WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology general circulation

  1. Ocean General Circulation Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  2. EOP MIT General Circulation Model (MITgcm)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data contains a regional implementation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) at a 1-km spatial resolution for the...

  3. Atmospheric General Circulation Changes under Global Warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palipane, Erool

    The work in this thesis is mainly two-fold. First we study the internal variability of the general circulation and focus our study on the annular modes and how important it is to simulate the subsynoptic scales in the circulation. In the next major section we will try to understand the mechanisms of the forced response and the mechanisms leading towards the jet shift from transient evolution in Atmospheric general circulation models. In the first part, in an attempt to assess the benefit of resolving the sub-synoptic to mesoscale processes, the spatial and temporal characteristics of the Annular Modes (AMs), in particular those related to the troposphere-stratosphere interaction, are evaluated for moderate- and high-horizontal resolution simulations with a global atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), in comparison with the ERA40 re- analysis. Relative to the CMIP-type climate models, the IFS AGCM demonstrates notable improvement in capturing the key characteristics of the AMs. Notably, the performance with the high horizontal resolution version of the model is systematically superior to the moderate resolution on all metrics examined, including the variance of the AMs at different seasons of the year, the intrinsic e-folding time scales of the AMs, and the downward influence from the stratosphere to troposphere in the AMs. Moreover, the high-resolution simulation with a greater persistence in the intrinsic variability of the SAM projects an appreciably larger shift of the surface westerly wind during the Southern Hemisphere summer under climate change. In the second part, the response of the atmospheric circulation to greenhouse gas-induced SST warming is investigated using large ensemble experiments with two AGCMs, with a focus on the robust feature of the poleward shift of the eddy driven jet. In these experiments, large ensembles of simulations are conducted by abruptly switching the SST forcing on from January 1st to focus on the wintertime circulation

  4. Analysis of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furusawa, Takehiko; Shimizu, Tadaaki; Yang, Guilin

    1987-05-20

    Fluidized bed combustors are commercialized as a technology to combust solid fuels with higher efficiency and lower emission and have functions of both combustion and simultaneous desulfurization and NOx reduction with dense phase fluidized beds but it is not so easy to realize these problems. The technology of circulating fluidized bed coal combustion is expected to offer potential break-through of various problems. But the details are not reported so far. Quantitative analysis of present situations was conducted and future problems were shown with officially available informations. This analysis includes the circulating rate and loading of solids, heat recovery and heat transfer rate as a function of loading of solids, the design of cyclones related to high solid concentration within the combustor, sulfur retention with reduced Ca/S ratio and problems related to NOx reduction to be developed in future. (51 refs, 23 figs, 8 tabs)

  5. The epistemological status of general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehle, Craig

    2017-05-01

    Forecasts of both likely anthropogenic effects on climate and consequent effects on nature and society are based on large, complex software tools called general circulation models (GCMs). Forecasts generated by GCMs have been used extensively in policy decisions related to climate change. However, the relation between underlying physical theories and results produced by GCMs is unclear. In the case of GCMs, many discretizations and approximations are made, and simulating Earth system processes is far from simple and currently leads to some results with unknown energy balance implications. Statistical testing of GCM forecasts for degree of agreement with data would facilitate assessment of fitness for use. If model results need to be put on an anomaly basis due to model bias, then both visual and quantitative measures of model fit depend strongly on the reference period used for normalization, making testing problematic. Epistemology is here applied to problems of statistical inference during testing, the relationship between the underlying physics and the models, the epistemic meaning of ensemble statistics, problems of spatial and temporal scale, the existence or not of an unforced null for climate fluctuations, the meaning of existing uncertainty estimates, and other issues. Rigorous reasoning entails carefully quantifying levels of uncertainty.

  6. The epistemological status of general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehle, Craig

    2018-03-01

    Forecasts of both likely anthropogenic effects on climate and consequent effects on nature and society are based on large, complex software tools called general circulation models (GCMs). Forecasts generated by GCMs have been used extensively in policy decisions related to climate change. However, the relation between underlying physical theories and results produced by GCMs is unclear. In the case of GCMs, many discretizations and approximations are made, and simulating Earth system processes is far from simple and currently leads to some results with unknown energy balance implications. Statistical testing of GCM forecasts for degree of agreement with data would facilitate assessment of fitness for use. If model results need to be put on an anomaly basis due to model bias, then both visual and quantitative measures of model fit depend strongly on the reference period used for normalization, making testing problematic. Epistemology is here applied to problems of statistical inference during testing, the relationship between the underlying physics and the models, the epistemic meaning of ensemble statistics, problems of spatial and temporal scale, the existence or not of an unforced null for climate fluctuations, the meaning of existing uncertainty estimates, and other issues. Rigorous reasoning entails carefully quantifying levels of uncertainty.

  7. Climatology of the HOPE-G global ocean general circulation model - Sea ice general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legutke, S. [Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum (DKRZ), Hamburg (Germany); Maier-Reimer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-12-01

    The HOPE-G global ocean general circulation model (OGCM) climatology, obtained in a long-term forced integration is described. HOPE-G is a primitive-equation z-level ocean model which contains a dynamic-thermodynamic sea-ice model. It is formulated on a 2.8 grid with increased resolution in low latitudes in order to better resolve equatorial dynamics. The vertical resolution is 20 layers. The purpose of the integration was both to investigate the models ability to reproduce the observed general circulation of the world ocean and to obtain an initial state for coupled atmosphere - ocean - sea-ice climate simulations. The model was driven with daily mean data of a 15-year integration of the atmosphere general circulation model ECHAM4, the atmospheric component in later coupled runs. Thereby, a maximum of the flux variability that is expected to appear in coupled simulations is included already in the ocean spin-up experiment described here. The model was run for more than 2000 years until a quasi-steady state was achieved. It reproduces the major current systems and the main features of the so-called conveyor belt circulation. The observed distribution of water masses is reproduced reasonably well, although with a saline bias in the intermediate water masses and a warm bias in the deep and bottom water of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The model underestimates the meridional transport of heat in the Atlantic Ocean. The simulated heat transport in the other basins, though, is in good agreement with observations. (orig.)

  8. Circulator Integrated in Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, R. van; Bent, G. van der; Ashari, M.; McKay, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a demonstration of an integrated circulator for TR modules using low temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology. Two different circulators have been realised to be used in TR modules in two different frequency bands, C-and Ku-band. The circulator is a three-port junction microstrip

  9. NAO-ocean circulation interactions in a coupled general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, A. [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici, Bologna (Italy); Gualdi, S.; Navarra, A. [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici, Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy); Scoccimarro, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    The interplay between the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the large scale ocean circulation is inspected in a twentieth century simulation conducted with a state-of-the-art coupled general circulation model. Significant lead-lag covariance between oceanic and tropospheric variables suggests that the system supports a damped oscillatory mode involving an active ocean-atmosphere coupling, with a typical NAO-like space structure and a 5 years timescale, qualitatively consistent with a mid-latitude delayed oscillator paradigm. The two essential processes governing the oscillation are (1) a negative feedback between ocean gyre circulation and the high latitude SST meridional gradient and (2) a positive feedback between SST and the NAO. The atmospheric NAO pattern appears to have a weaker projection on the ocean meridional overturning, compared to the gyre circulation, which leads to a secondary role for the thermohaline circulation in driving the meridional heat transport, and thus the oscillatory mode. (orig.)

  10. A general circulation model (GCM) parameterization of Pinatubo aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacis, A.A.; Carlson, B.E.; Mishchenko, M.I. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The June 1991 volcanic eruption of Mt. Pinatubo is the largest and best documented global climate forcing experiment in recorded history. The time development and geographical dispersion of the aerosol has been closely monitored and sampled. Based on preliminary estimates of the Pinatubo aerosol loading, general circulation model predictions of the impact on global climate have been made.

  11. Response of an ocean general circulation model to wind and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The stretched-coordinate ocean general circulation model has been designed to study the observed variability due to wind and thermodynamic forcings. The model domain extends from 60°N to 60°S and cyclically continuous in the longitudinal direction. The horizontal resolution is 5° × 5° and 9 discrete vertical levels.

  12. Gas-cooled reactor coolant circulator and blower technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    In the previous 17 meetings held within the framework of the International Working Group on Gas-Cooled Reactors, a wide variety of topics and components have been addressed, but the San Diego meeting represented the first time that a group of specialists had been convened to discuss circulator and blower related technology. A total of 20 specialists from 6 countries attended the meeting in which 15 technical papers were presented in 5 sessions: circulator operating experience I and II (6 papers); circulator design considerations I and II (6 papers); bearing technology (3 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. The stability of the thermohaline circulation in a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiller, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Mikolajewicz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Voss, R. [Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum (DKRZ), Hamburg (Germany)

    1996-02-01

    The stability of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation against meltwater input is investigated in a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. The meltwater input to the Labrador Sea is increased linearly for 250 years to a maximum input of 0.625 Sv and then reduced again to 0 (both instantaneously and slowly decreasing over 250 years). The resulting freshening forces a shutdown of the formation of North Atlantic deepwater and a subsequent reversal of the thermohaline circulation of the Atlantic, filling the deep Atlantic with Antarctic bottom water. The change in the overturning pattern causes a drastic reduction of the Atlantic northward heat transport, resulting in a strong cooling with maximum amplitude over the northern North Atlantic and a southward shift of the sea-ice margin in the Atlantic. Due to the increased meridional temperature gradient, the Atlantic intertropical convergence zone is displaced southward and the westerlies in the northern hemisphere gain strength. We identify four main feedbacks affecting the stability of the thermohaline circulation: the change in the overturning circulation of the Atlantic leads to longer residence times of the surface waters in high northern latitudes, which allows them to accumulate more precipitation and runoff from the continents, which results in an increased stability in the North Atlantic.

  14. Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.C.; Dudek, M.P.; Liang, X.Z.; Ding, M. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    We participate in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program with two objectives: (1) to improve the general circulation model (GCM) cloud/radiation treatment with a focus on cloud verticle overlapping and layer cloud optical properties, and (2) to study the effects of cloud/radiation-climate interaction on GCM climate simulations. This report summarizes the project progress since the Fourth ARM Science Team meeting February 28-March 4, 1994, in Charleston, South Carolina.

  15. Seasonal predictability of Kiremt rainfall in coupled general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleixner, Stephanie; Keenlyside, Noel S.; Demissie, Teferi D.; Counillon, François; Wang, Yiguo; Viste, Ellen

    2017-11-01

    The Ethiopian economy and population is strongly dependent on rainfall. Operational seasonal predictions for the main rainy season (Kiremt, June-September) are based on statistical approaches with Pacific sea surface temperatures (SST) as the main predictor. Here we analyse dynamical predictions from 11 coupled general circulation models for the Kiremt seasons from 1985-2005 with the forecasts starting from the beginning of May. We find skillful predictions from three of the 11 models, but no model beats a simple linear prediction model based on the predicted Niño3.4 indices. The skill of the individual models for dynamically predicting Kiremt rainfall depends on the strength of the teleconnection between Kiremt rainfall and concurrent Pacific SST in the models. Models that do not simulate this teleconnection fail to capture the observed relationship between Kiremt rainfall and the large-scale Walker circulation.

  16. Plausible Effect of Weather on Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation with a Coupled General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zedong; Wan, Xiuquan

    2018-04-01

    The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is a vital component of the global ocean circulation and the heat engine of the climate system. Through the use of a coupled general circulation model, this study examines the role of synoptic systems on the AMOC and presents evidence that internally generated high-frequency, synoptic-scale weather variability in the atmosphere could play a significant role in maintaining the overall strength and variability of the AMOC, thereby affecting climate variability and change. Results of a novel coupling technique show that the strength and variability of the AMOC are greatly reduced once the synoptic weather variability is suppressed in the coupled model. The strength and variability of the AMOC are closely linked to deep convection events at high latitudes, which could be strongly affected by the weather variability. Our results imply that synoptic weather systems are important in driving the AMOC and its variability. Thus, interactions between atmospheric weather variability and AMOC may be an important feedback mechanism of the global climate system and need to be taken into consideration in future climate change studies.

  17. Interactions Between the Thermohaline Circulation and Tropical Atlantic SST in a Coupled General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ron; Jiang, Xing-Jian; Travis, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Tropical Atlantic SST shows a (statistically well-defined) decadal time scale in a 104-year simulation of unforced variability by a coupled general circulation model (CGCM). The SST anomalies superficially resemble observed Tropical Atlantic variability (TAV), and are associated with changes in the atmospheric circulation. Brazilian rainfall is modulated with a decadal time scale, along with the strength of the Atlantic trade winds, which are associated with variations in evaporation and the net surface heat flux. However, in contrast to observed tropical Atlantic variability, the trade winds damp the associated anomalies in ocean temperature, indicating a negative feedback. Tropical SST anomalies in the CGCM, though opposed by the surface heat flux, are advected in from the Southern Hemisphere mid-latitudes. These variations modulate the strength of the thermohaline circulation (THC): warm, salty anomalies at the equator sink drawing cold, fresh mid-latitude water. Upon reaching the equator, the latter inhibit vertical overturning and advection from higher latitudes, which allows warm, salty anomalies to reform, returning the cycle to its original state. Thus, the cycle results from advection of density anomalies and the effect of these anomalies upon the rate of vertical overturning and surface advection. This decadal modulation of Tropical Atlantic SST and the thermohaline circulation is correlated with ocean heat transport to the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and Norwegian Sea SST. Because of the central role of equatorial convection, we question whether this mechanism is present in the current climate, although we speculate that it may have operated in palaeo times, depending upon the stability of the tropical water column.

  18. Clusters of Circulating Tumor Cells: a Biophysical and Technological Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Sam H; Edd, Jon; Haber, Daniel A; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet

    2017-09-01

    The vast majority of cancer associated deaths result from metastasis, yet the behaviors of its most potent cellular driver, circulating tumor cell clusters, are only beginning to be revealed. This review highlights recent advances to our understanding of tumor cell clusters with emphasis on enabling technologies. The importance of intercellular adhesions among cells in clusters have begun to be unraveled with the aid of promising microfluidic strategies for isolating clusters from patient blood. Due to their metastatic potency, the utility of circulating tumor cell clusters for cancer diagnosis, drug screening, precision oncology and as targets of antimetastatic therapeutics are being explored. The continued development of tools for exploring circulating tumor cell clusters will enhance our fundamental understanding of the metastatic process and may be instrumental in devising new strategies to suppress and eliminate metastasis.

  19. A Pacific Ocean general circulation model for satellite data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Y.; Halpern, D.; Mechoso, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    A tropical Pacific Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) to be used in satellite data assimilation studies is described. The transfer of the OGCM from a CYBER-205 at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory to a CRAY-2 at NASA's Ames Research Center is documented. Two 3-year model integrations from identical initial conditions but performed on those two computers are compared. The model simulations are very similar to each other, as expected, but the simulations performed with the higher-precision CRAY-2 is smoother than that with the lower-precision CYBER-205. The CYBER-205 and CRAY-2 use 32 and 64-bit mantissa arithmetic, respectively. The major features of the oceanic circulation in the tropical Pacific, namely the North Equatorial Current, the North Equatorial Countercurrent, the South Equatorial Current, and the Equatorial Undercurrent, are realistically produced and their seasonal cycles are described. The OGCM provides a powerful tool for study of tropical oceans and for the assimilation of satellite altimetry data.

  20. General circulation and tracers: studies in the Western Indian Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamous, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    The main question addressed in this thesis is how to best use the information obtained from hydro-biogeochemical tracer data, to study the oceanic general circulation in the Western Indian Ocean. First, a principal component analysis is performed on a historical data set. The tracers considered are temperature, salinity, density, oxygen, phosphate and silica. The method reduces the amount of data to be considered by a factor of 5. It reproduces correctly and efficiently the large-scale distributions of these oceanic properties. The analysed data are then used in a finite-difference nonlinear inverse model. The grid has a resolution of 4 deg. by 4 deg.. Dynamical as well as tracer conservation constraints are used. These constraints are well satisfied by the obtained solutions but the associated errors remain large. Additional constraints would be required in order to discuss the different solutions in more detail. Finally, a qualitative study is done on the deep distribution of helium-3. The data show several important features linked to hydrothermal input in the Gulf of Aden and on the Central Indian Ridge, and to the origin of water masses and deep circulation characteristics. However additional data are required in order to clarify the distribution of this tracer in other key areas. (author) [fr

  1. Self Circulation using RFID Technology with KOHA Software at St. Xavier’s College, Kolkata.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattopadhyay, Sougata; Savarimuthu, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    St. Xavier’s College Central Library has installed Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) technology based kiosk for self circulation through open source library management software KOHA. This technology is also improved library annual stock taking, ensure foolproof security and access control i.e. circulation management. This articles briefly describes why our library switch over from barcode based circulation to RFID based circulation, SWOT analysis of RFID technology, self-circulation using...

  2. [Treatment of cloud radiative effects in general circulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W.C.

    1993-01-01

    This is a renewal proposal for an on-going project of the Department of Energy (DOE)/Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. The objective of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of radiation-cloud in GCMs so that reliable predictions of the timing and magnitude of greenhouse gas-induced global warming and regional responses can be made. The ARM Program supports two research areas: (I) The modeling and analysis of data related to the parameterization of clouds and radiation in general circulation models (GCMs); and (II) the development of advanced instrumentation for both mapping the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere and high accuracy/precision radiometric observations. The present project conducts research in area (I) and focuses on GCM treatment of cloud life cycle, optical properties, and vertical overlapping. The project has two tasks: (1) Development and Refinement of GCM Radiation-Cloud Treatment Using ARM Data; and (2) Validation of GCM Radiation-Cloud Treatment

  3. A stratiform cloud parameterization for General Circulation Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghan, S.J.; Leung, L.R.; Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E.; McCaa, J.

    1994-01-01

    The crude treatment of clouds in General Circulation Models (GCMs) is widely recognized as a major limitation in the application of these models to predictions of global climate change. The purpose of this project is to develop a paxameterization for stratiform clouds in GCMs that expresses stratiform clouds in terms of bulk microphysical properties and their subgrid variability. In this parameterization, precipitating cloud species are distinguished from non-precipitating species, and the liquid phase is distinguished from the ice phase. The size of the non-precipitating cloud particles (which influences both the cloud radiative properties and the conversion of non-precipitating cloud species to precipitating species) is determined by predicting both the mass and number concentrations of each species

  4. Analysis of snow feedbacks in 14 general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D. A.; Cess, R. D.; Blanchet, J. P.; Chalita, S.; Colman, R.; Dazlich, D. A.; Del Genio, A. D.; Keup, E.; Lacis, A.; Le Treut, H.; Liang, X.-Z.; McAvaney, B. J.; Mahfouf, J. F.; Meleshko, V. P.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Norris, P. M.; Potter, G. L.; Rikus, L.; Roeckner, E.; Royer, J. F.; Schlese, U.; Sheinin, D. A.; Sokolov, A. P.; Taylor, K. E.; Wetherald, R. T.; Yagai, I.; Zhang, M.-H.

    1994-10-01

    Snow feedbacks produced by 14 atmospheric general circulation models have been analyzed through idealized numerical experiments. Included in the analysis is an investigation of the surface energy budgets of the models. Negative or weak positive snow feedbacks occurred in some of the models, while others produced strong positive snow feedbacks. These feedbacks are due not only to melting snow, but also to increases in boundary temperature, changes in air temperature, changes in water vapor, and changes in cloudiness. As a result, the net response of each model is quite complex. We analyze in detail the responses of one model with a strong positive snow feedback and another with a weak negative snow feedback. Some of the models include a temperature dependence of the snow albedo, and this has significantly affected the results.

  5. A stratiform cloud parameterization for general circulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghan, S.J.; Leung, L.R.; Chuang, C.C.; Penner, J.E.; McCaa, J.

    1994-01-01

    The crude treatment of clouds in general circulation models (GCMs) is widely recognized as a major limitation in applying these models to predictions of global climate change. The purpose of this project is to develop in GCMs a stratiform cloud parameterization that expresses clouds in terms of bulk microphysical properties and their subgrid variability. Various clouds variables and their interactions are summarized. Precipitating cloud species are distinguished from non-precipitating species, and the liquid phase is distinguished from the ice phase. The size of the non-precipitating cloud particles (which influences both the cloud radiative properties and the conversion of non-precipitating cloud species to precipitating species) is determined by predicting both the mass and number concentrations of each species

  6. General Overview of Desalination Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari-Nugroho

    2004-01-01

    Desalination, as discussed in this journal, refers to a water treatment process that removes salts from water. Desalination can be done in a number of ways, but the result is always the same : fresh water is produced from brackish or seawater. The quality of distillate water is indicated by the contents of Total Dissolved Solid (TDS) in it, the less number of TDS contents in it, the highest quality of distillate water it has. This article describes the general analysis of desalination technologies, the varies of water, operation and maintenance of the plant, and general comparison between desalination technologies. Basically, there are two common technologies are being used, i.e. thermal and membrane desalination, which are Multi Effect Distillation (MED), Multi Stage Flash (MSF) and Reverse Osmosis (RO), respectively. Both technologies differ from the energy source. Thermal desalination needs heat source from the power plant, while membrane desalination needs only the electricity to run the pumps. In thermal desalination, the vapour coming from boiling feedwater is condensate, this process produces the lowest saline water, about 10 part per million (ppm). The membrane technology uses semipermeable membrane to separate fresh water from salt dissolve. This technology produces the fresh water about 350-500 ppm. (author)

  7. Physically-Derived Dynamical Cores in Atmospheric General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Richard B.; Lin, Shian-Kiann

    1999-01-01

    The algorithm chosen to represent the advection in atmospheric models is often used as the primary attribute to classify the model. Meteorological models are generally classified as spectral or grid point, with the term grid point implying discretization using finite differences. These traditional approaches have a number of shortcomings that render them non-physical. That is, they provide approximate solutions to the conservation equations that do not obey the fundamental laws of physics. The most commonly discussed shortcomings are overshoots and undershoots which manifest themselves most overtly in the constituent continuity equation. For this reason many climate models have special algorithms to model water vapor advection. This talk focuses on the development of an atmospheric general circulation model which uses a consistent physically-based advection algorithm in all aspects of the model formulation. The shallow-water model of Lin and Rood (QJRMS, 1997) is generalized to three dimensions and combined with the physics parameterizations of NCAR's Community Climate Model. The scientific motivation for the development is to increase the integrity of the underlying fluid dynamics so that the physics terms can be more effectively isolated, examined, and improved. The expected benefits of the new model are discussed and results from the initial integrations will be presented.

  8. The relationship between sea surface temperature anomalies and atmospheric circulation in general circulation model experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharin, V.V.

    1994-01-01

    Several multi-year integrations of the Hamburg version of the ECMWF/T21 general circulation model driven by the sea surface temperature (SST) observed in the period 1970-1988 were examined to study the extratropical response of the atmospheric circulation to SST anomalies in the Northern Hemisphere in winter. In the first 19-years run SST anomalies were prescribed globally (GAGO run), and in two others SST variability was limited to extratropical regions (MOGA run) and to tropics (TOGA run), respectively. A canonical correlation analysis was applied to the monthly means to find the best correlated patterns of SST anomalies in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans and the Northern Hemisphere atmospheric flow. Contrary to expectation, the extratropical response in the GAGO run is not equal to the linear combination of the responses in the MOGA and TOGA runs. In the GAGO integration with globally prescribed SST the best correlated atmospheric pattern is global and is characterized by dipole structures of the same polarity in the North Atlantic and the North Pacific sectors. In the MOGA and TOGA experiments the atmospheric response is more local with main centers in the North Atlantic and North Pacific, respectively. The atmospheric modes found by the CCA were compared with the normal modes of the barotropic vorticity equation linearized about the 500 mb winter climate of the control integration driven by the climatological SST. The normal modes with smallest eigenvalues are similar to the canonical patterns of 500 mb geopotential height. The corresponding eigenvectors of the adjoint operator, which represent an external forcing optimal for exciting normal modes, have a longitudinal structure with maxima in regions characterized by enhanced high frequency baroclinic activity over both oceans. It was suggested that variability of storm tracks could play an important role in variability of the barotropic normal modes. (orig.)

  9. Prognostic cloud water in the Los Alamos general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristjansson, J.E.; Kao, C.Y.J.

    1993-01-01

    Most of today's general circulation models (GCMS) have a greatly simplified treatment of condensation and clouds. Recent observational studies of the earth's radiation budget have suggested cloud-related feedback mechanisms to be of tremendous importance for the issue of global change. Thus, there has arisen an urgent need for improvements in the treatment of clouds in GCMS, especially as the clouds relate to radiation. In the present paper, we investigate the effects of introducing pregnostic cloud water into the Los Alamos GCM. The cloud water field, produced by both stratiform and convective condensation, is subject to 3-dimensional advection and vertical diffusion. The cloud water enters the radiation calculations through the long wave emissivity calculations. Results from several sensitivity simulations show that realistic cloud water and precipitation fields can be obtained with the applied method. Comparisons with observations show that the most realistic results are obtained when more sophisticated schemes for moist convection are introduced at the same time. The model's cold bias is reduced and the zonal winds become stronger, due to more realistic tropical convection

  10. Prognostic cloud water in the Los Alamos general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristjansson, J.E.; Kao, C.Y.J.

    1994-01-01

    Most of today's general circulation models (GCMs) have a greatly simplified treatment of condensation and clouds. Recent observational studies of the earth's radiation budget have suggested cloud-related feedback mechanisms to be of tremendous importance for the issue of global change. Thus, an urgent need for improvements in the treatment of clouds in GCMs has arisen, especially as the clouds relate to radiation. In this paper, we investigate the effects of introducing prognostic cloud water into the Los Alamos GCM. The cloud water field, produced by both stratiform and convective condensation, is subject to 3-dimensional advection and vertical diffusion. The cloud water enters the radiation calculations through the longwave emissivity calculations. Results from several sensitivity simulations show that realistic water and precipitation fields can be obtained with the applied method. Comparisons with observations show that the most realistic results are obtained when more sophisticated schemes for moist convection are introduced at the same time. The model's cold bias is reduced and the zonal winds becomes stronger because of more realistic tropical convection

  11. Strengthening of the Walker circulation under globalwarming in an aqua-planet general circulation model simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tim; Zhang, Lei; Murakami, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-01

    Most climate models project a weakening of theWalker circulation under global warming scenarios. It is argued, based on a global averaged moisture budget, that this weakening can be attributed to a slower rate of rainfall increase compared to that of moisture increase, which leads to a decrease in ascending motion. Through an idealized aqua-planet simulation in which a zonal wavenumber-1 SST distribution is prescribed along the equator, we find that the Walker circulation is strengthened under a uniform 2-K SST warming, even though the global mean rainfall-moisture relationship remains the same. Further diagnosis shows that the ascending branch of the Walker cell is enhanced in the upper troposphere but weakened in the lower troposphere. As a result, a "double-cell" circulation change pattern with a clockwise (anti-clockwise) circulation anomaly in the upper (lower) troposphere forms, and the upper tropospheric circulation change dominates. The mechanism for the formation of the "double cell" circulation pattern is attributed to a larger (smaller) rate of increase of diabatic heating than static stability in the upper (lower) troposphere. The result indicates that the future change of the Walker circulation cannot simply be interpreted based on a global mean moisture budget argument.

  12. General survey of technology management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yong Ha; Jang Dong Hun; Lee, In Woo

    1999-02-15

    The content of this book are technology and management, conception of technology management, feature and model of technology management system, elements of technology management, performance measurement of technology management, connectivity between technology and business function, system management of technology, manpower management, readership and technology management, motivation and technology management, management of technical investment evaluation, new item development and marketing, product liability management, intellectual property rights and transfer of technology.

  13. General survey of technology management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Yong Ha; Jang Dong Hun; Lee, In Woo

    1999-02-01

    The content of this book are technology and management, conception of technology management, feature and model of technology management system, elements of technology management, performance measurement of technology management, connectivity between technology and business function, system management of technology, manpower management, readership and technology management, motivation and technology management, management of technical investment evaluation, new item development and marketing, product liability management, intellectual property rights and transfer of technology.

  14. Mid-latitude afforestation shifts general circulation and tropical precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    Swann, Abigail L. S.; Fung, Inez Y.; Chiang, John C. H.

    2011-01-01

    We show in climate model experiments that large-scale afforestation in northern mid-latitudes warms the Northern Hemisphere and alters global circulation patterns. An expansion of dark forests increases the absorption of solar energy and increases surface temperature, particularly in regions where the land surface is unable to compensate with latent heat flux due to water limitation. Atmospheric circulation redistributes the anomalous energy absorbed in the northern hemisphere, in particular ...

  15. Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J Iacono

    2011-04-07

    This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

  16. Mid-latitude afforestation shifts general circulation and tropical precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Abigail L S; Fung, Inez Y; Chiang, John C H

    2012-01-17

    We show in climate model experiments that large-scale afforestation in northern mid-latitudes warms the Northern Hemisphere and alters global circulation patterns. An expansion of dark forests increases the absorption of solar energy and increases surface temperature, particularly in regions where the land surface is unable to compensate with latent heat flux due to water limitation. Atmospheric circulation redistributes the anomalous energy absorbed in the northern hemisphere, in particular toward the south, through altering the Hadley circulation, resulting in the northward displacement of the tropical rain bands. Precipitation decreases over parts of the Amazon basin affecting productivity and increases over the Sahel and Sahara regions in Africa. We find that the response of climate to afforestation in mid-latitudes is determined by the amount of soil moisture available to plants with the greatest warming found in water-limited regions. Mid-latitude afforestation is found to have a small impact on modeled global temperatures and on global CO(2), but regional heating from the increase in forest cover is capable of driving unintended changes in circulation and precipitation. The ability of vegetation to affect remote circulation has implications for strategies for climate mitigation.

  17. Distribution of cocaine on banknotes in general circulation in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, C G G; Wilson, A; Sleeman, R; Morgan, B E M; Huish, J

    2017-01-01

    A study of the quantities of cocaine on banknotes in general circulation was conducted to investigate regional variations across England and Wales. No meaningful support was found for the proposition that there is regional variation in the quantities of cocaine in banknotes in general circulation in England and Wales. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Explicit prediction of ice clouds in general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Martin

    1999-11-01

    Although clouds play extremely important roles in the radiation budget and hydrological cycle of the Earth, there are large quantitative uncertainties in our understanding of their generation, maintenance and decay mechanisms, representing major obstacles in the development of reliable prognostic cloud water schemes for General Circulation Models (GCMs). Recognizing their relative neglect in the past, both observationally and theoretically, this work places special focus on ice clouds. A recent version of the UCLA - University of Utah Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) that includes interactive radiation is used to perform idealized experiments to study ice cloud maintenance and decay mechanisms under various conditions in term of: (1) background static stability, (2) background relative humidity, (3) rate of cloud ice addition over a fixed initial time-period and (4) radiation: daytime, nighttime and no-radiation. Radiation is found to have major effects on the life-time of layer-clouds. Optically thick ice clouds decay significantly slower than expected from pure microphysical crystal fall-out (taucld = 0.9--1.4 h as opposed to no-motion taumicro = 0.5--0.7 h). This is explained by the upward turbulent fluxes of water induced by IR destabilization, which partially balance the downward transport of water by snowfall. Solar radiation further slows the ice-water decay by destruction of the inversion above cloud-top and the resulting upward transport of water. Optically thin ice clouds, on the other hand, may exhibit even longer life-times (>1 day) in the presence of radiational cooling. The resulting saturation mixing ratio reduction provides for a constant cloud ice source. These CRM results are used to develop a prognostic cloud water scheme for the UCLA-GCM. The framework is based on the bulk water phase model of Ose (1993). The model predicts cloud liquid water and cloud ice separately, and which is extended to split the ice phase into suspended cloud ice (predicted

  19. Multi-year predictability in a coupled general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, Scott; Colman, Rob [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2006-02-01

    Multi-year to decadal variability in a 100-year integration of a BMRC coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (CGCM) is examined. The fractional contribution made by the decadal component generally increases with depth and latitude away from surface waters in the equatorial Indo-Pacific Ocean. The relative importance of decadal variability is enhanced in off-equatorial ''wings'' in the subtropical eastern Pacific. The model and observations exhibit ''ENSO-like'' decadal patterns. Analytic results are derived, which show that the patterns can, in theory, occur in the absence of any predictability beyond ENSO time-scales. In practice, however, modification to this stochastic view is needed to account for robust differences between ENSO-like decadal patterns and their interannual counterparts. An analysis of variability in the CGCM, a wind-forced shallow water model, and a simple mixed layer model together with existing and new theoretical results are used to improve upon this stochastic paradigm and to provide a new theory for the origin of decadal ENSO-like patterns like the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation. In this theory, ENSO-driven wind-stress variability forces internal equatorially-trapped Kelvin waves that propagate towards the eastern boundary. Kelvin waves can excite reflected internal westward propagating equatorially-trapped Rossby waves (RWs) and coastally-trapped waves (CTWs). CTWs have no impact on the off-equatorial sub-surface ocean outside the coastal wave guide, whereas the RWs do. If the frequency of the incident wave is too high, then only CTWs are excited. At lower frequencies, both CTWs and RWs can be excited. The lower the frequency, the greater the fraction of energy transmitted to RWs. This lowers the characteristic frequency of variability off the equator relative to its equatorial counterpart. Both the eastern boundary interactions and the accumulation of

  20. A Statistical Evaluation of Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models: Complexity vs. Simplicity

    OpenAIRE

    Robert K. Kaufmann; David I. Stern

    2004-01-01

    The principal tools used to model future climate change are General Circulation Models which are deterministic high resolution bottom-up models of the global atmosphere-ocean system that require large amounts of supercomputer time to generate results. But are these models a cost-effective way of predicting future climate change at the global level? In this paper we use modern econometric techniques to evaluate the statistical adequacy of three general circulation models (GCMs) by testing thre...

  1. Experimental investigation of an active magnetic regenerative heat circulator applied to self-heat recuperation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotani, Yui; Kansha, Yasuki; Ishizuka, Masanori; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    An experimental investigation into an active magnetic regenerative (AMR) heat circulator based on self-heat recuperation technology, was conducted to evaluate its energy saving potential in heat circulation. In an AMR heat circulator, magnetocaloric effect is applied to recuperate the heat exergy of the process fluid. The recuperated heat can be reused to heat the feed process fluid and realize self-heat recuperation. In this paper, AMR heat circulator has newly been constructed to determine the amount of heat circulated when applied to self-heat recuperation and the energy consumption of the heat circulator. Gadolinium and water was used as the magnetocaloric working material and the process fluid, respectively. The heat circulated amount was determined by measuring the temperature of the process fluid and gadolinium. The net work input for heat circulation was obtained from the magnetizing and demagnetizing forces and the distance travelled by the magnetocaloric bed. The results were compared with the minimum work input needed for heat circulation derived from exergy loss during heat exchange. It was seen that the experimentally obtained value was close to the minimum work input needed for heat circulation. - Highlights: • AMR heat circulator has newly been constructed for experimental evaluation. • Heat circulation in the vicinity of Curie temperature was observed. • Energy consumption of an AMR heat circulator has been measured. • Energy saving for processes near Curie temperature of working material was seen

  2. Constraints on Saturn's Tropospheric General Circulation from Cassini ISS Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelGenio, Anthony D.; Barbara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    An automated cloud tracking algorithm is applied to Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem high-resolution apoapsis images of Saturn from 2005 and 2007 and moderate resolution images from 2011 and 2012 to define the near-global distribution of zonal winds and eddy momentum fluxes at the middle troposphere cloud level and in the upper troposphere haze. Improvements in the tracking algorithm combined with the greater feature contrast in the northern hemisphere during the approach to spring equinox allow for better rejection of erroneous wind vectors, a more objective assessment at any latitude of the quality of the mean zonal wind, and a population of winds comparable in size to that available for the much higher contrast atmosphere of Jupiter. Zonal winds at cloud level changed little between 2005 and 2007 at all latitudes sampled. Upper troposphere zonal winds derived from methane band images are approx. 10 m/s weaker than cloud level winds in the cores of eastward jets and approx. 5 m/s stronger on either side of the jet core, i.e., eastward jets appear to broaden with increasing altitude. In westward jet regions winds are approximately the same at both altitudes. Lateral eddy momentum fluxes are directed into eastward jet cores, including the strong equatorial jet, and away from westward jet cores and weaken with increasing altitude on the flanks of the eastward jets, consistent with the upward broadening of these jets. The conversion rate of eddy to mean zonal kinetic energy at the visible cloud level is larger in eastward jet regions (5.2x10(exp -5) sq m/s) and smaller in westward jet regions (1.6x10(exp -5) sqm/s) than the global mean value (4.1x10(ep -5) sq m/s). Overall the results are consistent with theories that suggest that the jets and the overturning meridional circulation at cloud level on Saturn are maintained at least in part by eddies due to instabilities of the large-scale flow near and/or below the cloud level.

  3. Realisation of microstrip junction circulator using LTCC technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas; Krozer, V; Kjærgaard, Claus

    2011-01-01

    An integrated circulator based on low-temperature cofired ceramics (LTCC) tapes and LTCC compatible ferrite tapes has been developed for the first time and its performance has been verified experimentally. The insertion loss is less than 2 dB and the isolation is better than 25 dB with a centre...... frequency of 7.45 GHz. These results are in good agreement with simulations and offer a route towards integrated LTCC microwave circulators....

  4. On the norms of r-circulant matrices with generalized Fibonacci numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amara Chandoul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we obtain a generalization of [6, 8]. Firstly, we consider the so-called r-circulant matrices with generalized Fibonacci numbers and then found lower and upper bounds for the Euclidean and spectral norms of these matrices. Afterwards, we present some bounds for the spectral norms of Hadamard and Kronecker product of these matrices.

  5. Global Observations and Understanding of the General Circulation of the Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The workshop was organized to: (1) assess the ability to obtain ocean data on a global scale that could profoundly change our understanding of the circulation; (2) identify the primary and secondary elements needed to conduct a World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE); (3) if the ability is achievable, to determine what the U.S. role in such an experiment should be; and (4) outline the steps necessary to assure that an appropriate program is conducted. The consensus of the workshop was that a World Ocean Circulation Experiment appears feasible, worthwhile, and timely. Participants did agree that such a program should have the overall goal of understanding the general circulation of the global ocean well enough to be able to predict ocean response and feedback to long-term changes in the atmosphere. The overall goal, specific objectives, and recommendations for next steps in planning such an experiment are included.

  6. Interpretation of cloud-climate feedback as produced by 14 atmospheric general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cess, R. D.; Potter, G. L.; Ghan, S. J.; Blanchet, J. P.; Boer, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    Understanding the cause of differences among general circulation model projections of carbon dioxide-induced climatic change is a necessary step toward improving the models. An intercomparison of 14 atmospheric general circulation models, for which sea surface temperature perturbations were used as a surrogate climate change, showed that there was a roughly threefold variation in global climate sensitivity. Most of this variation is attributable to differences in the models' depictions of cloud-climate feedback, a result that emphasizes the need for improvements in the treatment of clouds in these models if they are ultimately to be used as climatic predictors.

  7. Using Green's Functions to initialize and adjust a global, eddying ocean biogeochemistry general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brix, H.; Menemenlis, D.; Hill, C.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Jahn, O.; Wang, D.; Bowman, K.; Zhang, H.

    2015-11-01

    The NASA Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) Flux Project aims to attribute changes in the atmospheric accumulation of carbon dioxide to spatially resolved fluxes by utilizing the full suite of NASA data, models, and assimilation capabilities. For the oceanic part of this project, we introduce ECCO2-Darwin, a new ocean biogeochemistry general circulation model based on combining the following pre-existing components: (i) a full-depth, eddying, global-ocean configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm), (ii) an adjoint-method-based estimate of ocean circulation from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II (ECCO2) project, (iii) the MIT ecosystem model "Darwin", and (iv) a marine carbon chemistry model. Air-sea gas exchange coefficients and initial conditions of dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, and oxygen are adjusted using a Green's Functions approach in order to optimize modeled air-sea CO2 fluxes. Data constraints include observations of carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) for 2009-2010, global air-sea CO2 flux estimates, and the seasonal cycle of the Takahashi et al. (2009) Atlas. The model sensitivity experiments (or Green's Functions) include simulations that start from different initial conditions as well as experiments that perturb air-sea gas exchange parameters and the ratio of particulate inorganic to organic carbon. The Green's Functions approach yields a linear combination of these sensitivity experiments that minimizes model-data differences. The resulting initial conditions and gas exchange coefficients are then used to integrate the ECCO2-Darwin model forward. Despite the small number (six) of control parameters, the adjusted simulation is significantly closer to the data constraints (37% cost function reduction, i.e., reduction in the model-data difference, relative to the baseline simulation) and to independent observations (e.g., alkalinity). The adjusted air-sea gas

  8. Simulation of the Low-Level-Jet by general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghan, S.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    To what degree is the low-level jet climatology and it`s impact on clouds and precipitation being captured by current general circulation models? It is hypothesised that a need for a pramaterization exists. This paper describes this parameterization need.

  9. Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model compared with the West Atlantic Geotraces cruises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulten, M. M. P.; Sterl, A.; Tagliabue, A.; Dutay, J. -C.; Gehlen, M.; de Baar, H. J. W.; Middag, R.

    2013-01-01

    A model of aluminium has been developed and implemented in an Ocean General Circulation Model (NEMO-PISCES). In the model, aluminium enters the ocean by means of dust deposition. The internal oceanic processes are described by advection, mixing and reversible scavenging. The model has been evaluated

  10. Selected translated abstracts of Russian-language climate-change publications. 4: General circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Razuvaev, V.N.; Sivachok, S.G. [All-Russian Research Inst. of Hydrometeorological Information--World Data Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents English-translated abstracts of important Russian-language literature concerning general circulation models as they relate to climate change. Into addition to the bibliographic citations and abstracts translated into English, this report presents the original citations and abstracts in Russian. Author and title indexes are included to assist the reader in locating abstracts of particular interest.

  11. High-resolution interpolation of climate scenarios for Canada derived from general circulation model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. T. Price; D. W. McKenney; L. A. Joyce; R. M. Siltanen; P. Papadopol; K. Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Projections of future climate were selected for four well-established general circulation models (GCMs) forced by each of three greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios recommended by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), namely scenarios A2, A1B, and B1 of the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Monthly data for the period 1961-2100 were...

  12. Dry deposition parameterization of sulfur oxides in a chemistry and general circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzeveld, L.N.; Lelieveld, J.; Roelofs, G.J.

    1998-01-01

    A dry deposition scheme, originally developed to calculate the deposition velocities for the trace gases O3, NO2, NO, and HNO3 in the chemistry and general circulation European Centre Hamburg Model (ECHAM), is extended to sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfate (SO42-). In order to reduce some of the

  13. Regional climates in the GISS general circulation model: Surface air temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitson, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    One of the more viable research techniques into global climate change for the purpose of understanding the consequent environmental impacts is based on the use of general circulation models (GCMs). However, GCMs are currently unable to reliably predict the regional climate change resulting from global warming, and it is at the regional scale that predictions are required for understanding human and environmental responses. Regional climates in the extratropics are in large part governed by the synoptic-scale circulation and the feasibility of using this interscale relationship is explored to provide a way of moving to grid cell and sub-grid cell scales in the model. The relationships between the daily circulation systems and surface air temperature for points across the continental United States are first developed in a quantitative form using a multivariate index based on principal components analysis (PCA) of the surface circulation. These relationships are then validated by predicting daily temperature using observed circulation and comparing the predicted values with the observed temperatures. The relationships predict surface temperature accurately over the major portion of the country in winter, and for half the country in summer. These relationships are then applied to the surface synoptic circulation of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM control run, and a set of surface grid cell temperatures are generated. These temperatures, based on the larger-scale validated circulation, may now be used with greater confidence at the regional scale. The generated temperatures are compared to those of the model and show that the model has regional errors of up to 10 C in individual grid cells.

  14. Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transport as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleckler, P. J.; Randall, D. A.; Boer, G.; Colman, R.; Dix, M.; Galin, V.; Helfand, M.; Kiehl, J.; Kitoh, A.; Lau, W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ocean surface net energy flux simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models constrained by realistically-varying sea surface temperatures and sea ice as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project. In general, the simulated energy fluxes are within the very large observational uncertainties. However, the annual mean oceanic meridional heat transport that would be required to balance the simulated surface fluxes is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean heat transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions. It is suggested that improved treatment of cloud radiative effects should help in the development of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models.

  15. A nested Atlantic-Mediterranean Sea general circulation model for operational forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Oddo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A new numerical general circulation ocean model for the Mediterranean Sea has been implemented nested within an Atlantic general circulation model within the framework of the Marine Environment and Security for the European Area project (MERSEA, Desaubies, 2006. A 4-year twin experiment was carried out from January 2004 to December 2007 with two different models to evaluate the impact on the Mediterranean Sea circulation of open lateral boundary conditions in the Atlantic Ocean. One model considers a closed lateral boundary in a large Atlantic box and the other is nested in the same box in a global ocean circulation model. Impact was observed comparing the two simulations with independent observations: ARGO for temperature and salinity profiles and tide gauges and along-track satellite observations for the sea surface height. The improvement in the nested Atlantic-Mediterranean model with respect to the closed one is particularly evident in the salinity characteristics of the Modified Atlantic Water and in the Mediterranean sea level seasonal variability.

  16. Water Treatment Technology - General Plant Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on general plant operations provides instructional materials for seven competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: water supply regulations, water plant…

  17. Impact of an improved shortwave radiation scheme in the MAECHAM5 General Circulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Morcrette

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the representation of ozone absorption in the stratosphere of the MAECHAM5 general circulation model, the spectral resolution of the shortwave radiation parameterization used in the model has been increased from 4 to 6 bands. Two 20-years simulations with the general circulation model have been performed, one with the standard and the other with the newly introduced parameterization respectively, to evaluate the temperature and dynamical changes arising from the two different representations of the shortwave radiative transfer. In the simulation with the increased spectral resolution in the radiation parameterization, a significant warming of almost the entire model domain is reported. At the summer stratopause the temperature increase is about 6 K and alleviates the cold bias present in the model when the standard radiation scheme is used. These general circulation model results are consistent both with previous validation of the radiation scheme and with the offline clear-sky comparison performed in the current work with a discrete ordinate 4 stream scattering line by line radiative transfer model. The offline validation shows a substantial reduction of the daily averaged shortwave heating rate bias (1–2 K/day cooling that occurs for the standard radiation parameterization in the upper stratosphere, present under a range of atmospheric conditions. Therefore, the 6 band shortwave radiation parameterization is considered to be better suited for the representation of the ozone absorption in the stratosphere than the 4 band parameterization. Concerning the dynamical response in the general circulation model, it is found that the reported warming at the summer stratopause induces stronger zonal mean zonal winds in the middle atmosphere. These stronger zonal mean zonal winds thereafter appear to produce a dynamical feedback that results in a dynamical warming (cooling of the polar winter (summer mesosphere, caused by an

  18. Polarized 3He Gas Circulating Technologies for Neutron Analyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, David [Xemed LLC, Durham, NH (United States); Hersman, Bill [Xemed LLC, Durham, NH (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We describe the development of an integrated system for quasi-continuous operation of a large volume neutron analyzer. The system consists of a non-magnetic diaphragm compressor, a prototype large volume helium polarizer, a surrogate neutron analyzer, a non-depolarizing gas storage reservoir, a non-ferrous valve manifold for handling gas distribution, a custom rubidium-vapor gas return purifier, and wire-wound transfer lines, all of which are immersed in a two-meter external magnetic field. Over the Phase II period we focused on three major tasks required for the successful deployment of these types of systems: 1) design and implementation of gas handling hardware, 2) automation for long-term operation, and 3) improvements in polarizer performance, specifically fabrication of aluminosilicate optical pumping cells. In this report we describe the design, implementation, and testing of the gas handling hardware. We describe improved polarizer performance resulting from improved cell materials and fabrication methods. These improvements yielded valved 8.5 liter cells with relaxation times greater than 12 hours. Pumping this cell with 1500W laser power with 1.25nm linewidth yielded peak polarizations of 60%, measured both inside and outside the polarizer. Fully narrowing this laser to 0.25nm, demonstrated separately on one stack of the four, would have allowed 70% polarization with this cell. We demonstrated the removal of 5 liters of polarized helium from the polarizer with no measured loss of polarization. We circulated the gas through a titanium-clad compressor with polarization loss below 3% per pass. We also prepared for the next phase of development by refining the design of the polarizer so that it can be engineer-certified for pressurized operation. The performance of our system far exceeds comparable efforts elsewhere.

  19. Computer technology forecast study for general aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seacord, C. L.; Vaughn, D.

    1976-01-01

    A multi-year, multi-faceted program is underway to investigate and develop potential improvements in airframes, engines, and avionics for general aviation aircraft. The objective of this study was to assemble information that will allow the government to assess the trends in computer and computer/operator interface technology that may have application to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. The current state of the art of computer hardware is assessed, technical developments in computer hardware are predicted, and nonaviation large volume users of computer hardware are identified.

  20. Polarized 3He gas circulating technologies for neutron analyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watt, David W. [Xemed, LLC, Durham, NH (United States)

    2017-10-02

    We outline our project to develop a circulating polarized helium-3 system for developing of large, quasi-continuously operating neutron analyzers. The project consisted of four areas: 1) Development of robust external cavity narrowed diode laser output with spectral line width < 0.17 nm and power of 2000 W. 2) Development of large glass polarizing cells using cell surface treatments to obtain long relaxation lifetimes. 3) Refinements of the circulation system with an emphasis on gas purification and materials testing. 4) Design/fabrication of a new polarizer system. 5) Preliminary testing of the new polarizer. 1. Developed Robust High-Power Narrowed Laser The optical configuration of the laser was discussed in the proposal and will be reviewed in the body of this report. The external cavity is configured to mutually lock the wavelength of five 10-bar laser stacks. All the logistical milestones were been met and critical subsystems- laser stack manifold and power divider, external laser cavity, and output telescope- were assembled and tested at low power. Each individual bar is narrowed to ~0.05 nm; when combined the laser has a cumulative spectral width of 0.17 nm across the entire beam due to variations of the bars central wavelength by +/- 0.1 nm, which is similar to that of Volume Bragg Grating narrowed laser bars. This configuration eliminates the free-running “pedestal” that occurs in other external cavity diode lasers. The full-scale laser was completed in 2016 and was used in both the older and newer helium polarizers. This laser was operated at 75% power for periods of up to 8 hours. Once installed, the spectrum became slightly broader (~.25 nm) at full power; this is likely due to very slight misalignments that occurred during handling. 2. Developed the processes to create uniform sintered sol-gel coatings. Our work on cell development comprised: 1) Production of large GE180 cells and explore different means of cell preparation, and 2) Development of

  1. Ability of the CCSR-NIES atmospheric general circulation model in the stratosphere. Chapter 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugata, S.

    1997-01-01

    A quantitative evaluation of climate change such as global warming is impossible without a high-quality numerical model which describes the dynamics of the climate system and the circulation of energy and materials. The Center for Climate Research - National Institute for Environmental Studies (CCSR-NIES) atmospheric general circulation model (hereafter, GCM for a general circulation model) has been developed to obtain such a high-quality model. The emphasis of the development has been laid on the troposphere and the lower stratosphere below about 30 km altitude. This is natural because human beings live on the Earth's surface and the condition of the lower atmosphere directly affects human life. However, the stratosphere and the upper atmosphere beyond it have recently been the focus even in investigations of climate change, because they are relevant to many issues which relate closely to tropospheric climate change, such as the ozone hole, material exchange between the stratosphere and the troposphere, and physical interaction between the stratosphere and troposphere. This study extended the region of the CCSR-NIES GCM to the lower mesosphere (about 70 km from the surface). This is our first attempt to investigate this GCM's climatology in the upper atmosphere, although some studies for QBO in the middle and lower stratosphere had been done with the GCM

  2. Numerical modeling of general circulation, thermohaline structure, and residence time in Gorgan Bay, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mohammad Hassan; Hadjizadeh Zaker, Nasser

    2018-01-01

    Gorgan Bay is a semi-enclosed basin located in the southeast of the Caspian Sea, Iran. The bay is recognized as a resting place for migratory birds as well as a spawning habitat for native fish. However, apparently, no detailed research on its physical processes has previously been conducted. In this study, a 3D coupled hydrodynamic and solute transport model was used to investigate general circulation, thermohaline structure, and residence time in Gorgan Bay. Model outputs were validated against a set of field observations. Bottom friction and attenuation coefficient of light intensity were tuned in order to achieve optimum agreement with the observations. Results revealed that, due to the interaction between bathymetry and prevailing winds, a barotropic double-gyre circulation, dominating the general circulation, existed during all seasons in Gorgan Bay. Furthermore, temperature and salinity fluctuations in the bay were seasonal, due to the seasonal variability of atmospheric fluxes. Results also indicated that under the prevailing winds, the domain-averaged residence time in Gorgan Bay would be approximately 95 days. The rivers discharging into Gorgan Bay are considered as the main sources of nutrients in the bay. Since their mouths are located in the area with a residence time of over 100 days, Gorgan Bay could be at risk of eutrophication; it is necessary to adopt preventive measures against water quality degradation.

  3. Implementing Numerical Experiments Based on the Coupled Model of Atmospheric General Circulation and Thermohaline Ocean One

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Parhomenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a realized hydrodynamic three-dimensional global climatic model, which comprises the model blocks of atmospheric general circulation, thermohaline large-scale circulation of the ocean, and sea ice evolution. Before rather strongly aggregated heat-moisturebalance model of the atmosphere for temperature and humidity of a surface layer was used as a model of the atmosphere. The atmospheric general circulation model is significantly more complicated and allows us to describe processes in the atmosphere more adequately. Functioning of a coupled climatic model is considered in conditions of the seasonal cycle of solar radiation.The paper considers a procedure for coupled calculation of the ocean model and atmospheric general circulation model. Synchronization of a number of parameters in both models is necessary for their joint action. In this regard a procedure of two-dimensional interpolation of data defined on the grids of the ocean model and atmosphere model and back is developed. A feature of this task is discrepancy of grid nodes and continental configurations in models. Coupled model-based long-term calculations for more than 400 years have shown its stable work. Calculation results and comparison with observation data are under discussion.The paper shows distribution of mean global atmosphere temperature versus time in stable conditions to demonstrate that there is inter-annual variability of atmosphere temperature at the steady state of a climate system. It presents distribution of temperature difference of the ocean surface from the observations and from the model of the ocean thermohaline circulation for January. Noticeable deviations of temperature are observed near Antarctica. Apparently, it is because of inaccurate calculation of the sea ice distribution in model. The geographical distribution of the ocean surface temperature for January with coupled calculation shows, in general, a zonal uniform structure of isolines

  4. An Improved Heat Budget Estimation Including Bottom Effects for General Ocean Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carder, Kendall; Warrior, Hari; Otis, Daniel; Chen, R. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper studies the effects of the underwater light field on heat-budget calculations of general ocean circulation models for shallow waters. The presence of a bottom significantly alters the estimated heat budget in shallow waters, which affects the corresponding thermal stratification and hence modifies the circulation. Based on the data collected during the COBOP field experiment near the Bahamas, we have used a one-dimensional turbulence closure model to show the influence of the bottom reflection and absorption on the sea surface temperature field. The water depth has an almost one-to-one correlation with the temperature rise. Effects of varying the bottom albedo by replacing the sea grass bed with a coral sand bottom, also has an appreciable effect on the heat budget of the shallow regions. We believe that the differences in the heat budget for the shallow areas will have an influence on the local circulation processes and especially on the evaporative and long-wave heat losses for these areas. The ultimate effects on humidity and cloudiness of the region are expected to be significant as well.

  5. Exploring the Venus global super-rotation using a comprehensive general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, J. M.; Read, P. L.

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric circulation in Venus is well known to exhibit strong super-rotation. However, the atmospheric mechanisms responsible for the formation of this super-rotation are still not fully understood. In this work, we developed a new Venus general circulation model to study the most likely mechanisms driving the atmosphere to the current observed circulation. Our model includes a new radiative transfer, convection and suitably adapted boundary layer schemes and a dynamical core that takes into account the dependence of the heat capacity at constant pressure with temperature. The new Venus model is able to simulate a super-rotation phenomenon in the cloud region quantitatively similar to the one observed. The mechanisms maintaining the strong winds in the cloud region were found in the model results to be a combination of zonal mean circulation, thermal tides and transient waves. In this process, the semi-diurnal tide excited in the upper clouds has a key contribution in transporting axial angular momentum mainly from the upper atmosphere towards the cloud region. The magnitude of the super-rotation in the cloud region is sensitive to various radiative parameters such as the amount of solar radiative energy absorbed by the surface, which controls the static stability near the surface. In this work, we also discuss the main difficulties in representing the flow below the cloud base in Venus atmospheric models. Our new radiative scheme is more suitable for 3D Venus climate models than those used in previous work due to its easy adaptability to different atmospheric conditions. This flexibility of the model was crucial to explore the uncertainties in the lower atmospheric conditions and may also be used in the future to explore, for example, dynamical-radiative-microphysical feedbacks.

  6. Improved stratospheric atmosphere forecasts in the general circulation model through a methane oxidation parametrization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Jun, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Climatic characteristics of tropical stratospheric methane have been well researched using various satellite data, and numerical simulations have furtherly conducted using chemical climatic models, while the impact of stratospheric methane oxidation on distribution of water vapor is not paid enough attention in general circulation models. Simulated values of water vapour in the tropical upper stratosphere, and throughout much of the extratropical stratosphere, were too low. Something must be done to remedy this deficiency in order to producing realistic stratospheric water vapor using a general circulation model including the whole stratosphere. Introduction of a simple parametrization of the upper-stratospheric moisture source due to methane oxidation and a sink due to photolysis in the mesosphere was conducted. Numerical simulations and analysis of the influence of stratospheric methane on the prediction of tropical stratospheric moisture and temperature fields were carried out. This study presents the advantages of methane oxidation parametrization in producing a realistic distribution of water vapour in the tropical stratosphere and analyzes the impact of methane chemical process on the general circulation model using two storm cases including a heavy rain in South China and a typhoon caused tropical storm.It is obvious that general circulation model with methane oxidation parametrization succeeds in simulating the water vapor and temperature in stratosphere. The simulating rain center value of contrast experiment is increased up to 10% than that of the control experiment. Introduction of methane oxidation parametrization has modified the distribution of water vapour and then producing a broadly realistic distribution of temperature. Objective weather forecast verifications have been performed using simulating results of one month, which demonstrate somewhat positive effects on the model skill. There is a certain extent impact of methane oxidation

  7. Comparison of three-dimensional ocean general circulation models on a benchmark problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chartier, M.

    1990-12-01

    A french and an american Ocean General Circulation Models for deep-sea disposal of radioactive wastes are compared on a benchmark test problem. Both models are three-dimensional. They solve the hydrostatic primitive equations of the ocean with two different finite difference techniques. Results show that the dynamics simulated by both models are consistent. Several methods for the running of a model from a known state are tested in the French model: the diagnostic method, the prognostic method, the acceleration of convergence and the robust-diagnostic method

  8. Dynamics and thermodynamics of the Indian Ocean warm pool in a high-resolution global general circulation model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Ishida, A.; Yoneyama, K.; RameshKumar, M.R.; Kashino, Y.; Mitsudera, H.

    The time evolution of the Indian Ocean warm pool, studied using a global high-resolution general circulation model, shows strong seasonality. The warm pool has the largest spatial extent during April-May, and least in December. The spatio...

  9. Circulating fluidized-bed technologies for the conversion of biomass into energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greil, C.; Hirschfelder, H.

    1995-01-01

    The paper introduces circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) combustion and CFB gasification. CFB combustion units are state-of-the-art and have proven their ability to convert biomass into power and/or steam. The existing units and projects in developing countries are discussed as examples of conventional technology. To illustrate advanced technologies, CFB gasification is discussed. Important process parameters of plants already in operation or under construction in developed countries are shown, Criteria for the selection of CFB combustion or gasification based on available feedstocks and products required are discussed. Finally, a procedure for implementing Lurgi's CFB technology in developing countries is proposed. (author)

  10. Orographic effects on tropical climate in a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Hideki

    Large-scale mountain modifies the atmospheric circulation directly through dynamic and thermodynamic process, and also indirectly through the interaction with the ocean. To investigate orographic impacts on tropical climate, a fully coupled general circulation model (CGCM) is developed by coupling a state-of-the-art atmospheric general circulation model and an ocean general circulation model. With realistic boundary conditions, the CGCM produces a reasonable climatology of sea surface temperature (SST), surface winds, and precipitation. When global mountains are removed, the model climatology displays substantial changes in both the mean-state and the seasonal cycle. The equatorial eastern Pacific SST acquires a semi-annual component as inter-tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) flips and flops across the equator following the seasonal migration of the sun. Without the Andes, wet air flows into the southeastern tropical Pacific from the humid Amazon, which weakens the meridional asymmetry during the Peruvian warm season (February-April). In addition, the northeasterly trade winds are enhanced north of the equator without the orographic blocking of Central American mountains and cools SST. Triggered by the SST cooling north and moistening south of the equator, the wind-evaporation-SST (WES) feedback further weakens the meridional asymmetry and prolongs the southern ITCZ. In the Atlantic Ocean, the equatorial cold tongue is substantially strengthened and develops a pronounced annual cycle in the absence of mountains. The easterly winds are overall enhanced over the equatorial Atlantic without orographic heating over the African highlands, developing a zonal asymmetry strengthened by the Bjerknes feedback. In the Indian Ocean, the thermocline shoals eastward and an equatorial cold tongue appears twice a year. During boreal summer, the Findlater jet is greatly weakened off Somalia and SST warms in the western Indian Ocean, forcing the equatorial easterly winds amplified

  11. Application of Molded Interconnect Device technology to the realization of a self-biased circulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laur, Vincent, E-mail: Vincent.laur@univ-brest.fr [Lab-STICC, University of Brest, Brest 29238 (France); Mattei, Jean-Luc; Vérissimo, Grégory; Queffelec, Patrick [Lab-STICC, University of Brest, Brest 29238 (France); Lebourgeois, Richard; Ganne, Jean-Pierre [Thales Research & Technology, Palaiseau 91767 (France)

    2016-04-15

    This paper describes the first electromagnetic characterization of a self-biased circulator in molded interconnect device (MID) technology. The circulator was designed using a 3D full-wave commercial simulator. It consists of microstrip access lines connected to a Y-junction in Substrate Integrated Waveguide (SIW) technology. Unlike classical technologies, the SIW Y-junction was not fabricated using metallic vias but by a Laser Direct Structuring (LDS) technique. A molded Cyclo-Olefin Polymer (COP) was used as a substrate and 3D metallized. The microwave properties of LDS-compatible COP are not well known so we investigated them through the use of cavity-perturbation and rectangular waveguide characterization methods. The device was then machined to insert a pre-oriented strontium hexaferrite puck doped with cobalt and lanthanum (Sr{sub 0,7}La{sub 0,3}Fe{sub 11,7}Co{sub 0,3}O{sub 19}). The characteristics of the MID circulator were assessed between 28 and 32 GHz. Without magnets, insertion losses of 3.32 dB were measured at 30.7 GHz. At the same frequency, an isolation level of 13.89 dB and return losses of 19.89 dB were observed. These measurements demonstrate for the first time the high potential of MID technology for the realization of low-cost non-reciprocal devices. - Highlights: • Molded Interconnect Device technology was used to realize a self-biased circulator. • This is the first demonstration of a non-reciprocal effect in MID technology. • Pre-oriented hexaferrites enable a self-biased circulation. • (La,Co){sub 0.3}-SrM hexaferrite cylinder shows a remanence to saturation ratio of 90%. • The measured self-biased circulator shows insertion losses of 3.3 dB and an isolation level of 13.9 dB at 30.7 GHz.

  12. Evaluation of water vapor distribution in general circulation models using satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soden, Brian J.; Bretherton, Francis P.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the water vapor distribution obtained from two general circulation models, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM), with satellite observations of total precipitable water (TPW) from Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and upper tropospheric relative humidity (UTH) from GOES. Overall, both models are successful in capturing the primary features of the observed water vapor distribution and its seasonal variation. For the ECMWF model, however, a systematic moist bias in TPW is noted over well-known stratocumulus regions in the eastern subtropical oceans. Comparison with radiosonde profiles suggests that this problem is attributable to difficulties in modeling the shallowness of the boundary layer and large vertical water vapor gradients which characterize these regions. In comparison, the CCM is more successful in capturing the low values of TPW in the stratocumulus regions, although it tends to exhibit a dry bias over the eastern half of the subtropical oceans and a corresponding moist bias in the western half. The CCM also significantly overestimates the daily variability of the moisture fields in convective regions, suggesting a problem in simulating the temporal nature of moisture transport by deep convection. Comparison of the monthly mean UTH distribution indicates generally larger discrepancies than were noted for TPW owing to the greater influence of large-scale dynamical processes in determining the distribution of UTH. In particular, the ECMWF model exhibits a distinct dry bias along the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and a moist bias over the subtropical descending branches of the Hadley cell, suggesting an underprediction in the strength of the Hadley circulation. The CCM, on the other hand, demonstrates greater discrepancies in UTH than are observed for the ECMWF model, but none that are as

  13. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry – general circulation model: Comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hein

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM is presented which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks. This is the first model which interactively combines a general circulation model with a chemical model, employing most of the important reactions and species necessary to describe the stratospheric and upper tropospheric ozone chemistry, and which is computationally fast enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. This is possible as the model time-step used for the chemistry can be chosen as large as the integration time-step for the dynamics. Vertically the atmosphere is discretized by 39 levels from the surface up to the top layer which is centred at 10 hPa, with a relatively high vertical resolution of approximately 700 m near the extra-tropical tropopause. We present the results of a control simulation representing recent conditions (1990 and compare it to available observations. The focus is on investigations of stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM reproduces main features of stratospheric dynamics in the arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to earlier model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their inter-hemispheric differences are reproduced. Considering methane oxidation as part of the dynamic-chemistry feedback results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapour concentrations. The current model constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic

  14. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry – general circulation model: Comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hein

    Full Text Available The coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM is presented which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks. This is the first model which interactively combines a general circulation model with a chemical model, employing most of the important reactions and species necessary to describe the stratospheric and upper tropospheric ozone chemistry, and which is computationally fast enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. This is possible as the model time-step used for the chemistry can be chosen as large as the integration time-step for the dynamics. Vertically the atmosphere is discretized by 39 levels from the surface up to the top layer which is centred at 10 hPa, with a relatively high vertical resolution of approximately 700 m near the extra-tropical tropopause. We present the results of a control simulation representing recent conditions (1990 and compare it to available observations. The focus is on investigations of stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM reproduces main features of stratospheric dynamics in the arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to earlier model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their inter-hemispheric differences are reproduced. Considering methane oxidation as part of the dynamic-chemistry feedback results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapour concentrations. The current model constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic

  15. Integrated cumulus ensemble and turbulence (ICET): An integrated parameterization system for general circulation models (GCMs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J.L.; Frank, W.M.; Young, G.S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Successful simulations of the global circulation and climate require accurate representation of the properties of shallow and deep convective clouds, stable-layer clouds, and the interactions between various cloud types, the boundary layer, and the radiative fluxes. Each of these phenomena play an important role in the global energy balance, and each must be parameterized in a global climate model. These processes are highly interactive. One major problem limiting the accuracy of parameterizations of clouds and other processes in general circulation models (GCMs) is that most of the parameterization packages are not linked with a common physical basis. Further, these schemes have not, in general, been rigorously verified against observations adequate to the task of resolving subgrid-scale effects. To address these problems, we are designing a new Integrated Cumulus Ensemble and Turbulence (ICET) parameterization scheme, installing it in a climate model (CCM2), and evaluating the performance of the new scheme using data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites.

  16. Results from a 2 x CO2 simulation with the Canadian Climate Centre general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Canadian Climate Centre's general circulation model (GCM), GCMII, was used to simulate a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. The experiment was a standard greenhouse gas climate change study, using a three-dimensional atmospheric circulation model coupled to a simple 'slab' ocean and a thermodynamic ice model. This standard experiment retains the sophistication and generality of an atmospheric GCM, is straightforward in its use of simplified ocean and ice models, is comparatively economical of computer time, and permits comparison of results from different models. Features of the second generation GCMII include: higher resolution at T32L10 with a transform grid of 3.75 x 3.75 degree; full diurnal and annual cycles; ocean and sea ice treatment involving specification of ocean transports; modified treatment of land surface processes and hydrology; a parameterization of cloud optical feedback; and a retention of the special application data sets of surface parameters for North America and Europe. Results of the simulation were a globally averaged surface temperature increase of 3.5 degree C; a precipitation and evaporation increase of 3%; an average decrease in soil moisture of 6.6%; a decrease in cloud cover of 2.2%; a 66% decrease in mass of sea ice; and marked changes in other quantities in the polar region. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Scoping Study of Airlift Circulation Technologies for Supplemental Mixing in Pulse Jet Mixed Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Berglin, Eric J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boeringa, Gregory K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buchmiller, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burns, Carolyn A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Minette, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-04-07

    At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a scoping study to investigate supplemental technologies for supplying vertical fluid motion and enhanced mixing in Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels designed for high solids processing. The study assumed that the pulse jet mixers adequately mix and shear the bottom portion of a vessel. Given that, the primary function of a supplemental technology should be to provide mixing and shearing in the upper region of a vessel. The objective of the study was to recommend a mixing technology and configuration that could be implemented in the 8-ft test vessel located at Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE). Several mixing technologies, primarily airlift circulator (ALC) systems, were evaluated in the study. This technical report contains a review of ALC technologies, a description of the PNNL testing and accompanying results, and recommended features of an ALC system for further study.

  18. Thermodynamics of the general diffusion process: Equilibrium supercurrent and nonequilibrium driven circulation with dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, H.

    2015-07-01

    Unbalanced probability circulation, which yields cyclic motions in phase space, is the defining characteristics of a stationary diffusion process without detailed balance. In over-damped soft matter systems, such behavior is a hallmark of the presence of a sustained external driving force accompanied with dissipations. In an under-damped and strongly correlated system, however, cyclic motions are often the consequences of a conservative dynamics. In the present paper, we give a novel interpretation of a class of diffusion processes with stationary circulation in terms of a Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium in which cyclic motions are on the level set of stationary probability density function thus non-dissipative, e.g., a supercurrent. This implies an orthogonality between stationary circulation J ss ( x) and the gradient of stationary probability density f ss ( x) > 0. A sufficient and necessary condition for the orthogonality is a decomposition of the drift b( x) = j( x) + D( x)∇φ( x) where ∇ṡ j( x) = 0 and j( x) ṡ∇φ( x) = 0. Stationary processes with such Maxwell-Boltzmann equilibrium has an underlying conservative dynamics , and a first integral ϕ( x) ≡ -ln f ss (x) = const, akin to a Hamiltonian system. At all time, an instantaneous free energy balance equation exists for a given diffusion system; and an extended energy conservation law among an entire family of diffusion processes with different parameter α can be established via a Helmholtz theorem. For the general diffusion process without the orthogonality, a nonequilibrium cycle emerges, which consists of external driven φ-ascending steps and spontaneous φ-descending movements, alternated with iso-φ motions. The theory presented here provides a rich mathematical narrative for complex mesoscopic dynamics, with contradistinction to an earlier one [H. Qian et al., J. Stat. Phys. 107, 1129 (2002)]. This article is supplemented with comments by H. Ouerdane and a final reply by the author.

  19. Simulations of physics and chemistry of polar stratospheric clouds with a general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, J.

    2005-04-20

    A polar stratospheric cloud submodel has been developed and incorporated in a general circulation model including atmospheric chemistry (ECHAM5/MESSy). The formation and sedimentation of polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) particles can thus be simulated as well as heterogeneous chemical reactions that take place on the PSC particles. For solid PSC particle sedimentation, the need for a tailor-made algorithm has been elucidated. A sedimentation scheme based on first order approximations of vertical mixing ratio profiles has been developed. It produces relatively little numerical diffusion and can deal well with divergent or convergent sedimentation velocity fields. For the determination of solid PSC particle sizes, an efficient algorithm has been adapted. It assumes a monodisperse radii distribution and thermodynamic equilibrium between the gas phase and the solid particle phase. This scheme, though relatively simple, is shown to produce particle number densities and radii within the observed range. The combined effects of the representations of sedimentation and solid PSC particles on vertical H{sub 2}O and HNO{sub 3} redistribution are investigated in a series of tests. The formation of solid PSC particles, especially of those consisting of nitric acid trihydrate, has been discussed extensively in recent years. Three particle formation schemes in accordance with the most widely used approaches have been identified and implemented. For the evaluation of PSC occurrence a new data set with unprecedented spatial and temporal coverage was available. A quantitative method for the comparison of simulation results and observations is developed and applied. It reveals that the relative PSC sighting frequency can be reproduced well with the PSC submodel whereas the detailed modelling of PSC events is beyond the scope of coarse global scale models. In addition to the development and evaluation of new PSC submodel components, parts of existing simulation programs have been

  20. Circulating metabolites and general cognitive ability and dementia: Evidence from 11 cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Sven J; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Pool, René; Shipley, Martin J; Teumer, Alexander; Chouraki, Vincent; Melo van Lent, Debora; Tynkkynen, Juho; Fischer, Krista; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Haller, Toomas; Singh-Manoux, Archana; Verhoeven, Aswin; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Leeuw, Francisca A; Wagner, Holger; van Dongen, Jenny; Hertel, Johannes; Budde, Kathrin; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Weinhold, Leonie; Ikram, M Arfan; Pietzner, Maik; Perola, Markus; Wagner, Michael; Friedrich, Nele; Slagboom, P Eline; Scheltens, Philip; Yang, Qiong; Gertzen, Robert E; Egert, Sarah; Li, Shuo; Hankemeier, Thomas; van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E M; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Maier, Wolfgang; Peeters, Carel F W; Jörgen Grabe, Hans; Ramirez, Alfredo; Seshadri, Sudha; Metspalu, Andres; Kivimäki, Mika; Salomaa, Veikko; Demirkan, Ayşe; Boomsma, Dorret I; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Amin, Najaf; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2018-01-06

    Identifying circulating metabolites that are associated with cognition and dementia may improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of dementia and provide crucial readouts for preventive and therapeutic interventions. We studied 299 metabolites in relation to cognition (general cognitive ability) in two discovery cohorts (N total = 5658). Metabolites significantly associated with cognition after adjusting for multiple testing were replicated in four independent cohorts (N total = 6652), and the associations with dementia and Alzheimer's disease (N = 25,872) and lifestyle factors (N = 5168) were examined. We discovered and replicated 15 metabolites associated with cognition including subfractions of high-density lipoprotein, docosahexaenoic acid, ornithine, glutamine, and glycoprotein acetyls. These associations were independent of classical risk factors including high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes. Six of the cognition-associated metabolites were related to the risk of dementia and lifestyle factors. Circulating metabolites were consistently associated with cognition, dementia, and lifestyle factors, opening new avenues for prevention of cognitive decline and dementia. Copyright © 2018 the Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.

  1. Circulating alpha1-antitrypsin in the general population: Determinants and association with lung function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berger Wolfgang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT deficiency associated with low AAT blood concentrations is an established genetic COPD risk factor. Less is known about the respiratory health impact of variation in AAT serum concentrations in the general population. We cross-sectionally investigated correlates of circulating AAT concentrations and its association with FEV1. Methods In 5187 adults (2669 females with high-sensitive c-reactive protein (CRP levels ≤ 10 mg/l from the population-based Swiss SAPALDIA cohort, blood was collected at the time of follow-up examination for measuring serum AAT and CRP. Results Female gender, hormone intake, systolic blood pressure, age in men and in postmenopausal women, as well as active and passive smoking were positively, whereas alcohol intake and BMI inversely correlated with serum AAT levels, independent of CRP adjustment. We observed an inverse association of AAT with FEV1 in the total study population (p Conclusion The results of this population-based study reflect a complex interrelationship between tobacco exposure, gender related factors, circulating AAT, systemic inflammatory status and lung function.

  2. Potential feedback mechanism between phytoplankton and upper ocean circulation with oceanic radiative transfer processes influenced by phytoplankton - Numerical ocean, general circulation models and an analytical solution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; Kano, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Muneyama, K.; Ueyoshi, K.; Subrahmanyam, B.; Nakata, K.; Lai, C.A.; Frouin, R.

    and Dickey (1987) demonstrate that the at- tenuation of visible energy and photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) (Morel, 1978) are primarily functions of chlorophyll pigments. iturriaga and Potential Feedback Mechanism 257 Siegel (1989) reported... isoPYcnal coordinate (BPYC) general circulation model (Oberhuber, 1993), Nakamoto et al. (2001) showed that surface chlorophyll pigments in the equatorial Pacific not only influence vertical penetration of solar ra- diation, but also modify...

  3. General circulation and climate changes in the Mid-European area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, S.; Hupfer, P.

    1992-01-01

    The long-term changes in the frequency distribution of weather patterns ('Grosswetterlage') are closely related to recent climate variations in the investigation area. However, this simple recording of weather pattern frequency changes is not enough for the complete explanation of the climatic changes which took place in our century in central Europe. One of the causes is the large variability of the weather for identical flow directions. In the case of weather situations which are linked to a low cloudiness degree, especially the temperature is strongly dependent on the duration of the 'Grosswetterlage'. Also when viewed from a long-term view, the climatic characteristics of the GWL air masses are by no means constant. If one considers the course of climate elements under identical circulation conditions, it is found that the average weather sometimes varied considerably in the course of the century although the general flow direction was the same. (orig./KW) [de

  4. Interpretation of Snow-Climate Feedback as Produced by 17 General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cess, R. D.; Potter, G. L.; Zhang, M.-H.; Blanchet, J.-P.; Chalita, S.; Colman, R.; Dazlich, D. A.; del Genio, A. D.; Dymnikov, V.; Galin, V.; Jerrett, D.; Keup, E.; Lacis, A. A.; Le Treut, H.; Liang, X.-Z.; Mahfouf, J.-F.; McAvaney, B. J.; Meleshko, V. P.; Mitchell, J. F. B.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Norris, P. M.; Randall, D. A.; Rikus, L.; Roeckner, E.; Royer, J.-F.; Schlese, U.; Sheinin, D. A.; Slingo, J. M.; Sokolov, A. P.; Taylor, K. E.; Washington, W. M.; Wetherald, R. T.; Yagai, I.

    1991-08-01

    Snow feedback is expected to amplify global warming caused by increasing concentrations of atmospheric greenhouse gases. The conventional explanation is that a warmer Earth will have less snow cover, resulting in a darker planet that absorbs more solar radiation. An intercomparison of 17 general circulation models, for which perturbations of sea surface temperature were used as a surrogate climate change, suggests that this explanation is overly simplistic. The results instead indicate that additional amplification or moderation may be caused both by cloud interactions and longwave radiation. One measure of this net effect of snow feedback was found to differ markedly among the 17 climate models, ranging from weak negative feedback in some models to strong positive feedback in others.

  5. Circulating Irisin Concentrations Are Associated with a Favourable Lipid Profile in the General Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oelmann

    Full Text Available Irisin is a myokine, which is mainly inversely associated with the risk for non-communicable diseases. Irisin improves cellular energy metabolism by uncoupling the mitochondrial respiratory chain resulting in increased energy expenditure using lipids. To date potential associations between irisin concentration and lipid profile are poorly understood. Therefore, this investigation aimed to evaluate potential associations between irisin and lipid levels in the general population.Data of 430 men and 537 women from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND with available irisin and lipid concentrations were used. Analyses of variance, linear and logistic regression models adjusted for age, HBA1c, waist circumference, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, systolic blood pressure, ALAT were calculated.We detected significantly inverse associations between irisin and circulating levels of total [beta coefficient 0.21 (standard error 0.08, p = 0.01], low-density cholesterol [-0.16 (0.07, p = 0.03] and triglycerides [-0.17 (0.08, p = 0.02] for men. Females without lipid lowering medication had an inverse association between irisin and total cholesterol [-0.12 (0.06, p = 0.05]. Further, male subjects with irisin concentrations in the third tertile had an increased odds for elevated low-density cholesterol [odds ratio 1.96 (95% confidence interval 1.07-3.48, p = 0.03 and triglyceride [1.95 (1.09-3.47, p = 0.02] levels, even after exclusion of subjects with lipid lowering medication. In addition, our data revealed an annual rhythm of serum irisin levels with peak levels arise in winter and summer months.This is the first investigation to report a significant association between circulating irisin and a favourable lipid profile in the general population. This may infer that higher irisin concentrations are associated with a reduced risk for non-communicable diseases.

  6. Surface Lander Missions to Mars: Support via Analysis of the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James R.; Bridger, Alison F.C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized the near-surface martian wind environment as calculated with a set of numerical simulations carried out with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (Mars GCM). These wind environments are intended to offer future spacecraft missions to the martian surface a data base from which to choose those locations which meet the mission's criteria for minimal near surface winds to enable a successful landing. We also became involved in the development and testing of the wind sensor which is currently onboard the Mars-bound Pathfinder lander. We began this effort with a comparison of Mars GCM produced winds with those measured by the Viking landers during their descent through the martian atmosphere and their surface wind measurements during the 3+ martian year lifetime of the mission. Unexpected technical difficulties in implementing the sophisticated Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) scheme of Haberle et al. (1993) within the Mars GCM precluded our carrying out this investigation with the desired improvement to the model's treatment of the PBL. Thus, our results from this effort are not as conclusive as we had anticipated. As it turns out, similar difficulties have been experienced by other Mars modelling groups in attempting to implement very similar PBL routines into their GCMs (Mars General Circulation Model Intercomparison Workshop, held at Oxford University, United Kingdom, July 22-24, 1996; organized by J. Murphy, J. Hollingsworth, M. Joshi). These problems, which arise due to the nature of the time stepping in each of the models, are near to being resolved at the present. The model discussions which follow herein are based upon results using the existing, less sophisticated PBL routine. We fully anticipate implementing the tools we have developed in the present effort to investigate GCM results with the new PBL scheme implemented, and thereafter producing the technical document detailing results from the analysis tools developed during this

  7. Northern Adriatic general circulation behaviour induced by heat fluxes variations due to possible climatic changes

    OpenAIRE

    Bergamasco, Andrea; Filipetto, Valentina; Tomasin, Alberto; Carniel, Sandro

    2003-01-01

    Summary. — The thermohaline circulation of the central-north Adriatic basin is investigated by means of a 3D hydrodynamic numerical model. Three diferent runs —where the surface heat fluxes annual average is respectively negative, slightly pos- itive and slightly negative—are performed; the general circulation patterns are then discussed and depicted, also with the aid of the trajectories of numerical particles released during the integrations. Results confirm that surface heat fluxes c...

  8. Thermospheric tides simulated by the national center for atmospheric research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model at equinox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesen, C.G.; Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C.

    1993-01-01

    The authors use the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere/ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM) to model tides and dynamics in the thermosphere. This model incorporates the latest advances in the thermosphere general circulation model. Model results emphasized the 70 degree W longitude region to overlap a series of incoherent radar scatter installations. Data and the model are available on data bases. The results of this theoretical modeling are compared with available data, and with prediction of more empirical models. In general there is broad agreement within the comparisons

  9. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2004-10-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2004 through September 30, 2004. The following tasks have been completed. First, renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building have started. Second, the design if the component parts of the CFBC system have been reviewed and finalized so that the drawings may be released to the manufacturers during the next quarter. Third, the experiments for solid waste (chicken litter) incineration have been conducted using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer (TGA). This is in preparation for testing in the simulated fluidized-bed combustor. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter has been outlined in this report.

  10. PV-θ view of diabatic–dynamical interaction in the general circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aarnout J. Van Delden

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the question how the zonal mean potential vorticity (PV distribution in potential temperature (θ coordinates is established in the atmosphere by the interaction of diabatic processes (cross-isentropic transport of mass with adiabatic dynamical processes (isentropic transport of mass and potential vorticity substance. As an aid in dissecting this interaction, a simplified model of the general circulation is constructed, which contains parametrisations of radiative transfer, wave drag and water cycle. This model reproduces the following four observed features of the atmosphere below 10 hPa: (1 a permanently present eastward subtropical jet, which in winter is separated from an eastward stratospheric jet by a zone (referred to as the ‘surf zone’, between θ=380 K and θ=550 K, where planetary wave drag reduces PV over the polar cap; (2 a stratospheric zonal wind reversal in spring or beginning of summer; (3 a tropical cold layer at 100 hPa, and (4 a realistic distribution of zonal mean cross-isentropic flow. The strength of the cross-isentropic flow depends on wave drag, latent heat release and the thermal inertia of both the atmosphere and the earth's surface. Of special interest is the layer between θ=315 K and θ=370 K (the ‘Middleworld’, which lies in the troposphere in the tropics and in the stratosphere in the extratropics. Mass converges diabatically into this layer in the deep tropics, mainly due to latent heat release, and diverges out of this layer elsewhere due to radiation flux divergence. Meridional isentropic vorticity flux divergence in the tropical Middleworld, associated with the upper branch of the Hadley circulation, creates a region in the subtropics, at θ=350 K and adjacent isentropic levels, with a marked isentropic meridional PV-gradient, forming the isentropic dynamical tropopause.

  11. Comparison of two general circulation models to downscale temperature and precipitation under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyasovszky, Istvan; Bogardi, Istvan; Duckstein, Lucien

    1994-12-01

    A semiempirical approach for downscaling general circulation model (GCM) based daily atmospheric circulation patterns (CP) and predicting local climatological variables under climate change is developed. Specifically, the daily 500-hPa surface outputs of the Canadian Climate Center (CCC) and Max Planck Institute (MPI) (Germany) GCMs are linked stochastically, using a split sampling approach, to local temperature and precipitation in Nebraska. Three series of data are analyzed: historical data, 1 × CO2 GCM results and 2 × CO2 GCM results. Between these three data sets, no significant difference can be detected in either CP typology (constructed by principal component analysis and k means method) or stochastic properties of daily time series (Markov matrix). On the other hand, the average geopotential height of the 500-hPa pressure field exhibits significant change, labeled the ΔCO2 effect, between the 1 × CO2 and 2 × CO2 cases. Accordingly, climate change is assumed to be represented by the historical average geopotential height augmented by the ΔCO2 increment. It is found that both the CCC and MPI GCMs lead to predicting a winter temperature increase of 3°-6°C, a smaller but significant increase in spring and fall temperatures, and no increase in summer. The probability of precipitation occurrence is found to remain almost unchanged, as well as the dry period duration. The estimates of local response to climate change depend upon the location and the GCM used for downscaling the CP. The MPI GCM, which includes an ocean-atmosphere coupling, appears to yield smaller downscaled changes than the purely atmosphere-based CCC GCM.

  12. Equatorial Indian Ocean subsurface current variability in an Ocean General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanaseelan, C.; Deshpande, Aditi

    2018-03-01

    The variability of subsurface currents in the equatorial Indian Ocean is studied using high resolution Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) simulations during 1958-2009. February-March eastward equatorial subsurface current (ESC) shows weak variability whereas strong variability is observed in northern summer and fall ESC. An eastward subsurface current with maximum amplitude in the pycnocline is prominent right from summer to winter during strong Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) years when air-sea coupling is significant. On the other hand during weak IOD years, both the air-sea coupling and the ESC are weak. This strongly suggests the role of ESC on the strength of IOD. The extension of the ESC to the summer months during the strong IOD years strengthens the oceanic response and supports intensification and maintenance of IODs through modulation of air sea coupling. Although the ESC is triggered by equatorial winds, the coupled air-sea interaction associated with IODs strengthens the ESC to persist for several seasons thereby establishing a positive feedback cycle with the surface. This suggests that the ESC plays a significant role in the coupled processes associated with the evolution and intensification of IOD events by cooling the eastern basin and strengthening thermocline-SST (sea surface temperature) interaction. As the impact of IOD events on Indian summer monsoon is significant only during strong IOD years, understanding and monitoring the evolution of ESC during these years is important for summer monsoon forecasting purposes. There is a westward phase propagation of anomalous subsurface currents which persists for a year during strong IOD years, whereas such persistence or phase propagation is not seen during weak IOD years, supporting the close association between ESC and strength of air sea coupling during strong IOD years. In this study we report the processes which strengthen the IOD events and the air sea coupling associated with IOD. It also unravels

  13. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry - general circulation model. Comparison with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, R.; Dameris, M.; Schnadt, C. [and others

    2000-01-01

    An interactively coupled climate-chemistry model which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks is presented. This is the first model, which interactively combines a general circulation model based on primitive equations with a rather complex model of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, and which is computational efficient enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. The applied model version extends from the Earth's surface up to 10 hPa with a relatively high number (39) of vertical levels. We present the results of a present-day (1990) simulation and compare it to available observations. We focus on stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. The current model version ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM can realistically reproduce stratospheric dynamics in the Arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to formerly applied model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their interhemispheric differences are reproduced. The consideration of the chemistry feedback on dynamics results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapor concentrations, i.e., the simulated meriodional water vapor gradient in the stratosphere is realistic. The present model version constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic trace gas emissions, and the future evolution of the ozone layer. (orig.)

  14. Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM): Global Structure and Dynamics Driven by Auroral and Joule Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougher, S. W.; J. Il. Waite, Jr.; Majeed, T.

    2005-01-01

    A growing multispectral database plus recent Galileo descent measurements are being used to construct a self-consistent picture of the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system. The proper characterization of Jupiter s upper atmosphere, embedded ionosphere, and auroral features requires the examination of underlying processes, including the feedbacks of energetics, neutral-ion dynamics, composition, and magnetospheric coupling. A fully 3-D Jupiter Thermospheric General Circulation Model (JTGCM) has been developed and exercised to address global temperatures, three-component neutral winds, and neutral-ion species distributions. The domain of this JTGCM extends from 20-microbar (capturing hydrocarbon cooling) to 1.0 x 10(exp -4) nbar (including aurora/Joule heating processes). The resulting JTGCM has been fully spun-up and integrated for greater than or equal to40 Jupiter rotations. Results from three JTGCM cases incorporating moderate auroral heating, ion drag, and moderate to strong Joule heating processes are presented. The neutral horizontal winds at ionospheric heights vary from 0.5 km/s to 1.2 km/s, atomic hydrogen is transported equatorward, and auroral exospheric temperatures range from approx.1200-1300 K to above 3000 K, depending on the magnitude of Joule heating. The equatorial temperature profiles from the JTGCM are compared with the measured temperature structure from the Galileo AS1 data set. The best fit to the Galileo data implies that the major energy source for maintaining the equatorial temperatures is due to dynamical heating induced by the low-latitude convergence of the high-latitude-driven thermospheric circulation. Overall, the Jupiter thermosphere/ionosphere system is highly variable and is shown to be strongly dependent on magnetospheric coupling which regulates Joule heating.

  15. The water cycle in the general circulation model of the martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaposhnikov, D. S.; Rodin, A. V.; Medvedev, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Within the numerical general-circulation model of the Martian atmosphere MAOAM (Martian Atmosphere: Observation and Modeling), we have developed the water cycle block, which is an essential component of modern general circulation models of the Martian atmosphere. The MAOAM model has a spectral dynamic core and successfully predicts the temperature regime on Mars through the use of physical parameterizations typical of both terrestrial and Martian models. We have achieved stable computation for three Martian years, while maintaining a conservative advection scheme taking into account the water-ice phase transitions, water exchange between the atmosphere and surface, and corrections for the vertical velocities of ice particles due to sedimentation. The studies show a strong dependence of the amount of water that is actively involved in the water cycle on the initial data, model temperatures, and the mechanism of water exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. The general pattern and seasonal asymmetry of the water cycle depends on the size of ice particles, the albedo, and the thermal inertia of the planet's surface. One of the modeling tasks, which results from a comparison of the model data with those of the TES experiment on board Mars Global Surveyor, is the increase in the total mass of water vapor in the model in the aphelion season and decrease in the mass of water ice clouds at the poles. The surface evaporation scheme, which takes into account the turbulent rise of water vapor, on the one hand, leads to the most complete evaporation of ice from the surface in the summer season in the northern hemisphere and, on the other hand, supersaturates the atmosphere with ice due to the vigorous evaporation, which leads to worse consistency between the amount of the precipitated atmospheric ice and the experimental data. The full evaporation of ice from the surface increases the model sensitivity to the size of the polar cap; therefore, the increase in the

  16. Supercritical fluids technology. Pt. 1 General topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marongiu, B.; De Giorgi, M. R.; Porcedda, S.; Cadoni, E.

    1998-01-01

    Supercritical fluids technology is among the emerging 'clean' technologies, that allows the minimization in the use of chemical and thermic treatments and products irradiation, diminishing the quantity of liquid wastes to be treated. In this first article phase equilibria thermodynamics and fluid mechanics of transport phenomena are reviewed [it

  17. Technological Innovation Science as General Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, Koichi

    The object of this paper is to provide some suggestions about the technological innovation science temporal lecture in Nagoya Institute of Technology in 2005. It was a unique lecture in terms of the following 3 points : 1) The lecture was not designed for graduated students of MOT course but for bachelor students in engineering. 2) The lecture was based on the case studies from history of Japanese industrial technology. 3) The lecture was focused on studying the vested or basic technology caused the technological innovation. It was shown that the lecture was useful for the students as an introduction of MOT and it also promoted a better understanding of manufacturing basic knowledge and engineers‧ ethics.

  18. A new process by which the general circulation system is maintained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Njau, E.C.

    1990-12-01

    According to the author's theory of climatic change (Nuovo Cimento C, 12, 597-611 (1989)), heat energy or temperature variations at any location on the earth may be expressed as a power series of some specific functions. These functions represent amplitude modulation processes in which the complex carrier signals are generated by interactions between the earth and its spinning motion on one hand and the constant component of extraterrestrial insolation on the other hand, while the modulating signals are formed by the variable components of extraterrestrial insolation. It is shown here that the latitudinal variation of the modulation indices involved in the above-mentioned processes leads to the establishment and maintenance of atmospheric stability along the intertropical as well as polar high pressure belts. Besides, a high level of atmospheric instability is permanently enforced along the subpolar low pressure belts. All the modulation indices attain minimum values along the equatorial low pressure belt and maximum values along the subpolar low pressure belts. Our analysis reflects and explains quite well the salient characteristics of the general circulation system already deduced from observations. (author). 20 refs

  19. A statistical intercomparison of temperature and precipitation predicted by four general circulation models with historical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotch, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    This study is a detailed intercomparison of the results produced by four general circulation models (GCMs) that have been used to estimate the climatic consequences of a doubling of the CO 2 concentration. Two variables, surface air temperature and precipitation, annually and seasonally averaged, are compared for both the current climate and for the predicted equilibrium changes after a doubling of the atmospheric CO 2 concentration. The major question considered here is: how well do the predictions from different GCMs agree with each other and with historical climatology over different areal extents, from the global scale down to the range of only several gridpoints? Although the models often agree well when estimating averages over large areas, substantial disagreements become apparent as the spatial scale is reduced. At scales below continental, the correlations observed between different model predictions are often very poor. The implications of this work for investigation of climatic impacts on a regional scale are profound. For these two important variables, at least, the poor agreement between model simulations of the current climate on the regional scale calls into question the ability of these models to quantitatively estimate future climatic change on anything approaching the scale of a few (< 10) gridpoints, which is essential if these results are to be used in meaningful resource-assessment studies. A stronger cooperative effort among the different modeling groups will be necessary to assure that we are getting better agreement for the right reasons, a prerequisite for improving confidence in model projections. 11 refs.; 10 figs

  20. Performance of the general circulation models in simulating temperature and precipitation over Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, Mohammadsadegh; Moghim, Sanaz; Abrishamchi, Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    General Circulation Models (GCMs) are advanced tools for impact assessment and climate change studies. Previous studies show that the performance of the GCMs in simulating climate variables varies significantly over different regions. This study intends to evaluate the performance of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5) GCMs in simulating temperature and precipitation over Iran. Simulations from 37 GCMs and observations from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) were obtained for the period of 1901-2005. Six measures of performance including mean bias, root mean square error (RMSE), Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), linear correlation coefficient (r), Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistic (KS), Sen's slope estimator, and the Taylor diagram are used for the evaluation. GCMs are ranked based on each statistic at seasonal and annual time scales. Results show that most GCMs perform reasonably well in simulating the annual and seasonal temperature over Iran. The majority of the GCMs have a poor skill to simulate precipitation, particularly at seasonal scale. Based on the results, the best GCMs to represent temperature and precipitation simulations over Iran are the CMCC-CMS (Euro-Mediterranean Center on Climate Change) and the MRI-CGCM3 (Meteorological Research Institute), respectively. The results are valuable for climate and hydrometeorological studies and can help water resources planners and managers to choose the proper GCM based on their criteria.

  1. Hurricane-type vortices in a general circulation model. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bengtsson, L.; Botzet, M.; Esch, M.

    1994-01-01

    A very high resolution atmospheric general circulation model, T106-L19, has been used for the simulation of hurricanes in a multi-year numerical experiment. Individual storms as well as their geographical and seasonal distribution agree remarkably well with observations. In spite of the fact that only the thermal and dynamical structure of the storms have been used as criteria of their identification, practically all of them occur in areas where the sea surface temperature is higher or equal to 26 C. There are some variations from year to year in the number of storms in spite of the fact that there are no interannual variations in the SST pattern. It is found that the number of storms in particular areas depend on the intensity of the Hadley-Walker cell. The result is clearly resolution dependant. At lower horizonal resolution, T42, for example, the intensity of the storms is significantly reduced and their overall structure is less realistic, including their vertical form and extention. (orig.)

  2. Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model for the Ionospheric Connection Explorer: TIEGCM-ICON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maute, Astrid

    2017-10-01

    The NASA Ionospheric Connection explorer (ICON) will study the coupling between the thermosphere and ionosphere at low- and mid-latitudes by measuring the key parameters. The ICON mission will also employ numerical modeling to support the interpretation of the observations, and examine the importance of different vertical coupling mechanisms by conducting numerical experiments. One of these models is the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model-ICON (TIEGCM-ICON) which will be driven by tidal perturbations derived from ICON observations using the Hough Mode Extension method (HME) and at high latitude by ion convection and auroral particle precipitation patterns from the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE). The TIEGCM-ICON will simulate the thermosphere-ionosphere (TI) system during the period of the ICON mission. In this report the TIEGCM-ICON is introduced, and the focus is on examining the effect of the lower boundary on the TI-system to provide some guidance for interpreting future ICON model results.

  3. Bivariate spatial analysis of temperature and precipitation from general circulation models and observation proxies

    KAUST Repository

    Philbin, R.

    2015-05-22

    This study validates the near-surface temperature and precipitation output from decadal runs of eight atmospheric ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) against observational proxy data from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP/NCAR) reanalysis temperatures and Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) precipitation data. We model the joint distribution of these two fields with a parsimonious bivariate Matérn spatial covariance model, accounting for the two fields\\' spatial cross-correlation as well as their own smoothnesses. We fit output from each AOGCM (30-year seasonal averages from 1981 to 2010) to a statistical model on each of 21 land regions. Both variance and smoothness values agree for both fields over all latitude bands except southern mid-latitudes. Our results imply that temperature fields have smaller smoothness coefficients than precipitation fields, while both have decreasing smoothness coefficients with increasing latitude. Models predict fields with smaller smoothness coefficients than observational proxy data for the tropics. The estimated spatial cross-correlations of these two fields, however, are quite different for most GCMs in mid-latitudes. Model correlation estimates agree well with those for observational proxy data for Australia, at high northern latitudes across North America, Europe and Asia, as well as across the Sahara, India, and Southeast Asia, but elsewhere, little consistent agreement exists.

  4. Atmospheric effects of nuclar war aerosols in general circulation model simulations: Influence of smoke optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.L.; Ramaswamy, V.; Covey, C.

    1987-01-01

    A global atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) is modified to include radiative transfer parameterizations for the absorption and scattering of solar radiation and the absorption of thermal infrared (IR) radiation by smoke aerosols. The solar scattering modifications include a parameterization for diagnosing smoke optical properties as a function of the time- and space-dependent smoke particle radii. The aerosol IR modifications allow for both the ''grey'' absorber approximation and a broadband approximation that resolves the aerosol absorption in four spectral intervals. We examine the sensitivity of some GCM-simulated atmospheric and climatic effects to the optical properties and radiative transfer parameterizations used in studies of massive injections of smoke. Specifically, we test the model response to solar scattering versus nonscattering smoke, variations in prescribed smoke single scattering albedo and IR specific absorption, and interactive versus fixed smoke optical properties. Hypothetical nuclear war created smoke scenarios assume the July injection of 60 or 180 Tg of smoke over portions of the mid-latitude land areas of the northern hemisphere. Atmospheric transport and scavenging of the smoke are included. Nonscattering smoke cases produce roughly 40 Wm/sup -2/ more Earth-atmosphere solar irradiance absorption over the northern hemisphere, when compared to scattering smoke cases having equivalent specific absorption efficiencies. Varying the elemental carbon content of smoke over a plausible range produces a 4 0 --6 0 C change in average mid-latitude land surface temperature, and a variation of about 0.1 in zonally averaged planetary albedo in the northern hemisphere

  5. Simulations of future climate with a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stendel, M.; Schmith, T.; Hesselbjerg Christensen, J.

    2001-01-01

    A coupled atmosphere/ocean general circulation model to study the time-dependent climate response to changing concentrations of greenhouse gases, chlorofluorocarbons and aerosols according to the new IPCC SRES scenarios A2 and B2 has been used. The results of these experiments are compared to an unforced 300-year control experiment. The changes in the last three decades of the scenario simulations (2071-2100) are furthermore compared to the simulation of present-day climate (1961-1990). In accordance with previous experiments we find that greenhouse warming is reduced when aerosol effects are considered. Sulfur emissions, however, are lower than in the IS92a scenario. Consequently, the greenhouse warming effect, which leads to a bigger temperature increase than in the GSDIO experiment can outweigh the aerosol cooling effect. The result shows that there still are serious difficulties and uncertainties in this type of model simulation. Those are partially due to oversimplifications in the model, concerning the radiative properties of aerosols in particular, and therefore the indirect aerosol effect. Another inherent problem, however, is the uncertainty in the scenarios themselves. This is the case for short-lived substances with an inhomogeneous spatial and temporal distribution, such as aerosols. Therefore, on a decadal horizon, changes in the emissions of those substance can exert a significant effect on anthropogenic climate change. (LN)

  6. The Tropical Subseasonal Variability Simulated in the NASA GISS General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Daehyun; Sobel, Adam H.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; Chen, Yonghua; Camargo, Suzana J.; Yao, Mao-Sung; Kelley, Maxwell; Nazarenko, Larissa

    2012-01-01

    The tropical subseasonal variability simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies general circulation model, Model E2, is examined. Several versions of Model E2 were developed with changes to the convective parameterization in order to improve the simulation of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). When the convective scheme is modified to have a greater fractional entrainment rate, Model E2 is able to simulate MJO-like disturbances with proper spatial and temporal scales. Increasing the rate of rain reevaporation has additional positive impacts on the simulated MJO. The improvement in MJO simulation comes at the cost of increased biases in the mean state, consistent in structure and amplitude with those found in other GCMs when tuned to have a stronger MJO. By reinitializing a relatively poor-MJO version with restart files from a relatively better-MJO version, a series of 30-day integrations is constructed to examine the impacts of the parameterization changes on the organization of tropical convection. The poor-MJO version with smaller entrainment rate has a tendency to allow convection to be activated over a broader area and to reduce the contrast between dry and wet regimes so that tropical convection becomes less organized. Besides the MJO, the number of tropical-cyclone-like vortices simulated by the model is also affected by changes in the convection scheme. The model simulates a smaller number of such storms globally with a larger entrainment rate, while the number increases significantly with a greater rain reevaporation rate.

  7. A statistical intercomparison of temperature and precipitation predicted by four general circulation models with historical data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotch, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    This study is a detailed intercomparison of the results produced by four general circulation models (GCMs) that have been used to estimate the climatic consequences of a doubling of the CO 2 concentration. Two variables, surface air temperature and precipitation, annually and seasonally averaged, are compared for both the current climate and for the predicted equilibrium changes after a doubling of the atmospheric CO 2 concentration. The major question considered here is: how well do the predictions from different GCMs agree with each other and with historical climatology over different areal extents, from the global scale down to the range of only several gridpoints? Although the models often agree well when estimating averages over large areas, substantial disagreements become apparent as the spatial scale is reduced. At scales below continental, the correlations observed between different model predictions are often very poor. The implications of this work for investigation of climatic impacts on a regional scale are profound. For these two important variables, at least, the poor agreement between model simulations of the current climate on the regional scale calls into question the ability of these models to quantitatively estimate future climatic change on anything approaching the scale of a few (< 10) gridpoints, which is essential if these results are to be used in meaningful resource-assessment studies. A stronger cooperative effort among the different modeling groups will be necessary to assure that we are getting better agreement for the right reasons, a prerequisite for improving confidence in model projections

  8. Considerations in the development of circulating tumor cell technology for clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkinson David R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript summarizes current thinking on the value and promise of evolving circulating tumor cell (CTC technologies for cancer patient diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy, as well as accelerating oncologic drug development. Moving forward requires the application of the classic steps in biomarker development–analytical and clinical validation and clinical qualification for specific contexts of use. To that end, this review describes methods for interactive comparisons of proprietary new technologies, clinical trial designs, a clinical validation qualification strategy, and an approach for effectively carrying out this work through a public-private partnership that includes test developers, drug developers, clinical trialists, the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA and the US National Cancer Institute (NCI.

  9. Fluorescence detection, enumeration and characterization of single circulating cells in vivo: technology, applications and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Carolin; Patil, Roshani; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark

    2018-01-01

    There are many diseases and biological processes that involve circulating cells in the bloodstream, such as cancer metastasis, immunology, reproductive medicine, and stem cell therapies. This has driven significant interest in new technologies for the study of circulating cells in small animal research models and clinically. Most currently used methods require drawing and enriching blood samples from the body, but these suffer from a number of limitations. In contrast, ‘in vivo flow cytometry’ (IVFC) refers to set of technologies that allow study of cells directly in the bloodstream of the organism in vivo. In recent years the IVFC field has grown significantly and new techniques have been developed, including fluorescence microscopy, multi-photon, photo-acoustic, and diffuse fluorescence IVFC. In this paper we review recent technical advances in IVFC, with emphasis on instrumentation, contrast mechanisms, and detection sensitivity. We also describe key applications in biomedical research, including cancer research and immunology. Last, we discuss future directions for IVFC, as well as prospects for broader adoption by the biomedical research community and translation to humans clinically.

  10. Cloud-turbulence interactions: Sensitivity of a general circulation model to closure assumptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkop, S.; Roeckner, E.

    1993-01-01

    Several approaches to parameterize the turbulent transport of momentum, heat, water vapour and cloud water for use in a general circulation model (GCM) have been tested in one-dimensional and three-dimensional model simulations. The schemes differ with respect to their closure assumptions (conventional eddy diffusivity model versus turbulent kinetic energy closure) and also regarding their treatment of cloud-turbulence interactions. The basis properties of these parameterizations are discussed first in column simulations of a stratocumulus-topped atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) under a strong subsidence inversion during the KONTROL experiment in the North Sea. It is found that the K-models tend to decouple the cloud layer from the adjacent layers because the turbulent activity is calculated from local variables. The higher-order scheme performs better in this respect because internally generated turbulence can be transported up and down through the action of turbulent diffusion. Thus, the TKE-scheme provides not only a better link between the cloud and the sub-cloud layer but also between the cloud and the inversion as a result of cloud-top entrainment. In the stratocumulus case study, where the cloud is confined by a pronounced subsidence inversion, increased entrainment favours cloud dilution through enhanced evaporation of cloud droplets. In the GCM study, however, additional cloud-top entrainment supports cloud formation because indirect cloud generating processes are promoted through efficient ventilation of the ABL, such as the enhanced moisture supply by surface evaporation and the increased depth of the ABL. As a result, tropical convection is more vigorous, the hydrological cycle is intensified, the whole troposphere becomes warmer and moister in general and the cloudiness in the upper part of the ABL is increased. (orig.)

  11. Comparison of an isotopic atmospheric general circulation model with new quasi-global satellite measurements of water vapor isotopologues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshimura, K.; Frankenberg, C.; Kanamitsu, M.; Worden, J.; Roeckmann, T.

    2011-01-01

    We performed an intensive comparison of an isotope‐incorporated atmospheric general circulation model with vapor isotopologue ratio observation data by two quasi‐global satellite sensors in preparation for data assimilation of water isotope ratios. A global Isotope‐incorporated Global Spectral Model

  12. High resolution interpolation of climate scenarios for the conterminous USA and Alaska derived from general circulation model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda A. Joyce; David T. Price; Daniel W. McKenney; R. Martin Siltanen; Pia Papadopol; Kevin Lawrence; David P. Coulson

    2011-01-01

    Projections of future climate were selected for four well-established general circulation models (GCM) forced by each of three greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios, namely A2, A1B, and B1 from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES). Monthly data for the period 1961-2100 were downloaded mainly from the web...

  13. Characteristics modeling for supercritical circulating fluidized bed boiler working in oxy-combustion technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balicki Adrian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the technologies which allow to reduce greenhouse gas emission, mainly carbon dioxide, special attention deserves the idea of ‘zeroemission’ technology based on boilers working in oxy-combustion technology. In the paper the results of analyses of the influence of changing two quantities, namely oxygen share in oxidant produced in the air separation unit, and oxygen share in oxidant supplied to the furnace chamber on the selected characteristics of a steam boiler including the degree of exhaust gas recirculation, boiler efficiency and adiabatic flame temperature, was examined. Due to the possibility of the integration of boiler model with carbon dioxide capture, separation and storage installation, the subject of the analysis was also to determine composition of the flue gas at the outlet of a moisture condensation installation. Required calculations were made using a model of a supercritical circulating fluidized bed boiler working in oxy-combustion technology, which was built in a commercial software and in-house codes.

  14. Tracer simulation using a global general circulation model: Results from a midlatitude instantaneous source experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlman, J.D.; Moxim, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    An 11-level general circulation model with seasonal variation is used to perform an experiment on the dispersion of passive tracers. Specially constructed time-dependent winds from this model are used as input to a separate tracer model. The methodologies employed to construct the tracer model are described.The experiment presented is the evolution of a hypothetical instantaneous source of tracer on 1 Janaury with maximum initial concentration at 65 mb, 36 0 N, 180 0 E. The tracer is assumed to have no sources or sinks in the stratosphere, but is subject to removal processes in the lower troposphere.The experimental results reveal a number of similarities to observed tracer behavior, including the average poleward-downward slope of mixing ratio isopleths, strong tracer gradients across the tropopause, intrusion of tracer into the Southern Hemisphere lower stratosphere, and the long-term interhemispheric exchange rate. The model residence times show behavior intermediate to those exhibited for particulate radioactive debris and gaseous C 14 O 2 . This suggests that caution should be employed when either radioactive debris or C 14 O 2 data are used to develop empirical models for prediction of gaseous tracers which are efficiently removed in the troposphere.In this experiment, the tracer mixing ratio and potential vorticity evolve to very high correlations. Mechanisms for this correlation are discussed. The zonal mean tracer balances exhibit complex behavior among the various transport terms. At early stages, the tracer evolution is dominated by eddy effects. Later, a very large degree of self-cancellation between mean cell and eddy effects is observed. During seasonal transitions, however, this self-cancellation diminishes markedly, leading to significant changes in the zonal mean tracer distribution. A possible theoretical explanation is presented

  15. Atmospheric circulation associated with extreme generalized frosts persistence in central-southern South America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Gabriela V. [Centro de Investigaciones Cientificas y Transferencia de Tecnologia a la Produccion, Diamante (CICYTTTP-CONICET), Diamante, Entre Rios (Argentina); Berri, Guillermo J. [Servicio Meteorologico Nacional - CONICET, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-03-15

    Generalized frosts (GF) in central-southern South America have a strong impact due to their spatial extension, and they are especially important when they become persistent. This paper aims at identifying the atmospheric circulation features that determine the extreme GF persistence, i.e. very persistent and without persistence, and the differences between them, during the 1961-1990 winters. Since the GF without persistence group outnumbers the other one, two subgroups are composed with events selected from winters with maximum and minimum frequency of GF occurrence, respectively. Additionally, the individual event of July 1988 within the very persistent GF group is analyzed due to its exceptional persistence. GF persistence is mainly conditioned by two large-scale dynamic factors. One is the Rossby wave train propagation across the Pacific Ocean, and the other one is the location with respect to the continent and the magnitude of the confluence in the jet entrance region in subtropical latitudes. A predominantly meridional Rossby wave train propagation with a confluence region to the west of the continent prior to the event favors GF with intermediate (null) persistence depending on the greater (lesser) jet acceleration. This is conditioned by the magnitude of the confluence, which, in turn, depends on the disposition of the wave train propagation pattern. Instead, an essentially zonal propagation with a confluence region to the east of the continent favors the GF persistence for several days, yet if there is no confluence the event does not persist. The greatest persistence of an event combines the confluence/diffluence of the jet entrance/exit region, which depends on the disposition with respect to the continent of the zonally propagating Rossby wave trains. (orig.)

  16. Arctic storms simulated in atmospheric general circulation models under uniform high, uniform low, and variable resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, E. L.; Bosler, P. A.; Taylor, M.

    2016-12-01

    The impact of strong extratropical storms on coastal communities is large, and the extent to which storms will change with a warming Arctic is unknown. Understanding storms in reanalysis and in climate models is important for future predictions. We know that the number of detected Arctic storms in reanalysis is sensitive to grid resolution. To understand Arctic storm sensitivity to resolution in climate models, we describe simulations designed to identify and compare Arctic storms at uniform low resolution (1 degree), at uniform high resolution (1/8 degree), and at variable resolution (1 degree to 1/8 degree). High-resolution simulations resolve more fine-scale structure and extremes, such as storms, in the atmosphere than a uniform low-resolution simulation. However, the computational cost of running a globally uniform high-resolution simulation is often prohibitive. The variable resolution tool in atmospheric general circulation models permits regional high-resolution solutions at a fraction of the computational cost. The storms are identified using the open-source search algorithm, Stride Search. The uniform high-resolution simulation has over 50% more storms than the uniform low-resolution and over 25% more storms than the variable resolution simulations. Storm statistics from each of the simulations is presented and compared with reanalysis. We propose variable resolution as a cost-effective means of investigating physics/dynamics coupling in the Arctic environment. Future work will include comparisons with observed storms to investigate tuning parameters for high resolution models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2016-7402 A

  17. Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrinos, A.A.; Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M.; Ellingson, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program

  18. Quantifying Contributions to Polar Warming Amplification in a Coupled General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, M.; Lu, J.

    2009-12-01

    An idealized coupled general circulation model is used to demonstrate that the surface warming due the doubling of CO2 can still be stronger in high latitudes than in low latitudes even without the negative evaporation feedback in low latitudes and positive ice-albedo feedback in high latitudes, as well as without the poleward latent heat transport. The new climate feedback analysis method formulated in Lu and Cai (2009) is used to isolate contributions from both radiative and non-radiative feedback processes to the total temperature change obtained with the coupled GCM. These partial temperature changes are additive and their sum is convergent to the total temperature change. The radiative energy flux perturbations due to the doubling of CO2 and water vapor feedback lead to a stronger warming in low latitudes than in high latitudes at the surface and throughout the entire troposphere. In the vertical, the temperature changes due to the doubling of CO2 and water vapor feedback are maximum near the surface and decrease with height at all latitudes. The simultaneous warming reduction in low latitudes and amplification in high latitudes by the enhanced poleward dry static energy transport reverses the warming pattern at the surface and in the lower troposphere into poleward increasing, but it is not able to do so in the upper troposphere. The enhanced vertical moist convections in the tropics acts to amplify the warming in the upper troposphere at an expense of reducing the warming in the lower troposphere and surface warming in the tropics. As a result, the final warming pattern shows the co-existence of a reduction of the meridional temperature gradient at the surface and in the lower troposphere with an increase of the meridional temperature gradient in the upper troposphere. In the tropics, the total warming is stronger in the upper troposphere than the surface warming.

  19. Quantifying contributions to polar warming amplification in an idealized coupled general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianhua; Cai, Ming

    2010-04-01

    An idealized coupled general circulation model is used to demonstrate that the surface warming due to the doubling of CO2 can still be stronger in high latitudes than in low latitudes even without the negative evaporation feedback in low latitudes and positive ice-albedo feedback in high latitudes, as well as without the poleward latent heat transport. The new climate feedback analysis method formulated in Lu and Cai (Clim Dyn 32:873-885, 2009) is used to isolate contributions from both radiative and non-radiative feedback processes to the total temperature change obtained with the coupled GCM. These partial temperature changes are additive and their sum is convergent to the total temperature change. The radiative energy flux perturbations due to the doubling of CO2 and water vapor feedback lead to a stronger warming in low latitudes than in high latitudes at the surface and throughout the entire troposphere. In the vertical, the temperature changes due to the doubling of CO2 and water vapor feedback are maximum near the surface and decrease with height at all latitudes. The simultaneous warming reduction in low latitudes and amplification in high latitudes by the enhanced poleward dry static energy transport reverses the poleward decreasing warming pattern at the surface and in the lower troposphere, but it is not able to do so in the upper troposphere. The enhanced vertical moist convection in the tropics acts to amplify the warming in the upper troposphere at an expense of reducing the warming in the lower troposphere and surface warming in the tropics. As a result, the final warming pattern shows the co-existence of a reduction of the meridional temperature gradient at the surface and in the lower troposphere with an increase of the meridional temperature gradient in the upper troposphere. In the tropics, the total warming in the upper troposphere is stronger than the surface warming.

  20. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-04-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period January 1, 2005 through March 31, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the renovation of the new Combustion Laboratory is nearly complete, and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building is in the final stages. Second, the fabrication and manufacture of the CFBC Facility is being discussed with a potential contractor. Discussions with potential contactor regarding the availability of materials and current machining capabilities have resulted in the modification of the original designs. The selection of the fabrication contractor for the CFBC Facility is expected during the next quarter. Third, co-firing experiments conducted with coal and chicken waste have been initiated in the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed facility. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described in this report.

  1. Benchtop Technologies for Circulating Tumor Cells Separation Based on Biophysical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Shi Low

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are tumor cells that have detached from primary tumor site and are transported via the circulation system. The importance of CTCs as prognostic biomarker is leveraged when multiple studies found that patient with cutoff of 5 CTCs per 7.5 mL blood has poor survival rate. Despite its clinical relevance, the isolation and characterization of CTCs can be quite challenging due to their large morphological variability and the rare presence of CTCs within the blood. Numerous methods have been employed and discussed in the literature for CTCs separation. In this paper, we will focus on label free CTCs isolation methods, in which the biophysical and biomechanical properties of cells (e.g., size, deformability, and electricity are exploited for CTCs detection. To assess the present state of various isolation methods, key performance metrics such as capture efficiency, cell viability, and throughput will be reported. Finally, we discuss the challenges and future perspectives of CTC isolation technologies.

  2. ESTABLISHMENT OF AN ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY WITH A CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTION SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Andy Wu; John T. Riley

    2005-07-30

    This purpose of this report is to present the progress made on the project ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period April 1, 2005 through June 30, 2005. The following tasks have been completed. First, the new Combustion Laboratory was occupied on June 15, 2005, and the construction of the Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Combustor Building is in the final painting stage. Second, the fabrication and manufacturing contract for the CFBC Facility was awarded to Sterling Boiler & Mechanical, Inc. of Evansville, Indiana. Sterling is manufacturing the assembly and component parts of the CFBC system. The erection of the CFBC system is expected to start September 1, 2005. Third, mercury emissions from the cofiring of coal and chicken waste was studied experimentally in the laboratory-scale simulated fluidized-bed combustion facility. The experimental results from this study are presented in this report. Finally, the proposed work for the next quarter is described.

  3. Development of pressurized internally circulating fluidized bed combustion technology; Kaatsu naibu junkan ryudosho boiler no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, I. [Center for Coal Utilization, Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Nagato, S.; Toyoda, S. [Ebara Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    The paper introduced support research on element technology needed for the design of hot models of the pressurized internally circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler in fiscal 1995 and specifications for testing facilities of 4MWt hot models after finishing the basic plan. The support research was conduced as follows: (a) In the test for analysis of cold model fluidization, it was confirmed that each characteristic value of hot models is higher than the target value. Further, calculation parameters required for computer simulation were measured and data on the design of air diffusion nozzle for 1 chamber wind box were sampled. (b) In the CWP conveyance characteristic survey, it was confirmed that it is possible to produce CWP having favorable properties. It was also confirmed that favorable conveyability can be maintained even if the piping size was reduced down to 25A. (c) In the gas pressure reducing test, basic data required for the design of gas pressure reducing equipment were sampled. Specifications for the fluidized bed combustion boiler of hot models are as follows: evaporation amount: 3070kg/h, steam pressure: 1.77MPa, fuel supply amount: 600kg-coal/h, boiler body: cylinder shape water tube internally circulating fluidized bed combustion boiler. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Analysing and combining atmospheric general circulation model simulations forced by prescribed SST: northern extratropical response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Maynard

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The ECHAM 3.2 (T21, ECHAM 4 (T30 and LMD (version 6, grid-point resolution with 96 longitudes × 72 latitudes atmospheric general circulation models were integrated through the period 1961 to 1993 forced with the same observed Sea Surface Temperatures (SSTs as compiled at the Hadley Centre. Three runs were made for each model starting from different initial conditions. The mid-latitude circulation pattern which maximises the covariance between the simulation and the observations, i.e. the most skilful mode, and the one which maximises the covariance amongst the runs, i.e. the most reproducible mode, is calculated as the leading mode of a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD analysis of observed and simulated Sea Level Pressure (SLP and geopotential height at 500 hPa (Z500 seasonal anomalies. A common response amongst the different models, having different resolution and parametrization should be considered as a more robust atmospheric response to SST than the same response obtained with only one model. A robust skilful mode is found mainly in December-February (DJF, and in June-August (JJA. In DJF, this mode is close to the SST-forced pattern found by Straus and Shukla (2000 over the North Pacific and North America with a wavy out-of-phase between the NE Pacific and the SE US on the one hand and the NE North America on the other. This pattern evolves in a NAO-like pattern over the North Atlantic and Europe (SLP and in a more N-S tripole on the Atlantic and European sector with an out-of-phase between the middle Europe on the one hand and the northern and southern parts on the other (Z500. There are almost no spatial shifts between either field around North America (just a slight eastward shift of the highest absolute heterogeneous correlations for SLP relative to the Z500 ones. The time evolution of the SST-forced mode is moderatly to strongly related to the ENSO/LNSO events but the spread amongst the ensemble of runs is not systematically related

  5. Classification of large circulating tumor cells isolated with ultra-high throughput microfluidic Vortex technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, James; Yu, Victor; Dhar, Manjima; Renier, Corinne; Matsumoto, Melissa; Heirich, Kyra; Garon, Edward B.; Goldman, Jonathan; Rao, Jianyu; Sledge, George W.; Pegram, Mark D.; Sheth, Shruti; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Sollier, Elodie; Di Carlo, Dino

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are emerging as rare but clinically significant non-invasive cellular biomarkers for cancer patient prognosis, treatment selection, and treatment monitoring. Current CTC isolation approaches, such as immunoaffinity, filtration, or size-based techniques, are often limited by throughput, purity, large output volumes, or inability to obtain viable cells for downstream analysis. For all technologies, traditional immunofluorescent staining alone has been employed to distinguish and confirm the presence of isolated CTCs among contaminating blood cells, although cells isolated by size may express vastly different phenotypes. Consequently, CTC definitions have been non-trivial, researcher-dependent, and evolving. Here we describe a complete set of objective criteria, leveraging well-established cytomorphological features of malignancy, by which we identify large CTCs. We apply the criteria to CTCs enriched from stage IV lung and breast cancer patient blood samples using the High Throughput Vortex Chip (Vortex HT), an improved microfluidic technology for the label-free, size-based enrichment and concentration of rare cells. We achieve improved capture efficiency (up to 83%), high speed of processing (8 mL/min of 10x diluted blood, or 800 μL/min of whole blood), and high purity (avg. background of 28.8±23.6 white blood cells per mL of whole blood). We show markedly improved performance of CTC capture (84% positive test rate) in comparison to previous Vortex designs and the current FDA-approved gold standard CellSearch assay. The results demonstrate the ability to quickly collect viable and pure populations of abnormal large circulating cells unbiased by molecular characteristics, which helps uncover further heterogeneity in these cells. PMID:26863573

  6. Effects of parasagittal meningiomas on intracranial venous circulation assessed by the virtual reality technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shousen; Ying, Jianbin; Wei, Liangfeng; Li, Shiqing; Jing, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    This study is to investigate the compensatory intracranial venous pathways in parasagittal meningiomas (PSM) patients by virtual reality technology. A total of 48 PSM patients (tumor group) and 20 patients with trigeminal neuralgia and hemifacial spasm but without intracranial venous diseases (control group) were enrolled. All patients underwent 3D CE-MRV examination. The 3D reconstructed images by virtual reality technology were used for assessment of diameter and number of intracranial veins, tumor location, venous sinus invasion degree and collateral circulation formation. Diameter of bridging veins in posterior 1/3 superior sagittal sinus (SSS) in tumor group was significantly smaller than that of the control group (P < 0.05). For tumors located in mid 1/3 SSS, diameter of bridging veins and vein of Labbé (VL) in posterior 1/3 SSS decreased significantly (P < 0.05). For tumors located in posterior 1/3 SSS, bridging vein number and transverse sinus (TS) diameter significantly decreased while superficial Sylvian vein (SSV) diameter increased significantly (P < 0.05). Compared with tumor in posterior 1/3 SSS subgroup, number of bridging veins in the tumor in mid 1/3 SSS subgroup increased significantly (P < 0.05). Compared with control group, only the bridging vein number in anterior 1/3 SSS segment in invasion Type 3-4 tumor subgroup decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Diameter of TS and bridging veins in posterior 1/3 SSS segment in sinus invasion Type 5-6 tumor subgroup decreased significantly (P < 0.05). Compared with control group, only the diameter of VL and TS of collateral circulation Grade 1 tumor subgroup decreased significantly (P < 0.05) while in Grade 3 tumor subgroup, TS diameter decreased and SSV diameter increased significantly (P < 0.05). The intracranial blood flow is mainly drained through SSV drainage after SSS occlusion by PSM.

  7. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2009-04-10

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterizes aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (Ta) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between Ta and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to the representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and Ta as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld - Ta relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between Ta and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - Ta relationship show a strong positive correlation between Ta and fcld The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of Ta, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd

  8. Application of blocking diagnosis methods to general circulation models. Part I: a novel detection scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriopedro, D. [Universidade de Lisboa, CGUL-IDL, Faculdade de Ciencias, Ed. C-8, Lisbon (Portugal); Universidad de Extremadura, Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Badajoz (Spain); Garcia-Herrera, R. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica de la Tierra II, Facultad de C.C. Fisicas, Madrid (Spain); Trigo, R.M. [Universidade de Lisboa, CGUL-IDL, Faculdade de Ciencias, Ed. C-8, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2010-12-15

    to General Circulation Models where observational thresholds may be unsuitable due to the presence of model bias. Part II of this study deals with a specific implementation of this novel method to simulations of the ECHO-G global climate model. (orig.)

  9. The GEM-Mars general circulation model for Mars: Description and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neary, L.; Daerden, F.

    2018-01-01

    GEM-Mars is a gridpoint-based three-dimensional general circulation model (GCM) of the Mars atmosphere extending from the surface to approximately 150 km based on the GEM (Global Environmental Multiscale) model, part of the operational weather forecasting and data assimilation system for Canada. After the initial modification for Mars, the model has undergone considerable changes. GEM-Mars is now based on GEM 4.2.0 and many physical parameterizations have been added for Mars-specific atmospheric processes and surface-atmosphere exchange. The model simulates interactive carbon dioxide-, dust-, water- and atmospheric chemistry cycles. Dust and water ice clouds are radiatively active. Size distributed dust is lifted by saltation and dust devils. The model includes 16 chemical species (CO2, Argon, N2, O2, CO, H2O, CH4, O3, O(1D), O, H, H2, OH, HO2, H2O2 and O2(a1Δg)) and has fully interactive photochemistry (15 reactions) and gas-phase chemistry (31 reactions). GEM-Mars provides a good simulation of the water and ozone cycles. A variety of other passive tracers can be included for dedicated studies, such as the emission of methane. The model has both a hydrostatic and non-hydrostatic formulation, and together with a flexible grid definition provides a single platform for simulations on a variety of horizontal scales. The model code is fully parallelized using OMP and MPI. Model results are evaluated by comparison to a selection of observations from instruments on the surface and in orbit, relating to atmosphere and surface temperature and pressure, dust and ice content, polar ice mass, polar argon, and global water and ozone vertical columns. GEM-Mars will play an integral part in the analysis and interpretation of data that is received by the NOMAD spectrometer on the ESA-Roskosmos ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter. The present paper provides an overview of the current status and capabilities of the GEM-Mars model and lays the foundations for more in-depth studies in support

  10. Improving the representation of turbulence and clouds in cloud resolving models and general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Peter A.

    Over the past few years a new type of general circulation model (GCM) has emerged that is known as the multiscale modeling framework (MMF). The Colorado State University (CSU) MMF represents a coupling between the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) GCM and the System of Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) cloud resolving model (CRM). Within this MMF the embedded CRM replaces the traditionally used parameterized moist physics in CAM to represent subgrid-scale (SGS) convection. However, due to substantial increases of computational burden associated with the MMF, the embedded CRM is typically run with a horizontal grid size of 4 km. With a horizontal grid size of 4 km, a low-order closure CRM cannot adequately represent shallow convective processes, such as trade-wind cumulus or stratocumulus. A computationally inexpensive parameterization of turbulence and clouds is presented in this dissertation. An extensive a priori test is performed to determine which functional form of an assumed PDF is best suited for coarse-grid CRMs for both deep shallow and deep convection. The diagnostic approach to determine the input moments needed for the assumed PDFs uses the subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) as the basis for the parameterization. The term known as the turbulent length scale (L) is examined, as it is needed to parameterize the dissipation of turbulence and therefore is needed to better balance the budgets of SGS TKE. A new formulation of this term is added to the model code which appears to be able to partition resolved and SGS TKE fairly accurately. Results from "offline" tests of the simple diagnostic closure within SAM shows that the cloud and turbulence properties of shallow convection can be adequately represented when compared to large eddy simulation (LES) benchmark simulations. Results are greatly improved when compared to the standard version of SAM. The preliminary test of the scheme within the embedded CRM of the MMF shows promising results with the

  11. The significance of cloud-radiative forcing to the general circulation on climate time scales - A satellite interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju; Smith, Eric A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of cloud- and surface-atmosphere forcing on the net radiation balance and their potential impact on the general circulation at climate time scales. The globally averaged cloud-forcing estimates and cloud sensitivity values taken from various recent studies are summarized. It is shown that the net radiative heating over the tropics is principally due to high clouds, while the net cooling in mid- and high latitudes is dominated by low and middle clouds.

  12. THE ROLE OF THE PUBLIC SECTOR IN TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT: GENERALIZATIONS FROM GENERAL PURPOSE TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Ruttan, Vernon W.

    2001-01-01

    In the new science and technology policy literature that emerged in the early 1980s it was held, while public support for science is appropriate, public support for technology development represents an unproductive use of public resources. The perspective that emerges in my recent book, Technology, Growth and Development: An Induced Innovation Perspective is quite different. Government has played an important role in technology development and transfer in almost every U.S. industry that has b...

  13. Contactless Patient Monitoring for General Wards: A Systematic Technology Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naziyok, Tolga P; Zeleke, Atinkut A; Röhrig, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Sudden, serious life-threatening situations happen even on general wards. Current technologies are working with sensors which are attached to every patient, which is a source of failures and false alarms. The goal of this review was to assess the state of the art of potential techniques for contactless patient monitoring in general wards. The MEDLINE database was used for literature retrieval. 453 unique references screened, 34 research articles met inclusion criteria. Ballistocardiography, Radar and Thermography technologies are the most widely tested techniques. The Majority of the studies are done in a laboratory setting. No study shows the feasibility of one contactless monitoring technology over the distance required for monitoring rooms. Today no technology is feasible. A combination of technologies may become feasible in 10 or more years, until then we have to think about ethical and privacy issues of these pervasive technologies.

  14. The Hamburg large scale geostrophic ocean general circulation model. Cycle 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier-Reimer, E.; Mikolajewicz, U.

    1992-02-01

    The rationale for the Large Scale Geostrophic ocean circulation model (LSG-OGCM) is based on the observations that for a large scale ocean circulation model designed for climate studies, the relevant characteristic spatial scales are large compared with the internal Rossby radius throughout most of the ocean, while the characteristic time scales are large compared with the periods of gravity modes and barotropic Rossby wave modes. In the present version of the model, the fast modes have been filtered out by a conventional technique of integrating the full primitive equations, including all terms except the nonlinear advection of momentum, by an implicit time integration method. The free surface is also treated prognostically, without invoking a rigid lid approximation. The numerical scheme is unconditionally stable and has the additional advantage that it can be applied uniformly to the entire globe, including the equatorial and coastal current regions. (orig.)

  15. Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Grandey, Benjamin; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2010-03-12

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterises aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth ({tau}{sub a}) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (N{sub d}) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between {tau}{sub a} and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. This suggests that the implementation of the second aerosol indirect effect mainly in terms of an autoconversion parameterisation has to be revisited in the GCMs. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (f{sub cld}) and {tau}{sub a} as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong f{sub cld} - {tau}{sub a} relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as a unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between {tau}{sub a} and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - {tau}{sub a} relationship show a strong positive correlation between {tau}{sub a} and f{sub cld} The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is

  16. Aerosol indirect effects – general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, T.; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, A.; Lohmann, U.; Bellouin, N.; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, A.; Feingold, G.; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Y.; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, P.; Stier, P.; Grandey, B.; Feichter, J.; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, D.; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, A.; Iversen, T.; Seland, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Lamarque, J. F.; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.

    2009-11-16

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated in the present study using three satellite datasets. The satellite datasets are taken as reference bearing in mind that cloud and aerosol retrievals include uncertainties. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (τa) and various cloud and radiation quantities consistently in models and satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over oceans. The relationship between τa and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to rep¬resentation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive re¬lationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and τa as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly in most of them. In a discussion of the hypo¬theses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld – τa relation¬ship, we find that none is unequivocally confirmed by our results. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between τa and cloud top tem¬perature and outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - τa relationship show a strong positive cor¬relation between τa and cloud fraction. The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of τa, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the short

  17. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2008-05-31

    On February 14, 2002, President Bush announced the Clear Skies Initiative, a legislative proposal to control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and mercury from power plants. In response to this initiative, the National Energy Technology Laboratory organized a Combustion Technology University Alliance and hosted a Solid Fuel Combustion Technology Alliance Workshop. The workshop identified multi-pollutant control; improved sorbents and catalysts; mercury monitoring and capture; and improved understanding of the underlying reaction chemistry occurring during combustion as the most pressing research needs related to controlling environmental emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The Environmental Control Technology Laboratory will help meet these challenges and offer solutions for problems associated with emissions from fossil-fueled power plants. The goal of this project was to develop the capability and technology database needed to support municipal, regional, and national electric power generating facilities to improve the efficiency of operation and solve operational and environmental problems. In order to effectively provide the scientific data and the methodologies required to address these issues, the project included the following aspects: (1) Establishing an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory using a laboratory-scale, simulated fluidized-bed combustion (FBC) system; (2) Designing, constructing, and operating a bench-scale (0.6 MW{sub th}), circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC) system as the main component of the Environmental Control Technology Laboratory; (3) Developing a combustion technology for co-firing municipal solid waste (MSW), agricultural waste, and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) with high sulfur coals; (4) Developing a control strategy for gaseous emissions, including NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}, organic compounds, and heavy metals; and (5) Developing new mercury capturing sorbents and new

  18. Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei-Ping Pan; Zhongxian Cheng; Yan Cao; John Smith

    2006-09-30

    This report is to present the progress made on the project entitled ''Establishment of an Environmental Control Technology Laboratory (ECTL) with a Circulating Fluidized-Bed Combustion (CFBC) System'' during the period July 1, 2006 through September 30, 2006. The following activities have been completed: the steel floor grating around the riser in all levels and the three-phase power supply for CFBC System was installed. Erection of downcomers, loop seals, ash bunker, thermal expansion joints, fuel and bed material bunkers with load cells, rotary air-lock valves and fuel flow monitors is underway. Pilot-scale slipstream tests conducted with bromine compound addition were performed for two typical types of coal. The purposes of the tests were to study the effect of bromine addition on mercury oxidization. From the test results, it was observed that there was a strong oxidization effect for Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The proposed work for next quarter and project schedule are also described.

  19. The LMDZ4 general circulation model: climate performance and sensitivity to parametrized physics with emphasis on tropical convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hourdin, Frederic; Musat, Ionela; Bony, Sandrine; Codron, Francis; Dufresne, Jean-Louis; Fairhead, Laurent; Grandpeix, Jean-Yves; LeVan, Phu; Li, Zhao-Xin; Lott, Francois [CNRS/UPMC, Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD/IPSL), Paris Cedex 05 (France); Braconnot, Pascale; Friedlingstein, Pierre [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l' Environnement (LSCE/IPSL), Saclay (France); Filiberti, Marie-Angele [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL), Paris (France); Krinner, Gerhard [Laboratoire de Glaciologie et Geophysique de l' Environnement, Grenoble (France)

    2006-12-15

    The LMDZ4 general circulation model is the atmospheric component of the IPSL-CM4 coupled model which has been used to perform climate change simulations for the 4th IPCC assessment report. The main aspects of the model climatology (forced by observed sea surface temperature) are documented here, as well as the major improvements with respect to the previous versions, which mainly come form the parametrization of tropical convection. A methodology is proposed to help analyse the sensitivity of the tropical Hadley-Walker circulation to the parametrization of cumulus convection and clouds. The tropical circulation is characterized using scalar potentials associated with the horizontal wind and horizontal transport of geopotential (the Laplacian of which is proportional to the total vertical momentum in the atmospheric column). The effect of parametrized physics is analysed in a regime sorted framework using the vertical velocity at 500 hPa as a proxy for large scale vertical motion. Compared to Tiedtke's convection scheme, used in previous versions, the Emanuel's scheme improves the representation of the Hadley-Walker circulation, with a relatively stronger and deeper large scale vertical ascent over tropical continents, and suppresses the marked patterns of concentrated rainfall over oceans. Thanks to the regime sorted analyses, these differences are attributed to intrinsic differences in the vertical distribution of convective heating, and to the lack of self-inhibition by precipitating downdraughts in Tiedtke's parametrization. Both the convection and cloud schemes are shown to control the relative importance of large scale convection over land and ocean, an important point for the behaviour of the coupled model. (orig.)

  20. Seasonal Water Transport in the Atmosphere of Mars: Applications of a Mars General Circulation Model Using Mars Global Surveyor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.; Bridger, Alison F. C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1999-01-01

    This is a Final Report for a Joint Research Interchange (JRI) between NASA Ames Research Center and San Jose State University, Department of Meteorology. We present below a summary of progress made during the duration of this JRI. The focus of this JRI has been to investigate seasonal water vapor transport in the atmosphere of Mars and its effects on the planet's present climate. To this end, the primary task has been to adapt a new dynamical processor for the adiabatic tendencies of the atmospheric circulation into the NASA Ames Mars general circulation model (MGCM). Using identical boundary and initial conditions, several comparative tests between the new and old MGCMs have been performed and the nature of the simulated circulations have been diagnosed. With confidence that the updated version of the Ames MGCM produces quite similar mean and eddy circulation statistics, the new climate model is well poised as a tool to pursue fundamental questions related to the spatial and seasonal variations of atmospheric water vapor on Mars, and to explore exchanges of water with non-atmospheric reservoirs and transport within its atmosphere. In particular, the role of surface sources and sinks can be explored, the range of water-vapor saturation altitudes can be investigated, and plausible precipitation mechanisms can be studied, for a range of atmospheric dust loadings. Such future investigations can contribute to a comprehensive study of surface inventories, exchange mechanisms, and the relative importance of atmospheric transport Mars' water cycle. A listing of presentations made and manuscripts submitted during the course of this project is provided.

  1. A Coupled Ocean General Circulation, Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model of the Global Oceans: Seasonal Distributions of Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Busalacchi, Antonio (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ocean general circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. Biogeochemical processes in the model are determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability. and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms. chlorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Basin scale (greater than 1000 km) model chlorophyll results are in overall agreement with CZCS pigments in many global regions. Seasonal variability observed in the CZCS is also represented in the model. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of imagery are generally in conformance although occasional departures are apparent. Model nitrate distributions agree with in situ data, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The overall agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicates that the model dynamics offer a reasonably realistic simulation of phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on synoptic scales. This is especially true given that initial conditions are homogenous chlorophyll fields. The success of the model in producing a reasonable representation of chlorophyll and nutrient distributions and seasonal variability in the global oceans is attributed to the application of a generalized, processes-driven approach as opposed to regional parameterization and the existence of multiple phytoplankton groups with different physiological and physical properties. These factors enable the model to simultaneously represent many aspects of the great diversity of physical, biological, chemical, and radiative environments encountered in the global oceans.

  2. Influence of various forcings on global climate in historical times using a coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stendel, Martin; Mogensen, Irene A.; Christensen, Jens H.

    2006-01-01

    The results of a simulation of the climate of the last five centuries with a state-of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model are presented. The model has been driven with most relevant forcings, both natural (solar variability, volcanic aerosol) and anthropogenic (greenhouse...... gases, sulphate aerosol, land-use changes). In contrast to previous GCM studies, we have taken into account the latitudinal dependence of volcanic aerosol and the changing land cover for a period covering several centuries. We find a clear signature of large volcanic eruptions in the simulated...

  3. River-flow predictions for the South African mid-summer using a coupled general circulation model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Olivier, C

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available , R.C., Griffes, S.M. (1998) MOM 3.0 manual. NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, 608 pp. Roeckner, E.K., Arpe, L., Bengtsson, M., Christoph, M., Claussen, L., Dűmenil, M., Esch, M., Giorgetta and Schulzwedia, U. (1996... GENERAL CIRCULATION MODEL C Olivier1, WA Landman2, AF Beraki1 South African Weather Service, Pretoria, 0181, South Africa1 Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria, 0184, South Africa2 There are limited sources of streamflow data...

  4. An assessment of General Aviation utilization of advanced avionics technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinby, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    Needs of the general aviation industry for services and facilities which might be supplied by NASA were examined. In the data collection phase, twenty-one individuals from nine manufacturing companies in general aviation were interviewed against a carefully prepared meeting format. General aviation avionics manufacturers were credited with a high degree of technology transfer from the forcing industries such as television, automotive, and computers and a demonstrated ability to apply advanced technology such as large scale integration and microprocessors to avionics functions in an innovative and cost effective manner. The industry's traditional resistance to any unnecessary regimentation or standardization was confirmed. Industry's self sufficiency in applying advanced technology to avionics product development was amply demonstrated. NASA research capability could be supportive in areas of basic mechanics of turbulence in weather and alternative means for its sensing.

  5. Effect of cloud-radiation feedback on the climate of a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, J.; Sud, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments are described which show significant changes in the simulated large-scale dynamical circulation of a global model. Fixed clouds acting as zonally asymmetric radiative heat sources increase the generation of eddy available potential energy (EAPE) and the energy's conversion to eddy kinetic energy. Generation of EAPE by net radiative heating increases by 50% (0.11 W/sq m) for the fixed cloud experiment. The increase caused by the stationary component is much larger (approximately 100%), but it is partially compensated by a decrease caused by the transient component. A substantial increase is found in the variances of the planetary-scale stationary waves and the medium-scale waves of 2.7 day period. Although the sea surface temperatures are prescribed identically in both integrations, the changes in evaporation and precipitation are found to be much larger over the oceans than over the land.

  6. The General Design and Technology Innovations of CAP1400

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Mingguang; Yan, Jinquan; Jun, Shentu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Xujia; Qiu, Zhongming

    2017-01-01

    The pressurized water reactor CAP1400 is one of the sixteen National Science and Technology Major Projects. Developed from China's nuclear R&D system and manufacturing capability, as well as AP1000 technology introduction and assimilation, CAP1400 is an advanced large passive nuclear power plant with independent intellectual property rights. By discussing the top design principle, main performance objectives, general parameters, safety design, and important improvements in safety, economy, an...

  7. Conceptual design of an active magnetic regenerative heat circulator based on self-heat recuperation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotani, Yui; Kansha, Yasuki; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    A conceptual design of an active magnetic regenerative (AMR) heat circulator for self-heat recuperation to realize energy savings in thermal processes is proposed. The process fluid heat is recuperated by the magnetocaloric effect of ferromagnetic material through the AMR heat circulation cycle. In an AMR heat circulator, all the process fluid heat is circulated and no make-up heat is added to raise the process fluid to its set temperature. A one-dimensional mathematical model of the AMR heat circulator was constructed to understand its behavior and verify its energy-saving potential. From the constructed one-dimensional mathematical model, it is seen that AMR heat circulator has potential to drastically reduce the total energy consumption in a thermal process. The temperature–entropy diagram shows that in order to gain the maximum energy saving, optimization of the parameters such as the flow rate and geometry of the ferromagnetic working material beds is needed. - Highlights: • Self-heat recuperative active magnetic regenerative heat circulator is introduced. • One-dimensional model is constructed to verify its energy-saving potential. • Total energy consumption in thermal process is drastically reduced. • Further energy can be saved by reducing the overlapping of thermodynamic cycles

  8. Effect of general anaesthesia on functional outcome in patients with anterior circulation ischaemic stroke having endovascular thrombectomy versus standard care: a meta-analysis of individual patient data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campbell, Bruce C. V.; van Zwam, Wim H.; Goyal, Mayank; Menon, Bijoy K.; Dippel, Diederik W. J.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Bracard, Serge; White, Philip; Dávalos, Antoni; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; van der Lugt, Aad; Ford, Gary A.; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Kelly, Michael; Bourcier, Romain; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.; Bang, Oh Young; Nogueira, Raul G.; Devlin, Thomas G.; van den Berg, Lucie A.; Clarençon, Frédéric; Burns, Paul; Carpenter, Jeffrey; Berkhemer, Olvert A.; Yavagal, Dileep R.; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Ducrocq, Xavier; Dixit, Anand; Quesada, Helena; Epstein, Jonathan; Davis, Stephen M.; Jansen, Olav; Rubiera, Marta; Urra, Xabier; Micard, Emilien; Lingsma, Hester F.; Naggara, Olivier; Brown, Scott; Guillemin, Francis; Muir, Keith W.; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J.; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Jovin, Tudor G.; Hill, Michael D.; Mitchell, Peter J.; Fransen, Puck Ss; Beumer, Debbie; Yoo, Albert J.; Schonewille, Wouter J.; Vos, Jan Albert; Nederkoorn, Paul J.; Wermer, Marieke Jh; van Walderveen, Marianne Aa; Staals, Julie; Hofmeijer, Jeannette; van Oostayen, Jacques A.; Lycklama à Nijeholt, Geert J.; Boiten, Jelis; Brouwer, Patrick A.; Emmer, Bart J.; de Bruijn, Sebastiaan F.; van Dijk, Lukas C.; Kappelle, Jaap; Lo, Rob H.; van Dijk, Ewoud J.; de Vries, Joost; de Kort, Paul L. M.; van Rooij, Willem Jan J.; van den Berg, Jan S. P.; van Hasselt, Boudewijn A. A. M.; Aerden, Leo A. M.; Dallinga, René J.; Visser, Marieke C.; Bot, Joseph C. J.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Eshghi, Omid; Schreuder, Tobien H. C. M. L.; Heijboer, Roel J. J.; Keizer, Koos; Tielbeek, Alexander V.; den Hertog, Heleen M.; Gerrits, Dick G.; van den Berg-Vos, Renske M.; Karas, Giorgos B.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Flach, Zwenneke; Marquering, Henk A.; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; Jenniskens, Sjoerd F. M.; Beenen, Ludo F. M.; van den Berg, René; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Brown, Martin M.; Liebig, Thomas; Stijnen, Theo; Andersson, Tommy; Mattle, Heinrich; Wahlgren, Nils; van der Heijden, Esther; Ghannouti, Naziha; Fleitour, Nadine; Hooijenga, Imke; Puppels, Corina; Pellikaan, Wilma; Geerling, Annet; Lindl-Velema, Annemieke; van Vemde, Gina; de Ridder, Ans; Greebe, Paut; de Bont-Stikkelbroeck, José; de Meris, Joke; Janssen, Kirsten; Struijk, Willy; Licher, Silvan; Boodt, Nikki; Ros, Adriaan; Venema, Esmee; Slokkers, Ilse; Ganpat, Raymie-Jayce; Mulder, Maxim; Saiedie, Nawid; Heshmatollah, Alis; Schipperen, Stefanie; Vinken, Stefan; van Boxtel, Tiemen; Koets, Jeroen; Boers, Merel; Santos, Emilie; Borst, Jordi; Jansen, Ivo; Kappelhof, Manon; Lucas, Marit; Geuskens, Ralph; Barros, Renan Sales; Dobbe, Roeland; Csizmadia, Marloes; Hill, M. D.; Goyal, M.; Demchuk, A. M.; Menon, B. K.; Eesa, M.; Ryckborst, K. J.; Wright, M. R.; Kamal, N. R.; Andersen, L.; Randhawa, P. A.; Stewart, T.; Patil, S.; Minhas, P.; Almekhlafi, M.; Mishra, S.; Clement, F.; Sajobi, T.; Shuaib, A.; Montanera, W. J.; Roy, D.; Silver, F. L.; Jovin, T. G.; Frei, D. F.; Sapkota, B.; Rempel, J. L.; Thornton, J.; Williams, D.; Tampieri, D.; Poppe, A. Y.; Dowlatshahi, D.; Wong, J. H.; Mitha, A. P.; Subramaniam, S.; Hull, G.; Lowerison, M. W.; Salluzzi, M.; Maxwell, M.; Lacusta, S.; Drupals, E.; Armitage, K.; Barber, P. A.; Smith, E. E.; Morrish, W. F.; Coutts, S. B.; Derdeyn, C.; Demaerschalk, B.; Yavagal, D.; Martin, R.; Brant, R.; Yu, Y.; Willinsky, R. A.; Weill, A.; Kenney, C.; Aram, H.; Stys, P. K.; Watson, T. W.; Klein, G.; Pearson, D.; Couillard, P.; Trivedi, A.; Singh, D.; Klourfeld, E.; Imoukhuede, O.; Nikneshan, D.; Blayney, S.; Reddy, R.; Choi, P.; Horton, M.; Musuka, T.; Dubuc, V.; Field, T. S.; Desai, J.; Adatia, S.; Alseraya, A.; Nambiar, V.; van Dijk, R.; Newcommon, N. J.; Schwindt, B.; Butcher, K. S.; Jeerakathil, T.; Buck, B.; Khan, K.; Naik, S. S.; Emery, D. 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S.; Boo, S.; Rai, A.; Roberts, T.; Tarabishy, A.; Gutmann, L.; Brooks, C.; Brick, J.; Domico, J.; Reimann, G.; Hinrichs, K.; Becker, M.; Heiss, E.; Selle, C.; Witteler, A.; Al'Boutros, S.; Danch, M.-J.; Ranft, A.; Rohde, S.; Burg, K.; Weimar, C.; Zegarac, V.; Hartmann, C.; Schlamann, M.; Göricke, S.; Ringlestein, A.; Wanke, I.; Mönninghoff, C.; Dietzold, M.; Budzik, R.; Davis, T.; Eubank, G.; Hicks, W. J.; Pema, P.; Vora, N.; Mejilla, J.; Taylor, M.; Clark, W.; Rontal, A.; Fields, J.; Peterson, B.; Nesbit, G.; Lutsep, H.; Bozorgchami, H.; Priest, R.; Ologuntoye, O.; Barnwell, S.; Dogan, A.; Herrick, K.; Takahasi, C.; Beadell, N.; Brown, B.; Jamieson, S.; Hussain, M. 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T.; Putnam, J.; Bhatt, A.; Kansara, A.; Caceves, D.; Lowenkopf, T.; Yanase, L.; Zurasky, J.; Dancer, S.; Freeman, B.; Scheibe Mirek, T.; Robison, J.; Roll, J.; Clark, D.; Rodriguez, M.; Fitzsimmons, B.-Fm; Zaidat, O.; Lynch, J. R.; Lazzaro, M.; Larson, T.; Padmore, L.; Das, E.; Farrow Schmidt, A.; Hassan, A.; Tekle, W.; Cate, C.; Jansen, O.; Cnyrim, C.; Wodarg, F.; Wiese, C.; Binder, A.; Riedel, C.; Rohr, A.; Lang, N.; Laufs, H.; Krieter, S.; Remonda, L.; Diepers, M.; Añon, J.; Nedeltchev, K.; Kahles, T.; Biethahn, S.; Lindner, M.; Chang, V.; Gächter, C.; Esperon, C.; Guglielmetti, M.; Arenillas Lara, J. F.; Martínez Galdámez, M.; Calleja Sanz, A. I.; Cortijo Garcia, E.; Garcia Bermejo, P.; Perez, S.; Mulero Carrillo, P.; Crespo Vallejo, E.; Ruiz Piñero, M.; Lopez Mesonero, L.; Reyes Muñoz, F. 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G.; Elnour, E.; El Zammar, Z.; Villwock, M.; Farid, H.; Balgude, A.; Cross, L.; Hansen, K.; Holtmannspötter, M.; Kondziella, D.; Hoejgaard, J.; Taudorf, S.; Soendergaard, H.; Wagner, A.; Cronquist, M.; Stavngaard, T.; Cortsen, M.; Krarup, L. H.; Hyldal, T.; Haring, H.-P.; Guggenberger, S.; Hamberger, M.; Trenkler, J.; Sonnberger, M.; Nussbaumer, K.; Dominger, C.; Bach, E.; Jagadeesan, B. D.; TAYLOR, R.; Kim, J.; Shea, K.; Tummala, R.; Zacharatos, H.; Sandhu, D.; Ezzeddine, M.; Grande, A.; Hildebrandt, D.; Miller, K.; Scherber, J.; Hendrickson, A.; Jumaa, M.; Zaidi, S.; Hendrickson, T.; Snyder, V.; Killer Oberpfalzer, M.; Mutzenbach, J.; Weymayr, F.; Broussalis, E.; Stadler, K.; Jedlitschka, A.; Malek, A.; Mueller Kronast, N.; Beck, P.; Martin, C.; Summers, D.; Day, J.; Bettinger, I.; Holloway, W.; Olds, K.; Arkin, S.; Akhtar, N.; Boutwell, C.; Crandall, S.; Schwartzman, M.; Weinstein, C.; Brion, B.; Prothmann, S.; Kleine, J.; Kreiser, K.; Boeckh Behrens, T.; Poppert, H.; Wunderlich, S.; Koch, M. L.; Biberacher, V.; Huberle, A.; Gora Stahlberg, G.; Knier, B.; Meindl, T.; Utpadel Fischler, D.; Zech, M.; Kowarik, M.; Seifert, C.; Schwaiger, B.; Puri, A.; Hou, S.; Wakhloo, A.; Moonis, M.; Henniger, N.; Goddeau, R.; Massari, F.; Minaeian, A.; Lozano, J. 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A.; Aja, L.; Serena, J.; Cobo, E.; Lees, Kennedy R.; Arenillas, J.; Roberts, R.; Al-Ajlan, F.; Zimmel, L.; Patel, S.; Martí-Fàbregas, J.; Salvat-Plana, M.; Bracard, S.; Anxionnat, René; Baillot, Pierre-Alexandre; Barbier, Charlotte; Derelle, Anne-Laure; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Richard, Sébastien; Samson, Yves; Sourour, Nader; Baronnet-Chauvet, Flore; Clarencon, Frédéric; Crozier, Sophie; Deltour, Sandrine; Di Maria, Federico; Le Bouc, Raphael; Leger, Anne; Mutlu, Gurkan; Rosso, Charlotte; Szatmary, Zoltan; Yger, Marion; Zavanone, Chiara; Bakchine, Serge; Pierot, Laurent; Caucheteux, Nathalie; Estrade, Laurent; Kadziolka, Krzysztof; Leautaud, Alexandre; Renkes, Céline; Serre, Isabelle; Desal, Hubert; Guillon, Benoît; Boutoleau-Bretonniere, Claire; Daumas-Duport, Benjamin; de Gaalon, Solène; Derkinderen, Pascal; Evain, Sarah; Herisson, Fanny; Laplaud, David-Axel; Lebouvier, Thibaud; Lintia-Gaultier, Alina; Pouclet-Courtemanche, Hélène; Rouaud, Tiphaine; Rouaud Jaffrenou, Violaine; Schunck, Aurélia; Sevin-Allouet, Mathieu; Toulgoat, Frederique; Wiertlewski, Sandrine; Gauvrit, Jean-Yves; Ronziere, Thomas; Cahagne, Vincent; Ferre, Jean-Christophe; Pinel, Jean-François; Raoult, Hélène; Mas, Jean-Louis; Meder, Jean-François; Al Najjar-Carpentier, Amen-Adam; Birchenall, Julia; Bodiguel, Eric; Calvet, David; Domigo, Valérie; Godon-Hardy, Sylvie; Guiraud, Vincent; Lamy, Catherine; Majhadi, Loubna; Morin, Ludovic; Trystram, Denis; Turc, Guillaume; Berge, Jérôme; Sibon, Igor; Menegon, Patrice; Barreau, Xavier; Rouanet, François; Debruxelles, Sabrina; Kazadi, Annabelle; Renou, Pauline; Fleury, Olivier; Pasco-Papon, Anne; Dubas, Frédéric; Caroff, Jildaz; Godard Ducceschi, Sophie; Hamon, Marie-Aurélie; Lecluse, Alderic; Marc, Guillaume; Giroud, Maurice; Ricolfi, Frédéric; Bejot, Yannick; Chavent, Adrien; Gentil, Arnaud; Kazemi, Apolline; Osseby, Guy-Victor; Voguet, Charlotte; Mahagne, Marie-Hélène; Sedat, Jacques; Chau, Yves; Suissa, Laurent; Lachaud, Sylvain; Houdart, Emmanuel; Stapf, Christian; 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Lapergue, Bertrand; Bourdain, Frédéric; Evrard, Serge; Graveleau, Philippe; Decroix, Jean Pierre; Wang, Adrien; Sellal, François; Ahle, Guido; Carelli, Gabriela; Dugay, Marie-Hélène; Gaultier, Claude; Lebedinsky, Ariel Pablo; Lita, Lavinia; Musacchio, Raul Mariano; Renglewicz-Destuynder, Catherine; Tournade, Alain; Vuillemet, Françis; Montoro, Francisco Macian; Mounayer, Charbel; Faugeras, Frederic; Gimenez, Laetitia; Labach, Catherine; Lautrette, Géraldine; Denier, Christian; Saliou, Guillaume; Chassin, Olivier; Dussaule, Claire; Melki, Elsa; Ozanne, Augustin; Puccinelli, Francesco; Sachet, Marina; Sarov, Mariana; Bonneville, Jean-François; Moulin, Thierry; Biondi, Alessandra; de Bustos Medeiros, Elisabeth; Vuillier, Fabrice; Courtheoux, Patrick; Viader, Fausto; Apoil-Brissard, Marion; Bataille, Mathieu; Bonnet, Anne-Laure; Cogez, Julien; Touze, Emmanuel; Leclerc, Xavier; Leys, Didier; Aggour, Mohamed; Aguettaz, Pierre; Bodenant, Marie; Cordonnier, Charlotte; Deplanque, Dominique; Girot, Marie; Henon, Hilde; Kalsoum, Erwah; Lucas, Christian; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Zuniga, Paolo; Arquizan, Caroline; Costalat, Vincent; Machi, Paolo; Mourand, Isabelle; Riquelme, Carlos; Bounolleau, Pierre; Arteaga, Charles; Faivre, Anthony; Bintner, Marc; Tournebize, Patrice; Charlin, Cyril; Darcel, Françoise; Gauthier-Lasalarie, Pascale; Jeremenko, Marcia; Mouton, Servane; Zerlauth, Jean-Baptiste; Lamy, Chantal; Hervé, Deramond; Hassan, Hosseini; Gaston, André; Barral, Francis-Guy; Garnier, Pierre; Beaujeux, Rémy; Wolff, Valérie; Herbreteau, Denis; Debiais, Séverine; Murray, Alicia; Ford, Gary; Clifton, Andy; Freeman, Janet; Ford, Ian; Markus, Hugh; Wardlaw, Joanna; Molyneux, Andy; Robinson, Thompson; Lewis, Steff; Norrie, John; Robertson, Fergus; Perry, Richard; Cloud, Geoffrey; Clifton, Andrew; Madigan, Jeremy; Roffe, Christine; Nayak, Sanjeev; Lobotesis, Kyriakos; Smith, Craig; Herwadkar, Amit; Kandasamy, Naga; Goddard, Tony; Bamford, John; Subramanian, Ganesh; Lenthall, Rob; Littleton, Edward; Lamin, Sal; Storey, Kelley; Ghatala, Rita; Banaras, Azra; Aeron-Thomas, John; Hazel, Bath; Maguire, Holly; Veraque, Emelda; Harrison, Louise; Keshvara, Rekha; Cunningham, James

    2018-01-01

    Background General anaesthesia (GA) during endovascular thrombectomy has been associated with worse patient outcomes in observational studies compared with patients treated without GA. We assessed functional outcome in ischaemic stroke patients with large vessel anterior circulation occlusion

  9. Plasma biomarker discovery in preeclampsia using a novel differential isolation technology for circulating extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kok Hian; Tan, Soon Sim; Sze, Siu Kwan; Lee, Wai Kheong Ryan; Ng, Mor Jack; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2014-10-01

    To circumvent the complex protein milieu of plasma and discover robust predictive biomarkers for preeclampsia (PE), we investigate if phospholipid-binding ligands can reduce the milieu complexity by extracting plasma extracellular vesicles for biomarker discovery. Cholera toxin B chain (CTB) and annexin V (AV) which respectively binds GM1 ganglioside and phosphatidylserine were used to isolate extracellular vesicles from plasma of PE patients and healthy pregnant women. The proteins in the vesicles were identified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, antibody array, and mass spectrometry. CTB and AV were found to bind 2 distinct groups of extracellular vesicles. Antibody array and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that PE patients had elevated levels of CD105, interleukin-6, placental growth factor, tissue inhibitor of metallopeptidase 1, and atrial natriuretic peptide in cholera toxin B- but not AV-vesicles, and elevated levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, pro-calcitonin, S100b, tumor growth factor β, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1, brain natriuretic peptide, and placental growth factor in both cholera toxin B- and AV-vesicles. CD9 level was elevated in cholera toxin B-vesicles but reduced in AV vesicles of PE patients. Proteome analysis revealed that in cholera toxin B-vesicles, 87 and 222 proteins were present only in PE patients and healthy pregnant women respectively while in AV-vesicles, 104 and 157 proteins were present only in PE and healthy pregnant women, respectively. This study demonstrated for the first time that CTB and AV bind unique extracellular vesicles, and their protein cargo reflects the disease state of the patient. The successful use of these 2 ligands to isolate circulating plasma extracellular vesicles for biomarker discovery in PE represents a novel technology for biomarker discovery that can be applied to other specialties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CO-PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY USING PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen Fan

    2006-05-30

    Foster Wheeler has completed work under a U.S. Department of Energy cooperative agreement to develop a gasification equipment module that can serve as a building block for a variety of advanced, coal-fueled plants. When linked with other equipment blocks also under development, studies have shown that Foster Wheeler's gasification module can enable an electric generating plant to operate with an efficiency exceeding 60 percent (coal higher heating value basis) while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The heart of the equipment module is a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) that is used to gasify the coal; it can operate with either air or oxygen and produces a coal-derived syngas without the formation of corrosive slag or sticky ash that can reduce plant availabilities. Rather than fuel a gas turbine for combined cycle power generation, the syngas can alternatively be processed to produce clean fuels and or chemicals. As a result, the study described herein was conducted to determine the performance and economics of using the syngas to produce hydrogen for sale to a nearby refinery in a hydrogen-electricity co-production plant setting. The plant is fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, produces 99.95 percent pure hydrogen at a rate of 260 tons per day and generates 255 MWe of power for sale. Based on an electricity sell price of $45/MWhr, the hydrogen has a 10-year levelized production cost of $6.75 per million Btu; this price is competitive with hydrogen produced by steam methane reforming at a natural gas price of $4/MMBtu. Hence, coal-fueled, PCFB gasifier-based plants appear to be a viable means for either high efficiency power generation or co-production of hydrogen and electricity. This report describes the PCFB gasifier-based plant, presents its performance and economics, and compares it to other coal-based and natural gas based hydrogen production technologies.

  11. JIGSAW-GEO (1.0): locally orthogonal staggered unstructured grid generation for general circulation modelling on the sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engwirda, Darren

    2017-06-01

    An algorithm for the generation of non-uniform, locally orthogonal staggered unstructured spheroidal grids is described. This technique is designed to generate very high-quality staggered Voronoi-Delaunay meshes appropriate for general circulation modelling on the sphere, including applications to atmospheric simulation, ocean-modelling and numerical weather prediction. Using a recently developed Frontal-Delaunay refinement technique, a method for the construction of high-quality unstructured spheroidal Delaunay triangulations is introduced. A locally orthogonal polygonal grid, derived from the associated Voronoi diagram, is computed as the staggered dual. It is shown that use of the Frontal-Delaunay refinement technique allows for the generation of very high-quality unstructured triangulations, satisfying a priori bounds on element size and shape. Grid quality is further improved through the application of hill-climbing-type optimisation techniques. Overall, the algorithm is shown to produce grids with very high element quality and smooth grading characteristics, while imposing relatively low computational expense. A selection of uniform and non-uniform spheroidal grids appropriate for high-resolution, multi-scale general circulation modelling are presented. These grids are shown to satisfy the geometric constraints associated with contemporary unstructured C-grid-type finite-volume models, including the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS-O). The use of user-defined mesh-spacing functions to generate smoothly graded, non-uniform grids for multi-resolution-type studies is discussed in detail.

  12. Investigating the Climate Impacts of Black Carbon in GFDL's AM2.1 Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, G.; Ming, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Black carbon aerosols (BC) have been shown to significantly impact the climate system through their radiative effects. Many of the physical processes that drive BC climate impacts, however, are not yet well characterized across general circulation models. This has made it increasingly difficult to reach a consensus within the modeling community on how best to calculate BC radiative forcing in a way that is both representative and comparable between models. Calculation methodologies that include atmospheric perturbations, while more representative, are also more sensitive to model-specific representation of physical processes than those that do not. This study investigates the physical processes behind atmospheric perturbations due to BC using a modified version of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AM2.1). The preindustrial control case is perturbed by inserting a globally uniform BC burden into the atmosphere at a series of layers, and the TOA flux change is analyzed. We use a theoretical framework to establish the robustness of the atmospheric response produced by the model in order to determine the comparability of forcing calculations derived using atmospheric perturbations in AM2.1. Responses vary based on the cloud environment and the level of BC emplacement. Results, however, exhibit robust correlation with theory with positive implications for the inclusion of the atmospheric response in the calculation of BC radiative forcing.

  13. Effect of AMOC collapse on ENSO in a high resolution general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mark S.; Collins, Mat; Drijfhout, Sybren S.; Kahana, Ron; Mecking, Jennifer V.; Lenton, Timothy M.

    2018-04-01

    We look at changes in the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in a high-resolution eddy-permitting climate model experiment in which the Atlantic Meridional Circulation (AMOC) is switched off using freshwater hosing. The ENSO mode is shifted eastward and its period becomes longer and more regular when the AMOC is off. The eastward shift can be attributed to an anomalous eastern Ekman transport in the mean equatorial Pacific ocean state. Convergence of this transport deepens the thermocline in the eastern tropical Pacific and increases the temperature anomaly relaxation time, causing increased ENSO period. The anomalous Ekman transport is caused by a surface northerly wind anomaly in response to the meridional sea surface temperature dipole that results from switching the AMOC off. In contrast to a previous study with an earlier version of the model, which showed an increase in ENSO amplitude in an AMOC off experiment, here the amplitude remains the same as in the AMOC on control state. We attribute this difference to variations in the response of decreased stochastic forcing in the different models, which competes with the reduced damping of temperature anomalies. In the new high-resolution model, these effects approximately cancel resulting in no change in amplitude.

  14. Impact of variable seawater conductivity on motional induction simulated with an ocean general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrgang, C.; Saynisch, J.; Thomas, M.

    2016-01-01

    Carrying high concentrations of dissolved salt, ocean water is a good electrical conductor. As seawater flows through the Earth's ambient geomagnetic field, electric fields are generated, which in turn induce secondary magnetic fields. In current models for ocean-induced magnetic fields, a realistic consideration of seawater conductivity is often neglected and the effect on the variability of the ocean-induced magnetic field unknown. To model magnetic fields that are induced by non-tidal global ocean currents, an electromagnetic induction model is implemented into the Ocean Model for Circulation and Tides (OMCT). This provides the opportunity to not only model ocean-induced magnetic signals but also to assess the impact of oceanographic phenomena on the induction process. In this paper, the sensitivity of the induction process due to spatial and temporal variations in seawater conductivity is investigated. It is shown that assuming an ocean-wide uniform conductivity is insufficient to accurately capture the temporal variability of the magnetic signal. Using instead a realistic global seawater conductivity distribution increases the temporal variability of the magnetic field up to 45 %. Especially vertical gradients in seawater conductivity prove to be a key factor for the variability of the ocean-induced magnetic field. However, temporal variations of seawater conductivity only marginally affect the magnetic signal.

  15. Simulating pathways of subsurface oil in the Faroe-Shetland Channel using an ocean general circulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, C E; Yool, A; Holliday, N P; Popova, E E; Jones, D O B; Ruhl, H A

    2017-01-15

    Little is known about the fate of subsurface hydrocarbon plumes from deep-sea oil well blowouts and their effects on processes and communities. As deepwater drilling expands in the Faroe-Shetland Channel (FSC), oil well blowouts are a possibility, and the unusual ocean circulation of this region presents challenges to understanding possible subsurface oil pathways in the event of a spill. Here, an ocean general circulation model was used with a particle tracking algorithm to assess temporal variability of the oil-plume distribution from a deep-sea oil well blowout in the FSC. The drift of particles was first tracked for one year following release. Then, ambient model temperatures were used to simulate temperature-mediated biodegradation, truncating the trajectories of particles accordingly. Release depth of the modeled subsurface plumes affected both their direction of transport and distance travelled from their release location, and there was considerable interannual variability in transport. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. The Finite Element Sea Ice-Ocean Model (FESOM v.1.4: formulation of an ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Finite Element Sea Ice-Ocean Model (FESOM is the first global ocean general circulation model based on unstructured-mesh methods that has been developed for the purpose of climate research. The advantage of unstructured-mesh models is their flexible multi-resolution modelling functionality. In this study, an overview of the main features of FESOM will be given; based on sensitivity experiments a number of specific parameter choices will be explained; and directions of future developments will be outlined. It is argued that FESOM is sufficiently mature to explore the benefits of multi-resolution climate modelling and that its applications will provide information useful for the advancement of climate modelling on unstructured meshes.

  17. An Estimate of the Global Ocean Transit Time Distribution Computed With an Eddy Rich General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, F. O.; Maltrud, M.; Peacock, S.; Lindsay, K.

    2008-12-01

    Transit time distributions (TTDs), or age spectra, provide a powerful conceptual framework for evaluating and interpreting the advective-diffusive transport properties of geophysical flows. Most calculations and practical applications of TTDs to date have considered only the case of steady circulations with parameterized turbulent mixing. We have computed the first decades of the global ocean TTD for the unsteady, but statistically stationary, flow using an ensemble of impulse boundary propagators in an eddy-rich general ciculation model. In this presentation we will provide an overview of the geographical and temporal structure of the computed TTD, consider the convergence properties of the TTD as a function of ensemble size, space-time coarsening, and lag time, and consider the utility of TTDs as a metric for testing eddy mixing parameterizations in coarse resolution models.

  18. Seasonal simulations of the planetary boundary layer and boundary-layer stratocumulus clouds with a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, D. A.; Abeles, J. A.; Corsetti, T. G.

    1985-01-01

    The formulation of the planetary boundary layer (PBL) and stratocumulus parametrizations in the UCLA general circulation model (GCM) are briefly summarized, and extensive new results are presented illustrating some aspects of the simulated seasonal changes of the global distributions of PBL depth, stratocumulus cloudiness, cloud-top entrainment instability, the cumulus mass flux, and related fields. Results from three experiments designed to reveal the sensitivity of the GCM results to aspects of the PBL and stratocumulus parametrizations are presented. The GCM results show that the layer cloud instability appears to limit the extent of the marine subtropical stratocumulus regimes, and that instability frequently occurs in association with cumulus convection over land. Cumulus convection acts as a very significant sink of PBL mass throughout the tropics and over the midlatitude continents in winter.

  19. Determination of humidity and temperature fluctuations based on MOZAIC data and parametrisation of persistent contrail coverage for general circulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Gierens

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Humidity and temperature fluctuations at pressure levels between 166 and 290 hPa on the grid scale of general circulation models for a region covered by the routes of airliners, mainly over the Atlantic, have been determined by evaluation of the data obtained with almost 2000 flights within the MOZAIC programme. It is found that the distributions of the fluctuations cannot be modelled by Gaussian distributions, because large fluctuations appear with a relatively high frequency. Lorentz distributions were used for the analytical representation of the fluctuation distributions. From these a joint probability distribution has been derived for simultaneous temperature and humidity fluctuations. This function together with the criteria for the formation and persistence of contrails are used to derive the maximum possible fractional coverage of persistent contrails in a grid cell of a GCM. This can be employed in a statistical formulation of contrail appearance in a climate model.

  20. Surface energy balances of three general circulation models: Current climate and response to increasing atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutowski, W.J.; Gutzler, D.S.; Portman, D.; Wang, W.C.

    1988-04-01

    The surface energy balance simulated by state-of-the-art general circulation models at GFDL, GISS and NCAR for climates with current levels of atmospheric CO 2 concentration (control climate) and with twice the current levels. The work is part of an effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy to assess climate simulations produced by these models. The surface energy balance enables us to diagnose differences between models in surface temperature climatology and sensitivity to doubling CO 2 in terms of the processes that control surface temperature. Our analysis compares the simulated balances by averaging the fields of interest over a hierarchy of spatial domains ranging from the entire globe down to regions a few hundred kilometers across

  1. On the intra-seasonal variability within the extratropics in a general circulation model and observational data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, W.; Bengtsson, L.

    1994-01-01

    There are various phenomena on different spatial and temporal scales contributing to the intra-seasonal variability within the extratropics. One may notice higher-frequency baroclinic disturbances affecting the day-to-day variability of the atmosphere. But one finds also low-frequency fluctuations on a typical time scale of a few weeks. Blocking anticyclones are probably the most prominent example of such features. These fluctuations on different scales, however, are influencing each other, in particular the temporal evolution and spatial distribution. There has been observational work on various phenomena contributing to the intra-seasonal variability for a long time. In the last decade or so, however, with the increasing importance of General Circulation Models there have been some studies dealing with the intra-seasonal variability as simulated by these models

  2. Antarctic boundary layer parametrization in a general circulation model: 1-D simulations facing summer observations at Dome C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, Etienne; Hourdin, Frédéric; Genthon, Christophe; Gallée, Hubert; Bazile, Eric; Lefebvre, Marie-Pierre; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Van de Wiel, Bas J. H.

    2017-07-01

    The parametrization of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) is critical over the Antarctic Plateau for climate modelling since it affects the climatological temperature inversion and the negatively buoyant near-surface flow over the ice-sheet. This study challenges state-of-the-art parametrizations used in general circulation models to represent the clear-sky summertime diurnal cycle of the ABL at Dome C, Antarctic Plateau. The Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique-Zoom model is run in a 1-D configuration on the fourth Global Energy and Water Cycle Exchanges Project Atmospheric Boundary Layers Study case. Simulations are analyzed and compared to observations, giving insights into the sensitivity of one model that participates to the intercomparison exercise. Snow albedo and thermal inertia are calibrated leading to better surface temperatures. Using the so-called "thermal plume model" improves the momentum mixing in the diurnal ABL. In stable conditions, four turbulence schemes are tested. Best simulations are those in which the turbulence cuts off above 35 m in the middle of the night, highlighting the contribution of the longwave radiation in the ABL heat budget. However, the nocturnal surface layer is not stable enough to distinguish between surface fluxes computed with different stability functions. The absence of subsidence in the forcings and an underestimation of downward longwave radiation are identified to be likely responsible for a cold bias in the nocturnal ABL. Apart from model-specific improvements, the paper clarifies on which are the critical aspects to improve in general circulation models to correctly represent the summertime ABL over the Antarctic Plateau.

  3. Seasonal Distributions of Global Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients: Analysis with a Coupled Ocean General Circulation Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson W.

    1999-01-01

    A coupled general ocean circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. The model is driven by climatological meteorological conditions, cloud cover, and sea surface temperature. Biogeochemical processes in the model are determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability, and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms, chorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrient groups (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Phytoplankton groups are initialized as homogeneous fields horizontally and vertically, and allowed to distribute themselves according to the prevailing conditions. Basin-scale model chlorophyll results are in very good agreement with CZCS pigments in virtually every global region. Seasonal variability observed in the CZCS is also well represented in the model. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of imagery are also in good conformance, although occasional departures are apparent. Agreement of nitrate distributions with in situ data is even better, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The good agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicates that the model dynamics realistically simulate phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on synoptic scales. This is especially true given that initial conditions are homogenous chlorophyll fields. The success of the model in producing a reasonable representation of chlorophyll and nutrient distributions and seasonal variability in the global oceans is attributed to the application of a generalized, processes-driven approach as opposed to regional parameterization, and the existence of multiple phytoplankton groups with different physiological and physical properties. These factors enable the model to simultaneously represent the great diversity of physical, biological

  4. Vehicle technology under CO2 constraint: a general equilibrium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Jacoby, Henry D.

    2006-01-01

    A study is presented of the rates of penetration of different transport technologies under policy constraints on CO 2 emissions. The response of this sector is analyzed within an overall national level of restriction, with a focus on automobiles, light trucks, and heavy freight trucks. Using the US as an example, a linked set of three models is used to carry out the analysis: a multi-sector computable general equilibrium model of the economy, a MARKAL-type model of vehicle and fuel supply technology, and a model simulating the split of personal and freight transport among modes. Results highlight the importance of incremental improvements in conventional internal combustion engine technology, and, in the absence of policies to overcome observed consumer discount rates, the very long time horizons before radical alternatives like the internal combustion engine hybrid drive train vehicle are likely to take substantial market share

  5. On the intra-seasonal variability within the extratropics in the ECHAM3 general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, W.

    1994-01-01

    First we consider the GCM's capability to reproduce the midlatitude variability on intra-seasonal time scales by a comparison with observational data (ECMWF analyses). Secondly we assess the possible influence of Sea Surface Temperatures on the intra-seasonal variability by comparing estimates obtained from different simulations performed with ECHAM3 with varying and fixed SST as boundary forcing. The intra-seasonal variability as simulated by ECHAM3 is underestimated over most of the Northern Hemisphere. While the contributions of the high-frequency transient fluctuations are reasonably well captured by the model, ECHAM3 fails to reproduce the observed level of low-frequency intra-seasonal variability. This is mainly due to the underestimation of the variability caused by the ultra-long planetary waves in the Northern Hemisphere midlatitudes by the model. In the Southern Hemisphere midlatitudes, on the other hand, the intra-seasonal variability as simulated by ECHAM3 is generally underestimated in the area north of about 50 southern latitude, but overestimated at higher latitudes. This is the case for the contributions of the high-frequency and the low-frequency transient fluctuations as well. Further, the model indicates a strong tendency for zonal symmetry, in particular with respect to the high-frequency transient fluctuations. While the two sets of simulations with varying and fixed Sea Surface Temepratures as boundary forcing reveal only small regional differences in the Southern Hemisphere, there is a strong response to be found in the Northern Hemisphere. The contributions of the high-frequency transient fluctuations to the intra-seasonal variability are generally stronger in the simulations with fixed SST. Further, the Pacific storm track is shifted slightly poleward in this set of simulations. For the low-frequency intra-seasonal variability the model gives a strong, but regional response to the interannual variations of the SST. (orig.)

  6. IL-33 circulating serum levels are increased in patients with non-segmental generalized vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, Mario; Cicero, Francesca; Mannucci, Carmen; Calapai, Gioacchino; Spatari, Giovanna; Barbuzza, Olga; Cannavò, Serafinella P; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2016-09-01

    IL-33 is a recently identified cytokine, encoded by the IL-33 gene, which is a member of the IL-1 family that drives the production of T-helper-2 (Th-2)-associated cytokines. Serum levels of IL-33 have been reported to be up-regulated in various T-helper (Th)-1/Th-17-mediated diseases, such as psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel. To investigate whether cytokine imbalance plays a role in the pathogenesis of vitiligo, we performed a case-control association study by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of IL-33 in our patients. IL-33 serum levels were measured by a quantitative enzyme immunoassay technique in patients with non-segmental generalized vitiligo and compared with those of healthy controls. IL-33 serum levels in patients with vitiligo were significantly increased than those in healthy controls. There was a positive correlation of IL-33 serum levels with extension of vitiligo and disease activity. This study suggests a possible systemic role of IL-33 in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Inhibiting IL-33 activity might be a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of autoimmune inflammatory disease, like vitiligo.

  7. Active Smoking and Hematocrit and Fasting Circulating Erythropoietin Concentrations in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenga, Michele F; Kieneker, Lyanne M; Touw, Daan J; Nolte, Ilja M; van der Meer, Peter; Huls, Gerwin; Gaillard, Carlo A J M; Bakker, Stephan J L

    2018-03-01

    Cigarette smoking continues to be one of the major risk factors for increased morbidity and mortality worldwide. Among many adverse health effects, smoking can induce erythrocytosis, which is commonly believed to result from elevated serum erythropoietin (EPO) levels. Currently, however, this notion is only alleged, without data available to substantiate it. Hence, we analyzed data from the Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-Stage Disease study, a prospective population-based cohort study. Smoking behavior was quantified as number of cigarettes smoked per day and as 24-hour urinary cotinine excretion levels, an objective and quantitative measure of nicotine exposure. In 6808 community-dwelling participants, the prevalence of nonsmokers, former smokers, and current smokers were 29%, 43%, and 28%, respectively. Hematocrit levels were higher in current smokers (41.4%±3.6%) than in nonsmokers (40.3%±3.6%) (Phematocrit levels (β=.12; P<.001) and hemoglobin levels (β=.11; P<.001), but inversely associated with EPO levels (β=-.09; P<.001). In sensitivity analyses, we observed a dose-dependent inverse association of smoking exposure reflected by 24-hour urinary cotinine excretion levels with EPO levels. Contrary to common belief, we identified that in the general population, smoking is inversely associated with EPO levels. Future mechanistic insight is needed to unravel the currently identified association, and if reproduced in other studies, guidelines for diagnosis of secondary erythrocytosis may need to be revisited. Copyright © 2018 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Oceanic sill-overflow systems: Investigations and simulation with the Poseidon ocean general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Whit G.

    Marginal seas transport dense water into the oceanic system by deep gravity currents through sill-overflow systems. This dense water is essential in establishing background characteristics and the density driven component of the meridional overturing of the ocean. This thesis investigates the controlling dynamics and several modeling issues related to oceanic deep gravity currents. The objectives and questions of this study center on the development of a climate scale model that adequately simulates sill-overflow deep gravity currents. These questions include the sensitivity of the model to resolution and various turbulence parameterizations when modeling these systems. A hybrid generalized vertical coordinate model is adapted to address these questions. This study uses theoretical model domains based on the Dynamics of Mixing and Entrainment group (DOME). Current, climate scale models typically have horizontal resolutions ranging from 1/2 to 1 degree resolution. The bulk of the vertical resolution in layered models is commonly placed in density or pressure space centered around the equatorial upper ocean, well away from the regions containing the deep gravity currents investigated in this study. Models solutions from this study show large dependence on both horizontal and vertical resolution. When horizontal resolution is decreased from 5 to 20 km, entrainment of ambient water into the gravity current decreases by approximately a factor of 3. The deep gravity currents in the lower (20 km) resolution experiments are deeper, denser and have larger along-slope velocities than the higher resolution experiments (5 km). This difference is explained by the homogenization of the gravity current in lower resolution simulations. The 5 km simulations show higher magnitudes and spatial variability of momentum. This homogenization results in underestimation of the applied bottom stress in the model. With a lower bottom stress, the current does not have sufficient shearing to

  9. Connection of the stratospheric QBO with global atmospheric general circulation and tropical SST. Part II: interdecadal variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zeng-Zhen [Climate Prediction Center (Room 605), NCEP/NWS/NOAA, Camp Springs, MD (United States); Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States); Huang, Bohua; Kinter, James L. [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States); George Mason University, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Earth Sciences, College of Science, Fairfax, VA (United States); Wu, Zhaohua [Florida State University, Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, and Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Kumar, Arun [Climate Prediction Center (Room 605), NCEP/NWS/NOAA, Camp Springs, MD (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The interdecadal variation of the association of the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) with tropical sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies (SSTA) and with the general circulation in the troposphere and lower stratosphere is examined using the ERA40 and NCEP/NCAR reanalyses, as well as other observation-based analyses. It is found that the relationship between the QBO and tropical SSTA changed once around 1978-1980, and again in 1993-1995. During 1966-1974, negative correlation between the QBO and NINO3.4 indices reached its maximum when the NINO3.4 index lagged the QBO by less than 6 months. Correspondingly, the positive correlations were observed when the NINO3.4 index led the QBO by about 11-13 months or lagged by about 12-18 months. However, maximum negative correlations were shifted from the NINO3.4 index lagging the QBO by about 0-6 months during 1966-1974 to about 3-12 months during 1985-1992. During 1975-1979, both the negative and positive correlations were relatively small and the QBO and ENSO were practically unrelated to each other. The phase-based QBO life cycle composites also confirm that, on average, there are two phase (6-7 months) delay in the evolution of the QBO-associated anomalous Walker circulation, tropical SST, atmospheric stability, and troposphere and lower stratosphere temperature anomalies during 1980-1994 in comparison with those in 1957-1978. The interdecadal variation of the association between the QBO and the troposphere variability may be largely due to the characteristic change of El Nino-Southern Oscillation. The irregularity of the QBO may play a secondary role in the interdecadal variation of the association. (orig.)

  10. Different generalizations of the elderly in design of welfare technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ertner, Marie

    2016-01-01

    ’ into design, is that it shows how Science and Technology Studies (STS) can be useful in order to better recognize differences between different enactments of an imagined user, in this case the elderly. The contribution of the paper to STS is a discussion of how I as an STS-informed ethnographer was invited......This article explores problems of representing the elderly in a User Driven Innovation (UDI) project developing Welfare Technology. Drawing on Helen Verran’s concept of the dual logics of generalization I attend to differences in enactments of the elderly. I engage with situations where the objects...... to participate in a User Driven Innovation project. Based on my reflections on this role, the paper reflects on the ethnographic account as a tool with particular qualities and limitations when inhabiting a position as mediator between users and an innovation project....

  11. Development of Communication Technologies in Turkey: A General Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Penpece

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Communication is a system that senders have possibility to send message to receiver in general meaning. It is considered that as a modern Turkish economy should use communication systems largely. It is critically important to show Turkey’s usage of communication technologies as a country that keeps up with new developments in the world. Communication tools that examined in this study are postal services, newspaper and magazines, fixed-line telephone and mobile phone, internet. According to examined period it is resulted that the usage of communication tools increased. It is observed that some communication tools usage decreased caused by different factors in some terms.

  12. Successful insertion of barotropic and baroclinic tides into a global 1/12 degree ocean general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbic, B. K.; Metzger, E.; Wallcraft, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, increasing computer power has allowed internal tide models to be run at high-resolution on a global scale (Arbic et al. 2004; Simmons et al. 2004; Hibiya et al. 2006; Simmons 2008). All of these models have been run as pure tide models (i.e., without wind and buoyancy forcing) with a horizontally uniform stratification (since the wind and buoyancy forcing required to support a nonuniform stratification is absent). We have recently completed a 5-year simulation in which the eight largest tidal constituents have been embedded into the HYCOM general circulation model, run globally at 1/12 degree resolution and with 32 vertical layers. The run includes realistic wind and buoyancy forcing. Hence a horizontally varying stratification as well as an energetic mesoscale eddy field are present in the model, and will interact with the internal tide field. We report here on some preliminary analyses of this simulation. The globally averaged rms elevation errors of the eight largest tidal constituents are comparable to those in previous forward tide models which include a tuned topographic internal wave drag. The amplitude and wavelength of the surface signature of internal tides compares well with that inferred from satellite altimetry data. The horizontally varying stratification leads to a very different surface signature of internal tides in polar regions, compared to results using a spatially uniform stratification. Ongoing and planned analyses of various aspects of the simulation--for instance eddy/tide interaction, the stationarity of internal tide beams, and the impact of tides on the general circulation, water masses, and the energy budget--will be briefly described. References Arbic, B.K., S.T. Garner, R.W. Hallberg, and H.L. Simmons, 2004: The accuracy of surface elevations in forward global barotropic and baroclinic tide models. Deep-Sea Research II 51, 3069-3101. Hibiya, T., M. Nagasawa, and Y. Niwa, 2006: Global mapping of diapycnal diffusivity in

  13. Polynomial Chaos–Based Bayesian Inference of K-Profile Parameterization in a General Circulation Model of the Tropical Pacific

    KAUST Repository

    Sraj, Ihab

    2016-08-26

    The authors present a polynomial chaos (PC)-based Bayesian inference method for quantifying the uncertainties of the K-profile parameterization (KPP) within the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm) of the tropical Pacific. The inference of the uncertain parameters is based on a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme that utilizes a newly formulated test statistic taking into account the different components representing the structures of turbulent mixing on both daily and seasonal time scales in addition to the data quality, and filters for the effects of parameter perturbations over those as a result of changes in the wind. To avoid the prohibitive computational cost of integrating the MITgcm model at each MCMC iteration, a surrogate model for the test statistic using the PC method is built. Because of the noise in the model predictions, a basis-pursuit-denoising (BPDN) compressed sensing approach is employed to determine the PC coefficients of a representative surrogate model. The PC surrogate is then used to evaluate the test statistic in the MCMC step for sampling the posterior of the uncertain parameters. Results of the posteriors indicate good agreement with the default values for two parameters of the KPP model, namely the critical bulk and gradient Richardson numbers; while the posteriors of the remaining parameters were barely informative. © 2016 American Meteorological Society.

  14. A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of our group to meet our stated objectives. The report is divided into sections entitled: Radiation Model Testing Activities, General Circulation Model Testing Activities, Science Team Activities, and Publications, Presentations and Meetings. The section on Science Team Activities summarizes our participation with the science team to further advance the observation and modeling programs. Appendix A lists graduate students supported, and post-doctoral appointments during the project. Reports on the activities during each of the first two years are included as Appendix B. Significant progress has been made in: determining the ability of line-by-line radiation models to calculate the downward longwave flux at the surface; determining the uncertainties in calculated the downwelling radiance and flux at the surface associated with the use of different proposed profiling techniques; intercomparing clear-sky radiance and flux observations with calculations from radiation codes from different climate models; determining the uncertainties associated with estimating N* from surface longwave flux observations; and determining the sensitivity of model calculations to different formulations of the effects of finite sized clouds

  15. Assessing the Tangent Linear Behaviour of Common Tracer Transport Schemes and Their Use in a Linearised Atmospheric General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdaway, Daniel; Kent, James

    2015-01-01

    The linearity of a selection of common advection schemes is tested and examined with a view to their use in the tangent linear and adjoint versions of an atmospheric general circulation model. The schemes are tested within a simple offline one-dimensional periodic domain as well as using a simplified and complete configuration of the linearised version of NASA's Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5). All schemes which prevent the development of negative values and preserve the shape of the solution are confirmed to have nonlinear behaviour. The piecewise parabolic method (PPM) with certain flux limiters, including that used by default in GEOS-5, is found to support linear growth near the shocks. This property can cause the rapid development of unrealistically large perturbations within the tangent linear and adjoint models. It is shown that these schemes with flux limiters should not be used within the linearised version of a transport scheme. The results from tests using GEOS-5 show that the current default scheme (a version of PPM) is not suitable for the tangent linear and adjoint model, and that using a linear third-order scheme for the linearised model produces better behaviour. Using the third-order scheme for the linearised model improves the correlations between the linear and non-linear perturbation trajectories for cloud liquid water and cloud liquid ice in GEOS-5.

  16. Polynomial Chaos-based Bayesian Inference of K-Profile Parametrization in a General Circulation Model of the Torpical Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoteit, I.; Sraj, I.; Zedler, S. E.; Jackson, C. S.; Knio, O. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a Polynomial Chaos (PC)-based Bayesian inference method for quantifying the uncertainties of K-Profile Parametrization (KPP) model in MIT General Circulation Model (MITgcm). The inference of the uncertain parameters is based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme that utilizes a newly formulated test statistic taking into account the different components representing the structures of turbulent mixing on both daily and seasonal timescales in addition to the data quality, and filters for the effects of parameter perturbations over those due to changes in the wind. To avoid the prohibitive computational cost of integrating the MITgcm model at each MCMC iteration, we build a surrogate model for the test statistic using the PC method. The traditional spectral projection method for finding the PC coefficients suffered from convergence issues due to the internal noise in the model predictions. Instead, a Basis-Pursuit-DeNoising (BPDN) compressed sensing approach was employed that filtered out the noise and determined the PC coefficients of a representative surrogate model. The PC surrogate is then used to evaluate the test statistic in the MCMC step for sampling the posterior of the uncertain parameters. We present results of the posteriors that indicate a good agreement with the default values for two parameters of the KPP model namely the critical bulk and gradient Richardson; while the posteriors of the remaining parameters were hardly informative.

  17. A Study of Longwave Radiation Codes for Climate Studies: Validation with ARM Observations and Tests in General Circulation Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert G. Ellingson

    2004-09-28

    One specific goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in General Circulation Models (GCMs) under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our project was geared to contribute to this goal by attacking major problems associated with one of the dominant radiation components of the problem --longwave radiation. The primary long-term project objectives were to: (1) develop an optimum longwave radiation model for use in GCMs that has been calibrated with state-of-the-art observations for clear and cloudy conditions, and (2) determine how the longwave radiative forcing with an improved algorithm contributes relatively in a GCM when compared to shortwave radiative forcing, sensible heating, thermal advection and convection. The approach has been to build upon existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We focused on comparing calculations from a set of models with operationally observed data for clear, overcast and broken cloud conditions. The differences found through the comparisons and physical insights have been used to develop new models, most of which have been tested with new data. Our initial GCM studies used existing GCMs to study the climate model-radiation sensitivity problem. Although this portion of our initial plans was curtailed midway through the project, we anticipate that the eventual outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and from our better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the model equilibrium climate, how improvements in climate prediction using this algorithm can be achieved.

  18. Estimating global air-sea fluxes from surface properties and from climatological flux data using an oceanic general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tziperman, Eli; Bryan, Kirk

    1993-12-01

    A simple method is presented and demonstrated for estimating air-sea fluxes of heat and fresh water with the aid of a general circulation model (GCM), using both sea surface temperature and salinity data and climatological air-sea flux data. The approach is motivated by a least squares optimization problem in which the various data sets are combined to form an optimal solution for the air-sea fluxes. The method provides estimates of the surface properties and air-sea flux data that are as consistent as possible with the original data sets and with the model physics. The calculation of these estimates involves adding a simple equation for calculating the air-sea fluxes during the model run and then running the model to a steady state. The proposed method was applied to a coarse resolution global primitive equation model and annually averaged data sets. Both the spatial distribution of the global air-sea fluxes and the meridional fluxes carried by the ocean were estimated. The resulting air-sea fluxes seem smoother and significantly closer to the climatological flux estimates than do the air-sea fluxes obtained from the GCM by simply specifying the surface temperature and salinity. The better fit to the climatological fluxes was balanced by a larger deviation from the surface temperature and salinity. These surface fields were still close to the observations within the measurement error in most regions, except western boundary areas. The inconsistency of the model and data in western boundary areas is probably related to the inability of the coarse resolution GCM to appropriately simulate the large transports there. The meridional fluxes calculated by the proposed method differ very little from those obtained by simply specifying the surface temperature and salinity. We suggest therefore that these meridional fluxes are strongly influenced by the interior model dynamics; in particular, the too-weak model meridional circulation cell seems to be the reason for

  19. Evaluation of North Eurasian snow-off dates in the ECHAM5.4 atmospheric general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, P.; Luomaranta, A.; Järvinen, H.; Takala, M.; Jylhä, K.; Bulygina, O. N.; Luojus, K.; Riihelä, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Koskinen, J.; Pulliainen, J.

    2014-12-01

    The timing of springtime end of snowmelt (snow-off date) in northern Eurasia in version 5.4 of the ECHAM5 atmospheric general circulation model (GCM) is evaluated through comparison with a snow-off date data set based on space-borne microwave radiometer measurements and with Russian snow course data. ECHAM5 reproduces well the observed gross geographical pattern of snow-off dates, with earliest snow-off (in March) in the Baltic region and latest snow-off (in June) in the Taymyr Peninsula and in northeastern parts of the Russian Far East. The primary biases are (1) a delayed snow-off in southeastern Siberia (associated with too low springtime temperature and too high surface albedo, in part due to insufficient shielding by canopy); and (2) an early bias in the western and northern parts of northern Eurasia. Several sensitivity experiments were conducted, where biases in simulated atmospheric circulation were corrected through nudging and/or the treatment of surface albedo was modified. While this alleviated some of the model biases in snow-off dates, 2 m temperature and surface albedo, especially the early bias in snow-off in the western parts of northern Eurasia proved very robust and was actually larger in the nudged runs. A key issue underlying the snow-off biases in ECHAM5 is that snowmelt occurs at too low temperatures. Very likely, this is related to the treatment of the surface energy budget. On one hand, the surface temperature Ts is not computed separately for the snow-covered and snow-free parts of the grid cells, which prevents Ts from rising above 0 °C before all snow has vanished. Consequently, too much of the surface net radiation is consumed in melting snow and too little in heating the air. On the other hand, ECHAM5 does not include a canopy layer. Thus, while the albedo reduction due to canopy is accounted for, the shielding of snow on ground by the overlying canopy is not considered, which leaves too much solar radiation available for melting snow.

  20. General framework and key technologies of national nuclear emergency system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Feng; Li Xudong; Zhu Guangying; Song Yafeng; Zeng Suotian; Shen Lifeng

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear emergency is the important safeguard for the sustainable development of nuclear energy, and is the significant part of national public crisis management. The paper gives the definition of nuclear emergency system explicitly based on the analysis of the characteristics of the nuclear emergency, and through the research of the structure and general framework, the general framework of the national nuclear emergency management system (NNEMS) is obtained, which is constructed in four parts, including one integrative platform, six layers, eight applications and two systems, then the paper indicate that the architecture of national emergency system that should be laid out by three-tiers, i.e. national, provincial and organizations with nuclear facilities, and also describe the functions of the NNEMS on the nuclear emergency's workflow. Finally, the paper discuss the key technology that NNIEMS needed, such as WebGIS, auxiliary decision-making, digitalized preplan and the conformity and usage of resources, and analyze the technical principle in details. (authors)

  1. The ability of general circulation models to simulate tropical cyclones and their precursors over the North Atlantic main development region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daloz, Anne Sophie; Chauvin, Fabrice [Groupe de Modelisation Grande Echelle et Climat, CNRM-GAME, Meteo-France, Toulouse Cedex 1 (France); Walsh, Kevin [University of Melbourne, School of Earth Sciences, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Lavender, Sally; Abbs, Deborah [CSIRO Atmospheric and Marine Research, Aspendale, VIC (Australia); Roux, Frank [Universite de Toulouse and Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Laboratoire d' Aerologie, Toulouse (France)

    2012-10-15

    The ability of General Circulation Models (GCMs) to generate Tropical Cyclones (TCs) over the North Atlantic Main Development Region (MDR; 10-20 N, 20-80 W; Goldenberg and Shapiro in J Clim 9:1169-1187, 1996) is examined through a subset of ocean-atmosphere coupled simulations from the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3) multimodel data set and a high-resolution (0.5 ) Sea Surface Temperature (SST)-forced simulation from the Australian Conformal-Cubic Atmospheric Model GCM. The results are compared with National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP-2) and European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis (ERA-40) reanalyses over a common period from 1980 to 1998. Important biases in the representation of the TC activity are encountered over the MDR. This study emphasizes the strong link in the GCMs between African Easterly Waves (AEWs) and TC activity in this region. However, the generation of AEWs is not a sufficient condition alone for the models to produce TCs. Precipitation over the Sahel, especially rainfall over the Fouta Djallon highlands (cf. Fig. 1), is playing a role in the generation of TCs over the MDR. The influence of large-scale fields such as SST, vertical wind shear and tropospheric humidity on TC genesis is also examined. The ability of TC genesis indices, such as the Genesis Potential Index and the Convective Yearly Genesis Potential, to represent TC activity over the MDR in simulations at low to high spatial resolutions is analysed. These indices are found to be a reasonable method for comparing cyclogenesis in different models, even though other factors such as AEW activity should also be considered. (orig.)

  2. Modeling the Dynamics of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over the Antarctic Plateau With a General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignon, Etienne; Hourdin, Frédéric; Genthon, Christophe; Van de Wiel, Bas J. H.; Gallée, Hubert; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Beaumet, Julien

    2018-01-01

    Observations evidence extremely stable boundary layers (SBL) over the Antarctic Plateau and sharp regime transitions between weakly and very stable conditions. Representing such features is a challenge for climate models. This study assesses the modeling of the dynamics of the boundary layer over the Antarctic Plateau in the LMDZ general circulation model. It uses 1 year simulations with a stretched-grid over Dome C. The model is nudged with reanalyses outside of the Dome C region such as simulations can be directly compared to in situ observations. We underline the critical role of the downward longwave radiation for modeling the surface temperature. LMDZ reasonably represents the near-surface seasonal profiles of wind and temperature but strong temperature inversions are degraded by enhanced turbulent mixing formulations. Unlike ERA-Interim reanalyses, LMDZ reproduces two SBL regimes and the regime transition, with a sudden increase in the near-surface inversion with decreasing wind speed. The sharpness of the transition depends on the stability function used for calculating the surface drag coefficient. Moreover, using a refined vertical grid leads to a better reversed "S-shaped" relationship between the inversion and the wind. Sudden warming events associated to synoptic advections of warm and moist air are also well reproduced. Near-surface supersaturation with respect to ice is not allowed in LMDZ but the impact on the SBL structure is moderate. Finally, climate simulations with the free model show that the recommended configuration leads to stronger inversions and winds over the ice-sheet. However, the near-surface wind remains underestimated over the slopes of East-Antarctica.

  3. Skills of General Circulation and Earth System Models in reproducing streamflow to the ocean: the case of Congo river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, M.; Caporaso, L.

    2017-12-01

    Although the importance of water resources in the context of climate change, it is still difficult to correctly simulate the freshwater cycle over the land via General Circulation and Earth System Models (GCMs and ESMs). Existing efforts from the Climate Model Intercomparison Project 5 (CMIP5) were mainly devoted to the validation of atmospheric variables like temperature and precipitation, with low attention to discharge.Here we investigate the present-day performances of GCMs and ESMs participating to CMIP5 in simulating the discharge of the river Congo to the sea thanks to: i) the long-term availability of discharge data for the Kinshasa hydrological station representative of more than 95% of the water flowing in the whole catchment; and ii) the River's still low influence by human intervention, which enables comparison with the (mostly) natural streamflow simulated within CMIP5.Our findings suggest how most of models appear overestimating the streamflow in terms of seasonal cycle, especially in the late winter and spring, while overestimation and variability across models are lower in late summer. Weighted ensemble means are also calculated, based on simulations' performances given by several metrics, showing some improvements of results.Although simulated inter-monthly and inter-annual percent anomalies do not appear significantly different from those in observed data, when translated into well consolidated indicators of drought attributes (frequency, magnitude, timing, duration), usually adopted for more immediate communication to stakeholders and decision makers, such anomalies can be misleading.These inconsistencies produce incorrect assessments towards water management planning and infrastructures (e.g. dams or irrigated areas), especially if models are used instead of measurements, as in case of ungauged basins or for basins with insufficient data, as well as when relying on models for future estimates without a preliminary quantification of model biases.

  4. Connection of stratospheric QBO with global atmospheric general circulation and tropical SST. Part I: methodology and composite life cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Bohua; Kinter, James L. [George Mason University, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Earth Sciences, College of Science, Fairfax, VA (United States); Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States); Hu, Zeng-Zhen [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States); Climate Prediction Center (suite 605), NCEP/NWS/NOAA, Camp Springs, MD (United States); Wu, Zhaohua [Florida State University, Department of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Science, and Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Kumar, Arun [Climate Prediction Center (suite 605), NCEP/NWS/NOAA, Camp Springs, MD (United States)

    2012-01-15

    The stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) and its association with the interannual variability in the stratosphere and troposphere, as well as in tropical sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTA), are examined in the context of a QBO life cycle. The analysis is based on the ERA40 and NCEP/NCAR reanalyses, radiosonde observations at Singapore, and other observation-based datasets. Both reanalyses reproduce the QBO life cycle and its associated variability in the stratosphere reasonably well, except that some long-term changes are detected only in the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis. In order to separate QBO from variability on other time scales and to eliminate the long-term changes, a scale separation technique [Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD)] is applied to the raw data. The QBO component of zonal wind anomalies at 30 hPa, extracted using the EEMD method, is defined as a QBO index. Using this index, the QBO life cycle composites of stratosphere and troposphere variables, as well as SSTA, are constructed and examined. The composite features in the stratosphere are generally consistent with previous investigations. The correlations between the QBO and tropical Pacific SSTA depend on the phase in a QBO life cycle. On average, cold (warm) SSTA peaks about half a year after the maximum westerlies (easterlies) at 30 hPa. The connection of the QBO with the troposphere seems to be associated with the differences of temperature anomalies between the stratosphere and troposphere. While the anomalies in the stratosphere propagate downward systematically, some anomalies in the troposphere develop and expand vertically. Therefore, it is possible that the temperature difference between the troposphere and stratosphere may alter the atmospheric stability and tropical deep convection, which modulates the Walker circulation and SSTA in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. (orig.)

  5. Influence of Last Glacial Maximum boundary conditions on the global water isotope distribution in an atmospheric general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Tharammal

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available To understand the validity of δ18O proxy records as indicators of past temperature change, a series of experiments was conducted using an atmospheric general circulation model fitted with water isotope tracers (Community Atmosphere Model version 3.0, IsoCAM. A pre-industrial simulation was performed as the control experiment, as well as a simulation with all the boundary conditions set to Last Glacial Maximum (LGM values. Results from the pre-industrial and LGM simulations were compared to experiments in which the influence of individual boundary conditions (greenhouse gases, ice sheet albedo and topography, sea surface temperature (SST, and orbital parameters were changed each at a time to assess their individual impact. The experiments were designed in order to analyze the spatial variations of the oxygen isotopic composition of precipitation (δ18Oprecip in response to individual climate factors. The change in topography (due to the change in land ice cover played a significant role in reducing the surface temperature and δ18Oprecip over North America. Exposed shelf areas and the ice sheet albedo reduced the Northern Hemisphere surface temperature and δ18Oprecip further. A global mean cooling of 4.1 °C was simulated with combined LGM boundary conditions compared to the control simulation, which was in agreement with previous experiments using the fully coupled Community Climate System Model (CCSM3. Large reductions in δ18Oprecip over the LGM ice sheets were strongly linked to the temperature decrease over them. The SST and ice sheet topography changes were responsible for most of the changes in the climate and hence the δ18Oprecip distribution among the simulations.

  6. Impact of absorbing aerosols on the simulation of climate over the Indian region in an atmospheric general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chakraborty

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact of anthropogenic absorbing aerosols (such as soot on the climate over the Indian region has been studied using the NCMRWF general circulation model. The absorbing aerosols increase shortwave radiative heating of the lower troposphere and reduce the heating at the surface. These effects have been incorporated as heating of the lower troposphere (up to 700hPa and cooling over the continental surface based on INDOEX measurements. The heating effect is constant in the pre-monsoon season and reduces to zero during the monsoon season. It is shown that even in the monsoon season when the aerosol forcing is zero, there is an overall increase in rainfall and a reduction in surface temperature over the Indian region. The rainfall averaged over the Tropics shows a small reduction in most of the months during the January to September period. The impact of aerosol forcing, the model's sensitivity to this forcing and its interaction with model-physics has been studied by changing the cumulus parameterization from the Simplified Arakawa-Schubert (SAS scheme to the Kuo scheme. During the pre-monsoon season the major changes in precipitation occur in the oceanic Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ, where both the schemes show an increase in precipitation. This result is similar to that reported in Chung2002. On the other hand, during the monsoon season the changes in precipitation in the continental region are different in the SAS and Kuo schemes. It is shown that the heating due to absorbing aerosols changes the vertical moist-static stability of the atmosphere. The difference in the precipitation changes in the two cumulus schemes is on account of the different responses in the two parameterization schemes to changes in vertical stability. Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (tropical meteorology; precipitation

  7. Initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth in a state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Voigt

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We study the initiation of a Marinoan Snowball Earth (~635 million years before present with the state-of-the-art atmosphere-ocean general circulation model ECHAM5/MPI-OM. This is the most sophisticated model ever applied to Snowball initiation. A comparison with a pre-industrial control climate shows that the change of surface boundary conditions from present-day to Marinoan, including a shift of continents to low latitudes, induces a global-mean cooling of 4.6 K. Two thirds of this cooling can be attributed to increased planetary albedo, the remaining one third to a weaker greenhouse effect. The Marinoan Snowball Earth bifurcation point for pre-industrial atmospheric carbon dioxide is between 95.5 and 96% of the present-day total solar irradiance (TSI, whereas a previous study with the same model found that it was between 91 and 94% for present-day surface boundary conditions. A Snowball Earth for TSI set to its Marinoan value (94% of the present-day TSI is prevented by doubling carbon dioxide with respect to its pre-industrial level. A zero-dimensional energy balance model is used to predict the Snowball Earth bifurcation point from only the equilibrium global-mean ocean potential temperature for present-day TSI. We do not find stable states with sea-ice cover above 55%, and land conditions are such that glaciers could not grow with sea-ice cover of 55%. Therefore, none of our simulations qualifies as a "slushball" solution. While uncertainties in important processes and parameters such as clouds and sea-ice albedo suggest that the Snowball Earth bifurcation point differs between climate models, our results contradict previous findings that Snowball Earth initiation would require much stronger forcings.

  8. A Comparison of the Lower Stratospheric Age-Spectra Derived from a General Circulation Model and Two Data Assimilation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, Mark R.; Douglass, Anne R.; Zhu, Zhengxin; Pawson, Steven

    2002-01-01

    We use kinematic and diabatic back trajectory calculations, driven by winds from a general circulation model (GCM) and two different data assimilation systems (DAS), to compute the age spectrum at three latitudes in the lower stratosphere. The age-spectra are compared to chemical transport model (CTM) calculations, and the mean ages from all of these studies are compared to observations. The age spectra computed using the GCM winds show a reasonably isolated tropics in good agreement with observations; however, the age spectra determined from the DAS differ from the GCM spectra. For the DAS diabatic trajectory calculations there is too much exchange between the tropics and mid-latitudes. The age spectrum is thus too broad and the tropical mean age is too old as a result of mixing older mid latitude air with tropical air. Likewise the mid latitude mean age is too young due to the in mixing of tropical air. The DAS kinematic trajectory calculations show excessive vertical dispersion of parcels in addition to excessive exchange between the tropics and mid latitudes. Because air is moved rapidly to the troposphere from the vertical dispersion, the age spectrum is shifted toward the young side. The excessive vertical and meridional dispersion compensate in the kinematic case giving a reasonable tropical mean age. The CTM calculation of the age spectrum using the DAS winds shows the same vertical and meridional dispersive characteristics of the kinematic trajectory calculation. These results suggest that the current DAS products will not give realistic trace gas distributions for long integrations; they also help explain why the extra tropical mean ages determined in a number of previous DAS driven CTM s are too young compared with observations. Finally, we note trajectory-generated age spectra . show significant age anomalies correlated with the seasonal cycles. These anomalies can be linked to year-to-year variations in the tropical heating rate. The anomalies are

  9. Comparison of mid-Pliocene climate predictions produced by the HadAM3 and GCMAM3 General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, A.M.; Chandler, M.A.; Valdes, P.J.; Salzmann, U.; Lunt, D.J.; Dowsett, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The mid-Pliocene warm period (ca. 3 to 3.3??million years ago) has become an important interval of time for palaeoclimate modelling exercises, with a large number of studies published during the last decade. However, there has been no attempt to assess the degree of model dependency of the results obtained. Here we present an initial comparison of mid-Pliocene climatologies produced by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies and Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research atmosphere-only General Circulation Models (GCMAM3 and HadAM3). Whilst both models are consistent in the simulation of broad-scale differences in mid-Pliocene surface air temperature and total precipitation rates, significant variation is noted on regional and local scales. There are also significant differences in the model predictions of total cloud cover. A terrestrial data/model comparison, facilitated by the BIOME 4 model and a new data set of Piacenzian Stage land cover [Salzmann, U., Haywood, A.M., Lunt, D.J., Valdes, P.J., Hill, D.J., (2008). A new global biome reconstruction and data model comparison for the Middle Pliocene. Global Ecology and Biogeography 17, 432-447, doi:10.1111/j.1466-8238.2007.00381.x] and combined with the use of Kappa statistics, indicates that HadAM3-based biome predictions provide a closer fit to proxy data in the mid to high-latitudes. However, GCMAM3-based biomes in the tropics provide the closest fit to proxy data. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Variability of 500-mb geopotential heights in a general circulation model and the projection of regional greenhouse effect climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palecki, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Many researchers have utilized general circulation models (GCMs) in establishing climate change scenarios for specific regions or locations, despite the mismatch of spatial scales involved. A major underlying assumption involved in utilizing model output in this manner is that the GCM contains mid-tropospheric dynamics that are internally consistent with those of the real climate system. The main purpose of this study is examine the forms and processes of mid-tropospheric variability in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM, with the hope of shedding light on this model-analog strategy. The response of mean 500 mb and surface air temperature fields in the GISS GCM to a doubling of CO 2 indicates a substantial relationship between the two. Unfortunately, the GISS GCM demonstrates systematic flaws in its simulation of mid-tropospheric dynamics. These are revealed in an examination of high-frequency and low-frequency 500-mb teleconnections in the model. The shapes and amplitudes of known teleconnection patterns are not well simulated. This is likely due to the weak stationary wave structure found in the control run of the model. More importantly, several model teleconnections appear to coincide geographically with the patterns of mean climate change. This may indicate a direct relationship between the modeled mid-tropospheric dynamics and the spatial patterns of mean climate change. This finding has two important implications. First, it is necessary to further study the influence of GCM mid-tropospheric dynamics on the spatial distribution of climate changes being modeled. Second, and more fundamentally, spatially specific climate system feedbacks may be substantially affected by variations in teleconnection strength and frequency, potentially impacting the global climate far beyond the regional scale

  11. Variability of 500-MB Geopotential Heights in a General Circulation Model and the Projection of Regional Greenhouse Effect Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palecki, Michael Anthony

    1991-02-01

    Many researchers have utilized general circulation models (GCMs) in establishing climate change scenarios for specific regions or locations, despite the mismatch of spatial scales involved. A major underlying assumption involved in utilizing model output in this manner is that the GCM contains mid-tropospheric dynamics that are internally consistent with those of the real climate system. The main purpose of this study is examine the forms and processes of mid-tropospheric variability in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM, with the hope of shedding light on this model-analog strategy. The response of mean 500 mb and surface air temperature fields in the GISS GCM to a doubling of CO_2 indicates a substantial relationship between the two. Unfortunately, the GISS GCM demonstrates systematic flaws in its simulation of mid-tropospheric dynamics. These are revealed in an examination of high-frequency and low -frequency 500-mb teleconnections in the model. The shapes and amplitudes of known teleconnection patterns are not well simulated. This is likely due to the weak stationary wave structure found in the control run of the model. More importantly, several model teleconnections appear to coincide geographically with the patterns of mean climate change. This may indicate a direct relationship between the modelled mid-tropospheric dynamics and the spatial patterns of mean climate change. This finding has two important implications. First, it is necessary to further study the influence of GCM mid -tropospheric dynamics on the spatial distribution of climate changes being modelled. Second, and more fundamentally, spatially specific climate system feedbacks may be substantially affected by variations in teleconnection strength and frequency, potentially impacting the global climate far beyond the regional scale.

  12. Development and implementation of a Variable Infiltration Capacity model of surface hydrology into the General Circulation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lettenmaier, D.P.; Stamm, J.F.; Wood, E.F.

    1993-04-01

    A Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model is described for the representation of land surface hydrology in General Circulation Models (GCMs). The VIC model computes runoff as a function of the distribution of soil moisture capacity within a GCM grid cell. The major distinguishing feature of the VIC model relative to the bucket model currently used to represent the land surface in many GCMs is that it parameterizes the nonlinearity of the fraction of precipitation that infiltrates over a large area (hence the production of direct runoff) as a function of spatial average soil moisture storage, and that it models subsurface runoff between storms via a simple recession mechanism. The VIC model was incorporated into the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) GCM at R15 resolution (roughly 4.5 degrees latitude by 7.5 degrees longitude). Ten-year simulations of global climate were produced using the GFDL GCM with both VIC land surface hydrology, and, for comparison purposes, the standard bucket representation. Comparison of the ten year runs using the VIC model with those using bucket hydrology showed that for the VIC run, global average runoff increased, soil moisture decreased, evaporation decreased, land surface temperature increased, and precipitation decreased. As expected, changes in precipitation occurred primarily over the continents, especially in the northern hemisphere. Changes in the surface water balance for Africa, Australia, and South America were much less than for North American and Eurasia. Both VIC and bucket simulations of surface air temperature and precipitation were compared with gridded monthly average observation fields. These comparisons indicated that the VIC hydrology reproduced winter temperatures better, and summer temperatures worse, than the bucket model. The VIC hydrology better represented global precipitation, primarily as a result of partially reducing the upward bias in precipitation associated with the GFDL R15 bucket runs

  13. 78 FR 77662 - Notice of Availability (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center Construction (GPW/IT)--Tracy Site.... ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center... FR 65300) announcing the publication of the General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology...

  14. On the dynamics of droughts in northeast Brazil - Observations, theory and numerical experiments with a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, A. D.; Shukla, J.

    1981-01-01

    The establishment of a thermally direct local circulation which has its ascending branch at about 10 deg N and its descending branch over northeast Brazil and the adjoining oceanic region is proposed as a possible mechanism for the occurrence of severe droughts over this Brazilian region. The driving for this anomalous circulation is provided by enhanced moist convection due to the effect of warmer sea surface anomalies over the northern tropical Atlantic and cooling associated with colder sea surface temperature anomalies in the southern tropical Atlantic. A simple primitive equation model is used to calculate the frictionally-controlled and thermally-driven circulation due to a prescribed heating function in a resting atmosphere, and a series of numerical experiments are carried out to test the sensitivity of the Goddard Laboratory's model to prescribed sea surface temperature anomalies over the tropical Atlantic.

  15. RISK ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE WATERS ASSOCIATED WITH WATER CIRCULATION TECHNOLOGIES ON TROUT FARMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Sidoruk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic development of aquaculture has led to an increasing impact on the status of surface waters. Fish production generates wastes that, at high concentrations, may present a serious risk to the aquatic environment. Studies on the assessment of the impact of water management technologies in trout production on the quality of surface waters were conducted in 2011. Six farms were selected for the studies and were divided into two groups based on water management solutions (n = 3: farms with a flow through system (FTS and farms with a recirculation aquaculture system (RAS. On all farms, water measurement points were set and they depicted the quality of inflow water, the quality of water in ponds and the quality of outflow water. The studies did not demonstrate any impact of applied technology on electrolyte conductivity or calcium and magnesium concentrations in outflow water from a trout operation. In addition, it was found that the use of water for production purposes resulted in a slight increase in phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations in waste waters.

  16. Improving groundwater predictions utilizing seasonal precipitation forecasts from general circulation models forced with sea surface temperature forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almanaseer, Naser; Sankarasubramanian, A.; Bales, Jerad

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have found a significant association between climatic variability and basin hydroclimatology, particularly groundwater levels, over the southeast United States. The research reported in this paper evaluates the potential in developing 6-month-ahead groundwater-level forecasts based on the precipitation forecasts from ECHAM 4.5 General Circulation Model Forced with Sea Surface Temperature forecasts. Ten groundwater wells and nine streamgauges from the USGS Groundwater Climate Response Network and Hydro-Climatic Data Network were selected to represent groundwater and surface water flows, respectively, having minimal anthropogenic influences within the Flint River Basin in Georgia, United States. The writers employ two low-dimensional models [principle component regression (PCR) and canonical correlation analysis (CCA)] for predicting groundwater and streamflow at both seasonal and monthly timescales. Three modeling schemes are considered at the beginning of January to predict winter (January, February, and March) and spring (April, May, and June) streamflow and groundwater for the selected sites within the Flint River Basin. The first scheme (model 1) is a null model and is developed using PCR for every streamflow and groundwater site using previous 3-month observations (October, November, and December) available at that particular site as predictors. Modeling schemes 2 and 3 are developed using PCR and CCA, respectively, to evaluate the role of precipitation forecasts in improving monthly and seasonal groundwater predictions. Modeling scheme 3, which employs a CCA approach, is developed for each site by considering observed groundwater levels from nearby sites as predictands. The performance of these three schemes is evaluated using two metrics (correlation coefficient and relative RMS error) by developing groundwater-level forecasts based on leave-five-out cross-validation. Results from the research reported in this paper show that using

  17. Application of General Circulation Models to Assess the Potential Impact of Climate Change on Potential Distribution and Relative Abundance of Melanoplus sanguinipes (Fabricius (Orthoptera: Acrididae in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Olfert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate is the dominant factor determining the distribution and abundance of most insect species. In recent years, the issue of climatic changes caused by human activities and the effects on agriculture has raised concern. General circulation model scenarios were applied to a bioclimatic model of Melanoplus sanguinipes to assess the potential impact of global warming on its distribution and relative abundance. Native to North America and widely distributed, M. sanguinipes is one of the grasshopper species of the continent most responsible for economic damage to grain, oilseed, pulse, and forage crops. Compared to predicted range and distribution under current climate conditions, model results indicated that M. sanguinipes would have increased range and relative abundance under the three general circulation model scenarios in more northern regions of North America. Conversely, model output predicted that the range of this crop pest could contract in regions where climate conditions became limiting.

  18. Nuclear Technology Review 2013. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In response to requests by Member States, the Secretariat produces a comprehensive Nuclear Technology Review each year. Attached is this year's report, which highlights notable developments principally in 2012. The Nuclear Technology Review 2013 covers the following areas: power applications, atomic and nuclear data, accelerators and research reactors, and nuclear sciences and applications. Additional documentation associated with the Nuclear Technology Review 2013 is available on the Agency's website1 in English on nuclear hydrogen production technology and preliminary lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident for advanced nuclear power plant technology development. Information on the IAEA's activities related to nuclear science and technology can also be found in the IAEA's Annual Report 2012 (GC(57)/3), in particular the Technology section, and the Technical Cooperation Report for 2012 (GC(57)/INF/4). The document has been modified to take account, to the extent possible, of specific comments by the Board of Governors and other comments received from Member States. (author)

  19. Streamflow changes in the Sierra Nevada, California, simulated using a statistically downscaled general circulation model scenario of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilby, Robert L.; Dettinger, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    Simulations of future climate using general circulation models (GCMs) suggest that rising concentrations of greenhouse gases may have significant consequences for the global climate. Of less certainty is the extent to which regional scale (i.e., sub-GCM grid) environmental processes will be affected. In this chapter, a range of downscaling techniques are critiqued. Then a relatively simple (yet robust) statistical downscaling technique and its use in the modelling of future runoff scenarios for three river basins in the Sierra Nevada, California, is described. This region was selected because GCM experiments driven by combined greenhouse-gas and sulphate-aerosol forcings consistently show major changes in the hydro-climate of the southwest United States by the end of the 21st century. The regression-based downscaling method was used to simulate daily rainfall and temperature series for streamflow modelling in three Californian river basins under current-and future-climate conditions. The downscaling involved just three predictor variables (specific humidity, zonal velocity component of airflow, and 500 hPa geopotential heights) supplied by the U.K. Meteorological Office couple ocean-atmosphere model (HadCM2) for the grid point nearest the target basins. When evaluated using independent data, the model showed reasonable skill at reproducing observed area-average precipitation, temperature, and concomitant streamflow variations. Overall, the downscaled data resulted in slight underestimates of mean annual streamflow due to underestimates of precipitation in spring and positive temperature biases in winter. Differences in the skill of simulated streamflows amongst the three basins were attributed to the smoothing effects of snowpack on streamflow responses to climate forcing. The Merced and American River basins drain the western, windward slope of the Sierra Nevada and are snowmelt dominated, whereas the Carson River drains the eastern, leeward slope and is a mix of

  20. Health Management Technology as a General Solution Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Yoshifumi; Tasaki, Hiroshi; Iwami, Taro; Tsuchiya, Naoki

    Health maintenance and improvement of humans, artifacts, and nature are pressing requirements considering the problems human beings have faced. In this article, the health management technology is proposed by centering cause-effect structure. The important aspect of the technology is evolvement through human-machine collaboration in response to changes of target systems. One of the reasons why the cause-effect structure is centered in the technology is its feature of transparency to humans by instinct point of view. The notion has been spreaded over wide application areas such as quality control, energy management, and healthcare. Some experiments were conducted to prove effectiveness of the technology in the article.

  1. Developing a Comprehensive View of General Technological Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzer, Eric

    A literature review was conducted to define technological literacy and its implications for the role of education in preparing citizens in a participatory democracy, as consumers and family members, for employment, and in the spiritual/philosophical dimensions of life as they relate to our conceptions of technology. A definition of technological…

  2. Eddy Effects in the General Circulation, Spanning Mean Currents, Mesoscale Eddies, and Topographic Generation, Including Submesoscale Nests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    layer the eddy flux is significantly diabatic with a shallow eddy-induced (Lagrangian) circulation cell and down-gradient lateral diapycnal flux. These...3D Schematic representation of the eddy effects on the mean buoyancy field decomposed between adiabatic eddy-induced advection and diabatic ...plane). The diabatic component acts to smooth out surface buoyancy extrema and is shown as sinuous arrows in the top plane. Interior diabatic fluxes

  3. Assessment of a general methodology for the analysis of natural circulation stability with water at supercritical pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debrah, K. S.

    2014-07-01

    To advance nuclear energy to meet future energy needs, the concept of Super Critical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) as part or Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors was introduced with plans to deploy by 2030. Supercritical water-cooled reactors pose new challenges in stability and natural circulation phenomena at supercritical pressures because of the strong variability of thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties. ln this research, included in the frame work of the International Atomic Energy Agency (lAEA) fellowship and Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on H eat transfer Behavior and Thermo hydraulics Codes Testing for SCWRs , the natural circulation H 2 O experimental data at supercritical pressures of 25 MPa obtained at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) of China, was used to evaluate the predictions of different system codes: RELAP5/MOD3.3, STAR-CCM+ as well as three (3) different and independent developed in-house codes (Ishii-sup loop, NCLoop T ran and NCLoop L ine). Stability analyses of an idealized loop (loop equivalent to CIAE natural circulation loop) of uniform diameter equivalent to the CIAE natural circulation loop at 25 MPa was performed using RELAP5 and an in-house code (Ishii-sup Loop). It was found for both RELAP and Ishii-sup Loop that, when heat structures are accounted for in models equipped with heat transfer and friction correlations for 'normal' fluids, the comparison with experimental data is not completely satisfactory because the observed experimental oscillations were delayed in simulation. It has also been found that the stability margin was slightly earlier than the peak of the flow rate-power curve at a given inlet enthalpy. Results from STAR-CCM+ was also compared with results obtained with RELAP5 and the in-house code of NCLoop. Even though STAR-CCM+ predicted a lower flow rate than the in-house codes, all codes exhibited the ability to predict the instability and results from all codes compared favorably. Stability

  4. 15 CFR Supplement No. 2 to Part 774 - General Technology and Software Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... necessary” information. 2. General Software Note. License Exception TSU (“mass market” software) is... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General Technology and Software Notes... Software Notes 1. General Technology Note. The export of “technology” that is “required” for the...

  5. Role of the Atmospheric General Circulation on the Temporal Variability of the Aerosol Distribution over Dakar (Senegal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senghor, Habib; Machu, Eric; Hourdin, Frederic; Thierno Gaye, Amadou; Gueye, Moussa; Simina Drame, Mamadou

    2016-04-01

    The natural or anthropogenic aerosols play an important role on the climate system and the human health through their optical and physical properties. To evaluate the potential impacts of these aerosols, it is necessary to better understand their temporal variability in relation with the atmospheric ciculation. Some previous case studies have pointed out the influence of the sea-breeze circulation on the vertical distribution of the aerosols along the Western African coast. In the present work, Lidar (Ceilometer CL31; located at Dakar) data are used for the period 2012-2014 together with Level-3 data from CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations) between 2007 and 2014 for studying the seasonal cycle of the vertical distribution of aerosols over Dakar (17.5°W, 14.74°N). Both instruments show strong seasonal variability with a maximum of aerosol occurrence in May over Dakar. The CL31 shows a crucial impact of sea-breeze circulation on the diurnal cycle of the Mixed Atmospheric Boundary Layer and a strong dust signal in spring in the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) located between 500 and 1000 m altitudes over Dakar.

  6. [MODERN EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY MASTERING PRACTICAL SKILLS OF GENERAL PRACTITIONERS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, L I; Prokopchuk, Y V; Naydyonova, O V

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the experience of postgraduate training of general practitioners--family medicine. Identified current trends, forms and methods of pedagogical innovations that enhance the quality of learning and mastering the practical skills of primary professionals providing care.

  7. An Evaluation of the Large-Scale Implementation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC Using an Ocean General Circulation Model with Low-Complexity Atmospheric Feedback Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous investigations of the large-scale deployment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversions (OTEC systems are extended by allowing some atmospheric feedback in an ocean general circulation model. A modified ocean-atmosphere thermal boundary condition is used where relaxation corresponds to atmospheric longwave radiation to space, and an additional term expresses horizontal atmospheric transport. This produces lower steady-state OTEC power maxima (8 to 10.2 TW instead of 14.1 TW for global OTEC scenarios, and 7.2 to 9.3 TW instead of 11.9 TW for OTEC implementation within 100 km of coastlines. When power production peaks, power intensity remains practically unchanged, at 0.2 TW per Sverdrup of OTEC deep cold seawater, suggesting a similar degradation of the OTEC thermal resource. Large-scale environmental effects include surface cooling in low latitudes and warming elsewhere, with a net heat intake within the water column. These changes develop rapidly from the propagation of Kelvin and Rossby waves, and ocean current advection. Two deep circulation cells are generated in the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific basins. The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC is reinforced while an AMOC-like feature appears in the North Pacific, with deep convective winter events at high latitudes. Transport between the Indo-Pacific and the Southern Ocean is strengthened, with impacts on the Atlantic via the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC.

  8. Numerical Analysis of General Trends in Single-Phase Natural Circulation in a 2D-Annular Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Desrayaud

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to address fluid flow behavior of natural circulation in a 2D-annular loop filled with water. A two-dimensional, numerical analysis of natural convection in a 2D-annular closed-loop thermosyphon has been performed for various radius ratios from 1.2 to 2.0, the loop being heated at a constant flux over the bottom half and cooled at a constant temperature over the top half. It has been numerically shown that natural convection in a 2D-annular closed-loop thermosyphon is capable of showing pseudoconductive regime at pitchfork bifurcation, stationary convective regimes without and with recirculating regions occurring at the entrance of the exchangers, oscillatory convection at Hopf bifurcation and Lorenz-like chaotic flow. The complexity of the dynamic properties experimentally encountered in toroidal or rectangular loops is thus also found here.

  9. Adoption and use of digital technologies among general dental practitioners in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zande, Marieke M; Gorter, Ronald C; Aartman, Irene H A; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    To investigate (1) the degree of digital technology adoption among general dental practitioners, and to assess (2) which personal and practice factors are associated with technology use. A questionnaire was distributed among a stratified sample of 1000 general dental practitioners in the Netherlands, to measure the use of fifteen administrative, communicative, clinical and diagnostic technologies, as well as personal factors and dental practice characteristics. The response rate was 31.3%; 65.1% replied to the questionnaire on paper and 34.9% online. Each specific digital technology was used by between 93.2% and 6.8% of the dentists. Administrative technologies were generally used by more dentists than clinical technologies. Dentists had adopted an average number of 6.3 ± 2.3 technologies. 22.5% were low technology users (0 to 4 technologies), 46.2% were intermediate technology users (5 to 7 technologies) and 31.3% were high technology users (8 to 12 technologies). High technology users more frequently had a specialization (ptechnology users, and invested more hours per year in professional activities (p=0.026) than intermediate technology users. High technology use was also more common for dentists working in practices with a higher average number of patients per year (ptechnologies. Technology use is associated with various patterns of person-specific factors, and is higher when working in larger dental practices. The findings provide insight into the current state of digital technology adoption in dental practices. Further exploration why some dentists are more reluctant to adopt technologies than others is valuable for the dental profession's agility in adjusting to technological developments.

  10. Training for Fluency and Generalization of Math Facts Using Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musti-Rao, Shobana; Lynch, Tom Liam; Plati, Erin

    2015-01-01

    As American students struggle with basic mathematical skills, the importance of math fact fluency has gained the attention of educators and researchers. Generalization of math fact fluency is also important for the transfer of skills to other settings and formats, assisting students in the completion of more varied and complicated math tasks. This…

  11. Technology Integration by General Education Teachers of English Language Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, Marie Simone

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing population of English language learners (ELLs) in elementary schools across the United States, and a current academic achievement gap between ELLs and non-ELLs. Researchers have found that integration of Web 2.0 tools has benefitted ELLs in language learning settings, outside of the general classroom. The research problem…

  12. Infusing technology into general studies program: The Nnamdi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is intended to give a summary of the efforts of school of general studies, Nnamdi Azikiwe University at moving in specified dimensions to realise her present status in blended procedures. It is hoped that the measure will be introductory enough to encourage and motivate other tertiary institutions to get in step.

  13. 78 FR 65300 - Notice of Availability (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center Construction (GPW/IT)--Tracy Site... proposed action to construct a General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center at Defense..., Suite 02G09, Alexandria, VA 22350- 3100. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ann Engelberger at (703) 767...

  14. 42 CFR 412.87 - Additional payment for new medical services and technologies: General provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... adequate, CMS will determine whether the charges of the cases involving a new medical service or technology... technology occurs in many different DRGs). Standardized charges reflect the actual charges of a case adjusted... technologies: General provisions. 412.87 Section 412.87 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES...

  15. The Mars Dust Cycle: Investigating the Effects of Radiatively Active Water Ice Clouds on Surface Stresses and Dust Lifting Potential with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is a critically important component of Mars' current climate system. Dust is present in the atmosphere of Mars year-round but the dust loading varies with season in a generally repeatable manner. Dust has a significant influence on the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation. The dust cycle is the most difficult of the three climate cycles (CO2, water, and dust) to model realistically with general circulation models. Until recently, numerical modeling investigations of the dust cycle have typically not included the effects of couplings to the water cycle through cloud formation. In the Martian atmosphere, dust particles likely provide the seed nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation of water ice clouds. As ice coats atmospheric dust grains, the newly formed cloud particles exhibit different physical and radiative characteristics. Thus, the coupling between the dust and water cycles likely affects the distributions of dust, water vapor and water ice, and thus atmospheric heating and cooling and the resulting circulations. We use the NASA Ames Mars GCM to investigate the effects of radiatively active water ice clouds on surface stress and the potential for dust lifting. The model includes a state-of-the-art water ice cloud microphysics package and a radiative transfer scheme that accounts for the radiative effects of CO2 gas, dust, and water ice clouds. We focus on simulations that are radiatively forced by a prescribed dust map, and we compare simulations that do and do not include radiatively active clouds. Preliminary results suggest that the magnitude and spatial patterns of surface stress (and thus dust lifting potential) are substantial influenced by the radiative effects of water ice clouds.

  16. Systems concept for speech technology application in general aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, R. A.; Bergeron, H.

    1984-01-01

    The application potential of voice recognition and synthesis circuits for general aviation, single-pilot IFR (SPIFR) situations is examined. The viewpoint of the pilot was central to workload analyses and assessment of the effectiveness of the voice systems. A twin-engine, high performance general aviation aircraft on a cross-country fixed route was employed as the study model. No actual control movements were considered and other possible functions were scored by three IFR-rated instructors. The SPIFR was concluded helpful in alleviating visual and manual workloads during take-off, approach and landing, particularly for data retrieval and entry tasks. Voice synthesis was an aid in alerting a pilot to in-flight problems. It is expected that usable systems will be available within 5 yr.

  17. Quiet Clean General Aviation Turbofan (QCGAT) technology study, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The preliminary design of an engine which satisfies the requirements of a quiet, clean, general aviation turbofan (QCGAT) engine is described. Also an experimental program to demonstrate performance is suggested. The T700 QCGAT engine preliminary design indicates that it will radiate noise at the same level as an aircraft without engine noise, have exhaust emissions within the EPA 1981 Standards, have lower fuel consumption than is available in comparable size engines, and have sufficient life for five years between overhauls.

  18. Design and Implementation of a Parallel Multivariate Ensemble Kalman Filter for the Poseidon Ocean General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppenne, Christian L.; Rienecker, Michele M.; Koblinsky, Chester (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A multivariate ensemble Kalman filter (MvEnKF) implemented on a massively parallel computer architecture has been implemented for the Poseidon ocean circulation model and tested with a Pacific Basin model configuration. There are about two million prognostic state-vector variables. Parallelism for the data assimilation step is achieved by regionalization of the background-error covariances that are calculated from the phase-space distribution of the ensemble. Each processing element (PE) collects elements of a matrix measurement functional from nearby PEs. To avoid the introduction of spurious long-range covariances associated with finite ensemble sizes, the background-error covariances are given compact support by means of a Hadamard (element by element) product with a three-dimensional canonical correlation function. The methodology and the MvEnKF configuration are discussed. It is shown that the regionalization of the background covariances; has a negligible impact on the quality of the analyses. The parallel algorithm is very efficient for large numbers of observations but does not scale well beyond 100 PEs at the current model resolution. On a platform with distributed memory, memory rather than speed is the limiting factor.

  19. A new ionospheric electron precipitation module coupled with RAM-SCB within the geospace general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yiqun; Jordanova, Vania K.; Ridley, Aaron J.; Albert, Jay M.; Horne, Richard B.; Jeffery, Christopher A.

    2016-09-01

    Electron precipitation down to the atmosphere due to wave-particle scattering in the magnetosphere contributes significantly to the auroral ionospheric conductivity. In order to obtain the auroral conductivity in global MHD models that are incapable of capturing kinetic physics in the magnetosphere, MHD parameters are often used to estimate electron precipitation flux for the conductivity calculation. Such an MHD approach, however, lacks self-consistency in representing the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes. In this study we improve the coupling processes in global models with a more physical method. We calculate the physics-based electron precipitation from the ring current and map it to the ionospheric altitude for solving the ionospheric electrodynamics. In particular, we use the BATS-R-US (Block Adaptive Tree Scheme-Roe type-Upstream) MHD model coupled with the kinetic ring current model RAM-SCB (Ring current-Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistent Magnetic field (B)) that solves pitch angle-dependent electron distribution functions, to study the global circulation dynamics during the 25-26 January 2013 storm event. Since the electron precipitation loss is mostly governed by wave-particle resonant scattering in the magnetosphere, we further investigate two loss methods of specifying electron precipitation loss associated with wave-particle interactions: (1) using pitch angle diffusion coefficients Dαα(E,α) determined from the quasi-linear theory, with wave spectral and plasma density obtained from statistical observations (named as "diffusion coefficient method") and (2) using electron lifetimes τ(E) independent on pitch angles inferred from the above diffusion coefficients (named as "lifetime method"). We found that both loss methods demonstrate similar temporal evolution of the trapped ring current electrons, indicating that the impact of using different kinds of loss rates is small on the trapped electron population. However, for the

  20. A study of long-term trends in mineral dust aerosol distributions in Asia using a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Makiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki; Takemura, Toshihiko

    2004-10-01

    Dust events have been observed in Japan with high frequency since 2000. On the other hand, the frequency of dust storms is said to have decreased in the desert regions of China since about the middle of the 1970s. This study simulates dust storms and transportation of mineral dust aerosols in the east Asia region from 1981 to 2001 using an aerosol transport model, Spectral Radiation-Transport Model for Aerosol Species (SPRINTARS), implemented in the Center for Climate System Research/National Institute for Environmental Studies atmospheric global circulation model, in order to investigate the main factors that control a dust event and its long-term variation. The model was forced to simulate a real atmospheric condition by a nudging technique using European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts reanalysis data on wind velocities, temperature, specific humidity, soil wetness, and snow depth. From a comparison between the long-term change in the dust emission and model parameters, it is found that the wind speed near the surface level had a significant influence on the dust emission, and snow is also an important factor in the early spring dust emission. The simulated results suggested that dust emissions from northeast China have a great impact on dust mass concentration in downwind regions, such as the cities of northeastern China, Korea, and Japan. When the frequency of dust events was high in Japan, a low-pressure system tended to develop over the northeast China region that caused strong winds. From 2000 to 2001 the simulated dust emission flux decreased in the Taklimakan desert and the northwestern part of China, while it increased in the Gobi desert and the northeastern part of China. Consequently, dust particles seem to be transported more from the latter region by prevailing westerlies in the springtime to downwind areas as actually observed. In spite of the similarity, however, there is still a large disagreement between observed and simulated dust

  1. A Variable-Resolution Stretched-Grid General Circulation Model and Data Assimilation System with Multiple Areas of Interest: Studying the Anomalous Regional Climate Events of 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox-Rabinovitz, Michael S.; Takacs, Lawrence; Govindaraju, Ravi C.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The new stretched-grid design with multiple (four) areas of interest, one at each global quadrant, is implemented into both a stretched-grid GCM (general circulation model) and a stretched-grid data assimilation system (DAS). The four areas of interest include: the U.S./Northern Mexico, the El Nino area/Central South America, India/China, and the Eastern Indian Ocean/Australia. Both the stretched-grid GCM and DAS annual (November 1997 through December 1998) integrations are performed with 50 km regional resolution. The efficient regional down-scaling to mesoscales is obtained for each of the four areas of interest while the consistent interactions between regional and global scales and the high quality of global circulation, are preserved. This is the advantage of the stretched-grid approach. The global variable resolution DAS incorporating the stretched-grid GCM has been developed and tested as an efficient tool for producing regional analyses and diagnostics with enhanced mesoscale resolution. The anomalous regional climate events of 1998 that occurred over the U.S., Mexico, South America, China, India, African Sahel, and Australia are investigated in both simulation and data assimilation modes. Tree assimilated products are also used, along with gauge precipitation data, for validating the simulation results. The obtained results show that the stretched-grid GCM and DAS are capable of producing realistic high quality simulated and assimilated products at mesoscale resolution for regional climate studies and applications.

  2. CONCENTRATION OF CIRCULATING IMMUNE COMPLEXES IN EXPERIMENTAL GENERALIZED INFLAMMATORY PROCESS IN ANIMALS OF DIFFERENT AGE UNDER ACTION OF IMMUNOMODULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko T.I.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Under physiological conditions a formation and a presence of the CEC in liquids is one of the manifestations of the immune response to receipt of antigens and an important factor, which provides immunity. Circulating immune complexes act as agents involved in the regulation of immune response and maintaining communication between the immune system and other regulatory systems of the body and direction to his defense. The intensity of the formation of the CEC may vary under the influence of infectious antigens and immune preparations. Material and methods. Material for the experiment were white male rats 3 months of age ("young" weighing 100 -140gr. (n = 40 and 22-month ("old" weighing 200 -240 g. (n = 40. And the first (n=10 and second (n=10 groups of rats served as controls. Third (n=15 and fourth (n=15 group of animals was injected intraperitoneal daily agar culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa № 27835 ATCC (injected with 1.5 ml suspension of bacteria, which contained 109 CFU/ml. Fifth (n=15 and sixth (n=15 groups of animals were injected intraperitoneally daily agar culture of Escherichia coli number 25592, ATCC (injected with 1.5 ml of bacteria suspension which contain 109 CFU/ml. Control animals were taken from the experiment by decapitation 3rd day – n=20. Control and infected animals were taken from the experiment by decapitation at 3rd day - n=27, 5th day – n=27 and 7th day – n=26. In the second phase of the experiment Ia (n = 6 and IIa (n = 6 were the control group of rats following administration of the experimental composite preparation consisting amino acids, nucleotides, enzymes, vitamins (MF. In two age groups of animals with inflammation induced by E. coli suspension treated with MF 20 mсl 3- month rats (IIIa group n = 6 and 40 mсl 22-month rats (IVa group n = 6. Ib (n = 6 and IIb (n = 6 were the control group of rats after the injection of comparison, containing mannitol and natural antioxidant betakaroten (PO. In two age

  3. Application of a general purpose finite element program system in pressure vessel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamodt, B.; Sandsmark, N.; Medonos, S.

    1977-01-01

    Main advantages of using general purpose finite element program systems in structural analysis are summarized. Several illustrative applications of the program system SESAM-69 to pressure vessel problems are described. The first example is a dynamic analysis of the motor housing of the internal main circulation pump of a BWR nuclear reactor. The next example is a transient heat conduction and stress analysis of deflector of feeding nozzle of PWR nuclear reactor. Then, numerical calculations of stress intensity factors and fatigue crack growth of semi-elliptical surface cracks are discussed. And finally, an elasto-plastic analysis of a thick plate with edge-cracks is considered. It is concluded that due to the fact that general purpose finite element program systems are general and user-orientated, they will gain increasingly higher popularity in the years ahead

  4. Control of primary production in the Arctic by nutrients and light: insights from a high resolution ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Popova

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the Arctic Basin was generally considered to be a low productivity area and was afforded little attention in global- or even basin-scale ecosystem modelling studies. Due to anthropogenic climate change however, the sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean is undergoing an unexpectedly fast retreat, exposing increasingly large areas of the basin to sunlight. As indicated by existing Arctic phenomena such as ice-edge blooms, this decline in sea-ice is liable to encourage pronounced growth of phytoplankton in summer and poses pressing questions concerning the future of Arctic ecosystems. It thus provides a strong impetus to modelling of this region.

    The Arctic Ocean is an area where plankton productivity is heavily influenced by physical factors. As these factors are strongly responding to climate change, we analyse here the results from simulations of the 1/4° resolution global ocean NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean model coupled with the MEDUSA (Model for Ecosystem Dynamics, carbon Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification biogeochemical model, with a particular focus on the Arctic basin. Simulated productivity is consistent with the limited observations for the Arctic, with significant production occurring both under the sea-ice and at the thermocline, locations that are difficult to sample in the field.

    Results also indicate that a substantial fraction of the variability in Arctic primary production can be explained by two key physical factors: (i the maximum penetration of winter mixing, which determines the amount of nutrients available for summer primary production, and (ii short-wave radiation at the ocean surface, which controls the magnitude of phytoplankton blooms. A strong empirical correlation was found in the model output between primary production and these two factors, highlighting the importance of physical processes in the Arctic Ocean.

  5. Impacts of the cloud structure's latitudinal variation on the general circulation of the Venus atmosphere as modeled by the LMD-GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate-Lopez, Itziar; Lebonnois, Sébastien

    2017-04-01

    A new simulation of Venus atmospheric circulation obtained with the LMD Venus GCM is described and the impact of cloud's latitudinal structure on the general circulation is analyzed. The model used here is based on that presented in Lebonnois et al. (2016). However, in the present simulation we consider the latitudinal variation of the cloud structure (Haus et al., 2014) both for the solar heating and to compute the infrared net-exchange rate matrix used in the radiative transfer module. The new cloud treatment affects mainly the balance in the angular momentum and the zonal wind distribution. Consequently, the agreement between the vertical profile of the modeled mean zonal wind and the profiles measured by different probes, is clearly improved from previous simulations in which zonal winds below the clouds were weak (roughly half the observed values). Moreover, the equatorial jet obtained at the base of the cloud deck is now more consistent with the observations. In Lebonnois et al. (2016) it was too strong compared to mid-latitudes, but in the present simulation the equatorial jet is less intense than the mid-latitude jets, in concordance with cloud-tracking measurements (Hueso et al., 2015). Since the atmospheric waves play a crucial role in the angular momentum budget of the Venus's atmospheric circulation, we analyze the wave activity by means of the Fast Fourier Transform technique studying the frequency spectrum of temperature, zonal and meridional wind fields. Modifications in the activity of the different types of waves present in the Venusian atmosphere compared to Lebonnois et al. (2016) are discussed, in terms of horizontal and vertical transport of the angular momentum by diurnal and semi-diurnal tides, barotropic and baroclinic waves, and Rossby and Kelvin type waves. Haus R., Kappel D. and Arnold G., 2014. Atmospheric thermal structure and cloud features in the southern hemisphere of Venus as retrieved from VIRTIS/VEX radiation measurements. Icarus

  6. Global environmental cycling of gamma-HCH and DDT in the 1980s--a study using a coupled atmosphere and ocean general circulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmo, Francesca; Lammel, Gerhard; Maier-Reimer, Ernst

    2009-09-01

    A coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model, ECHAM5-MPIOM, was used to study the multicompartmental cycling and long-range transport of persistent and semivolatile organics. Multiphase systems in air and ocean are covered by submodels for atmospheric aerosols, HAM, and marine biogeochemistry, HAMOCC5, respectively. The model, furthermore, encompasses 2D surface compartments, i.e. top soil, vegetation surfaces and sea-ice. The total environmental fate of gamma-hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma-HCH, lindane) and dichlorophenyltrichloroethane (DDT) in agriculture were studied. DDT is mostly present in the soils, the water-soluble gamma-HCH in soils and ocean. DDT has the longest residence time in almost all compartments. Quasi-steady state with regard to substance accumulation is reached within a few years in air and vegetation surfaces. In seawater the partitioning to suspended and sinking particles contributes to the vertical transport of substances. On the global scale deep water formation is, however, found to be more efficient. Up to 30% of DDT but only less than 0.2% of gamma-HCH in seawater are stored in particulate matter. On the time scale studied (1 decade) and on global scale substance transport in the environment is determined by the fast atmospheric circulation. The meridional transport mechanism, for both compounds, is significantly enhanced by multi-hopping. Net meridional transport in the ocean is effective only regionally, mostly by currents along the western boundaries of Africa and the Americas. The total environmental burdens of the substances experience a net northward migration from their source regions, which is more pronounced for DDT than for gamma-HCH. Due to the application distribution, however, after 10 years of simulation 21% of the global environmental burden of gamma-HCH and 12% of DDT have accumulated in the Arctic.

  7. Chemistry-Climate Interactions in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model. 2; New Insights into Modeling the Pre-Industrial Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, J. Lee; Shindell, D. T.; Koch, D.; Rind, D.; Hansen, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the chemical (hydroxyl and ozone) and dynamical response to changing from present day to pre-industrial conditions in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies General Circulation Model (GISS GMC). We identify three main improvements not included by many other works. Firstly, our model includes interactive cloud calculations. Secondly we reduce sulfate aerosol which impacts NOx partitioning hence Ox distributions. Thirdly we reduce sea surface temperatures and increase ocean ice coverage which impact water vapor and ground albedo respectively. Changing the ocean data (hence water vapor and ozone) produces a potentially important feedback between the Hadley circulation and convective cloud cover. Our present day run (run 1, control run) global mean OH value was 9.8 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. For our best estimate of pre-industrial conditions run (run 2) which featured modified chemical emissions, sulfate aerosol and sea surface temperatures/ocean ice, this value changed to 10.2 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. Reducing only the chemical emissions to pre-industrial levels in run 1 (run 3) resulted in this value increasing to 10.6 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. Reducing the sulfate in run 3 to pre-industrial levels (run 4) resulted in a small increase in global mean OH (10.7 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc). Changing the ocean data in run 4 to pre-industrial levels (run 5) led to a reduction in this value to 10.3 x 10(exp 5) molecules/cc. Mean tropospheric ozone burdens were 262, 181, 180, 180, and 182 Tg for runs 1-5 respectively.

  8. Can we determine what controls the spatio-temporal distribution of d-excess and 17O-excess in precipitation using the LMDZ general circulation model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Risi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined measurements of the H218O and HDO isotopic ratios in precipitation, leading to second-order parameter D-excess, have provided additional constraints on past climates compared to the H218O isotopic ratio alone. More recently, measurements of H217O have led to another second-order parameter: 17O-excess. Recent studies suggest that 17O-excess in polar ice may provide information on evaporative conditions at the moisture source. However, the processes controlling the spatio-temporal distribution of 17O-excess are still far from being fully understood. We use the isotopic general circulation model (GCM LMDZ to better understand what controls d-excess and 17O-excess in precipitation at present-day (PD and during the last glacial maximum (LGM. The simulation of D-excess and 17O-excess is evaluated against measurements in meteoric water, water vapor and polar ice cores. A set of sensitivity tests and diagnostics are used to quantify the relative effects of evaporative conditions (sea surface temperature and relative humidity, Rayleigh distillation, mixing between vapors from different origins, precipitation re-evaporation and supersaturation during condensation at low temperature. In LMDZ, simulations suggest that in the tropics convective processes and rain re-evaporation are important controls on precipitation D-excess and 17O-excess. In higher latitudes, the effect of distillation, mixing between vapors from different origins and supersaturation are the most important controls. For example, the lower d-excess and 17O-excess at LGM simulated at LGM are mainly due to the supersaturation effect. The effect of supersaturation is however very sensitive to a parameter whose tuning would require more measurements and laboratory experiments. Evaporative conditions had previously been suggested to be key controlling factors of d-excess and 17O-excess, but LMDZ underestimates their role. More generally, some shortcomings in the simulation of 17O

  9. 77 FR 70792 - Privacy Act of 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-004 General Information Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... 1974; Department of Homeland Security/ALL-004 General Information Technology Access Account Records..., Department of Homeland Security/ALL-004 General Information Technology Access Account Records System of... name: DHS/ALL-004 General Information Technology Access Account Records System of Records. Security...

  10. The climatology of carbon monoxide and water vapor on Mars as observed by CRISM and modeled by the GEM-Mars general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Daerden, Frank; Neary, Lori; Khayat, Alain

    2018-02-01

    Radiative transfer modeling of near-infrared spectra taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) instrument onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) enables the column-integrated abundance of carbon monoxide (CO) and water vapor (H2O) to be retrieved. These results provide a detailed global description of the seasonal and spatial distribution of CO in the Mars atmosphere and new information about the interannual variability of H2O. The CRISM retrievals show the seasonally and globally averaged carbon monoxide mixing ratio to be near 800 ppm, but with strong seasonal variations, especially at high latitudes. At low latitudes, the carbon monoxide mixing ratio varies in response to the mean seasonal cycle of surface pressure and shows little variation with topography. At high latitudes, carbon monoxide is depleted in the summer hemisphere by a factor of two or more, while in the winter hemisphere there is relatively higher mixing ratio in regions with low-lying topography. Water vapor shows only modest interannual variations, with the largest observed difference being unusually dry conditions in the wake of the Mars Year 28 global dust storm. Modeling results from the GEM-Mars general circulation model generally reproduce the observed seasonal and spatial trends and provide insight into the underlying physical processes.

  11. Simulations of the September 1987 lower thermospheric tides with the National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesen, C.G.; Roble, R.G.

    1991-01-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM) was used to simulate incoherent scatter radar observations of the lower thermosphere tides during the first Lower Thermosphere Coupling Study (LTCS) campaign, September 21-26, 1987. The TIGCM utilized time-varying histories of the model input fields obtained from the World Data Center for the LTCS period. These model inputs included solar flux, total hemispheric power, solar wind data from which the cross-polar-cap potential was derived, and geomagnetic K p index. Calculations were made for the semidiurnal ion temperatures and horizontal neutral winds at locations representative of Arecibo, Millstone Hill, and Sondrestrom. The diurnal tides at Sondrestrom were also simulated. Tidal inputs to the TIGCM lower boundary were obtained from the middle atmosphere model of Forbes and Vial (1989). The TIGCM tidal structures are in fair general agreement with the observations. The amplitudes tended to be better simulated than the phases, and the mid- and high-latitude locations are simulated better than the low-latitude thermosphere. This may indicate a need to incorporate coupling of the neutral atmosphere and ionosphere with the E region dynamo in the equatorial region to obtain a better representation of low-latitude thermospheric tides. The model simulations were used to investigate the daily variability of the tides due to the geomagnetic activity occurring during this period. In general, the ion temperatures were predicted to be affected more than the winds, and the diurnal components more than the semidiurnal. The effects are typically largest at high latitudes and higher altitudes, but discernible differences were produced at low latitudes

  12. Development of a global computable general equilibrium model coupled with detailed energy end-use technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimori, Shinichiro; Masui, Toshihiko; Matsuoka, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Detailed energy end-use technology information is considered within a CGE model. • Aggregated macro results of the detailed model are similar to traditional model. • The detailed model shows unique characteristics in the household sector. - Abstract: A global computable general equilibrium (CGE) model integrating detailed energy end-use technologies is developed in this paper. The paper (1) presents how energy end-use technologies are treated within the model and (2) analyzes the characteristics of the model’s behavior. Energy service demand and end-use technologies are explicitly considered, and the share of technologies is determined by a discrete probabilistic function, namely a Logit function, to meet the energy service demand. Coupling with detailed technology information enables the CGE model to have more realistic representation in the energy consumption. The proposed model in this paper is compared with the aggregated traditional model under the same assumptions in scenarios with and without mitigation roughly consistent with the two degree climate mitigation target. Although the results of aggregated energy supply and greenhouse gas emissions are similar, there are three main differences between the aggregated and the detailed technologies models. First, GDP losses in mitigation scenarios are lower in the detailed technology model (2.8% in 2050) as compared with the aggregated model (3.2%). Second, price elasticity and autonomous energy efficiency improvement are heterogeneous across regions and sectors in the detailed technology model, whereas the traditional aggregated model generally utilizes a single value for each of these variables. Third, the magnitude of emissions reduction and factors (energy intensity and carbon factor reduction) related to climate mitigation also varies among sectors in the detailed technology model. The household sector in the detailed technology model has a relatively higher reduction for both energy

  13. Ocean Circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Andrew F.; Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The ocean moderates the Earth's climate due to its vast capacity to store and transport heat; the influence of the large-scale ocean circulation on changes in climate is considered in this chapter. The ocean experiences both buoyancy forcing (through heating/cooling and evaporation/precipitation) and wind forcing. Almost all ocean forcing occurs at the surface, but these changes are communicated throughout the entire depth of the ocean through the meridional overturning circulation (MOC). In ...

  14. An Atmospheric General Circulation Model with Chemistry for the CRAY T3E: Design, Performance Optimization and Coupling to an Ocean Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrara, John D.; Drummond, Leroy A.; Mechoso, Carlos R.; Spahr, Joseph A.

    1998-01-01

    The design, implementation and performance optimization on the CRAY T3E of an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) which includes the transport of, and chemical reactions among, an arbitrary number of constituents is reviewed. The parallel implementation is based on a two-dimensional (longitude and latitude) data domain decomposition. Initial optimization efforts centered on minimizing the impact of substantial static and weakly-dynamic load imbalances among processors through load redistribution schemes. Recent optimization efforts have centered on single-node optimization. Strategies employed include loop unrolling, both manually and through the compiler, the use of an optimized assembler-code library for special function calls, and restructuring of parts of the code to improve data locality. Data exchanges and synchronizations involved in coupling different data-distributed models can account for a significant fraction of the running time. Therefore, the required scattering and gathering of data must be optimized. In systems such as the T3E, there is much more aggregate bandwidth in the total system than in any particular processor. This suggests a distributed design. The design and implementation of a such distributed 'Data Broker' as a means to efficiently couple the components of our climate system model is described.

  15. Fractionation and current time trends of PCB congeners: evolvement of distributions 1950–2010 studied using a global atmosphere-ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lammel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available PCBs are ubiquitous environmental pollutants expected to decline in abiotic environmental media in response to decreasing primary emissions since the 1970s. A coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model with embedded dynamic sub-models for atmospheric aerosols and the marine biogeochemistry and air-surface exchange processes with soils, vegetation and the cryosphere is used to study the transport and fate of four PCB congeners covering a range of 3–7 chlorine atoms.

    The change of the geographic distribution of the PCB mixture reflects the sources and sinks' evolvement over time. Globally, secondary emissions (re-volatilisation from surfaces are on the long term increasingly gaining importance over primary emissions. Secondary emissions are most important for the congeners with 5–6 chlorine atoms. Correspondingly, the levels of these congeners are predicted to decrease slowest. Changes in congener mixture composition (fractionation are characterized both geographically and temporally. In high latitudes enrichment of the lighter, less persistent congeners and more delayed decreasing levels in response to decreasing emissions are found. The delivery of the contaminants to high latitudes is predicted to be more efficient than previously suggested. The results suggest furthermore that the effectiveness of emission control measures may significantly vary among substances. The trends of decline of organic contaminant levels in the abiotic environmental media do not only vary with latitude (slow in high latitudes, but do also show longitudinal gradients.

  16. Study on the estimation of probabilistic effective dose. Committed effective dose from intake of marine products using Oceanic General Circulation Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Masanao

    2007-01-01

    The worldwide environmental protection is required by the public. A long-term environmental assessment from nuclear fuel cycle facilities to the aquatic environment also becomes more important to utilize nuclear energy more efficiently. Evaluation of long-term risk including not only in Japan but also in neighboring countries is considered to be necessary in order to develop nuclear power industry. The author successfully simulated the distribution of radionuclides in seawater and seabed sediment produced by atmospheric nuclear tests using LAMER (Long-term Assessment ModEl for Radioactivity in the oceans). A part of the LAMER calculated the advection- diffusion-scavenging processes for radionuclides in the oceans and the Japan Sea in cooperate with Oceanic General Circulation Model (OGCM) and was validated. The author is challenging to calculate probabilistic effective dose suggested by ICRP from intake of marine products due to atmospheric nuclear tests using the Monte Carlo method in the other part of LAMER. Depending on the deviation of each parameter, the 95th percentile of the probabilistic effective dose was calculated about half of the 95th percentile of the deterministic effective dose in proforma calculation. The probabilistic assessment gives realistic value for the dose assessment of a nuclear fuel cycle facility. (author)

  17. Massively Parallel Assimilation of TOGA/TAO and Topex/Poseidon Measurements into a Quasi Isopycnal Ocean General Circulation Model Using an Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppenne, Christian L.; Rienecker, Michele; Borovikov, Anna Y.; Suarez, Max

    1999-01-01

    A massively parallel ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF)is used to assimilate temperature data from the TOGA/TAO array and altimetry from TOPEX/POSEIDON into a Pacific basin version of the NASA Seasonal to Interannual Prediction Project (NSIPP)ls quasi-isopycnal ocean general circulation model. The EnKF is an approximate Kalman filter in which the error-covariance propagation step is modeled by the integration of multiple instances of a numerical model. An estimate of the true error covariances is then inferred from the distribution of the ensemble of model state vectors. This inplementation of the filter takes advantage of the inherent parallelism in the EnKF algorithm by running all the model instances concurrently. The Kalman filter update step also occurs in parallel by having each processor process the observations that occur in the region of physical space for which it is responsible. The massively parallel data assimilation system is validated by withholding some of the data and then quantifying the extent to which the withheld information can be inferred from the assimilation of the remaining data. The distributions of the forecast and analysis error covariances predicted by the ENKF are also examined.

  18. Impact of Advanced Propeller Technology on Aircraft/Mission Characteristics of Several General Aviation Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiter, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    Studies of several General Aviation aircraft indicated that the application of advanced technologies to General Aviation propellers can reduce fuel consumption in future aircraft by a significant amount. Propeller blade weight reductions achieved through the use of composites, propeller efficiency and noise improvements achieved through the use of advanced concepts and improved propeller analytical design methods result in aircraft with lower operating cost, acquisition cost and gross weight.

  19. REGULARYFRAMWORK AND LEGAL BASE OF ELECTRONIC DOCUMENT CIRCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taisiia H. Omelchenko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The general characteristic of legal base of electronic document circulation is presented in the article. It legislatively regulates the relations which connected with the information and information communication technologies. There is presented the list of the basic acts of regulation of sphere of information relations.

  20. Simulating Mars' Dust Cycle with a Mars General Circulation Model: Effects of Water Ice Cloud Formation on Dust Lifting Strength and Seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for the current climate of Mars. The radiative effects of dust impact the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere [1,2,3]. Although dust is present in the Martian atmosphere throughout the year, the level of dustiness varies with season. The atmosphere is generally the dustiest during northern fall and winter and the least dusty during northern spring and summer [4]. Dust particles are lifted into the atmosphere by dust storms that range in size from meters to thousands of kilometers across [5]. Regional storm activity is enhanced before northern winter solstice (Ls200 degrees - 240 degrees), and after northern solstice (Ls305 degrees - 340 degrees ), which produces elevated atmospheric dust loadings during these periods [5,6,7]. These pre- and post- solstice increases in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere with cross-equatorial transport of dust leading to enhanced dust lifting in the southern hemisphere [6]. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles [8,9,10]. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading.

  1. Adjustments of a global Finite-Element Sea Ice Ocean Model configuration to improve the general ocean circulation in the North Pacific and its marginal seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Patrick; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2017-04-01

    The sub-Arctic oceans like the Sea of Okhotsk, the Bering Sea, the Labrador Sea or the Greenland- Irminger-Norwegian (GIN) Sea react particularly sensitive to global climate changes and have the potential to reversely regulate climate change by CO2 uptake in the other areas of the world. So far, the natural processes in the Arctic and Subarctic system, especially over the Pacific realm, remain poorly understood in terms of numerical modeling. As such, in this study we focus on the North Pacific and its adjacent marginal seas (e.g. the Sea of Okhotsk, the Bering Sea and the Sea of Japan), which have nowadays a significant role in the climate system of the Northwest Pacific by influencing the atmospheric and oceanic circulation as well as the hydrology of the Pacific water masses. The Sea of Okhotsk, in particular, is characterized by a highly dynamical sea-ice coverage, where, in autumn and winter, due to massive sea ice formation and brine rejection, the Sea of Okhotsk Intermediate Water (SOIW) is formed which contributes to the mid-depth (500-1000m) water layer of the North Pacific known as newly formed North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW). By employing a Finite-Element Sea-Ice Ocean Model (FESOM), in a global configuration, but with high resolution over the marginal seas of the Northwest Pacific Ocean ( 7 km), we tested different meshes and forcing improvements to correct the general ocean circulation in the North Pacific realm towards a more realistic pattern. By using different forcing data (e.g. CORE2, ERA-40/interim, CCMP-correction), adapting the mesh resolutions in the tropical and subtropical North Pacific and changing the bathymetry over important inflow straits (e.g. Amukta Passage, Kruzenstern Strait), we show that the better results are obtained (when compared with observational data) via a combination of CCMP corrected COREv2 forcing with increased resolution in the pathway of the Kuroshio Extension Current and Northern Equatorial Current.

  2. Numerical simulation and analysis of impact of non-orographic gravity waves drag of middle atmosphere in framework of a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Wang, S.

    2017-12-01

    Gravity wave drag (GWD) is among the drivers of meridional overturning in the middle atmosphere, also known as the Brewer-Dobson Circulation, and of the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). The small spatial scales and complications due to wave breaking require their effects to be parameterised. GWD parameterizations are usually divided into two parts, orographic and non-orographic. The basic dynamical and physical processes of the middle atmosphere and the mechanism of the interactions between the troposphere and the middle atmosphere were studied in the frame of a general circulation model. The model for the troposphere was expanded to a global model considering middle atmosphere with the capability of describing the basic processes in the middle atmosphere and the troposphere-middle atmosphere interactions. Currently, it is too costly to include full non-hydrostatic and rotational wave dynamics in an operational parameterization. The hydrostatic non-rotational wave dynamics which allow an efficient implementation that is suitably fast for operation. The simplified parameterization of non-orographic GWD follows from the WM96 scheme in which a framework is developed using conservative propagation of gravity waves, critical level filtering, and non-linear dissipation. In order to simulate and analysis the influence of non-orographic GWD on the stratospheric wind and temperature fields, experiments using Stratospheric Sudden Warming (SSW) event case occurred in January 2013 were carried out, and results of objective weather forecast verifications of the two months period were compared in detail. The verification of monthly mean of forecast anomaly correlation (ACC) and root mean square (RMS) errors shows consistently positive impact of non-orographic GWD on skill score of forecasting for the three to eight days, both in the stratosphere and troposphere, and visible positive impact on prediction of the stratospheric wind and temperature fields. Numerical simulation

  3. The roles of general and technology-related parenting in managing youth screen time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Wesley; Parent, Justin; Forehand, Rex; Breslend, Nicole Lafko

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the associations of 2 types of parenting practices-general adaptive parenting and technology-related strategies-with youth screen time. We hypothesized that technology-related parenting focused on behavioral control would relate directly to screen time and serve to link general parenting to screen time. Participants were 615 parents drawn from 3 community samples of families with children across 3 development stages: young childhood (3-7 years; n = 210), middle childhood (8-12 years; n = 200), and adolescents (13-17 years; n = 205). Using structural equation modeling, we found that general adaptive parenting was not related to child screen time but was positively related to technology-related parenting strategies for all 3 samples. For the young and, to some extent, middle childhood samples, but not for the adolescent sample, general adaptive parenting was positively linked to youth screen time through technology-related parenting strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Attitudes of general practice dentists in private dental clinics in Almadinah Almunawarah toward novel endodontic technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mothanna AlRahabi

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: This study provides data regarding the current trends and attitudes of general practitioners in private dental clinics in Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah regarding novel technologies in endodontic treatment and reveals the gap between the new advances in endodontics and clinical practice, as well as the need to improve root canal treatment in private dental practices.

  5. The Dynamics of a General Purpose Technology in a Research and Assimilation Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahuis, R.

    1998-01-01

    Where is the productivity growth from the IT revolution? Why did the skill premium rise sharply in the early eighties? Were these phenomena related? This paper examines these questions in a general equilibrium model of growth. Technological progress in firms is driven by research aimed at improving

  6. General System Theory: Toward a Conceptual Framework for Science and Technology Education for All.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, David; Stroup, Walter

    1993-01-01

    Suggests using general system theory as a unifying theoretical framework for science and technology education for all. Five reasons are articulated: the multidisciplinary nature of systems theory, the ability to engage complexity, the capacity to describe system dynamics, the ability to represent the relationship between microlevel and…

  7. Tumor-selective replication herpes simplex virus-based technology significantly improves clinical detection and prognostication of viable circulating tumor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wen; Bao, Li; Yang, Shaoxing

    2016-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells remains a significant challenge due to their vast physical and biological heterogeneity. We developed a cell-surface-marker-independent technology based on telomerase-specific, replication-selective oncolytic herpes-simplex-virus-1 that targets telomerase......-reverse-transcriptase-positive cancer cells and expresses green-fluorescent-protein that identifies viable CTCs from a broad spectrum of malignancies. Our method recovered 75.5-87.2% of tumor cells spiked into healthy donor blood, as validated by different methods, including single cell sequencing. CTCs were detected in 59-100% of 326...... blood samples from patients with 6 different solid organ carcinomas and lymphomas. Significantly, CTC-positive rates increased remarkably with tumor progression from N0M0, N+M0 to M1 in each of 5 tested cancers (lung, colon, liver, gastric and pancreatic cancer, and glioma). Among 21 non-small cell lung...

  8. How did the General Purpose Technology Electricity contribute to the Second Industrial Revolution (II): The Communication Engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, B.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    The concept of the General Purpose Technology (GPT) of the late 1990s is a culmination of many evolutionairy views in innovation-thinking. By definition the GPT considers the technical, social, and economic effects of meta-technologies like steam-technology and electric technology. This paper uses

  9. How did the General Purpose Technology ’Electricity’ contribute to the Second Industrial Revolution (I): The Power Engines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, B.J.G.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the General Purpose Technology (GPT) of the late 1990s is a culmination of many evolutionairy views in innovation-thinking. By definition the GPT considers the technical, social, and economic effects of meta-technologies like steam-technology and electric technology. This paper uses

  10. The effects of future nationwide forest transition to discharge in the 21st century with regard to general circulation model climate change scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, Goro; Nakano, Katsuhiro; Tsuyama, Ikutaro; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2016-08-01

    Forest disturbance (or land-cover change) and climatic variability are commonly recognised as two major drivers interactively influencing hydrology in forested watersheds. Future climate changes and corresponding changes in forest type and distribution are expected to generate changes in rainfall runoff that pose a threat to river catchments. It is therefore important to understand how future climate changes will effect average rainfall distribution and temperature and what effect this will have upon forest types across Japan. Recent deforestation of the present-day coniferous forest and expected increases in evergreen forest are shown to influence runoff processes and, therefore, to influence future runoff conditions. We strongly recommend that variations in forest type be considered in future plans to ameliorate projected climate changes. This will help to improve water retention and storage capacities, enhance the flood protection function of forests, and improve human health. We qualitatively assessed future changes in runoff including the effects of variation in forest type across Japan. Four general circulation models (GCMs) were selected from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) ensemble to provide the driving fields: the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROC), the Meteorological Research Institute Atmospheric General Circulation Model (MRI-GCM), the Hadley Centre Global Environment Model (HadGEM), and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) climate model. The simulations consisted of an ensemble including multiple physics configurations and different reference concentration pathways (RCP2.6, 4.5, and 8.5), the results of which have produced monthly data sets for the whole of Japan. The impacts of future climate changes on forest type in Japan are based on the balance amongst changes in rainfall distribution, temperature and hydrological factors. Methods for assessing the impact of such changes include the

  11. Statistical downscaling of general-circulation-model- simulated average monthly air temperature to the beginning of flowering of the dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) in Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergant, Klemen; Kajfež-Bogataj, Lučka; Črepinšek, Zalika

    2002-02-01

    Phenological observations are a valuable source of information for investigating the relationship between climate variation and plant development. Potential climate change in the future will shift the occurrence of phenological phases. Information about future climate conditions is needed in order to estimate this shift. General circulation models (GCM) provide the best information about future climate change. They are able to simulate reliably the most important mean features on a large scale, but they fail on a regional scale because of their low spatial resolution. A common approach to bridging the scale gap is statistical downscaling, which was used to relate the beginning of flowering of Taraxacum officinale in Slovenia with the monthly mean near-surface air temperature for January, February and March in Central Europe. Statistical models were developed and tested with NCAR/NCEP Reanalysis predictor data and EARS predictand data for the period 1960-1999. Prior to developing statistical models, empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis was employed on the predictor data. Multiple linear regression was used to relate the beginning of flowering with expansion coefficients of the first three EOF for the Janauary, Febrauary and March air temperatures, and a strong correlation was found between them. Developed statistical models were employed on the results of two GCM (HadCM3 and ECHAM4/OPYC3) to estimate the potential shifts in the beginning of flowering for the periods 1990-2019 and 2020-2049 in comparison with the period 1960-1989. The HadCM3 model predicts, on average, 4 days earlier occurrence and ECHAM4/OPYC3 5 days earlier occurrence of flowering in the period 1990-2019. The analogous results for the period 2020-2049 are a 10- and 11-day earlier occurrence.

  12. Assessment of potential suspended sediment yield in Japan in the 21st century with reference to the general circulation model climate change scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, Goro; Golosov, Valentin; Chalov, Sergey; Takizawa, Satoshi; Oguma, Kumiko; Yoshimura, Kei; Shiiba, Michiharu; Hori, Tomoharu; Oki, Taikan

    2013-03-01

    In recent decades, soil erosion by water has become a worldwide problem, especially with climate change and progressive declines in the ratio of natural resources to human populations. Changes in future climate will influence soil erosion, particularly suspended sediment (SS) yield, and alter the effectiveness of water resources management strategies from a water quality perspective. We qualitatively assessed future changes in SS yield in Japan. We focused on the impacts of future hydrological changes projected by two models, the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROC) and the Meteorological Research Institute Atmospheric General Circulation Model (MRI-GCM), whose results have produced monthly data sets for the whole of Japan. The impacts of future climate changes on SS in Japan depend on the balance between changes in climatic and geologic factors. Methods for assessing impact using the catchment simulator were expanded to estimate the SS yield for the whole of Japan. The results indicated that SS generation will increase by the 2090s, with an 8% increase predicted using MRI-GCM data and a 24% increase using MIROC data, compared to present-day values measured by the Automated Meteorological Data Acquisition System (AMEDAS) of the Japan Meteorological Agency. Analysis by month showed the largest increases in SS in September, related to the frequency of extreme events such as typhoons. Increased SS can have negative effects on both society and the environment, including reduced crop productivity, worsened water quality, lower effective reservoir water levels, flooding and habitat destruction. Prediction of the impacts of future climate change on SS generation is crucial for effective environmental planning and management.

  13. Growth and decay of the Equatorial Atlantic SST mode by means of closed heat budget in a coupled General Circulation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene ePolo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tropical Atlantic variability is strongly biased in coupled General Circulation Models (GCM. Most of the models present a mean Sea Surface Temperature (SST bias pattern that resembles the leading mode of inter-annual SST variability. Thus, understanding the causes of the main mode of variability of the system is crucial. A GCM control simulation with the IPSL-CM4 model as part of the CMIP3 experiment has been analyzed. Mixed layer heat budget decomposition has revealed the processes involved in the origin and development of the leading inter-annual variability mode which is defined over the Equatorial Atlantic (hereafter EA mode. In comparison with the observations, it is found a reversal in the anomalous SST evolution of the EA mode: from west equator to southeast in the simulation, while in the observations is the opposite. Nevertheless, despite the biases over the eastern equator and the African coast in boreal summer, the seasonality of the inter-annual variability is well reproduced in the model. The triggering of the EA mode is found to be related to vertical entrainment at the equator as well as to upwelling along South African coast. The damping is related to the air-sea heat fluxes and oceanic horizontal terms. As in the observation, this EA mode exerts an impact on the West African and Brazilian rainfall variability. Therefore, the correct simulation of EA amplitude and time evolution is the key for a correct rainfall prediction over tropical Atlantic. In addition to that, identification of processes which are responsible for the tropical Atlantic biases in GCMs is an important element in order to improve the current global prediction systems.

  14. Role of Southern Ocean stratification in glacial atmospheric CO2 reduction evaluated by a three-dimensional ocean general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hidetaka; Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Oka, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration during glacial periods is known to be considerably lower than during interglacial periods. However, previous studies using an ocean general circulation model (OGCM) fail to reproduce this. Paleoclimate proxy data of the Last Glacial Maximum indicate high salinity (>37.0 practical salinity unit) and long water mass residence time (>3000 years) in the Southern Ocean, suggesting that salinity stratification was enhanced and more carbon was stored there. Reproducibility of salinity and water mass age is considered insufficient in previous OGCMs, which might affect the reproducibility of atmospheric CO2 concentration. This study investigated the role of increased stratification of the Southern Ocean in the glacial CO2 variation using an OGCM. We found that deep water formation in East Antarctica is required to explain high salinity in South Atlantic. Saltier deep Southern Ocean resulted in increased atmospheric CO2 concentration against previous estimates. This is partly due to increased volume transport of Antarctic Bottom Water and associated decrease in the water mass age of the deep Pacific Ocean. On the other hand, weakening of vertical mixing contributed to increase of the vertical gradient of dissolved inorganic carbon and decrease of atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, we show that it is unable to explain all of the glacial CO2 variations by the contribution of the Southern Ocean. Our findings indicate that detailed understanding of the impact of enhanced stratification in the Southern Ocean on the Pacific Ocean might be crucial to understanding the mechanisms behind the glacial-interglacial ocean carbon cycle variations.

  15. Tsengwen Reservoir Watershed Hydrological Flood Simulation Under Global Climate Change Using the 20 km Mesh Meteorological Research Institute Atmospheric General Circulation Model (MRI-AGCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuaki Kimura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe rainstorms have occurred more frequently in Taiwan over the last decade. To understand the flood characteristics of a local region under climate change, a hydrological model simulation was conducted for the Tsengwen Reservoir watershed. The model employed was the Integrated Flood Analysis System (IFAS, which has a conceptual, distributed rainfall-runoff analysis module and a GIS data-input function. The high-resolution rainfall data for flood simulation was categorized into three terms: 1979 - 2003 (Present, 2015 - 2039 (Near-future, and 2075 - 2099 (Future, provided by the Meteorological Research Institute atmospheric general circulation model (MRI-AGCM. Ten extreme rainfall (top ten events were selected for each term in descending order of total precipitation volume. Due to the small watershed area the MRI-AGCM3.2S data was downsized into higher resolution data using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model. The simulated discharges revealed that most of the Near-future and Future peaks caused by extreme rainfall increased compared to the Present peak. These ratios were 0.8 - 1.6 (Near-future/Present and 0.9 - 2.2 (Future/Present, respectively. Additionally, we evaluated how these future discharges would affect the reservoir¡¦s flood control capacity, specifically the excess water volume required to be stored while maintaining dam releases up to the dam¡¦s spillway capacity or the discharge peak design for flood prevention. The results for the top ten events show that the excess water for the Future term exceeded the reservoir¡¦s flood control capacity and was approximately 79.6 - 87.5% of the total reservoir maximum capacity for the discharge peak design scenario.

  16. Origin of surface and columnar Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) aerosols using source- and region-tagged emissions transport in a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S.; Venkataraman, C.; Boucher, O.

    2008-12-01

    We study the relative influence of aerosols emitted from different sectors and geographical regions on aerosol loading in south Asia. Sectors contributing aerosol emissions include biofuel and fossil fuel combustion, open biomass burning, and natural sources. Geographical regions include India (the Indo-Gangetic plain, central India, south India, and northwest India), southeast Asia, east Asia, Africa-west Asia, and the rest of the world. Simulations of the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX), from January to March 1999, are made in the general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD-ZT GCM) with emissions tagged by sector and geographical region. Anthropogenic emissions dominate (54-88%) the predicted aerosol optical depth (AOD) over all the receptor regions. Among the anthropogenic sectors, fossil fuel combustion has the largest overall influence on aerosol loading, primarily sulfate, with emissions from India (50-80%) and rest of the world significantly influencing surface concentrations and AOD. Biofuel combustion has a significant influence on both the surface and columnar black carbon (BC) in particular over the Indian subcontinent and Bay of Bengal with emissions largely from the Indian region (60-80%). Open biomass burning emissions influence organic matter (OM) significantly, and arise largely from Africa-west Asia. The emissions from Africa-west Asia affect the carbonaceous aerosols AOD in all receptor regions, with their largest influence (AOD-BC: 60%; and AOD-OM: 70%) over the Arabian Sea. Among Indian regions, the Indo-Gangetic Plain is the largest contributor to anthropogenic surface mass concentrations and AOD over the Bay of Bengal and India. Dust aerosols are contributed mainly through the long-range transport from Africa-west Asia over the receptor regions. Overall, the model estimates significant intercontinental incursion of aerosol, for example, BC, OM, and dust from Africa-west Asia and sulfate from distant regions (rest

  17. Oceanic dispersion of Fukushima-derived Cs-137 in the coastal, offshore, and open oceans simulated by multiple oceanic general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, H.; Furuno, A.; Kobayashi, T.; In, T.; Nakayama, T.; Ishikawa, Y.; Miyazawa, Y.; Usui, N.

    2017-12-01

    To understand the concentration and amount of Fukushima-derived Cs-137 in the ocean, this study simulates the oceanic dispersion of Cs-137 by an oceanic dispersion model SEA-GEARN-FDM developed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and multiple oceanic general circulation models. The Cs-137 deposition amounts at the sea surface were used as the source term in oceanic dispersion simulations, which were estimated by atmospheric dispersion simulations with a Worldwide version of System for Prediction of Environmental Emergency Dose Information version II (WSPEEDI-II) developed at JAEA. The direct release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant into the ocean based on in situ Cs-137 measurements was used as the other source term in oceanic dispersion simulations. The simulated air Cs-137 concentrations qualitatively replicated those measured around the North Pacific. The accumulated Cs-137 ground deposition amount in the eastern Japanese Islands was consistent with that estimated by aircraft measurements. The oceanic dispersion simulations relatively well reproduced the measured Cs-137 concentrations in the coastal and offshore oceans during the first few months after the Fukushima disaster, and in the open ocean during the first year post-disaster. It was suggested that Cs-137 dispersed along the coast in the north-south direction during the first few months post-disaster, and were subsequently dispersed offshore by the Kuroshio Current and Kuroshio Extension. Mesoscale eddies accompanied by the Kuroshio Current and Kuroshio Extension played an important role in dilution of Cs-137. The Cs-137 amounts were quantified in the coastal, offshore, and open oceans during the first year post-disaster. It was demonstrated that Cs-137 actively dispersed from the coastal and offshore oceans to the open ocean, and from the surface layer to the deeper layer in the North Pacific.

  18. Peripheral circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, M Harold; Davis, Michael J; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Simmons, Grant H; Bender, Shawn B; Padilla, Jaume; Bache, Robert J; Merkus, Daphne; Duncker, Dirk J

    2012-01-01

    Blood flow (BF) increases with increasing exercise intensity in skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscle. In humans during maximal exercise intensities, 85% to 90% of total cardiac output is distributed to skeletal and cardiac muscle. During exercise BF increases modestly and heterogeneously to brain and decreases in gastrointestinal, reproductive, and renal tissues and shows little to no change in skin. If the duration of exercise is sufficient to increase body/core temperature, skin BF is also increased in humans. Because blood pressure changes little during exercise, changes in distribution of BF with incremental exercise result from changes in vascular conductance. These changes in distribution of BF throughout the body contribute to decreases in mixed venous oxygen content, serve to supply adequate oxygen to the active skeletal muscles, and support metabolism of other tissues while maintaining homeostasis. This review discusses the response of the peripheral circulation of humans to acute and chronic dynamic exercise and mechanisms responsible for these responses. This is accomplished in the context of leading the reader on a tour through the peripheral circulation during dynamic exercise. During this tour, we consider what is known about how each vascular bed controls BF during exercise and how these control mechanisms are modified by chronic physical activity/exercise training. The tour ends by comparing responses of the systemic circulation to those of the pulmonary circulation relative to the effects of exercise on the regional distribution of BF and mechanisms responsible for control of resistance/conductance in the systemic and pulmonary circulations. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  19. Effect of general anaesthesia on functional outcome in patients with anterior circulation ischaemic stroke having endovascular thrombectomy versus standard care: a meta-analysis of individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bruce C V; van Zwam, Wim H; Goyal, Mayank; Menon, Bijoy K; Dippel, Diederik W J; Demchuk, Andrew M; Bracard, Serge; White, Philip; Dávalos, Antoni; Majoie, Charles B L M; van der Lugt, Aad; Ford, Gary A; de la Ossa, Natalia Pérez; Kelly, Michael; Bourcier, Romain; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Roos, Yvo B W E M; Bang, Oh Young; Nogueira, Raul G; Devlin, Thomas G; van den Berg, Lucie A; Clarençon, Frédéric; Burns, Paul; Carpenter, Jeffrey; Berkhemer, Olvert A; Yavagal, Dileep R; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Ducrocq, Xavier; Dixit, Anand; Quesada, Helena; Epstein, Jonathan; Davis, Stephen M; Jansen, Olav; Rubiera, Marta; Urra, Xabier; Micard, Emilien; Lingsma, Hester F; Naggara, Olivier; Brown, Scott; Guillemin, Francis; Muir, Keith W; van Oostenbrugge, Robert J; Saver, Jeffrey L; Jovin, Tudor G; Hill, Michael D; Mitchell, Peter J

    2018-01-01

    General anaesthesia (GA) during endovascular thrombectomy has been associated with worse patient outcomes in observational studies compared with patients treated without GA. We assessed functional outcome in ischaemic stroke patients with large vessel anterior circulation occlusion undergoing endovascular thrombectomy under GA, versus thrombectomy not under GA (with or without sedation) versus standard care (ie, no thrombectomy), stratified by the use of GA versus standard care. For this meta-analysis, patient-level data were pooled from all patients included in randomised trials in PuMed published between Jan 1, 2010, and May 31, 2017, that compared endovascular thrombectomy predominantly done with stent retrievers with standard care in anterior circulation ischaemic stroke patients (HERMES Collaboration). The primary outcome was functional outcome assessed by ordinal analysis of the modified Rankin scale (mRS) at 90 days in the GA and non-GA subgroups of patients treated with endovascular therapy versus those patients treated with standard care, adjusted for baseline prognostic variables. To account for between-trial variance we used mixed-effects modelling with a random effect for trials incorporated in all models. Bias was assessed using the Cochrane method. The meta-analysis was prospectively designed, but not registered. Seven trials were identified by our search; of 1764 patients included in these trials, 871 were allocated to endovascular thrombectomy and 893 were assigned standard care. After exclusion of 74 patients (72 did not undergo the procedure and two had missing data on anaesthetic strategy), 236 (30%) of 797 patients who had endovascular procedures were treated under GA. At baseline, patients receiving GA were younger and had a shorter delay between stroke onset and randomisation but they had similar pre-treatment clinical severity compared with patients who did not have GA. Endovascular thrombectomy improved functional outcome at 3 months both in

  20. USE OF INFORMATION – COMMUNICATIVE TECHNOLOGIES IN ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIVITY OF THE GENERAL EDUCATION ESTABLISHMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoya V. Savchenko

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with up-to-date questions concerning the effective introduction of the newest information technologies, system complexes and computer programs into management of general education establishment. The list of such computer programs more often introduced in educational establishments of Ukraine, their characteristics and the basic functions of their use is offered. There are developed the recommendations concerning the creation of uniform information environment of management, construction and conducting of databases aimed to assist the efficient control of a general education establishment.

  1. Global ocean circulation by altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunsch, Carl; Haidvogel, D.

    1991-01-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to determine the general circulation of the oceans and many of its climate and biochemical consequences through the optimum use of altimetry data from TOPEX/POSEIDON and related missions. Emphasis is on the global-scale circulation, as opposed to the regional scale, but some more local studies will be carried out. Because of funding limitations, the primary initial focus will be on the time-dependent global-scale circulation rather than the mean; eventually, the mean circulation must be dealt with as well.

  2. Light-based science and technologies and human civilization: an optical course for general education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaotong; Wang, Kaiwei; Yang, Qing; Si, Ke

    2017-08-01

    Starting from 2015, a general education course named "Light-based science and technologies and human civilization" has been offered in Zhejiang University. We try to give a humanism view angle to observe optics and optical engineering, and combine them with the relationship of human and the nature, the development of human society and human health. In this course we introduce different historical periods of light-based science and technologies, the great optical researchers, the typical research methods, advantages, academic discussions and the relationship with human civilization. The relevant cross-fields of learning and Nobel Prize winners are also included. This course provides the students with the typical examples about how academic revolution influences the world development, and also with humanism sight which exceeds the range of science and technologies themselves.

  3. Striving for a large market: evidence from a general purpose technology in action

    OpenAIRE

    Grid Thoma

    2009-01-01

    Various scholars have tried to focus on growth accounting of specific examples of general purpose technologies (GPTs). However, what are the factors that might make a GPT succeed or fail once the invention has been "triggered?" This article is a preliminary answer to this question and attempts to study GPTs from an ex-ante perspective trying to understand the strategic behavior, business model and performance of producer firms and what the factors are that can favor or hamper diffusion in the...

  4. Circulation economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Stig; Jakobsen, Ove

    2006-01-01

    sustainability. To illustrate the theoretical discussion, the paper gives some practical examples from the reprocessing industry in Norway. Findings - The paper finds, first, effective and efficient use of natural resources is necessary to implement circular value chains. Second, sustainable development...... presupposes a perspective integrating economic, natural and cultural values. Third, to organize the interplay between all stakeholders we introduce an arena for communicative cooperation. Originality/value - The paper concludes that circulation economics presupposes a change in paradigm, from a mechanistic...

  5. Robotics and systems technology for advanced endoscopic procedures: experiences in general surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurr, M O; Arezzo, A; Buess, G F

    1999-11-01

    The advent of endoscopic techniques changed surgery in many regards. This paper intends to describe an overview about technologies to facilitate endoscopic surgery. The systems described have been developed for the use in general surgery, but an easy application also in the field of cardiac surgery seems realistic. The introduction of system technology and robotic technology enables today to design a highly ergonomic solo-surgery platform. To relief the surgeon from fatigue we developed a new chair dedicated to the functional needs of endoscopic surgery. The foot pedals for high frequency, suction and irrigation are integrated into the basis of the chair. The chair is driven by electric motors controlled with an additional foot pedal joystick to achieve the desired position in the OR. A major enhancement for endoscopic technology is the introduction of robotic technology to design assisting devices for solo-surgery and manipulators for microsurgical instrumentation. A further step in the employment of robotic technology is the design of 'master-slave manipulators' to provide the surgeon with additional degrees of freedom of instrumentation. In 1996 a first prototype of an endoscopic manipulator system. named ARTEMIS, could be used in experimental applications. The system consists of a user station (master) and an instrument station (slave). The surgeon sits at a console which integrates endoscopic monitors, communication facilities and two master devices to control the two slave arms which are mounted to the operating table. Clinical use of the system, however, will require further development in the area of slave mechanics and the control system. Finally the implementation of telecommunication technology in combination with robotic instruments will open new frontiers, such as teleconsulting, teleassistance and telemanipulation.

  6. Evolution of ocean-induced ice melt beneath Zachariæ Isstrøm, Northeast Greenland combining observations and an ocean general circulation model from 1978 to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, C.; Rignot, E. J.; Menemenlis, D.; Millan, R.; Bjørk, A. A.; Khan, S. A.; Charolais, A.

    2017-12-01

    Zachariæ Isstrøm, a major ice stream in northeast Greenland, lost a large fraction of its ice shelf during the last decade. We study the evolution of subaqueous melting of its floating section from 1978 to present. The ice shelf melt rate depends on thermal forcing from warm, salty, subsurface ocean waters of Atlantic origin (AW), the mixing of AW with fresh, buoyant subglacial discharge at the calving margin, and the shape of the sub-ice-shelf cavity. Subglacial discharge doubled as a result of enhanced ice sheet runoff caused by warmer air temperatures. Ocean thermal forcing has increased due to enhanced advection of AW. Using an Eulerian method, MEaSUREs ice velocity, Operation IceBridge (OIB) ice thickness, and RACMO2.3 surface balance data, we evaluate the ice shelf melt rate in 1978, 1999 and 2010. The melt rate doubled from 1999 to 2010. Using a Lagrangian method with World View imagery, we map the melt rate in detail from 2011 to 2016. We compare the results with 2D simulations from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm), at a high spatial resolution (20-m horizontal and 40-m vertical grid spacing), using OIB ice thickness and sub-ice-shelf cavity for years 1978, 1996, 2010 and 2011, combined with in-situ ocean temperature/salinity data from Ocean Melting Greenland (OMG) 2017. We find that winter melt rates are 2 3 times smaller than summer rates and melt rates increase by one order magnitude during the transition from ice shelf termination to near-vertical calving wall termination. As the last remaining bits of floating ice shelf disappear, ice-ocean interaction will therefore play an increasing role in driving the glacier retreat into its marine-based basin. This work was performed under a contract with NASA Cryosphere Program at UC Irvine and Caltech's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  7. Knowledge Management Systems as an Interdisciplinary Communication and Personalized General-Purpose Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Schmitt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As drivers of human civilization, Knowledge Management (KM processes have co-evolved in line with General-Purpose-Technologies (GPT, such as writing, printing, and information and communication systems. As evidenced by the recent shift from information scarcity to abundance, GPTs are capable of drastically altering societies due to their game-changing impact on our spheres of work and personal development. This paper looks at the prospect of whether a novel Personal Knowledge Management (PKM concept supported by a prototype system has got what it takes to grow into a transformative General-Purpose-Technology. Following up on a series of papers, the KM scenario of a decentralizing revolution where individuals and self-organized groups yield more power and autonomy is examined according to a GPT's essential characteristics, including a wide scope for improvement and elaboration (in people's private, professional and societal life, applicability across a broad range of uses in a wide variety of products and processes (in multi-disciplinary educational and work contexts, and strong complementarities with existing or potential new technologies (like organizational KM Systems and a proposed World Heritage of Memes Repository. The result portrays the PKM concept as a strong candidate due to its personal, autonomous, bottom-up, collaborative, interdisciplinary, and creativity-supporting approach destined to advance the availability, quantity, and quality of the world extelligence and to allow for a wider sharing and faster diffusion of ideas across current disciplinary and opportunity divides.

  8. High technology at 'General Turbo', DH 12/13 balance-over speed testing stand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuta, Florian Nicolae; Vasiliu, Dinu; Mauna, Traian

    2005-01-01

    'General Turbo' activity started in 1970 including building the balancing and over speed stand. DH 12/13 is the latest up-to-date facility of this type, the best one of the five in Europe, and was commissioned in 2004. The facility was especially built to be used for Romanian Nuclear Power Plant rotor testing and also for thermal very big rotors. The paper underlines the main attributes and the components of the facility DH 12/13 based on the Schenck technology. (authors)

  9. General

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Page S20: NMR compound 4i. Page S22: NMR compound 4j. General: Chemicals were purchased from Fluka, Merck and Aldrich Chemical Companies. All the products were characterized by comparison of their IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopic data and their melting points with reported values. General procedure ...

  10. Multi-circulation boiler design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKenzie, Malcolm [Babcock and Wilcox Canada Ltd (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Steam assisted gravity drainage (SAGD) requires steam, which was historically supplied by once-through steam generators (OTSG). OTSGs are now often replaced by drum boilers for steam generation. Drum boilers have a higher capacity than OTSGs and produce reduced blowdown. However, the volume of contaminants in feedwater is generally significant and ASME criteria require high-quality feedwater. The current study investigates a new design for a multi-circulation boiler that would allow cleaner steam to be generated from lower quality feedwater. In drum boilers, water circulates in one zone. By analyzing circulation fundamentals (notably heat flux and void fraction), the design of multiple circulation zones was envisaged to separate the clean water from the contaminated water. Working with distinct circulation zones would allow the quality of the steam from low quality feedwater to be improved, all the while maintaining the blowdown. The new design would result in a boiler which is easier to clean and would meet ASME criteria.

  11. NASA/General Electric broad-specification fuels combustion technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA/General Electric Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology Program is being conducted to evolve and demonstrate the technology required to use broadened-properties fuels in current and next generation commercial aircraft engines. The first phase of this program, completed in 1982, involved the design and test evaluation of three different combustor concepts. All combustors were designed for the General Electric CF6-80A engine envelope and operating conditions, using Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel having a fuel hydrogen content of 12.8% by weight. Several different configurations of each combustor concept were evaluated in a series of high pressure sector combustor component tests. A total of 25 sector tests were conducted during phase 1. Combustor metal temperatures, emissions, exit temperature profiles, and radiant heat flux were measured over the full range of steady-state operating conditions using four fuels having nominal hydrogen contents between 11.8 and 14%. During the current phase 2 program, the two most promising concepts from phase 1 are being further refined and evaluated. For phase 2 testing, two additional fuels representing a wider range of fluidity and volatility are also being used in combustion system tests.

  12. Movement recognition technology as a method of assessing spontaneous general movements in high risk infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire eMarcroft

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preterm birth is associated with increased risks of neurological and motor impairments such as cerebral palsy. The risks are highest in those born at the lowest gestations. Early identification of those most at risk is challenging meaning that a critical window of opportunity to improve outcomes through therapy-based interventions may be missed. Clinically, the assessment of spontaneous general movements is an important tool which can be used for the prediction of movement impairments in high risk infants.Movement recognition aims to capture and analyze relevant limb movements through computerized approaches focusing on continuous, objective, and quantitative assessment. Different methods of recording and analyzing infant movements have recently been explored in high risk infants. These range from camera-based solutions to body-worn miniaturized movement sensors used to record continuous time-series data that represent the dynamics of limb movements. Various machine learning methods have been developed and applied to the analysis of the recorded movement data. This analysis has focused on the detection and classification of atypical spontaneous general movements. This paper aims to identify recent translational studies using movement recognition technology as a method of assessing movement in high risk infants. The application of this technology within pediatric practice represents a growing area of inter-disciplinary collaboration which may lead to a greater understanding of the development of the nervous system in infants at high risk of motor impairment.

  13. China general nuclear power corporation--The recent research and application of the modular technology in nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Qinwu

    2014-01-01

    Modular design and construction is one of the distinctive features of the 3 rd generation nuclear power technology. In order to promote the technological innovations in nuclear power engineering design and construction and develop the self-owned modular technology, China General Nuclear Power Corporation (CGN) has carried out the R and D and application of the modular technology based on the CPR1000-type nuclear power plants, and has made the national-level achievements in the establishment of modular design technology system, development of 3D modular design system and application of modular construction of containment steel liner in the demonstration projects. (author)

  14. The enrichment of natural radionuclides in oil shale-fired power plants in Estonia – The impact of new circulating fluidized bed technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaasma, Taavi; Kiisk, Madis; Meriste, Tõnis; Tkaczyk, Alan Henry

    2014-01-01

    Burning oil shale to produce electricity has a dominant position in Estonia's energy sector. Around 90% of the overall electric energy production originates from the Narva Power Plants. The technology in use has been significantly renovated – two older types of pulverized fuel burning (PF) energy production units were replaced with new circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology. Additional filter systems have been added to PF boilers to reduce emissions. Oil shale contains various amounts of natural radionuclides. These radionuclides concentrate and become enriched in different boiler ash fractions. More volatile isotopes will be partially emitted to the atmosphere via flue gases and fly ash. To our knowledge, there has been no previous study for CFB boiler systems on natural radionuclide enrichment and their atmospheric emissions. Ash samples were collected from Eesti Power Plant's CFB boiler. These samples were processed and analyzed with gamma spectrometry. Activity concentrations (Bq/kg) and enrichment factors were calculated for the 238 U ( 238 U, 226 Ra, 210 Pb) and 232 Th ( 232 Th, 228 Ra) family radionuclides and for 40 K in different CFB boiler ash fractions. Results from the CFB boiler ash sample analysis showed an increase in the activity concentrations and enrichment factors (up to 4.5) from the furnace toward the electrostatic precipitator block. The volatile radionuclide ( 210 Pb and 40 K) activity concentrations in CFB boilers were evenly distributed in finer ash fractions. Activity balance calculations showed discrepancies between input (via oil shale) and output (via ash fractions) activities for some radionuclides ( 238 U, 226 Ra, 210 Pb). This refers to a situation where the missing part of the activity (around 20% for these radionuclides) is emitted to the atmosphere. Also different behavior patterns were detected for the two Ra isotopes, 226 Ra and 228 Ra. A part of 226 Ra input activity, unlike 228 Ra, was undetectable in the solid

  15. US general aviation: The ingredients for a renaissance. A vision and technology strategy for US industry, NASA, FAA, universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Bruce

    1993-01-01

    General aviation today is a vital component in the nation's air transportation system. It is threatened for survival but has enormous potential for expansion in utility and use. This potential for expansion is fueled by new satellite navigation and communication systems, small computers, flat panel displays, and advanced aerodynamics, materials and manufacturing methods, and propulsion technologies which create opportunities for new levels of environmental and economic acceptability. Expanded general aviation utility and use could have a large impact on the nation's jobs, commerce, industry, airspace capacity, trade balance, and quality of life. This paper presents, in viewgraph form, a general overview of U.S. general aviation. Topics covered include general aviation shipment and billings; airport and general aviation infrastructure; cockpit, airplane, and airspace technologies; market demand; air traffic operations and aviation accidents; fuel efficiency comparisons; and general aviation goals and strategy.

  16. CBCT technology for diagnosis and treatment planning: what general practitioners should consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Curtis E

    2014-01-01

    The use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for diagnosis and treatment planning for a range of applications, including tooth removal, implant, endodontic, orthodontic, temporomandibular joint disorder, and obstructive airway cases, is well known. However, general practitioners should understand that beyond diagnosing fractures and tooth/root anomalies and assessing hard tissue before and after implant placement, this extraoral 3-dimensional (3-D) technology can be beneficial for performing more common diagnostic tasks, such as panoramic x-rays and bitewings. When used in place of intraoral sensors, it spares patients the discomfort of the rigid sensor. CBCT, which uses a fraction of the radiation dose of medical CT, can also be used to help clinicians create digital versions of their conventional impressions and poured models for digital transmission to other dental team members. For the growing number of practitioners who place implants, CBCT provides the ability to execute "top-down" treatment planning to offer patients restorative-based implant placement.

  17. NASA/General Electric broad-specification fuels combustion technology program - Phase I results and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.; Bahr, D. W.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    A program is being conducted to develop the technology required to utilize fuels with broadened properties in aircraft gas turbine engines. The first phase of this program consisted of the experimental evaluation of three different combustor concepts to determine their potential for meeting several specific emissions and performance goals, when operated on broadened property fuels. The three concepts were a single annular combustor; a double annular combustor; and a short single annular combustor with variable geometry. All of these concepts were sized for the General Electric CF6-80 engine. A total of 24 different configurations of these concepts were evaluated in a high pressure test facility, using four test fuels having hydrogen contents between 11.8 and 14%. Fuel effects on combustor performance, durability and emissions, and combustor design features to offset these effects were demonstrated.

  18. 76 FR 34886 - General Services Administration Acquisition Regulation; Implementation of Information Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-15

    ... Acquisition Regulation; Implementation of Information Technology Security Provision AGENCY: Office of... information technology (IT) supplies, services and systems with security requirements. DATES: Effective Date... effective date that include information technology (IT) supplies, services and systems with security...

  19. 77 FR 749 - General Services Administration Acquisition Regulation; Implementation of Information Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-06

    ... Acquisition Regulation; Implementation of Information Technology Security Provision AGENCY: Office of... orders that include information technology (IT) supplies, services and systems. DATES: Effective Date... 6, 2012 that include information technology (IT) supplies, services and systems with security...

  20. Final Technical Report: "Representing Endogenous Technological Change in Climate Policy Models: General Equilibrium Approaches"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Sue Wing

    2006-04-18

    The research supported by this award pursued three lines of inquiry: (1) The construction of dynamic general equilibrium models to simulate the accumulation and substitution of knowledge, which has resulted in the preparation and submission of several papers: (a) A submitted pedagogic paper which clarifies the structure and operation of computable general equilibrium (CGE) models (C.2), and a review article in press which develops a taxonomy for understanding the representation of technical change in economic and engineering models for climate policy analysis (B.3). (b) A paper which models knowledge directly as a homogeneous factor, and demonstrates that inter-sectoral reallocation of knowledge is the key margin of adjustment which enables induced technical change to lower the costs of climate policy (C.1). (c) An empirical paper which estimates the contribution of embodied knowledge to aggregate energy intensity in the U.S. (C.3), followed by a companion article which embeds these results within a CGE model to understand the degree to which autonomous energy efficiency improvement (AEEI) is attributable to technical change as opposed to sub-sectoral shifts in industrial composition (C.4) (d) Finally, ongoing theoretical work to characterize the precursors and implications of the response of innovation to emission limits (E.2). (2) Data development and simulation modeling to understand how the characteristics of discrete energy supply technologies determine their succession in response to emission limits when they are embedded within a general equilibrium framework. This work has produced two peer-reviewed articles which are currently in press (B.1 and B.2). (3) Empirical investigation of trade as an avenue for the transmission of technological change to developing countries, and its implications for leakage, which has resulted in an econometric study which is being revised for submission to a journal (E.1). As work commenced on this topic, the U.S. withdrawal

  1. Identifying patient safety problems associated with information technology in general practice: an analysis of incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrabi, Farah; Liaw, Siaw Teng; Arachi, Diana; Runciman, William; Coiera, Enrico; Kidd, Michael R

    2016-11-01

    To identify the categories of problems with information technology (IT), which affect patient safety in general practice. General practitioners (GPs) reported incidents online or by telephone between May 2012 and November 2013. Incidents were reviewed against an existing classification for problems associated with IT and the clinical process impacted. 87 GPs across Australia. Types of problems, consequences and clinical processes. GPs reported 90 incidents involving IT which had an observable impact on the delivery of care, including actual patient harm as well as near miss events. Practice systems and medications were the most affected clinical processes. Problems with IT disrupted clinical workflow, wasted time and caused frustration. Issues with user interfaces, routine updates to software packages and drug databases, and the migration of records from one package to another generated clinical errors that were unique to IT; some could affect many patients at once. Human factors issues gave rise to some errors that have always existed with paper records but are more likely to occur and cause harm with IT. Such errors were linked to slips in concentration, multitasking, distractions and interruptions. Problems with patient identification and hybrid records generated errors that were in principle no different to paper records. Problems associated with IT include perennial risks with paper records, but additional disruptions in workflow and hazards for patients unique to IT, occasionally affecting multiple patients. Surveillance for such hazards may have general utility, but particularly in the context of migrating historical records to new systems and software updates to existing systems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    This three-year project, in cooperation with Professor Bob Houze at University of Washington, has been successfully finished as planned. Both ARM (the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program) data and cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were used to identify the water budgets of clouds observed in two international field campaigns. The research results achieved shed light on several key processes of clouds in climate change (or general circulation models), which are summarized below. 1. Revealed the effect of mineral dust on mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) Two international field campaigns near a desert and a tropical coast provided unique data to drive and evaluate CRM simulations, which are TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment) and AMMA (the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). Studies of the two campaign data were contrasted, revealing that much mineral dust can bring about large MCSs via ice nucleation and clouds. This result was reported as a PI presentation in the 3rd ASR Science Team meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in March 2012. A paper on the studies was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2013). 2. Identified the effect of convective downdrafts on ice crystal concentration Using the large-scale forcing data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP (the Southern Great Plains) and other field campaigns, Goddard CRM simulations were carried out in comparison with radar and satellite observations. The comparison between model and observations revealed that convective downdrafts could increase ice crystal concentration by up to three or four orders, which is a key to quantitatively represent the indirect effects of ice nuclei, a kind of aerosol, on clouds and radiation in the Tropics. This result was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2011) and summarized in the DOE/ASR Research Highlights Summaries (see http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RMjY5/view). 3. Used radar

  3. Can technological innovation help China take on its climate responsibility? An intertemporal general equilibrium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Wei

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the effectiveness of China’s indigenous R and D and technological innovation to curb its carbon emissions. The mechanism of endogenous technical change (TC) is incorporated an intertemporal computable general equilibrium (CGE) model. R and D investments and knowledge creations are modeled as the endogenous behaviors of private firms. The accumulated stocks of knowledge are applied in the production process to affect the rate and bias of TC. Simulation results show that: (1) while China’s indigenous R and D efforts play a significant role to curb carbon emissions, sole dependence on R and D may be far from sufficient to achieve pledged climate target, with complementary policies being required to reinforce existing climate actions; (2) innovation policies can strengthen R and D investment and cut emissions further, but the complementary effect is relatively minor; (3) carbon taxation can generate significant carbon-saving benefits and fulfill climate target, but this achievement is at the cost of economic losses. The induced technical improvement, however, can partially mitigate the deadweight loss incurred by carbon tax distortion. - Highlights: ► We examine the effect of China’s technological innovation to curb its carbon emissions. ► A mechanism of R and D-induced technical change is incorporated into an intertemporal CGE model. ► Private R and D efforts and public R and D intervention are insufficient to achieve climate target. ► A carbon tax is indispensable to achieve climate target but at the cost of output losses. ► Induced technical change can partially mitigate the deadweight loss incurred by carbon tax.

  4. Impact of Smoking on Circulating Cardiac Troponin I Concentrations and Cardiovascular Events in the General Population: The HUNT Study (Nord-Trøndelag Health Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyngbakken, Magnus Nakrem; Skranes, Julia Brox; de Lemos, James A; Nygård, Ståle; Dalen, Håvard; Hveem, Kristian; Røsjø, Helge; Omland, Torbjørn

    2016-12-13

    Both tobacco smoking and circulating cardiac troponin I (cTnI) levels are associated with the risk of acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and cardiovascular death. However, whether cTnI levels differ according to smoking status and whether smoking modifies the prognostic relationship between cTnI and outcomes remain unclear. Using data from a large, population-based cohort, we assessed the association between smoking and cTnI and the impact of smoking on the associations between cTnI levels and the incidence of acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and cardiovascular death. cTnI was measured with a high-sensitivity assay in 3824 never smokers, 2341 former smokers, and 2550 current smokers participating in the prospective observational HUNT Study (Nord-Trøndelag Health Study). All subjects were free from known prior cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus at baseline. The age of the participants ranged from 19 to 94 years; 55.5% were women. Current smokers exhibited significantly lower levels of cTnI (median, 2.9 ng/L; interquartile range, 2.0-4.1 ng/L) than never smokers (3.2 ng/L; interquartile range, 2.2-4.7 ng/L; Psmoking is associated with lower concentrations of cTnI, suggesting that substances in tobacco smoke may affect cardiomyocyte injury. The association between cTnI levels and cardiovascular end points is stronger in never/former smokers than in current smokers, compatible with the theory that the detrimental cardiovascular impact of current smoking is mediated via mechanisms other than subclinical myocardial injury. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. The adoption of new endodontic technology amongst Danish general dental practitioners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørndal, L.; Reit, C.

    2005-01-01

    adoption of technology, electronic apex locators, NiTi instruments, rubber dam, treatment sessions, warm gutta-percha......adoption of technology, electronic apex locators, NiTi instruments, rubber dam, treatment sessions, warm gutta-percha...

  6. Circulating Adipocyte Fatty Acid Binding Protein (FABP4 Levels Are Associated with Irisin in the Middle-Aged General Chinese Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Zhang

    Full Text Available Adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (FABP4 has been recently characterized as an adipokine that is closely associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Irisin, a novel myokine, activates thermogenesis by increasing the transformation of white adipocytes to brown, and it has improved glucose homeostasis in animal models. In this study, we aimed to explore the relationship between serum FABP4 and irisin in middle-aged Chinese subjects.A total of 111 normal residents (56 men and 55 women of Fengxian District who were 40 to 60 years of age were recruited. Circulating FABP4 and irisin were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Anthropometric parameters, oral glucose tolerance test results, hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C, blood lipids, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, homeostasis model assessment-β and body fat composition were also determined.All participants were categorized by FABP4 tertiles. There were significant differences in blood pressure, body fat percentage, 2-h plasma glucose, and skeletal muscle mass among the three groups (P0.05. To exclude the effect of sex difference, partial correlations analysis showed that FABP4 was positively correlated with diastolic blood pressure (P<0.05 and body fat percentage (P<0.05 negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass (P<0.05 and irisin (P<0.05, while irisin was positively correlated with HbA1c (P<0.05 and negatively correlated with creatinine (P<0.05. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that serum FABP4 was independently associated with skeletal muscle mass (P<0.001, diastolic blood pressure (P<0.05 and irisin (P<0.05 after adjustment for age, body mass index, body fat percentage, total cholesterol and HbA1C.Elevated FABP4 levels increase the risks of obesity-related metabolic disorders and hypertension. Serum irisin might exert antagonistic effects on FABP4 in the middle-aged Chinese population.

  7. Attitudes in Korea toward Introducing Smart Policing Technologies: Differences between the General Public and Police Officers

    OpenAIRE

    HyungBin Moon; Hyunhong Choi; Jongsu Lee; Ki Soo Lee

    2017-01-01

    This study analyzes different attitudes toward introduction of smart policing technologies in cybercrime policing among the Korean public and police. Policing is essential for a sustainable community. Technological advances in policing have both positive and negative aspects, making it essential to investigate perceptions of both public and police when introducing smart policing technologies. A discrete choice experiment was undertaken to survey preferences of the public and police toward int...

  8. The unique effects of general and specific support in health care technology: An empirical examination of the principle of compatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrigino, Matthew B; Dunford, Benjamin B

    2016-01-01

    The principle of compatibility suggests that specific attitudes should target specific behaviors. The attitude-behavior relationship is contingent upon the consistency between the two. This aim of this study was to examine the strength of relationships involving general versus specific support perceptions and attitudes regarding smart pump technology in hospitals. Specifically, we hypothesized that organizational support perceptions would be more strongly related to general positive work attitudes than it would to smart pump satisfaction. We also hypothesized that smart pump-specific support would be more strongly related to smart pump satisfaction than it would to general positive work attitudes. Data were collected in a cross-sectional field study via online surveys at two large, public hospital systems in the Midwestern United States, one in Iowa (n = 311 nurses) and one in Wisconsin (n = 346 nurses). Because nurses in one system had more experience with smart pump technology than nurses in the other system, analyses were run separately to compare results across the two sites. Consistent with the principle of compatibility, hierarchical regression revealed across both sites that smart pump support had a stronger relationship with smart pump satisfaction whereas general organizational support perceptions had a stronger relationship with general positive work attitudes. In addition, moderation effects were present in one sample where high levels of the noncompatible support (e.g., smart pump-specific support on positive workplace attitudes) buffered low levels of compatible support. Our findings highlight the contextual importance of support in regard to the growing technological transformations that health care systems currently experience. When specific forms of support are provided for specific technologies, end-users will generally respond more favorably compared to when general support is the only available resource.

  9. Stirring the Pot: Supporting and Challenging General Education Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Faculty to Change Teaching and Assessment Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieha, Vicki; Shadle, Susan E.; Paterson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based instructional practices (ebips) have been associated with positive student outcomes; however, institutions struggle to catalyze widespread adoption of these practices in general education science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (stem) courses. Further, linking ebips with integrated learning assessment is rarely discussed…

  10. 48 CFR 27.204-2 - Use of patented technology under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of patented technology... Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND... and Trade (GATT). Article 31 of Annex 1C, Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property...

  11. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Special Libraries Division. Section: Science and Technology Libraries. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on science and technology libraries which were presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Online Information Service of the Japan Information Center of Science and Technology" (Ryuko Igarashi, Japan); (2) "A View from the Chip--The Influence of Information…

  12. Teaching Methods Influencing the Sustainability of the Teaching Process in Technology Education in General Education Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soobik, Mart

    2014-01-01

    The sustainability of technology education is related to a traditional understanding of craft and the methods used to teach it; however, the methods used in the teaching process have been influenced by the innovative changes accompanying the development of technology. In respect to social and economic development, it is important to prepare young…

  13. Impact of a simple parameterization of convective gravity-wave drag in a stratosphere-troposphere general circulation model and its sensitivity to vertical resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bossuet

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available Systematic westerly biases in the southern hemisphere wintertime flow and easterly equatorial biases are experienced in the Météo-France climate model. These biases are found to be much reduced when a simple parameterization is introduced to take into account the vertical momentum transfer through the gravity waves excited by deep convection. These waves are quasi-stationary in the frame of reference moving with convection and they propagate vertically to higher levels in the atmosphere, where they may exert a significant deceleration of the mean flow at levels where dissipation occurs. Sixty-day experiments have been performed from a multiyear simulation with the standard 31 levels for a summer and a winter month, and with a T42 horizontal resolution. The impact of this parameterization on the integration of the model is found to be generally positive, with a significant deceleration in the westerly stratospheric jet and with a reduction of the easterly equatorial bias. The sensitivity of the Météo-France climate model to vertical resolution is also investigated by increasing the number of vertical levels, without moving the top of the model. The vertical resolution is increased up to 41 levels, using two kinds of level distribution. For the first, the increase in vertical resolution concerns especially the troposphere (with 22 levels in the troposphere, and the second treats the whole atmosphere in a homogeneous way (with 15 levels in the troposphere; the standard version of 31 levels has 10 levels in the troposphere. A comparison is made between the dynamical aspects of the simulations. The zonal wind and precipitation are presented and compared for each resolution. A positive impact is found with the finer tropospheric resolution on the precipitation in the mid-latitudes and on the westerly stratospheric jet, but the general impact on the model climate is weak, the physical parameterizations used appear to be mostly independent to the

  14. Impact of a simple parameterization of convective gravity-wave drag in a stratosphere-troposphere general circulation model and its sensitivity to vertical resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bossuet

    Full Text Available Systematic westerly biases in the southern hemisphere wintertime flow and easterly equatorial biases are experienced in the Météo-France climate model. These biases are found to be much reduced when a simple parameterization is introduced to take into account the vertical momentum transfer through the gravity waves excited by deep convection. These waves are quasi-stationary in the frame of reference moving with convection and they propagate vertically to higher levels in the atmosphere, where they may exert a significant deceleration of the mean flow at levels where dissipation occurs. Sixty-day experiments have been performed from a multiyear simulation with the standard 31 levels for a summer and a winter month, and with a T42 horizontal resolution. The impact of this parameterization on the integration of the model is found to be generally positive, with a significant deceleration in the westerly stratospheric jet and with a reduction of the easterly equatorial bias. The sensitivity of the Météo-France climate model to vertical resolution is also investigated by increasing the number of vertical levels, without moving the top of the model. The vertical resolution is increased up to 41 levels, using two kinds of level distribution. For the first, the increase in vertical resolution concerns especially the troposphere (with 22 levels in the troposphere, and the second treats the whole atmosphere in a homogeneous way (with 15 levels in the troposphere; the standard version of 31 levels has 10 levels in the troposphere. A comparison is made between the dynamical aspects of the simulations. The zonal wind and precipitation are presented and compared for each resolution. A positive impact is found with the finer tropospheric resolution on the precipitation in the mid-latitudes and on the westerly stratospheric jet, but the general impact on the model climate is weak, the physical parameterizations used appear to be mostly independent to the

  15. Development of a Bunched Beam Electron Cooler based on ERL and Circulator Ring Technology for the Jefferson Lab Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Stephen V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hannon, Fay E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Hutton, Andrew M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Li, Rui [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Roblin, Yves R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Tennant, Christopher D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, He [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Jefferson Lab is in the process of designing an electron ion collider with unprecedented luminosity at a 45 GeV center-of-mass energy. This luminosity relies on ion cooling in both the booster and the storage ring of the accelerator complex. The cooling in the booster will use a conventional DC cooler similar to the one at COSY. The high-energy storage ring, operating at a momentum of up to 100 GeV/nucleon, requires novel use of bunched-beam cooling. There are two designs for such a cooler. The first uses a conventional Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) with a magnetized beam while the second uses a circulating ring to enhance both peak and average currents experienced by the ion beam. This presentation will describe the design of both the Circulator Cooling Ring (CCR) design and that of the backup option using the stand-alone ERL operated at lower charge but higher repetition rate than the ERL injector required by the CCR-based design.

  16. Using information and communication technologies to consult with patients in Victorian primary care: the views of general practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Lisa; Fairhurst, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Information and communication technologies such as email, text messaging and video messaging are commonly used by the general population. However, international research has shown that they are not used routinely by GPs to communicate or consult with patients. Investigating Victorian GPs' perceptions of doing so is timely given Australia's new National Broadband Network, which may facilitate web-based modes of doctor-patient interaction. This study therefore aimed to explore Victorian GPs' experiences of, and attitudes toward, using information and communication technologies to consult with patients. Qualitative telephone interviews were carried out with a maximum variation sample of 36GPs from across Victoria. GPs reported a range of perspectives on using new consultation technologies within their practice. Common concerns included medico-legal and remuneration issues and perceived patient information technology literacy. Policy makers should incorporate GPs' perspectives into primary care service delivery planning to promote the effective use of information and communication technologies in improving accessibility and quality of general practice care.

  17. Attitudes in Korea toward Introducing Smart Policing Technologies: Differences between the General Public and Police Officers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HyungBin Moon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes different attitudes toward introduction of smart policing technologies in cybercrime policing among the Korean public and police. Policing is essential for a sustainable community. Technological advances in policing have both positive and negative aspects, making it essential to investigate perceptions of both public and police when introducing smart policing technologies. A discrete choice experiment was undertaken to survey preferences of the public and police toward introduction of such technologies and conduct simulation analysis to compare changes in the acceptance of various scenarios. The study divides cybercrime policing into prevention and investigation. The sample included 500 members of the public and 161 police officers. The results show that the public thinks an increase in yearly taxes and invasion of privacy are the most important factors. Conversely, the police think factors enhancing the efficiency of policing are most important. Moreover, when smart policing technologies are introduced, the public and police perceive more utility in the prevention and investigation of cybercrime, respectively. Few studies in this field separate the prevention and investigation of crimes, or compare perceptions of the public and police toward the introduction of smart policing technologies. This study’s quantitative analysis provides insights lacking in previous literature.

  18. Visit of H.E. Mr. Attila Chikan, Minister of Economic Affairs, Prof. Adam Török, President, National Committee for Technological Development, Mr. Pal Koncz, Deputy Director General, National Committee for Technological Development, Hungary

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Visit of H.E. Mr. Attila Chikan, Minister of Economic Affairs, Prof. Adam Török, President, National Committee for Technological Development, Mr. Pal Koncz, Deputy Director General, National Committee for Technological Development, Hungary

  19. Dr Phil Mjwara Director General, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Ministry of Science and Technology Republic of South Africa visit the Alice experiment introduce by Prof. Jurgen Schukraft, spokeperson for Alice.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Dr Phil Mjwara Director General, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Ministry of Science and Technology Republic of South Africa visit the Alice experiment introduce by Prof. Jurgen Schukraft, spokeperson for Alice.

  20. Seasonal overturning circulation in the Red Sea: 2. Winter circulation

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Fengchao

    2014-04-01

    The shallow winter overturning circulation in the Red Sea is studied using a 50 year high-resolution MITgcm (MIT general circulation model) simulation with realistic atmospheric forcing. The overturning circulation for a typical year, represented by 1980, and the climatological mean are analyzed using model output to delineate the three-dimensional structure and to investigate the underlying dynamical mechanisms. The horizontal model circulation in the winter of 1980 is dominated by energetic eddies. The climatological model mean results suggest that the surface inflow intensifies in a western boundary current in the southern Red Sea that switches to an eastern boundary current north of 24N. The overturning is accomplished through a cyclonic recirculation and a cross-basin overturning circulation in the northern Red Sea, with major sinking occurring along a narrow band of width about 20 km along the eastern boundary and weaker upwelling along the western boundary. The northward pressure gradient force, strong vertical mixing, and horizontal mixing near the boundary are the essential dynamical components in the model\\'s winter overturning circulation. The simulated water exchange is not hydraulically controlled in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb; instead, the exchange is limited by bottom and lateral boundary friction and, to a lesser extent, by interfacial friction due to the vertical viscosity at the interface between the inflow and the outflow. Key Points Sinking occurs in a narrow boundary layer along the eastern boundary Surface western boundary current switches into an eastern boundary current Water exchange in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb is not hydraulically controlled © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  1. The Invisible Hand of Innovation showing in the General Purpose Technology of Electricity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kooij, B.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    The unintended economic effect on society as result of individual behaviour —Adam Smith’s ‘Invisible Hand’ of economic progress in the eighteenth century — had its equivalent in technological progress. In the nineteenth century, again individual behaviour with its Acts of Innovation and Acts of

  2. Using Mobile Apps to Entice General Education Students into Technology Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Michelle; Murphy, Diane

    2013-01-01

    It is of national importance to increase the number of college students pursuing degrees in information systems/information technology (IT/IS) subjects. The primary focus at many institutions is renovating or enhancing existing IT/IS programs and the target audience is the students who have selected to major in IT/IS subjects. This paper looks at…

  3. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Special Libraries. Section on Science and Technology Libraries. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on science and technology libraries which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "UAP (Universal Availability of Publications) and User Training for Categories of Grey Literature" (Dieter Schmidmaier, Mining Academy Freiberg, East Germany); (2) "Resource…

  4. Exploration of offering photoelectric experimental general elective courses for college students of science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shen; Sun, Binchao

    2017-08-01

    The necessity of offering photoelectric experiment general elective courses, such as the experiments of modern optical and innovational photoelectric design for non optic-electric's science and engineering students were discussed based on the analysis of the status quo and problems in experimental general elective course in science and engineering colleges of our country. And the characters of photoelectric disciplines, the goal of science and engineering quality-oriented education and the reform of science education at home and abroad were also considered. The instructional objectives, contents and characteristics of the courses were investigated. The specific methods, the CDIO (conceive, design, implement and operate) mode in the general courses has been proposed; the experiences and practical effects of offering these courses were concluded.

  5. Electrochemical Genosensing of Circulating Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Susana; Yáñez-Sedeño, Paloma; Pingarrón, José Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Management and prognosis of diseases requires the measurement in non- or minimally invasively collected samples of specific circulating biomarkers, consisting of any measurable or observable factors in patients that indicate normal or disease-related biological processes or responses to therapy. Therefore, on-site, fast and accurate determination of these low abundance circulating biomarkers in scarcely treated body fluids is of great interest for health monitoring and biological applications. In this field, electrochemical DNA sensors (or genosensors) have demonstrated to be interesting alternatives to more complex conventional strategies. Currently, electrochemical genosensors are considered very promising analytical tools for this purpose due to their fast response, low cost, high sensitivity, compatibility with microfabrication technology and simple operation mode which makes them compatible with point-of-care (POC) testing. In this review, the relevance and current challenges of the determination of circulating biomarkers related to relevant diseases (cancer, bacterial and viral infections and neurodegenerative diseases) are briefly discussed. An overview of the electrochemical nucleic acid–based strategies developed in the last five years for this purpose is given to show to both familiar and non-expert readers the great potential of these methodologies for circulating biomarker determination. After highlighting the main features of the reported electrochemical genosensing strategies through the critical discussion of selected examples, a conclusions section points out the still existing challenges and future directions in this field. PMID:28420103

  6. Low-Cost Quality Control and Nondestructive Evaluation Technologies for General Aviation Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Gavinsky, Bob; Semanskee, Grant

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Advanced General Aviation Transport Experiments (AGATE) Program has as a goal to reduce the overall cost of producing private aviation aircraft while maintaining the safety of these aircraft. In order to successfully meet this goal, it is necessary to develop nondestructive inspection techniques which will facilitate the production of the materials used in these aircraft and assure the quality necessary to maintain airworthiness. This paper will discuss a particular class of general aviation materials and several nondestructive inspection techniques that have proven effective for making these inspections. Additionally, this paper will discuss the investigation and application of other commercially available quality control techniques applicable to these structures.

  7. Stratospheric General Circulation with Chemistry Model (SGCCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Richard B.; Douglass, Anne R.; Geller, Marvin A.; Kaye, Jack A.; Nielsen, J. Eric; Rosenfield, Joan E.; Stolarski, Richard S.

    1990-01-01

    In the past two years constituent transport and chemistry experiments have been performed using both simple single constituent models and more complex reservoir species models. Winds for these experiments have been taken from the data assimilation effort, Stratospheric Data Analysis System (STRATAN).

  8. The ECHAM3 atmospheric general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The ECHAM model has been developed from the ECMWF model (cycle 31, November 1988). It contains several changes, mostly in the parameterization, in order to adjust the model for climate simulations. The technical details of the ECHAM operational model are described. (orig./KW)

  9. Analysis of technology requirements and potential demand for general aviation avionics systems in the 1980's. [technology assessment and technological forecasting of the aircraft industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, D. M.; Kayser, J. H.; Senko, G. M.; Glenn, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    The trend for the increasing need for aircraft-in-general as a major source of transportation in the United States is presented (military and commercial aircraft are excluded). Social, political, and economic factors that affect the aircraft industry are considered, and cost estimates are given. Aircraft equipment and navigation systems are discussed.

  10. Resolving Orbital and Climate Keys of Earth and Extraterrestrial Environments with Dynamics (ROCKE-3D) 1.0: A General Circulation Model for Simulating the Climates of Rocky Planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Way, M. J.; Aleinov, I.; Amundsen, David S.; Chandler, M. A.; Genio, A. D. Del; Fujii, Y.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N. Y.; Sohl, L.; Tsigaridis, K.; Clune, T. L.

    2017-01-01

    Resolving Orbital and Climate Keys of Earth and Extraterrestrial Environments with Dynamics (ROCKE-3D) is a three-dimensional General Circulation Model (GCM) developed at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies for the modeling of atmospheres of solar system and exoplanetary terrestrial planets. Its parent model, known as ModelE2, is used to simulate modern Earth and near-term paleo-Earth climates. ROCKE-3D is an ongoing effort to expand the capabilities of ModelE2 to handle a broader range of atmospheric conditions, including higher and lower atmospheric pressures, more diverse chemistries and compositions, larger and smaller planet radii and gravity, different rotation rates (from slower to more rapid than modern Earth’s, including synchronous rotation), diverse ocean and land distributions and topographies, and potential basic biosphere functions. The first aim of ROCKE-3D is to model planetary atmospheres on terrestrial worlds within the solar system such as paleo-Earth, modern and paleo-Mars, paleo-Venus, and Saturn’s moon Titan. By validating the model for a broad range of temperatures, pressures, and atmospheric constituents, we can then further expand its capabilities to those exoplanetary rocky worlds that have been discovered in the past, as well as those to be discovered in the future. We also discuss the current and near-future capabilities of ROCKE-3D as a community model for studying planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres.

  11. Resolving Orbital and Climate Keys of Earth and Extraterrestrial Environments with Dynamics (ROCKE-3D) 1.0: A General Circulation Model for Simulating the Climates of Rocky Planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Way, M. J.; Aleinov, I.; Amundsen, David S.; Chandler, M. A.; Genio, A. D. Del; Fujii, Y.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N. Y.; Sohl, L.; Tsigaridis, K. [NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY 10025 (United States); Clune, T. L. [Global Modeling and Assimilation Office, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Resolving Orbital and Climate Keys of Earth and Extraterrestrial Environments with Dynamics (ROCKE-3D) is a three-dimensional General Circulation Model (GCM) developed at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies for the modeling of atmospheres of solar system and exoplanetary terrestrial planets. Its parent model, known as ModelE2, is used to simulate modern Earth and near-term paleo-Earth climates. ROCKE-3D is an ongoing effort to expand the capabilities of ModelE2 to handle a broader range of atmospheric conditions, including higher and lower atmospheric pressures, more diverse chemistries and compositions, larger and smaller planet radii and gravity, different rotation rates (from slower to more rapid than modern Earth’s, including synchronous rotation), diverse ocean and land distributions and topographies, and potential basic biosphere functions. The first aim of ROCKE-3D is to model planetary atmospheres on terrestrial worlds within the solar system such as paleo-Earth, modern and paleo-Mars, paleo-Venus, and Saturn’s moon Titan. By validating the model for a broad range of temperatures, pressures, and atmospheric constituents, we can then further expand its capabilities to those exoplanetary rocky worlds that have been discovered in the past, as well as those to be discovered in the future. We also discuss the current and near-future capabilities of ROCKE-3D as a community model for studying planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres.

  12. Resolving Orbital and Climate Keys of Earth and Extraterrestrial Environments with Dynamics (ROCKE-3D) 1.0: A General Circulation Model for Simulating the Climates of Rocky Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Way, M. J.; Aleinov, I.; Amundsen, David S.; Chandler, M. A.; Clune, T. L.; Del Genio, A.; Fujii, Y.; Kelley, M.; Kiang, N. Y.; Sohl, L.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Resolving Orbital and Climate Keys of Earth and Extraterrestrial Environments with Dynamics (ROCKE-3D) is a three-dimensional General Circulation Model (GCM) developed at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies for the modeling of atmospheres of solar system and exoplanetary terrestrial planets. Its parent model, known as ModelE2, is used to simulate modern Earth and near-term paleo-Earth climates. ROCKE-3D is an ongoing effort to expand the capabilities of ModelE2 to handle a broader range of atmospheric conditions, including higher and lower atmospheric pressures, more diverse chemistries and compositions, larger and smaller planet radii and gravity, different rotation rates (from slower to more rapid than modern Earth's, including synchronous rotation), diverse ocean and land distributions and topographies, and potential basic biosphere functions. The first aim of ROCKE-3D is to model planetary atmospheres on terrestrial worlds within the solar system such as paleo-Earth, modern and paleo-Mars, paleo-Venus, and Saturn's moon Titan. By validating the model for a broad range of temperatures, pressures, and atmospheric constituents, we can then further expand its capabilities to those exoplanetary rocky worlds that have been discovered in the past, as well as those to be discovered in the future. We also discuss the current and near-future capabilities of ROCKE-3D as a community model for studying planetary and exoplanetary atmospheres.

  13. A Consortium for Ocean Circulation and Climate Estimation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stammer, Detlef

    2001-01-01

    We will improve the ocean general circulation models upon which assimilation is based, evaluate and improve assimilation techniques, and confront the practical problems of marshaling large data sets...

  14. Environmental Technology Verification: Supplement to Test/QA Plan for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners; Bioaerosol Inactivation Efficiency by HVAC In-Duct Ultraviolet Light Air Cleaners

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Air Pollution Control Technology Verification Center has selected general ventilation air cleaners as a technology area. The Generic Verification Protocol for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners is on the Environmental Technology Verification we...

  15. Microwave circulator design

    CERN Document Server

    Linkhart, Douglas K

    2014-01-01

    Circulator design has advanced significantly since the first edition of this book was published 25 years ago. The objective of this second edition is to present theory, information, and design procedures that will enable microwave engineers and technicians to design and build circulators successfully. This resource contains a discussion of the various units used in the circulator design computations, as well as covers the theory of operation. This book presents numerous applications, giving microwave engineers new ideas about how to solve problems using circulators. Design examples are provided, which demonstrate how to apply the information to real-world design tasks.

  16. Journalism as Cultures of Circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    of journalism. It is, however, more important than ever to shift attention away from texts to the processes through which they are circulated. This is partly because the many cultural forms of journalism (textual, institutional, technological, material, behavioural and imagined) are undergoing significant......, likes, comments, searches, journalist roles, writing and reading positions and identities etc. Such forms will be traced within the mediation of a specific event with the overall aim of beginning a theorization of the landscape of journalism as highly interrelated cultures of circulation.......The universe of journalism has always consisted of interspersed texts, meanings and practices. Yet, much journalism research has often isolated either texts and/or contexts and as such assumed relations between professional practices, informed (rational) readers and (conceived) core texts...

  17. Status of The General Atomics Low Speed Urban Maglev Technology Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurol, S; Baldi, R; Bever, D; Post, R

    2004-06-16

    This paper presents the status of General Atomics Urban Maglev Program. The development provides an innovative approach for low speed transportation suitable for very challenging urban environments. Permanent magnets arranged in a 'Halbach' array configuration produce a relatively stiff magnetic suspension operating with an air gap of 25 mm. The project has progressed from design and prototype hardware testing, to the construction of a 120-meter full-scale test track, located in San Diego, California. Dynamic testing of the levitation, propulsion and guidance systems is being performed.

  18. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1996. Annex V: PSI general energy technology newsletter 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, C.; Leuenberger, J. [eds.

    1997-06-01

    Surveying the results of General Energy Research in 1996, three major trends can be identified. First, in areas where research results have reached an advanced stage, decisive steps have been taken to promote a transfer towards industrial realization; examples include biomass gasification, advanced battery concepts, and combustion research. Second, in projects with longer term orientation, several options are being evaluated by exploratory studies, e.g. in solar chemistry and reaction analysis. Third, in line with the strategic planning of our institute, the development and characterization of materials for energy research has received increased attention. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  19. Psychotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Health Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder are among the most commonly diagnosed mental illnesses in Canada; both are associated with a high societal and economic burden. Treatment for major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder consists of pharmacological and psychological interventions. Three commonly used psychological interventions are cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal therapy, and supportive therapy. The objectives of this report were to assess the effectiveness and safety of these types of therapy for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder, to assess the cost-effectiveness of structured psychotherapy (CBT or interpersonal therapy), to calculate the budget impact of publicly funding structured psychotherapy, and to gain a greater understanding of the experiences of people with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder. We performed a literature search on October 27, 2016, for systematic reviews that compared CBT, interpersonal therapy, or supportive therapy with usual care, waitlist control, or pharmacotherapy in adult outpatients with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder. We developed an individual-level state-transition probabilistic model for a cohort of adult outpatients aged 18 to 75 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder to determine the cost-effectiveness of individual or group CBT (as a representative form of structured psychotherapy) versus usual care. We also estimated the 5-year budget impact of publicly funding structured psychotherapy in Ontario. Finally, we interviewed people with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder to better understand the impact of their condition on their daily lives and their experience with different treatment options, including psychotherapy. Interpersonal therapy compared with usual care reduced posttreatment major depressive disorder

  20. Psychotherapy for Major Depressive Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMartin, Kristen; Gajic-Veljanoski, Olga; Wells, David; Higgins, Caroline; Walter, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder are among the most commonly diagnosed mental illnesses in Canada; both are associated with a high societal and economic burden. Treatment for major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder consists of pharmacological and psychological interventions. Three commonly used psychological interventions are cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), interpersonal therapy, and supportive therapy. The objectives of this report were to assess the effectiveness and safety of these types of therapy for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder, to assess the cost-effectiveness of structured psychotherapy (CBT or interpersonal therapy), to calculate the budget impact of publicly funding structured psychotherapy, and to gain a greater understanding of the experiences of people with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder. Methods We performed a literature search on October 27, 2016, for systematic reviews that compared CBT, interpersonal therapy, or supportive therapy with usual care, waitlist control, or pharmacotherapy in adult outpatients with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder. We developed an individual-level state-transition probabilistic model for a cohort of adult outpatients aged 18 to 75 years with a primary diagnosis of major depressive disorder to determine the cost-effectiveness of individual or group CBT (as a representative form of structured psychotherapy) versus usual care. We also estimated the 5-year budget impact of publicly funding structured psychotherapy in Ontario. Finally, we interviewed people with major depressive disorder and/or generalized anxiety disorder to better understand the impact of their condition on their daily lives and their experience with different treatment options, including psychotherapy. Results Interpersonal therapy compared with usual care reduced

  1. High-recovery visual identification and single-cell retrieval of circulating tumor cells for genomic analysis using a dual-technology platform integrated with automated immunofluorescence staining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campton, Daniel E; Ramirez, Arturo B; Nordberg, Joshua J; Drovetto, Nick; Clein, Alisa C; Varshavskaya, Paulina; Friemel, Barry H; Quarre, Steve; Breman, Amy; Dorschner, Michael; Blau, Sibel; Blau, C Anthony; Sabath, Daniel E; Stilwell, Jackie L; Kaldjian, Eric P

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are malignant cells that have migrated from solid cancers into the blood, where they are typically present in rare numbers. There is great interest in using CTCs to monitor response to therapies, to identify clinically actionable biomarkers, and to provide a non-invasive window on the molecular state of a tumor. Here we characterize the performance of the AccuCyte® – CyteFinder® system, a comprehensive, reproducible and highly sensitive platform for collecting, identifying and retrieving individual CTCs from microscopic slides for molecular analysis after automated immunofluorescence staining for epithelial markers. All experiments employed a density-based cell separation apparatus (AccuCyte) to separate nucleated cells from the blood and transfer them to microscopic slides. After staining, the slides were imaged using a digital scanning microscope (CyteFinder). Precisely counted model CTCs (mCTCs) from four cancer cell lines were spiked into whole blood to determine recovery rates. Individual mCTCs were removed from slides using a single-cell retrieval device (CytePicker™) for whole genome amplification and subsequent analysis by PCR and Sanger sequencing, whole exome sequencing, or array-based comparative genomic hybridization. Clinical CTCs were evaluated in blood samples from patients with different cancers in comparison with the CellSearch® system. AccuCyte – CyteFinder presented high-resolution images that allowed identification of mCTCs by morphologic and phenotypic features. Spike-in mCTC recoveries were between 90 and 91%. More than 80% of single-digit spike-in mCTCs were identified and even a single cell in 7.5 mL could be found. Analysis of single SKBR3 mCTCs identified presence of a known TP53 mutation by both PCR and whole exome sequencing, and confirmed the reported karyotype of this cell line. Patient sample CTC counts matched or exceeded CellSearch CTC counts in a small feasibility cohort. The AccuCyte

  2. A general approach for the estimation of loss of life due to natural and technological disasters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonkman, S.N.; Lentz, A.; Vrijling, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    In assessing the safety of engineering systems in the context of quantitative risk analysis one of the most important consequence types concerns the loss of life due to accidents and disasters. In this paper, a general approach for loss of life estimation is proposed which includes three elements: (1) the assessment of physical effects associated with the event; (2) determination of the number of exposed persons (taking into account warning and evacuation); and (3) determination of mortality amongst the population exposed. The typical characteristics of and modelling approaches for these three elements are discussed. This paper focuses on 'small probability-large consequences' events within the engineering domain. It is demonstrated how the proposed approach can be applied to various case studies, such as tunnel fires, earthquakes and flood events.

  3. Patients' use and views of real-time feedback technology in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Christine; Davey, Antoinette; Elmore, Natasha; Carter, Mary; Mounce, Luke; Wilson, Ed; Burt, Jenni; Roland, Martin; Campbell, John

    2017-06-01

    There is growing interest in real-time feedback (RTF), which involves collecting and summarizing information about patient experience at the point of care with the aim of informing service improvement. To investigate the feasibility and acceptability of RTF in UK general practice. Exploratory randomized trial. Ten general practices in south-west England and Cambridgeshire. All patients attending surgeries were eligible to provide RTF. Touch screens were installed in waiting areas for 12 weeks with practice staff responsible for encouraging patients to provide RTF. All practices received fortnightly feedback summaries. Four teams attended a facilitated reflection session. RTF 'response rates' among consulting patients were estimated, and the representativeness of touch screen users were assessed. The frequency of staff-patient interactions about RTF (direct observation) and patient views of RTF (exit survey) were summarized. Associated costs were collated. About 2.5% consulting patients provided RTF (range 0.7-8.0% across practices), representing a mean of 194 responses per practice. Patients aged above 65 were under-represented among touch screen users. Receptionists rarely encouraged RTF but, when this did occur, 60% patients participated. Patients were largely positive about RTF but identified some barriers. Costs per practice for the twelve-week period ranged from £1125 (unfacilitated team-level feedback) to £1887 (facilitated team ± practitioner-level feedback). The main cost was the provision of touch screens. Response rates for RTF were lower than those of other survey modes, although the numbers of patients providing feedback to each practice were comparable to those achieved in the English national GP patient survey. More patients might engage with RTF if the opportunity were consistently highlighted to them. © 2016 The Authors. Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Value Added: History of Physics in a ``Science, Technology, and Society'' General Education Undergraduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Dwight

    2016-03-01

    In thirty years of teaching a capstone ``Science, Technology, and Society'' course to undergraduate students of all majors, I have found that, upon entering STS, to most of them the Manhattan Project seems about as remote as the Civil War; few can describe the difference between nuclear and large non-nuclear weapons. With similar lack of awareness, many students seem to think the Big Bang was dreamed up by science sorcerers. One might suppose that a basic mental picture of weapons that held entire populations hostage should be part of informed citizenship. One might also suppose that questions about origins, as they are put to nature through evidence-based reasoning, should be integral to a culture's identity. Over the years I have found the history of physics to be an effective tool for bringing such subjects to life for STS students. Upon hearing some of the history behind (for example) nuclear weapons and big bang cosmology, these students can better imagine themselves called upon to help in a Manhattan Project, or see themselves sleuthing about in a forensic science like cosmology. In this talk I share sample student responses to our class discussions on nuclear weapons, and on cosmology. The history of physics is too engaging to be appreciated only by physicists.

  5. An overview of autonomous rendezvous and docking system technology development at General Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenzel, Fred

    The Centaur avionics suite is undergoing a dramatic modernization for the commercial, DoD Atlas and Titan programs. The system has been upgraded to the current state-of-the-art in ring laser gyro inertial sensors and Mil-Std-1750A processor technology. The Cruise Missile avionic system has similarly been evolving for many years. Integration of GPS into both systems has been underway for over five years with a follow-on cruise missile system currently in flight test. Rendezvous and Docking related studies have been conducted for over five years in support of OMV, CTV, and Advanced Upper Stages, as well as several other internal IR&D's. The avionics system and AR&D simulator demonstrated to the SATWG in November 1990 has been upgraded considerably under two IR&D programs in 1991. The Centaur modern avionics system is being flown in block upgrades which started in July of 1990. The Inertial Navigation Unit will fly in November of 1991. The Cruise Missile avionics systems have been fully tested and operationally validated in combat. The integrated AR&D system for space vehicle applications has been under development and testing since 1990. A Joint NASA / GD ARD&L System Test Program is currently being planned to validate several aspects of system performance in three different NASA test facilities in 1992.

  6. Circulation pump mounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalicky, A.

    1976-01-01

    The suspension is described of nuclear reactor circulating pumps enabling their dilatation with a minimum reverse force consisting of spacing rods supported with one end in the anchor joints and provided with springs and screw joints engaging the circulating pump shoes. The spacing rods are equipped with side vibration dampers anchored in the shaft side wall and on the body of the circulating pump drive body. The negative reverse force F of the spacing rods is given by the relation F=Q/l.y, where Q is the weight of the circulating pump, l is the spatial distance between the shoe joints and anchor joints, and y is the deflection of the circulating pump vertical axis from the mean equilibrium position. The described suspension is advantageous in that that the reverse force for the deflection from the mean equilibrium position is minimal, dynamic behaviour is better, and construction costs are lower compared to suspension design used so far. (J.B.)

  7. Proper Sizing of Circulation Pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Nørgaard, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes the preliminary results from field tests of replacing various types of old pumps used for circulating water in heating systems in single- and double-family houses with new types of pumps. The tests were carried out in Denmark for the Danish Electricity Savings Trust......, but the results can be applied to Europe in general. Despite the small sample of houses involved in the test, 15 houses, some rather safe conclusions can be drawn from the results, which showed that newly developed pumps with power consumption around 5-8 W, can perform the task of circulating the water...... sufficiently to keep the houses satisfactorily warm during the heating season of the test. The old replaced pumps used 5-10 times more power. In Europe alone, a gradual replacement of the present vastly oversized pumps with such small but sufficient pumps can save the construction of 17 large power plants...

  8. Performance of Two Cloud-Radiation Parameterization Schemes in the Finite Volume General Circulation Model for Anomalously Wet May and June 2003 Over the Continental United States and Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Mocko, David M.; Lin, S. J.

    2006-01-01

    An objective assessment of the impact of a new cloud scheme, called Microphysics of Clouds with Relaxed Arakawa-Schubert Scheme (McRAS) (together with its radiation modules), on the finite volume general circulation model (fvGCM) was made with a set of ensemble forecasts that invoke performance evaluation over both weather and climate timescales. The performance of McRAS (and its radiation modules) was compared with that of the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (NCAR CCM3) cloud scheme (with its NCAR physics radiation). We specifically chose the boreal summer months of May and June 2003, which were characterized by an anomalously wet eastern half of the continental United States as well as northern regions of Amazonia. The evaluation employed an ensemble of 70 daily 10-day forecasts covering the 61 days of the study period. Each forecast was started from the analyzed initial state of the atmosphere and spun-up soil moisture from the first-day forecasts with the model. Monthly statistics of these forecasts with up to 10-day lead time provided a robust estimate of the behavior of the simulated monthly rainfall anomalies. Patterns of simulated versus observed rainfall, 500-hPa heights, and top-of-the-atmosphere net radiation were recast into regional anomaly correlations. The correlations were compared among the simulations with each of the schemes. The results show that fvGCM with McRAS and its radiation package performed discernibly better than the original fvGCM with CCM3 cloud physics plus its radiation package. The McRAS cloud scheme also showed a reasonably positive response to the observed sea surface temperature on mean monthly rainfall fields at different time leads. This analysis represents a method for helpful systematic evaluation prior to selection of a new scheme in a global model.

  9. Ten-year follow-up on adoption of endodontic technology and clinical guidelines amongst Danish general dental practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markvart, Merete; Fransson, Helena; Bjørndal, Lars

    2018-03-09

    The aim of this study was to re-assess the adoption of certain endodontic technology and central treatment principles of root canal treatments as advocated by guidelines presented by the European Society of Endodontology. The questionnaire included the same questions in 2003 and 2013. The general dental practitioners (GDPs) anonymously reported how frequent ('often', 'occasionally', and 'never') they used certain endodontic technology and adhered to central treatment principles. The statistical analyses were performed using Chi-squared test and Goodman-Kruskal's γ-coefficient as an association measure. The overall response rate of the 2013 group was 46.5% (n = 531). The frequencies of GDPs reporting often use of rubber dam, apex locator and rotary NiTi instruments were significantly higher (p Adoption was significantly influenced by the factors gender (p = .601) and time since graduation (p = .361), and the cluster analyses revealed the neglected use of rubber dam to be associated with no established postoperative recall system. After 10 years, there was a higher frequency of GDPs who had adopted certain endodontic technologies. However, progress towards high-quality root canal treatment might be obstructed as the majority of GDPs avoids consistent use of rubber dam, and routinely neglects recalls for postoperative controls of their endodontic treatments.

  10. Hall Effect Gyrators and Circulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giovanni; DiVincenzo, David P.

    2014-04-01

    The electronic circulator and its close relative the gyrator are invaluable tools for noise management and signal routing in the current generation of low-temperature microwave systems for the implementation of new quantum technologies. The current implementation of these devices using the Faraday effect is satisfactory but requires a bulky structure whose physical dimension is close to the microwave wavelength employed. The Hall effect is an alternative nonreciprocal effect that can also be used to produce desired device functionality. We review earlier efforts to use an Ohmically contacted four-terminal Hall bar, explaining why this approach leads to unacceptably high device loss. We find that capacitive coupling to such a Hall conductor has much greater promise for achieving good circulator and gyrator functionality. We formulate a classical Ohm-Hall analysis for calculating the properties of such a device, and show how this classical theory simplifies remarkably in the limiting case of the Hall angle approaching 90°. In this limit, we find that either a four-terminal or a three-terminal capacitive device can give excellent circulator behavior, with device dimensions far smaller than the ac wavelength. An experiment is proposed to achieve GHz-band gyration in millimeter (and smaller) scale structures employing either semiconductor heterostructure or graphene Hall conductors. An inductively coupled scheme for realizing a Hall gyrator is also analyzed.

  11. Hall Effect Gyrators and Circulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Viola

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The electronic circulator and its close relative the gyrator are invaluable tools for noise management and signal routing in the current generation of low-temperature microwave systems for the implementation of new quantum technologies. The current implementation of these devices using the Faraday effect is satisfactory but requires a bulky structure whose physical dimension is close to the microwave wavelength employed. The Hall effect is an alternative nonreciprocal effect that can also be used to produce desired device functionality. We review earlier efforts to use an Ohmically contacted four-terminal Hall bar, explaining why this approach leads to unacceptably high device loss. We find that capacitive coupling to such a Hall conductor has much greater promise for achieving good circulator and gyrator functionality. We formulate a classical Ohm-Hall analysis for calculating the properties of such a device, and show how this classical theory simplifies remarkably in the limiting case of the Hall angle approaching 90°. In this limit, we find that either a four-terminal or a three-terminal capacitive device can give excellent circulator behavior, with device dimensions far smaller than the ac wavelength. An experiment is proposed to achieve GHz-band gyration in millimeter (and smaller scale structures employing either semiconductor heterostructure or graphene Hall conductors. An inductively coupled scheme for realizing a Hall gyrator is also analyzed.

  12. SpaceX Dragon Air Circulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brenda; Piatrovich, Siarhei; Prina, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    The Dragon capsule is a reusable vehicle being developed by Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) that will provide commercial cargo transportation to the International Space Station (ISS). Dragon is designed to be a habitable module while it is berthed to ISS. As such, the Dragon Environmental Control System (ECS) consists of pressure control and pressure equalization, air sampling, fire detection, illumination, and an air circulation system. The air circulation system prevents pockets of stagnant air in Dragon that can be hazardous to the ISS crew. In addition, through the inter-module duct, the air circulation system provides fresh air from ISS into Dragon. To utilize the maximum volume of Dragon for cargo packaging, the Dragon ECS air circulation system is designed around cargo rack optimization. At the same time, the air circulation system is designed to meet the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) inter-module and intra-module ventilation requirements and acoustic requirements. A flight like configuration of the Dragon capsule including the air circulation system was recently assembled for testing to assess the design for inter-module and intra-module ventilation and acoustics. The testing included the Dragon capsule, and flight configuration in the pressure section with cargo racks, lockers, all of the air circulation components, and acoustic treatment. The air circulation test was also used to verify the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Dragon capsule. The CFD model included the same Dragon internal geometry that was assembled for the test. This paper will describe the Dragon air circulation system design which has been verified by testing the system and with CFD analysis.

  13. Autonomic Regulation of Splanchnic Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Fraser

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the autonomic nervous system in circulatory regulation of the splanchnic organs (stomach, small intestine, colon, liver, pancreas and spleen is reviewed. In general, the sympathetic nervous system is primarily involved in vasoconstriction, while the parasympathetic contributes to vasodilation. Vasoconstriction in the splanchnic circulation appears to be mediated by alpha-2 receptors and vasodilation by activation of primary afferent nerves with subsequent release of vasodilatory peptides, or by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. As well, an important function of the autonomic nervous system is to provide a mechanism by which splanchnic vascular reserve can be mobilized during stress to maintain overall cardiovascular homeostasis.

  14. A 40 GHz fully integrated circuit with a vector network analyzer and a coplanar-line-based detection area for circulating tumor cell analysis using 65 nm CMOS technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Taiki; Matsunaga, Maya; Kobayashi, Atsuki; Nakazato, Kazuo; Niitsu, Kiichi

    2018-03-01

    A 40-GHz fully integrated CMOS-based circuit for circulating tumor cells (CTC) analysis, consisting of an on-chip vector network analyzer (VNA) and a highly sensitive coplanar-line-based detection area is presented in this paper. In this work, we introduce a fully integrated architecture that eliminates unwanted parasitic effects. The proposed analyzer was designed using 65 nm CMOS technology, and SPICE and MWS simulations were used to validate its operation. The simulation confirmed that the proposed circuit can measure S-parameter shifts resulting from the addition of various types of tumor cells to the detection area, the data of which are provided in a previous study: the |S 21| values for HepG2, A549, and HEC-1-A cells are -0.683, -0.580, and -0.623 dB, respectively. Additionally, the measurement demonstrated an S-parameters reduction of -25.7% when a silicone resin was put on the circuit. Hence, the proposed system is expected to contribute to cancer diagnosis.

  15. NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this DOE Cooperative Agreement is to conduct a cost-shared clean coal technology project to demonstrate the feasibility of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology and to evaluate economic, environmental, and operational benefits of CFB steam generators on a utility scale. At the conclusion of the Phase 2 program, testing related to satisfying these objectives was completed. Data analysis and reporting are scheduled for completion by October 1991. (VC)

  16. Ocean circulation using altimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minster, Jean-Francois; Brossier, C.; Gennero, M. C.; Mazzega, P.; Remy, F.; Letraon, P. Y.; Blanc, F.

    1991-01-01

    Our group has been very actively involved in promoting satellite altimetry as a unique tool for observing ocean circulation and its variability. TOPEX/POSEIDON is particularly interesting as it is optimized for this purpose. It will probably be the first instrument really capable of observing the seasonal and interannual variability of subtropical and polar gyres and the first to eventually document the corresponding variability of their heat flux transport. The studies of these phenomena require data of the best quality, unbiased extraction of the signal, mixing of these satellite data with in situ measurements, and assimilation of the whole set into a dynamic description of ocean circulation. Our group intends to develop responses to all these requirements. We will concentrate mostly on the circulation of the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans: This will be done in close connection with other groups involved in the study of circulation of the tropical Atlantic Ocean, in the altimetry measurements (in particular, those of the tidal issue), and in the techniques of data assimilation in ocean circulation models.

  17. [Circulating proteinic biomarkers and breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathelin, C; Koehl, C; Rio, M-C

    2006-01-01

    Circulating proteinic biomarkers are secreted by tumor cells or by their environmental cells and they have a variable specificity. In case of breast cancer, carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) was for a long time the only circulating biomarker used. Nowadays, the most useful biomarkers measure circulating levels of fragments of MUC1-polymorphic epithelial mucin (MUC1-PEM): cancer antigen (CA) 15.3, mucin-like carcinoma-associated antigen (MCA), CA 27-29, CA 549... They are useful for general disease follow-up. Other circulating markers belonging to keratins (tissue polypeptide antigen, TPA, TPS or Cyfra 21.1) are correlated with proliferative activity of breast tumors. More recently, the measure of the c-erb B2 circulating part (extra cellular domain, ECD) was proposed as a prognostic biomarker for breast tumors with c-erb B2 overexpression. Moreover, the determination of urinary level of trefoil factor1 (PS2-TFF1) might be useful for the follow-up of hormonodependent breast cancers. The present review describes the clinical interest of these different circulating biomarkers in case of breast cancer, emphasizing their biological characteristics.

  18. General dental practitioners' knowledge of polymerisation of resin-based composite restorations and light curing unit technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, A; Turner, S

    2011-09-23

    Clinical successful use of resin-based composite restorations (RBCs) depends on knowledge of material and light curing unit (LCU) related factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate general dental practitioners' knowledge of polymerisation of RBCs and LCU technology. Members of the Active Research Group of the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK) in England, Scotland and Wales engaged in primary dental care were sent a letter introducing the study and asking for their cooperation, followed by an email containing a link to the online survey questionnaire, hosted on Surveymonkey.com. The questionnaire enquired about current LCUs, and asked a series of questions on material science. Sixty-six percent of the 274 members contacted responded. Fifty-seven percent used LED units, 25% quartz tungsten halogen (QTH), and 1% plasma arc (missing: 17%). Thirty percent reported having access to a radiometer. Appropriate responses regarding the degree of conversion of composite and adhesive materials were given by 32% and 23% respectively, and 22% agreed that LED and QTH LCUs had comparable efficiency in polymerising composites. Thirty-three percent were aware that RBCs eluted substances that may have adverse local or systemic consequences. Fifty-eight percent stated that if polymerisation of RBC is slowed down, polymerisation stress will be lower, and 43% said that polymerisation shrinkage will be reduced if the degree of conversion is reduced. Knowledge (measured by appropriate responses to these questions) was not related to years since qualification (r=-0.05, n=168, p=0.53). The study suggests that dentists' knowledge of curing RBC restorations and LCUs is poor. This indicates that there is a need for training and guidance in this aspect of primary dental care.

  19. Health communication, information technology and the public’s attitude toward periodic general health examinations [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan-Hoang Vuong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periodic general health examinations (GHEs are gradually becoming more popular as they employ subclinical screenings, as a means of early detection. This study considers the effect of information technology (IT, health communications and the public’s attitude towards GHEs in Vietnam. Methods: A total of 2,068 valid observations were obtained from a survey in Hanoi and its surrounding areas. Results: In total, 42.12% of participants stated that they were willing to use IT applications to recognise illness symptoms, and nearly 2/3 of them rated the healthcare quality at average level or below. Discussion: The data, which was processed by the BCL model, showed that IT applications (apps reduce hesitation toward GHEs; however, older people seem to have less confidence in using these apps. Health communications and government’s subsidy also increased the likelihood of people attending periodic GHEs. The probability of early check-ups where there is a cash subsidy could reach approximately 80%.

  20. Arctic circulation regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L

    2015-10-13

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. © 2015 The Authors.

  1. Unmasking circulating tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swennenhuis, Joost Franciscus

    2017-01-01

    The number of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) that can be isolated from blood of cancer patients is prognostic for the course of the disease. A higher number of CTCs correlates with a worse prognosis. A change from a higher number to a lower number of CTCs indicates a benefit of the current treatment

  2. Why general purpose technologies matter in innovation systems : The case of artificial intelligence in the mining and metal producing industry of Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Karakaya, Emrah

    2017-01-01

    There are many signs indicating that artificial intelligence – reproduction of the cognitive functions that humans have such as learning and problem solving by machines– has been spreading among various industries. The rise of artificial intelligence – as this article conceptualize as a general purpose technology –   is affecting not only the cognitive dimension of technological innovation systems but also the organizational, institutional and economic dimensions. However, from a technologica...

  3. Forcing mechanisms of the Bay of Bengal circulation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Vinayachandran, P.N.; Shetye, S.R.; Sengupta, D.; Gadgil, S.

    A state-of-the-art ocean general circulation model, set up for the North Indian Ocean and driven by climatological wind stress simulates most of the observed features of the near-surface circulation of the Bay of Bengal. The prominent features...

  4. Turbulent diffusion of lines and circulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyink, Gregory L. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)], E-mail: eyink@ams.jhu.edu

    2007-09-03

    We study material lines and passive vectors in a model of turbulent flow at infinite-Reynolds number, the Kraichnan-Kazantsev ensemble of velocities that are white-noise in time and rough (Hoelder continuous) in space. It is argued that the phenomenon of 'spontaneous stochasticity' generalizes to material lines and that conservation of circulations generalizes to a 'martingale property' of the stochastic process of lines.

  5. Influence of geomagnetic disturbance on atmospheric circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodera, K.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of geomagnetic disturbance or passage of the solar sector boundary on the atmospheric circulation was reported. Unfortunately little is known about the general morphology of Sun weather relationships. In order to know the general characteristics, pressure height variations on an isobaric surface over the Northern Hemisphere were analyzed. Although it may be suitable to use some index, or some integrated value for statistical purposes, weather prediction data were used to verify whether the obtained tropospheric response is caused externally or not.

  6. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  7. Shallow Circulations: Relevance and Strategies for Satellite Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, Gilles; Reitebuch, Oliver; Naumann, Ann Kristin

    2017-11-01

    Shallow circulations are central to many tropical cloud systems. We investigate the potential of existing and upcoming data to document these circulations. Different methods to observe or constrain atmospheric circulations rely on satellite-borne instruments. Direct observations of the wind are currently possible at the ocean surface or using tracer patterns. Satellite-borne wind lidar will soon be available, with a much better coverage and accuracy. Meanwhile, circulations can be constrained using satellite observations of atmospheric diabatic heating. We evaluate the commonalities and discrepancies of these estimates together with reanalysis in systems that include shallow circulations. It appears that existing datasets are in qualitative agreement, but that they still differ too much to provide robust evaluation criteria for general circulation models. This state of affairs highlights the potential of satellite-borne wind lidar and of further work on current satellite retrievals.

  8. Effect of Vegetation on the Late Miocene Ocean Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Lohmann

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We examine the role of the vegetation cover and the associated hydrological cycle on the deep ocean circulation during the Late Miocene (~10 million years ago. In our simulations, an open Central American gateway and exchange with fresh Pacific waters leads to a weak and shallow thermohaline circulation in the North Atlantic Ocean which is consistent with most other modeling studies for this time period. Here, we estimate the effect of a changed vegetation cover on the ocean general circulation using atmospheric circulation model simulations for the late Miocene climate with 353 ppmv CO2 level. The Late Miocene land surface cover reduces the albedo, the net evaporation in the North Atlantic catchment is affected and the North Atlantic water becomes more saline leading to a more vigorous North Atlantic Deep Water circulation. These effects reveal potentially important feedbacks between the ocean circulation, the hydrological cycle and the land surface cover for Cenozoic climate evolution.

  9. Controlled humidity gas circulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruner, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A programmable circulator capable of regulating the humidity of a gas stream over a wide range of humidity is described. An optical dew-point hygrometer is used as a feedback element to control the addition or removal of water vapor. Typical regulation of the gas is to a dew-point temperature of +- 0.2 0 C and to an accuracy limited by the dew-point hygrometer

  10. Ocean circulation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koblinsky, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Remotely sensed signatures of ocean surface characteristics from active and passive satellite-borne radiometers in conjunction with in situ data were utilized to examine the large scale, low frequency circulation of the world's oceans. Studies of the California Current, the Gulf of California, and the Kuroshio Extension Current in the western North Pacific were reviewed briefly. The importance of satellite oceanographic tools was emphasized.

  11. Fluid circulation control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benard, Henri; Henocque, Jean.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontal fluid circulation control device, of the type having a pivoting flap. This device is intended for being fitted in the pipes of hydraulic installation, particularly in a bleed and venting system of a nuclear power station shifting radioactive or contaminated liquids. The characteristic of this device is the cut-out at the top of the flap to allow the air contained in the pipes to flow freely [fr

  12. Decree-Law No. 548/77 of 31 December - Further amendments in the general organisation of the Ministry of Industry and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Further to Decree-Law No. 358/76 of 14 May 1976 establishing the general reorganisation of the Ministry of Industry and Technology, this Decree-Law creates new departments and decides the abolition of others, including the Junta de Energia Nuclear. The JEN's activities are henceforth to be redistributed to other departments in the Ministry. (NEA) [fr

  13. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  14. World Ocean Circulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R. Allyn

    1992-01-01

    The oceans are an equal partner with the atmosphere in the global climate system. The World Ocean Circulation Experiment is presently being implemented to improve ocean models that are useful for climate prediction both by encouraging more model development but more importantly by providing quality data sets that can be used to force or to validate such models. WOCE is the first oceanographic experiment that plans to generate and to use multiparameter global ocean data sets. In order for WOCE to succeed, oceanographers must establish and learn to use more effective methods of assembling, quality controlling, manipulating and distributing oceanographic data.

  15. Circulation of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitani, P.

    2016-01-01

    Since the dawn of man, contemplation of the stars has been a primary impulse in human beings, who proliferated their knowledge of the stars all over the world. Aristotle sees this as the product of primeval and perennial “wonder” which gives rise to what we call science, philosophy, and poetry. Astronomy, astrology, and star art (painting, architecture, literature, and music) go hand in hand through millennia in all cultures of the planet (and all use catasterisms to explain certain phenomena). Some of these developments are independent of each other, i.e., they take place in one culture independently of others. Some, on the other hand, are the product of the “circulation of stars.” There are two ways of looking at this. One seeks out forms, the other concentrates on the passing of specific lore from one area to another through time. The former relies on archetypes (for instance, with catasterism), the latter constitutes a historical process. In this paper I present some of the surprising ways in which the circulation of stars has occurred—from East to West, from East to the Far East, and from West to East, at times simultaneously.

  16. Circulation in the Mediterranean Sea: evidences, debates and unanswered questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Millot

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The overall counterclockwise alongslope circulation of Atlantic Water (AW in the western basin of the Mediterranean Sea is now generally accepted. As the eastern basin displays similar general features, why is it generally assumed to function in a different way, and why is AW now said to circulate across the interior of the eastern basin? Relatively huge mesoscale anticyclonic eddies induced by the instability of the AW circulation in the south of the western basin have lifetimes up to several years. It is possible that they extend down to the sea bottom and play a major role in the distribution of all water masses. Why have apparently similar eddies generated in the eastern basin never received specific attention? Once formed, Mediterranean Waters (MWs must spread and circulate before outflowing. Why have simple dynamical arguments for understanding the circulation of AW, such as the Coriolis effect, rarely been considered for the circulation of MWs? In this paper we address these major aspects of water circulation in the Mediterranean Sea. In order to be as objective and convincing as possible, and to write a paper that can be understood by as broad a readership as possible, we have chosen to present only raw data sets that can be easily interpreted by the reader without any help from the author. Based on the evidence provided by these data sets, we specify the current debates and list what we think are the main unanswered questions.

  17. MaTech - the BMFT ''new materials'' materials research program - 1994 annual report about new materials for innovative information technology, energy technology, traffic engineering, medical engineering and production engineering applications, and about general materials research and new fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lillack, D.; Gilbert, I.; Runte, S.

    1995-01-01

    This annual report gives a survey of projects supported within the framework of the Matfo and Ma-Tech programs. These projects focus on research into materials for innovative: 1. information technology, 2. energy technology, 3. traffic engineering, 4. medical engineering, and 5. production engineering applications and on 6. general materials research and new fields. The descriptions of individual projects indicate project goals and work schedules, names of important sub-contractors, and total costs and the funds contributed by BMFT. Information added in an annex includes inter alia a list of publications, lectures, contracts, or patents resulting from project activities in the year 1994. (MM) [de

  18. The role of the thermohaline circulation in abrupt climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter U; Pisias, Nicklas G; Stocker, Thomas F; Weaver, Andrew J

    2002-02-21

    The possibility of a reduced Atlantic thermohaline circulation in response to increases in greenhouse-gas concentrations has been demonstrated in a number of simulations with general circulation models of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. But it remains difficult to assess the likelihood of future changes in the thermohaline circulation, mainly owing to poorly constrained model parameterizations and uncertainties in the response of the climate system to greenhouse warming. Analyses of past abrupt climate changes help to solve these problems. Data and models both suggest that abrupt climate change during the last glaciation originated through changes in the Atlantic thermohaline circulation in response to small changes in the hydrological cycle. Atmospheric and oceanic responses to these changes were then transmitted globally through a number of feedbacks. The palaeoclimate data and the model results also indicate that the stability of the thermohaline circulation depends on the mean climate state.

  19. Circulation in the Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, E. Peter

    2001-01-01

    Much information on processes and circulation within the Arctic Ocean has emerged from measurements made on icebreaker expeditions during the past decade. This article offers a perspective based on these measurements, summarizing new ideas regarding how water masses are formed and how they circulate. Best understood at present is the circulation of the Atlantic Layer and mid-depth waters, to depths of about 1700 m, which move in cyclonic gyres in the four major basins of the Arctic Ocean. New...

  20. The behavioural aspect of green technology investments: A general positive model in the context of heterogeneous agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobloch, F.; Mercure, J.F.A.

    2016-01-01

    Studies report that firms do not invest in cost-effective green technologies. While economic barriers can explain parts of the gap, behavioural aspects cause further under-valuation. This could be partly due to systematic deviations of decision-making agents’ perceptions from normative benchmarks,

  1. In Harmony: A Technology-Based Music Education Model to Enhance Musical Understanding and General Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portowitz, Adena; Peppler, Kylie A.; Downton, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on the practice and evaluation of a music education model, In Harmony, which utilizes new technologies and current theories of learning to mediate the music learning experience. In response to the needs of twenty-first century learners, the educational software programs Teach, Learn, Evaluate! and Impromptu served as central…

  2. The ocean circulation inverse problem

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wunsch, C

    1996-01-01

    .... This book addresses the problem of inferring the state of the ocean circulation, understanding it dynamically, and even forecasting it through a quantitative combination of theory and observation...

  3. Manufacturing technologies for photovoltaics and possible means of their development in Russia (Review). Part 1: General approach to the development of photoelectric converters and basic silicon technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, A. B.; Popel', O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The state and key tendencies of the development of basic technologies for manufacture of photoelectric converters (PECs) in the world are considered, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. The first part of the review gives short information on the development of photovoltaics in the world and planes of the development of solar power plants in Russia. Total power of photoelectric plants operating in various countries in 2015 exceeded 150 GW and increased in the last ten years with a rate of approximately 50% per year. Russia made important state decisions on the support of the development of renewable power engineering and developed mechanisms, which were attractive for business, on the stimulation of building of the network of solar power plants with a total power to 1.5 GW in the country to 2020. At the same time, the rigid demands are made with respect to the localization of the production of components of these plants that opens new abilities for the development of the domestic production of photovoltaics manufacture. Data on the efficiency of PECs of various types that are attained in the leading laboratories of the world are given. Particular emphasis has been placed on the consideration of basic silicon technologies of PEC manufacture, which had the widest commercial application. The basic methods for production of polycrystalline silicon and making single-crystal and multicrystal silicon are described. Fundamentals of making techniques for plates, PECs, and photoelectric modules based on single-crystal and polycrystalline silicon are considered. The second part will be devoted to modifications of manufacturing techniques for photoelectric converters, enhancement methods for contact structures, and recommendations of authors with respect to the choice of prospective technologies for the expansion of PEC production in Russia. It will involve formulations and substantiations of the most promising lines of the development of photoelectric

  4. Gas cooled fast breeder reactor design for a circulator test facility (modified HTGR circulator test facility)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-01

    A GCFR helium circulator test facility sized for full design conditions is proposed for meeting the above requirements. The circulator will be mounted in a large vessel containing high pressure helium which will permit testing at the same power, speed, pressure, temperature and flow conditions intended in the demonstration plant. The electric drive motor for the circulator will obtain its power from an electric supply and distribution system in which electric power will be taken from a local utility. The conceptual design decribed in this report is the result of close interaction between the General Atomic Company (GA), designer of the GCFR, and The Ralph M. Parson Company, architect/engineer for the test facility. A realistic estimate of total project cost is presented, together with a schedule for design, procurement, construction, and inspection.

  5. [Access, use and preferences of Information and Communication Technologies by physicians in a general hospital in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vásquez-Silva, Luis; Ticse, Ray; Alfaro-Carballido, Luz; Guerra-Castañon, Felix

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the access, use and preferences of information and communication technology (ICT) by physicians who practice at Cayetano Heredia National Hospital. The questionnaire explored the availability and skills of ICT, time, educational activities, search engines and technological applications most used as well as ICT preferences in education.211 physicians were surveyed; laptop use was 93%, tablet and smartphone use was 66% and 88%.68% have mobile Internet. Differences were evident in the frequency of use of ICT in 25-34 year old age group as well as a higher level of skills (p<0.05). 86% use PubMed, Facebook and WhatsApp as a means of exchanging images and data related to health, 50% participated in medical blogs, online courses or videoconferences. The use and access of ICT is common among doctors in this hospital and there is positive interest in its use in education.

  6. Seasonal overturning circulation in the Red Sea: 1. Model validation and summer circulation

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Fengchao

    2014-04-01

    The overturning circulation in the Red Sea exhibits a distinct seasonally reversing pattern and is studied using high-resolution MIT general circulation model simulations. In the first part of this study, the vertical and horizontal structure of the summer overturning circulation and its dynamical mechanisms are presented from the model results. The seasonal water exchange in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb is successfully simulated, and the structures of the intruding subsurface Gulf of Aden intermediate water are in good agreement with summer observations in 2011. The model results suggest that the summer overturning circulation is driven by the combined effect of the shoaling of the thermocline in the Gulf of Aden resulting from remote winds in the Arabian Sea and an upward surface slope from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Aden set up by local surface winds in the Red Sea. In addition, during late summer two processes associated, respectively, with latitudinally differential heating and increased salinity in the southern Red Sea act together to cause the reversal of the contrast of the vertical density structure and the cessation of the summer overturning circulation. Dynamically, the subsurface northward pressure gradient force is mainly balanced by vertical viscosity resulting from the vertical shear and boundary friction in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb. Unlike some previous studies, the three-layer summer exchange flows in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb do not appear to be hydraulically controlled.

  7. Towards passive brain-computer interfaces: applying brain-computer interface technology to human-machine systems in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Thorsten O; Kothe, Christian

    2011-04-01

    Cognitive monitoring is an approach utilizing realtime brain signal decoding (RBSD) for gaining information on the ongoing cognitive user state. In recent decades this approach has brought valuable insight into the cognition of an interacting human. Automated RBSD can be used to set up a brain-computer interface (BCI) providing a novel input modality for technical systems solely based on brain activity. In BCIs the user usually sends voluntary and directed commands to control the connected computer system or to communicate through it. In this paper we propose an extension of this approach by fusing BCI technology with cognitive monitoring, providing valuable information about the users' intentions, situational interpretations and emotional states to the technical system. We call this approach passive BCI. In the following we give an overview of studies which utilize passive BCI, as well as other novel types of applications resulting from BCI technology. We especially focus on applications for healthy users, and the specific requirements and demands of this user group. Since the presented approach of combining cognitive monitoring with BCI technology is very similar to the concept of BCIs itself we propose a unifying categorization of BCI-based applications, including the novel approach of passive BCI.

  8. How northern freshwater input can stabilise thermohaline circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Lambert

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The North Atlantic thermohaline circulation (THC carries heat and salt towards the Arctic. This circulation is partly sustained by buoyancy loss and is generally believed to be inhibited by northern freshwater input as indicated by the ‘box-model’ of Stommel (1961. The inferred freshwater-sensitivity of the THC, however, varies considerably between studies, both quantitatively and qualitatively. The northernmost branch of the Atlantic THC, which forms a double estuarine circulation in the Arctic Mediterranean, is one example where both buoyancy loss and buoyancy gain facilitate circulation. We have built on Stommel's original concept to examine the freshwater-sensitivity of a double estuarine circulation. The net inflow into the double estuary is found to be more sensitive to a change in the distribution of freshwater than to a change in the total freshwater input. A double estuarine circulation is more stable than a single overturning, requiring a larger amount and more localised freshwater input into regions of buoyancy loss to induce a thermohaline ‘collapse’. For the Arctic Mediterranean, these findings imply that the Atlantic inflow may be relatively insensitive to increased freshwater input. Complementing Stommel's thermal and haline flow regimes, the double estuarine circulation allows for a third: the throughflow regime. In this regime, a THC with warm poleward surface flow can be sustained without production of dense water; a decrease in high-latitude dense water formation does therefore not necessarily affect regional surface conditions as strongly as generally thought.

  9. Circulating Tumor Cells Versus Circulating Tumor DNA in Colorectal Cancer: Pros and Cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Carlyn Rose C; Zhou, Lanlan; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) are emerging noninvasive multifunctional biomarkers in liquid biopsy allowing for early diagnosis, accurate prognosis, therapeutic target selection, spatiotemporal monitoring of metastasis, as well as monitoring response and resistance to treatment. CTCs and ctDNA are released from different tumor types at different stages and contribute complementary information for clinical decision. Although big strides have been taken in technology development for detection, isolation and characterization of CTCs and sensitive and specific detection of ctDNA, CTC-, and ctDNA-based liquid biopsies may not be widely adopted for routine cancer patient care until the suitability, accuracy, and reliability of these tests are validated and more standardized protocols are corroborated in large, independent, prospectively designed trials. This review covers CTC- and ctDNA-related technologies and their application in colorectal cancer. The promise of CTC-and ctDNA-based liquid biopsies is envisioned.

  10. Natural Circulation Phenomena and Modelling for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-03-01

    The role of natural circulation in advanced water cooled reactor design has been extended with the adoption of passive safety systems. Some designs utilize natural circulation to remove core heat during normal operation. Most passive safety systems used in evolutionary and innovative water cooled reactor designs are driven by natural circulation. The use of passive systems based on natural circulation can eliminate the costs associated with the installation, maintenance and operation of active systems that require multiple pumps with independent and redundant electric power supplies. However, considering the weak driving forces of passive systems based on natural circulation, careful design and analysis methods must be employed to ensure that the systems perform their intended functions. Several IAEA Member States with advanced reactor development programmes are actively conducting investigations of natural circulation to support the development of advanced water cooled reactor designs with passive safety systems. To foster international collaboration on the enabling technology of passive systems that utilize natural circulation, in 2004 the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) on Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling and Reliability of Passive Systems that Utilize Natural Circulation. Three reports were published within the framework of this CRP. The first report (IAEA-TECDOC-1474) contains the material developed for the first IAEA training course on natural circulation in water cooled nuclear power plants. The second report (IAEA-TECDOC-1624) describes passive safety systems in a wide range of advanced water cooled nuclear power plant designs, with the goal of gaining insights into system design, operation and reliability. This third, and last, report summarizes the research studies completed by participating institutes during the CRP period.

  11. General Education Issues, Distance Education Practices: Building Community and Classroom Interaction through the Integration of Curriculum, Instructional Design, and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Jeri L.; Berner, R. Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Examines the issues in a case study surrounding the integration of videoconferencing and Web-based instruction to bring the literature of journalism to life for undergraduate students. Sets forth examples of principles and practices for successful integration of distance education and general education. Also describes the students' reactions in…

  12. Effect of educational intervention on adoption of new endodontic technology by general dental practitioners: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, M; Eriksson, H G; Axelsson, S; Tegelberg, A

    2009-04-01

    To survey the clinical endodontic protocols of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in public dental clinics and to assess the effect of an educational intervention on the adoption of a nickel-titanium (Ni-Ti) rotary system. General dental practitioners in a Swedish Intervention County (IC), underwent an educational programme in endodontics. A follow-up questionnaire was posted to 98 GDPs in the IC and to 97 GDPs in a Control County (CC), where no specific training had been provided. The questionnaire concerned demographics, clinical endodontic protocols and instrumentation techniques. The response rate to the questionnaire was 87%. More than 90% of all GDPs reported they always or generally used rubber dam, determined working length, used the canal irrigant 0.5% buffered NaOCl and calcium hydroxide as an interappointment dressing. Two of three GDPs reported, they generally or always informed the patient of the prognosis. Every second GDP reported routines for postoperative recall and follow-up. The Ni-Ti rotary technique was reported to be completely adopted by 77% of the GDPs in the IC, significantly higher than in the CC (6%), P session, compared with only 32% in the CC, P endodontic protocols. GDPs who had undergone an educational programme in Ni-Ti rotary instrumentation reported they had successfully integrated the technique into daily clinical practice.

  13. Sino-Danish Brain Circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø; Du, Xiangyun; Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe

    2014-01-01

    China is faced with urgent needs to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable economy based on innovation and knowledge. Brain circulation and research and business investments from the outside are central for this development. Sino-American brain circulation and research...... and investment by overseas researchers and entrepreneurs are well described. In that case, the US is the center of global R&D and S&T. However, the brain circulation and research and investments between a small open Scandinavian economy, such as Denmark, and the huge developing economy of China are not well...... understood. In this case, Denmark is very highly developed, but a satellite in the global R&D and S&T system. With time and the growth of China as a R&D and S&T power house, both Denmark and China will benefit from brain circulation between them. Such brain circulation is likely to play a key role in flows...

  14. Refractory experience in circulating fluidized bed combustors, Task 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, R.Q.

    1989-11-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation into the status of the design and selection of refractory materials for coal-fueled circulating fluidized-bed combustors. The survey concentrated on operating units in the United States manufactured by six different boiler vendors: Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, Foster Wheeler, Keeler Dorr-Oliver, Pyropower, and Riley Stoker. Information was obtained from the boiler vendors, refractory suppliers and installers, and the owners/operators of over forty units. This work is in support of DOE's Clean Coal Technology program, which includes circulating fluidized-bed technology as one of the selected concepts being evaluated.

  15. State of the Art Report for a Bearing for VHTR Helium Circulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Seon; Song, Kee Nam; Kim, Yong Wan; Lee, Won Jae

    2008-10-01

    A helium circulator in a VHTR(Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor) plays a core role which translates thermal energy at high temperature from a nuclear core to a steam generator. Helium as a operating coolant circulates a primary circuit in high temperature and high pressure state, and controls thermal output of a nuclear core by controlling flow rate. A helium circulator is the only rotating machinery in a VHTR, and its reliability should be guaranteed for reliable operation of a reactor and stable production of hydrogen. Generally a main helium circulator is installed on the top of a steam generator vessel, and helium is circulated only by a main helium circulator in a normal operation state. An auxiliary or shutdown circulator is installed at the bottom of a reactor vessel, and it is an auxiliary circulator for shutting down a reactor in case of refueling or accelerating cooling down in case of fast cooling. Since a rotating shaft of a helium circulator is supported by bearings, bearings are the important machine elements which determines reliability of a helium circulator and a nuclear reactor. Various types of support bearings have been developed and applied for circulator bearings since 1960s, and it is still developing for developing VHTRs. So it is necessary to review and analyze the current technical state of helium circulator support bearings to develop bearings for Koran developing VHTR helium circulator

  16. Feasibility in Using Technological Resources for Implementing the Environmental Culture Cross-Cutting Factor for Sustainable Development in the Costa Rican Basic General Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorna Matarrita-Román

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to analyze whether the use of technological resources may be feasible in the implementation of the environmental culture cross-cutting factor for sustainable development, which focuses on environmental issues related to the contents of the Science study program for the seventh year of the basic general education. The research design is qualitative with a dominant approach and uses some quantitative elements specifically in the design of instruments and some data analysis techniques. The type of study was developed with a multi-method approach; a trend that has been shaping a research style which integrates various methods in a single design. For this, we identified the didactic strategies and their relationship to both, technology and the environmental axis for sustainable development, used by six Science teachers of the 7th grade, in public institutions of the province of Heredia, Central Valley, Costa Rica, as well as the opinion of 20 students from that same grade. The main results include the opinions of the students, who showed a considerable interest in classes where technological resources are used. However, teachers do not show great interest or positive opinions on this matter; in addition, they are not well trained on the use of technological resources. It was also identified that the teaching personal who participated in the study do not develop this curricular axis.

  17. A morphometric study of antral G-cell density in a sample of adult general population: comparison of three different methods and correlation with patient demography, helicobacter pylori infection, histomorphology and circulating gastrin levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersson, Fredrik; Borch, Kurt; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2008-01-01

    whether these methods are intercorrelated and the relation of these methods to plasma gastrin concentrations, demography, the occurrence of H. pylori infection and chronic gastritis. Gastric antral mucosal biopsy sections from 273 adults (188 with and 85 without H pylori infection) from a general...... population sample were examined immunohistochemically for G-cells using cell counting, stereology (point counting) and computerized image analysis. Gastritis was scored according to the updated Sydney system. Basal plasma gastrin concentrations were measured by radioimmunoassay. The three methods for G...

  18. Solar thermal energy utilization. German studies on technology and application. Vol. 1. General investigations on energy availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, M. (Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V. (DFVLR), Koeln (Germany, F.R.). Hauptabteilung Energietechnik) (ed.)

    1987-01-01

    The first volume of a three-volume series titled 'Solar thermal energy utilization' comprises three papers dealing with general investigations into energy availability. Their titles are: Yearly yield of solar CRS-process heat and temperature of reaction; - literature survey in the field of primary and secondary concentrating solar energy systems concerning the choice and manufacturing process of suitable materials; - considerations and proposals for future research and development of high temperature solar processes. Each of the three chapters was abstracted for entry into the database. (HWJ).

  19. Distance educational technologies as means of increase of student’s motivation in the learning of general physics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubkin, M. K.; Ivanov, D. A.; Ivanova, I. V.; Spivak, V. S.

    2017-11-01

    The Department of General physics and nuclear fusion, National Research University “Moscow Power Engineering Institute”, developed a set of tests (over 1000 questions) for the current control of knowledge of students in the section “Electricity and magnetism” of the General physics course using the internet distance learning system “Prometheus” (fourth generation). Under this section of the proposed test tasks are divided into sections corresponding to the topics section. These tasks include quality issues, design tasks, tasks with a choice of answers (one of many, many of many), the job with the selection region in the figure, tasks with detailed answer. The variety of tasks allows the teacher not only to objectively assess the student acquired knowledge but also to develop his problem-solving skills, to learn to be fluent in theory. The results of testing conducted for several years, show the high interest of students in the repeated independent execution of tasks and correlate well with the results of intermediate certification (exams).

  20. Using the Job-Demands-Resources model to predict turnover in the information technology workforce – General effects and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hoonakker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High employee turnover has always been a major issue for Information Technology (IT. In particular, turnover of women is very high. In this study, we used the Job Demand/Resources (JD-R model to examine the relationship between job demands and job resources, stress/burnout and job satisfaction/commitment, and turnover intention and tested the model for gender differences. Data were collected in five IT companies. A sample of 624 respondents (return rate: 56%; 54% males; mean age: 39.7 years was available for statistical analyses. Results of our study show that relationships between job demands and turnover intention are mediated by emotional exhaustion (burnout and relationships between job resources and turnover intention are mediated by job satisfaction. We found noticeable gender differences in these relationships, which can explain differences in turnover intention between male and female employees. The results of our study have consequences for organizational retention strategies to keep men and women in the IT work force.

  1. Cyclonic circulation of Saturn's atmosphere due to tilted convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasyev, Y. D.; Zhang, Y.

    2018-02-01

    Saturn displays cyclonic vortices at its poles and the general atmospheric circulation at other latitudes is dominated by embedded zonal jets that display cyclonic circulation. The abundance of small-scale convective storms suggests that convection plays a role in producing and maintaining Saturn's atmospheric circulation. However, the dynamical influence of small-scale convection on Saturn's general circulation is not well understood. Here we present laboratory analogue experiments and propose that Saturn's cyclonic circulation can be explained by tilted convection in which buoyancy forces do not align with the planet's rotation axis. In our experiments—conducted with a cylindrical water tank that is heated at the bottom, cooled at the top and spun on a rotating table—warm rising plumes and cold sinking water generate small anticyclonic and cyclonic vortices that are qualitatively similar to Saturn's convective storms. Numerical simulations complement the experiments and show that this small-scale convection leads to large-scale cyclonic flow at the surface and anticyclonic circulation at the base of the fluid layer, with a polar vortex forming from the merging of smaller cyclonic storms that are driven polewards.

  2. Acoustic Studies of the Large Scale Ocean Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menemenlis, Dimitris

    1999-01-01

    Detailed knowledge of ocean circulation and its transport properties is prerequisite to an understanding of the earth's climate and of important biological and chemical cycles. Results from two recent experiments, THETIS-2 in the Western Mediterranean and ATOC in the North Pacific, illustrate the use of ocean acoustic tomography for studies of the large scale circulation. The attraction of acoustic tomography is its ability to sample and average the large-scale oceanic thermal structure, synoptically, along several sections, and at regular intervals. In both studies, the acoustic data are compared to, and then combined with, general circulation models, meteorological analyses, satellite altimetry, and direct measurements from ships. Both studies provide complete regional descriptions of the time-evolving, three-dimensional, large scale circulation, albeit with large uncertainties. The studies raise serious issues about existing ocean observing capability and provide guidelines for future efforts.

  3. Medical imaging technology shock and volatility of macro economics: Analysis using a three-sector dynamical stochastic general equilibrium REC model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shurong; Huang, Yeqing

    2017-07-07

    The study analysed the medical imaging technology business cycle from 1981 to 2009 and found that the volatility of consumption in Chinese medical imaging business was higher than that of the developed countries. The volatility of gross domestic product (GDP) and the correlation between consumption and GDP is also higher than that of the developed countries. Prior to the early 1990s the volatility of consumption is even higher than GDP. This fact makes it difficult to explain the volatile market using the standard one sector real economic cycle (REC) model. Contrary to the other domestic studies, this study considers a three-sector dynamical stochastic general equilibrium REC model. In this model there are two consumption sectors, whereby one is labour intensive and another is capital intensive. The more capital intensive investment sector only introduces technology shocks in the medical imaging market. Our response functions and Monte-Carlo simulation results show that the model can explain 90% of the volatility of consummation relative to GDP, and explain the correlation between consumption and GDP. The results demonstrated the significant correlation between the technological reform in medical imaging and volatility in the labour market on Chinese macro economy development.

  4. Steam generator of the forced circulation type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forestier, Jean; Leblanc, Bernard; Monteil, Marcel; Monteil, Pierre

    1977-01-01

    The steam generator described is of the forced circulation single passage type comprising an outer casing including a vertical generally cylindrical side ring, an internal skirt coaxial with the outer casing, the bottom of this skirt having a free edge separated from a bottom end closing the outer casing, a central tube plate extending horizontally near a top end, in opposition to the bottom end, a peripheral tube plate, parallel to the central plate and located in the annular space under this central plate, a bundle of J shaped tubes [fr

  5. An examination of the advances in science and technology of prevention of tooth decay in young children since the Surgeon General's Report on Oral Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milgrom, Peter; Zero, Domenick T; Tanzer, Jason M

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses a number of areas related to how effectively science and technology have met Healthy People 2010 goals for tooth decay prevention. In every area mentioned, it appears that science and technology are falling short of these goals. Earlier assessments identified water fluoridation as one of the greatest public health accomplishments of the last century. Yet, failure to complete needed clinical and translational research has shortchanged the caries prevention agenda at a critical juncture. Science has firmly established the transmissible nature of tooth decay. However, there is evidence that tooth decay in young children is increasing, although progress has been made in other age groups. Studies of risk assessment have not been translated into improved practice. Antiseptics, chlorhexidine varnish, and polyvinylpyrrolidone iodine (PVI-I) may have value, but definitive trials are needed. Fluorides remain the most effective agents, but are not widely disseminated to the most needy. Fluoride varnish provides a relatively effective topical preventive for very young children, yet definitive trials have not been conducted. Silver diamine fluoride also has potential but requires study in the United States. Data support effectiveness and safety of xylitol, but adoption is not widespread. Dental sealants remain a mainstay of public policy, yet after decades of research, widespread use has not occurred. We conclude that research has established the public health burden of tooth decay, but insufficient research addresses the problems identified in the report Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General. Transfer of technology from studies to implementation is needed to prevent tooth decay among children. This should involve translational research and implementation of scientific and technological advances into practice.

  6. NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project. 1990 Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this DOE Cooperative Agreement is to conduct a cost-shared clean coal technology project to demonstrate the feasibility of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology and to evaluate economic, environmental, and operational benefits of CFB steam generators on a utility scale. At the conclusion of the Phase 2 program, testing related to satisfying these objectives was completed. Data analysis and reporting are scheduled for completion by October 1991. (VC)

  7. Invertibility and Explicit Inverses of Circulant-Type Matrices with k-Fibonacci and k-Lucas Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaolin Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulant matrices have important applications in solving ordinary differential equations. In this paper, we consider circulant-type matrices with the k-Fibonacci and k-Lucas numbers. We discuss the invertibility of these circulant matrices and present the explicit determinant and inverse matrix by constructing the transformation matrices, which generalizes the results in Shen et al. (2011.

  8. SUBSTATIONS OF DISTRICT HEATING SYSTEMS WITH PULSE COOLANT CIRCULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey N. Makeev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Objectives The aim of the study is to generalise the results of the application of technologies and means for organising pulse coolant flow within a district heating system in order to increase its energy efficiency based on the organisation of local hydraulic shocks and the subsequent use of their energy to ensure the purification of heat energy equipment, intensify the heat transfer process and realise the possibility of transforming the available head from one hydraulic circuit to another. Methods Substations connecting the thermal power installations of consumers with heat networks via dependent and independent schemes are analytically generalised. The use of pulse coolant circulation is proposed as a means of overcoming identified shortcomings. Results Principal schemes of substations with pulse coolant circulation for dependent and independent connection of thermal power installations are detailed. A detailed description of their operation is given. The advantages of using pulse coolant circulation in substations are shown. The materials reflecting the results of the technical implementation and practical introduction of this technology are presented. Conclusion Theoretical analysis of the operation of the basic schemes of substations with pulse coolant circulation and the results of their practical application, as well as the materials of scientific works devoted to the use of the energy of a hydraulic impact and the study of the effect of pulse coolant flow on thermal and hydrodynamic processes, have yielded a combination of factors reflecting technical and economic rationality of application of pulse coolant circulation

  9. GENERAL Iarticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 2. Supersymmetry. Akshay Kulkarni P Ramadevi. General Article Volume 8 Issue 2 February 2003 pp 28-41 ... Author Affiliations. Akshay Kulkarni1 P Ramadevi1. Physics Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai 400 076, India.

  10. Promoting the International Transfer of Low-Carbon Technologies: Evidence and Policy Challenges. Report for the Commissariat general a la strategie et a la prospective (French Center for Policy Planning)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glachant, Matthieu; Dussaux, Damien; Meniere, Yann; Dechezlepretre, Antoine; Auverlot, Dominique

    2013-10-01

    The international diffusion of technologies with a potential to reduce carbon emissions is at the core of current climate change negotiations. North-to-South technology transfer is of particular importance since technologies have so far been mostly developed in industrialized countries, but are urgently required to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in fast-growing emerging economies. Against this background, the primary objective of this study is to give recommendations on how the transfer of low-carbon technologies could be promoted. Our contribution to the current debate is threefold. First, we provide an up-to-date picture of the climate-related technology transfer landscape, based on a combination of patent data, bilateral trade data and foreign investment data. Second, we develop and implement a methodology to identify which technologies should be given priority and which recipient countries should be targeted. Third, we discuss the potential of different policy approaches and the instruments available to promote technology transfer. The picture of technology diffusion is totally different for emerging economies and least-developed countries. The latter group of countries is hardly visible in the data simply because they do not import climate-mitigation technologies. In contrast, technologies are already flowing into emerging economies through market channels such as the import of capital goods, local investment by multinational enterprises that own technologies, and the associated circulation of skilled workers (about 16-30% of global transfer flows, depending on the indicator, a percentage in line with their contribution to world GDP). South-South technology transfer is, however, very limited, as technology providers are mostly located in industrialized countries. Several countries - China, South Africa, Mexico and, to a lesser extent, Brazil - seem particularly well connected to global technology flows. Fewer technologies are transferred towards other

  11. Circulation of water masses in the Baltic Proper revealed through iodine isotopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yi, P.; Chen, X.G.; Aldahan, A.

    2013-01-01

    Tracer technology has been used to understand water circulation in marine systems where the tracer dose is commonly injected into the marine waters through controlled experiments, accidental releases or waste discharges. Anthropogenic discharges of 129I have been used to trace water circulation...

  12. 4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  13. Signature of the CERN – EGO (European Gravitational Observatory) Agreement concerning Collaboration in Scientific, Technological, Educational and other Domains of Mutual Interest, by R. Heuer, Director-General and Prof. F. Ferrini.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Signature of the CERN – EGO (European Gravitational Observatory) Agreement concerning Collaboration in Scientific, Technological, Educational and other Domains of Mutual Interest, by R. Heuer, Director-General and Prof. F. Ferrini.

  14. 25 November 2008 - State Councilor in charge of Science, Technology and Education Y. Liu, People's Repblic of China, visiting AMS experiment with CERN Director-General R. Aymar and AMS Collaborator Y. Yang.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    25 November 2008 - State Councilor in charge of Science, Technology and Education Y. Liu, People's Repblic of China, visiting AMS experiment with CERN Director-General R. Aymar and AMS Collaborator Y. Yang.

  15. Chinese Commission of Science Technology and Industry for National Defense Senior Vice Minister CHEN Qiufa exchanging gifts at luncheon and signing the Guest Book on 1st November 2007 with CERN Director-General R. Aymar.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Chinese Commission of Science Technology and Industry for National Defense Senior Vice Minister CHEN Qiufa exchanging gifts at luncheon and signing the Guest Book on 1st November 2007 with CERN Director-General R. Aymar.

  16. 24th May 2011 - ITER Organization Director-General O.Motojima visiting SM18 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Deputy L. Rossi, accompanied by Adviser for Relations with ITER J.-P. Koutchouk.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    24th May 2011 - ITER Organization Director-General O.Motojima visiting SM18 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Deputy L. Rossi, accompanied by Adviser for Relations with ITER J.-P. Koutchouk.

  17. Equatorial zonal circulations: Historical perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastenrath, Stefan

    2007-04-01

    The changing perceptions on zonal circulations in the equatorial belt are traced for (a) stratospheric wind regimes, and (b) vertical-zonal circulation cells in the troposphere. (a) Observations from the Krakatoa eruption 1883 and Berson's 1908 expedition to East Africa, along with later soundings over Batavia (Jakarta) led to the notion of "Krakatoa easterlies" around 30 km (10 mb) and "Berson westerlies" around 20 km (50 mb). Prompted by contrary observations since the late 1950s, this dogma was replaced by the notion of easterlies alternating with westerlies in the equatorial stratosphere at a rhythm of about 26 months. (b) Stimulated by Bjerknes' postulate of a "Walker circulation" along the Pacific Equator, a multitude of such cells have been hypothesized at other longitudes, in part from zonal contrasts of temperature and cloudiness. Essential for the diagnosis of equatorial zonal circulation cells is the continuity following the flow between the centers of ascending and subsiding motion. Evaluation of the recent NCEP-NCAR and ECMWF Reanalysis upper-air datasets reveals equatorial zonal circulation cells over the Pacific all year round, over the Atlantic only in boreal winter, and over the Indian Ocean only in autumn, all being seasons and oceanic longitudes with strong zonal flow in the lower troposphere.

  18. The Invertibility, Explicit Determinants, and Inverses of Circulant and Left Circulant and g-Circulant Matrices Involving Any Continuous Fibonacci and Lucas Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaolin Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulant matrices play an important role in solving delay differential equations. In this paper, circulant type matrices including the circulant and left circulant and g-circulant matrices with any continuous Fibonacci and Lucas numbers are considered. Firstly, the invertibility of the circulant matrix is discussed and the explicit determinant and the inverse matrices by constructing the transformation matrices are presented. Furthermore, the invertibility of the left circulant and g-circulant matrices is also studied. We obtain the explicit determinants and the inverse matrices of the left circulant and g-circulant matrices by utilizing the relationship between left circulant, g-circulant matrices and circulant matrix, respectively.

  19. Texas hospitals with higher health information technology expenditures have higher revenue: A longitudinal data analysis using a generalized estimating equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinhyung; Choi, Jae-Young

    2016-04-05

    The benefits of health information technology (IT) adoption have been reported in the literature, but whether health IT investment increases revenue generation remains an important research question. Texas hospital data obtained from the American Hospital Association (AHA) for 2007-2010 were used to investigate the association of health IT expenses and hospital revenue. The generalized estimation equation (GEE) with an independent error component was used to model the data controlling for cluster error within hospitals. We found that health IT expenses were significantly and positively associated with hospital revenue. Our model predicted that a 100% increase in health IT expenditure would result in an 8% increase in total revenue. The effect of health IT was more associated with gross outpatient revenue than gross inpatient revenue. Increased health IT expenses were associated with greater hospital revenue. Future research needs to confirm our findings with a national sample of hospitals.

  20. Modelling the Seasonal Overturning Circulation in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Fengchao

    2015-04-01

    The overturning circulation in the Red Sea exhibits a distinct seasonally reversing pattern and is studied using 50-year, high-resolution MIT general circulation model simulations. The seasonal water exchange in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb is successfully simulated, and the structures of the intruding subsurface Gulf of Aden intermediate water are in good agreement with summer observations in 2011. The model results suggest that the summer overturning circulation is driven by the combined effect of the shoaling of the thermocline in the Gulf of Aden resulting from remote winds in the Arabian Sea and an upward surface slope from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Aden set up by local surface winds in the Red Sea. For the winter overturning circulation, the climatological model mean results suggest that the surface inflow intensifies in a western boundary current in the southern Red Sea that switches to an eastern boundary current north of 24°N. The overturning is accomplished through a cyclonic recirculation and a cross-basin overturning circulation in the northern Red Sea, with major sinking occurring along a narrow band of width about 20 km along the eastern boundary and weaker upwelling along the western boundary. The northward pressure gradient force, strong vertical mixing, and horizontal mixing near the boundary are the essential dynamical components in the model\\'s winter overturning circulation.

  1. CIRCULATING MOVING BED COMBUSTION PROOF OF CONCEPT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jukkola, Glen

    2010-06-30

    Circulating Moving Bed (CMB) combustion technology has its roots in traditional circulating fluidized bed technology and involves a novel method of solid fuel combustion and heat transfer. CMB technology represents a step change in improved performance and cost relative to conventional PC and FBC boilers. The CMB heat exchanger preheats the energy cycle working fluid, steam or air, to the high temperature levels required in systems for advanced power generation. Unique features of the CMB are the reduction of the heat transfer surfaces by about 60% as a result of the enhanced heat transfer rates, flexibility of operation, and about 30% lower cost over existing technology. The CMB Phase I project ran from July 2001 through March 2003. Its objective was to continue development of the CMB technology with a series of proof of concept tests. The tests were conducted at a scale that provided design data for scale up to a demonstration plant. These objectives were met by conducting a series of experiments in ALSTOM Power’s Multi-use Test Facility (MTF). The MTF was modified to operate under CMB conditions of commercial interest. The objective of the tests were to evaluate gas-to-solids heat transfer in the upper furnace, assess agglomeration in the high temperature CMB bubbling bed, and evaluate solids-to-tube heat transfer in the moving bed heat exchanger. The Phase I program results showed that there are still some significant technical uncertainties that needed to be resolved before the technology can be confidently scaled up for a successful demonstration plant design. Work remained in three primary areas: • scale up of gas to solid heat transfer • high temperature finned surface design • the overall requirements of mechanical and process design. The CMB Phase II workscope built upon the results of Phase I and specifically addressed the remaining technical uncertainties. It included a scaled MTF heat transfer test to provide the necessary data to scale up gas

  2. Prediction of cloud droplet number in a general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghan, S.J.; Leung, L.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    We have applied the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) bulk cloud microphysics parameterization to the treatment of stratiform clouds in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). The RAMS predicts mass concentrations of cloud water, cloud ice, rain and snow, and number concnetration of ice. We have introduced the droplet number conservation equation to predict droplet number and it`s dependence on aerosols.

  3. Evaluation of a stratiform cloud parameterization for general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghan, S.J.; Leung, L.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); McCaa, J. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    To evaluate the relative importance of horizontal advection of cloud versus cloud formation within the grid cell of a single column model (SCM), we have performed a series of simulations with our SCM driven by a fixed vertical velocity and various rates of horizontal advection.

  4. On the interbasin-scale thermohaline circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, William J.

    1995-05-01

    The global-scale circulation has long been one of oceanography's most challenging and exciting research topics. A few features of the abyssal (near bottom) and deep circulation of the Atlantic Ocean have been known for over 50 years, and in the past decade or so there has been a developing focus on the world oceans' thermohaline circulation. The term thermohaline circulation as used here applies not only to a direct response to atmospheric buoyancy fluxes but also in the general sense of water mass modification or conversion, where mechanisms may be associated with internal mixing processes and even wind forcing (i.e., wind-induced upwelling or wind-driven mixing). The thermohaline circulation components reviewed and summarized in the following are associated with water mass conversion processes that are involved with interbasin exchange. Updated summary maps of the volume transports (in sverdrups; 1Sv = 106 m³ s-1) for the interbasin-scale pathways of the abyssal and deep thermohaline circulation and associated upper level compensating flows are developed for two to four vertical layers or potential density intervals, based primarily on a synthesis of published observational results. The cell(s) involving the largest worldwide exchange transport-wise (53 Sv) are associated with an interaction between various deep and bottom water components via Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW). The first major conversion step in the replacement path for the renewal (14 Sv) of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) is taken to be primarily to CDW. Bottom water in the Indian Ocean originates as lower CDW which recirculates while also moving equatorward in deep western boundary currents with eventual conversion to both deep and intermediate layer flows. Some of the intermediate water so formed in the Indian Ocean moves through the Agulhas Current system (ACS) and may "leak" into the Benguela Current regime (BCR), although probably primarily flowing through the ACS into the Subantarctic

  5. Toroidal bubbles with circulation in ideal hydrodynamics: A variational approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, V.P.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Incompressible, inviscid, irrotational, unsteady flows with circulation Gamma around a distorted toroidal bubble are considered. A general variational principle that determines the evolution of the bubble shape is formulated. For a two-dimensional (2D) cavity with a constant area A, exact...

  6. Sustaining observations of the unsteady ocean circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frajka-Williams, E

    2014-09-28

    Sustained observations of ocean properties reveal a global warming trend and rising sea levels. These changes have been documented by traditional ship-based measurements of ocean properties, whereas more recent Argo profiling floats and satellite records permit estimates of ocean changes on a near real-time basis. Through these and newer methods of observing the oceans, scientists are moving from quantifying the 'state of the ocean' to monitoring its variability, and distinguishing the physical processes bringing signals of change. In this paper, I give a brief overview of the UK contributions to the physical oceanographic observations, and the role they have played in the wider global observing systems. While temperature and salinity are the primary measurements of physical oceanography, new transbasin mooring arrays also resolve changes in ocean circulation on daily timescales. Emerging technologies permit routine observations at higher-than-ever spatial resolutions. Following this, I then give a personal perspective on the future of sustained observations. New measurement techniques promise exciting discoveries concerning the role of smaller scales and boundary processes in setting the large-scale ocean circulation and the ocean's role in climate. The challenges now facing the scientific community include sustaining critical observations in the case of funding system changes or shifts in government priorities. These long records will enable a determination of the role and response of the ocean to climate change. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  7. If It Circulates, Keep It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Describes a project in which a library's circulation figures were used as a basis for weeding out inactive items. The findings of the project are used to provide guidelines for purchasing library materials and making recommendations on rebound books, security systems, and promotion of classics and core titles. (CLB)

  8. VanderLaan Circulant Type Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulant matrices have become a satisfactory tools in control methods for modern complex systems. In the paper, VanderLaan circulant type matrices are presented, which include VanderLaan circulant, left circulant, and g-circulant matrices. The nonsingularity of these special matrices is discussed by the surprising properties of VanderLaan numbers. The exact determinants of VanderLaan circulant type matrices are given by structuring transformation matrices, determinants of well-known tridiagonal matrices, and tridiagonal-like matrices. The explicit inverse matrices of these special matrices are obtained by structuring transformation matrices, inverses of known tridiagonal matrices, and quasi-tridiagonal matrices. Three kinds of norms and lower bound for the spread of VanderLaan circulant and left circulant matrix are given separately. And we gain the spectral norm of VanderLaan g-circulant matrix.

  9. Response in atmospheric circulation and sources of Greenland precipitation to glacial boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langen, Peter Lang; Vinther, Bo Møllesøe

    2009-01-01

    The response in northern hemisphere atmospheric circulation and the resulting changes in moisture sources for Greenland precipitation to glacial boundary conditions are studied in NCAR's CCM3 atmospheric general circulation model fitted with a moisture tracking functionality. We employ both...... seasonality, condensation temperatures and source temperatures are assessed. Udgivelsesdato: June 2009...

  10. Response of the Atlantic overturning circulation to South Atlantic sources of buoyancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, W.; Ruijter, W.P.M. de; Sterl, A.; Drijfhout, S.

    2001-01-01

    The heat and salt input from the Indian to Atlantic Oceans by Agulhas Leakage is found to influence the Atlantic overturning circulation in a low-resolution Ocean General Circulation Model. The model used is the Hamburg Large-Scale Geostrophic (LSG) model, which is forced by mixed boundary

  11. The 1958-2009 Greenland ice sheet surface melt and the mid-tropospheric atmospheric circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fettweis, X.; Mabille, G.; Erpicum, M.; Nicolay, S.; van den Broeke, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the impact of the mid-tropospheric circulation over the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) on surface melt, as simulated by the regional climate model MAR, an automatic Circulation type classification (CTC) based on 500 hPa geopotential height from reanalyses is developed. General

  12. A global mean dynamic topography and ocean circulation estimation using a preliminary GOCE gravity model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Bingham, R.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar

    2011-01-01

    The Gravity and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission measures Earth’s gravity field with an unprecedented accuracy at short spatial scales. In doing so, it promises to significantly advance our ability to determine the ocean’s general circulation. In this study, an ini...

  13. Circulating Tumor Cells, Enumeration and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Mei Hou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The detection and enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs has shown significant clinical utility with respect to prognosis in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers. Emerging studies show that CTCs can provide pharmacodynamic information to aid therapy decision making. CTCs as a ‘virtual and real-time biopsy’ have clear potential to facilitate exploration of tumor biology, and in particular, the process of metastasis. The challenge of profiling CTC molecular characteristics and generating CTC signatures using current technologies is that they enrich rather than purify CTCs from whole blood; we face the problem of looking for the proverbial ‘needle in the haystack’. This review summarizes the current methods for CTC detection and enumeration, focuses on molecular characterization of CTCs, unveils some aspects of CTC heterogeneity, describes attempts to purify CTCs and scans the horizon for approaches leading to comprehensive dissection of CTC biology.

  14. Circulating Tumor Cells, Enumeration and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Jian-Mei [Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Krebs, Matthew [Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Christie Hospital Foundation NHS Trust, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Ward, Tim; Morris, Karen; Sloane, Robert [Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Blackhall, Fiona [Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Cancer Research Centre, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Christie Hospital Foundation NHS Trust, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); Dive, Caroline, E-mail: cdive@picr.man.ac.uk [Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom); School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Cancer Research Centre, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester M20 4BX (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-09

    The detection and enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has shown significant clinical utility with respect to prognosis in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers. Emerging studies show that CTCs can provide pharmacodynamic information to aid therapy decision making. CTCs as a ‘virtual and real-time biopsy’ have clear potential to facilitate exploration of tumor biology, and in particular, the process of metastasis. The challenge of profiling CTC molecular characteristics and generating CTC signatures using current technologies is that they enrich rather than purify CTCs from whole blood; we face the problem of looking for the proverbial ‘needle in the haystack’. This review summarizes the current methods for CTC detection and enumeration, focuses on molecular characterization of CTCs, unveils some aspects of CTC heterogeneity, describes attempts to purify CTCs and scans the horizon for approaches leading to comprehensive dissection of CTC biology.

  15. Circulating Tumor Cells, Enumeration and Beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Jian-Mei; Krebs, Matthew; Ward, Tim; Morris, Karen; Sloane, Robert; Blackhall, Fiona; Dive, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    The detection and enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has shown significant clinical utility with respect to prognosis in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers. Emerging studies show that CTCs can provide pharmacodynamic information to aid therapy decision making. CTCs as a ‘virtual and real-time biopsy’ have clear potential to facilitate exploration of tumor biology, and in particular, the process of metastasis. The challenge of profiling CTC molecular characteristics and generating CTC signatures using current technologies is that they enrich rather than purify CTCs from whole blood; we face the problem of looking for the proverbial ‘needle in the haystack’. This review summarizes the current methods for CTC detection and enumeration, focuses on molecular characterization of CTCs, unveils some aspects of CTC heterogeneity, describes attempts to purify CTCs and scans the horizon for approaches leading to comprehensive dissection of CTC biology

  16. Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, Raymond E.

    1991-10-01

    Colorado-Ute Electric Association began a study to evaluate options for upgrading and extending the life of its Nucla power station in 1982. Located in southwestern Colorado near the town of Nucla, this station was commissioned in 1959 with a local bituminous coal as its design fuel for three identical stoker-fired units, each rated at 12.6 MW(e). Poor station efficiency, high fuel costs, and spiraling boiler maintenance costs forced the Nucla Station into low priority in the CUEA dispatch order as early as 1981. Among the options CUEA considered was to serve as a host utility to demonstrate Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (AFBC) technology. The anticipated environmental benefits and apparent attractive economics of a circulating AFBC led to Colorado-Ute's decision to proceed with the design and construction of a demonstration project in 1984 at the Nucla facility.

  17. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology.

  18. Circulating Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Spitali, Pietro

    2015-07-22

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. Genetic and biochemical research over the years has characterized the cause, pathophysiology and development of the disease providing several potential therapeutic targets and/or biomarkers. High throughput - omic technologies have provided a comprehensive understanding of the changes occurring in dystrophic muscles. Murine and canine animal models have been a valuable source to profile muscles and body fluids, thus providing candidate biomarkers that can be evaluated in patients. This review will illustrate known circulating biomarkers that could track disease progression and response to therapy in patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We present an overview of the transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics and lipidomic biomarkers described in literature. We show how studies in muscle tissue have led to the identification of serum and urine biomarkers and we highlight the importance of evaluating biomarkers as possible surrogate endpoints to facilitate regulatory processes for new medicinal products.

  19. 26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

  20. Radioisotopic evaluation of portal circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maliska, C.; Rosenthal, D.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a radio-tracer of portal circulation through the intestine, should prevent cruel punctures in the portal-vein or spleen as it is usually the case with traditional methods in the study of portal-system. The absorption of I-131 and Tc-99m, previously cheked in rabbits presented similar results in dogs. The time of circulation between terminal large-intestine and the liver (t-RF) was determined by external counting at hepatic level by recording radioactivity variation-time. In healthy animals the t-RF was from 20to 60 seconds, with average time of 42 seconds. In 2 animals with partial binding of portal-vein the t-RF went up to 110 and 120 seconds. (Author) [pt

  1. Spaceborne studies of ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzert, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    The history and near-term future of ocean remote sensing to study ocean circulation are examined. Seasat provided the first-ever global data sets of sea surface topography (altimeter) and marine winds (scatterometer) and laid the foundation for the next generation of satellite missions planned for the late 1980s. The future missions are the next generation of altimeter and scatterometer to be flown aboard TOPEX (TOPography EXperiment) and NROSS (Navy Remote Sensing System), respectively. The data from these satellites will be coordinated with measurements made at sea to determine the driving forces of ocean circulation and to study the oceans' role in climate variability. The significance of such studies to such matters as climatic changes, fisheries, commerce, waste disposal, and national defense is noted.

  2. Ocean circulation generated magnetic signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoj, C.; Kuvshinov, A.; Maus, S.

    2006-01-01

    Conducting ocean water, as it flows through the Earth's magnetic field, generates secondary electric and magnetic fields. An assessment of the ocean-generated magnetic fields and their detectability may be of importance for geomagnetism and oceanography. Motivated by the clear identification...... of ocean tidal signatures in the CHAMP magnetic field data we estimate the ocean magnetic signals of steady flow using a global 3-D EM numerical solution. The required velocity data are from the ECCO ocean circulation experiment and alternatively from the OCCAM model for higher resolution. We assume...... of the magnetic field, as compared to the ECCO simulation. Besides the expected signatures of the global circulation patterns, we find significant seasonal variability of ocean magnetic signals in the Indian and Western Pacific Oceans. Compared to seasonal variation, interannual variations produce weaker signals....

  3. Circulation of immigrants to Hungary

    OpenAIRE

    Sándor Illés

    2015-01-01

    We measure the demographic patterns associated with international circular migration. Firstly, we define the circulation within the conceptual framework of transnationalism. Secondly, we create macro-scale data bank on long-term international circular migrants based on an original statistical method. Thirdly, we seek to gain further insight into the composition of international circular immigrants by gender, age, and family status. Conclusions indicate the need for future research.

  4. The Money in Circulation Demand

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Kožel

    2000-01-01

    The paper discusses the main determinants of money-in-circulation demand in the Czech economy from 1996 to 1999. The volume of intended transactions (approximated by retail revenue from sales), the opportunity cost of holding cash (approximated by interest rate) and the expected rate of inflation are identified as the factors that most importantly account for the development of cash demand. A simple regression model was estimated in order to quantify the relationships among the aforementioned...

  5. Internal variability of the thermohaline ocean circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Raa, Lianke Alinda te

    2003-01-01

    Variations in the ocean circulation can strongly influence climate due to the large heat transport by the ocean currents. Variability of the thermohaline ocean circulation, the part of the ocean circulation driven by density gradients, occurs typically on (inter)decadal and longer time scales and is an important issue in present-day climate research. Although there are many indications from observations and numerical modeling studies that internal variability of the thermohaline circulation m...

  6. Multiple states in the late Eocene ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baatsen, M. L. J.; von der Heydt, A. S.; Kliphuis, M.; Viebahn, J.; Dijkstra, H. A.

    2018-04-01

    The Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT) marks a major step within the Cenozoic climate in going from a greenhouse into an icehouse state, with the formation of a continental-scale Antarctic ice sheet. The roles of steadily decreasing CO2 concentrations versus changes in ocean circulation at the EOT are still debated and the threshold for Antarctic glaciation is obscured by uncertainties in global geometry. Here, a detailed study of the late Eocene ocean circulation is carried out using an ocean general circulation model under two slightly different geography reconstructions of the middle-to-late Eocene (38 Ma). Using the same atmospheric forcing, both geographies give a profoundly different equilibrium ocean circulation state. The underlying reason for this sensitivity is the presence of multiple equilibria characterised by either North or South Pacific deep water formation. A possible shift from a southern towards a northern overturning circulation would result in significant changes in the global heat distribution and consequently make the Southern Hemisphere climate more susceptible for significant cooling and ice sheet formation on Antarctica.

  7. Internal variability of the thermohaline ocean circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raa, Lianke Alinda te

    2003-01-01

    Variations in the ocean circulation can strongly influence climate due to the large heat transport by the ocean currents. Variability of the thermohaline ocean circulation, the part of the ocean circulation driven by density gradients, occurs typically on (inter)decadal and longer time scales and is

  8. 16 December 2013 - P. Lavie President of the Technion Institute of Technology in Israel visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. G. Mikenberg, E. Rabinovici, Y. Rozen and S. Tarem present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    16 December 2013 - P. Lavie President of the Technion Institute of Technology in Israel visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. G. Mikenberg, E. Rabinovici, Y. Rozen and S. Tarem present throughout.

  9. 17 January 2014 - Y. Sakurada Japanese Senior Vice Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez. Head of International Relations R. Voss present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    17 January 2014 - Y. Sakurada Japanese Senior Vice Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez. Head of International Relations R. Voss present throughout.

  10. 1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

  11. Ocean circulation and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselmann, Klaus

    1991-09-01

    Recent numerical simulations using global ocean circulation models are reviewed together with model experiments involving further important climate sub-systems with which the ocean interacts: the atmosphere, the air-sea interface and the global carbon cycle. A common feature of all ocean circulation experiments considered is the strong sensitivity of the circulation to relatively minor changes in surface forcing, particularly to the buoyancy fluxes in regions of deep water formation in high latitudes. This may explain some of the well-known deficiencies of past global ocean circulation simulations. The strong sensitivity may also have been the cause of rapid climate changes observed in paleoclimatic records and can lead further to significant natural climate variability on the time scales of a few hundred years through the stochastic forcing of the ocean by atmospheric weather variability. Gobal warming computations using two different coupled ocean-atmosphere models for the "business-as-usual" scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change yield a significantly stronger warming delay due to the heat uptake by the oceans in the Southern Ocean than estimated on the basis of box-diffusion models. Recent advances in surface wave modelling, illustrated by a comparison of wave height fields derived from the WAM model and the GEOSAT altimeter, hold promise for the development of an improved representation of ocean-atmosphere coupling based on an explicit description of the dynamical processes at the air-sea interface. Global carbon cycle simulations with a three dimensional carbon cycle model tuned to reproduce past variations of carbon cycle indices show a significant impact of variations in the ocean circulation on the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere and thereby on climate. The series of experiments suggest that for the study of climate in the time scale range from 101-103years, it would be highly desirable, and has indeed now become feasible, to couple

  12. Assimilation of TOPEX/POSEIDON Altimeter Data into a Global Ocean Circulation Model: Are the Results Any Good?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumori, I.; Fu, L. L.; Chao, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The feasibility of assimilating satellite altimetry data into a global ocean general ocean general circulation model is studied. Three years of TOPEX/POSEIDON data is analyzed using a global, three-dimensional, nonlinear primitive equation model.

  13. 15 February 2012 - Geneva United Nations Office Director-General K.-J. Tokayev in the LHC tunnel with Adviser for Relations with international organisations M. Bona and Technology Department Head F. Bordry.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, director-general of the United Nations Office at Geneva, (centre picture 02), visited CERN on 15 February. He toured the LHC tunnel with Maurizio Bona, CERN’s adviser to the director-general, relations with international organizations, left, and Frédérick Bordry, CERN’s technology department head. He also visited the ATLAS underground experimental area, as well as the exhibition at the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  14. Vasculitis of the mesenteric circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Matthew J; Warrington, Kenneth J

    2017-02-01

    Vasculitis of the mesenteric circulation is an uncommon but life-threatening manifestation of systemic vasculitis. Initial symptoms are frequently non-specific and therefore patients often present to primary care physicians and gastroenterologists with abdominal pain or gastrointestinal bleeding. Given the severity of the conditions associated with mesenteric vasculitis, it is imperative to appropriately diagnose and initiate treatment of suspected cases. This review will focus on diseases commonly associated with vasculitis of the mesenteric vessels. Imaging characteristics and clinical features assisting in diagnosis as well as initial approaches to treatment are emphasized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Diarrhea caused by circulating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Elisabeth; Kump, Patrizia; Krejs, Guenter J

    2012-09-01

    Circulating agents cause intestinal secretion or changes in motility with decreased intestinal transit time, resulting in secretory-type diarrhea. Secretory diarrhea as opposed to osmotic diarrhea is characterized by large-volume, watery stools, often more than 1 L per day; by persistence of diarrhea when patients fast; and by the fact that on analysis of stool-water, measured osmolarity is identical to that calculated from the electrolytes present. Although sodium plays the main role in water and electrolyte absorption, chloride is the major ion involved in secretion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Glucose feeds the TCA cycle via circulating lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Sheng; Ghergurovich, Jonathan M; Morscher, Raphael J; Jang, Cholsoon; Teng, Xin; Lu, Wenyun; Esparza, Lourdes A; Reya, Tannishtha; Le Zhan; Yanxiang Guo, Jessie; White, Eileen; Rabinowitz, Joshua D

    2017-11-02

    Mammalian tissues are fuelled by circulating nutrients, including glucose, amino acids, and various intermediary metabolites. Under aerobic conditions, glucose is generally assumed to be burned fully by tissues via the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle) to carbon dioxide. Alternatively, glucose can be catabolized anaerobically via glycolysis to lactate, which is itself also a potential nutrient for tissues and tumours. The quantitative relevance of circulating lactate or other metabolic intermediates as fuels remains unclear. Here we systematically examine the fluxes of circulating metabolites in mice, and find that lactate can be a primary source of carbon for the TCA cycle and thus of energy. Intravenous infusions of 13 C-labelled nutrients reveal that, on a molar basis, the circulatory turnover flux of lactate is the highest of all metabolites and exceeds that of glucose by 1.1-fold in fed mice and 2.5-fold in fasting mice; lactate is made primarily from glucose but also from other sources. In both fed and fasted mice, 13 C-lactate extensively labels TCA cycle intermediates in all tissues. Quantitative analysis reveals that during the fasted state, the contribution of glucose to tissue TCA metabolism is primarily indirect (via circulating lactate) in all tissues except the brain. In genetically engineered lung and pancreatic cancer tumours in fasted mice, the contribution of circulating lactate to TCA cycle intermediates exceeds that of glucose, with glutamine making a larger contribution than lactate in pancreatic cancer. Thus, glycolysis and the TCA cycle are uncoupled at the level of lactate, which is a primary circulating TCA substrate in most tissues and tumours.

  17. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of 86 Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with 141 Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO 2 ) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines

  18. Helium circulator design concepts for the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Nichols, M.K.; Kaufman, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Two helium circulators are featured in the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) power plant - (1) the main circulator, which facilitates the transfer of reactor thermal energy to the steam generator, and (2) a small shutdown cooling circulator that enables rapid cooling of the reactor system to be realized. The 3170 kW(e) main circulator has an axial flow compressor, the impeller being very similar to the unit in the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) plant. The 164 kW(e) shutdown cooling circulator, the design of which is controlled by depressurized conditions, has a radial flow compressor. Both machines are vertically oriented, have submerged electric motor drives, and embody rotors that are supported on active magnetic bearings. As outlined in this paper, both machines have been conservatively designed based on established practice. The circulators have features and characteristics that have evolved from actual plant operating experience. With a major goal of high reliability, emphasis has been placed on design simplicity, and both machines are readily accessible for inspection, repair, and replacement, if necessary. In this paper, conceptual design aspects of both machines are discussed, together with the significant technology bases. As appropriate for a plant that will see service well into the 21st century, new and emerging technologies have been factored into the design. Examples of this are the inclusion of active magnetic bearings, and an automated circulator condition monitoring system. (author). 18 refs, 20 figs, 13 tabs

  19. Monitoring and control requirement definition study for Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG). Volume 2, appendix A: Selected DSG technologies and their general control requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    A consistent approach was sought for both hardware and software which will handle the monitoring and control necessary to integrate a number of different DSG technologies into a common distribution dispatch network. It appears that the control of each of the DSG technologies is compatible with a supervisory control method of operation that lends itself to remote control from a distribution dispatch center.

  20. Fritz Schott's Contributions to the Understanding of the Ocean Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbeck, M.

    2009-04-01

    The ocean circulation and its central significance for global climate lay at the heart of Fritz's research. In the context of hard-won data from his more than 30 research cruises to key regions of the Atlantic and Indian oceans, he made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the wind-driven and thermohaline ocean circulation. His insights and explorations of circulation and dynamics of the tropical Indian and Atlantic Oceans have led the field and provided a large part of the basis for planning large, international experiments. Fritz's work is also distinguished by his making exceptional use of modeling results, increasingly as the models have improved. His research has provided a much clearer correspondence between the observed ocean-structure and dynamical theory-noting both theoretical successes and limitations. Besides his general interest in the physical oceanography of the World Oceans, most of his research was devoted to the dynamics of tropical oceans with its intense and highly variable current systems. Concerning the Indian Ocean, Fritz's investigated the response of the Somali Current system to the variable monsoon winds in the early 1980's, obtaining high-quality, hydrographic surveys and the first long term direct measurement of ocean currents from moored arrays. His analyses and interpretations provided a synthesis of the complex circulations there. In the tropical Atlantic Ocean Fritz research focused on the western boundary circulation with important contributions to the understanding of the North Brazil Current retroflection, and the variability of the shallow and deep western boundary currents. Trying to solve the fundamental question ‘what is the role of the tropical ocean for climate variability', Fritz initiated large multinational research programs under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Projects WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) and CLIVAR (Climate Variability and Predictability). Fritz was the initiator and

  1. Ocean circulation generated magnetic signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoj, C.; Kuvshinov, A.; Maus, S.

    2006-01-01

    of ocean tidal signatures in the CHAMP magnetic field data we estimate the ocean magnetic signals of steady flow using a global 3-D EM numerical solution. The required velocity data are from the ECCO ocean circulation experiment and alternatively from the OCCAM model for higher resolution. We assume......Conducting ocean water, as it flows through the Earth's magnetic field, generates secondary electric and magnetic fields. An assessment of the ocean-generated magnetic fields and their detectability may be of importance for geomagnetism and oceanography. Motivated by the clear identification...... an Earth's conductivity model with a surface thin shell of variable conductance with a realistic ID mantle underneath. Simulations using both models predict an amplitude range of +/-2 nT at Swarm altitude (430 km). However at sea level, the higher resolution simulation predicts a higher strength...

  2. A blood circulation model for reference man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F.; Williams, L.R.

    1996-01-01

    A dynamic blood circulation model that predicts the movement and gradual dispersion of a bolus of material in the circulation after its intravenous injection into an adult human. The main purpose of the model is improve the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides that decay in the circulation to a significant extent. The model partitions the blood volume into 24 separate organs or tissues, right heart chamber, left heart chamber, pulmonary circulation, arterial outflow to the aorta and large arteries, and venous return via the large veins. Model results were compared to data obtained from injection of carbon 11 labeled carbon monoxide or rubidium 86

  3. A blood circulation model for reference man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Williams, L.R. [Indiana Univ., South Bend, IN (United States). Div. of Liberal Arts and Sciences

    1996-12-31

    A dynamic blood circulation model that predicts the movement and gradual dispersion of a bolus of material in the circulation after its intravenous injection into an adult human. The main purpose of the model is improve the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides that decay in the circulation to a significant extent. The model partitions the blood volume into 24 separate organs or tissues, right heart chamber, left heart chamber, pulmonary circulation, arterial outflow to the aorta and large arteries, and venous return via the large veins. Model results were compared to data obtained from injection of carbon 11 labeled carbon monoxide or rubidium 86.

  4. Role of Circulating Fibrocytes in Cardiac Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rong-Jie; Su, Zi-Zhuo; Liang, Shu-Min; Chen, Yu-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Rong; Nie, Ru-Qiong; Wang, Jing-Feng; Xie, Shuang-Lun

    2016-02-05

    It is revealed that circulating fibrocytes are elevated in patients/animals with cardiac fibrosis, and this review aims to provide an introduction to circulating fibrocytes and their role in cardiac fibrosis. This review is based on the data from 1994 to present obtained from PubMed. The search terms were "circulating fibrocytes " and "cardiac fibrosis ". Articles and critical reviews, which are related to circulating fibrocytes and cardiac fibrosis, were selected. Circulating fibrocytes, which are derived from hematopoietic stem cells, represent a subset of peripheral blood mononuclear cells exhibiting mixed morphological and molecular characteristics of hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells (CD34+/CD45+/collagen I+). They can produce extracellular matrix and many cytokines. It is shown that circulating fibrocytes participate in many fibrotic diseases, including cardiac fibrosis. Evidence accumulated in recent years shows that aging individuals and patients with hypertension, heart failure, coronary heart disease, and atrial fibrillation have more circulating fibrocytes in peripheral blood and/or heart tissue, and this elevation of circulating fibrocytes is correlated with the degree of fibrosis in the hearts. Circulating fibrocytes are effector cells in cardiac fibrosis.

  5. Biogeochemical proxies in Scleractinian corals used to reconstruct ocean circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilderson, T.P.; Kashgarian, M.; Schrag, D.P.

    2002-01-01

    We utilize monthly 14 C data derived from coral archives in conjunction with ocean circulation models to address two questions: 1) how does the shallow circulation of the tropical Pacific vary on seasonal to decadal time scales and 2) which dynamic processes determine the mean vertical structure of the equatorial Pacific thermocline. Our results directly impact the understanding of global climate events such as the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). To study changes in ocean circulation and water mass distribution involved in the genesis and evolution of ENSO and decadal climate variability, it is necessary to have records of climate variables several decades in length. Continuous instrumental records are limited because technology for continuous monitoring of ocean currents has only recently been available, and ships of opportunity archives such as COADS contain large spatial and temporal biases. In addition, temperature and salinity in surface waters are not conservative and thus can not be independently relied upon to trace water masses, reducing the utility of historical observations. Radiocarbon ( 14 C) in sea water is a quasi-conservative water mass tracer and is incorporated into coral skeletal material, thus coral 14 C records can be used to reconstruct changes in shallow circulation that would be difficult to characterize using instrumental data. High resolution Δ 14 C time-series such as these, provide a powerful constraint on the rate of surface ocean mixing and hold great promise to augment onetime surveys such as GEOSECS and WOCE. These data not only provide fundamental information about the shallow circulation of the Pacific, but can be used as a benchmark for the next generation of high resolution ocean models used in prognosticating climate change. (author)

  6. Circulator Integrated in Low Temperature Co-fired Ceramics Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, R. van; Bent, G. van der; Ashari, M.; McKay, M.

    2014-01-01

    The front-end circuitry of transceiver modules is slowly being updated from GaAs-based MMICs to Gallium-Nitride. Especially GaN power amplifiers and TR switches, but also low-noise amplifiers, offer significant performance improvement over GaAs components. Therefore it is interesting to also explore

  7. Administration of the Science Education Project "Man: A Course of Study" (MACOS), National Science Foundation. Comptroller General's Report to the House Committee on Science and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    In this report the Comptroller General of the General Accounting Office (GAO) examines National Science Foundation (NSF) policies, procedures, and practices for developing, evaluating, and implementing precollege science education projects and their specific applications to "Man: A Course of Study" (MACOS). The topics investigated…

  8. Main circulator design features for HTR 100, HTR 500 and space heating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, J.; Glass, D.

    1988-01-01

    All design alternatives for modern high-temperature reactors have a common circulator concept: It is based on a vertical shaft design with a flying impeller. The circulators are equipped with active magnetic bearings and are driven by induction motors connected to variable-speed static converters. Due to their multiple functions during normal reactor operation and under accident conditions, extremely high requirements are made to safety-relevant circulators, since with the reactor pressurized as well as under depressurized conditions specified delivery heads and flow rates have to be ensured. The use of active magnetic bearings permits to obtain maintenance-free operation and functional safety to an extent which had not been achieved before. Magnetic bearings are therefore provided for the total range including primary gas circulators of a drive power of several MW as well as circulators for helium loops of reactor auxiliary systems. The essential feature for using active magnetic bearings is the retainer bearing technology, preventing contact between rotor and static circulator parts upon unintended deenergisation of the magnets. Results of current experiments are reported. Another aspect to be considered for reliable long-term operation for several decades is the effect of rotor dynamics. The various natural frequencies resulting from torsion and bending modes in view of a drive by a frequency-controlled induction motor have to be considered as well as the specific characteristics of the active magnetic bearings. Special attention has to be directed to the internal cooling loop so as to ensure that reactor temperature excursions in the event of deviation from normal operation can be overcome without damage. For circulator components exposed to temperature fields the design characteristics are determined by combining experimental and analytical methods. The coordination of all component parts is currently being optimized on a prototype circulator whose detailed

  9. Influence of reactor design on the establishment of natural circulation in pool-type LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durham, M.E.

    1976-01-01

    The general principles involved in establishing natural circulation in a pool-type liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor following loss of a.c. supplies are elucidated and the effects of design features by use of the computer code MELANI are quantified. It is shown that natural circulation can provide a feasible means of emergency core cooling in addition to that provided by pony motors. The choice of primary pump rundown time has a significant effect in controlling peak core outlet temperatures in the hypothetical case of natural circulation alone being the core heat removal process. (author)

  10. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C., E-mail: pgascoyn@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics Research, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Unit 951, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Shim, Sangjo [Department of Imaging Physics Research, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Unit 951, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0800, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Present address: Micro & Nanotechnology Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, 208 North Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-03-12

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is an electrokinetic method that allows intrinsic dielectric properties of suspended cells to be exploited for discrimination and separation. It has emerged as a promising method for isolating circulation tumor cells (CTCs) from blood. DEP-isolation of CTCs is independent of cell surface markers. Furthermore, isolated CTCs are viable and can be maintained in culture, suggesting that DEP methods should be more generally applicable than antibody-based approaches. The aim of this article is to review and synthesize for both oncologists and biomedical engineers interested in CTC isolation the pertinent characteristics of DEP and CTCs. The aim is to promote an understanding of the factors involved in realizing DEP-based instruments having both sufficient discrimination and throughput to allow routine analysis of CTCs in clinical practice. The article brings together: (a) the principles of DEP; (b) the biological basis for the dielectric differences between CTCs and blood cells; (c) why such differences are expected to be present for all types of tumors; and (d) instrumentation requirements to process 10 mL blood specimens in less than 1 h to enable routine clinical analysis. The force equilibrium method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF) is shown to offer higher discrimination and throughput than earlier DEP trapping methods and to be applicable to clinical studies.

  11. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R. C. Gascoyne

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dielectrophoresis (DEP is an electrokinetic method that allows intrinsic dielectric properties of suspended cells to be exploited for discrimination and separation. It has emerged as a promising method for isolating circulation tumor cells (CTCs from blood. DEP-isolation of CTCs is independent of cell surface markers. Furthermore, isolated CTCs are viable and can be maintained in culture, suggesting that DEP methods should be more generally applicable than antibody-based approaches. The aim of this article is to review and synthesize for both oncologists and biomedical engineers interested in CTC isolation the pertinent characteristics of DEP and CTCs. The aim is to promote an understanding of the factors involved in realizing DEP-based instruments having both sufficient discrimination and throughput to allow routine analysis of CTCs in clinical practice. The article brings together: (a the principles of DEP; (b the biological basis for the dielectric differences between CTCs and blood cells; (c why such differences are expected to be present for all types of tumors; and (d instrumentation requirements to process 10 mL blood specimens in less than 1 h to enable routine clinical analysis. The force equilibrium method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF is shown to offer higher discrimination and throughput than earlier DEP trapping methods and to be applicable to clinical studies.

  12. Global atmospheric circulation statistics: Four year averages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. F.; Geller, M. A.; Nash, E. R.; Gelman, M. E.

    1987-01-01

    Four year averages of the monthly mean global structure of the general circulation of the atmosphere are presented in the form of latitude-altitude, time-altitude, and time-latitude cross sections. The numerical values are given in tables. Basic parameters utilized include daily global maps of temperature and geopotential height for 18 pressure levels between 1000 and 0.4 mb for the period December 1, 1978 through November 30, 1982 supplied by NOAA/NMC. Geopotential heights and geostrophic winds are constructed using hydrostatic and geostrophic formulae. Meridional and vertical velocities are calculated using thermodynamic and continuity equations. Fields presented in this report are zonally averaged temperature, zonal, meridional, and vertical winds, and amplitude of the planetary waves in geopotential height with zonal wave numbers 1-3. The northward fluxes of sensible heat and eastward momentum by the standing and transient eddies along with their wavenumber decomposition and Eliassen-Palm flux propagation vectors and divergences by the standing and transient eddies along with their wavenumber decomposition are also given. Large interhemispheric differences and year-to-year variations are found to originate in the changes in the planetary wave activity.

  13. Methods of quantifying circulating IgE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrett, T.G.; Merrett, J.

    1978-01-01

    Four radioimmunoassay techniques, two conventional and two sandwich, have been used to measure circulating IgE levels in 100 sera. The test sera had IgE levels ranging from 1.0 to 20,000 u/ml, and each was measured at five dilutions, ranging from three-fold to 400-fold. The same IgE standards were used throughout, and the optimal range for each assay was determined by assessing data for quality control sera and the WHO standard 69/204. To be of general use in the United Kingdom an IgE test must measure accurately levels as low as 20-30 u IgE/ml. The Phadebas RIST method failed to meet this criterion, and of the remaining tests the double antibody method had the most useful operating range and produced the most reliable results. However, the double antibody method is not available commercially and so, for the majority of laboratories, the Phadebas PRIST technique should be the method chosen. (author)

  14. Steady state performance of subcritical and supercritical pressure natural circulation in the same test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swapnalee, B.T.; Vijayan, P.K; Sharma, Manish; Pilkhwal, D.S.; Saha, D.; Sinha, R.K.

    2011-01-01

    For supercritical pressure natural circulation loops, explicit correlation for steady state flow are not available. While using the subcritical natural circulation flow correlation for supercritical pressure data, it has been observed that subcritical flow correlation is not able to predict the steady state flow accurately near supercritical pressure condition. A generalized correlation has been proposed to estimate the steady state flow in supercritical pressure natural circulation loop based on a relationship between dimensionless density and dimensionless enthalpy reported in literature. This generalized correlation has been tested with the steady state supercritical pressure CO 2 data and found to be in good agreement. Subsequently supercritical pressure data for different working fluids reported in literature has also been compared with the proposed correlation. It is observed that the same generalized correlation is applicable for other fluids also. The present paper deals with the details of the test facility, the derivation of the generalized correlation and comparison with experimental data. (author)

  15. FFTF operating experience with sodium natural circulation: slides included

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, T.M.; Additon, S.L.; Beaver, T.R.; Midgett, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has been designed for passive, back-up, safety grade decay heat removal utilizing natural circulation of the sodium coolant. This paper discusses the process by which operator preparation for this emergency operating mode has been assured, in paralled with the design verification during the FFTF startup and acceptance testing program. Over the course of the test program, additional insights were gained through the testing program, through on-going plant analyses and through general safety evaluations performed throughout the nuclear industry. These insights led to development of improved operator training material for control of decay heat removal during both forced and natural circulation as well as improvements in the related plant operating procedures.

  16. On the stability of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Matthias; Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    One of the most important large-scale ocean current systems for Earth's climate is the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Here we review its stability properties and present new model simulations to study the AMOC's hysteresis response to freshwater perturbations. We employ seven different versions of an Ocean General Circulation Model by using a highly accurate tracer advection scheme, which minimizes the problem of numerical diffusion. We find that a characteristic freshwater hysteresis also exists in the predominantly wind-driven, low-diffusion limit of the AMOC. However, the shape of the hysteresis changes, indicating that a convective instability rather than the advective Stommel feedback plays a dominant role. We show that model errors in the mean climate can make the hysteresis disappear, and we investigate how model innovations over the past two decades, like new parameterizations and mixing schemes, affect the AMOC stability. Finally, we discuss evidence that current climate models systematically overestimate the stability of the AMOC. PMID:19897722

  17. Refractory experience in circulating fluidized bed combustors, Task 7. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, R.Q.

    1989-11-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation into the status of the design and selection of refractory materials for coal-fueled circulating fluidized-bed combustors. The survey concentrated on operating units in the United States manufactured by six different boiler vendors: Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, Foster Wheeler, Keeler Dorr-Oliver, Pyropower, and Riley Stoker. Information was obtained from the boiler vendors, refractory suppliers and installers, and the owners/operators of over forty units. This work is in support of DOE`s Clean Coal Technology program, which includes circulating fluidized-bed technology as one of the selected concepts being evaluated.

  18. Experiment Study on Corrosion Control Using Coking Wastewater as Circulating Cooling Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huanzhen; Dong, Changqing; Bian, Lei; Zhao, Qian

    The coking wastewater drainage will bring severe water environmental pollution, so it is necessary to change the coking wastewater into resource. The reuse of pre-treated coking wastewater as make-up water for circulating cooling system is an important way. To prevent the circulating cooling system corrosion, the characteristic and the corrosion control technology and the effect of the classic corrosion inhibitors in the circulating cooling water system were studied by static experiment and dynamic experiment based on water quality stabilization theory. The results indicate that the corrosion in circulating cooling system is mainly spot corrosion caused by pollutants in coking wastewater, and the corrosion inhibition technology on the model of precipitated membrane based on phosphor series should be preferred. The mixed corrosion inhibitors HEDP and Zn 2+ optimally selected by experiment can form a firm corrosion inhibition membrane on heat transfer surface, and the corrosion inhibition rate could reach 85.6%. The corrosion rate of common carbon steel is 0.105 mm/a, which could satisfy the criterion of > Design criterion of the industrial circulating cooling water treatment > (GB 50050-95). The practical application to the circulating cooling system shows that the mixed corrosion inhibitors HEDP and Zn 2+ can control the corrosion in the system economically when the concentration multiple is 2-2.2, which opens up a feasible way for changing the coking wastewater into resource.

  19. Antidepressant use and circulating prolactin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Katherine W; Okereke, Olivia I; Qian, Jing; Tworoger, Shelley S; Rice, Megan S; Hankinson, Susan E

    2016-07-01

    To determine whether antidepressants (AD), specifically selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are linked to elevated prolactin levels among the general population. Circulating prolactin levels were available for 4593 healthy participants in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHS2, including 267 AD users. We fit generalized linear models to calculate and compare adjusted mean prolactin levels between AD users and non-users and further among SSRI users. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) for "elevated" prolactin levels (>11 ng/mL) comparing AD users to non-users. We evaluated AD use and change in prolactin levels among 610 NHS participants with two measurements an average of 11 years apart. Adjusted geometric mean prolactin levels were similar among SSRI users (13.2 ng/mL, 95 % CI 12.2-14.4), users of other classes of ADs (12.7 ng/mL, 95 % CI 11.0-14.6), and non-users (13.1 ng/mL, 95 % CI 12.8-13.4). Neither AD use (OR 1.17, 95 % CI 0.89-1.53) nor SSRI use (OR 0.95, 95 % CI 0.66-1.38) was associated with elevated prolactin levels. Change in prolactin levels was similar across women who started, stopped, consistently used, or never used ADs. This study does not support the hypothesis that AD use would influence breast cancer risk via altered prolactin levels. These results provide some evidence that use of ADs to treat depression or other conditions may not substantially increase prolactin levels in the majority of women.

  20. The Study of Technology as a Field of Knowledge in General Education: Historical Insights and Methodological Considerations from a Swedish Case Study, 1842-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallström, Jonas; Hultén, Magnus; Lövheim, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Today, technology education in Sweden is both a high-status and a low-status phenomenon. Positive values such as economic growth, global competitiveness and the sustainability of the welfare state are often coupled with higher engineering education and sometimes even upper secondary education. Negative values, on the other hand, are often…

  1. COST 733 - WG4: Applications of circulation type classifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demuzere, M.; Ustrnul, Z.

    2009-04-01

    Circulation type classifications have a long history in meteorology and climatology. Thereby, the usage of classifications has widened in recent decades, covering multiple applications in a wide range of fields. The main objective of COST 733 is to achieve a general numerical method for assessing, comparing and classifying typical weather situations in different European regions. To accomplish this goal, five different workgroups are established, each with their specific aims. In this framework, the main task of Workgroup 4 (WG4) in COST 733 implies the testing of the selected subjective and objective circulation type methods for various classifications. Specific attention is paid to a comprehensive selection of the applications, the performance of the selected applications and intercomparison and final assessment of the application results. Afterwards, final recommendations are passed on to Workgroup 2, responsible for the development of a general circulation method. At present, various classification methods are used in many fields of atmospheric and climatological sciences for a large spectrum of purposes, making the classification methods one of the most important fields in synoptic and statistical climatology. Workgroup 4 addresses the following application topics: air quality, climate change and variability, hydrology, risks and hazards, forest fires and climatological mapping. Workgroup 4 participants test all of these topics, each in their specific field and their geographical area of interest. Furthermore, topics on phenology, mesoscale modelling on air quality, biometeorology and agriculture are also addressed in collaboration with COST 725, 728, 730 and 734 respectively. A more detailed overview is presented here, with a comprehensive listing of all surveys done within the COST733 framework, and some examples of the application-wise testing of the various selected circulation pattern methods.

  2. Natural circulation and stability performance of BWRs (NACUSP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre, C.; Caruge, D.; Castrillo, F.; Dominicus, G.; Geutjes, A.J.; Saldo, V.; Hagen, T.H.J.J. van der; Hennig, D.; Huggenberger, M.; Ketelaar, K.C.J.; Manera, A.; Munoz-Cobo, J.L.; Prasser, H.-M.; Rohde, U.; Royer, E.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    2005-01-01

    From the beginning of BWR technology it was realized that a BWR can become unstable under particular circumstances caused by a feedback between the thermal-hydraulics and the neutronics. This instability can result in oscillations of the power and the flow rate, which is an unwanted phenomenon. The NACUSP project addresses the stability issues in current and future BWRs by expanding the basic understanding through well structured testing and analyses of experimental data, by analyses of existing operational stability data from three different European reactors (Forsmark, Leibstadt, Cofrentes), by applying this knowledge via efficient models and validated computer codes to operating reactors and reactor designs, and by developing general guidelines for reactor operation and design on how to avoid BWR instabilities. In order to cover the parameter range as efficiently as possible, four existing, sophisticated thermohydraulic test facilities (CLOTAIRE [Gouirand, J.M., 1988. CLOTAIRE Program, description and manufacturing of the mock-up, CEA Cadarache, DRE/STRE/LGV 88-876.] DESIRE [van de Graaf, R., van der Hagen, T.H.J.J., Mudde, R.F., 1994. Two-phase flow scaling laws for a simulated BWR assembly. Nucl. Eng. Des. 148, 455-462.] CIRCUS [de Kruijf, W.J.M., van der Hagen, T.H.J.J., Mudde, R.F., 2000. CIRCUS; a natural circulation two-phase flow facility, Eurotherm Seminar No. 63, 6-8 September 1999 Genoa, Italy, 391-395] and PANDA [Dreier, J., Huggenberger, M., Aubert, C., Bandurski, T., Fischer, O., Healzer, J., Lomperski, S., Strassberger, H.-J., Varadi, G., Yadigaroglu, G., 1996. The PANDA facility and first test results, Kerntechnik 61, 214-222]) have been selected. To extrapolate from small-scale separate-effect testing conditions to full-scale integral reactor conditions one needs to rely on the performance of computer codes (MONA [Hoyer, N., 1994. MONA, a 7-Equation Transient two-phase flow model for LWR dynamics, Proceedings of the International Conference on

  3. Circulating tumor cells: the substrate of personalized medicine?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan eGreene

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are believed to be responsible for the development of metastatic disease. Over the last several years there has been a great interest in understanding the biology of CTCs to understand metastasis, as well as for the development of companion diagnostics to predict patient response to anti-cancer targeted therapies. Understanding CTC biology requires innovative technologies for the isolation of these rare cells. Here we review several methods for the detection, capture, and analysis of CTCs and also provide insight on improvements for CTC capture amenable to cellular therapy applications.

  4. Fourier ptychographic microscopy for filtration-based circulating tumor cell enumeration and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Anthony; Chung, Jaebum; Ou, Xiaoze; Zheng, Guoan; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Datar, Ram; Yang, Changhuei; Cote, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are recognized as a candidate biomarker with strong prognostic and predictive potential in metastatic disease. Filtration-based enrichment technologies have been used for CTC characterization, and our group has previously developed a membrane microfilter device that demonstrates efficacy in model systems and clinical blood samples. However, uneven filtration surfaces make the use of standard microscopic techniques a difficult task, limiting the performance of automated imaging using commercially available technologies. Here, we report the use of Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) to tackle this challenge. Employing this method, we were able to obtain high-resolution color images, including amplitude and phase, of the microfilter samples over large areas. FPM's ability to perform digital refocusing on complex images is particularly useful in this setting as, in contrast to other imaging platforms, we can focus samples on multiple focal planes within the same frame despite surface unevenness. In model systems, FPM demonstrates high image quality, efficiency, and consistency in detection of tumor cells when comparing corresponding microfilter samples to standard microscopy with high correlation (R² = 0.99932). Based on these results, we believe that FPM will have important implications for improved, high throughput, filtration-based CTC analysis, and, more generally, image analysis of uneven surfaces.

  5. Development of environmental friendly lost circulation material from banana peel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauki, Arina; Hasan, Nur â.€˜Izzati; Naimi, Fardelen Binti Md; Othman, Nur Hidayati

    2017-12-01

    Loss of expensive mud could lead to major financial problem in executing a drilling project and is one of the biggest problems that need to be tackled during drilling. Synthetic Based Mud (SBM) is the most stable state of the art drilling mud used in current drilling technologies. However, the problem with lost circulation is still inevitable. The focus of this project is to develop a new potential waste material from banana peel in order to combat lost circulation in SBM. Standard industrial Lost Circulation Material (LCM) is used to compare the performance of banana peel as LCM in SBM. The effects of different sizing of banana peels (600 micron, 300 micron and 100 micron) were studied on the rheological and filtration properties of SBM and the bridging performance of banana peel as LCM additive. The tests were conducted using viscometer, HTHP filter press and sand bed tester. Thermal analysis of banana peel was also studied using TGA. According to the results obtained, 300 and 100 micron size of banana peel LCM exhibited an improved bridging performance by 65% as compared to industrial LCM. However, banana peel LCM with the size of 600 micron failed to act as LCM due to the total invasion of mud into the sand bed.

  6. Cold-Flow Circulating Fluidized-Bed Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parviz Famouri

    2005-07-01

    In a variety of industrial applications, the use of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) provides various advantages, such as reducing environmental pollution and increasing process efficiency. The application of circulating fluidized bed technology contributes to the improvement of gas-solid contact, reduction of the cross-sectional area with the use of higher superficial velocities, the use of the solids circulation rate as an additional control variable, and superior radial mixing, Grace et al. [1]. In order to improve raw material usage and utility consumption, optimization and control of CFB is very important, and an accurate, real time model is required to describe and quantify the process. Currently there is no accepted way to construct a reliable model for such a complex CFB system using traditional methods, especially at the pilot or industrial scale. Three major obstacles in characterizing the system are: 1) chaotic nature of the system; 2) non-linearity of the system, and 3) number of immeasurable unknowns internal to the system,[2]. Advanced control theories and methods have the ability to characterize the system, and can overcome all three of these obstacles. These methods will be discussed in this report.

  7. De la circulation des nourritures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Lestage

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Tout en provoquant une rupture avec le réseau social d’origine et un isolement plus ou moins conséquent et plus ou moins temporaire, la migration produit une intense activité sociale compensatoire(i.e. les échanges de services et de biens. Dans ce texte, je m’intéresse à l’échange de nourritures entre les migrants mixtèques originaires de l’État de Oaxaca, dans le sud du Mexique, qui vivent et/ou se déplacent en Basse Californie (Mexique et en Californie (États-Unis. Je me propose d’interroger les modalités de maintien et d’extension des réseaux sociaux à travers les dons et le commerce alimentaire, avec pour objectif l’analyse de la reproduction sociale et identitaire dans un contexte de migration.The circulation of food. How Mexican migrants perpetuate and extend social links through the acquisition of food productsOn the one hand, migration tears apart the original social network, creating a somewhat effective and temporary isolation. On the other hand, migration produces an intense social activity (e.g. exchanges of services and goods which makes up for the loneliness of isolation. This text shows how Mixtec migrants from the state of Oaxaca in the South of Mexico, who live in and/or move between Baja California (Mexico and California (United States, perpetuate and extend their social networks through food gifts and trade. Basically, social reproduction in a context of migration is analyzed here.

  8. Development of CO2 circulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, J.

    1988-01-01

    The development of the basic machine types we have supplied has not been without problems. The Windscale AGR (the prototype AGR) was a small 1.2 MW vertically up circulator with an inlet temperature of 237 deg. C (459 deg. F). Oil leakage problems occurred and were cured in the works test facility and the machine went into service with no other problems. The Horizontal 5 MW machines for Hinkley/Hunterston were not so fortunate with vibration problems, interface corrosion problems (effecting the whole reactor) and material dimensional stability problems. Oil ingress problems did not show up in test work but were later reported from site. These reports were initially exagerated due to the measuring techniques which took the operators some time to resolve. In the vertical 5 MW machines for Hartlepool and Heysham 1 there are two interesting factors, firstly a spar failure and secondly shaft axial stability. Many of the problems were due to modifications at site or our inability to model all aspects of site installation from which lessons for the future can be learned. The latest stations Torness and Heysham II incorporate these lessons. The machines have been designed with so much margin that during the resolution of the reactor control rod gag problems the machines were run continuously at 20% overload (6.3 MW). From an initial accident case of 350 deg. C inlet temperature, this increased to 458 deg. C and now stands at 585 deg. C. No modifications to the impeller were required. The site experience to date is good with no operational problems reported. (author). 4 figs

  9. Application of virtual reality technology to activities for offering information to the general public in the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Hiroshi; Kawase, Keiichi; Sugihara, Kozo; Yamamoto, Junta

    2000-01-01

    The Tono Geoscience Center is carrying out the Mizunami Underground Research Laboratory Project (MIU Project), as part of its scientific research program, in Mizunami City, Gifu Prefecture. We believe that the public and especially the local residents should have a precise understanding of the MIU project. Therefore, to provide information we have used virtual reality (VR) technology in the project since 1996. Software to introduce both the MIU Project and the geology of the Tono district has been completed. The Tono district is characterized by uranium ore deposits, and by clay deposits which are used by the pottery industry. Software with some amusement value, such as hot spring drilling, has also been completed. We plan further software development of VR technology to increase the feeling of realism. (author)

  10. Circulating microRNAs in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamam, Rimi; Hamam, Dana; Alsaleh, Khalid A

    2017-01-01

    Effective management of breast cancer depends on early diagnosis and proper monitoring of patients' response to therapy. However, these goals are difficult to achieve because of the lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers for early detection and for disease monitoring. Accumulating evidence...... in the past several years has highlighted the potential use of peripheral blood circulating nucleic acids such as DNA, mRNA and micro (mi)RNA in breast cancer diagnosis, prognosis and for monitoring response to anticancer therapy. Among these, circulating miRNA is increasingly recognized as a promising...... circulating miRNAs as diagnostic, prognostic or predictive biomarkers in breast cancer management....

  11. Necklaces: Generalizations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Hyderabad. Prior to that he served in several organizations including the. IIIT Hyderabad, IIT .... n over Fq. The study of circulants has a very long history in the theory of matrices and determinants. Orthogonal circu- ... don words have applications to free Lie algebras. The number of Lyndon words of length n over a finite field.

  12. Molecular biomarker analyses using circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Punnoose

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of cancer biomarkers from blood could significantly enable biomarker assessment by providing a relatively non-invasive source of representative tumor material. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs isolated from blood of metastatic cancer patients hold significant promise in this regard.Using spiked tumor-cells we evaluated CTC capture on different CTC technology platforms, including CellSearch and two biochip platforms, and used the isolated CTCs to develop and optimize assays for molecular characterization of CTCs. We report similar performance for the various platforms tested in capturing CTCs, and find that capture efficiency is dependent on the level of EpCAM expression. We demonstrate that captured CTCs are amenable to biomarker analyses such as HER2 status, qRT-PCR for breast cancer subtype markers, KRAS mutation detection, and EGFR staining by immunofluorescence (IF. We quantify cell surface expression of EGFR in metastatic lung cancer patient samples. In addition, we determined HER2 status by IF and FISH in CTCs from metastatic breast cancer patients. In the majority of patients (89% we found concordance with HER2 status from patient tumor tissue, though in a subset of patients (11%, HER2 status in CTCs differed from that observed in the primary tumor. Surprisingly, we found CTC counts to be higher in ER+ patients in comparison to HER2+ and triple negative patients, which could be explained by low EpCAM expression and a more mesenchymal phenotype of tumors belonging to the basal-like molecular subtype of breast cancer.Our data suggests that molecular characterization from captured CTCs is possible and can potentially provide real-time information on biomarker status. In this regard, CTCs hold significant promise as a source of tumor material to facilitate clinical biomarker evaluation. However, limitations exist from a purely EpCAM based capture system and addition of antibodies to mesenchymal markers could further improve CTC

  13. Seawater circulating system in an aquaculture laboratory

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    The note gives an account, for the first time in India, of an Aquaculture Laboratory with open type seawater circulating system developed at the National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India. Besides describing the details of the system...

  14. Schools Underrate Circulation's Role, Managers Claim

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, John

    1976-01-01

    "Education for journalism should include instruction concerning the function of a newspaper's circulation department, but colleges and universities are doing a poor job of such instruction." (Author/KS)

  15. Blocking device especially for circulating pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susil, J.; Vychodil, V.; Lorenc, P.

    1976-01-01

    The claim of the invention is a blocking device which blocks reverse flow occurring after the shutdown of circulating pumps, namely in the operation of nuclear power plants or in pumps with a high delivery head. (F.M.)

  16. Global warming and changes in ocean circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duffy, P.B.; Caldeira, K.C.

    1998-02-01

    This final report provides an overview of the goals and accomplishments of this project. Modeling and observational work has raised the possibility that global warming may cause changes in the circulation of the ocean. If such changes would occur they could have important climatic consequences. The first technical goal of this project was to investigate some of these possible changes in ocean circulation in a quantitative way, using a state-of -the-art numerical model of the ocean. Another goal was to develop our ocean model, a detailed three-dimensional numerical model of the ocean circulation and ocean carbon cycles. A major non-technical goal was to establish LLNL as a center of excellence in modelling the ocean circulation and carbon cycle.

  17. 3rd August 2010 - CEO Siemens Healthcare Sector, Chief Technology Officer, Head of Corporate Technology, Member of Siemens AG Managing Board, Germany, H. Requardt, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1008148 11: H. von Dewitz in the ATLAS Visitor centre with Collaboration member M. Hauschild (left) and Former IT Department Head W. von Rüden (right) CERN-HI-1008148 18 : Head of Innovation and Systems Projects, Siemens Healthcare Sector O. Heid (left) in the ATLAS Visitor centre with Collaboration member M. Hauschild. CERN-HI-1008148: in the ATLAS visitor centre, from left to right: Former IT Department Head W. von Rüden; ATLAS Collaboration P. Mättig; CEO Siemens Healthcare Sector, Chief Technology Officer, Head of Corporate Technology, Member of Siemens AG Managing Board, Germany, H. Requardt; Head of Innovation and Systems Projects, Siemens Healthcare Sector O. Heid; H. von Dewitz; ATLAS Collaboration member M. Hauschild.

  18. Autoregressive logistic regression applied to atmospheric circulation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanche, Y.; Mínguez, R.; Méndez, F. J.

    2014-01-01

    Autoregressive logistic regression models have been successfully applied in medical and pharmacology research fields, and in simple models to analyze weather types. The main purpose of this paper is to introduce a general framework to study atmospheric circulation patterns capable of dealing simultaneously with: seasonality, interannual variability, long-term trends, and autocorrelation of different orders. To show its effectiveness on modeling performance, daily atmospheric circulation patterns identified from observed sea level pressure fields over the Northeastern Atlantic, have been analyzed using this framework. Model predictions are compared with probabilities from the historical database, showing very good fitting diagnostics. In addition, the fitted model is used to simulate the evolution over time of atmospheric circulation patterns using Monte Carlo method. Simulation results are statistically consistent with respect to the historical sequence in terms of (1) probability of occurrence of the different weather types, (2) transition probabilities and (3) persistence. The proposed model constitutes an easy-to-use and powerful tool for a better understanding of the climate system.

  19. Computational Analysis of Dual Radius Circulation Control Airfoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Rausch, E. M.; Vatsa, V. N.; Rumsey, C. L.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of the work is to use multiple codes and multiple configurations to provide an assessment of the capability of RANS solvers to predict circulation control dual radius airfoil performance and also to identify key issues associated with the computational predictions of these configurations that can result in discrepancies in the predicted solutions. Solutions were obtained for the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) dual radius circulation control airfoil and the General Aviation Circulation Control (GACC) dual radius airfoil. For the GTRI-DR airfoil, two-dimensional structured and unstructured grid computations predicted the experimental trend in sectional lift variation with blowing coefficient very well. Good code to code comparisons between the chordwise surface pressure coefficients and the solution streamtraces also indicated that the detailed flow characteristics were matched between the computations. For the GACC-DR airfoil, two-dimensional structured and unstructured grid computations predicted the sectional lift and chordwise pressure distributions accurately at the no blowing condition. However at a moderate blowing coefficient, although the code to code variation was small, the differences between the computations and experiment were significant. Computations were made to investigate the sensitivity of the sectional lift and pressure distributions to some of the experimental and computational parameters, but none of these could entirely account for the differences in the experimental and computational results. Thus, CFD may indeed be adequate as a prediction tool for dual radius CC flows, but limited and difficult to obtain two-dimensional experimental data prevents a confident assessment at this time.

  20. Stability analysis on natural circulation boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Peter

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the study is a stability analysis of the simplified boiling water reactor concept. A fluid dynamics code, DYNOS, was developed and successfully validated against FRIGG and DESIRE data and a stability benchmark on the Ringhals 1 forced circulation BWR. Three simplified desings were considered in the analysis: The SWRIOOO by Siemens and the SBWR and ESBWR from the General Electric Co. For all three design operational characteristics, i.e. power versus flow rate maps, were calculated. The effects which different geometric and operational parameters, such as the riser height, inlet subcooling etc., have on the characteristics have been investigated. Dynamic simulations on the three simplified design revealed the geysering and the natural circulation oscillations modes only. They were, however, only encountered at pressure below 0.6 MPa. Stability maps for all tree simplified BWRs were calculated and plotted. The study concluded that a fast pressurisation of the reactor vessel is necessary to eliminate the possibility of geysering or natural circulation oscillations mode instability. (au) 26 tabs., 88 ills.

  1. The influence of orography on modern ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffre, Pierre; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Donnadieu, Yannick; Sepulchre, Pierre; Goddéris, Yves

    2018-02-01

    The effects of orography on climate are investigated with a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (IPSL-CM5). Results are compared with previous investigations in order to dig out robust consequences of the lack of orography on the global scale. Emphasis is made on the thermohaline circulation whose sensitivity to orography has only been subject to a very limited number of studies using coupled models. The removal of the entire orography switches the Meridional Overturning Circulation from the Atlantic to the Pacific, following freshwater transfers from the latter to the former that reverse the salinity gradient between these oceans. This is in part due to the increased freshwater export from the Pacific to the Atlantic through North America in the absence of the Rocky Mountains and the consecutive decreased evaporation in the North Atlantic once the Atlantic MOC weakens, which cools the northern high-latitudes. In addition and unlike previous model studies, we find that tropical freshwater transfers are a major driver of this switch. More precisely, the collapse of the Asian summer monsoon, associated with westward freshwater transfer across Africa, is critical to the freshening of the Atlantic and the increased salt content in the Pacific. Specifically, precipitations are increasing over the Congo catchment area and induce a strong increase in runoff discharging into the tropical Atlantic. In addition, the removal of the Andes shifts the area of strong precipitation toward the Amazonian catchment area and results in a larger runoff discharging into the Tropical Atlantic.

  2. The influence of orography on modern ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffre, Pierre; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Donnadieu, Yannick; Sepulchre, Pierre; Goddéris, Yves

    2017-04-01

    The effects of orography on climate are investigated with a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (IPSL-CM5). Results are compared with previous investigations in order to dig out robust consequences of the lack of orography on the global scale. Emphasis is made on the thermohaline circulation whose sensitivity to orography has only been subject to a very limited number of studies using coupled models. The removal of the entire orography switches the Meridional Overturning Circulation from the Atlantic to the Pacific, following freshwater transfers from the latter to the former that reverse the salinity gradient between these oceans. This is in part due to the increased freshwater export from the Pacific to the Atlantic through North America in the absence of the Rocky Mountains and the consecutive decreased evaporation in the North Atlantic once the Atlantic MOC weakens, which cools the northern high-latitudes. In addition and unlike previous model studies, we find that tropical freshwater transfers are a major driver of this switch. More precisely, the collapse of the Asian summer monsoon, associated with westward freshwater transfer across Africa, is critical to the freshening of the Atlantic and the increased salt content in the Pacific. Specifically, precipitations are increasing over the Congo catchment area and induce a strong increase in runoff discharging into the tropical Atlantic. In addition, the removal of the Andes shifts the area of strong precipitation toward the Amazonian catchment area and results in a larger runoff discharging into the Tropical Atlantic.

  3. Complex use of waste in wastewater and circulating water treatment from oil in heat power stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaeva, L. A.; Iskhakova, R. Ya.

    2017-06-01

    Sewage and circulating water from oil of thermal power plants (TPP) generated in fuel-oil shops during washing of electrical equipment and its running into the storm drainage system from the industrial site has been considered in the paper. It has been suggested to use the carbonate sludge of water treatment modified with hydrophobing emulsion as a sorption material for waste and circulating water treatment in thermal power plants. The carbonate sludge is waste accumulated in clarifiers at the stage of natural water pretreatment. General technical characteristics of the sludge, such as moisture, bulk density, total pore volume, ash, etc., have been determined. It has been found that the sludge without additional treatment is a hydrophilic material that has low adsorption capacity and wettability with nonpolar compounds. Therefore, the sludge is treated with organosilicon compounds to reduce the moisture capacity and increase its floatation. Several types of sorption materials based on the carbonate sludge subjected to surface and volume hydrophobization have been developed. During the volume treatment, the hydrophobing compound has been introduced into the material along with the plastifier. In case of the surface treatment, heat-treated granules have been soaked into hydrophobing emulsion. It has been shown that surface hydrophobization is most economically advantageous, because it reduces the consumption of water-repelling agent, wherein the total pore volume and sorption capacity during surface hydrophobization increase by 45 and 25% compared to that during volume hydrophobization. Based on the obtained results, the most effective sorption material has been chosen. To produce this material, it is necessary to sequentially carry out mixing of carbonate sludge with the binder, granulation, calcination, impregnation with a waterrepellent emulsion, and drying of the finished material. The suggested technology to produce the material and use it as a sorbent allows

  4. Slow and Steady: Ocean Circulation. The Influence of Sea Surface Height on Ocean Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haekkinen, Sirpa

    2000-01-01

    The study of ocean circulation is vital to understanding how our climate works. The movement of the ocean is closely linked to the progression of atmospheric motion. Winds close to sea level add momentum to ocean surface currents. At the same time, heat that is stored and transported by the ocean warms the atmosphere above and alters air pressure distribution. Therefore, any attempt to model climate variation accurately must include reliable calculations of ocean circulation. Unlike movement of the atmosphere, movement of the ocean's waters takes place mostly near the surface. The major patterns of surface circulation form gigantic circular cells known as gyres. They are categorized according to their general location-equatorial, subtropical, subpolar, and polar-and may run across an entire ocean. The smaller-scale cell of ocean circulation is known' as an eddy. Eddies are much more common than gyres and much more difficult to track in computer simulations of ocean currents.

  5. Limiting Cash Circulation as a Means to Combat Shadow Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina S. Panova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with actual problems of modern state and development prospects of cash circulation in Russia and abroad; the comparative analysis of monetization of the economy of Russia and foreign countries; quantitative parameters of aggregate money turnover, including the value of cash and non-cash spheres; the correlations of macroeconomic variables and indicators of cash circulation in Russia. Special attention is given by the authors to the limitations of cash payments and settlements in the fight against shadow economy. In particular, researched the level of shadow economy; the relationship between cash money circulation and shadow economy; the problems encountered by foreign states in imposing administrative limits on the amount of payments in cash; provides specific recommendations and outlines the required steps to introduce such restrictions in Russia. It is concluded that the limitation of the maximum size of payments in cash can lead to simultaneous reduce the underground economy because revenues derived from the hidden and informal economic activities can be translated in non-cash form. However, in the long run, when adopting legislative restrictions on the payment of funds by individuals on their own bank accounts or, for example, need to prove the lawful origin of money if you make them into a bank account to limit payments in cash will be the first step towards the goal of reducing shadow economy in Russia. In general, limiting the cash circulation - multi-factor task - that requires the solution of economic, political, social, administrative, psychological problems. The overall decrease in cash money (up to the optimum, economically justified level, it will lead to lower inflation rates, the level of corruption, will improve the investment climate and the liberalization of the credit market in our country.

  6. General report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicklisch, F.

    1984-01-01

    Growing complexity of technical matter has meant that technical expertise is called upon in more and more legal proceedings. The technical expert is, in general terms, the mediator between technology and the law, he is also entrusted with the task of pointing up the differences in approach and in the nature of authority in these two areas and thus paving the way for mutual understanding. The evaluation of the technical expert's opinion is one of the cardinal problems bound up with the role of the expert in legal procedure. After the presentation of the expert's opinion, the judge is supposed to possess so much specialised knowledge that he can assess the opinion itself in scientific and technical respects and put his finger on any errors the expert may have made. This problem can only be solved via an assessment opinion. First of all, the opinion can be assessed indirectly via evaluation of the credentials and the neutrality and independence of the expert. In direct terms, the opinion can be subjected to a certain - albeit restricted - scrutiny, whether it is generally convincing, as far as the layman is competent to judge. This interpretation alone makes it possible to classify and integrate legally the technical standards and regulations represent expert statements on the scientific and technical theorems based on the knowledge and experience gained in a given area. They are designed to reflect prevailing opinion among leading representatives of the profession and can thus themselves be regarded as expert opinions. As a rule, these opinions will have such weight that - other than in exceptional cases - they will not be invalidated in procedure by deviating opinions from individual experts. (orig./HSCH) [de

  7. Effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on circulating microparticles levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekhtiar, A.; Al-Massarani, Gh.; Najjar, F.; Aljapawe, A.

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is known to cause disruption of cytoskeleton. Cytoskeleton disorganization results in circulating microvesicles (MVs). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the exposure to low-radiation and MVs levels in the peripheral blood of individuals working in radiation technology field.(author)

  8. Automation Of University Report Documentation Preparation With Electronic Documents Circulation Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Melnik

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Considered are the questions of info-comunicational technology for university report information gathering and processing. It is proposed to automate the basic university reports preparation process. On the basis of the proposed system, it possible to provide electronic documents circulation between the Ministry of Education and universities of Ukraine.

  9. Enhanced electrokinetic remediation of fluorine-contaminated soil by applying an ammonia continuous circulation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Shufa; Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Shuangyan [Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang (China)

    2016-02-15

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effects of ammonia continuous circulation enhanced electrokinetic remediation of fluorine contaminated soil and to analyze its influence on soil pH after remediation. An experimental study was carried out in self-made electrokinetic apparatus. The voltage gradient was set at 1.0V/cm and ammonia water with different concentrations was used as electrolyte which circulated in series. Comparative studies were made by using deionized water as electrolyte which circulated separately in one experiment and continuously in another. According to the experiment the continuous circulation of ammonia water increased the current value during the remediation process and maintained current through the soil cell stabler, which not only increased fluorine migration but also reduced energy consumption. Among the given ammonia concentrations (0, 0.01, 0.1 and 0.2mol/L) the removal rate increased with ammonia concentration. 0.2mol/L had the highest current (26.8mA), and the removal rate amounted up to 57.3%. By using ammonia circulation enhanced electrokinetic technology, the difference between pH values of cathode soil and anode soil became smaller. Ammonia continuous circulation enhanced electrokinetics can effectively remediate fluorine contaminated soil and the residual ammonia in the soil can also improve soil fertility.

  10. Marketing technology in macroeconomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamegawa, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we incorporate a marketing technology into a dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model by assuming a matching friction for consumption. An improvement in matching can be interpreted as an increase in matching technology, which we call marketing technology because of similar properties. Using a simulation analysis, we confirm that a positive matching technology shock can increase output and consumption.

  11. Deep-water Circulation: Processes & Products (16-18 June 2010, Baiona): introduction and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Molina, Francisco Javier; Stow, Dorrik A. V.; Llave, Estefanía; Rebesco, Michele; Ercilla, Gemma; van Rooij, David; Mena, Anxo; Vázquez, Juan-Tomás; Voelker, Antje H. L.

    2011-12-01

    deep-water ecosystems and bottom currents confirm the need for this field to be investigated and mapped in detail. Likewise, it is confirmed that deep-water contourites are not only of academic interest but also potential resources of economic value. Cumulatively, both the congress and the present volume serve to demonstrate that the role of bottom currents in shaping the seafloor has to date been generally underestimated, and that our understanding of such systems is still in its infancy. Future research on contourites, using new and more advanced techniques, should focus on a more detailed visualization of water-mass circulation and its variability, in order to decipher the physical processes involved and the associations between drifts and other common bedforms. Moreover, contourite facies models should be better established, including their associations with other deep-water sedimentary environments both in modern and ancient submarine domains. The rapid increase in deep-water exploration and the new deep-water technologies available to the oil industry and academic institutions will undoubtedly lead to spectacular advances in contourite research in terms of processes, morphology, sediment stacking patterns, facies, and their relationships with other deep-marine depositional systems.

  12. Simulation and analysis of the mesoscale circulation in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Echevin

    Full Text Available The large-scale and mesoscale circulation of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea are simulated with an eddy-resolving primitive-equation regional model (RM of 1/16° resolution embedded in a general circulation model (GM of the Mediterranean Sea of 1/8° resolution. The RM is forced by a monthly climatology of heat fluxes, precipitation and wind stress. The GM, which uses the same atmospheric forcing, provides initial and boundary conditions for the RM. Analysis of the RM results shows that several realistic features of the large-scale and mesoscale circulation are evident in this region. The mean cyclonic circulation is in good agreement with observations. Mesoscale variability is intense along the coasts of Sardinia and Corsica, in the Gulf of Lions and in the Catalan Sea. The length scales of the Northern Current meanders along the Provence coast and in the Gulf of Lions’ shelf are in good agreement with observations. Winter Intermediate Water is formed along most of the north-coast shelves, between the Gulf of Genoa and Cape Creus. Advection of this water by the mean cyclonic circulation generates a complex eddy field in the Catalan Sea. Intense anticyclonic eddies are generated northeast of the Balearic Islands. These results are in good agreement with mesoscale activity inferred from satellite altimetric data. This work demonstrates the feasibility of a down-scaling system composed of a general-circulation, a regional and a coastal model, which is one of the goals of the Mediterranean Forecasting System Pilot Project.

    Key words. Oceanography: physical (currents; eddies and mesoscale processes; general circulation

  13. Simulation and analysis of the mesoscale circulation in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Echevin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The large-scale and mesoscale circulation of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea are simulated with an eddy-resolving primitive-equation regional model (RM of 1/16° resolution embedded in a general circulation model (GM of the Mediterranean Sea of 1/8° resolution. The RM is forced by a monthly climatology of heat fluxes, precipitation and wind stress. The GM, which uses the same atmospheric forcing, provides initial and boundary conditions for the RM. Analysis of the RM results shows that several realistic features of the large-scale and mesoscale circulation are evident in this region. The mean cyclonic circulation is in good agreement with observations. Mesoscale variability is intense along the coasts of Sardinia and Corsica, in the Gulf of Lions and in the Catalan Sea. The length scales of the Northern Current meanders along the Provence coast and in the Gulf of Lions’ shelf are in good agreement with observations. Winter Intermediate Water is formed along most of the north-coast shelves, between the Gulf of Genoa and Cape Creus. Advection of this water by the mean cyclonic circulation generates a complex eddy field in the Catalan Sea. Intense anticyclonic eddies are generated northeast of the Balearic Islands. These results are in good agreement with mesoscale activity inferred from satellite altimetric data. This work demonstrates the feasibility of a down-scaling system composed of a general-circulation, a regional and a coastal model, which is one of the goals of the Mediterranean Forecasting System Pilot Project. Key words. Oceanography: physical (currents; eddies and mesoscale processes; general circulation

  14. 46 CFR 56.50-45 - Circulating pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Circulating pumps. 56.50-45 Section 56.50-45 Shipping... APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-45 Circulating pumps. (a) A main circulating pump and emergency means for circulating water through the main condenser shall be provided. The...

  15. Gathering Useful Circulation Data in the Documents Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kevin L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes simple, unobtrusive method of determining who uses government publications by analyzing manual check-out circulation data at Arkansas State University. Per capita circulation and cross-tabulation results, analysis by classification number, document circulation and library circulation statistics, and publications that make up more than…

  16. Global Solution of Atmospheric Circulation Models with Humidity Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric circulation models are deduced from the very complex atmospheric circulation models based on the actual background and meteorological data. The models are able to show features of atmospheric circulation and are easy to be studied. It is proved that existence of global solutions to atmospheric circulation models with the use of the $T$-weakly continuous operator.

  17. Cascade of circulations in fluid turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2006-12-01

    Kelvin's theorem on conservation of circulations is an essential ingredient of Taylor's theory of turbulent energy dissipation by the process of vortex-line stretching. In previous work, we have proposed a nonlinear mechanism for the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem in ideal turbulence at infinite Reynolds number. We develop here a detailed physical theory of this cascade of circulations. Our analysis is based upon an effective equation for large-scale coarse-grained velocity, which contains a turbulent-induced vortex force that can violate Kelvin's theorem. We show that singularities of sufficient strength, which are observed to exist in turbulent flow, can lead to nonvanishing dissipation of circulation for an arbitrarily small coarse-graining length in the effective equations. This result is an analog for circulation of Onsager's theorem on energy dissipation for singular Euler solutions. The physical mechanism of the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem is diffusion of lines of large-scale vorticity out of the advected loop. This phenomenon can be viewed as a classical analog of the Josephson-Anderson phase-slip phenomenon in superfluids due to quantized vortex lines. We show that the circulation cascade is local in scale and use this locality to develop concrete expressions for the turbulent vortex force by a multiscale gradient expansion. We discuss implications for Taylor's theory of turbulent dissipation and we point out some related cascade phenomena, in particular for magnetic flux in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  18. Donation after brain circulation determination of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalle Ave, Anne L; Bernat, James L

    2017-02-23

    The fundamental determinant of death in donation after circulatory determination of death is the cessation of brain circulation and function. We therefore propose the term donation after brain circulation determination of death [DBCDD]. In DBCDD, death is determined when the cessation of circulatory function is permanent but before it is irreversible, consistent with medical standards of death determination outside the context of organ donation. Safeguards to prevent error include that: 1] the possibility of auto-resuscitation has elapsed; 2] no brain circulation may resume after the determination of death; 3] complete circulatory cessation is verified; and 4] the cessation of brain function is permanent and complete. Death should be determined by the confirmation of the cessation of systemic circulation; the use of brain death tests is invalid and unnecessary. Because this concept differs from current standards, consensus should be sought among stakeholders. The patient or surrogate should provide informed consent for organ donation by understanding the basis of the declaration of death. In cases of circulatory cessation, such as occurs in DBCDD, death can be defined as the permanent cessation of brain functions, determined by the permanent cessation of brain circulation.

  19. Circulating water pumps for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Tsuneaki

    1979-01-01

    Shortly, the nuclear power station with unit power output of 1100 MW will begin the operation, and the circulating water pumps manufactured recently are those of 2.4 to 4 m bore, 840 to 2170 m 3 /min discharge and 2100 to 5100 kW driving power. The circulating water pumps are one of important auxiliary machines, because if they fail, power generation capacity lowers immediately. Enormous quantity of cooling water is required to cool condensers, therefore in Japan, sea water is usually used. As siphon is formed in circulating water pipes, the total head of the pumps is not very high. The discharge of the pumps is determined so as to keep the temperature rise of discharged water lower than 7 deg. C. The quantity of cooling water for nuclear power generation is about 50% more as compared with thermal power generation because of the difference in steam conditions. The total head of the pumps is normally from 8 to 15 m. The circulating water pumps rarely stop after they started the operation, therefore it is economical to determine the motor power so that it can withstand 10% overload for a short period, instead of large power. At present, vertical shaft, oblique flow circulating water pumps are usually employed. Recently, movable blade pumps are adopted. The installation, construction and materials of the pumps and the problems are described. (Kako, I.)

  20. Energy efficieny in existing domestic buildings: Technologies, potential, cost and economic efficiency. General report; Energieeffizienz im Wohngebaeudebestand - Techniken, Potenziale, Kosten und Wirtschaftlichkeit. Querschnittsbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loga, T.; Diefenbach, N.; Enseling, A.; Hacke, U.; Born, R.; Knissel, J.; Hinz, E. (comps.)

    2007-11-22

    The study outlines the considerable dynamics of technological development. Among others, the need for accelerating the market penetration of innovative measures is discussed. There are great discrepancies in the practical implementation of different measures, and it is shown that so-called low-investive measures can make a significant contribution to energy conservation. Implementation of complex measures also shows that the results achieved are strongly dependent on the energy savings goals on the one hand and on the regional or local housing situation and the resulting price levels on the other hand. This stresses the influence of the design of boundary conditions, and the question that comes up is the function of funding policy. The housing industry will have to intensify its energetic portfolio management during the next few years to cope with the new challenges, and the consumer behaviour has great influence. Here, too, efficient behaviour has considerable energy saving potential. The next few years will show if and inhowfar measures for higher transparency will have an effect. (orig.)