical discussion. We theorize and discuss princip...

  10. THE EXPERIMENTAL PLAN OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF STUDENTS’ COGNITIVE ACTIVITY BY MEANS OF THE REFLECTIVE TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Gasanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the problem of the cognitive activity development is extremely topical, the author of the article represents the concrete experimental plan for the development of the students’ cognitive activity by means of the reflective technology. In the author's opinion, the reflection increases the cognitive activity, by virtue of giving the process of learning the subjectness and subjectivity features (the subjectness of the cognition reflects the individual's activity, while the subjectivity reflects the personal meaning of the content of the cognition and the cognitive process. The aim of the paper is studying the possibilities of the reflective technology in enhancing the students’ cognitive activity. The object of the study is the cognitive activity of the cognition subjects. The subject of the research is the reflexive educational technologies as a means of developing the cognition subjects’ cognitive activity. At an ascertaining stage the author diagnosed the cognitive activity peculiarities, expressed in the academic success indicators, the degree of the learning difficulty/easiness, the emotional attitude towards the learning (like/doesn’t like to learn, curiosity, the internality of achievements and students’ reflection in the experimental and the control groups. At a forming stage of the research the author approved the reflective technology of increasing the students’ cognitive activity in the experimental groups. At a control stage she performed the repeated diagnostics of the cognitive activity peculiarities, expressed in the academic success indicators and future teachers’ reflection in the experimental and control groups. As a result of the experiment, which lasted during 2 semesters the students’ reflexivity of thinking became significantly increased, their reflective skills were developed, and the need for self-cognition and development appeared. Their cognitive activity was substantially increased, expressed

  11. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  12. Evaluation methods for physical activity-promoting mobile technologies: an interdisciplinary scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire McCallum

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many thousands of mobile apps, wearables and other technologies available to support and promote physical activity. However, the rapidly evolving nature of these technologies means that the methodologies traditionally used to evaluate the effectiveness of behaviour change interventions (such as the randomised controlled trial may not be appropriate to evaluate their effectiveness. A scoping review was conducted to identify the methods currently being used to evaluate physical activity-promoting mobile technologies across health and computing science disciplines. In addition to the range of methods used, the review explored their strengths and weaknesses. The results improve understandings of when and why to use existing methods from health and computing science. Opportunities for combining and hybridising methods across the two disciplines are also identified. The review will be used to inform the development and piloting of novel, ‘fit-for-purpose’ research designs that will allow rigorous evaluation of the effectiveness of rapidly-evolving physical activity-promoting mobile technologies and their ‘active ingredients’ to build an evidence base of what works, why and for whom.

  13. Interactive Whiteboards and All That Jazz: Analysing Classroom Activity with Interactive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Howard; Beauchamp, Gary; Jones, Sonia; Kennewell, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The term "orchestration", has been used to describe the teacher's role in activity settings incorporating interactive technologies. This musical analogy suggests pre-planned manipulation of events to generate "performance" leading to learning. However, in two recent projects we have observed how effective teaching and learning…

  14. Technological and Traditional Drawing Approaches Encourage Active Engagement in Histology Classes for Science Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Barbara; Torsney, Ben; Stewart, Katherine; Smith, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to promote more active engagement of science undergraduates in histology practical classes some technology-based innovations were introduced. First, an interactive pre-lab tutorial was set up using an electronic handset voting system, where guidance on tissue analysis was given. Second, a web-based resource where students could access…

  15. Pre-Service Teachers' Learning Styles and Preferences towards Instructional Technology Activities and Collaborative Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusop, Farrah Dina; Sumari, Melati

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate pre-service teachers' learning styles and their preferences with respect to 15 technology-based instructional activities and collaborative work tasks. Felder and Silverman's online Index of Learning Style (ILS) and a questionnaire were used to measure students' learning styles and…

  16. Overview of CERN Technology Transfer Strategy and Accelerator-Related Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Chesta, E; Wuensch, W; Sgobba, S; Stora, T; Chiggiato, P; Taborelli, M

    2013-01-01

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is actively engaged in identifying technologies developed for its accelerator complex that could be profitably used by partner research organizations or commercial companies in applications with potentially high socio-economic impact beyond pure fundamental physics research. \

  17. Teacher roles in designing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to provide insight into the value of different teacher roles in designing and implementing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy. Three cases, each with a different teacher role (executor-only, re-designer, co-designer) were examined. In the executor-only

  18. Teachers conversations during design of technology rich curriculum activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschman, Ferry; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2014-01-01

    Boschman, F., McKenney, S. & Voogt (2013). Teachers conversations during design of technology rich curriculum activities for early literacy. Paper presentation at the European Association for Practitioner Research on Improving Learning (EAPRIL) Annual Conference. November 27-29, Biel/Bienne, Switzer

  19. 77 FR 42949 - Special Conditions: Tamarack Aerospace Group, Cirrus Model SR22; Active Technology Load...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ..., four-passenger, composite airplane. The installation of winglets, as proposed by Tamarack, increases... design change will install winglets and an Active Technology Load Alleviation system (ATLAS). The addition of the ATLAS mitigates the negative effects of the winglets by effectively aerodynamically...

  20. 77 FR 28530 - Special Conditions: Tamarack Aerospace Group, Cirrus Model SR22; Active Technology Load...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ..., composite airplane. The installation of winglets, as proposed by Tamarack, increases aerodynamic efficiency... Group's modification. The design change will install winglets and an Active Technology Load Alleviation System (ATLAS). The addition of the ATLAS mitigates the negative effects of the winglets by...

  1. 78 FR 10055 - Special Conditions: Tamarack Aerospace Group, Cirrus Model SR22; Active Technology Load...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... engine, four- passenger, composite airplane. The installation of winglets, as proposed by Tamarack... Aerospace Group's modification. The design change will install winglets and an Active Technology Load Alleviation System (ATLAS). The addition of the ATLAS mitigates the negative effects of the winglets...

  2. Tailored interventions to promote Active Ageing using mobile technology: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrita, M.; Melenk, J.; El Menshawy, N.; Tabak, Monique; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam Marie Rosé

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Mobile technologies facilitate innovative and ubiquitous interventions to promote Active Ageing in daily life. To ensure adoption, such interventions must be designed in co-operation with older adults. This work presents the results of a feasibility study of a system that monitors

  3. Rockets: An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educational guide discusses rockets and includes activities in science, mathematics, and technology. It begins with background information on the history of rocketry, scientific principles, and practical rocketry. The sections on scientific principles and practical rocketry focus on Sir Isaac Newton's Three Laws of Motion. These laws explain…

  4. Using Technology To Implement Active Learning in Large Classes. Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, William J.; Dufresne, Robert J.; Leonard, William J.

    An emerging technology, classroom communication systems (CCSs), has the potential to transform the way we teach science in large-lecture settings. CCSs can serve as catalysts for creating a more interactive, student-centered classroom in the lecture hall, thereby allowing students to become more actively involved in constructing and using…

  5. Teacher roles in designing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cviko, Amina; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to provide insight into the value of different teacher roles in designing and implementing technology-rich learning activities for early literacy. Three cases, each with a different teacher role (executor-only, re-designer, co-designer) were examined. In the executor-only role

  6. Technological and Traditional Drawing Approaches Encourage Active Engagement in Histology Classes for Science Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, Barbara; Torsney, Ben; Stewart, Katherine; Smith, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to promote more active engagement of science undergraduates in histology practical classes some technology-based innovations were introduced. First, an interactive pre-lab tutorial was set up using an electronic handset voting system, where guidance on tissue analysis was given. Second, a web-based resource where students could access…

  7. Suited for Spacewalking: A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Technology Education, Mathematics, and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Gregory L.; George, Jane A. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Technology Education, Mathematics, and Science National Aeronautics and Space Administration Office of Human Resources and Education Education Division Washington, DC Education Working Group NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, Texas This publication is in the Public Domain and is not protected by copyright. Permission is not required for duplication.

  8. Tailored interventions to promote Active Ageing using mobile technology: a feasibility study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cabrita, M.; Melenk, J.; El Menshawy, N.; Tabak, M.; Vollenbroek-Hutten, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Mobile technologies facilitate innovative and ubiquitous interventions to promote Active Ageing in daily life. To ensure adoption, such interventions must be designed in co-operation with older adults. This work presents the results of a feasibility study of a system that monitors phys

  9. Hands-on, online, and workshop-based K-12 weather and climate education resources from the Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D. A.; Denning, A.; Burt, M. A.; Gardiner, L.; Genyuk, J.; Hatheway, B.; Jones, B.; La Grave, M. L.; Russell, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its fourth year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University (CSU) is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences. This is accomplished through collaborations in resource development and dissemination between CMMAP scientists, CSU’s Little Shop of Physics (LSOP) program, and the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Little Shop of Physics develops new hands on science activities demonstrating basic science concepts fundamental to understanding atmospheric characteristics, weather, and climate. Videos capture demonstrations of children completing these activities which are broadcast to school districts and public television programs. CMMAP and LSOP educators and scientists partner in teaching a summer professional development workshops for teachers at CSU with a semester's worth of college-level content on the basic physics of the atmosphere, weather, climate, climate modeling, and climate change, as well as dozens of LSOP inquiry-based activities suitable for use in classrooms. The W2U project complements these efforts by developing and broadly disseminating new CMMAP-related online content pages, animations, interactives, image galleries, scientists’ biographies, and LSOP videos to K-12 and public audiences. Reaching nearly 20 million users annually, W2U is highly valued as a curriculum enhancement

  10. Providing Hands on Experiences to Museum Visitors to Explore and Learn about Earthquakes and their Impacts in the Pacific Northwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, S. E.; Schiffman, C. R.; Butler, R. F.; Farley, M.; Frankel, S.; Hunter, N.; Lillie, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past ten years, UNAVCO has developed a suite of learning materials for formal undergraduate and grades 6-12 classroom environments, integrating GPS data from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) to explore Earth science processes. To make complex Earth processes accessible to general audiences, UNAVCO has designed a multi-component visiting museum exhibit that explores the tectonic setting of the United States Pacific Northwest, hazards of living on a plate boundary, and the technologies being used to study the plate motion and in the future, help communities become more resilient to the impacts of earthquakes. This exhibit was installed in Fall 2013 at the Oregon State University (OSU) Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) in Newport, Oregon. Through multiple hands-on elements, visitors to the HMSC exhibit explore and experience the build up and release of strain in the region, along with some of the technologies used to measure these changes. In one component, visitors compress a model of the Pacific Northwest to feel the build up of strain in the landscape and observe the movement of land over time. Supporting panels connect this movement to the measurements currently being observed by the network of PBO and other GPS stations in the Pacific Northwest. In another component, visitors learn about the recurrence interval for earthquakes at the Juan De Fuca - North America plate boundary by turning a handle to slowly move and compress plates until a simulated earthquake occurs. A related component explores how an earthquake early warning system (EEWS) of the future might combine seismic data collected by both seismometers and real time GPS to allow people and communities time to prepare for oncoming ground shaking and tsunami after an earthquake. Several technologies are also highlighted throughout the exhibit, including information panels that compare the accuracy of high precision GPS with smartphone technologies. Additionally, models of a full

  11. Design Brief--Packaging: More than Just a Box! Communications: Getting the Message across with Advertising. Technology Learning Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technology Teacher, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Each technology learning activity in this article includes content description, objectives, required materials, challenge, and evaluation questions. Subjects are designing product packages and communication through advertising. (SK)

  12. Teleneurology in patients with multiple sclerosis: EDSS ratings derived remotely and from hands-on examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Robert L; Bever, Christopher T; Ehrmantraut, Mary; Forte, Alan; Culpepper, William J; Wallin, Mitchell T

    2008-01-01

    We compared the telemedicine assessment of 20 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) with the findings of a hands-on examiner. The remote specialist was a neurologist with expertise in MS; the hands-on examination was performed by an experienced mid-level practitioner. We also compared the findings of a second specialist viewing the examination in the room with the patient. The videoconference link operated at a bandwidth of 384 kbit/s. All three examiners independently completed a standardized rating scale for neurological functions. Cronbach's alpha for the three raters' total expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score was 0.99 with individual correlations ranging from 0.96-0.97. Agreement between raters for individual neurological domain scores was more variable. The most consistent assessments were for optic, bowel and bladder, and cerebral functions. The least consistent were for cerebellar and brain stem functions. Agreement between the remote and local examiners was similar to that reported for different neurological examiners directly assessing the same patient using the EDSS rating system.

  13. Lab-in-a-box @ school: Exiting hands-on experiments in soft matter physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Karin; Brinkmann, Martin; Müller, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Soft materials like liquids and polymers are part of everyday life, yet at school, this topic is rarely touched. Within the priority program SPP 1064 'Nano- and Microfluidics' of the German Science Foundation, we designed an outreach project that allows pupils (age 14 to 18) to perform hands-on experiments (www.labinabox.de). The experiments allow them e.g. to feel viscosity and viscoelasticity, experience surface tension or see structure formation. We call the modus operandi 'subjective experiments' to contrast them with the scientifically objective experiments, which pupils often describe as being boring. Over a dozen different experiments under the topic 'physics of fluids' are collected in a big box that travels to the school. Three other topics of boxes are available, 'physics of light, 'physics of liquid crystals', and 'physics of adhesion and friction'. Each experiment can be performed by 1-3 pupils within 10 - 20 min. That way, each scholar can perform 6 to 8 different small experiments within one topic. 'Subjective experiments' especially catch the attention of girls without disadvantaging boys. Both are fascinated by the hands-on physics experience and are therefore eager to perform also 'boring' objective experiments. Morover, before/after polls reveal that their interest in physics has greatly advanced. The project can easily be taken over and/or adapted to other topics in the natural sciences. Financial support of the German Science Foundation DFG is acknowledged.

  14. Acts of Sound: Hands-On Workshop for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keolian, Robert; Loubeau, Alexandra; Poese, Matthew E.; Clark, Linde J.; Hansen, Uwe J.; Morrison, Andrew; Korman, Murray S.; Tucholski, Edward

    2005-09-01

    The Committee on Education in Acoustics is proud to present a workshop for high school students from the Minneapolis public schools. The theme of mentorship will be developed throughout the program. The eight mentors have individually developed their own workstations to inspire, challenge and delight a student's imagination about sound. The students will split into eight groups of three and work for 30 minutes at their own stations. After initial guidance, the students will do hands-on experiments, take data and try to come up with their own discoveries. Next, students have 15 minutes to prepare impromptu drawings and transparencies for a ``team'' presentation. Each team will be given 5 minutes to present at their workstation. A mini-cam and projector will be used to zoom in. During refreshments, there will be time for feedback and a musical skit. Then students may walk around to all the other stations to meet the other mentors and do more hands-on experiments at their own pace, as time permits. [Special thanks go to James Bickel, the science curriculum coordinator for the Minneapolis public schools, all the students and their teachers.

  15. Hands-on-Science: Using Education Research to Construct Learner-Centered Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, R. R.; Chimonidou, A.; Kopp, S.

    2014-07-01

    Research into the process of learning, and learning astronomy, can be informative for the development of a course. Students are better able to incorporate and make sense of new ideas when they are aware of their own prior knowledge (Resnick et al. 1989; Confrey 1990), have the opportunity to develop explanations from their own experience in their own words (McDermott 1991; Prather et al. 2004), and benefit from peer instruction (Mazur 1997; Green 2003). Students in astronomy courses often have difficulty understanding many different concepts as a result of difficulties with spatial reasoning and a sense of scale. The Hands-on-Science program at UT Austin incorporates these research-based results into four guided-inquiry, integrated science courses (50 students each). They are aimed at pre-service K-5 teachers but are open to other majors as well. We find that Hands-on-Science students not only attain more favorable changes in attitude towards science, but they also outperform students in traditional lecture courses in content gains. Workshop Outcomes: Participants experienced a research-based, guided-inquiry lesson about the motion of objects in the sky and discussed the research methodology for assessing students in such a course.

  16. Technology in the Marketing Activities of Schools as an Example to Institutional Isomorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Çağla Garipağaoğlu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to understand and explore the isomorphic changes in the private school chain sector in Turkey over the last five years regarding the effects of recent technology adoptions for school marketing activities. Qualitative research model was used and the two largest school chains were selected with concept sampling strategy. To collect data, we interviewed the chief marketing officers of the two selected school chains by using a semi-structured interview guideline. The data was analyzed by using content analysis. The results of the study provide a relatively new perspective based on the concept of institutional isomorphism to the use of technologies for marketing purposes (both as a marketing tool and a marketing product in the private school chain sector. The results show that technology is a powerful marketing product, which is used by schools as a marketing strategy, as well. This eventually leads to convergence of learning environments in different schools. Technology is considered to be a powerful tool for marketing school’s activities, as well, and this power is acknowledged by both school chains. Similarly, use of technology as a marketing tool becomes an isomorphic force for the two competing schools.

  17. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  18. Hands-On Science Reform, Science Achievement, and the Elusive Goal of "science for All" in a Diverse Elementary School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, Marissa

    Given the emphasis on "science for all" in national reform documents, this study analyzed student science achievement scores in hands-on reform versus traditional classrooms for 3,667 students in Grades 3 to 6 by gender, ethnicity, free or reduced lunch status, parent education, and level of English proficiency to determine whether these subgroups performed better or worse in reform classrooms. Teachers in reform classrooms used exemplary hands-on science kits and attended 1-day in-service training per kit. Teachers in traditional classrooms used the regular activity-based science curriculum with textbook. Gender differences favoring boys appeared in both types of classrooms, but were larger in the reform classrooms. Boys from lower socioeconomic levels performed better in reform classrooms, but limited-English-proficient boys performed worse. Parent education was significantly related to higher achievement for boys only in reform classrooms. For girls this relation was significant only in traditional classrooms. White girls performed significantly worse in reform classroom, but there were no differences for Asian and Hispanic girls. Implications for adapting hands-on science reform to meet student needs are discussed.

  19. Research and Technology Activities Supporting Closed-Brayton-Cycle Power Conversion System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The elements of Brayton technology development emphasize power conversion system risk mitigation. Risk mitigation is achieved by demonstrating system integration feasibility, subsystem/component life capability (particularly in the context of material creep) and overall spacecraft mass reduction. Closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) power conversion technology is viewed as relatively mature. At the 2-kWe power level, a CBC conversion system Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of six (6) was achieved during the Solar Dynamic Ground Test Demonstration (SD-GTD) in 1998. A TRL 5 was demonstrated for 10 kWe-class CBC components during the development of the Brayton Rotating Unit (BRU) from 1968 to 1976. Components currently in terrestrial (open cycle) Brayton machines represent TRL 4 for similar uses in 100 kWe-class CBC space systems. Because of the baseline component and subsystem technology maturity, much of the Brayton technology task is focused on issues related to systems integration. A brief description of ongoing technology activities is given.

  20. Decentralized Solar Energy Technology Assessment Program: review of activities (April 1978-December 1979)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronfman, B.H.; Carnes, S.A.; Schweitzer, M.; Peelle, E.; Enk, G.

    1980-05-01

    The Decentralized Solar Energy Technology Assessment Program (TAP), sponsored by the Office of Solar Energy, Department of Energy, is a technology assessment and planning activity directed at local communities. Specifically, the objectives of the TAP are: (1) to assess the socioeconomic and institutional impacts of the widespread use of renewable energy technologies; (2) to involve communities in planning for their energy futures; and (3) to plan for local energy development. This report discusses two major efforts of the TAP during the period April 1978 to December 1979: the community TA's and several support studies. Four communities have been contracted to undertake an assessment-planning exercise to examine the role of solar renewable energy technologies in their future. The communities selected are the Southern Tier Central Region of New York State, (STC); Richmond, Kentucky, Kent, Ohio; and Franklin County, Massachusetts. Descriptions and progress to date of the community TA's are presented in detail. Two major support study efforts are also presented. A review of existing literature on the legal and institutional issues relative to the adoption of decentralized solar technologies is summarized. A preliminary analysis of potential socioeconomic impacts and other social considerations relative to decentralized solar technologies is also described.

  1. Imagine Astronomy at the Rochester Institute of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapson, Valerie; Almeyda, T.; Freeman, M.; Lena, D.; Principe, D.; Punzi, K.; Sargent, B. A.; Vaddi, S.; Vazquez, B.; Vorobiev, D.

    2014-01-01

    The Imagine RIT Innovation and Creativity Festival is an annual free event held each year on the campus of the Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT). The purpose of the festival is to showcase the work and research conducted by students and faculty at RIT, and get the public excited about science and technology. For the past three years, graduate students, post-docs and faculty in the Astrophysical Sciences and Technology graduate program at RIT have participated in the festival by showcasing their astronomy research in a fun, interactive and hands on way. We have presented work conducted with various telescopes in the fields of star formation and galaxy evolution. Here, we present our three unique exhibits and the public’s reception to each exhibit. We found that interactive games such as astro-trivia, and hands on activities such as building a scale model of the Hubble Space Telescope were the most exciting for visitors. Interactive pieces of the exhibit in general acquired the most attention, whereas posters and videos, despite their pictorial nature, were not as well received. The most successful piece of our exhibit each year has been solar observing through eclipse glasses and telescopes. Most people who observed the sun at our exhibit were left awe-struck because this was their first experience viewing an astronomical object through a telescope. We plan to improve upon our exhibit by introducing more hands-on activities that will engage the public in current astronomy research at RIT.

  2. The articulated body. Physical activity, fitness and neew technologies of health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otto, Lene

    2010-01-01

    of anticipations of fit bodies as essential to individual health. I identify a physical activity discourse in which new modes of knowing, experiencing and doing bodies involve new types of health technologies in which bodies must be connected to mechanical and electronic appliances, inscribed with biomedical...... discourses. The growing significance of obesity has meant that scientific measurements of physical activity and fitness are ubiquitous in the Western world. Health promotion campaigns persuade the population to meet expectations of normality by encouraging participation in a certain number of minutes...... of physical exercise every day. These practices serve to maintain a particular way of understanding the body and how it can (or should) be enacted. Focusing on the role of physical activity and fitness in health promotion, I explore how physical exercise as a social-material technology, through which the body...

  3. The application of active noise control technology to reduce noise from air pollution control equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Depies, C. R.; Kapsos, D. W.

    1996-08-01

    The basic concept of active noise control, i. e. to create a noise field in a space in order to destructively interfere with an existing noise, and in the process create a quieter space, was explained. The manner in which noise control technology can be used in air pollution control equipment was described and guidelines for application were provided. A number of case studies were used to illustrate the suitability of active noise control for low frequency noise problems, especially in the area of air pollution control equipment. Impressive reduction of low frequency noise, energy efficiency, ability to retrofit into an existing duct system, and the hardware`s insensitivity to dirty exhaust environments were cited as the principal reasons for the success of active noise control technology over more traditional in-line passive silencers. 1 ref., 8 figs.

  4. The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI): Activity Status in 2012

    CERN Document Server

    Ochiai, M; Haubold, H J; Doi, T

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI) was launched by the United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) within the United Nations Programme on Space Applications. The Initiative aims at promoting international cooperation in human spaceflight and space exploration-related activities, creating awareness among countries on the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications, and building capacity in microgravity education and research. HSTI has conducted a series of outreach activities and expert meetings bringing together participants from around the world. HSTI will also be implementing science and educational activities in relevant areas to raise the capacities, particularly in developing countries, in pursuit of the development goals of the United Nations, thus contributing to promoting the peaceful uses of outer space.

  5. Persons with moderate Alzheimer's disease use simple technology aids to manage daily activities and leisure occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Renna, Caterina; Pinto, Katia; De Vanna, Floriana; Caffò, Alessandro O; Stasolla, Fabrizio

    2014-09-01

    Two studies assessed technology-aided programs to support performance of daily activities and selection/activation of music items with patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease. In Study I, four patients were presented with activity-related pictorial instructions via a computer fitted with inexpensive, commercial software. In Study II, four patients were (a) presented with different music options and (b) allowed to select and activate the preferred option via a microswitch response. Study I showed that each patient learned to perform the two activities available with percentages of correct responses exceeding 85 by the end of the intervention. Study II showed that all patients learned to choose and activate music options. Psychology students, employed in a social validation check, scored the patients' behavior within the program better than their behavior in a control situation. The relevance and usability of simplified pictorial-instruction programs and music choice programs for patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease were discussed.

  6. Prototype Active Silicon Sensor in 150 nm HR-CMOS Technology for ATLAS Inner Detector Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Rymaszewski, Piotr; Breugnon, Patrick; Godiot, Stépahnie; Gonella, Laura; Hemperek, Tomasz; Hirono, Toko; Hügging, Fabian; Krüger, Hans; Liu, Jian; Pangaud, Patrick; Peric, Ivan; Rozanov, Alexandre; Wang, Anqing; Wermes, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    The LHC Phase-II upgrade will lead to a significant increase in luminosity, which in turn will bring new challenges for the operation of inner tracking detectors. A possible solution is to use active silicon sensors, taking advantage of commercial CMOS technologies. Currently ATLAS R&D programme is qualifying a few commercial technologies in terms of suitability for this task. In this paper a prototype designed in one of them (LFoundry 150 nm process) will be discussed. The chip architecture will be described, including different pixel types incorporated into the design, followed by simulation and measurement results.

  7. Technology solutions to support supervisory activities and also to provide information access to the society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, D.; Mello, A. B.

    2016-07-01

    Inmetro's data about the conformity of certificated products, process and services are, usually, displayed at fragmented databases of difficult access for several reasons, for instance, the lack of computational solutions which allow this kind of access to its users. A discussion about some of the technological solutions to support supervisory activities by the appropriate regulatory bodies and also to provide information access to society in general is herein presented, along with a theoretical explanation of the pros and cons of such technologies to the conclusion that a mobile platform seems to be the best tool for the requirements of Inmetro.

  8. Technological Activities and Their Impact on the Financial Performance of the Firm : Exploitation and Exploration within and between Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belderbos, Rene; Faems, Dries; Leten, Bart; Van Looy, Bart

    2010-01-01

    The present study analyzes the impact of firms' technological strategies on their financial performance. Technology strategies are defined by making a distinction between explorative and exploitative as well as collaborative and solitary technological activities. Several hypotheses are tested on a p

  9. Effects of Shared Active Surface Technology on the Communication and Speech of Two Preschool Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Fefer, Sarah A.

    2017-01-01

    Shared active surface (SAS) technology can be described as a supersized tablet computer for multiple simultaneous users. SAS technology has the potential to resolve issues historically associated with learning via single-user computer technology. This study reports findings of a SAS on the social communication and nonsocial speech of two preschool…

  10. Effects of Shared Active Surface Technology on the Communication and Speech of Two Preschool Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.; Fefer, Sarah A.

    2017-01-01

    Shared active surface (SAS) technology can be described as a supersized tablet computer for multiple simultaneous users. SAS technology has the potential to resolve issues historically associated with learning via single-user computer technology. This study reports findings of a SAS on the social communication and nonsocial speech of two preschool…

  11. Tour Through the Solar System: A Hands-On Planetary Geology Course for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, S. B.; Gillis-Davis, J. J.

    2011-09-01

    We have developed a course in planetary geology for high school students, the primary goals of which are to help students learn how to learn, to reduce the fear and anxiety associated with learning science and math, and to encourage an interest in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Our emphasis in this course is on active learning in a learner-centered environment. All students scored significantly higher on the post-knowledge survey compared with the pre-knowledge survey, and there is a good correlation between the post-knowledge survey and the final exam. Student evaluations showed an increased interest in STEM fields as a result of this course.

  12. The Assessment of Science and Technology Activity in Primary Health Care: an Approach to the Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenia Tamara Sánchez García

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary Health Care is the strategy to organize the management of health system that ensures universal access to minimum health services through equitable distribution of resources, community participation and implication of policies from other sectors. Therefore, the development of assessment in Science and Technology System at this level becomes of vital importance. The policy and management of science and technology are crucial in the strategic development of each country. In this sense, considering the convergence of the activity of science and technology with social development becomes a necessity particularly important for developing countries. The purpose of this literature review is to summarize the development of this modality in Cuba and the world, in such a way that it will serve to help people who need information on the subject.

  13. The TECS model leads to active use of technology in home care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ulla Gars; Skov, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Digitization in healthcare is accelerating worldwide. This article focuses on the X-Changery development project involving home-care nurses and their use of the iPad as a new tool in patients’ homes. The goal of the project was to bring knowledge from recent research on technological literacy...... in working life back to a work setting, thus giving nurses new technology competencies with the aim of enhancing their professionalism through the use of the iPad as a work tool. Through field observations, learning labs and focus-group interviews we can see that X-Changery gave home-care nurses a common...... language to exchange experiences and share knowledge about the iPad as a work tool. Use of the iPad in patients’ homes led to new habits and routines. Nurses acquired relational expertise, implying active use of technology. The results show the importance of focusing on and funding reflection...

  14. Technology Efficacy in Active Prosthetic Knees for Transfemoral Amputees: A Quantitative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr M. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have presented technological ensembles of active knee systems for transfemoral prosthesis. Other studies have examined the amputees’ gait performance while wearing a specific active prosthesis. This paper combined both insights, that is, a technical examination of the components used, with an evaluation of how these improved the gait of respective users. This study aims to offer a quantitative understanding of the potential enhancement derived from strategic integration of core elements in developing an effective device. The study systematically discussed the current technology in active transfemoral prosthesis with respect to its functional walking performance amongst above-knee amputee users, to evaluate the system’s efficacy in producing close-to-normal user performance. The performances of its actuator, sensory system, and control technique that are incorporated in each reported system were evaluated separately and numerical comparisons were conducted based on the percentage of amputees’ gait deviation from normal gait profile points. The results identified particular components that contributed closest to normal gait parameters. However, the conclusion is limitedly extendable due to the small number of studies. Thus, more clinical validation of the active prosthetic knee technology is needed to better understand the extent of contribution of each component to the most functional development.

  15. THE DEVELOPMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES AND THEIR INTRODUCTION IN THE ACTIVITY OF ENTERPRISES OF THE TOURISM SPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kucherenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article aims at the analysis of the development and implementation of information technologies in the activity of enterprises of the tourism sector. Considered the potential of information technology in managing the implementation of a tourist product, the advantages of using Internet resources as for travel agencies and their clients. The analysis of development and introduction of information technologies in the activity of enterprises of the tourism sector. In the practical activity of the tourist companies use a variety of types of information technologies, namely: global distribution system; system of booking and reservation; electronic information systems; information systems management; mobile communication systems; services of the global computer network Internet.

  16. Robot Vision to Monitor Structures in Invisible Fog Environments Using Active Imaging Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seungkyu; Park, Nakkyu; Baik, Sunghoon; Choi, Youngsoo; Jeong, Kyungmin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Active vision is a direct visualization technique using a highly sensitive image sensor and a high intensity illuminant. Range-gated imaging (RGI) technique providing 2D and 3D images is one of emerging active vision technologies. The RGI technique extracts vision information by summing time sliced vision images. In the RGI system, objects are illuminated for ultra-short time by a high intensity illuminant and then the light reflected from objects is captured by a highly sensitive image sensor with the exposure of ultra-short time. The RGI system provides 2D and 3D image data from several images and it moreover provides clear images from invisible fog and smoke environment by using summing of time-sliced images. Nowadays, the Range-gated (RG) imaging is an emerging technology in the field of surveillance for security applications, especially in the visualization of invisible night and fog environment. Although RGI viewing was discovered in the 1960's, this technology is, nowadays, more and more applicable by virtue of the rapid development of optical and sensor technologies, such as highly sensitive imaging sensor and ultra-short pulse laser light. In contrast to passive vision systems, this technology enables operation even in harsh environments like fog and smoke. During the past decades, several applications of this technology have been applied in target recognition and in harsh environments, such as fog, underwater vision. Also, this technology has been demonstrated 3D imaging based on range-gated imaging. In this paper, a robot system to monitor structures in invisible fog environment is developed using an active range-gated imaging technique. The system consists of an ultra-short pulse laser device and a highly sensitive imaging sensor. The developed vision system is carried out to monitor objects in invisible fog environment. The experimental result of this newly approach vision system is described in this paper. To see invisible objects in fog

  17. Hands-on curriculum teaches biomedical engineering concepts to home-schooled students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagstetter, Ann M; Nimunkar, Amit J; Tompkins, Willis J

    2009-01-01

    University level outreach has increased over the last decade to stimulate K-12 student interest in engineering related fields. Home schooling students are one of the groups that are valued for engineering admissions due to diligent study habits and high achievement scores. However, home schooled students have inadequate access to science, math, and engineering related resources, which precludes the development of interdisciplinary teaching methods. To address this problem, we have developed a hands-on, STEM based curriculum as a safe and comprehensive supplement to current home schooling curricula. The ultimate goal is to stimulate university-student relations and subsequently increase engineering recruitment opportunities. Our pre and post workshop survey comparisons demonstrate that integrating disciplines, via the manner presented in this study, provides a K-12 student-friendly engineering learning method.

  18. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Tutorial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; S. T. Beck; S. T. Wood

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) refers to a set of computer programs that were developed to create and analyze probabilistic risk assessment (PRAs). This volume is the tutorial manual for the SAPHIRE system. In this document, a series of lessons are provided that guide the user through basic steps common to most analyses preformed with SAPHIRE. The tutorial is divided into two major sections covering both basic and advanced features. The section covering basic topics contains lessons that lead the reader through development of a probabilistic hypothetical problem involving a vehicle accident, highlighting the program’s most fundamental features. The advanced features section contains additional lessons that expand on fundamental analysis features of SAPHIRE and provide insights into more complex analysis techniques. Together, these two elements provide an overview into the operation and capabilities of the SAPHIRE software.

  19. The APSU 0.5m Telescope - A Hands-On Learning Environment for Secondary Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allyn Smith, J.; Buckner, S. L.; Pirkle, S. F.

    2012-05-01

    Physical science teachers with hands-on experience are critical to secondary education learning. In "Before It’s Too Late," the U.S. Department of Education (2000) estimated "about 56% of high school students taking physical science are taught by out-of-field teachers." In Tennessee, the problem is even greater, while the demand is increasing. This project aims to address the shortage of well-prepared physics and astronomy teachers. Austin Peay State University has recently installed a 0.5m telescope with imaging and rudimentary spectroscopic capability. We are committed to working with the College of Education to bring secondary teachers in training and practicing secondary teachers to the telescope to experience basic operations and conduct small research projects. This is done via classes and summer workshops. We describe the program setup, expectations for the participants, learning outcomes, and the evaluation process.

  20. PERSON-CENTERED AND PERSON-ACTIVITY APPROACH AS A BASIS OF INTEGRATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia N. KARPOVA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article touches upon one of the most acute and complex problems of the modern Russian society the problem of reforming the current system of professional education. The author emphasizes the fact that person – centered and person-activity approach should be the key elements in higher education system modernization as a student personality and his future professional activity should be highlighted in the process of education and upbringing. The author has developed and successfully implemented the integrative language teaching technology, which unites both linguistic and religious knowledge. The article provides a detailed description of the main stages of the process of the technology introduction, the literature and the video materials that were used in the course of the technology implementation in the educational process, as well as formulates conclusions at each stage of its implementation. The effectiveness of the integrative language teaching technology has been proven and is defined by the author as the effect of pedagogical synergy of mutual interaction of several disciplines, characterized by the fact that the influence of the tech nology use exceeds the influence exerted by each discipline as the component of the educational process taken separately.

  1. Hands-On Astrophysics: Variable Stars in Math, Science, and Computer Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, J. A.; Percy, J. R.

    1999-12-01

    Hands-On Astrophysics (HOA): Variable Stars in Math, Science, and Computer Education, is a project recently developed by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) with funds from the National Science Foundation. HOA uses the unique methods and the international database of the AAVSO to develop and integrate students' math and science skills through variable star observation and analysis. It can provide an understanding of basic astronomy concepts, as well as interdisciplinary connections. Most of all, it motivates the user by exposing them to the excitement of doing real science with real data. Project materials include: a database of 600,000 variable star observations; VSTAR (a data plotting and analysis program), and other user friendly software; 31 slides and 14 prints of five constellations; 45 variable star finder charts; an instructional videotape in three 15-minute segments; and a 560-page student's and teacher's manual. These materials support the National Standards for Science and Math education by directly involving the students in the scientific process. Hands-On Astrophysics is designed to be flexible. It is organized so that it can be used at many levels, in many contexts: for classroom use from high school to college level, or for individual projects. In addition, communication and support can be found through the AAVSO home page on the World Wide Web: http://www.aavso.org. The HOA materials can be ordered through this web site or from the AAVSO, 25 Birch Street Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. We gratefully acknowledge the education grant ESI-9154091 from the National Science Foundation which funded the development of this project.

  2. Interaction Design Beyond the Product : Creating Technology-Enhanced Activity Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptelinin, Victor; Bannon, Liam J.

    2012-01-01

    The field of interaction design to date has been predominantly concerned with designing products, that is, devices, systems, and more recently services. A growing body of theoretical and empirical analyses suggests that the scope of interaction design needs to be expanded: An explicit concern...... of the field should include not only helping designers create better products but also helping people themselves create better environments for their work, learning, and leisure activities. In this article we argue that expanding the scope of interaction design beyond products requires a revision of some...... between intrinsic and extrinsic technology-enabled practice transformation, and foreground the need for interaction design research and practice to more directly deal with analysis and construction of technology-enhanced activity spaces. The implications of these notions for the research agenda...

  3. Effects of mill stream flours technological quality on fermentative activity of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirić Katarina V.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This work in concerned with the interdependence between technological quality of mill stream flours and fermentative activity of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each mill stream flour has its own specific properties, determined by the particle size, technological phase of its formation and part of the wheat kernel it consists of. Biochemical complexity of dough during examination of fermentative activity of baker's yeast confirmed the influence of a number of physical and biochemical flour properties, such as ash content, wet gluten content, rheological flour properties, phytic acid content and amylograph peak viscosity. Abudance of significant flour characteristic, their interaction and different behavior in the presence of the yeast, showed diversity and variation of result within the same category of the mill stream flour.

  4. Impacts of U.S. Export Control Policies on Science and Technology Activities and Competitiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-25

    international cooperation with foreign nations and/or consortia on space activities that are of mutual benefit and that further the peaceful ...mutual benefit and that further the peaceful exploration and use of space, as well as to advance national security, homeland security, and foreign...Technology, Cambridge, MA Gail H. Cassell, Vice President, Scientific Affairs and Distinguised Lilly Research Scholar for Infectious Diseases, Eli

  5. Technology in the Marketing Activities of Schools as an Example to Institutional Isomorphism

    OpenAIRE

    B. Çağla Garipağaoğlu; Sinem Vatanartıran; Şirin Karadeniz

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand and explore the isomorphic changes in the private school chain sector in Turkey over the last five years regarding the effects of recent technology adoptions for school marketing activities. Qualitative research model was used and the two largest school chains were selected with concept sampling strategy. To collect data, we interviewed the chief marketing officers of the two selected school chains by using a semi-structured interview guideline. The ...

  6. System safety activities supporting an aero-space plane ground support technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the specific system safety activities required to support the ground support technology program associated with the design of an aerospace plane. Safe zones must be assessed to ensure that explosive safety requirements are attained to protect the vehicle, personnel, and support and operational facilities. Attention is given to the specific and unique design requirements connected with the utilization of cryogenic fuels as they apply to the design and development of an aerospace plane.

  7. Supporting daily activities and indoor travel of persons with moderate Alzheimer's disease through standard technology resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Renna, Caterina; Ventrella, Marilisa; Pinto, Katia; Minervini, Mauro G; Oliva, Doretta; Groeneweg, Jop

    2013-08-01

    These two studies were aimed at evaluating standard technology resources for supporting activity and travel among patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, Study I assessed a pictorial instruction program relying on the use of a portable computer and a commercially available and inexpensive video editing software for supporting the performance of daily activities with three patients. Study II assessed the indoor travel performance of four patients (i.e., the three involved in Study I and a fourth patient with no previous research exposure) using a commercially available, basic doorbell system with sound and light cues. The percentages of correct activity steps obtained with the instruction program used in Study I were relatively high and largely similar to the percentages reported in previous studies using more sophisticated technology. During Study II, the percentages of correct travels of two patients matched the data of the most successful patients involved in previous studies with more sophisticated technology. The percentages of the other two patients tended to be lower than those obtained previously, but were still practically relevant. The implications of the results of the two studies and a number of issues for new research are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [The contribution of Web 2.0 technologies to the empowerment of active patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver-Mora, Martí; Iñiguez-Rueda, Lupicinio

    2017-03-01

    The Spanish health system has recently been marked by the emergence of more active patients who are characterized as being better informed about their disease, having a more participatory attitude, wanting to have a greater influence in making decisions about their health and asserting their rights as patients. Therefore, this article aims to report on how the introduction of Web 2.0 technologies can contribute to the empowering of more active patients. To achieve this, 14 semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients and representatives of patient associations who have used Web 2.0 technologies to interact with other patients or to communicate with health professionals. From the results obtained, we highlight the fact that Web 2.0 technologies provide greater access to health-related information, improve communication between patients and health professionals, and enable the creation of new spaces of interaction among patients. All of the facts above contribute to the formation of a more active role on the part of patients.

  9. HybridPLAY: A New Technology to Foster Outdoors Physical Activity, Verbal Communication and Teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Diego José; Boj, Clara; Portalés, Cristina

    2016-04-23

    This paper presents HybridPLAY, a novel technology composed of a sensor and mobile-based video games that transforms urban playgrounds into game scenarios. With this technology we aim to stimulate physical activity and playful learning by creating an entertaining environment in which users can actively participate and collaborate. HybridPLAY is different from other existing technologies that enhance playgrounds, as it is not integrated in them but can be attached to the different elements of the playgrounds, making its use more ubiquitous (i.e., not restricted to the playgrounds). HybridPLAY was born in 2007 as an artistic concept, and evolved after different phases of research and testing by almost 2000 users around the world (in workshops, artistic events, conferences, etc.). Here, we present the temporal evolution of HybridPLAY with the different versions of the sensors and the video games, and a detailed technical description of the sensors and the way interactions are produced. We also present the outcomes after the evaluation by users at different events and workshops. We believe that HybridPLAY has great potential to contribute to increased physical activity in kids, and also to improve the learning process and monitoring at school centres by letting users create the content of the apps, leading to new narratives and fostering creativity.

  10. HybridPLAY: A New Technology to Foster Outdoors Physical Activity, Verbal Communication and Teamwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego José Díaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents HybridPLAY, a novel technology composed of a sensor and mobile-based video games that transforms urban playgrounds into game scenarios. With this technology we aim to stimulate physical activity and playful learning by creating an entertaining environment in which users can actively participate and collaborate. HybridPLAY is different from other existing technologies that enhance playgrounds, as it is not integrated in them but can be attached to the different elements of the playgrounds, making its use more ubiquitous (i.e., not restricted to the playgrounds. HybridPLAY was born in 2007 as an artistic concept, and evolved after different phases of research and testing by almost 2000 users around the world (in workshops, artistic events, conferences, etc.. Here, we present the temporal evolution of HybridPLAY with the different versions of the sensors and the video games, and a detailed technical description of the sensors and the way interactions are produced. We also present the outcomes after the evaluation by users at different events and workshops. We believe that HybridPLAY has great potential to contribute to increased physical activity in kids, and also to improve the learning process and monitoring at school centres by letting users create the content of the apps, leading to new narratives and fostering creativity.

  11. Laboratory demonstration of a primary active mirror for space with the LATT: large aperture telescope technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briguglio, Runa; Biasi, Roberto; Gallieni, Daniele; Vettore, Christian; d'Amato, Francesco; Xompero, Marco; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Lisi, Franco; Riccardi, Armando; Patauner, Christian; Lazzarini, Paolo; Tintori, Matteo; Duò, Fabrizio; Pucci, Mauro; Zuccaro Marchi, Alessandro; Maresi, Luca

    2016-07-01

    The LATT project is an ESA contract under TRP programme to demonstrate the scalability of the technology from ground-based adaptive mirrors to space active primary mirrors. A prototype spherical mirror based on a 40 cm diameter 1 mm thin glass shell with 19 contactless, voice-coil actuators and co-located position sensors have been manufactured and integrated into a final unit with an areal density lower than 20 kg/m2. Laboratory tests demonstrated the controllability with very low power budget and the survival of the fragile glass shell exposed to launch accelerations, thanks to an electrostatic locking mechanism; such achievements pushes the technology readiness level toward 5. With this prototype, the LATT project explored the feasibility of using an active and lightweight primary for space telescopes. The concept is attractive for large segmented telescopes, with surface active control to shape and co-phase them once in flight. In this paper we will describe the findings of the technological advances and the results of the environmental and optical tests.

  12. AN ACTIVITY THEORY APPROACH TO STUDY BARRIERS OF FACULTY REGARDING TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro Guzman, Willy

    2016-01-01

    Information and communication technologies are instruments for supporting new ways of teaching and learning. Nevertheless, its impact concerning scope has not reached the expected level. This strain between benefits and impact has been inquired from the perspective of barriers of teachers to use...... for a reconceptualization in the study of barriers arguing that the teaching process is a complex and dynamic activity that needs to be examined from a collective perspective. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory is the theoretical framework used in the study. It concludes with the necessity of overcoming the existing...

  13. Perceived difficulties using everyday technology after acquired brain injury: influence on activity and participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, Anita; Lexell, Jan; Lund, Maria Larsson

    2010-12-01

    Using everyday technology (ET) is a prerequisite for activities and participation at home and in the community. It is well known that persons with an acquired brain injury (ABI) can have limitations in activities of daily living but our knowledge of their difficulties using ET is not known. Thirty-six persons (27 men and 9 women, mean age 44 years, age range 26-60) with an ABI (2-10 years post injury) were interviewed, using the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ), about their perceived difficulties using ET and how these difficulties influenced their everyday activities and their possibilities to participate at home and in the community. A majority (78%) of the persons reported difficulties using ET. The most common difficulties were related to the use of telecommunication and computers. Despite these difficulties, a majority still used most objects and services independently. Twenty-six participants (72%) perceived that their difficulties using ET influenced their everyday activities and their possibility to participate at home and in the community. The results indicate that rehabilitation following an ABI should consider whether clients' use of ET influences their activity and participation and adopt interventions accordingly. The results also indicate that difficulties using ET need to be considered in the design of community services to prevent societal barriers.

  14. Digital imaging information technology for biospeckle activity assessment relative to bacteria and parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E; Cabrera, Humberto; Grassi, Hilda C; de J Andrades, Efrén; Otero, Isabel; Rodríguez, Dania; Darias, Juan G

    2017-08-01

    This paper reports on the biospeckle processing of biological activity using a visualization scheme based upon the digital imaging information technology. Activity relative to bacterial growth in agar plates and to parasites affected by a drug is monitored via the speckle patterns generated by a coherent source incident on the microorganisms. We present experimental results to demonstrate the potential application of this methodology for following the activity in time. The digital imaging information technology is an alternative visualization enabling the study of speckle dynamics, which is correlated to the activity of bacteria and parasites. In this method, the changes in Red-Green-Blue (RGB) color component density are considered as markers of the growth of bacteria and parasites motility in presence of a drug. The RGB data was used to generate a two-dimensional surface plot allowing an analysis of color distribution on the speckle images. The proposed visualization is compared to the outcomes of the generalized differences and the temporal difference. A quantification of the activity is performed using a parameterization of the temporal difference method. The adopted digital image processing technique has been found suitable to monitor motility and morphological changes in the bacterial population over time and to detect and distinguish a short term drug action on parasites.

  15. NASA Technology Applications Team: Commercial applications of aerospace technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Team has maintained its focus on helping NASA establish partnerships with U.S. industry for dual use development and technology commercialization. Our emphasis has been on outcomes, such as licenses, industry partnerships and commercialization of technologies, that are important to NASA in its mission of contributing to the improved competitive position of U.S. industry. The RTI Team has been successful in the development of NASA/industry partnerships and commercialization of NASA technologies. RTI ongoing commitment to quality and customer responsiveness has driven our staff to continuously improve our technology transfer methodologies to meet NASA's requirements. For example, RTI has emphasized the following areas: (1) Methodology For Technology Assessment and Marketing: RTI has developed and implemented effective processes for assessing the commercial potential of NASA technologies. These processes resulted from an RTI study of best practices, hands-on experience, and extensive interaction with the NASA Field Centers to adapt to their specific needs. (2) Effective Marketing Strategies: RTI surveyed industry technology managers to determine effective marketing tools and strategies. The Technology Opportunity Announcement format and content were developed as a result of this industry input. For technologies with a dynamic visual impact, RTI has developed a stand-alone demonstration diskette that was successful in developing industry interest in licensing the technology. And (3) Responsiveness to NASA Requirements: RTI listened to our customer (NASA) and designed our processes to conform with the internal procedures and resources at each NASA Field Center and the direction provided by NASA's Agenda for Change. This report covers the activities of the Research Triangle Institute Technology Applications Team for the period 1 October 1993 through 31 December 1994.

  16. Cognitive Achievement and Motivation in Hands-on and Teacher-Centred Science Classes: Does an additional hands-on consolidation phase (concept mapping) optimise cognitive learning at work stations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerstner, Sabine; Bogner, Franz X.

    2010-05-01

    Our study monitored the cognitive and motivational effects within different educational instruction schemes: On the one hand, teacher-centred versus hands-on instruction; on the other hand, hands-on instruction with and without a knowledge consolidation phase (concept mapping). All the instructions dealt with the same content. For all participants, the hands-on approach as well as the concept mapping adaptation were totally new. Our hands-on approach followed instruction based on "learning at work stations". A total of 397 high-achieving fifth graders participated in our study. We used a pre-test, post-test, retention test design both to detect students' short-term learning success and long-term learning success, and to document their decrease rates of newly acquired knowledge. Additionally, we monitored intrinsic motivation. Although the teacher-centred approach provided higher short-term learning success, hands-on instruction resulted in relatively lower decrease rates. However, after six weeks, all students reached similar levels of newly acquired knowledge. Nevertheless, concept mapping as a knowledge consolidation phase positively affected short-term increase in knowledge. Regularly placed in instruction, it might increase long-term retention rates. Scores of interest, perceived competence and perceived choice were very high in all the instructional schemes.

  17. Hands-on approach during breastfeeding support in a neonatal intensive care unit: a qualitative study of Swedish mothers' experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumas Louise

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Assisting mothers to breastfeed is not easy when babies experience difficulties. In a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU, nurses often help mothers by using hands-on-breast without their permission. Little is known about how mothers feel about this unusual body touching. To gain more knowledge from mothers who lived through this experience, this hands-on practice was studied in a NICU in Sweden. Methods Between January and June 2001, in-depth interviews were conducted with ten mothers of preterm or sick term infants and all of them experienced the hands-on approach. In this research, Radnitzky's seven principles of hermeneutic interpretation were applied in order to interpret the meaning of mothers' responses. This article presents results related to the period of initiation of breastfeeding. This qualitative study was based on a combination of the models of Gustafsson, Orem, and Aarts' Marte Meo. Results Five main themes were identified: Insult to integrity, Manipulating the baby, Understanding and adjustment, Breasts as objects, Alternatives to this practice. Hands-on help in the breastfeeding situation was experienced as unpleasant and the women experienced their breasts as objectified. The mothers accepted the hands-on help given by nursing staff, even though they considered it unpleasant. Most mothers expressed a need for assistance when starting breastfeeding, but could not suggest any alternative to hands-on help such as demonstrating with an artificial breast and a doll. Conclusion The study provides information about how mothers experience unexpected hands-on help with breastfeeding in a NICU, which has not been described previously. Since most mothers in this study regarded this behavior as unpleasant and not helpful mostly because it was unexpected and unexplained, it would be important to either explain beforehand to mothers what type of physical approach could be attempted on their body or better, to avoid this

  18. A new high-performance AC/DC power factor correction switching converter based on one-cycle control technology and active floating-charge technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chao

    2008-01-01

    A new family of converters, high-performance AC/DC power factor correction (PFC) switching converters with one-cycle control technology and active floating-charge technology, was derived and experimentally verified. The topology of a single-phase CCM and DCM Boost-PFC switching converter was also analyzed. Its operating prniciples and control methods were expounded. Based on these, a new type of AC/DC switching converter circuits for PFC combined with one-cycle control technology was presented herein. The proposed AC/DC switching converter significantly helps improve the converter efficiency and its power factor value.

  19. Mobile technology and the value chain: Participants, activities and value creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coursaris, C.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Technology has evolved significantly and it is increasingly being used by businesses and consumers alike. Technologies such as those supporting electronic business (e-Business and mobile business (m-Business are being used across organizations extensively in an attempt to improve operations and subsequently translate in either financial gains or strategic advantages. Opportunities for realizing either of the two types of benefits can be identified through an examination of a business’ value chain. This conceptual study begins by proposing a business-centric interaction model that helps explain the interactions among all participants involved in an organization’s possible activities. The paper then explores the potential fit of wireless and mobile technologies across a company’s value chain through the citation of potential mobile and wireless business applications currently available. Finally, a discussion on the expected benefits and relevant concerns of mobile technology, as well as considerations for future research are provided.

  20. Participation after acquired brain injury: Associations with everyday technology and activities in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahpour, Mandana; Kottorp, Anders; Nygård, Louise; Lund, Maria Larsson

    2015-01-01

    The development of the information society has led to increased use of everyday technology and changed the conditions for participation. Enabling participation in everyday life situations is an important rehabilitation goal after acquired brain injury (ABI). Identifying factors associated with individuals' experienced participation and problems therein is therefore essential. This study aimed at exploring the relationship between perceived difficulty in everyday technology use, perceived ability in the activities of daily living (ADL), and perceived participation, and participation problems in persons with ABI. Eighty-one persons with ABI participated in the study and were assessed by the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire, the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire, and the ADL taxonomy. Findings showed that the combined model of difficulty in everyday technology (ET) use, ADL ability, and the interaction between them explained both participation in various domains of everyday life, and also overall level of perceived participation and the perceived problems. The findings underscore the importance of evaluating individuals' ability in both ET use and ADL after ABI to increase the probability of explaining these persons' participation in desired everyday life situations and, also, for rehabilitation design.

  1. Physical activity interventions using mass media, print media, and information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, B H; Owen, N; Forsyth, L H; Cavill, N A; Fridinger, F

    1998-11-01

    Media-based physical activity interventions include a variety of print, graphic, audiovisual, and broadcast media programs intended to influence behavior change. New information technology allows print to be delivered in personalized, interactive formats that may enhance efficacy. Media-based interventions have been shaped by conceptual models from health education, Social Cognitive Theory, the Transtheoretical Model, and Social Marketing frameworks. We reviewed 28 studies of media-based interventions of which seven were mass media campaigns at the state or national level and the remaining 21 were delivered through health care, the workplace, or in the community. Recall of mass-media messages generally was high, but mass-media campaigns had very little impact on physical activity behavior. Interventions using print and/or telephone were effective in changing behavior in the short term. Studies in which there were more contacts and interventions tailored to the target audience were most effective. A key issue for research on media-based physical activity interventions is reaching socially disadvantaged groups for whom access, particularly to new forms of communication technology, may be limited. There is a clear need for controlled trials comparing different forms and intensities of media-based physical activity interventions. Controlled studies of personalized print, interactive computer-mediated programs, and web-based formats for program delivery also are needed. The integration of media-based methods into public and private sector service delivery has much potential for innovation.

  2. Assistive technology for the promotion of activity of daily living with children in hospital contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Moniz da Silveira

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to characterize the routine of a pediatric nursing ward in relation tothe performance of their users on the Activity of Daily Living - ADL: personal hygiene, bathing and feeding, aswell as point out the possible uses of assistive technology concerning the ADL performance. The participants werethe following; 10 members of a nursing team, 12 caretakers and their hospitalized children with ages betweensix and twelve. The characterization of the pediatric nursing was made through semi-structured interviews andobservation developed by the researchers. Results showed that 100% (n = 10 of professionals, members ofthe nursing staff, reported performing guidance and/or supervision and/or performance of the following ADL:personal hygiene, bathing and feeding of children under their responsibility. Children remained in hospital fromthree to forty-five days and 75% (n = 9 of them reported ADL dependence in personal care, 83.3% (n = 10in the bathing activity and 16.6 % (n = 2 in the feeding activity. Children also reported that they were helpedwith personal care, bathing and feeding by their caretakers. Caretakers identified differences in the performanceof the children’s personal hygiene (41.6%, n = 5, bathing (66.6%, n = 8 and feeding (50%, n = 6 activities.Except for slight differences in the reports of the children, parents reported similar data and the bathing activitypresented the highest level of assistance. Recommendations on the use of technology in hospital contexts wereelaborated based on these results.

  3. Multiple Behavior Change in Diet and Activity: A Randomized Controlled Trial Using Mobile Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring, Bonnie; Schneider, Kristin; McFadden, H.G.; Vaughn, Jocelyn; Kozak, Andrea T.; Smith, Malaina; Moller, Arlen C.; Epstein, Leonard H.; DeMott, Andrew; Hedeker, Donald; Siddique, Juned; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Many patients exhibit multiple chronic disease risk behaviors. Research provides little information about advice that can maximize simultaneous health behavior changes. Methods To test which combination of diet and activity advice maximizes healthy change, we randomized 204 adults with elevated saturated fat and low fruit/vegetable intakes, high sedentary leisure time and low physical activity to one of four treatments: increase fruit/vegetable and physical activity; decrease fat and sedentary leisure; decrease fat and increase physical activity; increase fruit/vegetable and decrease sedentary leisure. Treatments provided three weeks of remote coaching supported by mobile decision support technology and financial incentives. During treatment, incentives were contingent on using the mobile device to self-monitor and attain behavioral targets; during follow-up they were contingent only on recording. The outcome was standardized, composite improvement on the four diet and activity behaviors at end of treatment and five month follow-up. Results Of those randomized, 200 (98%) completed follow-up. The increase fruit/vegetable and decrease sedentary leisure treatment improved more than the other 3 treatments (p<.001). Specifically, fruit/vegetables increased from 1.2 servings/day to 5.5; sedentary leisure decreased from 219.2 minutes/day to 89.3; saturated fat decreased from 12.0% of calories consumed to 9.5%. Differences between treatment groups were maintained through follow-up. Traditional dieting (decrease fat and increase physical activity) improved less than the other 3 treatments (p<.001). Conclusions Remote coaching supported by mobile technology and financial incentives holds promise to improve diet and activity. Targeting fruits/vegetables and sedentary leisure together maximizes overall adoption and maintenance of multiple healthy behavior changes. PMID:22636824

  4. Persuasive Technology in Mobile Applications Promoting Physical Activity: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, John; Win, Khin Than; Oinas-Kukkonen, Harri; Freeman, Mark

    2016-03-01

    Persuasive technology in mobile applications can be used to influence the behaviour of users. A framework known as the Persuasive Systems Design model has been developed for designing and evaluating systems that influence the attitudes or behaviours of users. This paper reviews the current state of mobile applications for health behavioural change with an emphasis on applications that promote physical activity. The inbuilt persuasive features of mobile applications were evaluated using the Persuasive Systems Design model. A database search was conducted to identify relevant articles. Articles were then reviewed using the Persuasive Systems Design model as a framework for analysis. Primary task support, dialogue support, and social support were found to be moderately represented in the selected articles. However, system credibility support was found to have only low levels of representation as a persuasive systems design feature in mobile applications for supporting physical activity. To ensure that available mobile technology resources are best used to improve the wellbeing of people, it is important that the design principles that influence the effectiveness of persuasive technology be understood.

  5. Using place-based concepts, multicultural lenses, and hands-on experience to broaden participation in the sciences for native youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flick, K. C.; Keepseagle, L.

    2013-12-01

    . Through field trips to broaden perspective, self-directed action research projects, and formal and informal classroom settings, the SLC serves as a stepping stone for students to discover Science/Math/ Technology-related careers and interact with people and professionals of all ages who pursue these careers. SLC participation empowers young students so they may one day serve as leaders and roles models to positively influence their classmates, schools, and communities for future generations. Through this collaborative education design process we have used place-based concepts, multicultural lenses, and hands-on experiences to explore reciprocal learning relationships which broaden participation of native students in geosciences and geoscientists' participation in cultural teachings.

  6. High Integrated Microwave Architecture Using LTCC-SIP Technology in Active Phased Array Antenna Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Shi, Wei; Dou, Wen-Bin; Shen, Ya

    2012-06-01

    A kind of three dimensional Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramic (LTCC)-System in Package (SIP) transition was proposed in this paper. The basic design of SIP with LTCC technology was done by vertical transitions which transmit the microwave signal from the bottom to the surface of the substrate. The measured insertion loss did not exceed 1.5 dB, which contains the insertion loss of the test board about 0.6 dB at 18 GHz and the return loss was better than-15 dB up to 18 GHz. Then this technology was applied to a kind of phase shifting and amplifier module with two output ports. Basing on this module, a miniature Ku-band active phase array antenna was realized. The design results in a small size(84.8 mm×84.8 mm×55 mm). The measured performance of systems radiation pattern was also given.

  7. Creating experiential learning activities using Web 2.0 tools and technologies: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brixey, Juliana J; Warren, Judith J

    2009-01-01

    Learning is no longer an internal individual activity but occurs through networks and connections. The aim of this project was to teach online health informatics students to use Web 2.0 tools and technologies to form networks and connections through experiential learning assignments. Web 2.0 tools and technologies were evaluated using a criteria checklist prior to implementation for students enrolled in health informatics classes at the University of Kansas School of Nursing. Health informatics students have developed competencies using an instant message service, blogging, concept mapping, social bookmarking, and interacting a virtual environment. In the future, health care professionals will have to work in rapidly changing environments and keep abreast of new innovations and tools, learn to use those tools, and to teach others about the tools.

  8. Space technology: A study of the significance of recognition for innovators of spinoff technologies. 1993 activities/1994, 1995 plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    During the past 30 years as NASA has conducted technology transfer programs, it has gained considerable experience - particularly pertaining to the processes. However, three areas have not had much scrutiny: the examination of the contributions of the individuals who have developed successful spinoffs, the commercial success of the spinoffs themselves, and the degree to which they are understood by the public. In short, there has been limited evaluation to measure the success of technology transfer efforts mandated by Congress. Research conducted during the first year of a three-year NASA grant to the United States Space Foundation has taken the initial steps toward measuring the success of methodologies to accomplish that Congressionally-mandated technology transfer. In particular, the US Space Foundation, in cooperation with ARAC, technology transfer experts; JKA, a nationally recognized themed entertainment design company; and top evaluation consultants, inaugurated and evaluated a fresh approach including commercial practices to encourage, motivate, and energize technology transfer by: recognizing already successful efforts (Space Technology Hall of Fame Award), drawing potential business and industrial players into the process (Space Commerce Expo), and informing and motivating the general public (Space Technology Hall of Fame public venues). The first year's efforts are documented and directions for the future are outlined.

  9. Mission activities planning for a Hermes mission by means of AI-technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, U.; Hajen, G.; Schielow, N.; Mitschdoerfer, P.; Allard, F.

    1993-01-01

    Mission Activities Planning is a complex task to be performed by mission control centers. AI technology can offer attractive solutions to the planning problem. This paper presents the use of a new AI-based Mission Planning System for crew activity planning. Based on a HERMES servicing mission to the COLUMBUS Man Tended Free Flyer (MTFF) with complex time and resource constraints, approximately 2000 activities with 50 different resources have been generated, processed, and planned with parametric variation of operationally sensitive parameters. The architecture, as well as the performance of the mission planning system, is discussed. An outlook to future planning scenarios, the requirements, and how a system like MARS can fulfill those requirements is given.

  10. Teaching Challenge in Hands-on DSP Experiments for Night-School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen M. Kuo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapid increase in digital signal processing (DSP applications has generated a strong demand for electrical engineers with DSP backgrounds; however, the gap between industry needs and university curricula still exists. To answer this challenge, a sequence of innovative DSP courses that emphasize hands-on experiments and practical applications were developed for continuing education in electrical and computer engineering. These courses are taught in the evening for night-school students having at least three years of work experience. These courses enable students to experiment with sophisticated DSP applications to augment the theoretical, conceptual, and analytical materials provided in traditional DSP courses. The inclusion of both software and hardware developments allows students to undertake a wide range of DSP projects for real-world applications. Assessment data concludes that the digital signal processor fundamentals course can increase learning interest and overcome the prerequisite problem of DSP laboratory experiments. This paper also briefly introduces representative examples of some challenging DSP applications.

  11. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Data Loading Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; K. J. Kvarfordt; S. T. Wood

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and developed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This report is intended to assist the user to enter PRA data into the SAPHIRE program using the built-in MAR-D ASCII-text file data transfer process. Towards this end, a small sample database is constructed and utilized for demonstration. Where applicable, the discussion includes how the data processes for loading the sample database relate to the actual processes used to load a larger PRA models. The procedures described herein were developed for use with SAPHIRE Version 6.0 and Version 7.0. In general, the data transfer procedures for version 6 and 7 are the same, but where deviations exist, the differences are noted. The guidance specified in this document will allow a user to have sufficient knowledge to both understand the data format used by SAPHIRE and to carry out the transfer of data between different PRA projects.

  12. Using students' misconceptions of primary coloured lights to design a hands-on coloured light mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nopparatjamjomras, Suchai; Chitaree, Ratchapak

    2009-06-01

    A surface mount typed multi-coloured Light-Emitting Diode (LED) is used as a light source for the hands-on coloured light mixer. The LED consists of red, green and blue tiny sources but the mixer is designed to have four switches corresponding to red, green, blue and yellow light. These colours correspond to students' misconceptions of primary coloured lights; they realize that the primary colours and the rules for lights mixing are the same as those of paints. To generate a yellow light, a microcontroller placed between four input switches and the LED operates both a red and green tiny sources. In addition, the microcontroller is employed to eliminate some combinations of coloured light mixing to simplify the experiment (basic mode) for non advanced students. If the mixer is used with more advanced students, a number of combinations will increase and students need more analytical skills to find out the primary coloured lights (the coloured lights that can not be produced by the mixing of any other coloured lights). Therefore, the mixer is able to use with more advanced and non advanced students depending on the program in the microcontroller and some modifications of the circuit. Furthermore, to introduce students an idea that other hues or shades can be generated by mixing of these three primary coloured lights of different intensities, a tuning circuit is integrated to vary an intensity of the green light source.

  13. A Critical Perspective of an Online Hands-On Laboratory Framework for Environmental Engineering Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Tota-Maharaj

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In environmental engineering education at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels, laboratory exercises are a key component for a holistic learning experience. This project gives an outlook of online learning related research and teaching linked to a lab-based learning environment. The advent of the internet and online resources such as weblogs as a major communication methodology in higher education has showed a great deal of interest. In this project a further step into the realm of providing an online support system for student’s access to remote and distributed laboratory facilities in water and environmental engineering modules has been conducted. The approach demonstrates the feasibility of using an online laboratory effectively which can enable learners to reinforce their learning through hands-on practicals and can also be carried out in a flexible environment. An online weblog related the research and interlinked teaching for water and environmental engineering modules which can be implemented in reforming a lecture-based course for students undertaking water and wastewater engineering subjects

  14. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-On Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Technical Reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; W. J. Galyean; S. T. Beck

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. Herein information is provided on the principles used in the construction and operation of Version 6.0 and 7.0 of the SAPHIRE system. This report summarizes the fundamental mathematical concepts of sets and logic, fault trees, and probability. This volume then describes the algorithms used to construct a fault tree and to obtain the minimal cut sets. It gives the formulas used to obtain the probability of the top event from the minimal cut sets, and the formulas for probabilities that apply for various assumptions concerning reparability and mission time. It defines the measures of basic event importance that SAPHIRE can calculate. This volume gives an overview of uncertainty analysis using simple Monte Carlo sampling or Latin Hypercube sampling, and states the algorithms used by this program to generate random basic event probabilities from various distributions. Also covered are enhance capabilities such as seismic analysis, cut set "recovery," end state manipulation, and use of "compound events."

  15. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-On Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Technical Reference Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. L. Smith; W. J. Galyean; S. T. Beck

    2006-07-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) using a personal computer (PC) running the Microsoft Windows? operating system. Herein information is provided on the principles used in the construction and operation of Version 6.0 and 7.0 of the SAPHIRE system. This report summarizes the fundamental mathematical concepts of sets and logic, fault trees, and probability. This volume then describes the algorithms used to construct a fault tree and to obtain the minimal cut sets. It gives the formulas used to obtain the probability of the top event from the minimal cut sets, and the formulas for probabilities that apply for various assumptions concerning reparability and mission time. It defines the measures of basic event importance that SAPHIRE can calculate. This volume gives an overview of uncertainty analysis using simple Monte Carlo sampling or Latin Hypercube sampling, and states the algorithms used by this program to generate random basic event probabilities from various distributions. Also covered are enhance capabilities such as seismic analysis, cut set "recovery," end state manipulation, and use of "compound events."

  16. Effect of Electronic Interactive Technologies Usage on Services Marketing Activities Empirical Study on Banking Sector in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria A. Azzam

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The importance of new technology in marketing of financial services can't be ignored. Interactive technology helpsmarketers to inexpensively engage consumers in one- to- one relationships fueled by two way conversation via mouse click oncomputer. Several organizations especially in services businesses are increasingly strengthening their marketing function byeffectively interacting with their customers with the help of sophisticated interactive technologies in an integrated manner.Enough research in the usage or adoption of electronic data interchange (EDI can be found both in information systems andmarketing literature. Therefore; it appears that different interactive technologies have been studied individually by differentresearchers. This motivates researchers to find out studies related to interactive technologies and their usage or adoptionespecially in the field of marketing activities in a developing country like Jordan. This paper attempts to understand the effectof the usage of interactive technologies in financial services businesses with the intention to derive implications for thedevelopment of interactive technologies to suit its intended users.

  17. Development of active edge pixel sensors and four-side buttable modules using vertical integration technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchiolo, A.; Andricek, L.; Moser, H.-G.; Nisius, R.; Richter, R. H.; Terzo, S.; Weigell, P.

    2014-11-01

    We present an R&D activity focused on the development of novel modules for the upgrade of the ATLAS pixel system at the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The modules consist of n-in-p pixel sensors, 100 or 200 μm thick, produced at VTT (Finland) with an active edge technology, which considerably reduces the dead area at the periphery of the device. The sensors are interconnected with solder bump-bonding to the ATLAS FE-I3 and FE-I4 read-out chips, and characterised with radioactive sources and beam tests at the CERN-SPS and DESY. The results of these measurements will be discussed for devices before and after irradiation up to a fluence of 5 ×1015neq /cm2. We will also report on the R&D activity to obtain Inter Chip Vias (ICVs) on the ATLAS read-out chip in collaboration with the Fraunhofer Institute EMFT. This step is meant to prove the feasibility of the signal transport to the newly created readout pads on the backside of the chips allowing for four side buttable devices without the presently used cantilever for wire bonding. The read-out chips with ICVs will be interconnected to thin pixel sensors, 75 μm and 150 μm thick, with the Solid Liquid Interdiffusion (SLID) technology, which is an alternative to the standard solder bump-bonding.

  18. A status of the activities of the NASA/MSFC pump stage technology team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R.; Williams, R.; Dakhoul, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology was established to aid the transfer of CFD related advancements among academia, government agencies, and industry. The specific goals of the Consortium are to develop CFD methodologies necessary to solve propulsion problems, to validate these methodologies, and to apply these methodologies in the design process. To accomplish these goals, a team of experts in various related fields was formed, a schedule of activities necessary to meet the goals was generated, and funding for the activities was obtained from NASA. During the past year (Mar. 1991 - Mar. 1992) the team's activities have focused on preliminary code validation and on the design of an advanced impeller. Six codes were used to calculate the flow in a Rocketdyne 0.3 flow coefficient inducer, and the results were compared to L2F data available for the inducer. This activity identified shortcomings in the experimental data sets and in the analytical solutions which must be surmounted in any future team activity. The design of the advanced impeller relied heavily on CFD results to obtain an optimized geometry. The optimized geometry was analyzed using four different codes, at design and off-design conditions. Activities for the next year include the optimization of a tandem blade impeller design, benchmark of CFD codes for diffuser and volute flows, the collection of L2F data for 'state-of-the-art' impeller and inducer, and the verification of the advanced pump team impeller design in a water rig.

  19. Low cost assistive technology to support educational activities for adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Alan Patricio; Bulle Oliveira, Acary Souza; Pinheiro Bezerra, Italla Maria; Pedrozo Campos Antunes, Thaiany; Guerrero Daboin, Blanca Elena; Raimundo, Rodrigo Daminello; Dos Santos, Vagner Rogério; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2017-08-30

    The concept of assistive technology covers several areas of action; one of them is communication with the elaboration of accessible solutions to overcome daily difficulties. It contributes to the resumption of functional abilities, expanding and facilitating inclusion and independent living. To analyze the usability of a low cost prototype device to support educational activities of adolescents with cerebral palsy. A descriptive observational study. The evaluation of a prototype device was made through a validated questionnaire, Quest Version 2.0, on the level of the user's satisfaction with an assistive technology, composed of 12 evaluation items. The questionnaire was filled out by the educator based on the observation of four wheelchair-bound participants diagnosed with cerebral palsy according to the international classification of diseases and health-related problems, ICD-10, who attend a coexistence and teaching institution in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The device developed was considered an assistive technology, which provided an experience with a positive level of satisfaction for the participants. The tested prototype contributes to communication and interaction allowing adolescents with cerebral palsy to participate in educational activities. Implications for Rehabilitation The device assists the individual in the educational activities and can positively influence their development, observe the individual number 5, who has an important limitation in coordination and fine movements, placing the role of the task in the vertical position offers a new perspective to perform the task, this stimulates him to try to perform the work, so the challenge was adjusted to the demands of each individual which can contribute to its neuromotor development, the amplitude of the distal movements and the manual ability, since it must look for alternatives to complete the task requested.

  20. Apollo Program Summary Report: Synopsis of the Apollo Program Activities and Technology for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    Overall program activities and the technology developed to accomplish lunar exploration are discussed. A summary of the flights conducted over an 11-year period is presented along with specific aspects of the overall program, including lunar science, vehicle development and performance, lunar module development program, spacecraft development testing, flight crew summary, mission operations, biomedical data, spacecraft manufacturing and testing, launch site facilities, equipment, and prelaunch operations, and the lunar receiving laboratory. Appendixes provide data on each of the Apollo missions, mission type designations, spacecraft weights, records achieved by Apollo crewmen, vehicle histories, and a listing of anomalous hardware conditions noted during each flight beginning with Apollo 4.