WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology first-year students

  1. Investigating First Year Education Students' Stress Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Gretchen; Midford, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigated the stress levels of first-year education students who undertake teaching practicum and theory units during their first year of teacher education program. First, 139 first-year and 143 other years' education students completed the PSS-10 scale, which measures perceived level of stress. Then, 147 first-year education…

  2. Analyzing the Effect of Technology-Based Intervention in Language Laboratory to Improve Listening Skills of First Year Engineering Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupathi Madhumathi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available First year students pursuing engineering education face problems with their listening skills. Most of the Indian schools use a bilingual method for teaching subjects from primary school through high school. Nonetheless, students entering university education develop anxiety in listening to classroomlectures in English. This article reports an exploratory study that aimed to find out whether the listening competences of students improved when technology was deployed in language laboratory. It also investigated the opinions of the students about using teacher-suggested websites for acquiring listening skills. The results of the study indicated that the use of technology in a language laboratory for training students in listening competences had reduced the anxiety of the students when listening to English. Further, there was a significant improvement on the part of students in acquiring listening skills through technology-based intervention.Muchos estudiantes de ingeniería de primer año en India tienen problemas con sus habilidades de escucha en inglés; experimentan ansiedad al momento de escuchar conferencias en inglés, pese a que provienen de colegios donde se sigue un modelo bilingüe para enseñar materias desde la primariahasta la secundaria. Con el objetivo de averiguar si las competencias de escucha de los estudiantes mejoran cuando se introduce la tecnología en el laboratorio de idiomas, se realizó un estudio exploratorio en el que se tuvieron en cuenta las opiniones de los estudiantes acerca del uso de sitios web sugeridos por el docente para adquirir habilidades de escucha. Los resultados indican que el uso de la tecnología en el laboratorio de idiomas reduce la ansiedad de los estudiantes al momento de escuchar conferencias en inglés y que progresan significativamente en sus habilidades de escucha.

  3. SLEEP HABITS AMONG FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Neera; Varun; Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is part of the rhythm of life; without a good sleep the mind is less adaptive, mood is altered and the body loses the ability to refresh. The sleep-wake cycle of medical students is quite different and sleep deprivation, poor sleep quality, occurrence of napping episodes during the day. This study was designed to assess sleep habits in first year medical students. MATERIAL AND METHODS Participants of this study were healthy medical students of first year MBBS course of S...

  4. Stress in Romanian First Year Nursing Students

    OpenAIRE

    NECHITA, FLORENTINA; Streba, C.T.; Vere, C.C.; NECHITA, D.; Rogoveanu, I

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to analyze the stress of the students from the nursing department within the Medical Midwife and Nurse School from our University. Subjects and methods: For this purpose a questionnaire, comprising the factors the students consider important for their academic preparation during the first year, was elaborated and applied to 100 students. Results: The result analysis revealed no significant differences as far as the genders of the subjects were concerned. In the same...

  5. First-Year College Students' Perceptions of Their Experiences Using Information and Communication Technologies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Sara K.

    2013-01-01

    The increasingly integrated presence of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) on university campuses in recent decades has prompted calls for a better understanding of how students use ICTs in higher education, including the transition to college. While research indicates that students with higher self-efficacy are more likely to…

  6. Information Literacy and First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme, William A.

    2008-01-01

    During the same period in which the general higher education community was increasing its overall focus on first-year student success, the fields of library and information science were pursuing a more holistic approach to development of overall information abilities by moving away from tool-based library skills instruction toward a more…

  7. First-Year College Students' Attitudes toward Communication Technologies and Their Perceptions of Communication Competence in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreale, Sherwyn; Staley, Constance; Stavrositu, Carmen; Krakowiak, Maja

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to better understand new college students' attitudes toward and perceptions of communication media and technology and themselves as communicators in the context of communication competence. Building on the results of a previous qualitative study, the researchers developed a survey focused on communication competence in…

  8. First Year Experience: How We Can Better Assist First-Year International Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zi; Sendall, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    While many American colleges and universities are providing a First Year Experience (FYE) course or program for their first year students, those programs are not often customized to take into account international students' (IS) unique challenges. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, this study evaluated a FYE course that was customized for…

  9. Students and Teachers’ Perceptions into the Viability of Mobile Technology Implementation to Support Language Learning for First Year Business Students in a Middle Eastern University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal M. Tayan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Advancements in technology have enabled us to learn, adapt and exploit our skills and knowledge in new ways.  Appreciating the potential of technology may yet give growth and enrich the process of language education, particularly through a student-centred mobile learning environment. Consequently, a constructivist approach to learning can create tremendous possibilities for both language learners and teachers. By exploiting the affordances of mobile technologies and the Internet, a new platform of learning or Mobile Assisted Language Learning (MALL can be realised, through which learners truly learn to learn.  Yet, while many of today’s language institutions and places of learning have begun to understand the potential presented by mobile technology as a tool and resource to content and language development, apprehension may still exist among educational practitioners, learners and senior management.  Such apprehension may stem from a lack of understanding in fully appreciating the opportunities and affordances posed by MALL in creating a support structure to learning and teaching excellence. This may be particularly true within developing countries such as those found in the Middle East. Consequently, set in a Saudi university context, the purpose of this study is to investigate learners’ and teachers’ perceptions towards the proposed implementation of a MALL programme, while exploring whether the promotion of mobile technologies could assist learning and become a viable support structure in teaching English as a second language.  Interviews were conducted with three English instructors who teach on the first year Business English programme at the university. The study also analysed 191 student participants who completed a Likert scale questionnaire designed to explore their mobile learning experiences, attitudes and perceptions towards the proposed MALL programme in their educational context. The findings from the student

  10. Student Engagement in a Large Classroom: Using Technology to Generate a Hybridized Problem- Based Learning Experience in a Large First Year Undergraduate Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Sherry; Boyd, Cleo

    2016-01-01

    Large first year undergraduate courses have unique challenges in the promotion of student engagement and self-directed learning due to resource constraints that prohibit small group discussions with instructors. The Monthly Virtual Mystery was developed to increase student engagement in a large (N = 725) first year undergraduate class in…

  11. DIGITAL NATIVE: A STUDY ON THE FIRST-YEAR STUDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deny Efita Nur Rakhmawati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The digital native generation emergent triggers the educational practitioner to develop a new way of approaching the teaching practice in the classroom. As it is claimed that this generation has a unique characteristics and way of learning. Therefore, this paper explore the experience of the first year student of English language and letters department in using technology. Students were asked about their access to, use of and preferences for a wide range of established and emerging technologies and technology based tools using a questioner developed to assess their level of digital nativity. The results show that many first year students are highly tech-savvy. However, each student’s experience on the use of technologies and tools (e.g. computers, mobile phones show considerable variation. The findings are analyzed using the Prensky’s theory on the ‘Digital Natives’ and the implications for using technology to support teaching and learning in higher education. The reported data indicate that for a range of emerging technologies were used intensively by the students. Furthermore, the majority of the respondents also claimed that they used the tools and technology to support their study. However, it is inconclusive as how the student integrate the tools and technology in their study.

  12. Why Do First-Year Students of German Lose Motivation during their First Year at University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Vera

    2013-01-01

    This article explores motivational changes of first-year students enrolled on German degree courses at two major UK universities. It reports on the qualitative data obtained by a longitudinal mixed-methods study, and focuses on the interplay between students' motivation and the higher education learning environment. In particular, the article aims…

  13. Why Do First-Year Students of German Lose Motivation during their First Year at University?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Vera

    2013-01-01

    This article explores motivational changes of first-year students enrolled on German degree courses at two major UK universities. It reports on the qualitative data obtained by a longitudinal mixed-methods study, and focuses on the interplay between students' motivation and the higher education learning environment. In particular, the article aims…

  14. How Do Learning Communities Affect First-Year Latino Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Juan Carlos; Bray, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Do learning communities with pedagogies of active learning, collaborative learning, and integration of course material affect the learning, achievement, and persistence of first-year Latino university students? The data for this project was obtained from a survey of 1,330 first-year students in the First-Year Learning Community Program at Texas…

  15. Predicting prehospital care students' first-year academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Veronica

    2006-01-01

    To answer two research questions: First, can previously identified factors relating to academic performance be used to predict first-year academic success for students undertaking a newly developed and vocationally oriented prehospital care course delivered in a rural setting? Second, can the study's findings be used to develop appropriate student selection criteria to assist in the admission of students into relevant tertiary studies or the prehospital care industry? A retrospective review of all first-year, on-campus prehospital care students enrolled in a vocational course at a rural Australian university from 1998 to 2001 was conducted. Six predictors of academic performance were examined, namely: University Admission Index (UAI), postsecondary educational qualifications, student entry type (traditional or mature-aged), previous health-related experience, gender, and background (rural or urban). Three dependent variables assessed academic performance: grade point average (GPA) of students who completed all required first-year subjects, GPA of students who completed at least one subject in the first year, and the student's ability to successfully complete the first year. UAI > 50, previous health-related experience, postsecondary educational qualifications, background, student entry type, and gender were all found to be significant predictors of first-year academic performance in selective cohorts. In addition, a combination of predictors produced higher GPAs than did any single predictor. Academic performance of first-year students in the prehospital care discipline can be predicted given the appropriate selection variables. Admission selection can be assisted with the generated Student Selection 001.

  16. Determining Classroom Placement for First Year English Language Learner Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Rodrigo H.; Maxwell, Gerri M.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores classroom placement for first year English Language Learner (ELL) students from the perspective of a dual language director and two bilingual education strategists. The study strives to interrogate classroom placement for first year ELL students whose language proficiency level is at beginning level. Through a process of coding…

  17. Correlates of Depression in First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villatte, Aude; Marcotte, Diane; Potvin, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to identify and rank the personal, family-related, social, and academic correlates of depressive symptoms in first-year college students. A questionnaire that included the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was administered to 389 first-year college students (mean age = 18.9; SD = 3.38; 59.4% female). Eight variables…

  18. Musculoskeletal disorders among first-year Ghanaian students in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Musculoskeletal disorders among first-year Ghanaian students in a nursing college. Jubilant Kwame ... lem amongst future generation of nursing students must be given utmost priority. This study .... ing use of computers in learning. To the best ...

  19. Career identities of first-year female coloured students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    female coloured students' career identity, at a higher education institution in the Eastern Cape .... among first-year students, such as gender, race, ethnicity and socio-economic status. ...... White Paper on Integrated National Disability. Strategy.

  20. Factors predictive of depression in first-year college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandy, Julie M; Penckofer, Sue; Solari-Twadell, Phyllis A; Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    Starting college is a challenging time for first-year students and is often accompanied by emotions such as depression, which can negatively affect academic performance and quality of life. This descriptive correlational study examined stress, coping, depressive symptomology, spirituality, and social support in a convenience sample of first-year students (N = 188) from two private colleges. Results indicated that 45% of students demonstrated greater than average levels of stress and 48% reported clinically significant depressive symptomology. Significant relationships existed between depressive symptoms and stress (p stress (p stress reduction in first-year students should be considered for decreasing depressive symptoms to enhance their college experience. \\

  1. Academic Engagement among First-Year College Students: Precollege Antecedents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Stanislaw; Sessa, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    This study describes how student characteristics and environmental influences experienced in high school (and the interactions among them) impact academic engagement of first-semester college students. Data, collected from 300 first-year students at a single university at two different times, showed that precollege student characteristics of…

  2. First-Year Students' Perspectives on Intercultural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Amy; Williams, Rhiannon D.; Shaw, Marta A.; Jie, Yiyun

    2014-01-01

    Faculty can play a critical role in supporting students' intercultural development, but studies indicate that instructors report a lack of formal understanding about how to maximize this opportunity. Through the investigation of 115 first-year students' written reflections, this study provides faculty with students' perspectives on intercultural…

  3. Motivating First-Year University Students by Interdisciplinary Study Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Franziska D.; Dirsch-Weigand, Andrea; Awolin, Malte; Pinkelman, Rebecca J.; Hampe, Manfred J.

    2017-01-01

    In order to increase student commitment from the beginning of students' university careers, the Technische Universität Darmstadt has introduced interdisciplinary study projects involving first-year students from the engineering, natural, social and history, economics and/or human sciences departments. The didactic concept includes sophisticated…

  4. First-Year Athletes' Student Development and Their University Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidla, Debie D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Investigated relationships between aspects of student athletes' psychosocial development and perceptions of university residence environment. Student athletes (n=53) enrolled in first-year orientation class completed Student Developmental Task and Lifestyle Inventory and University Residence Environment Scale. Findings revealed that student…

  5. Motivating First-Year University Students by Interdisciplinary Study Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Franziska D.; Dirsch-Weigand, Andrea; Awolin, Malte; Pinkelman, Rebecca J.; Hampe, Manfred J.

    2017-01-01

    In order to increase student commitment from the beginning of students' university careers, the Technische Universität Darmstadt has introduced interdisciplinary study projects involving first-year students from the engineering, natural, social and history, economics and/or human sciences departments. The didactic concept includes sophisticated…

  6. First-Year University Students' Understanding of Rate of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezuidenhout, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Explores first-year students' understanding of fundamental calculus concepts using written tests and interviews. Analysis of the written and verbal responses to the test items revealed significant misconceptions on which students' mathematical activities were based. Describes some of those misconceptions and errors relating to students'…

  7. Scaffolding Fully Online First Year Computer Literacy Students for Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall Dixon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the findings of a study of first year students studying a fully online computer literacy module on a Real Estate Agency and Property Economics degree programme at Dublin Institute of Technology, Ireland. In addition to the cohort of entrants to higher education without prior computer literacy skills, there will also be a cohort who are unfamiliar with learning in an online mode. Those students well versed with internet and social media network skills do not necessarily have good office/desktop software skills. "Digital natives" they may be but are they really computer literate? Fully online learning systems in themselves do not foster the type of supportive environments that would encourage students to succeed. In this study a scaffolding approach was adopted with the inclusion of a number of learning supports (ranging from regular e-mails through to face-to-face tutorials to provide a more likely opportunity to succeed. The results indicate that those students who navigated the unfamiliar online terrain and availed of the supports succeeded in this module.

  8. Are Digital Natives a World-Wide Phenomenon? An Investigation into South African First Year Students' Use and Experience with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinyane, Hannah

    2010-01-01

    In 2001 Marc Prensky coined the phrase "digital natives" to refer to the new generation of students who have grown up surrounded by technology. His companion papers spurred large amounts of research, debating changes that are required to curricula and pedagogical models to cater for the changes in the student population. This article reports on a…

  9. The First Year of College: Understanding Student Persistence in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Marina Calvet

    This research study aimed to expand our understanding of the factors that influence student persistence in engineering. The unique experiences of engineering students were examined as they transitioned into and navigated their first year of college at a public research university in California. Most students provided similar responses with respect to the way they experienced the transition to college and social life. There was, however, wide student response variation regarding their experience of academic life and academic policies, as well as in their level of pre-college academic preparation and financial circumstances. One key finding was that students' experiences during the first year of college varied widely based on the extent to which they had acquired organizational and learning skills prior to college. The study used a mixed methods approach. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected through an online survey and one-on-one interviews conducted with freshman students near the end of their first year of college. The theoretical foundations of this study included Astin's Theory of Student Involvement and Tinto's Theory of Student Departure. The design of the study was guided by these theories which emphasize the critical importance of student involvement with the academic and social aspects of college during the first year of college.

  10. Realized Benefits for First-Year Student Peer Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzynski, Matthew R.; Beverly, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated student-learning outcomes of college peer educators whose primary responsibility or interest was to address health and safety topics on campus, such as alcohol and illicit drug use, tobacco issues, sexual health and safety issues, nutrition, and violence prevention. Participants included 69 first-year college students who…

  11. Exploring First-Year College Students' Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, D. Scott

    2017-01-01

    The development of college students' cultural competence is important in an increasingly diverse world. This exploratory, qualitative, action research study examined how 158 first-year students understood and applied core concepts after participating in a standardized diversity and social justice lesson plan designed using transformative education…

  12. Realized Benefits for First-Year Student Peer Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wawrzynski, Matthew R.; Beverly, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated student-learning outcomes of college peer educators whose primary responsibility or interest was to address health and safety topics on campus, such as alcohol and illicit drug use, tobacco issues, sexual health and safety issues, nutrition, and violence prevention. Participants included 69 first-year college students who…

  13. First-Year Student Aspirations: A Multinodal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grellier, Jane

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the aspirations of first-year university students in a particular socio-geographic context, by juxtaposing this context with those of Western universities in the 1970s. The rhizomatic analysis enables student voices and personal narratives to complement, extend and undercut the words of published researchers and of the…

  14. Teaching academic writing to first year university students: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporate Edition

    to students and this has consequences to their styles of learning hence the overall ... Key words:English as second language, academic writing, first year ... can help the lecturer get a clear idea of students' difficulties and the type of assistance they .... socio-linguistic or educational backgrounds, as well as the willingness to ...

  15. Psychosocial Factors Predicting First-Year College Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumrei-Mancuso, Elizabeth J.; Newton, Fred B.; Kim, Eunhee; Wilcox, Dan

    2013-01-01

    This study made use of a model of college success that involves students achieving academic goals and life satisfaction. Hierarchical regressions examined the role of six psychosocial factors for college success among 579 first-year college students. Academic self-efficacy and organization and attention to study were predictive of first semester…

  16. Promoting Conceptual Change in First Year Students' Understanding of Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costu, Bayram; Ayas, Alipasa; Niaz, Mansoor

    2010-01-01

    We constructed the PDEODE (Predict-Discuss-Explain-Observe-Discuss-Explain) teaching strategy, a variant of the classical POE (Predict-Observe-Explain) activity, to promote conceptual change, and investigated its effectiveness on student understanding of the evaporation concept. The sample consisted of 52 first year students in a primary science…

  17. Financial expectations of first-year veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Christine C; Schulhofer-Wohl, Sam; Root Kustritz, Margaret V; Molgaard, Laura K; Lee, David

    2015-07-15

    To assess student awareness of the financial costs of pursuing a veterinary education, to determine student expectations for financial returns of a veterinary career, and to identify associations between student debt and factors such as future career plans or personality type. Survey. First-year veterinary students at the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine. In 2013, prior to the first day of class, all incoming first-year students received an email invitation to complete an online survey. The survey contained questions about demographics, current financial situation, current debt, expected debt at graduation, expected annual income following graduation, intent to pursue specialty training, and Myers-Briggs personality type. 72 of 102 (71%) students completed the survey; 65 respondents answered all relevant questions and provided usable data. Student responses for expected debt at graduation were comparable to national averages for veterinary college graduates; responses for expected annual income following graduation were lower than averages for University of Minnesota veterinary college graduates and national averages. However, students predicted even lower annual income if they did not attend veterinary college. Expected debt and expected annual income were not correlated with factors such as personality type or future career plans. Results indicated that first-year veterinary students were aware of the financial costs of their veterinary education and had realistic expectations for future salaries. For typical veterinary students, attending veterinary college appeared to be financially worthwhile, given lower expected earnings otherwise.

  18. A mathematics support programme for first-year engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillock, Poh Wah; Jennings, Michael; Roberts, Anthony; Scharaschkin, Victor

    2013-10-01

    This article describes a mathematics support programme at the University of Queensland, targeted at first-year engineering students identified as having a high risk of failing a first-year mathematics course in calculus and linear algebra. It describes how students were identified for the programme and the main features of the programme. The success of the programme was evaluated using student feedback as well as a comparison of the performance of students who participated in the support programme with those of a similar background who briefly attended or did not attend the programme. The pass rate in the supported group of regular attendees was 79% compared with 43% and 46% in the briefly supported and unsupported groups, respectively. Both student feedback and statistical data indicate that the programme was highly successful in improving the performance of those who regularly engaged with it.

  19. Well-being in first year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardelli, Gina; Sim, Wonjin; Borges, Nicole; Roman, Brenda

    2015-02-01

    This study explored the well-being, attitudes toward counseling, willingness to seek counseling, and coping strategies of first year medical students. Gender differences in attitudes toward and willingness to seek counseling were also explored. One hundred five first year medical students (98 % response rate) were administered a 59-item questionnaire about well-being, attitudes toward counseling, willingness to seek counseling, and coping strategies during the first week of medical school. The data were analyzed with hierarchical regression and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). Female medical students were less willing to seek counseling and had more negative attitudes toward counseling compared to male medical students. Most students indicated that they chose not to seek counseling because they did not feel a need for it. Three students reported that stigma prevented them from seeking counseling. Unhealthy coping strategies (denial, self-blame, and substance use) were negatively associated with well-being while healthy coping strategies (active coping, emotional support, and instrumental support) did not correlate with well-being. Medical schools should continue efforts to make counseling accessible. Conversations about counseling may help address the more negative attitudes of female students toward counseling, a finding which merits further investigation given that women typically have more positive attitudes toward counseling than men. Use of unhealthy coping strategies can be addressed in classes, clubs, and by advisors and mentors. Limitations of this study include that only first year medical students were surveyed and that it was a cross sectional study.

  20. [The epidemiology of ADHD in first-year university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, P; Demyttenaere, K; Nock, M K; Green, J G; Kessler, R C; Bruffaerts, R

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in university students. To investigate the prevalence of adult ADHD and comorbid psychiatric symptoms and their effect on the academic performance of first-year university students, and to find out to what extent these students make use of the mental health services of the university. All first-year students at the University of Leuven in Belgium were asked to complete a computer-assisted survey with a weighted cross-sectional design (n=4,921, response rate=65.4%). The ADHD of these students was measured with the help of the ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-6). On the basis of the threshold used, we found that between 1.4 and 8.3% of the entire population of first-year students met the criteria for ADHD. Even after controlling for sociodemographic variables, we found that ADHD was associated with a wide range of emotional problems including suicide attempts (OR=9.10; Cohen's d=0.53), binge eating (OR=5.87; Cohen's d=0.42), or psychotic symptoms (ORS 4.44-4.69; Cohen's d=0.36-0.37). Students with ADHD were 2.46-3.84 times more likely to have a total grading percentage below 50 at the end of the academic year. Current use and lifetime use of the professional mental health services were estimated in the 7.6-15.5% and 26.5-41.5% range, respectively. Adult ADHD is common among first-year university students and is associated with comorbid psychiatric symptoms and poor academic performance. It is therefore surprising that so few students actually receive treatment for their psychiatric and emotional problems.

  1. Integrated Chemistry and Biology for First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdella, Beth R. J.; Walczak, Mary M.; Kandl, Kim A.; Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.

    2011-01-01

    A three-course sequence for first-year students that integrates beginning concepts in biology and chemistry has been designed. The first two courses that emphasize chemistry and its capacity to inform biological applications are described here. The content of the first course moves from small to large particles with an emphasis on membrane…

  2. Student Engagement in a Large Classroom: Using Technology to Generate a Hybridized Problem-based Learning Experience in a Large First Year Undergraduate Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry Fukuzawa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Large first year undergraduate courses have unique challenges in the promotion of student engagement and self-directed learning due to resource constraints that prohibit small group discussions with instructors. The Monthly Virtual Mystery was developed to increase student engagement in a large (N = 725 first year undergraduate class in anthropology at the University of Toronto Mississauga. The teaching challenge was to develop a participation component (worth 6% of the final grade that would increase student engagement without incurring any additional resource costs. The goal of the virtual mystery was to incorporate the principles of problem-based learning to engage students in self-directed learning through an online medium. Groups of approximately 50 students collaborated on a series of “virtual” case studies in a discussion board. Students submitted comments or questions each week to identify the information they needed to solve the mystery. A facilitator oversaw the discussion board to guide students in collaboration and resource acquisition. The final grades of students who participated in the virtual mystery (N=297 were compared to students who participated in a passive online learning exercise that involved watching weekly online videos and answering questions in a course reader (N = 347. Student self-selection determined group participation. Participation completion for both the virtual mystery and the course reader were high (78.8% and 91.6% respectively. There were no significant differences in the distribution of final grades between the participation options. The high completion rate of the virtual mystery demonstrated that an active learning project can be implemented using problem-based learning principles through an online discussion board; however, the large online group collaborations were problematic. Students were frustrated with repetition and inequitable participation in such large groups; however, students evaluated

  3. [The evaluation of health condition of first year students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharova, R N; Timofeeva, A V; Mikhaĭlova, A E; Tomofeev, L F

    2014-01-01

    The study was organized to evaluate initial health condition and to detect risk factors of chronic diseases in first year students of University. The sampling consisted of 649 students aged from 15 to 30 years (mean age is 18.8 ± 1.5 years). The analysis of total morbidity demonstrated that 46.1% of first year students suffered from chronic diseases. It is noted that diseases of musculo-skeletal system have especially high prevalence in students. The analysis of data of anonymous survey concerning behavioral risk factors established prevalence of tobacco smoking, alcohol consumption and sedentary life-style. Among students, 23.5% of males and 9.3% of females smoked and correspondingly 28.5% and 12.5% took alcoholic drinks. The physical activity of students was insufficient and only one third of respondents follows healthy life-style. The group of healthy students consisted only 18.2% and 81.8% had different deviations i.e. risk factors of development of chronic diseases.

  4. A Proposal of Listening Exercises for First Year Medicine Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dileys Alejo Segrera

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Listening comprehension is one of the linguistic skills to be considered in English language teaching. The present paper is aimed at designing exercises to strengthen the development of listening skills in first year medicine students at the University of Medical Sciences of Cienfuegos. In order to conduct this research, it was performed the analysis of the official documents governing the discipline so that we could identify weaknesses in the existing programs. Instruments of qualitative methodology were applied such as surveys to teachers for the diagnose of learning needs of future professionals and a diagnostic test for first year medicine students to determine the major challenges in the domain of communicative skills. Triangulation of these results justified and guided the proposal described in this paper. It was validated by a group of specialists in the Languages Department who agreed on its successful implementation during the 2011-2012 accademical course, which has showed significant progress in the mastering of listening skills.

  5. Sustained parenting and college drinking in first-year students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrisi, Rob; Ray, Anne E

    2010-04-01

    Research indicates that for many students excessive drinking in college is a continuation of high school drinking tendencies. However, there have been limited theory-driven, systematic interventions targeting students so as to prevent alcohol misuse in their transition to college. Almost all current prevention approaches tend to be focused on younger populations and college-drinking interventions are typically delivered to students when they are already on campus. These analyses draw from a novel program of research involving parents of college freshmen based on the work of Turrisi et al. [Turrisi et al. [2001] Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 15(4), 366-372; Turrisi, et al. [2009] Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 7, 315-326] and focuses on examining: (1) the relationship between parenting and student drinking tendencies during the transitional period between high school and college and into the first year of college, and (2) the mediation process by which sustained parenting throughout the first year is related to college-drinking outcomes and consequences so as to inform future intervention efforts. The empirical evidence from this study suggests that sustained parental efforts have a beneficial effect on reducing high-risk drinking and preventing harm even at this late stage of late adolescent/early adult development. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. EVALUATION OF PERSONALITY TYPE OF FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neha S

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Even though research in health professional education has confirmed that non - cognitive factors like personality has importance in selection , training and academic performance of the students. To prepare competent medical doctors , medical schools need to monitor and assess the students at regular intervals. Personality typing is a useful tool for counsell ing , motivation and guidance of the students and if considered while developing of course will enhance learning and improve the performance of the medical students. So it is necessary a blend of personality characteristics with the cognitive ability of learner during medical education to become a successful medical student. Aim of the present study was to assess the personality type using Myers - Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI among the first year medical students of J . N . Medical College Belgaum. METHODOLOG Y : One hundred and fifty students gave consent and enrolled in this study. Consented students were subjected to MBTI questionnaire to identify their personality type. RESULTS : MBTI questionnaire was used to identified personality type of the students , out of 150 students were 80 Extroverts (E , 70 Introverts (I , 90 Perceivers (P , 60 Judgers (J , 76 Filling , 57 sensing , 93 intuitive , 74 thinking type i e E>I , P>J , F>S and N>T. The most common personality type was ENFP (14% remaining types showed INFP (12% , INTP (9.3%. INFJ , ENFJ , ESFJ , ESFP were of equal percentage (6.7%. CONCLUSION : It has been seen that different type of personalities are found in different medical schools and health professionals and poor performance and drop out of the student occur from the course when the course structure , teaching format and personality type do not match. Hence there is a need to assess every individual’s personality type which helps in counseling and guidance to learners as a part of remedial measures especially for the low achievers to maximize the learning and students who are

  7. Mentoring for first year medical students: humanising medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Arati; Singh, Navjeevan; Dhaliwal, Upreet

    2013-01-01

    New entrants are vulnerable to the challenges of the medical course; mentoring programmes are known to offer support. This paper evaluated the experiences of students and faculty enrolled in a new mentoring programme. After needs analysis of students and faculty, a small-group mentoring programme for new medical students was initiated. Fifty-five volunteer faculty mentors were allocated two-three students each. At year-end, feedback using an open-ended questionnaire, revealed that there was no contact in one-third of the cases; the commonest reasons cited were lack of mentee initiative, time and commitment. Supportive mentors were appreciated. Over 95% of respondents believed that mentoring was a good idea; many believed the mentee benefitted; mentors also reported improved communication and affective skills; 60 (77.0%) mentees wanted to mentor new students the following year. Thus, mentoring of first-year students by faculty was effective, when contact occurred, in making the mentee feel supported. Mentoring may be a means of honing the affective domain and humanitarian instincts of medical faculty and students.

  8. Developing information literacy with first year oral health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, P J; Foxlee, N; Green, W

    2009-02-01

    In this time of rapid expansion of the scientific knowledge base, subject matter runs the risk of becoming outdated within a relatively short time. Instead of adding more content to already crowded curricula, the focus should be on equipping students to adapt to their changing world. The ability to access, evaluate and apply new knowledge for the benefit of patients has been acknowledged as an important goal for dental education. Information literacy is key to achieving this. An information literacy programme for first year oral health students was instituted. This was integrated within a biosciences course and linked with its assessment. Small group instruction reinforced by the use of a tailored online Assignment Guide was used in the context of a specific task. Effectiveness was measured in terms of assessment outcome, processes used and student experience. Twenty-seven students participated in the intervention which was effective in enhancing foundation literacy skills and confidence of students in accessing and evaluating information sources in the context of a clinical problem. Improvement in higher level literacy skills required to articulate this information in the synthesis of a scientific review was not demonstrated. Integration of this information literacy programme within the learning activities and assessment of a basic sciences course resulted in significantly enhanced information literacy skills. As this is highly relevant for higher education students in general, the wider promotion of information literacy should be encouraged.

  9. A wellness program for first year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrady, Angele; Brennan, Julie; Lynch, Denis; Whearty, Kary

    2012-12-01

    Entering medical students experience distress symptoms due to the demands of the intensive curriculum, adjustment to new environments and increased responsibilities. The purpose of this controlled, randomized study was to determine the effects of a structured wellness program on measures of anxiety, depression and frequency of acute illness in 449 first year medical students. The effects of eight sessions of stress management were compared to a wait list control group. High risk students were identified based on scores on psychological inventories and number of recent life events (WLE). Results showed that depression, anxiety scores and frequency of acute illness were higher in women than in men, and were higher in students with multiple life events. Significant decreases were observed in depression in the intervention group students when WLE was the covariate (p = .045). Further, the high risk group showed consistently lower depression scores after the intervention compared to high risk wait list controls (p = .003), and these changes were maintained at the end of school year. There were no significant changes in anxiety or frequency of acute illness. Wellness programs can be implemented in medical school and may be particularly useful for entering students with elevated psychological distress.

  10. University First Year Advisors: A network approach for first year student transition and retention. A Practice Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Box

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Focussing expressly on student support and retention, improving the first year experience has been addressed by Murdoch University through the implementation of a School discipline-specific network of professional First Year Advisors (FYAs. FYA initiatives, both broad-based and varied, have been developed in alignment with the changing needs of students as identified throughout the semesters. A combination of outreach telephone campaigns and face-to-face student support enables FYAs to conduct a "just in time" approach to positively increase student engagement, and ultimately, retention. With a bespoke database, FYAs and academic staff have been able to streamline the process of reporting students in need of support, and gather data relating to student retention. The FYA program is yet to be formally evaluated although initial feedback and student consultation is promising. This paper outlines the program's development, current initiatives and expected outcomes.  

  11. Beyond the Tweet: Using Twitter to Enhance Engagement, Learning, and Success among First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Bettina; Moore, Hélène; Barry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This study incorporated social media microblogging technology (Twitter) across disciplines to provide 411 first-year undergraduate students studying in large-classroom settings with opportunities to connect in real-time, both within and outside the classroom, with their professor, other students, and members of the professional community. This…

  12. Beyond the Tweet: Using Twitter to Enhance Engagement, Learning, and Success among First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Bettina; Moore, Hélène; Barry, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This study incorporated social media microblogging technology (Twitter) across disciplines to provide 411 first-year undergraduate students studying in large-classroom settings with opportunities to connect in real-time, both within and outside the classroom, with their professor, other students, and members of the professional community. This…

  13. Scaffolding Assignments: Analysis of Assignmentor as a Tool to Support First Year Students' Academic Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    There are several technological tools which aim to support first year students' challenges, especially when it comes to academic writing. This paper analyses one of these tools, Wiley's AssignMentor. The Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge framework was used to systematise this analysis. The paper showed an alignment between the tools'…

  14. 'All eggs in one basket… or just blindfold the chicken?' tackling first year student engagement with learning technologies and the VLE

    OpenAIRE

    Tannant, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This workshop addressed the importance of a Personal Learning Environment (PLE) and what guidance institutions provide to new students arriving to university with regard to using useful learning tools effectively. Workshop participants were made up of TEL expertise from across the HEI sector. Three groups of 5 or 6 people worked on the following tasks: TASK 1: The Perfect PLE - Design a PLE to most enhance a new student's learning experience at university. The group may elect a specific...

  15. The mandala: first-year undergraduate nursing students' learning experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar, Diane J; Iwasiw, Carroll L; Evans, Marilyn K

    2012-12-05

    The mandala is a circular art form used by psychologists to access subconscious thought through symbolism and it has recently been adopted by nurse educators as a learning strategy for self-awareness. The lived experiences of six first-year undergraduate nursing students who completed a mandala assignment for emotional learning were explored using hermeneutic phenomenology. Participants experiences diverged from their original expectations that the mandala assignment would allow for a fun and free expression of 'self'. Participants did describe experiences of self-discovery; however, their experiences also resembled those associated with socialization in nursing education. Participants described both self-reflection and critical-reflection while completing the mandala assignment. Nurse educators and researchers can gain insight regarding the use of this assignment as an integrated transformative learning approach for emotional learning.

  16. Academic Failure of First-Year Engineering and Technological Students in India and Assessment of Motivation Factors--A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheruvalath, Reena

    2012-01-01

    This study has been conducted to show that there is a recent trend in engineering colleges in India that students who are considered to be highly intelligent show poor academic performance during their 1st year. This article is proposed to examine the role of motivation factors such as teaching methods and learning material in the academic…

  17. The Impacts of Intrusive Advising on the Persistence of First-Year Science, Technology, and Mathematics Students Identified Using a Risk Prediction Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    Set in a large, urban, public university, this study explores the use of an institutionally specific risk instrument developed to identify students who had a high risk of attrition and the effectiveness of subsequent interventions deployed through advising. Though implemented throughout the institution, this study identified control and treatment…

  18. SELF-MEDICATION AMONG FIRST-YEAR NURSING STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAGDALENA IORGA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to identify self-medication practices among nursing students. Material and methods: A number of 89 first-year nursing school students voluntarily answered a questionnaire regarding selfmedication. The data were processed using SPSS 17. Results: Regarding the acquisition of certain drugs, the results are the following: antibiotics (M = 2.29 ± 1.04, analgesics (M = 2.50 ± 1.26, sleeping pills (M = 1.29 ± 1.15, vitamins (M = 3.03 ± 1.10, anti-inflammatory drugs (M = 2.48 ± 1.07 and natural products (M = 3.24 ± 1.17. TV promotion and price do not change students’ choice of a special drug. A total of 94.32% claimed that they store drugs at home and 62.50% declared that they keep drugs out of reach (bags, private car, office, etc. Variables like age and nursing experience had no influence on drug-buying behaviour. The conclusion was that a high number of students from nursing school use drugs with no medical prescription. Vitamins and natural products are the most frequent drugs bought without medical indication

  19. Peculiarities of endurance development for first year students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pochernina A.G.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to determine the dynamics of the specific endurance first-year students in the classroom of physical education. Material : the study involved 20 students. Conducted educational testing: seed of lifting in supine position, hang on bent arms, jumping from sitting up with the stop, run 30m, bending and straightening the arms in emphasis lying, tilt forward from a sitting position, shuttle run, broad jump start. Results : found that the passage of the training module volleyball observed development of specific endurance and all motor abilities. Established that the manifestation and development of motor skills are interrelated. Since force is a functional foundation for the development of other skills, flexibility - the foundation of all mechanical movements. Without the development of strength, speed, coordination abilities impossible to develop endurance. Therefore, it is inappropriate and incorrect receipt of unidirectional only specific endurance (dynamic power and static, speed-power. Conclusions: indicated the need to achieve functional specialization of the body in the direction which is necessary for high-level manifestation of certain motor skills.

  20. [Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in first year university students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, C A; Vacchino, M N; Spillmann, C A; Soria, J A

    1996-12-01

    The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and their relation to a self-reported family history of disease was examined in 3,357 first year university students of Mar del Plata University (Argentine). The prevalence of family disease was 27.5% for hypercholesterolemia, 42.1% for hypertension, 26.9% for diabetes mellitus, 27.2% for obesity and 42.1% for cardiovascular disease. The percentual of 80.7% of the population surveyed showed at least one of these diseases in their previous family history. The prevalence of hypertension (systolic blood pressure levels > or = 140 mmHg) or/and diastolic blood pressure levels > or = 90 mmHg) was 7.0%. Hypertension was related to Body Mass Index (BMI), male sex and age. The percentual of 14.4% presented hypercholesterolemia (> or = 210 mg/dl), which was associated with age, BMI and family history of obesity and hypercholesterolemia. Nine hundred and eleven subjects (27.1%) were smokers. Differences related to sex were not found. Smoking was positively related to age and the career they had chosen. The examination detected one hundred and twenty-three (3.7%) students with cardiac problems. This was associated with a family history of cardiovascular disease. Preventive measures were suggested.

  1. Online mathematics education: E-math for first year engineering students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen; Schmidt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We consider the technology enhanced learning of first year engineering mathematics and in particular the application of E-learning objects and principles in the course Mathematics 1 which has a yearly intake of 750 students at the technical University of Denmark. We show that with non-linear mult...

  2. Student engagement in first year of an ICT degree: staff and student perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheard, Judy; Carbone, Angela; Hurst, A. J.

    2010-03-01

    This article reports on a study of student engagement in the first year of their undergraduate information and communication technology (ICT) degree at an Australian university. The study was conducted at Monash University in the four undergraduate ICT degrees of the Faculty of Information Technology. The study draws on data collected from staff and students using interviews and a start of semester survey. Three aspects of engagement broadly classified as behavioural, cognitive and affective are used as a framework to analyse the data. Results show that staff perceived students as demonstrating low levels of engagement in their university study. Students presented many reasons to explain the nature and extent of their engagement. Many of their reasons relate to studying in an educational landscape of changing lifestyles and work patterns and a strong reliance on technology to support their learning. This article re-conceptualises the undergraduate student learning experience in the current tertiary climate. Implications of the perceived lack of student engagement are discussed and recommendations are made for ways to increase the level of student engagement.

  3. Purposeful Engagement of First-Year Division I Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Eddie; Speer, Laura; Taustine, Maria; Harrison, C. Keith

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which transitioning, first-year student-athletes engage in educationally sound activities in college. The sample included 147 revenue and nonrevenue first-year student-athletes who were surveyed at four large Division 1-A universities. Findings revealed that revenue and nonrevenue first-year student athletes…

  4. Understanding Weight Management Perceptions in First-Year College Students Using the Health Belief Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bhibha M.; Evans, Ellen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine weight management barriers, using the Health Belief Model, in first-year college students. Participants: First-year college students (n = 45), with data collected in April, May, and November 2013. Methods: Nominal group technique sessions (n = 8) were conducted. Results: First-year students recognize benefits to weight…

  5. Understanding Weight Management Perceptions in First-Year College Students Using the Health Belief Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bhibha M.; Evans, Ellen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine weight management barriers, using the Health Belief Model, in first-year college students. Participants: First-year college students (n = 45), with data collected in April, May, and November 2013. Methods: Nominal group technique sessions (n = 8) were conducted. Results: First-year students recognize benefits to weight…

  6. First-Year Students' Expectations of Conduct and Consequence: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crance Gutmann, Gina-Lyn

    2008-01-01

    Research on first-year students' expectations about college has explored areas of academic and social expectations, but not first-year college students' expectations about judicial conduct and consequence. The purpose of this study was to empirically explore two questions: what are first year students' expectations about campus conduct and…

  7. Online mathematics education: E-math for first year engineering students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markvorsen, Steen; Schmidt, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    We consider the technology enhanced learning of first year engineering mathematics and in particular the application of E-learning objects and principles in the course Mathematics 1 which has a yearly intake of 750 students at the technical University of Denmark. We show that with non......-linear multimedia technology and e-learning principles it is possible to strengthen and enhance the students' desire and ability to prepare for the teaching and to read and enjoy the textual representations of the course materials....

  8. Introducing a buddying scheme for first year pre-registration students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Anne

    Student buddying schemes have been found to be helpful for a variety of different university students. This article describes a scheme where first year pre-registration child nursing students are buddied with second-year students, which was first initiated in the academic year 2012/2013. The first year students were aware that peer support was available but contact was only maintained by a minority of students. At present it is uncertain what impact the scheme has had on attrition figures, particularly in the first year. Initial evaluation indicates that students found the scheme helpful and would like it to continue to be available to first-year students.

  9. Supporting Students in the Margins: Establishing a First-Year Experience for LGBTQA Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dian; Norris, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the creation of a comprehensive First-Year Experience program for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, and ally (LGBTQA) students. Background information on First-Year Experience programs, LGBTQA populations, and the benefits of providing this program are described. The authors discuss how to plan and implement this…

  10. Faculty intervention as support for first-year students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thinking underlying this study is that improvement of students' overall experience .... However, not all new students are able to attend the orientation week and, in some cases, ..... Use of Portals, CRM, Assessment: Stellenbosch University.

  11. Communicating with first year students; so many channels but is anyone listening? A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Lodge

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Communicating with first year students has become a far more complex prospect in the digital age. There is a lot of competition for limited attentional resources from media sources in almost endless channels. Getting important messages to students when there is so much competing information is a difficult prospect for academic and professional divisions of the university alike. Students’ preferences for these communication channels are not well understood and are constantly changing with the introduction of new technology. A first year group was surveyed about their use and preference for various sources of information. Students were generally positive about the use of social networking and other new online media but strongly preferred more established channels for official academic and administrative information. A discussion of the findings and recommendations follows.

  12. An Instructional Design Framework to Improve Student Learning in a First-Year Engineering Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Yelamarthi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, numerous universities have identified benefits of flipped learning environments and have been encouraging instructors to adapt such methodologies in their respective classrooms, at a time when departments are facing significant budget constraints. This article proposes an instructional design framework utilized to strategically enhance traditional flipped methodologies in a first-year engineering course, by using low-cost technology aids and proven pedagogical techniques to enhance student learning. Implemented in a first-year engineering course, this modified flipped model demonstrated an improved student awareness of essential engineering concepts and improved academic performance through collaborative and active learning activities, including flipped learning methodologies, without the need for expensive, formal active learning spaces. These findings have been validated through two studies and have shown similar results confirming that student learning is improved by the implementation of multi-pedagogical strategies in-formed by the use of an instructional design in a traditional classroom setting.

  13. Sudoku Puzzles for First-Year Organic Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alice L.; Lamoureux, G.

    2007-01-01

    Sudoku puzzle was designed to teach about amino acids and functional groups to the students of undergraduate organic chemistry students. The puzzles focus on helping the student learn the name, 3-letter code and 1-letter code of common amino acids and functional groups.

  14. Correlates of Smokeless Tobacco Use among First Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangler, John; Song, Eunyoung; Pockey, Jessica; Sutfin, Erin L.; Reboussin, Beth A.; Wagoner, Kimberly; Wolfson, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Smokeless tobacco (SLT) use is associated with specific adverse health effects. Knowledge of student tobacco use, including SLT, may guide inquiry into other risky health behaviors, and provide opportunities for health education of students. Design: An incentivized email invitation to complete a web-based survey was sent to students at…

  15. Engaging and Empowering First-Year Students through Curriculum Design: Perspectives from the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovill, Catherine; Bulley, Cathy J.; Morss, Kate

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing value being placed on engaging and empowering first-year students and first-year curriculum design is a key driver and opportunity to ensure early enculturation into successful learning at university. This paper summarises the literature on first-year curriculum design linked to student engagement and empowerment. We present…

  16. Engaging and Empowering First-Year Students through Curriculum Design: Perspectives from the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovill, Catherine; Bulley, Cathy J.; Morss, Kate

    2011-01-01

    There is an increasing value being placed on engaging and empowering first-year students and first-year curriculum design is a key driver and opportunity to ensure early enculturation into successful learning at university. This paper summarises the literature on first-year curriculum design linked to student engagement and empowerment. We present…

  17. University Students' Reading of Their First-Year Mathematics Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Mary D.; Selden, Annie; Selden, John

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the observed behaviors and difficulties that 11 precalculus and calculus students exhibited in reading new passages from their mathematics textbooks. To gauge the "effectiveness" of these students' reading, we asked them to attempt straightforward mathematical tasks, based directly on what they had just read. The…

  18. Vocabulary Acquisition--First Year German Language Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassner-Roberts, Sigrid

    An experiment was conducted using the suggestopedia method to learn German vocabulary words. Four students who had failed, or nearly failed, tests during the regular university term, took part in two tutoring sessions in which the following procedure was used. First, a pretest of 72 lexical items was given. The students cooperated with the teacher…

  19. Teaching Communication Skills to First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Mark; Letendre, Andrew

    1986-01-01

    A course in communication skills for medical students at the University of Massachusetts Medical School is described. Three issues are examined: the effectiveness of behavioral scientists and physicians as course instructors, the value of videotaped role-playing exercises, and the value of trained actors and medical students as simulated patients.…

  20. University Students' Reading of Their First-Year Mathematics Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Mary D.; Selden, Annie; Selden, John

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the observed behaviors and difficulties that 11 precalculus and calculus students exhibited in reading new passages from their mathematics textbooks. To gauge the "effectiveness" of these students' reading, we asked them to attempt straightforward mathematical tasks, based directly on what they had just read. The…

  1. The first-year experience, student transitions and institutional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    which students need to progress in order to engage with the undergraduate studies ... and epistemological engagement (Harper & Quay, 2009) as key aims of an FYE, focus on ... papers in this special FYE edition of the Journal for Student Affairs in Africa. ... relative absence of important areas of analysis in the collection of ...

  2. Cardiovascular system state of the first year students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosynskyi E. О.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Approaches to definition of a level of state of health of students are shown. 94 students (48 girls and 46 youths of basic medical group took part in an experiment. The state of the cardiovascular system was probed on indexes by frequencies of heart-throbs, arteriotony, index of Robinson, adaptation potential of circulation of blood. It is marked that at the beginning of school year students have a low level of functioning of the cardiovascular system. At 73,5 % girls and 62,2 % youth is expose tachycardia. At 8,2 % girls and 26,7 % youth is expose the enhanceable norm of systole arteriotony.

  3. Engagement among Students with Intellectual Disabilities and First Year Students: A Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Jo M.; Therrien, William J.; Weeden, Dustin D.; Pascarella, Ernest; Hosp, John L.

    2015-01-01

    A phenomenon is spreading across institutions of higher education (IHEs)--the participation of students with intellectual disabilities (ID) in inclusive postsecondary education programs. Data on two cohorts of first-year students with ID indicate that these students are experiencing college life, as measured by the National Survey of Student…

  4. Project Planning and Management for First Year Engineering Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Lise B.; S. Stachowicz, Marian

    2014-01-01

    of this educational paradigm are:1) Theme of semester; 2) Continuous group work during the semester; 3) Students manage their own educational processes; 4) The teacher and group members as resources. Russian educational system has restrictions to use PBL. Some of them are: 1) “Vertical” structure of learning plans...... evaluating students it is supposed that they have received an identical set of knowledge and skills listed at federal education standards – and this set is evaluated. The individual educational trajectory of the student practically is not considered. The best way of adapting PBL within Russian educational...... the annex to the main diploma. The experiment was started in Saratov State University in September 2013 with 3rd year students of additional educational program «Web designer». The experimental results will be used in developing bachelors programs using PBL....

  5. First-Year Student Motivations for Service-Learning: An Application of the Volunteer Functions Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Andrew J.; Christensen, Robert K.

    2017-01-01

    This study extends a line of research focused on motivational factors that contribute to first-year students' reasons for engaging in service-learning. Among first-year students, altruistically-motivated students (Christensen, Stritch, Kellough, & Brewer, 2015) and minority students (Pearl & Christensen, 2016) were not only more…

  6. Interdisciplinary robotics project for first-year engineering degree students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Aznar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition of both transversal and specific competences cannot be achieved using conventional methodologies. New methodologies must be applied that promote the necessary competences for proper professional development. Interdisciplinary projects can be a suitable tool for competence-based learning. A priori, this might be complicated, as subjects are traditionally studied at the university level in isolated compartments, with a fragmented structure. Taking advantage of the creation of new degree programs in Mechanical Engineering and Electronic Engineering and Industrial Automation, in the 2010-11 academic year we decided to add an interdisciplinary project (IP to our teaching methodology. The importance of this project lies in the fact that it requires the participation of all the courses in all the academic years in the degree program. The present article explains the methodology used in the interdisciplinary project and how it was implemented in the first year of the Mechanical Engineering and Electronic Engineering and Industrial Automation degree programs. Furthermore, an evaluation is conducted of all four years of the interdisciplinary project, revealing the main problems with its execution and how they have been addressed.

  7. Introducing nanoengineering and nanotechnology to the first year students through an interactive seminar course

    CERN Document Server

    Raza, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    We report a first year seminar course on nanoengineering, which provides a unique opportunity to get exposed to the bottom-up approach and novel nanotechnology applications in an informal small class setting early in the undergraduate engineering education. Our objective is not only to introduce the fundamentals and applications of nanoengineering but also the issues related to ethics, environmental and societal impact of nanotechnology used in engineering. To make the course more interactive, laboratory tours for microfabrication facility, microscopy facility, and nanoscale laboratory at the University of Iowa are included, which inculcate the practical feel of the technology. The course also involves active student participation through weekly student presentations, highlighting topics of interest to this field, with the incentive of "nano is everywhere" Final term papers submitted by the students involve a rigorous technology analysis through various perspectives. Furthermore, a student based peer review p...

  8. Metaphors about computer education of first year nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çolak Serap

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The meaning of the word of metaphor is represented as likening indirect speech. A metaphor provides a more clear transfer about an idea encountered in an event, situation or a concept. The aim of this study was by the use of metaphor to learn the thoughts and feelings of nursing students about computer education. The study included 65 (45 female, 19 male (1 experimental subject has been excluded because of missing data nursing students of Kocaeli University (please note that gender wasn’t specified on the first survey form. Students were asked by survey form to provide their age, gender, geographical region, place of residence within Kocaeli and their reason for choosing the department. We examined nursing students as opposed to computer education through the use of metaphors. Respondents filled in the blanks: “Computer education is similar to/like … because….” 42 different metaphors were produced. Most of the metaphors produced pertained to the human brain, world, television, smart room, encyclopedia etc. When we separated them into categories and examined them, we see 18 metaphors in the category of guidance and investment in information. Nowadays the use of computers is very important in nursing just as it is in all job groups, particularly in their student life in operating Microsoft Office programs, Acrobat Reader and the like.

  9. A study on the students feedback on the foundation course in first year MBBS curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srimathi T

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: To study the students feedback on the short orientation course in first year MBBS curriculum, which was introduced in the institution as per the recommendations of Medical Council of India for the Foundation course. Methodology: 250 First year MBBS students were divided into 7 small groups of 35 to 36 each. They attended a short orientation course over a period of 8 days on a rotation basis. The skills taught include Stress and Time Management, language, communication, use of information technology, National health policies, Biohazard safety, Introduction to the preclinical subjects, Medical literature search, First Aid and Basic life support, Medical ethics and professionalism. The results were analyzed on the 8th day by student’s feedback and debate sessions. Results: Positive feedback of 88.5 to 98.5% was recorded regarding the objectives of the course, contents, presentation, future value of the course in the student’s career by a Questionnaire issued to the students. Remedial measures undertaken for negative Feedback. The course enabled self directed learning of the subjects. Conclusion: The Foundation Course at the beginning of the First phase of the course enables the First year students to acquire the basic knowledge and skills required for all the subsequent phases in MBBS course and later on their medical practice and career.

  10. Mental problems among first-year conservatory students compared with medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Fenema, E M; van Geel, C C J

    2014-06-01

    Musical education and the musical profession can be stressful, which may make musicians vulnerable for stress-related disorders. To determine if music students are particularly at risk for mental problems, we used the Standardised Assessment of Personality-Abbreviated Scale (SAPAS) and the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ48S) to compare symptoms in first-year conservatory students (n=33) and first-year medical students (n=43). On the SAPAS, we found that medical students have significantly more difficulty making and keeping friends (p=0.015). Also, we observed a trend that conservatory students lose their temper more easily (p=0.040). Both student groups showed high scores for the personality trait "perfectionism." On the SQ48, we observed a trend that both conservatory and medical students experience more psychological problems than the general population, but there were no significant differences between conservatory students and medical students in the total scores of both questionnaires.

  11. Prior Knowledge of Mechanics amongst First Year Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Dick

    2007-01-01

    In the last 25 years, A-level Mathematics syllabi have changed very considerably, introducing a broader range of application areas but reducing the previous emphasis on classical mechanics. This article describes a baseline survey undertaken to establish in detail the entry levels in mechanics for the cohort of students entering Engineering…

  12. Determinants of daytime sleepiness in first-year nursing students: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ching-Feng; Yang, Li-Yu; Wu, Li-Min; Liu, Yi; Chen, Hsing-Mei

    2014-06-01

    Daytime sleepiness may affect student learning achievement. Research studies have found that daytime sleepiness is common in university students; however, information regarding the determinants of daytime sleepiness in this population is still lacking. The purpose of this study was to investigate the determinants of daytime sleepiness in first-year nursing students. In particular, we looked for the relationship between perceived symptoms, nocturnal sleep quality, and daytime sleepiness. A cross-sectional and correlational design was employed. Participants were recruited from two nursing programs at an institute of technology located in southern Taiwan. Ninety-three nursing students completed the questionnaires one month after enrollment into their program. Approximately 35% of the participants experienced excessive daytime sleepiness at the beginning of the semester. Six variables (joining a student club, perceived symptoms, daytime dysfunction, sleep disturbances, sleep latency, and subjective sleep quality) were significantly correlated with daytime sleepiness. Among them, daytime dysfunction and perceived symptoms were two major determinants of daytime sleepiness, both accounting for 37.2% of the variance. Daytime sleepiness in students should not be ignored. It is necessary to help first-year students identify and mitigate physical and psychological symptoms early on, as well as improve daytime functioning, to maintain their daytime performance and promote learning achievement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Project Planning and Management for First Year Engineering Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Lise B.; S. Stachowicz, Marian

    2014-01-01

    of this educational paradigm are:1) Theme of semester; 2) Continuous group work during the semester; 3) Students manage their own educational processes; 4) The teacher and group members as resources. Russian educational system has restrictions to use PBL. Some of them are: 1) “Vertical” structure of learning plans....... Related courses follow each other in different semesters. So there is no theme of semester; 2) The classroom set-up has limitations. There is no way to provide a permanent place for a project work for each group; 3) Classical forms of education are based on an active role of the teacher; 4. While...

  14. University students' approaches to learning first-year mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Haitham M

    2003-12-01

    This study assessed reliability and validity of the Approaches to earning Mathematics Questionnaire, for 218 university students. The study also identified the relationship between subscales. Internal consistency as Cronbach alpha was .77 for the Surface Approach to Learning scale and .88 for the Deep Approach to Learning scale. Principal components analysis yielded a two-factor solution accounting for only 34.6% of variance. The factors were interpreted as Surface Approach and Deep Approach to learning mathematics, as in Australia. The former subscale scores were negatively correlated -.2 with the latter subscale scores.

  15. Readiness and expectations questionnaire : a cross-cultural measurement instrument for first-year university students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ellen; Andre, Stefanie; Suhre, Cor

    2013-01-01

    The readiness and expectations questionnaire (REQ) assesses first-year students' expectations and preparedness for their first year in university. This measurement instrument is useful for educational policy and curriculum development; it can also be used to predict the outcomes of the first year of

  16. Readiness and expectations questionnaire : a cross-cultural measurement instrument for first-year university students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ellen; Andre, Stefanie; Suhre, Cor

    The readiness and expectations questionnaire (REQ) assesses first-year students' expectations and preparedness for their first year in university. This measurement instrument is useful for educational policy and curriculum development; it can also be used to predict the outcomes of the first year of

  17. Readiness and expectations questionnaire : a cross-cultural measurement instrument for first-year university students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Ellen; Andre, Stefanie; Suhre, Cor

    2013-01-01

    The readiness and expectations questionnaire (REQ) assesses first-year students' expectations and preparedness for their first year in university. This measurement instrument is useful for educational policy and curriculum development; it can also be used to predict the outcomes of the first year of

  18. Career Self-Appraisals and Educational Aspirations of Diverse First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Courtney E.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the career, social, and academic self-appraisals and educational aspirations of first-year college students of diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds. Participants included 72 first-year students of Black, Asian, and White ethnicities. Career self-appraisals were significantly different for Black and Asian students when compared to…

  19. Peer Mentoring to Develop Psychological Literacy in First-Year and Graduating Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Lorelle J.; Chester, Andrea; Xenos, Sophie; Elgar, Karen

    2013-01-01

    First- and final-year undergraduate students have unique transition issues. To support both the transition of first-year students into the program, and the transition of third-year students out of the program and into the workforce or further study, a face-to-face peer mentoring program was embedded into the first-year psychology curricula at RMIT…

  20. The Role of Preceptors in First-Year Student Engagement in Introductory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Katherine A.; Voelker, Joseph C.

    2008-01-01

    The preceptor program at the University of Hartford was designed to increase engagement among first-year students and to provide role-modeling opportunities for upper-class students. Data from the first two years of the program were examined. In the first year, 611 undergraduate students in 40 introductory-level courses (26 with preceptors, 14…

  1. Leadership Skills of First-Year Students at Public Universities in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omari, Aieman Ahmad; Tineh, Abdullah Mohammad Abu; Khasawneh, Samer Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the pre-college leadership skills of first-year students and examine differences by gender on eight distinct scales. The Student Leadership Outcomes Inventory defined these eight scales. A total of 296 participants were chosen to participate in the study from a population of all first-year students at a…

  2. Student interest as a key driver of engagement for first year students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Kahu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Much has been written about the challenges faced by first year students at university. This paper adds to that literature by exploring student interest, known to be associated with persistence and learning. Using data from a qualitative study following 19 students through their first year at a regional Australian university, the paper examines the antecedents and consequences of student interest. Findings show the students’ existing individual interests and goals interact with the teaching environment to trigger situational interest. Situational interest then enhances behavioural and cognitive engagement and leads to better learning and grades. Perceived relevance of the learning task is shown to be a particularly important determinant of student interest. Students’ emotions, self-efficacy, and their sense of belonging are also important factors in explaining the links between student interest, the teaching environment, and student engagement.

  3. First year university student engagement using digital curation and career goal setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The engagement of students is one of the most pressing issues facing higher education in the 21st century. Around the world, participation rates in tertiary education are on the rise and one of the key challenges facing educators is finding ways to engage these students. We present the results of a project that assesses the impact of an engagement strategy in which a cohort of students entering their first year of university (1 establish and maintain a clear goal of their ideal future career and (2 make use of a web-based digital curation tool to research and present their findings. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of the strategy, which could arguably be applied to a broad range of disciplines given that the majority of students today are technologically literate.

  4. Predicting success among first-year engineering students at the Rand Afrikaans University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maree, Jacobus G; Pretorius, Anlia; Eiselen, Riëtte J

    2003-10-01

    160 first-year students in the Engineering Faculty at the Rand Afrikaans University completed the Study Orientation Questionnaire in Mathematics and the Senior Aptitude Test Advanced. 100 students who passed and 40 who failed the first year scored significantly differently on three subtests, Calculations, Study attitude in mathematics, and Problem-solving behaviour in mathematics. Step-wise linear regression showed a combination of three fields, namely, Calculations, Study attitude in mathematics, and Mathematics anxiety, contributed significantly (R2=25.8%) towards predicting the first-year aggregate score of first-year engineering students.

  5. First-Year College Students' Strengths Awareness and Perceived Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Roberts, Julia E.; Reinhard, Alex P.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether first-year college students' strengths awareness is associated with their perceived leadership development. The institution in this study offered all first-year students the Clifton StrengthsFinder assessment and strengths-related programming. The results of hierarchical regression analysis of two…

  6. Fostering First-Year Students' Engagement and Well-Being through Visual Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Michele C.

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study that explored the learning outcomes from an innovative instructional method, visual narratives, used in a first-year seminar. Fifty-three students enrolled in a mandatory first semester student success course were instructed to use visual images to tell the story of the first-year experience. Data…

  7. Improving the Retention of First-Year College Students: A Temporal Model of Assessment and Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Hall P.; Davidson, William B.

    2015-01-01

    This investigation sought to determine when colleges should conduct assessments to identify first-year students at risk of dropping out. Thirty-five variables were used to predict the persistence of 2,024 first-year students from four universities in the southeastern United States. The predictors were subdivided into groups according to when they…

  8. Promoting a Deliberative and Active Citizenry: Developing Traditional First Year College Student Political Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, John T.; Bunting, Hadley; Dodson, Kyle; Horne, Miriam; Portilla, Julian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examine the impact of a curriculum designed to increase first year college student political engagement. We used a staggered implementation design in which eight classes of traditional first year college students in were taught a political engagement curriculum by two instructors. The results confirm the positive impact of the…

  9. First-Year Students' Use of Social Network Sites to Reduce the Uncertainty of Anticipatory Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Isolde K.; Lerstrom, Alan; Tintle, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This study surveyed 399 incoming first-year students at two colleges in the Midwest on their use of social network sites before college entry and its impact on various dimensions of the first-year experience. Significant correlations were found for two pairs of variables: (a) students who used social network sites before arriving on campus…

  10. First-Year Students' Loss Experiences and Institutional Belongingness in the Transition to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Karen; Servaty-Seib, Heather L.

    2016-01-01

    First-year students' transition experiences are often considered to involve losses; however, few scholars have intentionally defined or offered measures to assess these losses. The aims of this study were to use the Perceived Impact of Life Events Scale (PILES) to identify the loss domains that traditional-age, first-year college students (N =…

  11. Institutional Factors That Positively Impact First-Year Students' Sense of Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmening, Debra S.; Jacob, Stacy A.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative case study conducted at a single institution in the Midwest examines how institutional context and environment impact college students' sense of well-being. Twenty-seven first-year students participated in one to two hour, in-depth interviews where they talked about their first-year experiences, their concepts of well-being, and…

  12. Exploring Characteristics of Retained First-Year Students Enrolled in Non-Proximal Distance Learning Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillstock, Laurie G.; Havice, Pamela A.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored pre- and post-admission characteristics of retained first-year students enrolled in non-proximal distance learning programs within public, 2-year colleges. Five pre-admission and six post-admission characteristics were explored. The sample for this study consisted of 197 first-year students enrolled in non-proximal distance…

  13. Curricular Infusion and High-Risk Drinking among First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Klein, Sara; Behringer, Laurie Bartell; Ulrich, Anastasia Stacy; Caldwell, Rebecca J.; Hourigan, Aimee

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the curricular contexts effective at reducing high-risk drinking behaviors among 206 first-year undergraduate students. Results showed that infusing alcohol prevention messages into curricular content presented to first-year students who lived and studied together may have helped curb their high-risk drinking behaviors. This…

  14. A Passion for Service? Motivations for Volunteerism among First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, John T.; Dodson, Kyle; Elias, Kaitlyn; Gewirtzman, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This study addressed the links between first-year college students' motivations to volunteer, gender, and past volunteering practices. We surveyed 149 first-year students using items from the Volunteer Functions Inventory (Clary et al., 1998). The results of a series of one-way ANOVAs determined significant differences in motivations when…

  15. Making the Grade: Understanding Learning and Grade Orientations of First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Jennifer M.

    2009-01-01

    First-year undergraduate students enter college with varying expectations, motivations, and goals and are being bombarded with messages about the importance of grades, sometimes to the detriment of learning. This descriptive, cross-sectional study employs LOGO II to describe the learning and grade orientations of first-year students and identify…

  16. Adjustment to College in Nonresidential First-Year Students: The Roles of Stress, Family, and Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefen, Dalia R.; Fish, Marian C.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored factors related to college adjustment in nonresidential first-year students. It was hypothesized that stress, family functioning, and coping strategies would predict academic, personal-emotional, and social adjustment in addition to institutional attachment. The sample comprised 167 first-year college students (ages 18-23)…

  17. The Impact of Mentor Leadership Styles on First-Year Adult Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Staley, Charlesetta

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study explored the leadership styles of mentors for retained first-year adult students to analyze whether the prevalent style had a higher impact on first-year adult student retention. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) 5x was used to collect data on the mentors' leadership styles from the perspective of retained…

  18. An Investigation of First-Year Engineering Student and Instructor Perspectives of Learning Analytics Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, David B.; Brozina, Cory; Novoselich, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how first-year engineering undergraduates and their instructors describe the potential for learning analytics approaches to contribute to student success. Results of qualitative data collection in a first-year engineering course indicated that both students and instructors\temphasized a preference for learning analytics…

  19. The Impact of Mentor Leadership Styles on First-Year Adult Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Staley, Charlesetta

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study explored the leadership styles of mentors for retained first-year adult students to analyze whether the prevalent style had a higher impact on first-year adult student retention. The Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) 5x was used to collect data on the mentors' leadership styles from the perspective of retained…

  20. First year engineering students: Perceptions of engineers and engineering work amongst domestic and international students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Bennett

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite being well ahead of many other disciplines in establishing strong and evidence-based research and practice, engineering in many countries still experiences high rates of student and graduate attrition. One possible reason for this is that students enter engineering study without understanding the realities of either their degree program or engineering work, and without a sense of motivation and commitment. The research reported here aimed to extend understanding of first year engineering students’ thinking about their competencies, identity, self-efficacy, motivation, and career. The study involved over 1,100 first year engineering students enrolled in a common first year unit. Responses were coded using the Engineers Australia graduate competencies as a framework, and this paper reports findings from the most diverse cohort of students (n=260, of whom 49% were international students with English as their second language. The research identified differences between international and domestic students’ perceptions of self and of career competencies, possibly related to self-esteem. Implications include improved confidence and motivation to learn as students consider their strengths, interests and goals. Further, the research raises the need for analysis of international students’ cultural and educational background to determine how different cohorts of international students self-appraise and how they associate learning with their future careers.

  1. First-Year College Students' Strengths Awareness: Building a Foundation for Student Engagement and Academic Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Stubblefield, Robin

    2014-01-01

    As strengths-based approaches continue to gain steady momentum in colleges and universities, a distinct need for scholarship on the benefits of strengths-based practices has emerged. In fall 2011, all first-year students at a university in the Midwest were invited to discover their strengths by taking the Clifton StrengthsFinder. The purpose of…

  2. Moral development of first-year pharmacy students in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Julie; Becket, Gordon; Wilson, Sarah Ellen

    2014-03-12

    To investigate the moral development of pharmacy students over their first academic year of study at a university in the United Kingdom. Pharmacy students completed Defining Issues Test (DIT) at the start of their first year (phase 1) and again at the end of their first year (phase 2) of the program. Pharmacy students (N=116) had significantly higher moral reasoning at the beginning of their first year than by the end of it. Scores differed by students' gender and age; however, these findings differed between phase 1 and phase 2. First-year pharmacy students in the United Kingdom scored lower on moral reasoning than did pharmacy students in the United States and Canada.

  3. A broadly implementable research course in phage discovery and genomics for first-year undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Tuajuanda C; Burnett, Sandra H; Carson, Susan; Caruso, Steven M; Clase, Kari; DeJong, Randall J; Dennehy, John J; Denver, Dee R; Dunbar, David; Elgin, Sarah C R; Findley, Ann M; Gissendanner, Chris R; Golebiewska, Urszula P; Guild, Nancy; Hartzog, Grant A; Grillo, Wendy H; Hollowell, Gail P; Hughes, Lee E; Johnson, Allison; King, Rodney A; Lewis, Lynn O; Li, Wei; Rosenzweig, Frank; Rubin, Michael R; Saha, Margaret S; Sandoz, James; Shaffer, Christopher D; Taylor, Barbara; Temple, Louise; Vazquez, Edwin; Ware, Vassie C; Barker, Lucia P; Bradley, Kevin W; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Pope, Welkin H; Russell, Daniel A; Cresawn, Steven G; Lopatto, David; Bailey, Cheryl P; Hatfull, Graham F

    2014-02-04

    Engaging large numbers of undergraduates in authentic scientific discovery is desirable but difficult to achieve. We have developed a general model in which faculty and teaching assistants from diverse academic institutions are trained to teach a research course for first-year undergraduate students focused on bacteriophage discovery and genomics. The course is situated within a broader scientific context aimed at understanding viral diversity, such that faculty and students are collaborators with established researchers in the field. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES) course has been widely implemented and has been taken by over 4,800 students at 73 institutions. We show here that this alliance-sourced model not only substantially advances the field of phage genomics but also stimulates students' interest in science, positively influences academic achievement, and enhances persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines. Broad application of this model by integrating other research areas with large numbers of early-career undergraduate students has the potential to be transformative in science education and research training. Engagement of undergraduate students in scientific research at early stages in their careers presents an opportunity to excite students about science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines and promote continued interests in these areas. Many excellent course-based undergraduate research experiences have been developed, but scaling these to a broader impact with larger numbers of students is challenging. The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Science Education Alliance Phage Hunting Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES) program takes advantage of the huge size and diversity of the bacteriophage population to engage students in discovery of new viruses, genome

  4. How Can We Nurture and Develop Creativity in First Year Design Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Meakin

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This research paper investigates the perceptions of first year third level design students in regards to their creative thinking and use of creative strategies, while studying a first year design based curriculum in an Institute of Technology in Dublin. The research aimed to question students in a three-phase, sequential project. The first phase, questioned twenty seven students by issuing anonymous questionnaires to gather data on their methods of incubating design ideas, if they experienced any levels of anxiety when doing so, and their satisfaction levels in their design and creative abilities. Literature was reviewed to discover the attributes of those we perceive as creative and if those attributes can be nurtured. Further literature was researched on whether or not creativity can be measured and what are the barriers to creativity. Finally the literature review addressed what might be the correct creative environment for students. The purpose of the investigation of the literature and the questionnaire data gathering was to create a format for the second phase of the project, a one day creativity workshop that addressed issues on creativity raised by the literature and the student cohort. A Creativity Games Day workshop was designed and conducted with a volunteer group of ten. It was hoped the workshop would enhance student‟s belief in their creative abilities. The third phase of the project involved collecting further data by issuing a second questionnaire at the end of the workshop. A comparison of the data from both questionnaires was discussed to ascertain whether or not the participant‟s perception of their creativity levels had changed. This small pilot study, while acknowledging the limitations placed on the results due to the narrow experience and small sample size of the research, does suggest that creativity can be nurtured in a student cohort.

  5. The Effects of Work on Leadership Development among First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Mark H.; Pascarella, Ernest T.; Padgett, Ryan D.; Blaich, Charles

    2012-01-01

    A substantial proportion of college students have always worked while pursuing their college degree. However, despite decades of research on working college students, very little consensus has emerged about the effect of work on college student development. This study analyzes Wabash National Study (WNS) data from 2,931 first-year students at 19…

  6. Learning Communities: Foundations for First-Year Students' Development of Pluralistic Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Mitchell, Tania D.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between first-year undergraduates' (n = 1,701) participation in learning communities and their development of leadership and multicultural competence. The sample included first-year students who were enrolled at six large, public research universities in 2012 and completed the Student…

  7. Computer literacy among first year medical students in a developing country: A cross sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of computer assisted learning (CAL) has enhanced undergraduate medical education. CAL improves performance at examinations, develops problem solving skills and increases student satisfaction. The study evaluates computer literacy among first year medical students in Sri Lanka. Methods The study was conducted at Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka between August-September 2008. First year medical students (n = 190) were invited for the study. Data on computer literacy and associated factors were collected by an expert-validated pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Computer literacy was evaluated by testing knowledge on 6 domains; common software packages, operating systems, database management and the usage of internet and E-mail. A linear regression was conducted using total score for computer literacy as the continuous dependant variable and other independent covariates. Results Sample size-181 (Response rate-95.3%), 49.7% were Males. Majority of the students (77.3%) owned a computer (Males-74.4%, Females-80.2%). Students have gained their present computer knowledge by; a formal training programme (64.1%), self learning (63.0%) or by peer learning (49.2%). The students used computers for predominately; word processing (95.6%), entertainment (95.0%), web browsing (80.1%) and preparing presentations (76.8%). Majority of the students (75.7%) expressed their willingness for a formal computer training programme at the faculty. Mean score for the computer literacy questionnaire was 48.4 ± 20.3, with no significant gender difference (Males-47.8 ± 21.1, Females-48.9 ± 19.6). There were 47.9% students that had a score less than 50% for the computer literacy questionnaire. Students from Colombo district, Western Province and Student owning a computer had a significantly higher mean score in comparison to other students (p computer training was the strongest predictor of computer literacy (β = 13.034), followed by using

  8. Assessing Information Literacy Skills Development in First Year Students: A Multi-Year Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Assessment data from 5 years of a pretest/posttest with first-year students was analyzed using McNemar's test. The results show that revisiting previous assessment data can identify significant changes in information literacy skill development.

  9. Exploring writing apprehension amongst Afrikaans-speaking first-year students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Louise Olivier; Jako Olivier

    2016-01-01

    .... The DM-WAT was conducted with two groups of first-year students. An exploratory factor analysis was administered and this led to the identification of four distinct factors which are also associated with related aspects in the literature...

  10. A Model to Predict Student Failure in the First Year of the Undergraduate Medical Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard J.A. Baars

    2017-06-01

    Discussion: The earliest moment with the highest specificity to predict student failure in the first-year curriculum seems to be at 6 months. However, additional factors are needed to improve this prediction or to bring forward the predictive moment.

  11. Linking students and lecturers - a first year student-staff interview project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjørnegaard Malm, Rie; Lilleøren, Karianne; Mattias Lundmark, Anders

    2017-04-01

    With a wish to familiarize our first year geoscience students with their lecturers, we have introduced a staff-student interview project during their first few weeks as students, a project modified from Dwyer (2001). Our main goals with this project are to tighten the (apparent) gap between the faculty members and the students by introducing the students to academia through a personal meeting. The students are grouped and asked to find an interesting staff member to interview, and are instructed to ask for a CV, a list of publications and an example of a scientific paper authored by the interviewee. During the interview the students should find out how this specific academic career was formed, and how the idea for the example paper came up and finally became a published paper. The students then present their interviewee in class. We also asked the students to answer a questionnaire before and after the exercise. After the exercise students reported a better understanding of the nature of the geosciences and a more nuanced view towards research. They express surprise in how accessible the researchers were, and that they feel more at home at the department after the project. These preliminary results are followed up by interviews of the participating students in December and January 2016/17.

  12. Enquiry-Based Learning: Experiences of First Year Chemistry Students Learning Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy; Rowley, Natalie M.

    2011-01-01

    We explored the experiences of first year chemistry students of an Enquiry-Based Learning (EBL) approach to learning spectroscopy. An investigation of how students' perceived confidences changed as a result of their experience of using EBL in the spectroscopy course was carried out. Changes in the students' perceived confidence, both in their…

  13. The Impact of a Living Learning Community on First-Year Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Margaret A.; Everett, Jess W.; Whittinghill, Dex

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of an engineering living and learning community (ELC) on first-year engineering students. A control group of non-ELC students was used to compare the experiences of the ELC participants. Analysis of survey data showed that there was significant differences between the ELC students and the…

  14. Sophisticated Chaos: The Influence of Academic Discourse on Student Success in First-Year English Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Students' conceptualizations of academic writing are often based on their cultural and social expectations of what it means to be a student or an instructor in the academy. These expectations are as varied as any target population and continue to grow as multi-cultural heritages continue to expand. First-year student writers' performances are…

  15. Developing an Embedded Peer Tutor Program in Design Studio to Support First Year Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamberlan, Lisa; Wilson, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    An improved first year student experience is a strategic focus for higher education in an increasingly competitive marketplace. A successful peer tutoring program creates a visible community of practice, supports the student learning experience, elevates senior students as ambassadors of the program, and reinforces an emphasis on learning through…

  16. McDaniel Step Ahead: A Summer Transitional Program for First Year College Students with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Dana L.; Gould, Sarah A.; Conley, Melanie L.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of students with disabilities seeking postsecondary education. The complexity of needs is also increasing, resulting in more students withdrawing from college or taking leaves of absence in their first year. In 2012, the Student Academic Support Services office (SASS) at McDaniel…

  17. Exploring the Parental Role in First-Year Students' Emotional Well-Being: Considerations by Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sax, Linda J.; Weintraub, Dayna S.

    2014-01-01

    During a time of growing parental involvement in the lives of college-going students, this study examines how interactions with parents relate to students' sense of emotional well-being and how this varies by gender. Using longitudinal data on first-year college students at one institution, the study reveals the importance of both quality and…

  18. First-Year Students' Plans to Volunteer: An Examination of the Predictors of Community Service Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruce, Ty M.; Moore, John V.

    2007-01-01

    The impacts of community service participation on college student development are extensive and well documented. The characteristics of students that predict volunteerism, however, are not well understood. The purpose of this study is two-fold: first, to estimate the differences in first-year students' decision to volunteer while in college by…

  19. Perceived Social Support and Well Being: First-Year Student Experience in University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awang, Mohd Mahzan; Kutty, Faridah Mydin; Ahmad, Abdul Razaq

    2014-01-01

    The current study explored first-year student experience in receiving social support and its relation to their ability to adapt with university ethos. It also explored how social support on academic adjustment, social adjustment and emotional adjustment among students were significantly associated with student well-being. This qualitative research…

  20. First-Year University Science and Engineering Students' Understanding of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Shelley

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a case study of first-year science and engineering students' understandings of plagiarism. Students were surveyed for their views on scenarios illustrating instances of plagiarism in the context of the academic work and assessment of science and engineering students. The aim was to explore their understandings of plagiarism and their…

  1. Knowledge and Community: The Effect of a First-Year Seminar on Student Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittendrigh, Adele; Borkowski, John; Swinford, Steven; Plumb, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the effects of an academic seminar on the persistence of first-year college students, including effects on students most at risk of dropping out. A secondary interest was demonstrating the utility of using classification and regression tree analysis to identify relevant predictors of student persistence. The results of the…

  2. First-Year Students' Employment, Engagement, and Academic Achievement: Untangling the Relationship between Work and Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Gary R.; Kuh, George D.; Massa-McKinley, Ryan C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among first-year students' employment, engagement, and academic achievement using data from the 2004 National Survey of Student Engagement. A statistically significant negative relationship was found between working more than 20 hours per week and grades, even after controlling for students' characteristics…

  3. First-Year University Science and Engineering Students' Understanding of Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Shelley

    2007-01-01

    This paper is a case study of first-year science and engineering students' understandings of plagiarism. Students were surveyed for their views on scenarios illustrating instances of plagiarism in the context of the academic work and assessment of science and engineering students. The aim was to explore their understandings of plagiarism and their…

  4. An Exploratory Factor Analysis of the Cognitive Functioning of First-Year Bachelor Students with Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, Maaike; Tops, Wim; Stevens, Michaël; Brysbaert, Marc

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of students with dyslexia register in higher education. As a consequence, information on their pattern of strengths and weaknesses is essential to construct adequate assessment and diagnostic protocols. In a sample of 100 first-year bachelor students with dyslexia and 100 control students, a large pool of cognitive skills were…

  5. The Achievement Goals Orientation of South African First Year University Physics Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarain, Umesh Dewnarain; Ramaila, Sam

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the achievement goals orientation of first year physics students at a South African university. The mixed methods design involved a quantitative survey of 291 students using an achievement goals questionnaire and individual interviews of selected participants. Results showed that the students perceived they have a stronger…

  6. Using Facebook to Enhance Independent Student Engagement: A Case Study of First-Year Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Jeff C.

    2015-01-01

    A case study was conducted to assess the efficacy of online communication tools for enhancing independent student engagement in a first-year undergraduate class. Material relevant to course topics was shared with students through three communication platforms and data were extracted to measure student engagement. A questionnaire was also used to…

  7. Enquiry-Based Learning: Experiences of First Year Chemistry Students Learning Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Timothy; Rowley, Natalie M.

    2011-01-01

    We explored the experiences of first year chemistry students of an Enquiry-Based Learning (EBL) approach to learning spectroscopy. An investigation of how students' perceived confidences changed as a result of their experience of using EBL in the spectroscopy course was carried out. Changes in the students' perceived confidence, both in their…

  8. Knowledge or Feelings: First-Year Students' Perceptions of Graduate Teaching Assistants in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Monica F.; Zhu, Jiabin; Cekic, Osman; Chavela, Rocio; London, Jeremi

    2010-01-01

    In a first-year engineering course with an enrollment of approximately 1900 students per year, seventy-eight undergraduate engineering students' perceptions of their graduate teaching assistants were obtained using a modified Adjective Generation Technique. Based upon student feedback, researchers identified three themes of highest concern to the…

  9. Sexual Orientation and First-Year College Students' Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadick, Richard; Dagirmanjian, Faedra Backus; Trub, Leora; Dawson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine differences between heterosexual and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and questioning students' nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD). Participants: First-year university students between October 2009 and October 2013 who self-identified as heterosexual, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning. Methods: Students completed…

  10. Structured student-generated videos for first-year students at a dental school in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hanan; Khan, Saad A; Toh, Chooi G

    2013-05-01

    Student-generated videos provide an authentic learning experience for students, enhance motivation and engagement, improve communication skills, and improve collaborative learning skills. This article describes the development and implementation of a student-generated video activity as part of a knowledge, observation, simulation, and experience (KOSE) program at the School of Dentistry, International Medical University, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It also reports the students' perceptions of an activity that introduced first-year dental students (n=44) to clinical scenarios involving patients and dental team aiming to improve professional behavior and communication skills. The learning activity was divided into three phases: preparatory phase, video production phase, and video-watching. Students were organized into five groups and were instructed to generate videos addressing given clinical scenarios. Following the activity, students' perceptions were assessed with a questionnaire. The results showed that 86 percent and 88 percent, respectively, of the students agreed that preparation of the activity enhanced their understanding of the role of dentists in provision of health care and the role of enhanced teamwork. In addition, 86 percent and 75 percent, respectively, agreed that the activity improved their communication and project management skills. Overall, the dental students perceived that the student-generated video activity was a positive experience and enabled them to play the major role in driving their learning process.

  11. Student Communication and Study Habits of First-Year University Students in the Digital Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Echenique, Eliana; Bullen, Mark; Marqués-Molías, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research into the study habits of-university students, their use digital technologies and how they communicate with each other and their professors. We conclude that most students feel comfortable with digital technologies and that they use social media for connecting and interacting with friends rather than for academic…

  12. Peer to peer mentoring: Outcomes of third-year midwifery students mentoring first-year students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Rosemarie; Fox, Deborah; Barratt-See, Georgina

    2017-06-01

    Undergraduate midwifery students commonly experience anxiety in relation to their first clinical placement. A peer mentoring program for midwifery students was implemented in an urban Australian university. The participants were first-year mentee and third-year mentor students studying a three-year Bachelor degree in midwifery. The program offered peer support to first-year midwifery students who had little or no previous exposure to hospital clinical settings. Mentors received the opportunity to develop mentoring and leadership skills. The aim was to explore the benefits, if any, of a peer mentoring program for midwifery students. The peer mentoring program was implemented in 2012. Sixty-three peer mentors and 170 mentees participated over three academic years. Surveys were distributed at the end of each academic year. Quantitative survey data were analysed descriptively and qualitative survey data were analysed thematically using NVivo 10 software. Over 80% of mentors and mentees felt that the program helped mentees adjust to their midwifery clinical placement. At least 75% of mentors benefited, in developing their communication, mentoring and leadership skills. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data, including 'Receiving start-up advice'; 'Knowing she was there' and 'Wanting more face to face time'. There is a paucity of literature on midwifery student peer mentoring. The findings of this program demonstrate the value of peer support for mentees and adds knowledge about the mentor experience for undergraduate midwifery students. The peer mentor program was of benefit to the majority of midwifery students. Copyright © 2017 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fulfilling the Promise of the Community College: Increasing First-Year Student Engagement and Success. The First-Year Experience Monograph Series Number 56

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas, Ed.; King, Margaret C., Ed.; Stanley, Patricia, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    For the past three decades, American higher education has paid increasing attention to the beginning college experience--to ensuring that entering students make a successful transition to college. Yet, much of the extant research and practice literature focuses on the experience of first-year students entering four-year colleges and universities.…

  14. First Year English at The College of The Bahamas: Student Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Austin Oenbring

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The report presents the findings of a student exit survey of the largest first-year writing course at the College of the Bahamas, a study designed to measure students’ perception of learning in the course. To facilitate comparison, the survey instrument generally followed publicly-available survey studies of first-year composition students at other pots-secondary institutions. While exit survey suggests that students perceive the course as a whole to be beneficial for their development as academic writers, there is some evidence that students over-represented their learning in the class in their responses to the survey. Based on the data, the authors make several suggestions for improving student experience and outcomes in first-year writing courses at the College of the Bahamas.

  15. Are hookups replacing romantic relationships? A longitudinal study of first-year female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielder, Robyn L; Carey, Kate B; Carey, Michael P

    2013-05-01

    To assess the prevalence and frequency of sexual hookups across the first year of college and to compare rates of hookups and romantic relationship sex. We surveyed 483 first-year female college students (mean age, 18.1 years; range, 18-21 years, 64% white) monthly over the first year of college about the frequency of sexual behavior in the context of hookups and romantic relationships. The prevalence of hookups involving oral or vaginal sex was 34% before college and 40% during the first year, compared with 58% and 56%, respectively, with romantic partners. Fewer than one in five participants (7%-18%) had a sexual hookup each month, whereas 25%-38% had sex in the context of relationships each month. Hooking up varies in frequency over the first year in college, but remains less common than sex in the context of relationships. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The Identity of a "College Student": Perceptions of College Academics and Academic Rigor among First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michaela D. E.; Spencer, Megan; French, T. Nathaniel

    2009-01-01

    Researchers interested in post-secondary instruction often emphasize the importance of the first-year experience for college students. Despite this focus, qualitative studies of student perceptions are decidedly rare. This essay is a partial report of the findings from conducting qualitative interviews with first-year students about their…

  17. First-Year Students' Attitudes towards the Grand Challenges and Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Joni M.; Han, Yi; Davis, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The "Grand Challenges" for Engineering are an effort to portray engineering as a field that has profound impacts on society. This study explores the level of interest first-year engineering students had in various "Grand Challenges" and in nanotechnology topics. We administered a survey to a large sample of students enrolled in…

  18. First Year Medical Students' Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interest in Geriatric Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei-Hsin; Hoffman, Kimberly G.; Hosokawa, Michael C.; Gray, M. Peggy; Zweig, Steven C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an extracurricular geriatric program on medical students' knowledge of, and attitudes toward, the elderly and their interest in studying geriatric medicine. The participants were first-year medical students (n = 137) who joined the Senior Teacher Education Partnership (STEP) program that…

  19. First-Year College Students' Time Use: Relations With Self-Regulation and GPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeaux, Jordan; Deutsch, Aaron; Kitsantas, Anastasia; Winsler, Adam

    2017-01-01

    How students manage their time is critical for academic performance and is an important component of self-regulated learning. The purpose of the present study was to examine relationships among first-year college students' (N = 589) time use, academic self-regulation, and target and actual grade point average (GPA) at three time points. Findings…

  20. Measuring the Academic Self-Efficacy of First-Year Accounting Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Marann; Flood, Barbara; Griffin, Julie

    2014-01-01

    This study measured the levels of academic self-efficacy of first-year accounting students. It also investigated whether there were any gender differences and the extent to which efficacy levels explained variation in academic performance. Overall the analysis revealed that many students lacked the confidence to participate fully in the academic…

  1. The Impact of Different Parenting Styles on First-Year College Students' Adaptation to College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the impact of different parenting styles on college students' adaptation to college. During the second week of college, 80 first-year students from two-parent families completed the Tests of Reactions and Adaptations to College, English version and the Parental Authority Questionnaire. Authoritative…

  2. The Initial Conceptions for Earthquakes Phenomenon for Moroccan Students of the First Year Secondary College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddif, Aâtika; Touir, Rachid; Majdoubi, Hassan; Larhzil, Hayat; Mousaoui, Brahim; Ahmamou, Mhamed

    2015-01-01

    This work proposes initially to identify the initial conceptions of Moroccan students in the first year of secondary college about the notion of earthquakes. The used methodology is based on a questionnaire addressed to students of life science and Earth in Meknes city, before any official teaching about the said phenomenon. The obtained results…

  3. A Study of First-Year Chemistry Students' Understanding of Solution Concentration at the Tertiary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Berg, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on students' understanding of sugar concentration in aqueous solutions presented in two different modes: a visual submicroscopic mode for particles and a verbal mode referring to macroscopic amounts of sugar. One hundred and forty-five tertiary college students studying some form of first-year chemistry participated in the…

  4. Success in College Mathematics: Comparisons Between Remedial and Nonremedial First-Year College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Siadat, M. Vali; Fogel, Shereen F.; Pascarella, Ernest T.; Nora, Amaury

    1999-01-01

    A study using a path-analytic model compared first-year college students enrolled in remedial-type mathematics courses with counterparts enrolled in nonremedial coursework. Results revealed that students enrolled in nonremedial courses entered the institution with many advantages over those enrolled in remedial mathematics. Background variables…

  5. First-Year College Students' Time Use: Relations With Self-Regulation and GPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeaux, Jordan; Deutsch, Aaron; Kitsantas, Anastasia; Winsler, Adam

    2017-01-01

    How students manage their time is critical for academic performance and is an important component of self-regulated learning. The purpose of the present study was to examine relationships among first-year college students' (N = 589) time use, academic self-regulation, and target and actual grade point average (GPA) at three time points. Findings…

  6. Assessing the Scope and Feasibility of First-Year Students' Research Paper Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinto, Erin; Bowles-Terry, Melissa; Santos, Ariel J.

    2016-01-01

    This study applied a content analysis methodology in two ways to evaluate first-year students' research topics: a rubric to examine proposed topics in terms of scope, development, and the "researchability" of the topic, as well as textual analysis, using ATLAS.ti, to provide an overview of the types of subjects students select for a…

  7. Academic Advising Experiences of First-Year Undecided Students: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Kyle C.

    2014-01-01

    Often the frontline campus representatives who interact with undecided students, academic advisors receive the opportunity to offer academic support and guidance during the academic journey, which especially benefits first-year students trying to navigate this new and challenging endeavor. As a result of their unique position, advisors have the…

  8. Factors influencing alcohol and illicit drug use amongst first year medical students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popescu, Codruta Alina; Bob, Mihai Horatiu; Junjan, Veronica; Armean, Sebastian Mihai; Buzoianu, Anca Dana

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were a) to investigate patterns of alcohol, smoking and illicit drug use and b) evaluate the relationship between substance abuse and personality factors in a cohort of 267 first year medical students. 12.3 % (men) and 11.8% (female) medical students reported to be drinking

  9. Examining the Relationship between Faculty-Librarian Collaboration and First-Year Students' Information Literacy Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Veronica Arellano; Rabinowitz, Celia E.

    2016-01-01

    Using surveys, interviews, and a rubric-based assessment of student research essays, the St. Mary's College of Maryland Assessment in Action team investigated the relationship between faculty-librarian collaboration in a First Year Seminar (FYS) course and students' demonstrated information literacy (IL) abilities. In gathering information on the…

  10. "I Felt Like Such a Freshman": First-Year Students Crossing the Library Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula R.; Jagman, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative analysis of reflective essays by first-year students in an academic skills course documented outcomes related to the Association of College and Research Libraries Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Student narratives showed how novices encounter the clusters of concepts described in the Framework as…

  11. Beyond Books: The Extended Academic Benefits of Library Use for First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Fransen, Jan; Nackerud, Shane

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether there are relationships between first-year college students' use of academic libraries and four academic outcomes: academic engagement, engagement in scholarly activities, academic skills development, and grade point average. The results of regression analyses suggest students' use of books…

  12. Perceived Helpfulness of Peer Editing Activities: First-Year Students' Views and Writing Performance Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludemann, Pamela M.; McMakin, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    The perceived value of peer editing to students is unclear. To investigate, first-year students (N = 35) completed a writing attitudes scale and first writing assignment in September 2012. The expected writing requirements were explained and handouts provided, as well as subsequent instructor feedback and grades. A second writing assignment was…

  13. Applying Matched Sampling to Evaluate a University Tutoring Program for First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walvoord, Mark E.; Pleitz, Jacob D.

    2016-01-01

    Our study used a case-control matching design to assess the influence of a voluntary tutoring program in improving first-year students' Grade Point Averages (GPA). To evaluate program effectiveness, we applied case-control matching to obtain 215 pairs of students with or without participation in tutoring, but matched on high school GPA and…

  14. An exploratory factor analysis of the cognitive functioning of first-year bachelor students with dyslexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callens, Maaike; Tops, Wim; Stevens, Michael; Brysbaert, Marc

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of students with dyslexia register in higher education. As a consequence, information on their pattern of strengths and weaknesses is essential to construct adequate assessment and diagnostic protocols. In a sample of 100 first-year bachelor students with dyslexia and 100 contro

  15. Terror + 48 Hours: First-Year Students Respond to the Attack on America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidler, Peter G.

    2004-01-01

    Peter Beidler reflects in this essay upon his experiences with his first year students following the events of 9-11. When the class met, still numb with the horror of events, Beidler and his apprentice teacher devised a different kind of exercise for the class. Having taken fifteen minutes to talk about the attacks with students, the author passed…

  16. First-Year College Students' Experiences in the EFL Flipped Classroom: A Case Study in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zainuddin, Zamzami

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the first year college students' learning and experiences in an EFL flipped classroom at the State Islamic University of Ar-Raniry in Indonesia. 27 students who enrolled in English 2 course participated as samples of this study. The data were collected from diverse sources including questionnaire surveys, focus…

  17. An Interdisciplinary Guided Inquiry Laboratory for First Year Undergraduate Forensic Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Sarah L.; Loughlin, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    An effective guided inquiry forensic case study (a pharmacy break-in) is described for first-year students. Four robust introductory forensic chemistry and biology experiments are used to analyze potential drug samples and determine the identity of a possible suspect. Students perform presumptive tests for blood on a "point of entry…

  18. "I Felt Like Such a Freshman": First-Year Students Crossing the Library Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Paula R.; Jagman, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Qualitative analysis of reflective essays by first-year students in an academic skills course documented outcomes related to the Association of College and Research Libraries Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Student narratives showed how novices encounter the clusters of concepts described in the Framework as…

  19. First Year Experience Courses for Students in Developmental Education. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2016

    2016-01-01

    "First year experience courses for students in developmental education" are designed to ease the transition to college by providing academic and social development supports. Although course content and focus may vary, most are designed to introduce students to campus resources, provide training in time management and study skills, and…

  20. The Relationship between Living Arrangement, Academic Performance, and Engagement among First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, Denise Shata

    2013-01-01

    One way students become engaged in their undergraduate experience is through place of residence. Factors associated with high academic performance suggest high levels of engagement in campus life. This study investigated the relationship between living arrangement and the academic performance of first-year, full-time undergraduate students. The…

  1. Teaching Intercultural Awareness to First-Year Medical Students via Experiential Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Keith R.; Venable, Rhonda; Sieveking, Nicholas; Miller, Bonnie

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed the extent to which a one-time experiential intervention improved intercultural awareness and sensitivity among first-year medical students. The students participated in group activities in which they shared personal experiences, solved a hypothetical problem, and engaged in team building exercises. Post-intervention, students…

  2. The effect of the fit between secondary and university education on first-year student achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torenbeek, Marjolein; Jansen, Ellen; Hofman, Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    Central in this study is the role of student variables and the fit between secondary education and university education in the explanation of first-year student achievement. The fit between two levels of education can be defined in different ways. In this study the focus is on four fit-aspects: appr

  3. Online Lecture Recordings and Lecture Attendance: Investigating Student Preferences in a Large First Year Psychology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Alexandra; Raju, Sadhana; Sharma, Manjula D.

    2016-01-01

    While blended learning has been around for some time, the interplay between lecture recordings, lecture attendance and grades needs further examination particularly for large cohorts of over 1,000 students in 500 seat lecture theatres. This paper reports on such an investigation with a cohort of 1,450 first year psychology students' who indicated…

  4. Transitioning Transfer Students: Interactive Factors that Influence First-Year Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingchu; Williams, James E.; Vieweg, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the diverse patterns of interactive factors that influence transfer students' first-year retention at a midsize four-year university. The population for this study consisted of five cohorts totaling 1,713 full-time, degree-seeking transfer students. Sequential sets of logistic regression analyses on blocks of variables were…

  5. First-Year Biology Students' Understandings of Meiosis: An Investigation Using a Structural Theoretical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Frances; Pegg, John; Panizzon, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Meiosis is a biological concept that is both complex and important for students to learn. This study aims to explore first-year biology students' explanations of the process of meiosis, using an explicit theoretical framework provided by the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome (SOLO) model. The research was based on responses of 334…

  6. An Index to Measure the Ability of First Year Science Students to Transfer Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, A. L.; Sharma, M. D.; Britton, S.; New, P. B.

    2007-01-01

    This project aimed to quantitatively measure the ability of first year science students to transfer their mathematical skills and knowledge to a physical context. An instrument used in earlier studies to measure transfer of mathematical knowledge was modified for this project, and tested with 49 student volunteers. This paper presents the Transfer…

  7. (Un)Intended Consequences: The First-Year College Experience of Female Students with Dual Credits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobolowsky, Barbara F.; Allen, Taryn Ozuna

    2016-01-01

    Using Merton's (1957) anticipatory socialization theory, this qualitative study explored how participation in dual credit in high school helped introduce 12 female students to the academic and social aspects of college to ease their first-year transitions. These students, who entered one Texas university with between 15 and 78 dual credits,…

  8. Early Identification and Characterization of Students Who Drop out in the First Year at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, G. J. A.; Arnold, I. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    At Erasmus School of Economics about 40% of the students in the bachelor program Economics and Business drop out in the first academic year. We examined whether it is feasible (a) to identify on the basis of their participation and achievement in the first 2 (out of 10) examinations students who drop out in the first year, and (b) to characterize…

  9. Beyond Books: The Extended Academic Benefits of Library Use for First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Fransen, Jan; Nackerud, Shane

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether there are relationships between first-year college students' use of academic libraries and four academic outcomes: academic engagement, engagement in scholarly activities, academic skills development, and grade point average. The results of regression analyses suggest students' use of books…

  10. Physiology of adaptation of first-year students to studies at higher educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panikhina, A V

    2011-07-01

    Changes in anthropometric and hematological values and parameters of cardiovascular function indicated sufficiently effective adaptation of first-year students to studies at higher educational institutions. On the other hand, a certain strain of the physiological optimum caused by examination stress was found in the students.

  11. Developing Autonomous Learning in First Year University Students Using Perspectives from Positive Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaskill, Ann; Denovan, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Autonomous learning is a commonly occurring learning outcome from university study, and it is argued that students require confidence in their own abilities to achieve this. Using approaches from positive psychology, this study aimed to develop confidence in first-year university students to facilitate autonomous learning. Psychological character…

  12. An Interdisciplinary Guided Inquiry Laboratory for First Year Undergraduate Forensic Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Sarah L.; Loughlin, Wendy A.

    2015-01-01

    An effective guided inquiry forensic case study (a pharmacy break-in) is described for first-year students. Four robust introductory forensic chemistry and biology experiments are used to analyze potential drug samples and determine the identity of a possible suspect. Students perform presumptive tests for blood on a "point of entry…

  13. First-Year Biology Students' Understandings of Meiosis: An Investigation Using a Structural Theoretical Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Frances; Pegg, John; Panizzon, Debra

    2009-01-01

    Meiosis is a biological concept that is both complex and important for students to learn. This study aims to explore first-year biology students' explanations of the process of meiosis, using an explicit theoretical framework provided by the Structure of the Observed Learning Outcome (SOLO) model. The research was based on responses of 334…

  14. Two First-Year Students' Strategies for Writing from Sources: Patchwriting or Plagiarism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyan; Casanave, Christine Pearson

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report a case study of two first-year students at a university in Hong Kong doing the same writing assignment that required the use of sources. We explore the students' understanding of plagiarism, their strategies for composing, the similarity between their texts and source texts, and the lecturer's assessment of their work. The…

  15. Examining the Relationship between Faculty-Librarian Collaboration and First-Year Students' Information Literacy Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Veronica Arellano; Rabinowitz, Celia E.

    2016-01-01

    Using surveys, interviews, and a rubric-based assessment of student research essays, the St. Mary's College of Maryland Assessment in Action team investigated the relationship between faculty-librarian collaboration in a First Year Seminar (FYS) course and students' demonstrated information literacy (IL) abilities. In gathering information on the…

  16. Problematic Topics in First-Year Mathematics: Lecturer and Student Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Shé, Caitríona; Mac an Bhaird, Ciarán; Ní Fhloinn, Eabhnat; O'Shea, Ann

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we report on the outcomes of two surveys carried out in higher education institutions of Ireland; one of students attending first-year undergraduate non-specialist mathematics modules and another of their lecturers. The surveys aimed to identify the topics that these students found difficult, whether they had most difficulty with the…

  17. Practice Makes Perfect? University Students' Response to a First-Year Transition Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Catherine; Sheffield, Suzanne Le-May

    2008-01-01

    This paper shares new insights on the first-year university student transition experience. Our research focuses on students' practice of academic skills developed in a "Foundations for Learning" course, from their own perspective, after they completed the course. Once they had an opportunity to practice what they learned in subsequent…

  18. First-Year Students' Perspectives on Reasons for and Prevention of Their Own Alcohol Overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Two hundred twenty-six first-year students enrolled at a large, public Midwest university and deemed to require an emergency transport for a potential alcohol overdose completed a brief questionnaire on the student's perceptions of why the event occurred, what might have happened to prevent the overdose situation, and personal assessment of…

  19. Factors affecting student success in a first-year mathematics course: a South African experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizito, Rita; Munyakazi, Justin; Basuayi, Clement

    2016-01-01

    In spite of sustained efforts tertiary institutions implement to try and improve student academic performance, the number of students succeeding in first-year mathematics courses remains disturbingly low. For most students, the gap between their mathematical capability and the competencies they are expected and need to develop to function effectively in these courses persists even after course instruction. In this study, an instrument for identifying and examining factors affecting student performance and success in a first-year Mathematics university course was developed and administered to 86 students. The overall Cronbach's Alpha coefficient for the questionnaire was found to be 0.916. Having identified variables from prior research known to affect student performance, factor analysis was used to identify variables exhibiting the greatest impact on student performance. The variables included prior academic knowledge, workload, student approaches to learning, assessment, student support teaching quality, methods and resources. From the analysis, students' perceptions of their workload emerged as the factor having the greatest impact on student's performance, followed by the matriculation examination score. The findings are discussed and strategies that can be used to improve teaching and contribute to student success in a first-year mathematics course in a South African context are presented.

  20. Bridging the Gap: Understanding the Differing Research Expectations of First-Year Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meg Raven

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The project sought to understand the research expectations of first-year students upon beginning university study, and how they differed from the expectations of their professors, in order to provide more focused instruction and work moreeffectively with professors and student support services.Methods – A survey of 317 first-year undergraduate students and 75 professors at MountSaint Vincent University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, was conducted to determine what eachexpected of first-year student research. Students were surveyed on the first day of theterm in order to best understand their research expectations as they transitioned fromhigh school to university.Results – The gulf between student and professor research expectations was found to beconsiderable, especially in areas such as time required for reading and research and theresources necessary to do research. While students rated their preparedness foruniversity as high, they also had high expectations related to their ability to use nonacademicsources. The majority of professors believed that students are not prepared todo university-level research, do not take enough responsibility for their own learning,should use more academic research sources, and should read twice as much as studentsbelieve they should. Conclusions – By better understanding differing research expectations, students can beguided very early in their studies about appropriate academic research practices, andlibrarians and professors can provide students with improved research instruction.Strategies for working with students, professors, and the university community arediscussed.

  1. Teaching a sonographically guided invasive procedure to first-year medical students using a novel finger transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Brion; Corbett, Rebecca; Delamarter, Taylor

    2013-04-01

    The exposure to ultrasound technology in medicine is increasing at multiple training levels. Ultrasound transducers have evolved to provide higher-resolution imaging for more accurate structural identification, with few improvements in ease of use. This study investigated a novel finger ultrasound transducer used by first-year medical students conducting structural identification and practicing an invasive procedure. A literature search was conducted on texts, specialty journals, and websites regarding the anatomy of internal jugular and subclavian vein central line placement with sonographic guidance and the use of a finger transducer. First-year medical students performed timed sonographically guided cannulation on the internal jugular and subclavian veins on a phantom torso and identified the internal jugular and subclavian veins on a healthy volunteer using the finger transducer and a conventional transducer. After exposure to both transducers, a survey was taken regarding transducer preference. The literature search revealed no studies comparing finger and classic transducers or sonographically guided central line techniques being conducted by first-year medical students. The students identified and cannulated the internal jugular and subclavian veins using both transducers. Survey results revealed that 70% of the students preferred the finger transducer. This study showed that first-year medical students could interpret sonographic anatomy while conducting a clinical procedure. The finger transducer proved successful in structure identification and was preferred to the classic transducer because of its combined tactile presence. This pilot study of a novel finger transducer showed the benefits of combining palpatory skills with ultrasound technology in teaching first-year medical students to perform invasive procedures.

  2. [Predictors of success among first-year medical students at the University of Parakou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoukonou, Thierry; Tognon-Tchegnonsi, Francis; Mensah, Emile; Allodé, Alexandre; Adovoekpe, Jean-Marie; Gandaho, Prosper; Akpona, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Several factors including grades obtained in the Baccalaureate can influence academic performance of first year medical students. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between results achieved by students taking Baccalaureate exam and student academic success during the first year of medical school. We conducted an analytical study that included the whole number of students regularly enrolled in their first year of medical school at the university of Parakou in the academic year 2010-2011. Data for the scores for each academic discipline and distinction obtained in the Baccalaureate were collected. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression and multiple linear regression made it possible to determine the best predictors of success and grade point average obtained by students at the end of the year. SPSS Statistics 17.0 was used to analyse data and a p value p students regularly enrolled, we could exploit the data on 407 students. They were aged 15-31 years; 262 (64.4%) were male. 98 were enrolled with a success rate of 23.7%. Concerning men, the scores obtained in mathematics, in physical sciences, the grade point average obtained in the Baccalaureate and honors obtained in the Baccalaureate were associated with their success at the end of the year, but in multivariate analysis only a score in physical sciences > 15/20 was associated with success (OR: 2,8 [1,32-6,00]). Concerning the general average grade obtained at the end of the year, only an honor obtained in the Baccalaureate was associated (standard error of the correlation coefficient: 0,130 Beta =0,370 and p=0,00001). The best predictors of student academic success during the first year were a good grade point average in physical sciences during the Baccalaureate and an honor obtained in the Baccalaureate The inclusion of these elements in the enrollement of first-year students could improve academic performance.

  3. Understanding the influences on self-confidence among first-year undergraduate nursing students in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesser-Smyth, Patricia A; Long, Tony

    2013-01-01

    To report a mixed-methods study of the development of self-confidence in Irish nursing students undertaking the first year of an undergraduate nursing programme. Self-confidence underpins nurses' competence to carry out care effectively, yet there is little empirical evidence of how this attribute is fostered in pre-registration preparation. There is an assumption, however, that self-confidence develops independently and spontaneously. A sequential, mixed methods three-phase design was used. The design involved pretest and posttest measurements of self-confidence, focus group interviews, a student self-evaluation questionnaire and analysis of the relevant curriculum content. Data were collected between September 2007-April 2008 and sampling was from three cohorts of students at three different Institutes of Technology in Ireland. Data collection matched the nature of the data, including descriptive, non-inferential statistics and qualitative content analysis. There was considerable variation in the amount and nature of theoretical preparation. Factors in clinical practice exerted the most influence. Self-confidence fluctuated during the first clinical placement and as students' self-confidence developed, simultaneously, motivation towards academic achievement increased. Conversely, self-confidence was quickly eroded by poor preceptor attitudes, lack of communication, and feeling undervalued. The development of self-confidence is complex and multi-factorial. This study offers further understanding of facilitators and barriers that may be relevant elsewhere in promoting student nurses' developing self-confidence. The development of self-confidence must be recognized as a central tenet for the design and delivery of undergraduate programmes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Aspects of caring for dying patients which cause anxiety to first year student nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Jan; Barnett, Mandy

    2005-08-01

    To examine what aspects of caring for dying patients cause anxiety in student nurses during their first year of training. Qualitative descriptive study. A university in the UK delivering preregistration nurse education. A purposive sample of 38 student nurses who had just completed their first year of their programme consented to participate in the study. Data triangulation was employed, with data collected from students' reflective diaries and two focus group meetings. Eight themes emerged relating to students' anxiety about caring for dying patients: coping with the physical suffering of patients: what to do or say; the severing of the relationship with the patient; the type of death; cardiopulmonary resuscitation; last offices; coping mechanisms; and interventions that would improve the student experience. Findings from the study suggest that it is aspects of the caring role, rather than personal fear of death, that form the source of much of students' anxiety.

  5. Precollege Predictors of Incapacitated Rape Among Female Students in Their First Year of College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Kate B; Durney, Sarah E; Shepardson, Robyn L; Carey, Michael P

    2015-11-01

    The first year of college is an important transitional period for young adults; it is also a period associated with elevated risk of incapacitated rape (IR) for female students. The goal of this study was to identify prospective risk factors associated with experiencing attempted or completed IR during the first year of college. Using a prospective cohort design, we recruited 483 incoming first-year female students. Participants completed a baseline survey and three follow-up surveys over the next year. At baseline, we assessed precollege alcohol use, marijuana use, sexual behavior, and, for the subset of sexually experienced participants, sex-related alcohol expectancies. At the baseline and all follow-ups, we assessed sexual victimization. Approximately 1 in 6 women (18%) reported IR before entering college, and 15% reported IR during their first year of college. In bivariate analyses, precollege IR history, precollege heavy episodic drinking, number of precollege sexual partners, and sex-related alcohol expectancies (enhancement and disinhibition) predicted first-year IR. In multivariate analyses with the entire sample, only precollege IR (odds ratio = 4.98, p year. IR during the first year of college is independently associated with a history of IR and with expectancies about alcohol's enhancement of sexual experience. Alcohol expectancies are a modifiable risk factor that may be a promising target for prevention efforts.

  6. Reading competency of first-year undergraduate students at University of Botswana: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beauty B. Ntereke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to read and interpret textbooks and other assigned material is a critical component of success at university level. Therefore, the aims of this study are twofold: to evaluate the reading levels of first-year students when they first enter the university to determine how adequately prepared they are for university reading. It is also to find out if there will be any significant improvement after going through the academic literacy course offered to first-year students. The participants were 51 first-year undergraduate humanities students enrolled in the Communication and Academic Literacy course at the University of Botswana. The data were collected through a reading test adopted from Zulu which was administered at the beginning of the first semester. The same test was administered at the end of the semester after the students had gone through the academic literacy course to see if there was any difference in performance. The findings of this study indicate that there is a mixed and wide variation of students reading competency levels when students first enter the university and that a significant number of first-year entrants are inadequately prepared for university reading.

  7. The Understanding and Usage of Computer Among UniMAP's First Year Diploma Engineering Students

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Idrus, Syed Zulkarnain; Nordin, Norshahrizan

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Computer usage is vital especially in the new era of digital revolution. Users as young as kindergartens have been exposed to computers. Nevertheless, in primary and secondary schools, they are also utilising the computer systems and imparting knowledge and computer skills to their students. In UniMAP, the first year diploma students are all engineering students and can be considered as school leavers. Presumably, they might have some knowledge on computers regardless ...

  8. Do first-year university students understand the language of mathematics?

    OpenAIRE

    Sastre Vázquez, Patricia; D'Andrea, Rodolfo; Villacampa Esteve, Yolanda; Navarro González, Francisco José

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the project is to determine if the understanding of the language of Mathematics of students starting university is propitious to the development of an appropriate cognitive structure. The objective of this current work was to analyse the ability of first-year university students to translate the registers of verbal or written expressions and their representations to the registers of algebraic language. Results indicate that students do not understand the basic elements of the langu...

  9. ATTITUDE AND EMOTIONAL REACTIONS OF FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS TOWARDS CADAVER DISSECTION

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaraman; Bharathi Prabakaran; Ismail; Thirumalaikolundu Subramanian

    2014-01-01

    : INTRODUCTION: Cadaver dissection is mandatory for medical education. The cadaver dissection develops the knowledge and skill of the students regarding human anatomy to understand and fulfill the requirement of medical education. AIM: This study was conducted with objective of observing attitude and emotional reactions of first year Medical students to the dissecting cadavers. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The attitude and view of students on cadaver dissection was assessed by a ...

  10. Assessment of Research Interests of First-Year Osteopathic Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, John; McClellan, Nicholas; McFaul, Derek; Massey, Blaine; Guenther, Elisabeth; Kisby, Glen

    2016-07-01

    According to a 2014 survey, 59% of students entering allopathic medical school reported previous research experience. However, limited data exist on the amount of research experience that students have before entering osteopathic medical school. A strong understanding of the research skills and level of interest of first-year osteopathic medical students is essential for developing research programs at osteopathic medical schools. Limited data exist on the amount of research experience that students have before starting osteopathic medical school. A strong understanding of the research skills and level of interest of first-year medical students is essential for developing research programs at osteopathic medical schools. To determine the amount of previous research experience of first-year osteopathic medical students, their level of interest in participating in research during medical school, the factors influencing their interest in research, and their research fields of interest. First-year osteopathic medical students (class of 2019) at the Western University of Health Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific in Pomona, California (WesternU/COMP), and Pacific-Northwest in Lebanon, Oregon (WesternU/COMP-Northwest), campuses were surveyed about their previous research experiences and whether they were interested in participating in research during medical school. Surveys were administered through an anonymous online portal. Responses were evaluated for evidence of interest in conducting research. Of the 346 osteopathic medical students invited to participate in the study, the response rate was 77% (N=266). A total of 167 from WesternU/COMP and 99 from the WesternU/COMP-Northwest responded. More than 215 students (81%) reported they had participated in research before entering medical school. In addition, 200 students (75%) either expressed a strong interest in participating in research during medical school or were currently conducting research

  11. The effect of a cultural competence educational intervention for first-year nursing students in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Anita; Nuszen, Evelyn; Rom, Miriam; Noble, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention to increase general cultural competence of first-year nursing students. This was a quasi-experimental study that used a convenience sample with an experimental group and a control group and pre- and posttesting. The sample comprised 146 first-year nursing students enrolled in the Introduction to Nursing course divided into an intervention group (n = 58) of students from one school and a control group (n = 88) including students from two schools. The intervention group received a 2-hour faculty lecture on cultural competence, and students prepared and delivered a student group presentation about a cultural group in Israel, basing the presentation on Campinha-Bacote's five constructs. A demographic data instrument and Campinha-Bacote's Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Healthcare Professional-Revised© were used for pre- and posttesting. Students who received the educational intervention increased scores significantly (68 ± 6 to 73 ± 6, p = .000), students who did not receive the educational intervention had no significant increase (67 ± 6 to 66 ± 6). Introducing the topic of cultural competence for nursing students in the first-year Introduction to Nursing course as an integrative learning strategy revealed significant increases in cultural competence scores. Recommendations are to include evidence-based cultural competence teaching strategies into the nursing curriculum.

  12. Academic achievement in first-year Portuguese college students: the role of academic preparation and learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Paula; Guisande, Adelina M; Almeida, Leandro S; Páramo, Fernanda M

    2009-06-01

    This paper analyses the role of academic preparation and learning strategies in the prediction of first-year Portuguese college students' academic achievement, considering students' sex and academic field attended. A sample of 445 first-year college students (68.5% female) from the University of Minho (25.8% enrolled in economics, 35.3% in science/technology, and 38.9% in humanities degrees) participated in the study. Students answered a questionnaire on learning strategies in the classroom at the end of the first semester, which consisted of 44 items organized in five dimensions: comprehensive approach, surface approach, personal competency perceptions, intrinsic motivation, and organization of study activities. Academic achievement (grade point average at the end of first year) and academic preparation (students' higher education access mark) were obtained through the academic records of the university. Results showed that academic preparation was the strongest predictor of first-year academic achievement, and only marginal additional variance was explained by learning strategies as assessed by the self-reported questionnaire. There were sex and academic field differences, but these variables do not seem strong enough to affect the results, although the different percentages of variance captured by each model and the different weights associated to higher education access mark, stimulate the use of these and/or other personal and contextual variables when analysing the phenomenon.

  13. Ready for College: Assessing the Influence of Student Engagement on Student Academic Motivation in a First-Year Experience Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Keyana Chamere

    2013-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Summer Academy (VTSA) Program, developed by through a collaborative partnership between faculty, administrators and staff concerned by attrition among first year students, was introduced in summer 2012 as a campus initiative to assist first-year college students transition and acclimate to the academic and social systems of the…

  14. A phenomenographic study of students' experiences with transition from pre-college engineering programs to first-year engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, Noah

    Recent national dialogues on the importance of preparing more students for careers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics has driven the development of formal and informal learning opportunities for children and adolescents to explore engineering. Despite the growth of these programs, relatively little research exists on how participation in these programs affects students who choose to pursue further study in engineering. The present study addressed this gap through an exploration of the different ways that First-Year Engineering students experience the transition from pre-college engineering to undergraduate engineering studies. Given the focus of this research on students' experiences, phenomenography was chosen to explore the phenomenon of transition from pre-college to first-year engineering at a large, public Midwestern university. This facilitated understanding the range of variation in the ways that students experienced this transition. Twenty-two students with different amounts of participation in a variety of different engineering programs were selected to be interviewed using a purposeful maximum variation sampling strategy. The interviews were guided by a semi-structured interview protocol that encouraged the participants to reflect on their pre-college engineering experiences, their experiences in First-Year Engineering, and the transition between the two domains. The interviews were analyzed using phenomenographic methods to develop an outcome space consisting of five qualitatively different but related ways of experiencing the transition from pre-college to First-Year Engineering. These categories of description included Foreclosure, Frustration, Tedium, Connection, and Engaging Others. With the exception of the first category which was characterized by a lack of passion and commitment to engineering, the remaining four categories formed a hierarchical relationship representing increasing integration in First-Year Engineering. The

  15. Who wants to be a surgeon? A study of 300 first year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellis Harold

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While medicine in general is becoming more female-dominated, women are still under-represented in surgery. Opinion is divided as to whether this is due to lifestyle considerations, disinterest or perceived discrimination. It is not clear at what stage these careers decisions are made. Methods 300 first year medical students at Guy's King's and St Thomas' School of Medicine (GKT were asked their view on possible career choices at this stage. Results While men represented only 38% of the student population, they represented over two-thirds of the students wishing to pursue a career in surgery. Women still opt for general practice and paediatrics. Conclusion Surgery is a disproportionately unpopular career choice of the female first-year medical students of GKT compared to the male students. It appears that the choice is freely made and, at this stage at least, does not represent concerns about compatibility with lifestyle.

  16. The relationship between academic performance and recreation use among first-year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Slade

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Self-care activities, including exercise, may be neglected by medical students in response to increasing academic demands. Low levels of exercise among medical students may have ripple effects on patient care and counseling. This study investigates the reciprocal role of recreation use and academic performance among first-year medical students. Methods: We combined retrospective administrative data from four cohorts of first-year medical students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 2006 to 2010 (n=408. We estimated regression models to clarify the role of changes in recreation use before examinations on changes in academic performance, and vice versa. Results: The use of recreation facilities by first-year medical students was highly skewed. We found that changes in recreation use before an exam were positively associated with changes in exam performance, and vice versa. Students who make large decreases in their recreation use are likely to decrease their exam scores, rather than increase them. Discussion: Students who make decreases in their recreation, on average, are likely to decrease their exam scores. These findings suggest that medical students may be able to boost their achievement through wellness interventions, even if they are struggling with exams. We find no evidence that decreasing wellness activities will help improve exam performance.

  17. The relationship between academic performance and recreation use among first-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Alexander N; Kies, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Self-care activities, including exercise, may be neglected by medical students in response to increasing academic demands. Low levels of exercise among medical students may have ripple effects on patient care and counseling. This study investigates the reciprocal role of recreation use and academic performance among first-year medical students. We combined retrospective administrative data from four cohorts of first-year medical students at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 2006 to 2010 (n=408). We estimated regression models to clarify the role of changes in recreation use before examinations on changes in academic performance, and vice versa. The use of recreation facilities by first-year medical students was highly skewed. We found that changes in recreation use before an exam were positively associated with changes in exam performance, and vice versa. Students who make large decreases in their recreation use are likely to decrease their exam scores, rather than increase them. Students who make decreases in their recreation, on average, are likely to decrease their exam scores. These findings suggest that medical students may be able to boost their achievement through wellness interventions, even if they are struggling with exams. We find no evidence that decreasing wellness activities will help improve exam performance.

  18. Factors Negatively Affecting University Adjustment from the Views of First-Year University Students: The Case of Mersin University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevinç, Seda; Gizir, Cem Ali

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative case study aims to investigate the most common factors that negatively affect adjustment to university and coping strategies used by first-year university students in the adaptation process from the viewpoint of first-year university students. The participants were 25 first-year university students from various faculties at Mersin…

  19. First year medical students' attitude toward anatomical corpse dissection and its relationship with their personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bob, Mihai HoraŢiu; Popescu, CodruŢa Alina; Suciu, ŞoimiŢa Mihaela; Buzoianu, Anca Dana

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy is an important and intense mandatory course offered during the first year of medical school. Corpse dissection is very important in Anatomy teaching, and first year students will encounter, most likely for the first time, a dead human body during Anatomy labs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anxiety experienced by medical students with no previous corpse dissection background just before, after a week, and then after a month of dissection labs, and to investigate the relationship between students' personality and their attitude towards dissection. 138 first year English Section medical students from the "Iuliu Hatieganu" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, completed a personality inventory, an anxiety scale and a questionnaire to assess their attitudes and reactions to anatomical dissection. The level of anxiety reported by students increased from before the first dissection encounter to after one month of dissection labs. There is a relationship between the Five Factor model of personality and students' attitudes towards dissection. Medical students could be better prepared for their first corpse dissection experience if the preparation before dissection would take in consideration their psychological traits.

  20. Designing a model to improve first year student adjustment to university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Nikfal Azar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The increase in the number of universities for the last decade in Iran increases the need for higher education institutions to manage their enrollment, more effectively. The purpose of this study is to design a model to improve the first year university student adjustment by examining the effects of academic self-efficacy, academic motivation, satisfaction, high school GPA and demographic variables on student’s adjustment to university. The study selects a sample of 357 students out of 4585 bachelor first year student who were enrolled in different programs. Three questionnaires were used for collection of data for this study, namely academic self-efficacy, academic motivation and student satisfaction with university. Structural equation modeling was employed using AMOS version7.16 to test the adequacy of the hypothesized model. Inclusion of additional relationship in the initial model improved the goodness indices considerably. The results suggest that academic self-efficacy were related positively to adjustment, both directly (B=0.35 and indirectly through student satisfaction (B=0.14 and academic motivation (B=0.9. The results indicate a need to develop programs that effectively promote the self-efficacy of first year student of student to increase college adjustment and consequently retention rate.

  1. First-Year Engineering Students' Views of the Nature of Engineering: Implications for Engineering Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatas, F. Ö.; Bodner, G. M.; Unal, Suat

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted on the views of the nature of engineering held by 114 first-year engineering majors; the study built on prior work on views of the nature of science held by students, their instructors, and the general public. Open-coding analysis of responses to a 12-item questionnaire suggested that the participants held tacit beliefs that…

  2. Financial Socialization of First-Year College Students: The Roles of Parents, Work, and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Soyeon; Barber, Bonnie L.; Card, Noel A.; Xiao, Jing Jian; Serido, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    This cross-sectional study tests a conceptual financial socialization process model, specifying four-levels that connect anticipatory socialization during adolescence to young adults' current financial learning, to their financial attitudes, and to their financial behavior. A total of 2,098 first-year college students (61.9% females) participated…

  3. Valsalva ratio: a measure of stress in first year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamshad Begum Abdul Razak Loni

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that VR is affected by the academic stress in the first year medical students and that among them females are more affected which may be due to the new environment and new protocol of the education system. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1599-1604

  4. Evidence for the Impact of Assessment on Mood and Motivation in First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Rosanne; Gilleard, Wendy; Baglin, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Learning, and particularly assessment practices, that encourages a self-determined approach enhances feelings of well-being and achievement motivation. Students (n = 137) in a common first-year unit were the participants for an evaluation of the impact of assessment. The Intrinsic Motivation Inventory and the Brunel Mood Scale were used to assess…

  5. Cause-Effect Analysis: Improvement of a First Year Engineering Students' Calculus Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoff, Quay; Harding, Ansie

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the mathematics department at a South African university and in particular on teaching of calculus to first year engineering students. The paper reports on a cause-effect analysis, often used for business improvement. The cause-effect analysis indicates that there are many factors that impact on secondary school teaching of…

  6. Predicting First-Year Student Success in Learning Communities: The Power of Pre-College Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperry, Rita A.

    2015-01-01

    The study used pre-college variables in the prediction of retention and probation status of first-year students in learning communities at a regional public university in South Texas. The correlational study employed multivariate analyses on data collected from the campus registrar about three consecutive cohorts (N = 4,215) of first-year…

  7. First-Year Student Perceptions Related to Leadership Awareness and Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehane, Melissa R.; Sturtevant, Kathryn A.; Moore, Lori L.; Dooley, Kim E.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to explore first-year college student perceptions related to when they first became aware of leadership and perceived influences on leadership. The study was rooted in the Leadership Identity Development Model (Komives, Owen, Longerbeam, Mainella, & Osteen, 2005). Five purposively selected individuals completing the first…

  8. Early Tracking or Finally Leaving? Determinants of Early Study Success in First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Jasperina; Jansen, Ellen; Hofman, Adriaan; Flache, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Two theoretical approaches underlie this investigation of the determinants of early study success among first-year university students. Specifically, to extend Walberg's educational productivity model, this study draws on the expectancy-value theory of achievement motivation in a contemporary university context. The survey data came from 407…

  9. Mathematics and Natural Science Students' Motivational Profiles and their First-year Academic Achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon; Vermue, Carlien; Deinum, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Our study focused on describing first-year university students’ motivational profiles and their achievement. 755 students in the faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences participated in the study. Data on academic motivation was collected before the start of the program, data on achievement at

  10. Cause-Effect Analysis: Improvement of a First Year Engineering Students' Calculus Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hoff, Quay; Harding, Ansie

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the mathematics department at a South African university and in particular on teaching of calculus to first year engineering students. The paper reports on a cause-effect analysis, often used for business improvement. The cause-effect analysis indicates that there are many factors that impact on secondary school teaching of…

  11. Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Counseling Attitudes among First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirpak, David M.; Schlosser, Lewis Z.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between a set of self-efficacy variables and a set of variables assessing attitudes toward counseling. Results revealed a significant relationship between self-efficacy and attitudes toward counseling among a sample of 253 first-year college students. Low perceptions of self-efficacy were…

  12. Tutorials for Enhancing Skills Development in First Year Students Taking Biological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Nicola J.; Barker, Martin; Dennis, Catherine; Dalrymple, Sarah; McPherson, Lindsay R.

    2012-01-01

    In order to increase engagement and to consolidate skills, a tutorial-based skills course (module) was introduced as a compulsory component of first-year in the School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen. We evaluated whether students had attained certain "graduate attributes" during the course, comprising: transferable and…

  13. Balancing Risk? First Year Performing Arts Students' Experience of a Community Arts Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hains-Wesson, Rachael; Campbell, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This study examines participants' responses to first year students' street performances as a non-placement work-integrated learning (WIL) activity over a two year period. The purpose of the study was to determine: (1) community perception, (2) continuous improvement, and (3) future needs. Data was collected through surveying…

  14. What about the "Google Effect"? Improving the Library Research Habits of First-Year Composition Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a consideration of how students' existing information-seeking behaviors affect traditional methods of teaching library research in first-year writing courses and offers an alternative method that uses both library and popular Internet search tools. It addresses one aspect of the ongoing pedagogical struggle with new…

  15. Mathematics and Natural Science Students' Motivational Profiles and their First-year Academic Achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon; Vermue, Carlien; Deinum, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Our study focused on describing first-year university students’ motivational profiles and their achievement. 755 students in the faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences participated in the study. Data on academic motivation was collected before the start of the program, data on achievement at th

  16. Impact of a Preventive Cardiology Curriculum on Knowledge and Attitudes of First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitia, Marie C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study of 54 first-year Marshall University (West Virginia) medical students found that a preventive cardiology curriculum improved both knowledge of and attitudes about preventive cardiology in general and on all 4 subscales (epidemiological evidence, risk factor characteristics, pathophysiology, primary interventions). (Author/MSE)

  17. Stress-Reducing Brain Exercises: A Psychoeducational Workshop for First-Year Postsecondary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The intent of the following project is to highlight information about the stress response, resilience, and executive function development and to apply it to first-year postsecondary student populations in a workshop format. The first part of the project presents three comprehensive literature reviews of academic research available on these…

  18. Student Failure in First Year Modules in the Biosciences: An Interview Based Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Jon; Graal, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate retention is a major concern for universities and first year failure is a significant contributor to the overall statistics for non-progression. This report describes an interview-based investigation of students' perceptions for the reasons underlying their failure in 1st and 2nd semester modules. The most commonly cited reasons were…

  19. Principles for Assessing Student Engagement in the First Year of College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, John; Kuh, George

    2004-01-01

    While most institutions know how many of their faculty members have terminal degrees and the number of books in the library, too few have reliable information about the frequency with which first-year students discuss ideas with faculty members outside class, how much time they spend on academic activities, or how often they interact with students…

  20. Personal Growth, Habits and Understanding: Pleasure Reading Among First-Year University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Parlette

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – This study examines the reading habits and experiences of first-year undergraduate students at Dalhousie University and the University of King’s College in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.Methods – First-year undergraduate university students (aged 18 to 20 were recruited to take part in focus group discussions and responses were analysed to examine the following topics: (1 the role of reading in their lives, both academic and personal; (2 the development of reading habits from childhood; (3 reading engagement strategies; and (4 selection strategies.Results – This study suggests that reading for pleasure is a well-established habit amongst many first-year undergraduate students. First-year undergraduates primarily read for pleasure in order to relax but also recognize that pleasure reading can play a positive role in their academic performance, enhancing their range of background knowledge as well as their active vocabulary.Conclusions – The conclusions of this research provide recommendations for librarians and university administration to engage students and increase rates of retention in postsecondary institutions. In particular, recommendations related to the importance of pleasure reading collections, campus reading programs, book clubs, readers’ advisory services and quiet and comfortable reading areas in academic libraries are provided.

  1. Creating First-Year Assessment Support: Lecturer Perspectives and Student Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dargusch, Joanne; Harris, Lois R.; Reid-Searl, Kerry; Taylor, Benjamin A.

    2017-01-01

    While online courses provide opportunities for a range of assessment tools and resources, little is known about how lecturers might best provide assessment cues to support diverse cohorts. This study explored how lecturers communicate messages about assessment expectations to first-year students in two courses at an Australian regional university…

  2. Some of the problems in first year students' academic writing in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some of the problems in first year students' academic writing in some SADC ... Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives ... writing in some Southern African Development Community (SADC) universities. ... The forms or varieties are simply mistakes or errors which can be eradicated by teaching.

  3. Tutorials for Enhancing Skills Development in First Year Students Taking Biological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, Nicola J.; Barker, Martin; Dennis, Catherine; Dalrymple, Sarah; McPherson, Lindsay R.

    2012-01-01

    In order to increase engagement and to consolidate skills, a tutorial-based skills course (module) was introduced as a compulsory component of first-year in the School of Biological Sciences, University of Aberdeen. We evaluated whether students had attained certain "graduate attributes" during the course, comprising: transferable and generic…

  4. Balancing Risk? First Year Performing Arts Students' Experience of a Community Arts Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hains-Wesson, Rachael; Campbell, Angela

    2014-01-01

    This study examines participants' responses to first year students' street performances as a non-placement work-integrated learning (WIL) activity over a two year period. The purpose of the study was to determine: (1) community perception, (2) continuous improvement, and (3) future needs. Data was collected through surveying participants'…

  5. Exploring Lecturers' Views of First-Year Health Science Students' Misconceptions in Biomedical Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhorst, Elmi; Mamede, Sílvia; Hartman, Nadia; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2015-01-01

    Research has indicated that misconceptions hamper the process of knowledge construction. Misconceptions are defined as persistent ideas not supported by current scientific views. Few studies have explored how misconceptions develop when first year health students conceptually move between anatomy and physiology to construct coherent knowledge…

  6. Exploring Lecturers' Views of First-Year Health Science Students' Misconceptions in Biomedical Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhorst, Elmi; Mamede, Sílvia; Hartman, Nadia; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2015-01-01

    Research has indicated that misconceptions hamper the process of knowledge construction. Misconceptions are defined as persistent ideas not supported by current scientific views. Few studies have explored how misconceptions develop when first year health students conceptually move between anatomy and physiology to construct coherent knowledge…

  7. Facilitating the development of agency in first-year students. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem van Schoor

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Open distance learning (ODL requires students to take control of their study processes from the beginning in order to achieve study success. To achieve control, first-year students have to understand what agency requires of them and they have to know what to do to exercise agency. An online program was  developed at the University of South Africa (Unisa to facilitate the development of agency in first-year students and a pilot program was conducted with a group of students who had failed an Economics I course to test the program. The data indicated that time management in a variety of contexts was the major debilitating factor for participants. Feedback from the users indicated that they were generally positive about the program structure and contents, as well as their experience in using it. 

  8. Making sense of how I learn: Metacognitive capital and the first year university student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Larmar

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available 0 0 1 106 608 Griffith University 5 1 713 14.0 Normal 0 false false false EN-AU JA X-NONE The retention and engagement of students entering universities globally has been a significant priority area in higher education over the last decade in alignment with a widening participation agenda.  Research focusing on the successful transition of first year students has been widespread and contributed to the current body of knowledge focusing on best practices in engaging first year students. This paper focuses on a factor of significant and growing importance in this context: critical thinking. We argue that students who are not equipped with sufficient metacognitive capital when entering university are at increased risk of attrition.  Further, we suggest some possible avenues for intervention.

  9. Factors influencing the choice of profession of first-year teaching students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hislop-Esterhuizen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The lack of appropriately qualified teachers in South Africa is growing rapidly and debates about the decline in teacher numbers in South Africa are increasing. In this study, the results of an investigation into possible factors that impact on the career choice of teaching students are reported. The reasons why first-year teaching students at the University of Pretoria chose teachings a career were studied by using a non-experimental design (survey design; administering anon-standardised questionnaire. The results revealed, inter alia, that a number of factors influence the career choice of first-year teaching students. Trends that emerged from the current study include the following: many more women than men enter the teaching profession; relatively few African language speaking students choose education as a field of study and the role of parents in helping their children to choose a career cannot be underestimated. 

  10. Partnerships for success: A collaborative support model to enhance the first year student experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Einfalt

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent discourse about engaging first year students calls for more collaboration in terms of adopting a holistic approach to course delivery and support. This paper discusses a collaborative support model operating at a regional Australian university since 2008. In particular, it describes a collaborative support initiative emerging from this model that is based on providing an informal consultative space where students can drop-in and gain assessment support for research, writing and content. A focus group, online surveys and interviews with co-ordinators were conducted to evaluate the impact of this initiative. Findings suggest that this collaborative support model impacts on the first year student experience by: raising awareness about academic skills and the processes for researching and writing; promoting peer learning opportunities; building confidence and providing suitable support for a diverse range of students.

  11. Stress and dietary behaviour among first-year university students in Australia: sex differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papier, Keren; Ahmed, Faruk; Lee, Patricia; Wiseman, Juliet

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between stress and food selection patterns by sex among first-year undergraduate students studying in an Australian university. Participating in this cross-sectional study were 728 (331 men and 397 female students) first-year students, ages >18 y, attending the Gold Coast Campus of Griffith University. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire consisting of three sections: sociodemographic information, stress measures, and a 7-d food frequency questionnaire. More than half (52.9%) of the participants were found to suffer from some level of stress, with relatively more female students (57.4%) suffering than men (47.4%). Men who experienced mild to moderate levels of stress were two to three times more likely to eat cereal foods (P students. However, they were less likely to consume vegetables and fruit (P students who experienced mild to moderate stress were 2.22 times more likely to eat processed food (P students. Female students who experienced severe stress were less likely to consume meat alternatives (P students, with stress being a more significant predictor of unhealthy food selection among male students. Further research is needed using a qualitative approach to understand how stress and eating behavior are related in university students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A Study on the Vocabulary Size of First-Year College Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董丽莉

    2016-01-01

    Vocabulary, as the information carrier, plays an indispensable role of language. Likely, vocabulary learning is a signifi-cant part in English learning, so vocabulary acquisition becomes one of the hottest SLA research fields. This study tests the vo-cabulary size of 61 first-year students in Jiangsu Maritime Institute by applying the adjusted Nation's Vocabulary Level Test (VLT), laying basis for further researches and studies on vocabulary acquisition and development of those students.

  13. A Learning styles of first year medical students studying physiology in Tamil Nadu.

    OpenAIRE

    Suzanne Maria D’cruz, Navin Rajaratnam, Chandrasekhar M

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the diversity of learning style preferences of first year medical students will help teachers of Physiology design teaching-learning activities that while catering to their preferences also challenge them to grow in categories that are against their preferences. Most research using the VARK (Visual, Aural, Read-write, Kinesthetic) questionnaire that assesses sensory modality preference alone showed that medical students studying Physiology were multimodal. Aim: The aim of this s...

  14. First-year dental students' motivation and attitudes for choosing the dental profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramova, Nadya; Yaneva, Krassimira; Bonev, Boyko

    2014-01-01

    To determine first-year dental students' current motivation and attitudes for choosing the dental profession at the Faculty of Dental Medicine, Medical University - Sofia, Bulgaria. An anonymous questionnaire, consisting of 12 questions about students' socio-demographic profile and their motivation for choosing dentistry, was administered to 119 first-year dental students at the Faculty of Dental Medicine of the Medical University of Sofia. The study was conducted at the beginning of the 2012-2013 academic year. The data was processed and analyzed with the following software: Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2; Microsoft SQL Server 2008; Internet Information Server 7.5.; Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010. The majority of the students (73%) were self-motivated for choosing dentistry as a career; 61% of them did not have relatives in the medical profession; 43% chose dental medicine because it is a prestigious, humane and noble profession; 50% - for financial security; 59% - because of the independence that it provides. There were no significant differences in the motivation between males and females. Independence, financial security and 'prestige' were the predominant motivating factors in this group of first-year dental students. Determining the reasons for choosing dentistry has important implications for the selection and training of students as well as for their future job satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 by Academy of Sciences and Arts of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

  15. A participative evaluation model to refine academic support for first year Indigenous higher education students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronwyn Rossingh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an evaluative approach designed to provide a cycle of continuous improvement to retain Indigenous students during their first year of higher education.   The evaluation model operates in conjunction with a student academic enrichment program that is premised on valuing and respecting each student's background and life experience whilst building capability for learning success.  Data collected will be used for continual improvement of a newly developed innovative academic enrichment program that caters to the needs of Indigenous students.  The defining mechanisms of the model for measuring the first year experience are particularly meaningful for the Australian Centre For Indigenous Knowledges and Education as it moves into its inaugural year of operation in 2012. This preeminent time requires a flexible model to receive timely feedback in a reflexive environment where students guide the process as they continue their journey of accumulating knowledge and leave behind their contribution in shaping the landscape for future first year Indigenous students.  

  16. Engaging first-year students in meaningful library research a practical guide for teaching faculty

    CERN Document Server

    Flaspohler, Molly

    2011-01-01

    Aimed at teaching professionals working with first-year students at institutions of higher learning, this book provides practical advice and specific strategies for integrating contemporary information literacy competencies into courses intended for novice researchers. The book has two main goals - to discuss the necessity and value of incorporating information literacy into first-year curricula; and to provide a variety of practical, targeted strategies for doing so. The author will introduce and encourage teaching that follows a process-driven, constructivist framework as a way of engaging f

  17. Does gender influence learning style preferences of first-year medical students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Jill A; Lujan, Heidi L; DiCarlo, Stephen E

    2007-12-01

    Students have specific learning style preferences, and these preferences may be different between male and female students. Understanding a student's learning style preference is an important consideration when designing classroom instruction. Therefore, we administered the visual, auditory, reading/writing, kinesthetic (VARK) learning preferences questionnaire to our first-year medical students; 38.8% (97 of 250 students) of the students returned the completed questionnaire. Both male (56.1%) and female (56.7%) students preferred multiple modes of information presentation, and the numbers and types of modality combinations were not significantly different between genders. Although not significantly different, the female student population tended to be more diverse than the male population, encompassing a broader range of sensory modality combinations within their preference profiles. Instructors need to be cognizant of these differences and broaden their range of presentation styles accordingly.

  18. Acquisition and Long-term Retention of Bedside Ultrasound Skills in First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Peter; Oleskevich, Sharon; Lewis, John

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess bedside ultrasound skill acquisition and retention in medical students after completion of the first year of a new undergraduate bedside ultrasound curriculum at McGill University. Skill acquisition was assessed in first-year medical students (n = 195) on completion of their bedside ultrasound instruction. Instruction included 6 clinically based 60-minute practical teaching sessions evenly spaced throughout the academic year. Students' ability to meet course objectives was measured according to a 4-point Likert rating scale. Evaluations were performed by both instructors and the students themselves. Retention of skill acquisition was evaluated 8 months later on a year-end practical examination. The mean percentage ± SD of students assigned a rating of "strongly agree" or "agree" by instructors was 98% ± 0.4% for all 6 teaching sessions (strongly agree, 52% ± 3%; agree, 46% ± 3%). According to student self-evaluations, the mean percentage of students assigned a rating of strongly agree was significantly greater than the percentage assigned by instructors for all teaching sessions (86% ± 2% versus 52% ± 3%; P year-end examination showed that 91% ± 2% of students were assigned a rating of strongly agree or agree for their ability to demonstrate skills learned 8 months previously. Ninety-five percent of students reported that bedside ultrasound improved their understanding of anatomy for all 6 teaching sessions (mean, 95% ± 0.01%). These results demonstrate that first-year medical students show acquisition and long-term retention of basic ultrasound skills on completion of newly implemented bedside ultrasound instruction.

  19. ON HEALTH PROTECTION AND HEALTH RELATED PHYSICAL CULTURE TRAININGS OF FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Fotynyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to assess health protection and health related physical culture trainings of first year students. Material: in the research first year students (n=121; 86 boys and 35girls of age 16 - 19 years, participated. Results: components of students’ individual health were found. Situation with health related physical culture trainings, ensuring students’ sound health and optimal functional potentials of their organisms were determined. It was found that leading role shall be played by formation of health world vision values, knowledge about formation of practical skills in healthy life style. Motivation tendency for realization of intentions and practicing of health related physical culture trainings were found in students. Conclusions: the received results prove students’ tendency to pay insufficient attention to individual health. It was found that health related physical culture trainings require modern renewal of education’s content, forms and methods of physical education. The basis of such trainings shall be health related orientation.

  20. Figures and First Years: An Analysis of Calculus Students' Use of Figures in Technical Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan J. Antonacci

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This three-year study focused on first-year Calculus I students and their abilities to incorporate figures in technical reports. In each year, these calculus students wrote a technical report as part of the Polar Bear Module, an educational unit developed for use in partner courses in biology, computer science, mathematics, and physics as part of the Multidisciplinary Sustainability Education (MSE project at Ithaca College. In the first year of the project, students received basic technical report guidelines. In year two, the report guidelines changed to include explicit language on how to incorporate figures. In year three, a grading rubric was added to the materials provided to one of the two classes. In all three years, the students performed below expectations in their use of graphs in their reports. Reviews of the figures in the 78 technical reports written by the 106 students showed repeated deficiencies in the figures and how the students used them in the discussion sections and in evidence-based arguments. In year three the student’s quantitative literacy (QL skills were assessed using an extract from a QL assessment instrument published in Numeracy. The results indicated that the students could both read and interpret figures, suggesting that issues with QL were not the main contributor to student difficulty with written discussion about graphs. The study underscores the need that explicit instructional attention be given to developing student knowhow in the use of figures in technical reports.

  1. Sexual orientation and first-year college students' nonmedical use of prescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadick, Richard; Dagirmanjian, Faedra Backus; Trub, Leora; Dawson, Heather

    2016-01-01

    To examine differences between heterosexual and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and questioning students' nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD). First-year university students between October 2009 and October 2013 who self-identified as heterosexual, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning. Students completed questionnaires on demographic variables and NMUPD. Any NMUPD was examined, as were stimulants, anxiolytics, and painkillers. Hierarchical regression was used to examine differential NMUPD based on sexual orientation, gender, and race. For any NMUPD and painkillers, bisexual and questioning students reported higher rates of nonmedical use than heterosexual students and gay men. When compared with heterosexual females, lesbian, bisexual, and questioning females reported higher any NMUPD and nonmedical painkiller use. For stimulants and anxiolytics, bisexual students reported the highest nonmedical use, followed by gay and lesbian students. There may be particular risk for NMUPD associated with membership in marginalized groups in terms of both sexual orientation and gender.

  2. Student Retention and First-Year Programs: A Comparison of Students in Liberal Arts Colleges in the Mountain South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jeff S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between the retention rate and 9 first-year student programs at Liberal Arts Colleges in the Mountain South, a region in the southern Appalachian Mountains of the United States. Nine first-year programs were studied: Summer Bridge Programs, Preterm Orientation, Outdoor Adventure Orientation,…

  3. Effective physiology teaching methods: from the perspective of first year MBBS students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagothu, Rajani Santhakumari; Reddy Indla, Yogananda; Paluru, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Students who took admission in first year MBBS course used to study physiology, anatomy and biochemistry for one and half years. Since a decade the first year course duration was reduced to one year unaltering the syllabus in the three basic subjects. So students are focusing on the easy ways to clear the university exams by accepting the concise books, which is dampening the real quality of the subject knowledge. This study is aimed at understanding the best methods of physiology teaching in the lecture gallery, from the student's perspective. The present study was undertaken at a private medical college in southern part of India in Telangana state, on 100 students who took admission in first year MBBS course, in the academic year 2015-2016. Out of 100, 36 are boys and 64 are girl students. Distributed a question paper which is having 2 sets of questions. First question is having three statements regarding the teaching methods namely; chalk and blackboard teaching, over head projection teaching and power point teaching. Students were asked to choose the best statement which they prefer. Second question is consisting of combination of teaching methods and they are; chalk and blackboard with over head projection teaching method, chalk and blackboard with power point presentation. Again the students were asked to choose one of the 2 statements in 2(nd) question. Students preference of teaching methods for understanding of physiology in percentage; chalk and blackboard-54, over head projection teaching-4, power point presentation-32, chalk and blackboard with over head projection-26, chalk and blackboard with power point presentation-64. Majority of the students are in favor of a combination of chalk and blackboard with power point presentation for better understanding of physiology, next is chalk and blackboard teaching alone.

  4. A service-learning course for first-year pharmacy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Kevin R

    2008-08-15

    To describe the design of a required service-learning course offered to first- year (P1) pharmacy students, and to assess student learning and the relevance of this learning in the pharmacy curriculum. A 14-week service-learning course was designed and community organizations were recruited to participate. All first-year students enrolled in the School completed the course. A post-course survey was administered to the students, inquiring about what they had learned from the course; supervisors at the students' service sites also completed a short survey. The course and the student survey instrument were completed by 195 students, and of these 190 gave permission for the information they provided to be used in the study. Notable learning outcomes were identified, especially in the areas of communication and the social and behavioral aspects of pharmacy. The survey administered at the conclusion of the course described in this article demonstrated that students in the course had achieved the desired learning outcomes. This shows that service-learning is a pedagogy that educators can employ to effect relevant learning in the pharmacy curriculum.

  5. Using Assessment Data to Inform Library Instruction for First Year Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Gilbert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Seeking ways to develop information literacy skills among first year college students, librarians at our institution developed a pilot program to measure the effects of a multiple library instruction session module on students’ research skills in the first semester. The pilot program incorporates a substantial assessment model consisting of a pretest, posttest, and a citation analysis of final papers. Results demonstrate that students who had multiple library instruction sessions during the first semester report higher levels of confidence and greater use of library resources than students who had only a single instruction session.

  6. Assessment of nutrition knowledge and related aspects among first-year Kuwait University students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sabban, Farouk; Badr, Hanan E

    2011-01-01

    Assessing nutrition knowledge of populations assists in drawing strategies for education programs. Nutrition-related problems are common in Kuwait, thus data on nutrition knowledge are needed. This study involved administration of a questionnaire to 1,037 first-year Kuwait University students. The overall nutrition knowledge score was rated as fair, with deficiency in specific areas of knowledge. Students' dietary habits, attitudes, and interest in nutrition information were assessed as fair. Our findings will aid in building a nutrition knowledge database in Kuwait. A simplified course on aspects of healthy nutrition and lifestyle to all Kuwait University students is highly recommended.

  7. The transition to self-regulated learning for first-year dental students: threshold concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, M

    2017-08-01

    Research shows that when students arrive at university they are often not prepared for independent learning. New students enter a period of transition during their first year, which is often characterised by emotional destabilisation, as they move towards becoming more self-regulating in their new learning environment. In this small-scale qualitative study, data from an in-depth pair interview were triangulated with data from a questionnaire, to explore participants' experiences of self-regulated learning in the first year of a Dental Surgery course. Five threshold concepts relating to learning in transition emerged from the analysis of the data. These concepts were as follows: learning how to learn using a range of self-chosen sources instead of a single textbook, learning how to organise incoming information without guidance, distinguishing between main ideas and detail during revision, coping with a heavy workload, and knowing what to expect from examinations and coursework. Strong emotions (feeling confused, overwhelmed and scared) were associated with negotiating these threshold concepts. However, the study illustrates how the participants adopted new cognitive and metacognitive strategies to become more self-regulating over time. The findings of the study suggest that lecturers, tutors, study advisers and peers all have an important role to play in explicitly guiding first-year students as they grapple with troublesome threshold concepts relating to self-regulated learning. Furthermore, structural changes to the content-heavy, lecture-based curricula often associated with first-year Medical and Dental courses would help ease students' transition to independent learning, which may make an impact on student attainment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Primary care, the ROAD less traveled: what first-year medical students want in a specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinite, Kimberly L; Reddy, Shalini T; Kazantsev, Stephanie M; Kogan, Jennifer R; Durning, Steven J; Blevins, Terri; Chou, Calvin L; Diemer, Gretchen; Dunne, Dana W; Fagan, Mark J; Hartung, Paul J; Mechaber, Hilit F; Paauw, Douglas S; Wong, Jeffrey G; DeZee, Kent J

    2013-10-01

    Medical students are increasingly choosing non-primary-care specialties. Students consider lifestyle in selecting their specialty, but how entering medical students perceive lifestyle is unknown. This study investigates how first-year students value or rate lifestyle domains and specialty-selection characteristics and whether their ratings vary by interest in primary care (PC). During the 2012-2013 academic year, the authors conducted a cross-sectional survey of first-year medical students from 11 MD-granting medical schools. Using a five-point Likert-type scale (1 = not important at all; 5 = extremely important), respondents rated the importance of 5 domains of good lifestyle and 21 characteristics related to specialty selection. The authors classified students into five groups by PC interest and assessed differences by PC interest using one-way analysis of variance. Of 1,704 participants, 1,020 responded (60%). The option "type of work I am doing" was the highest-rated lifestyle domain (mean 4.8, standard deviation [SD] 0.6). "Being satisfied with the job" was the highest-rated specialty-selection characteristic (mean 4.7, SD 0.5). "Availability of practice locations in rural areas" was rated lowest (mean 2.0, SD 1.1). As PC interest decreased, the importance of "opportunities to work with underserved populations" also decreased, but importance of "average salary earned" increased (effect sizes of 0.98 and 0.94, respectively). First-year students valued enjoying work. The importance of financial compensation was inversely associated with interest in PC. Examining the determinants of enjoyable work may inform interventions to help students attain professional fulfillment in PC.

  9. Factors influencing attitude toward care of dying patients in first-year nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelin, Carina Lundh; Melin-Johansson, Christina; Henoch, Ingela; Bergh, Ingrid; Ek, Kristina; Hammarlund, Kina; Prahl, Charlotte; Strang, Susann; Westin, Lars; Österlind, Jane; Browall, Maria

    2016-01-01

    To describe Swedish first-year undergraduate nursing students' attitudes toward care of dying patients. Possible influences such as age, earlier care experiences, care education, experiences of meeting dying patients and place of birth were investigated. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) was used in six universities. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used. Some 371 students (67.3%) reported overall positive attitude toward caring for dying patients (total mean FATCOD 119.5, SD 10.6) early in their first semester. Older students, students with both earlier care experience and earlier education, those with experience of meeting a dying person, and students born in Sweden reported the highest scores, a more positive attitude. Age, earlier care experience and education, experiences of meeting a dying person and place of birth seems to affect students' attitudes toward care of the dying and need to be considered among nursing educators.

  10. Exploring possible selves in a first-year physics foundation class: Engaging students by establishing relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Dawn; Roberts, Lynne; Creagh, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Students often complain that they cannot see the relevance of what they are being taught in foundation physics classes. While revising and adjusting the curriculum and teaching are important, this study suggests it might also be useful to help students view their learning in relation to their future career aspirations. This paper reports on a study conducted with first-year students enrolled in a compulsory foundation physics unit with a history of low pass rates. Working within a "possible selves" framework, activities were designed to help students position their learning in relation to possible future lives and careers. Two cohorts of students (N =93 ) engaged in an intensive workshop comprising multiple activities relating to self and career. Self-reflection worksheets were analyzed using content analysis. The results indicate that students experience immediate benefits from these activities through self-reflection on the current self, future possible professional selves, and the role of current studies in narrowing the gap between the two.

  11. How to Make Mathematics Relevant to First-Year Engineering Students: Perceptions of Students on Student-Produced Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Birgit; Lamborn, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Many approaches to make mathematics relevant to first-year engineering students have been described. These include teaching practical engineering applications, or a close collaboration between engineering and mathematics teaching staff on unit design and teaching. In this paper, we report on a novel approach where we gave higher year engineering…

  12. How to Make Mathematics Relevant to First-Year Engineering Students: Perceptions of Students on Student-Produced Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, Birgit; Lamborn, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Many approaches to make mathematics relevant to first-year engineering students have been described. These include teaching practical engineering applications, or a close collaboration between engineering and mathematics teaching staff on unit design and teaching. In this paper, we report on a novel approach where we gave higher year engineering…

  13. Peer teaching experience of the first year medical students from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansever, Zeliha; Avsar, Zeynep; Cayir, Yasemin; Acemoglu, Hamit

    2015-02-01

    To document peer teaching activity performed by first-year medical students and their views on the teaching activity. Survey. Medical Education Department, Ataturk University, Erzurum, Turkey, in the 2012 - 2013 academic year. Volunteer students were selected for peer teaching model by an academician from the Medical Education Department. Students were taught subjects selected from classes such as biochemistry and microbiology in the same way as the academicians do. Following each class activity, the teaching student was assessed by the other students on a 5-point rating scale. Written and verbal feedback was also obtained from both teaching students and participated students. Verbal feedbacks were noted by a faculty member and similar opinions were categorized. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 20 statistical program. Eleven students took part in the program. Feedback was received from students 171 times. The mean number of students participated was 24.4 ± 14.3 in each program. Statistical analysis revealed that mean value for teaching materials, peer instructors and teaching environment were 4.62 ± 0.49, 4.63 ± 0.47 and 3.88 ± 1. 27 respectively. Peer teaching method is a pretty good way of teaching for medical students. It is a practicable technique that can be used in medical training. Taking part in this program as a lecturer, student increased students' self-confidence in the learning and teaching activities. Quite positive feedbacks were received.

  14. "How Much Can One Book Do?": Exploring Perceptions of a Common Book Program for First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Kristen; Brown, Natalya; Piper, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on student surveys and faculty interviews with regard to a university pilot project of a common book program for first-year students. We found that a minority of students read the book and the book was integrated into only some faculty members' courses. First-year students varied in their perceptions of the impact the project…

  15. Analysis of first-year college chemistry students' knowledge about and usage of text

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentecost, Thomas Crawford

    This study analyzed the usage of textbooks by 58 students in a first-year college chemistry course, the students' approaches to studying, and their knowledge about science reading. Student success in the course was measured by the final exam score. To analyze students' textbook usage the Science Reading Strategy Survey (SRSS) was developed. The SRSS allowed students' usage of the textbook to be categorized into one of three groups: methodical/linear use, efficient use, and making connections/deep use. Seventy-one percent of chemistry students were categorized as using the textbook in a deep/making connections manner, while 15% reported text usage that was categorized as efficient and 11% reported a methodical/linear approach to text use. The students' approaches to studying were determined by using the Study Process Questionnaire (SPQ). The internal structure of the SPQ was confirmed by factor analysis. Forty-three percent of students adopted an achieving approach and 41% approached their studies with a surface approach. Only 7.1% of students had a deep approach to learning. The disconnect between approach (SPQ) and reading strategies (SRSS) could be due to the students finding their general chemistry textbook a valuable resource for getting through a difficult subject they are not strongly motivated to learn. Student's knowledge about reading science text was measured by the Index of Science Reading Awareness (ISRA). This was the first time this instrument had been used with college students. The ISRA was analyzed and the instrument was used to measure students' knowledge about science reading strategies and their general knowledge about science reading and text. The majority, 62%, of first-year chemistry students possess comprehensive knowledge about science reading strategies and science text. The remainder of students had surface knowledge and no students in this study were found to have an incomplete knowledge. There was no correlation between the student

  16. Ready for College: Assessing the Influence of Student Engagement on Student Academic Motivation in a First-Year Experience Program

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis, Keyana Chamere

    2013-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Summer Academy (VTSA) Program, developed by through a collaborative partnership between faculty, administrators and staff concerned by attrition among-first year students, was introduced in summer 2012 as a campus initiative to assist first-year college students transition and acclimate to the academic and social systems of the campus environment. VTSA is a six-week intensive residential summer-bridge program that provides academic preparation, highly-individualized advising...

  17. When Contact Is Not Enough: Affecting First Year Medical Students' Image towards Older Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumastuti, Sasmita; van Fenema, Esther; Polman-van Stratum, Eugenie C F; Achterberg, Wilco; Lindenberg, Jolanda; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2017-01-01

    Many medical schools have initiated care internships to familiarize their students with older persons and to instil a professional attitude. To examine the impact of care internships on the image that first-year medical students have of older persons and to explore the underlying concepts that may play a role in shaping this image. Survey before and after a two-week compulsory care internship using the Aging Semantic Differential (ASD; 32 adjectives) and the Attitudes toward Old People (AOP; 34 positions) questionnaires. Before and after a care internship involving interpersonal contact, 252 and 244 first-year medical students at the Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC) in the academic year 2012-2013 participated. Descriptive statistics, analyses of variance, and principal component analysis were used; clusters of adjectives and positions were reduced into concepts to examine dominant patterns of views. Changes in image were investigated as mean differences of the total and concept scores. Both the ASD and the AOP questionnaires showed a poor general image of older persons that significantly worsened after the care internship (p students considering over 75 years as being old increased from 17.2% to 31.2% (p student's gender and previous contact experience. Medical schools should carefully consider care internships to ensure that students do not worsen their views on older patients, which may occur due to inadequate contact depth and quality within a rather unsupportive context.

  18. A Model for Partnering First-Year Student Pharmacists With Community-Based Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Andrea L.; Shawl, Lauren; Motl Moroney, Susannah E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To design, integrate, and assess the effectiveness of an introductory pharmacy practice experience intended to redefine first-year student pharmacists’ views on aging and medication use through their work with a healthy, community-based older-adult population. Design. All students (N = 273) completed live skills training in an 8-hour boot camp provided during orientation week. Teams were assigned an independently living senior partner, completed 10 visits and reflections, and documented health-related information using an electronic portfolio (e-portfolio). Assessment. As determined by pre- and post-experience survey instruments, students gained significant confidence in 7 skill areas related to communication, medication interviews, involving the partner in health care, and applying patient-care skills. Student reflections, in-class presentations, and e-portfolios documented that personal attitudes toward seniors changed over time. Senior partners enjoyed mentoring and interacting with students and many experienced health improvements as a result of the interaction. Conclusions. The model for partnering first-year student pharmacists with community-based older adults improved students’ skills and fostered their connections to pharmacist roles and growth as person-centered providers. PMID:22761526

  19. Relationship between anticipatory socialization experiences and first-year veterinary students' career interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedrowicz, April A; Fish, Richard E; Hammond, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to explore first-year veterinary students' anticipatory socialization-life, education, and social experiences that assist in preparation for professional occupations-and determine what relationship exists between those experiences and career interests. Seventy-three first-year veterinary students enrolled in the Careers in Veterinary Medicine course completed the Veterinary Careers survey. Results show that students' anticipatory vocational socialization experiences are significantly related to their stated career interests. The career interests with the highest percentage of students expressing "a great deal of interest" included specialty private practice (37%), research and teaching in an academic setting (33%), and international veterinary medicine (31%). The career interests with the highest percentage of students expressing "no interest at all" included the military (50%), equine private practice (42%), and the pharmaceutical industry (41%). Less than half of the students (42%) stated that they reconsidered their career path after the first semester of veterinary school, but the majority (87%) developed a better understanding of how to pursue a nontraditional career path should they choose to do so.

  20. Readiness for Self-Directed learning among first year Saudi Medical students: A descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Mona; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present study was to explore the readiness for Self Directed Learning (SDL) among first year Saudi Medical students enrolled at King Saud University (KSU) and Princess NourahBintAbdulrahman University (PNU) in Saudi Arabia. First year medical students were invited to participate in a descriptive cross sectional study design. Data were collected using a Self-Directed Learner Readiness Scale (SDLRS) which is a self- assessment tool aimed to assess three main components: self-management, desire for learning and self-control. The students responded to each item of the SDLRS on a 5-point Likert scale. Data were analyzed using SPSS, mean, median and total scores were calculated and were compared among student's groups. The mean score for the desire of learning was the highest (4.08± 0.5) of all the three components of the SDLRS followed by self-control (3.9± 0.9), while the least mean score was for self-management (3.7±0.5). Overall, differences between student's groups were not statistically significant. The present study revealed that the overall SDL readiness of participants was good, students were highly motivated for self-learning and had the ability for self-control. However, they need assistance to improve their self-management skills.

  1. The impact of a living learning community on first-year engineering students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Margaret A.; Everett, Jess W.; Whittinghill, Dex

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of an engineering living and learning community (ELC) on first-year engineering students. A control group of non-ELC students was used to compare the experiences of the ELC participants. Analysis of survey data showed that there was significant differences between the ELC students and the non-ELC students in how they responded to questions regarding social support, academic support, connectedness to campus, and satisfaction with the College of Engineering and the institution as a whole. Particularly, there were significant differences between ELC and non-ELC students for questions related to feeling like part of an engineering community, having strong relationships with peers, belonging to a supportive peer network, studying with engineering peers, and spending time with classmates outside of class.

  2. First-Year Pharmacy Students' Views on Their Chosen Professional Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Lezley-Anne; Askin, Fergal; Hall, Maurice

    2016-11-25

    Objective. To investigate what factors influenced students to study pharmacy and determine in which sector they hoped to gain employment, both in the short and longer term. Methods. First-year pharmacy students (n=124) were invited to complete a paper-based, self-administered questionnaire consisting of 4 sections. Descriptive statistics and nonparametric tests were conducted. Results. One hundred (96.8% response rate) students completed the questionnaire (22.5% male; 77.5% female). Key influential factors for choosing pharmacy included: enjoyment of science at school, a desire to improve people's health and wellbeing, and to work in health care. Career aspirations were to work in a hospital or in community practice rather than in industry or academia. Conclusions. Students choose pharmacy as a career primarily for altruistic and clinical reasons. This research provides information for pharmacy schools about the career aspirations of students and data from future pharmacists is potentially helpful to pharmacy professional organizations and potential employers.

  3. [Results of a problem-based learning experience applied to first year medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasce, E; Ramírez, L; Ibáñez, P

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of applying problem-based learning methodologies to first year medical students. During 1992, they participated in tutorial groups composed by ten students, that undertook the study of three clinical problems from a biological, psychological and social perspective. Cognitive tests that included multiple choice and developmental questions were used for assessment. An anonymous enquiry about the students opinion towards the educational experience was also applied. Students achieved 76% of the predetermined goals for each problem. Scoring was better for developmental than multiple choice questions. The experience had a great acceptance among students, that considered as positive features the learning motivation, the stimulus for active participation, the achievement of personal expectancies, the integration of knowledge areas and the encouragement of team work and information seeking.

  4. Addressing culture shock in first year midwifery students: Maximising the initial clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Allison M; Catling, Christine; Hogan, Rosemarie; Homer, Caroline S E

    2014-12-01

    Many Bachelor of Midwifery students have not had any exposure to the hospital setting prior to their clinical placement. Students have reported their placements are foreign to them, with a specialised confusing 'language'. It is important to provide support to students to prevent culture shock that may lead to them leaving the course. To assist first year midwifery students with the transition into clinical practice by providing a preparatory workshop. An action research project developed resources for a workshop held prior to students' first clinical placement. Four phases were held: Phase one involved holding discussion groups with students returning from clinical practice; Phase two was the creation of vodcasts; Phase three was integration of resources into the clinical subject and phase four was the evaluation and reflection on the action research project. Evaluations of the workshops were undertaken through surveying the students after they returned from their clinical placement. A descriptive analysis of the evaluations was performed. Students rated the workshop, vodcasts and the simulated handover positively. Further recommendations were that complications of labour and birth be included in their first semester as students were unexpectedly exposed to this in their first clinical placement. The students evaluated the workshop positively in reducing the amount of culture shock experienced on the first clinical placement. In addition the students provided further recommendations of strategies that would assist with clinical placement. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. First Year Mathematics at a regional university: Does it cater to student diversity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Whannell

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the academic performance of students in a first year undergraduate mathematics course at a regional university.  A custom designed questionnaire which assessed study behaviours, staff support and peer and family relationships and the levels of mathematics efficacy and anxiety was completed by 162 students.  The study established a wide range of mathematical efficacy based upon the number and type of mathematics courses completed at the secondary level of education and identifies this as the primary factor in student failure in the course.  The need for institutions to acknowledge the diversity of student preparedness in mathematics at the first year undergraduate level and respond through the use of academic staff with appropriate educational training and a caring and supportive teaching pedagogy is described.  The capacity of a single one-size-fits-all mathematics course in the first semester of undergraduate study to meet the needs of all students is discussed.

  6. Perceptions of epilepsy among first-year medical students at Mulago Hospital in Kampala, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Jeffrey; Berrett, Sawyer; Kimuli, Ivan; Katabira, Elly

    2015-10-01

    Epilepsy is associated with stigma throughout the world, which leads to poor treatment of people with epilepsy (PWE). In Uganda, there are more than 75,000 PWE and a large treatment gap. This study evaluated the knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding epilepsy among first-year medical students at Mulago Hospital. A 22-question survey was developed based on the previous studies of Birbeck et al.'s regarding the stigma of epilepsy in Zambia. This was administered to first-year medical students (96 respondents) at Mulago Hospital in Uganda. More than 80% said that they would not allow their children to marry PWE. Most respondents believed that epilepsy was a mental illness, and many believed that PWE cannot have normal intelligence. Students reported that there was a negative perception and negative treatment of PWE in the community. Some students believed that epilepsy was caused by supernatural causes and was contagious. These misperceptions must be identified and corrected among medical students and other healthcare providers to allow for fair treatment of PWE; this should be incorporated into medical school curriculums in Uganda. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Introducing first year students to interprofessionalism: Exploring professional identity in the "enterprise culture": a Foucauldian analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMatteo, Dale J; Reeves, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the experiences of, and thoughts on, interprofessional learning and care of first year health science students at a large Canadian university within a broad socioeconomic context. We apply discourse analysis to survey data collected to evaluate an introductory interprofessional event involving first year students from a variety of health professions. Follow-up focus-group interviews were conducted to gain greater understanding of student issues and concerns emerging from the survey, providing a second source of data. A significant paper entitled, "Education, enterprise culture and the entrepreneurial self: A Foucauldian perspective" by Peters (2001) provides an historical and theoretical framework for this paper. Peters notes the changing nature of professionalism and global crises in public institutions under neoliberalism as governments divest themselves of social responsibility, shifting it onto individuals through increased privatization and focus on entrepreneurialism. In exploring the thoughts and experiences of students through the historical lens of a shifting professional discourse and changing cultural and political environment, a unique view of professionalism and this interprofessional project comes to light. Reflective of the paradigm shift that Peters documents, there was evidence of students "internalizing" responsibility for a sustainable health care system through acquisition of interprofessional knowledge and behaviours.

  8. THE EFFECT OF LEARNING ENVIRONMENT FACTORS ON BIOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT OF FIRST YEAR STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podstawski Robert

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study conducted among students of UWM in Olsztyn was to diagnose the level of biological development of first year students aged 19-20 years, depending on the location and type of secondary school attended. The research on the level of physical and motor development was carried out in 2012 during the compulsory physical education classes of 361 full-time students randomly selected with the use of statistical tables out of 250 student groups. In order to determine the level of physical development, basic anthropometric parameters of the subjects were measured such as body weight and height, and 13 motor tests were used to determine the motor level. The results showed that factors such as the location and type of secondary school attended did not differentiate significantly the level of physical and motor development of first-year students, and the occurring differences were rather incidental and accidental. The weak interaction of factors used was probably the result of blurring the differences and barriers between schools operating in rural areas and in urban areas, a similar curriculum, and an 8-month stay of the subjects at university.

  9. Bridging the gap to first year health science: Early engagement enhances student satisfaction and success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothi Thalluri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Student academic success and positive satisfaction in first year health sciences programs is shaped by their transition experience. An introduction to core knowledge, study skills, and engagement with staff and students has historically been overlooked, but this has been newly recognised as a contributor to first year success, especially with mass higher education of students from diverse backgrounds. The University of South Australia ‘Preparing for Health Sciences’ workshop was designed to assist the student transition into health science programs. The workshop improved confidence and enthusiasm in starting university (56% pre- and 95% post-workshop, and 97% considered the workshop effective overall. Introduction to biological principles was widely considered to be beneficial (87%. The attrition rate after the first semester in 2014 was 7.6%, which is appreciably lower than the standard 12% in science-based courses. These findings demonstrate that an introductory workshop does greatly assist in the transition of students into their health science programs.

  10. HIV/AIDS knowledge among first year MBBS, Nursing, Pharmacy students of a health university, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Sachdeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine level of HIV/AIDS knowledge among first-year MBBS, nursing and pharmacy students of a health university. Materials and Methods: A pre-designed, pre-tested, anonymous self-administered, semi-structured questionnaire was circulated among available 129, 53 and 55 first-year MBBS, nursing and pharmacy students during Oct′ 09. Data entry, management and analysis were carried out using MS excel and software statistical package. Result: Out of the total 237 students, there were 123 (51.9% female and 103 (44.0% students from rural native place. A majority of students were able to correctly write the full form of AIDS (95.8% in comparison to HIV (72.6% and the difference between two terminologies were known to 87.6%, 81.1% and 70.9% of MBBS, nursing and pharmacy students, respectively. All four common routes of transmission of infection and methods of prevention were known to majority of the lot. However, injecting drug users (IDU and truck driver as a risk category was correctly reported by 67.5% and 55.3% students, whereas 35.9% incorrectly mentioned that smoking is a risk factor for acquiring infection. A statistically significant (P <0.05 proportion of MBBS followed by nursing and pharmacy students were aware that infection neither spreads by social activities like handshake/playing nor by mosquito bite. However, low level was ascertained with regard to items related to non-curability of infection (57.4% and availability of anti-retro viral therapy (27.4%. Conclusion: Overall high level of knowledge was recorded in the present study with a difference noted among students in three professional streams.

  11. How Much Do Our Incoming First Year Students Know?: Diagnostic Testing in Mathematics at Third Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blathnaid Sheridan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A continuing cause for concern in higher education institutions is the poor core mathematical skills of incoming students. Many institutions now offer mathematics support services such as drop-in centres, online resources and short ‘refresher courses’ in an attempt to alleviate the problem. The majority of third level institutions in Ireland and internationally now make use of diagnostic testing of incoming first year students that both predict subsequent success and select groups for remediation. This project was developed to explore the issues around diagnostic testing and follow-up support for incoming students in the College of Sciences and Health. A large cohort of first year science students was tested and those who failed to achieve 50% on the test were offered support. This support came in the form of peer-assisted student led tutorials during which students had the opportunity to revise basic areas of mathematics. On comparison of the scores on the diagnostic test with the end of module results we have noticed a correlation between students who scored poorly on the diagnostic test and students who failed the Semester 1 mathematics module. The key recommendations arising from this study are; diagnostic testing provides useful information about the cohort as a whole and provides lecturers with information about gaps in the prior knowledge of the group allowing them to take particular care when introducing new topics, diagnostic testing helps to identify those students who are significantly weaker than the rest of the cohort and thus enables them to be targeted with support and attention. Furthermore, by carrying out diagnostic testing over an extended period of time, trends can be observed. This information can then be used by Schools or Departments in an attempt to cope with diversity and ensuring that follow-up support is adequately provided.

  12. Changes in Myopia Prevalence among First-Year University Students in 12 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Jorge; Braga, Ana; Queirós, António

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the changes in myopia prevalence among Portuguese first-year university students in 2002 and 2014 at the University of Minho. The refractive status and axial length of first-year students at the School of Sciences, University of Minho, were measured in 2014. Refractive error was measured with subjective refraction under cycloplegia and axial length was measured by optical biometry. The data were compared with those obtained from a similar cohort of 111 students in 2002. Myopia was defined as a mean spherical equivalent of ≤-0.50D. A survey was conducted to know the routine of the participants. They were asked how many hours per week (hrs/wk) they had spent, on average in the previous year, watching TV, using the computer, studying, participating in manual hobbies, and participating in outdoor activities. In 2014, 75 students were assessed (15 male and 60 female) with a mean age (mean ± SD) of 19.8 ± 1.6 years (ranging from 18 to 24 years). The mean refractive error M (spherical equivalent) was -0.77 ± 1.79D and the axial length was 23.74 ± 1.19 mm. The prevalence of myopia was 41.3% (31 of 75). In 2002, the mean refractive error M was 0.01 ± 1.53D, the axial length was 23.40 ± 0.93 mm, and the myopia prevalence was 23.4% (26 of 111). The differences between myopia prevalence and mean refractive error are statistically significant (p years, the prevalence of myopia among first-year university students at the School of Sciences of the University of Minho rose from 23.4 to 41.3%. This increase in myopia prevalence could be related to the lifestyle changes of the studied population.

  13. [Assessment of communication skills with an OSCE among first year medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbeck, Sabine; Mauch, Marianne; Leschnik, Elisabeth; Beutel, Manfred E; Laubach, Wilfried

    2011-11-01

    In order to determine if first year medical students of a Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology course have adopted basic physician patient communication skills, we developed an appropriate Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). The parcours took place in a pretest condition (n=182) and in the following semester under test condition, now relevant for passing the course (n=181). Reliability of the OSCE reached a medium degree (α=0.55/0.50). Results of written examinations and OSCE scores were weakly correlated. The correlation between task competence and patient-centeredness was higher in the pretest than under test condition. Female students mostly achieved higher scores than male students. Nearly all of the students (92%/97%) were in favor of continuing this examination. Physician-patient communication is a process of high complexity, but it can be tested by OSCE. Relevance for passing the course seems to enhance the learning behaviour.

  14. Changes in alcohol use among first year university students in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunin, Lee; Díaz-Martínez, Alejandro; Díaz-Martínez, L Rosa; Kuranz, Seth; Hernández-Ávila, Carlos; Fernández-Varela, Héctor

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol use and misuse is widespread among university students in many countries. Specific cultural factors may impact alcohol use after entering university. This paper considers changes in alcohol use among first year university students in Mexico. A qualitative study using ethnographic interviews with 57 female and 60 male student drinkers in Mexico City from March to June 2011. Each interview was evaluated by a set of thematic codes developed inductively from the interviews. Findings from excessive, heavy, regular, occasional drinkers, abstainers, and non-drinkers were analyzed to explore whether or not linkages existed between and/or among particular themes. Students reported factors associated with changes in role and status, friendships, and increased autonomy as reasons for increasing or decreasing their alcohol use after entering university. CONCLUSIONS/IMPORTANCE: Understanding the influence of Mexican cultural norms on alcohol use among Mexican and Mexican Americans can be helpful in informing studies and preventive efforts among both Mexican and Mexican American young people.

  15. Asking a Great Question: A Librarian Teaches Questioning Skills to First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    In a single one-hour session, first-year medical students were taught a framework for differentiating between lower-order questions that lead to knowledge of facts and higher-order questions that lead to integration of concepts and deeper learning, thereby preparing them for problem-based learning (PBL). Students generated lists of questions in response to an assertion prompt and categorized them according to Bloom's Taxonomy. These data were analyzed in addition to data from the course exam, which asked them to formulate a higher-level question in response to a prompt. Categorizing questions according to Bloom's Taxonomy was a more difficult task for students than was formulating higher-order questions. Students reported that the skills that they learned were used in subsequent PBL sessions to formulate higher-order learning objectives that integrated new and previously-learned concepts.

  16. "It's Almost a Mindset that Teachers Need to Change": First-Year Students' Need to Be Inducted into Time Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Jacques; Jansen, Ellen; Torenbeek, Marjolein

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the findings related to a number of research projects investigating students' expectations and experiences of the first year in higher education. In particular, findings with regard to first-year students' expectations and challenges with issues of time management are reported. It was found that many students were realistic…

  17. Assessing the Impact of First-Year Experience Courses on Student Success in Community and Technical Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Luv'Tesha L.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact first-year experience courses have on first-year student performance when enrolled in these courses at public community and technical colleges in Kentucky. The target population for this research study was composed of freshman students participating in the course compared to students not participating in the same…

  18. "It's Almost a Mindset that Teachers Need to Change": First-Year Students' Need to Be Inducted into Time Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, Jacques; Jansen, Ellen; Torenbeek, Marjolein

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the findings related to a number of research projects investigating students' expectations and experiences of the first year in higher education. In particular, findings with regard to first-year students' expectations and challenges with issues of time management are reported. It was found that many students were realistic…

  19. E-learning for students in their first year: a French experimentation at the medical school of Grenoble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Jean-Marie; Pagonis, Daniel; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Romanet, Jean-Paul; Sele, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    A local study carried out in the Medical School of Grenoble shows that teaching in the first year in medicine studies satisfies neither the students, nor the teachers. The Faculty of Medicine of Grenoble decided to set up a reform in order to offer a high quality education. This reform leads to a complete reorganization of the curriculum and to the intensive use of new information and communication technologies of information, in particular, the use of multimedia documents. The communication and information technologies team of the Faculty of Medicine of Grenoble carried out an innovating and daring reform to start at the academic year 2006-2007. The new course is built on three activities: self learning on multi-media resources, meetings with teachers for questions-answers sessions and tutorials animated by older students. This article reports the first results for this successful project. In the academic year 2006-2007, are concerned 1290 students, 40 teachers and 8 disciplines.

  20. Impact of a service-learning course on first-year pharmacy students' learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Kevin R

    2013-03-12

    To assess the differences in learning outcomes of first-year (P1) pharmacy students enrolled in a course based on service learning with those of a comparable group of students not enrolled in a course involving service learning. Students on 2 campuses of a school of pharmacy completed a required P1 course involving service learning. A control group of students at a different school completed typical P1 courses, none of which involved service learning. A questionnaire was administered to P1 students in the study group at the conclusion of the service-learning course, and a similar questionnaire was administered to P1 students in the control group in the spring of their P1 year. Survey questions inquired about what the students had learned generally and in the areas identified as common to the 2 groups of respondents. Differences in the learning outcomes of the students were identified, most notably in the areas of professional communication, cultural competence, the elderly, and awareness of service-providing agencies in the community. This study demonstrated that service-learning positively impacts pharmacy students' learning outcomes.

  1. Inquiry-based learning to improve student engagement in a large first year topic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masha Smallhorn

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the opportunity for students to be involved in inquiry-based activities can improve engagement with content and assist in the development of analysis and critical thinking skills. The science laboratory has traditionally been used as a platform to apply the content gained through the lecture series. These activities have exposed students to experiments which test the concepts taught but which often result in a predicted outcome. To improve the engagement and learning outcomes of our large first year biology cohort, the laboratories were redeveloped. Superlabs were run with 100 students attending weekly sessions increasing the amount of contact time from previous years. Laboratories were redeveloped into guided-inquiry and educators facilitated teams of students to design and carry out an experiment. To analyse the impact of the redevelopment on student satisfaction and learning outcomes, students were surveyed and multiple choice exam data was compared before and after the redevelopment. Results suggest high levels of student satisfaction and a significant improvement in student learning outcomes. All disciplines should consider including inquiry-based activities as a methodology to improve student engagement and learning outcome as it fosters the development of independent learners. 

  2. Teaching mode efficiency and learning preferences of first year nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan-Andrews, Terri A

    2009-01-01

    The student population in universities is very diverse: ranging ages, experiences, culture, level of preparedness and learning styles. This diversity presents academics with increasing challenges to motivate and promote student understanding. The aim of the current study was to develop knowledge of different learning styles among first year health science students and determine the benefits that students obtain from each teaching strategy. A questionnaire was designed for quantitative data collection, consisting of two sections. The first section sought student feedback on their experiences of lectures, tutorials and practical classes; the second section, consists of the 'VARK test', Visual, Aural, Read/write, Kinesthetic sensory modalities determines the different ways of receiving information [Fleming, N.D., 1995. I'm different; not dumb. Modes of presentation (VARK) in the tertiary classroom. In: Zelmer, A. (Ed.), Annual Conference of the Higher Education and Research Development Society of Australasia. J.]. The study identified that the majority of students found the lectures, tutorials and practical sessions to be beneficial to their learning and the combination reiterates and emphasises various life science concepts. The most favoured strategy was practical sessions, while tutorials were seen as least useful. The sensory mode the majority of students preferred to receive information was kinesthetic, the hands on approach to learning. Students are diverse creatures with differing abilities and mode for learning. There is no single right way to present material but by providing several different approaches the differing learning styles of students can be accommodated.

  3. Smoking patterns and their relationship to drinking among first-year college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeppner, Bettina B; Bidwell, L Cinnamon; Colby, Suzanne M; Barnett, Nancy P

    2014-06-01

    Unlike older smokers, young adult smokers frequently engage in light and intermittent smoking. It remains unclear how stable such smoking patterns are over time, as substantial variability exists between these smokers. This study identified subgroups of college student smokers based on the trajectory of their smoking frequency during the first year of college, thereby examining stability versus instability over time. We then tested if the interplay between drinking and smoking differed in the identified groups to determine the relative role drinking may play in intermittent versus more regular smoking. Incoming college students at 3 institutions completed online biweekly surveys of their daily substance use throughout the first year of college. Students who reported smoking at least 1 cigarette during this year (n = 266) were included in analyses (70% female, 74% White). Group-based trajectory modeling identified 5 groups of smokers, 3 of which maintained their smoking frequency throughout the year (77%), and 2 groups of infrequent smokers showed significant trends (11% increasing, 12% decreasing). Notably, nondaily smoking was maintained at different specific frequencies (e.g., 1 vs. 3 days per week). Identified groups differed in the relationship between drinking and smoking, where cooccurrence was particularly strong among infrequent smokers, and trends in smoking quantity differed between groups. While there was a diversity of smoking patterns in the sample, patterns of intermittent smoking remain relatively stable for a majority of students throughout the year. Intervention messages targeting drinking and smoking should be tailored on the basis of smoking frequency.

  4. An assisted living facility curriculum to introduce geriatrics to first-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Iris L; Dodd, Kimberly A; Warrier, Sarita S; Pugliese, Louis J; McMackin, Naomi Y; Taylor, Julie Scott

    2015-01-01

    Many U.S. medical schools have developed curricula in geriatric medicine to address the growing older adult population. At our university, the authors have integrated an assisted living facility (ALF) program into a required first-year clinical skills course. During the 2011 to 2012 academic year, an electronic survey was distributed to 109 first-year medical students prior to and after the program. Eighty-eight percent and 85% of students completed the pre- and postintervention survey, respectively. Students reported a positive attitude toward caring for older adults (92.5% post- vs. 80.2% preintervention), an understanding of the medical and social needs of older adults (89.2% post- vs. 38.5% preintervention), an acquisition of the skills to assess the health of older adults (71% post- vs. 14.5% preintervention), and an understanding of ALFs as nonmedical supportive housing (92.5% post- vs. 70.8% preintervention). The authors' curriculum offers an innovative method to integrate geriatrics education early in medical education and to involve medical students in their community.

  5. Formative clinical evaluation of first-year students in fundamental nursing science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Wannenburg

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available The outcome of any system of evaluation has a considerable impact on the daily lives of students in a variety of educational settings. Hence, it was attempted to illustrate the complexity of the problem when evaluating the performance skills of first year students in the clinical environment of the general hospital. The choice of the research field originated from the increasing concern of the researcher about the reliability of the current evaluation practices in the formative assessment of first year student nurses. The impression gained is that nurse educators are more concerned with the end results of evaluation than with the teaching-learning process needed to reach this goal. Due to the many variables that can influence its results, the implementation of the evaluation process in clinical nursing is extremely complicated. In the course of studying the literature relevant to the research field, the researcher identified aspects that can be considered as of critical importance in the assessment of student performance in clinical nursing.

  6. Near-peer mentoring to complement faculty mentoring of first-year medical students in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satendra Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The first year is stressful for new medical students who have to cope with curricular challenges, relocation issues, and separation from family. Mentoring reduces stress and facilitates adaptation. A program for faculty mentoring of first-semester students was initiated by the Medical Education Unit in 2009 at University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. Feedback after the first year revealed that mentees were reluctant to meet their mentors, some of whom were senior faculty. In the following year, student mentors (near-peers were recruited to see if that would improve the rate and quality of contact between mentees and mentors. Methods: Volunteer faculty (n=52, near-peers (n=57, and new entrants (n=148 admitted in 2010 participated in the ratio of 1:1:3. The program aims were explained through an open house meeting, for reinforcement, and another meeting was conducted 5 months later. At year-end, a feedback questionnaire was administered (response rate: faculty, 28 [54%]; mentees, 74 [50%]. Results: Many respondent faculty (27, 96% and mentees (65, 88% believed that near-peer mentoring was useful. Compared to the preceding year, the proportion of meetings between faculty mentors and mentees increased from 4.0±5.2 to 7.4±8.8; mentees who reported benefit increased from 23/78 (33% to 34/74 (46%. Benefits resulted from mentors’ and near-peers’ demonstration of concern/support/interaction/counseling (35, 47.3% mentees; 23 mentees (82% wanted to become near-peers themselves. Conclusion: Near-peer mentoring supplements faculty mentoring of first-year medical students by increasing system effectiveness.

  7. The Role of Digital Technologies in Learning: Expectations of First Year University Students / Le rôle des technologies numériques dans l’apprentissage : les attentes des étudiants de première année universitaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Gabriel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A growing literature suggests that there is a disjuncture between the instructional practices of the education system and the student body it is expected to serve, particularly with respect to the roles of digital technologies. Based on surveys and focus group interviews of first-year students at a primarily undergraduate Canadian university and focus group interviews of professors at the same institution, this study explores the gaps and intersections between students’ uses and expectations for digital technologies while learning inside the classroom and socializing outside the classroom, and the instructional uses, expectations and concerns of their professors. It concludes with recommendations for uses of digital technologies that go beyond information transmission, the need for extended pedagogical discussions to harness the learning potentials of digital technologies, and for pedagogies that embrace the social construction of knowledge as well as individual acquisition. Des études de plus en plus nombreuses suggèrent qu’il existe un écart entre les pratiques d’enseignement dans le système de l’éducation et la population étudiante desservie, notamment en ce qui concerne le rôle des technologies numériques. La présente étude, fondée sur les résultats de sondages et d’entrevues de groupe auprès des étudiants de première année inscrits à une université canadienne principalement axée sur les études de premier cycle, ainsi que sur des entrevues de groupe auprès de professeurs du même établissement, explore les écarts et les concordances entre, d’une part, l’utilisation et les attentes des étudiants relativement aux technologies numériques dans l’apprentissage en classe et dans les relations sociales en dehors des classes, et, d’autre part, l’utilisation de ces technologies dans les pratiques d’enseignement, les préoccupation et les attentes des professeurs. L’étude se conclut par des

  8. Freshman 15 in England: a longitudinal evaluation of first year university student's weight change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadeboncoeur, Claudia; Foster, Charlie; Townsend, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Weight change in first year university students, often referred to as 'Freshman 15', has been shown to be a common problem in North America. Studies have reported weight gain to be between 1 kg and 4 kg over the academic year and a recent meta-analysis found a mean gain of 1.34 kg and that 61 % of students gained weight. A limited number of studies have investigated weight change in England and large scale studies are needed to understand better weight change trends and to conduct subgroup analyses. This is important in the context of rising obesity prevalence, especially as behaviours and unhealthy weight in early adulthood often remains over the lifetime. We recruited students across 23 universities in England to complete a web-based survey at three time points in 2014-2015: beginning of academic year, December, end of academic year. Students were asked to self-report height and weight. We calculated weight change of each student between time points and conducted t-tests and pared analysis of variance to investigate the effect of time, sex and initial BMI. We also investigated weight change amongst weight gainers and in weight losers separately. We followed 215 students over three time points and found a mean weight change of 0.98 kg (95%CI 0.49-1.47) over a mean length of 34 weeks of follow-up. The weight change rate was not significantly different over different terms. Over 51 % of the sample gained more than 0.5 kg by the end of the academic year, with a mean gain of 3.46 kg. Female weight gainers had a significantly lower baseline weight than non-weight gaining females. Twenty-five percent of the sample lost more than 0.5 kg with a mean of -3.21 kg. Within weight losers, males lost significantly more weight than females. Our findings reinforce that the first year of university is a crucial time in the life of students during which the majority tend to gain weight. However, we also found that 25 % lost weight, indicating that 75 % of students

  9. Interprofessional education for first year psychology students: career plans, perceived relevance and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lynne D; Forman, Dawn

    2015-05-01

    Undergraduate psychology students have been largely excluded from interprofessional education (IPE) initiatives. In contrast to many health professions, undergraduate psychology students do not engage in work placements as part of their degree, and many enter careers outside the health care context. However, the collaborative skills gained through an IPE experience may well be beneficial to students who work in this wider context. This research examines whether undergraduate psychology students' views of IPE vary according to their planned career directions, and if so, whether the perceived relevance of IPE mediates the relationships. A sample of 188 Australian university undergraduate psychology students completed an online questionnaire following completion of a first-year IPE health sciences program. Path analysis indicated that psychology students' attitudes towards IPE are associated with both professional identification and practitioner orientation, fully mediated through the perceived relevance of IPE to future career and study plans. Stronger professional identification and practitioner orientation were associated with greater perceived relevance and more positive and less negative attitudes towards IPE. Placing a stronger emphasis on the generalizability of IP skills taught may increase students' awareness of the relevance outside of the health context, reducing disengagement of students planning alternative careers.

  10. First-year engineering students' views of the nature of engineering: implications for engineering programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karataş, F. Ö.; Bodner, G. M.; Unal, Suat

    2016-01-01

    A study was conducted on the views of the nature of engineering held by 114 first-year engineering majors; the study built on prior work on views of the nature of science held by students, their instructors, and the general public. Open-coding analysis of responses to a 12-item questionnaire suggested that the participants held tacit beliefs that engineering (1) involves problem solving; (2) is a form of applied science; (3) involves the design of artefacts or systems; (4) is subject to various constraints; and (5) requires teamwork. These beliefs, however, were often unsophisticated, and significant aspects of the field of engineering as described in the literature on engineering practices were missing from the student responses. The results of this study are important because students' beliefs have a strong influence on what they value in a classroom situation, what they attend to in class, and how they choose to study for a course.

  11. Increasing the emotional engagement of first year mature-aged distance students: Interest and belonging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Kahu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This research followed 19 mature-aged distance students through their first semester of undergraduate study. The analysis of interviews and video diaries presented in this paper focuses on two key elements of emotional engagement: interest and belonging. Findings highlight the importance of interest triggered by personal preferences and experiences. Interest led to enjoyment, increased behavioural engagement with greater time and effort expended, and improved cognitive engagement in terms of depth and breadth of learning. In contrast, there was less evidence of the social side of emotional engagement, belonging. Participants felt little connection to the university, but connecting with fellow students through face-to-face courses and online forums was important for some to reduce their sense of isolation. However, distance study was not for all. The findings highlight the need for staff to consider emotional engagement when designing and delivering the curriculum and when interacting with students, particularly in the all-important first year.

  12. Empathy as related to motivations for medicine in a sample of first-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Pereira, Manuel; Trancas, Bruno; Loureiro, José; Papoila, Ana; Caldas-de-Almeida, José Miguel

    2013-02-01

    Professionalism and empathy are crucial in clinical settings. An association would be expected between empathic attitudes and altruistic motivations for a medical education. However, data is scarce in first-year students, and a previous small-scale study did not fully confirm the hypothesis that person-oriented motives would have a strong relationship to empathy. The present study tested this association in a larger sample. 202 first-year medical students (M age = 19.0 yr., SD = 2.7; 67.3% women) were assessed cross-sectionally, using the Vaglum and colleagues' indexes on motives for choosing medicine (security/status, person-orientation, and interest in the natural sciences) and the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy for students. There was a weak association between empathy and person-orientation, but the evidence regarding links between empathy and the three motivation scores was low overall. In this Portuguese sample there was not a clear-cut association between empathy and motivations for medical school.

  13. Faculty Student Mentoring of First Year Traditional Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Students to Increase Retention and Decrease Attrition Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, Melissa S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the results of a faculty mentoring program of first year traditional baccalaureate degree nursing students at a university in the mid-west with multiple campuses, including three nursing campuses. One campus site was chosen for this project. The students were asked to participate in the project and informed…

  14. Career Development among First-Year College Students: College Self-Efficacy, Student Persistence, and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen L.; Jenkins-Guarnieri, Michael A.; Murdock, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the career development of college student persistence decisions through the theoretical lens of social cognitive career theory (SCCT). Specifically, the authors sought to understand the potential role of college self-efficacy in first-year student persistence and academic success at a medium size university. Using a…

  15. A Comparison of Course Delivery Formats on Student Success for First Year Developmental English Students at California Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantum, Camilla Nancy Phillips

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the influence of campus-based and online-based community college developmental English courses on two student success factors: course persistence and course success. Retrospective data on all first year California community college students enrolled in developmental English courses between 2008 and 2011 were analyzed for…

  16. Students' first year experience of a BSc (Hons) in nursing: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Julia; Ooms, Ann; Newcombe, Paul; Marks-Maran, Di

    2015-01-01

    All new nurses in England from 2013 will be educated at the point of registration to the degree level. A study was undertaken into the first-year experience of one cohort on the new degree programme at one university. The aim of the study was to evaluate nursing students' experience during the first year of the degree programme in terms of their engagement with the programme, its impact and value and their overall satisfaction. A mixed method qualitative and quantitative survey design was used. One cohort of students at one university in south west London was studied. In total 96 out of 256 students completed the online survey questionnaire (response rate=37.5%). Data were collected through an online questionnaire survey comprising Likert-style, demographic and open-ended questions. Data were analysed using SPSS version 19 and through the framework method. Students' responses were largely positive. Areas of concern expressed included assessment timings and juggling personal/family commitments with academic workload. Although some experienced a degree of stress in year 1 the majority indicated that stress was not a problem; some experienced little or no stress at all. Students were positive about the quality of teaching, support received, and their relationships with academic staff. Satisfaction with year 1 was high. A small percentage considered leaving during year 1. Factors that made them stay included personal motivation to succeed, family support and help from academic staff and mentors. Overall attrition rate is low. As nursing in England moves to an all-graduate profession at the point of registration it is timely to evaluate issues like attrition, the students' engagement with their academic and practice experience, the impact on them of their assignments/assessments, stressors, their perceptions of quality, what makes them stay and their overall satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A phenomenographic analysis of first-year engineering students' experiences with problems involving multiple possible solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dringenberg, Emily A.

    Engineers are expected to solve problems that are ill-structured. These problems are presented with a lack of necessary information and allow for different ways of engaging with the problem; they are open-ended and involve multiple possible solutions with multiple means of evaluation. In order to allow maximum time for students to develop skills for solving such problems, undergraduate engineering programs can introduce such problems during the first year of students' education, in the form of cornerstone design tasks. This provides students with more opportunities to develop their ability to engage with ill-structured problems, which are characteristic of engineering work. Researchers have documented variation within both the behavior and perceptions of students' early experiences with design problems. General themes include novice-like design behavior, discomfort with lack of information, difficulty with problem scoping, and resistance to ambiguity. To build on these generalizations of students' experiences, a more thorough understanding of the variation in how students experience this phenomenon of engaging with ill-structured problems is needed to design effective learning environments. This work presents the qualitatively different ways that engineering students experience problems with multiple possible solutions during their first year of engineering studies. Using phenomenography as the methodological framework, data were collected through in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 27 first-year engineering students. The iterative, phenomenographic analysis resulted in seven descriptive categories for the ways participants experienced problems involving multiple possible solutions. The names of these categories represent the different foci of the students' experiences: completion, transition, iteration, organization, collaboration, reasoning, and growth. These categories are organized along two crucial dimensions of variation: reaction to ambiguity and role

  18. Tobacco Smoking Habits Among First Year Medical Students, University of Prishtina, Kosovo: Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çuperjani, Frederik; Elezi, Shkëlzen; Lila, Albert; Daka, Qëndresë; Dakaj, Qëndrim; Gashi, Sanije

    2015-06-01

    Tobacco smoking remains the leading causes of preventable morbidity and mortality in the world, requiring intensified national and international public health response. World Health Organization (WHO) has urged health professional organizations to encourage and support their members to be models for not using tobacco products and promote tobacco-free culture. Healthcare students are the future authority of the health society, they are in a position to play a vital role and have impact on social norms related to smoking. To determine the prevalence of tobacco smoking among healthcare students of Medical Faculty, University of Prishtina in Kosovo, so that recommendations can be made for its cessation among healthcare providers and thereafter the community. Descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted using self-administrated questionnaire prepared for this purpose. A total of 284 first year healthcare students of Medical Faculty, University of Prishtina in Kosovo were enrolled in the study. The data were analyzed using SPSS 22. All respondents completed the questionnaire, giving a response rate of 100% (general medicine=180, dentistry = 104). The prevalence of students who have ever smoked was 53.2%. However, only 8.9% (9.1% M vs. 8.7% F) of the general medicine students and 5.8% (4.8% M vs. 6.5% F) of dentistry students declared that smoke tobacco every day. Overall, the research shows that the prevalence of occasional smokers among medical students in Kosova is quite high.

  19. Pre-commencement interviews to support transition and retention of first year undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Wood

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the findings of a pilot study conducted at a regional university in Australia involving a pre-commencement interview strategy that aimed to better support first-year students transitioning into an undergraduate nursing program. The aim of the study was to determine the efficacy of the approach and inform the development of more effective transition and retention strategies (STARS at the institutional level. The study was informed by Kalsbeek’s (2013 ‘4 Ps’ framework for student retention, which identifies student profile, progress through their studies, university processes and alignment between a university’s promises and the student experience of its delivery on those promises as critical components of an all-of-institution approach to improving student retention and success. An additional ‘P’, preparedness, was identified as another important dimension, recognising that student preparedness for study is a vital component of an effective transition and retention strategy. The findings viewed through the lens of the expanded ‘5Ps’ framework highlight the potential of the approach as an institutional strategy for improving student transition, retention and success.  

  20. Computer literacy among first year medical students in a developing country: A cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranasinghe Priyanga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of computer assisted learning (CAL has enhanced undergraduate medical education. CAL improves performance at examinations, develops problem solving skills and increases student satisfaction. The study evaluates computer literacy among first year medical students in Sri Lanka. Methods The study was conducted at Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, Sri Lanka between August-September 2008. First year medical students (n = 190 were invited for the study. Data on computer literacy and associated factors were collected by an expert-validated pre-tested self-administered questionnaire. Computer literacy was evaluated by testing knowledge on 6 domains; common software packages, operating systems, database management and the usage of internet and E-mail. A linear regression was conducted using total score for computer literacy as the continuous dependant variable and other independent covariates. Results Sample size-181 (Response rate-95.3%, 49.7% were Males. Majority of the students (77.3% owned a computer (Males-74.4%, Females-80.2%. Students have gained their present computer knowledge by; a formal training programme (64.1%, self learning (63.0% or by peer learning (49.2%. The students used computers for predominately; word processing (95.6%, entertainment (95.0%, web browsing (80.1% and preparing presentations (76.8%. Majority of the students (75.7% expressed their willingness for a formal computer training programme at the faculty. Mean score for the computer literacy questionnaire was 48.4 ± 20.3, with no significant gender difference (Males-47.8 ± 21.1, Females-48.9 ± 19.6. There were 47.9% students that had a score less than 50% for the computer literacy questionnaire. Students from Colombo district, Western Province and Student owning a computer had a significantly higher mean score in comparison to other students (p Conclusion Sri Lankan medical undergraduates had a low-intermediate level of computer

  1. A Student-Led Introduction to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health for First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosz, Andrea M; Gutierrez, Daniel; Lui, Andrea A; Chang, Julia J; Cole-Kelly, Kathy; Ng, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals face significant health disparities. This is in part because many physicians are not sensitive to, and/or are underprepared to address, LGBT-specific concerns. To help meet this need, we, a group of second- and fourth-year medical students with faculty oversight, organized a session on LGBT health for first-year medical students. The three second-year and one fourth-year student authors designed a mandatory session for the 167 first-years at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Cleveland, OH. The 2-hour session consisted of a student-delivered presentation, a patient panel, and a small-group session. Students' LGBT health knowledge and confidence in providing care were assessed anonymously before and after the session, and individuals' pre- and post-session assessments were paired using student-generated identifiers. A total of 73 complete, matched pre-/post-session assessments were received. Students' familiarity with LGBT terminology and demographics increased significantly after the session. Students' perceived preparedness and comfort in providing LGBT-specific care significantly improved in most areas as well. Students strongly praised the session, in particular the patient panel. A student-led educational session on LGBT health can effectively improve first-year medical students' LGBT knowledge and confidence to provide care.

  2. Usefulness of Crossword Puzzles in Helping First-Year BVSc Students Learn Veterinary Terminology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelo, Angel; Castillo, Cristina; May, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate terminology is essential for successful communication among health professionals. However, students have traditionally been encouraged to learn terminology by rote memorization and recall, strategies that students try to avoid. The use of crossword puzzles as a learning tool has been evaluated in other education disciplines, but not for terminology related to veterinary science. Hence, the objective of this study was to test whether crossword puzzles might be an effective aid to learning veterinary terminology. Forty-two first-year students enrolled in a Bachelor of Veterinary Science program were randomly divided into two groups and their previous knowledge of veterinary terms tested. One group received a list of 30 terms with their definitions. The other group received the same list plus six specially designed puzzles incorporating these 30 terms. After 50 minutes, both groups completed a post-intervention test and the results were compared statistically. The results showed that the students using the crossword puzzles performed better in the post-intervention test, correctly retaining more terms than the students using only rote learning. In addition, qualitative data, gathered through an electronic survey and focus group discussions, revealed a positive attitude among students toward the use of crossword puzzles.

  3. Practice of walking, moderate and vigorous physical activity and associated factors in first year undergraduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Salvador Claumann

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The changes that occur with the beginning of university life may interfere with the practice of physical activities by students. The aim was to investigate the association between the practice of walking, moderate and vigorous physical activities with sociodemographic factors and weight status in freshman students in the first semester of the first year of a public university in Florianopolis/SC. This study assessed198 students (86 men and 112 women. The practice of physical activities was collected with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire – IPAQ, short version. Students of human and educational sciences reported higher amounts of moderate physical activity when compared to health and exact science counterparts (p< 0.05. It was verified that male students, from higher economic status, from the health sciences, and full-time students showed higher time of practice of vigorous physical activity (p< 0.05. Significant associations were also observed between study period and walking, and between gender, scientific field and vigorous physical activity. It was concluded that the variables associated with the practice of physical activity differ according to the type and intensity of physical activity.

  4. Exploring first-year undergraduate medical students' self-directed learning readiness to physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Reem Rachel; Fisher, Murray; Kamath, Asha; Izzati, T Aizan; Nabila, Saidatul; Atikah, Nik Nur

    2011-12-01

    Medical students are expected to possess self-directed learning skills to pursue lifelong learning. Previous studies have reported that the readiness for self-directed learning depends on personal attributes as well as the curriculum followed in institutions. Melaka Manipal Medical College of Manipal University (Karnataka, India) offers a Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery (MBBS) twinning program that is of 5 yr in duration. Keeping in mind the amount of time that the curriculum has devoted for self-directed learning, we explored the self-directed learning readiness of first-year MBBS students (n = 130) using a self-directed learning readiness scale (SDLRS) and explored the correlation between SDLRS scores of high achievers, medium achievers, and low achievers with their academic performance in physiology examinations. Students were requested to respond to each item of the SDLRS on a Likert scale. Median scores of the three scales of the SDLRS were compared across the three groups of students using a Kruskall-Wallis test. SDLRS scores of the students (n = 130) were correlated with their marks in theory papers of first, second, and third block-end examinations using Spearmann's correlation coefficient. The mean item score for desire for learning was found to be higher followed by self-control and self-management. Data analyses showed significantly high (P learning and ability of self-control, students need to be supported in their self-management skills.

  5. Predicting the "Freshman 15": Environmental and Psychological Predictors of Weight Gain in First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella-Zarb, Rachel A.; Elgar, Frank J.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To investigate weight gain in first-year university students; and (2) to examine whether environmental and psychological factors, specifically accommodation and stress, predict weight gain. Methods: Eighty-four first-year university students (77 per cent female) were weighed and completed the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen, Kamarck…

  6. Predicting Physical Activity of First-Year University Students: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Matthew Yiu Wing; Bray, Steven Russell; Ginis, Kathleen Anne Martin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to apply Ajzen's theory of planned behavior (TPB) and a measure of past physical activity behavior to predict first-year students' physical activity intentions and behavior. Participants and Methods: First-year university students (N = 212) completed measures of TPB variables and past physical activity at…

  7. First-Year Students' Use of Social Network Sites to Reduce the Uncertainty of Anticipatory Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Isolde K.; Lerstrom, Alan; Tintle, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    This study surveyed 399 incoming first-year students at two colleges in the Midwest on their use of social network sites before college entry and its impact on various dimensions of the first-year experience. Significant correlations were found for two pairs of variables: (a) students who used social network sites before arriving on campus…

  8. Helping First-Year Students Get Grit: The Impact of Intentional Assignments on the Development of Grit, Tenacity, and Perseverance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Joann S.

    2017-01-01

    College student persistence is of the most challenging issues currently facing higher education. This study is an exploration of grit, tenacity, and perseverance as demonstrated by 43 first-year students at a small, teaching-intensive university in South Texas in response to two required exercises assigned in a first-year seminar. Student…

  9. It's almost a mindset that teachers need to change : First-year students' need to be inducted into time management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J.; Jansen, E.P.W.A.; Torenbeek, M.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the findings related to a number of research projects investigating students' expectations and experiences of the first year in higher education. In particular, findings with regard to first-year students' expectations and challenges with issues of time management are

  10. Global Consciousness and Pillars of Sustainable Development: A Study on Self-Perceptions of the First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyeva, Tamara; Douglas, William

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to provide data on the self-perceived state of sustainability consciousness of first-year Hong Kong students. Design/methodology/approach: Within a mixed-method research design framework, the authors conducted 787 questionnaires and collected 989 reflective narratives of first-year students of a university in Hong Kong,…

  11. Classroom Karaoke: A Social and Academic Transition Strategy to Enhance the First-Year Experience of Youth Studies Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    An innovative icebreaker initiative--"classroom karaoke"--was deployed at the beginning of a first-year undergraduate course in youth studies at an Australian university. The study used karaoke as a social and academic transition strategy to enhance students' first-year experience at university. Students responded positively to this…

  12. It's almost a mindset that teachers need to change : First-year students' need to be inducted into time management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J.; Jansen, E.P.W.A.; Torenbeek, M.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the findings related to a number of research projects investigating students' expectations and experiences of the first year in higher education. In particular, findings with regard to first-year students' expectations and challenges with issues of time management are reported

  13. The Effects of a Pedometer-Based Intervention on First-Year University Students: A Randomized Control Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Paul; Caperchione, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effects of a 12-week pedometer-based intervention on the physical activity behavior, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), and psychological well-being of first-year university students. Participants: First-year university students (N = 184) were recruited during September 2012 and randomly assigned to an intervention…

  14. Predicting Physical Activity of First-Year University Students: An Application of the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Matthew Yiu Wing; Bray, Steven Russell; Ginis, Kathleen Anne Martin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to apply Ajzen's theory of planned behavior (TPB) and a measure of past physical activity behavior to predict first-year students' physical activity intentions and behavior. Participants and Methods: First-year university students (N = 212) completed measures of TPB variables and past physical activity at…

  15. Where from, Who, Why and How? A Study of the Use of Sources by First Year L2 University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Celia; Morton, Janne; Storch, Neomy

    2013-01-01

    Knowing how to use sources effectively often poses considerable challenges for first year undergraduate students for whom English is a second language (L2). In this longitudinal case study we investigated the selection and self-reported use of source materials by thirteen first year L2 undergraduate students from a range of disciplines enrolled at…

  16. The Relationships among Academic Attitudes, Psychological Attitudes, and the First-Semester Academic Achievement of First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Amy L.; Weigand, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among academic and psychological attitudes and academic achievement of first-year students. The College Resilience Scale, the Academic Motivation Scale, the College Self-Efficacy Inventory, and the University Environment Scale were administered to 164 first-year undergraduate students enrolled at a large RU/VH…

  17. Perceived Norms and Alcohol Use among First-Year College Student-Athletes' Different Types of Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massengale, Kelley E. C.; Ma, Alice; Rulison, Kelly L.; Milroy, Jeffrey J.; Wyrick, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe first-year college student-athletes' friendship contexts and test whether their perceptions of alcohol use and approval by different types of friends are associated with their own alcohol use. Participants: First-year student-athletes (N = 2,622) from 47 colleges and universities participating in National Collegiate Athletic…

  18. The Impact of Self-Concept and College Involvement on the First-Year Success of Medical Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying-Xue; Ou, Chun-Quan; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Wan, Cheng-Song; Guo, Cui; Li, Li; Chen, Ping-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Students' first-year academic success plays a critical role on their overall development in college, which implies the need to concentrate on identifying ways to improve students' first-year academic success. Different from most research on the subject, this study attempted to combine the sociological perspective of college impact with a…

  19. Perceived Norms and Alcohol Use among First-Year College Student-Athletes' Different Types of Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massengale, Kelley E. C.; Ma, Alice; Rulison, Kelly L.; Milroy, Jeffrey J.; Wyrick, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To describe first-year college student-athletes' friendship contexts and test whether their perceptions of alcohol use and approval by different types of friends are associated with their own alcohol use. Participants: First-year student-athletes (N = 2,622) from 47 colleges and universities participating in National Collegiate Athletic…

  20. Oral vs. Vaginal Sex Experiences and Consequences Among First-Year College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Eva S; Vasilenko, Sara A; Leavitt, Chelom E

    2016-02-01

    To fully understand late adolescents' experiences of oral sex, we must consider both risk and normative developmental perspectives. Sexual experiences include a range of behaviors, but research on sexual behaviors and consequences focuses primarily on vaginal sex. Oral sex occurs at rates similar to vaginal sex, and carries some, though less, risk than vaginal sex. The current study examined the event-level prevalence and consequences of oral sex compared to vaginal sex with other-sex partners in first-year college students. Daily data were from recently sexually active first-year college students (N = 253 people, 834 days; M age, 18.4 years; SD = 0.4; 56% female; 31% Hispanic/Latino; 17% African American, 14% Asian American/Pacific Islander, 25% European American, 12% multiracial) who reported on sexual behaviors and consequences. Both positive (intimacy, physical satisfaction) and negative (worrying about health, guilt) consequences were less common for oral than vaginal sex. Gender differences suggested that female adolescents may find vaginal sex more rewarding than oral sex, whereas male adolescents may find them equally rewarding.

  1. Physical and mental health perspectives of first year undergraduate rural university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Rafat; Guppy, Michelle; Robertson, Suzanne; Temple, Elizabeth

    2013-09-15

    University students are often perceived to have a privileged position in society and considered immune to ill-health and disability. There is growing evidence that a sizeable proportion experience poor physical health, and that the prevalence of psychological disorders is higher in university students than their community peers. This study examined the physical and mental health issues for first year Australian rural university students and their perception of access to available health and support services. Cross-sectional study design using an online survey form based on the Adolescent Screening Questionnaire modeled on the internationally recognised HEADSS survey tool. The target audience was all first-year undergraduate students enrolled in an on-campus degree program. The response rate was 41% comprising 355 students (244 females, 111 males). Data was analysed using standard statistical techniques including descriptive and inferential statistics; and thematic analysis of the open-ended responses. The mean age of the respondents was 20.2 years (SD 4.8). The majority of the students lived in on-campus residential college style accommodation, and a third combined part-time paid work with full-time study. Most students reported being in good physical health. However, on average two health conditions were reported over the past six months, with the most common being fatigue (56%), frequent headaches (26%) and allergies (24%). Mental health problems included anxiety (25%), coping difficulties (19.7%) and diagnosed depression (8%). Most respondents reported adequate access to medical doctors and support services for themselves (82%) and friends (78%). However the qualitative comments highlighted concerns about stigma, privacy and anonymity in seeking counselling. The present study adds to the limited literature of physical and mental health issues as well as barriers to service utilization by rural university students. It provides useful baseline data for the

  2. Exploring lecturers' views of first-year health science students' misconceptions in biomedical domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenhorst, Elmi; Mamede, Sílvia; Hartman, Nadia; Schmidt, Henk G

    2015-05-01

    Research has indicated that misconceptions hamper the process of knowledge construction. Misconceptions are defined as persistent ideas not supported by current scientific views. Few studies have explored how misconceptions develop when first year health students conceptually move between anatomy and physiology to construct coherent knowledge about the human body. This explorative study analysed lecturers' perceptions of first-year health science students' misconceptions in anatomy and physiology to gain a deeper understanding of how and why misconceptions could potentially arise, by attempting to link sources of misconceptions with four schools of thought, namely theories on concept formation, complexity, constructivism and conceptual change. This was a qualitative study where ten lecturers involved in teaching anatomy and physiology in the health science curricula at the University of Cape Town were interviewed to explore perceptions of students' misconceptions. Analytical induction was used to uncover categories within the interview data by using a coding system. A deeper analysis was done to identify emerging themes that begins to explore a theoretical understanding of why and how misconceptions arise. Nine sources of misconceptions were identified, including misconceptions related to language, perception, three dimensional thinking, causal reasoning, curricula design, learning styles and moving between macro and micro levels. The sources of misconceptions were then grouped together to assist educators with finding educational interventions to overcome potential misconceptions. This explorative study is an attempt in theory building to understand what is at the core of biomedical misconceptions. Misconceptions identified in this study hold implications for educators as not all students have the required building blocks and cognitive skills to successfully navigate their way through biomedical courses. Theoretical insight into the sources of misconceptions can

  3. Basic life support knowledge of first-year university students from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, S V; Margarido, M R R A; Caires, I S; Santos, R A N; Souza, S G; Souza, J M A; Martimiano, R R; Dutra, C S K; Palha, P; Zanetti, A C G; Pazin-Filho, A

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate knowledge of first aid among new undergraduates and whether it is affected by their chosen course. A questionnaire was developed to assess knowledge of how to activate the Mobile Emergency Attendance Service - MEAS (Serviço de Atendimento Móvel de Urgência; SAMU), recognize a pre-hospital emergency situation and the first aid required for cardiac arrest. The students were also asked about enrolling in a first aid course. Responses were received from 1038 of 1365 (76.04%) new undergraduates. The questionnaires were completed in a 2-week period 1 month after the beginning of classes. Of the 1038 respondents (59.5% studying biological sciences, 11.6% physical sciences, and 28.6% humanities), 58.5% knew how to activate the MEAS/SAMU (54.3% non-biological vs 61.4% biological, P=0.02), with an odds ratio (OR)=1.39 (95%CI=1.07-1.81) regardless of age, sex, origin, having a previous degree or having a relative with cardiac disease. The majority could distinguish emergency from non-emergency situations. When faced with a possible cardiac arrest, 17.7% of the students would perform chest compressions (15.5% non-biological vs 19.1% biological first-year university students, P=0.16) and 65.2% would enroll in a first aid course (51.1% non-biological vs 74.7% biological, Pstudents recognized emergency situations, a significant proportion did not know the MEAS/SAMU number and only a minority had sufficient basic life support skills to help with cardiac arrest. A significant proportion would not enroll in a first aid course. Biological first-year university students were more prone to enroll in a basic life support course.

  4. A Dual-Process Examination of Alcohol-Related Consequences Among First-Year College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, Kimberly A; Turrisi, Rob; Cleveland, Michael J; Scaglione, Nichole M; Reavy, Racheal; Sell, Nichole M; Varvil-Weld, Lindsey

    2015-11-01

    Despite showing reductions in college student drinking, interventions have shown some inconsistency in their ability to successfully decrease consequences. With the goal of improving prevention efforts, the purpose of this study was to examine the role of consequence-specific constructs, in addition to drinking, that influence students' experiences with alcohol-related problems. The study examined how drinking and protective behaviors mediated the relationships between students' willingness to experience consequences, intentions to avoid them, and four categories of alcohol-related problems (physiological, social, sexual, and academic). First-year college student drinkers (n = 2,024) at a large northeastern university completed surveys during the fall and spring of their freshman year. As expected, different patterns of associations emerged for physiological and nonphysiological consequences. When physiological consequences (e.g., hangover, vomiting) were examined, drinking significantly mediated the effect of willingness on the consequences. Drinking-specific protective behaviors indirectly influenced consequences through drinking behaviors whereas general protective behaviors did not. When nonphysiological (e.g., social, sexual, academic) consequences were examined, drinking and general protective behaviors emerged as significant mediators of the effects of willingness and intentions on the consequences, whereas drinking-specific protective behaviors did not. The results suggest that prevention efforts (e.g., personalized feedback) could be tailored to address specific types of protective behaviors as well as specific types of consequences frequently experienced by college students.

  5. Psychological and sociocultural adjustment of first-year international students: Trajectories and predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Reiko; Frazier, Patricia; Syed, Moin

    2015-07-01

    Despite the increasing number of international students in U.S. universities, the temporal course of international students' adjustment has not been adequately tested, and only 1 study to date has examined multiple trajectories of adjustment. Therefore, the first goal of the current study was to explore multiple trajectories of adjustment among first-year international students using a broader range of adjustment measures (i.e., psychological distress, positive psychological adjustment, sociocultural adjustment). The second goal was to identify important predictors of trajectories. A wide range of individual and interpersonal predictor variables was examined, including academic stress and perceived control over academic stress, personality, social relationships, and language-related factors. Undergraduate and graduate international students in their first semester at a large midwestern university participated in this 5-wave longitudinal study (N = 248) that spanned 1 academic year. Multiple trajectories emerged, and the trajectories varied across the 3 adjustment measures. Average trajectories masked the trajectories of small groups of students who maintained or increased in terms of adjustment difficulties across outcomes. Contrary to popular theories, the U-shape adjustment trajectory (characterized by initial euphoria, distress, and then recovery) did not emerge. The most consistent predictors of adjustment trajectories were perceived present control over academic stress and Neuroticism. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. ATTITUDE AND EMOTIONAL REACTIONS OF FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS TOWARDS CADAVER DISSECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivaraman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: Cadaver dissection is mandatory for medical education. The cadaver dissection develops the knowledge and skill of the students regarding human anatomy to understand and fulfill the requirement of medical education. AIM: This study was conducted with objective of observing attitude and emotional reactions of first year Medical students to the dissecting cadavers. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The attitude and view of students on cadaver dissection was assessed by a modified structured pretested Questionnaire. Also the emotional reactions at the time of doing dissection were assessed by a standard questionnaire ALE (Appraisal of Life Events scale. RESULTS: Of the 141 participants, 49% were female and 51% were Male. The attitude and emotional status of students varied in cadaver dissection and even among sex. Altogether 83.68% had experienced the excitement, 85.82% sympathized for the cadaver. However, 92.90% expressed confidence over cadaver dissection and 98.57 % answered cadaver dissection was the best method for Medical Education to understand human anatomy. CONCLUSION: Majority of Medical students viewed Cadaver dissection was the best method for medical education to understand Human anatomy. They do not report their first exposure to cadaver dissection as an aversive experience. Instead, as per ALE (Appraisal of Life Events scale, they found it to be a positive and a challenging life event.

  7. Perceived stress in first year medical students - associations with personal resources and emotional distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinen, Ines; Bullinger, Monika; Kocalevent, Rüya-Daniela

    2017-01-06

    Medical students have been found to report high levels of perceived stress, yet there is a lack of theoretical frameworks examining possible reasons. This cross-sectional study examines correlates of perceived stress in medical students on the basis of a conceptual stress model originally developed for and applied to the general population. The aim was to identify via structural equation modeling the associations between perceived stress and emotional distress (anxiety and depression), taking into account the activation of personal resources (optimism, self-efficacy and resilient coping). Within this cross-sectional study, 321 first year medical students (age 22 ± 4 years, 39.3% men) completed the Perceived Stress Questionnaire (PSQ-20), the Self-Efficacy Optimism Scale (SWOP) and the Brief Resilient Coping Scale (BRCS) as well as the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-4). The statistical analyses used t-tests, ANOVA, Spearman Rho correlation and multiple regression analysis as well as structural equation modeling. Medical students reported higher levels of perceived stress and higher levels of anxiety and depression than reference samples. No statistically significant differences in stress levels were found within the sample according to gender, migration background or employment status. Students reported more self-efficacy, optimism, and resilient coping and higher emotional distress compared to validation samples and results in other studies. Structural equation analysis revealed a satisfactory fit between empirical data and the proposed stress model indicating that personal resources modulated perceived stress, which in turn had an impact on emotional distress. Medical students' perceived stress and emotional distress levels are generally high, with personal resources acting as a buffer, thus supporting the population-based general stress model. Results suggest providing individual interventions for those students, who need support in dealing with the

  8. Assessment of first-year veterinary students' clinical skills using objective structured clinical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, Kent; Read, Emma K; Vallevand, Andrea; Krebs, Gord; Donszelmann, Darlene; Muelling, Christoph K W; Freeman, Sarah L

    2010-01-01

    The DVM program at the University of Calgary offers a Clinical Skills course each year for the first three years. The course is designed to teach students the procedural skills required for entry-level general veterinary practice. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) were used to assess students' performance on these procedural skills. A series of three OSCEs were developed for the first year. Content was determined by an exam blueprint, exam scoring sheets were created, rater training was provided, a mock OSCE was performed with faculty and staff, and the criterion-referencing Ebel method was used to set cut scores for each station using two content experts. Each station and the overall exam were graded as pass or fail. Thirty first-year DVM students were assessed. Content validity was ensured by the exam blueprint and expert review. Reliability (coefficient α) of the stations from the three OSCE exams ranged from 0.0 to 0.71. The three exam reliabilities (Generalizability Theory) were, for OSCE 1, G=0.56; OSCE 2, G=0.37; and OSCE 3, G=0.32. Preliminary analysis has suggested that the OSCEs demonstrate face and content validity, and certain stations demonstrated adequate reliability. Overall exam reliability was low, which reflects issues with first-time exam delivery. Because this year was the first that this course was taught and this exam format was used, work continues in the program on the teaching of the procedural skills and the development and revision of OSCE stations and scoring checklists.

  9. The impact of gross anatomy laboratory on first year medical students' interest in a surgical career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulcrano, Marisa E; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Kumar, Anagha

    2016-09-01

    This study sought to determine the impact of gross anatomy laboratory (GA) on first year medical students' (M1) interest in a surgical career. Secondary objectives included identifying other influences in M1s' career decision making. This prospective study included surveys before and after GA. All M1s enrolled in GA were invited to participate. Sixty students completed both the pre- and post-test surveys. A 5-point Likert-type scale surveyed participants' interests, specific personality traits, experience during the course of GA, and likelihood of pursuing a surgical career. Statistical analysis included Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test and (Polychotomous) Ordinal Logistic Regression Model. Students' desire to work with their hands increased (50 vs. 33.3%) and enjoyment working with instruments and tools similarly increased (50 vs. 41.7%). Likelihood of pursuing a surgical career after gross anatomy increased in 31.7% of students, decreased in 16.7%, and was unchanged in 51.7%. Over 75% of students with a prior interest in surgery and 21% of those who previously felt neutral agreed that they were likely to pursue a career in surgery at the conclusion of the laboratory. Students with a surgeon family member were 0.1976 times as likely to exhibit a positive change in interest (P values 0.024). Gross anatomy may influence up to a third of the class to consider a surgical career, especially those with a prior interest in surgery and those previously feeling ambivalent. Students with a surgeon family member became less likely to enter a surgical career after gross anatomy. Clin. Anat. 29:691-695, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Comparing gender awareness in Dutch and Swedish first-year medical students - results from a questionaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersson Jenny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To ascertain good and appropriate healthcare for both women and men implementation of gender perspectives in medical education is needed. For a successful implementation, knowledge about students' attitudes and beliefs about men, women, and gender is crucial. The aim of this study was to compare attitudes to gender and gender stereotyping among Dutch and Swedish male and female medical students. Methods In this cross-sectional study, we measured the attitudes and assumptions about gender among 1096 first year medical students (616 Dutch and 480 Swedish with the validated Nijmegen Gender Awareness in Medicine Scale (N-GAMS. The response rate was 94% in the Netherlands and 93% in Sweden. Univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to compare the scores between Dutch and Swedish male and female students. Linear regressions were used to analyze the importance of the background variables. Results There were significant differences in attitudes to gender between Dutch and Swedish students. The Swedish students expressed less stereotypical thinking about patients and doctors and the Dutch were more sensitive to gender differences. The students' sex mattered for gender stereotyping, with male students in both countries agreeing more with stereotypical statements. Students' age, father's birth country and mother's education level had some impact on the outcome. Conclusions There are differences between cultures as well as between men and women in gender awareness that need to be considered when implementing gender in medical education. This study suggests that to arouse the students' interest in gender issues and make them aware of the significance of gender in medical work, the examples used in discussions need to be relevant and challenging in the context of the specific country. Due to different levels of knowledge and different attitudes within the student population it is important to create a climate for dialogue where

  11. PREVALENCE OF HYPERTENSION, OBESITY AND ANEMIA AMONG FIRST YEAR DENTAL STUDENTS IN BAREILLY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qazi Rais

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Hypertension, obesity and nutritional anemia is highly prevalent and largely undiagnosed among dental students. Early identification of these diseases is essential among them, considering their role as future surgeons and role models in public health intervention. Prevalence of hypertension, obesity and anemia among the dental students of Bareilly was studied. METHODS: This cross sectional study was carried out among the first year students of Institute of Dental Sciences, Bareilly after obtaining institutional ethical committee clearance and informed consent of respondents. A structured and pretested questionnaire was used to collect information about the respondent’s demographic profile, family history of hypertension and diabetes, the measurement of blood pressure, anthropometrical parameters and anemia. RESULTS: Out of the 107 respondents, nearly 28.0% had a positive family history of hypertension and/or diabetes. The prevalence of hypertension was 27.1% while about 28.0 % were found to be overweight. Nearly 57.6% had an increased waist hip ratio and about 14.8% were anemic. A higher proportion of males were found to be overweight and hypertensive as compared to the females, the difference being statistically insignificant. Increased waist hip ratio was found to be significantly higher among the males while anemia was significantly higher among the females (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Early identification of hypertension, obesity and anemia and their modification among dental students is required.

  12. Thinking about thinking: changes in first-year medical students' metacognition and its relation to performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Wei Han; Vadivelu, Jamunarani; Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Sim, Joong Hiong

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown the importance of metacognition in medical education. Metacognitive skills consist of two dimensions: knowledge of metacognition and regulation of metacognition. This study hypothesizes that the knowledge and regulation of metacognition is significantly different at the beginning and end of the academic year, and a correlation exists between the two dimensions of metacognitive skills with academic performance. The Metacognitive Skills Inventory comprising 52 Likert-scale items was administered to 159 first-year medical students at the University of Malaya. Students' year-end results were used to measure their academic performance. A paired sample t-test indicated no significant difference for knowledge of metacognition at the beginning and end of the academic year. A paired sample t-test revealed significant difference for regulation of metacognition at the beginning and end of the academic year. A very strong correlation was found between the two dimensions of metacognition. The correlation between knowledge and regulation of metacognition with students' academic result was moderate. The improvement in students' metacognitive regulation and the moderate correlation between knowledge and regulation of metacognition with academic performance at the end of the academic year indicate the probable positive influence of the teaching and learning activities in the medical program.

  13. First-Year College Students With ADHD and/or LD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPaul, George J; Pinho, Trevor D; Pollack, Brittany L; Gormley, Matthew J; Laracy, Seth D

    Students with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and/or learning disabilities (LD) experience significant challenges in making the transition from high school to college. This study examined the ways first-year college students with ADHD, LD, ADHD+LD, and comparison peers differ in engagement, core self-evaluation, high school preparation behaviors, and goals/expectations. Participants were from the 2010 Cooperative Institutional Research Program Freshman Survey, including students with ADHD ( n = 5,511), LD ( n = 2,626), ADHD+LD ( n = 1,399), or neither disability ( n = 5,737). Controlling for SAT/ACT scores, family income, and parent education, students with ADHD, LD, or ADHD+LD differed from peers on self-ratings of academic and creative abilities and psychosocial functioning; school disengagement, substance use, and emotional difficulties during their last year of high school; reasons for attending college; and expectations for college activities. Several differences were found between disability groups. Implications for college support services and future research are discussed.

  14. Learning in First-Year Biology: Approaches of Distance and On-Campus Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Frances Catherine

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to extend previous research into learning of tertiary biology, by exploring the learning approaches adopted by two groups of students studying the same first-year biology topic in either on-campus or off-campus "distance" modes. The research involved 302 participants, who responded to a topic-specific version of the Study Process Questionnaire, and in-depth interviews with 16 of these students. Several quantitative analytic techniques, including cluster analysis and Rasch differential item functioning analysis, showed that the younger, on-campus cohort made less use of deep approaches, and more use of surface approaches than the older, off-campus group. At a finer scale, clusters of students within these categories demonstrated different patterns of learning approach. Students' descriptions of their learning approaches at interview provided richer complementary descriptions of the approach they took to their study in the topic, showing how deep and surface approaches were manifested in the study context. These findings are critically analysed in terms of recent literature questioning the applicability of learning approaches theory in mass education, and their implications for teaching and research in undergraduate biology.

  15. Patients treated by dental students in outreach: the first year of a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkind, A; Potter, C; Watts, C; Blinkhorn, F; Duxbury, J; Hull, P; Blinkhorn, A S

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the patients treated by 4th year undergraduate students during the first year of a pilot outreach course to teach Restorative Dentistry in community clinics in 2001-02. Data were collected from 908 summaries of patient treatment completed by the students, and from 139 patient questionnaires. Some 75% of patients were aged between 16 and 64, 58% were female, and 16% had dental phobia or anxiety. Most lived locally to the clinic and 41% made their initial contact as an emergency or drop-in. Some 37% made only a single visit (including children treated as emergencies) but 22% made six or more visits. Did not attend (DNA) was a problem and 18% of patients DNA to complete their treatment. Students undertook the full range of restorative procedures, with the emphasis on direct restorations, preventive treatment and advice, scaling, extractions and emergency treatment. Patients' main reasons for attending the clinic were lay recommendation, the need for treatment, convenience, free treatment, or the lack of access to a dentist. Some 30% said they did not have or did not know of an alternative source of dental care, and half had not seen a dentist for at least 2 years. The study demonstrates that despite difficulties related to attendance, a suitable patient base can be established offering students the opportunity to provide comprehensive care for adults in a primary care setting.

  16. A Research Preparatory Program for First-Year College Students: Student Selection and Preparation Lead to Persistence in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiduc, Rachael R.; Drane, Denise; Beitel, Greg J.; Flores, Luke C.

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate research experiences may increase persistence in STEM majors. We describe a research program that targets first-year students selected for their curiosity and attitudes towards science. We explain the implementation of the program over 3 years and present evaluation data using a group of matched controls. Participants and controls…

  17. Strengths-Based Approaches in College and University Student Housing: Implications for First-Year Students' Retention and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Taylor, Leonard, Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Strengths-based approaches are expanding in higher education; however, little is known about the impacts of these approaches in housing and residence life settings. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between first-year students' strengths interactions in housing and their engagement and retention. The results suggest that…

  18. Learning approaches as predictors of academic performance in first year health and science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamonson, Yenna; Weaver, Roslyn; Chang, Sungwon; Koch, Jane; Bhathal, Ragbir; Khoo, Cheang; Wilson, Ian

    2013-07-01

    To compare health and science students' demographic characteristics and learning approaches across different disciplines, and to examine the relationship between learning approaches and academic performance. While there is increasing recognition of a need to foster learning approaches that improve the quality of student learning, little is known about students' learning approaches across different disciplines, and their relationships with academic performance. Prospective, correlational design. Using a survey design, a total of 919 first year health and science students studying in a university located in the western region of Sydney from the following disciplines were recruited to participate in the study - i) Nursing: n = 476, ii) Engineering: n = 75, iii) Medicine: n = 77, iv) Health Sciences: n = 204, and v) Medicinal Chemistry: n = 87. Although there was no statistically significant difference in the use of surface learning among the five discipline groups, there were wide variations in the use of deep learning approach. Furthermore, older students and those with English as an additional language were more likely to use deep learning approach. Controlling for hours spent in paid work during term-time and English language usage, both surface learning approach (β = -0.13, p = 0.001) and deep learning approach (β = 0.11, p = 0.009) emerged as independent and significant predictors of academic performance. Findings from this study provide further empirical evidence that underscore the importance for faculty to use teaching methods that foster deep instead of surface learning approaches, to improve the quality of student learning and academic performance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Basic life support knowledge of first-year university students from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Santos

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate knowledge of first aid among new undergraduates and whether it is affected by their chosen course. A questionnaire was developed to assess knowledge of how to activate the Mobile Emergency Attendance Service - MEAS (Serviço de Atendimento Móvel de Urgência; SAMU, recognize a pre-hospital emergency situation and the first aid required for cardiac arrest. The students were also asked about enrolling in a first aid course. Responses were received from 1038 of 1365 (76.04% new undergraduates. The questionnaires were completed in a 2-week period 1 month after the beginning of classes. Of the 1038 respondents (59.5% studying biological sciences, 11.6% physical sciences, and 28.6% humanities, 58.5% knew how to activate the MEAS/SAMU (54.3% non-biological vs 61.4% biological, P=0.02, with an odds ratio (OR=1.39 (95%CI=1.07-1.81 regardless of age, sex, origin, having a previous degree or having a relative with cardiac disease. The majority could distinguish emergency from non-emergency situations. When faced with a possible cardiac arrest, 17.7% of the students would perform chest compressions (15.5% non-biological vs 19.1% biological first-year university students, P=0.16 and 65.2% would enroll in a first aid course (51.1% non-biological vs 74.7% biological, P<0.01, with an OR=2.61 (95%CI=1.98-3.44 adjusted for the same confounders. Even though a high percentage of the students recognized emergency situations, a significant proportion did not know the MEAS/SAMU number and only a minority had sufficient basic life support skills to help with cardiac arrest. A significant proportion would not enroll in a first aid course. Biological first-year university students were more prone to enroll in a basic life support course.

  20. Weight, socio-demographics, and health behaviour related correlates of academic performance in first year university students

    OpenAIRE

    Deliens, Tom; Clarys, Peter; De De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte

    2013-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to examine differences in socio-demographics and health behaviour between Belgian first year university students who attended all final course exams and those who did not. Secondly, this study aimed to identify weight and health behaviour related correlates of academic performance in those students who attended all course exams. Methods: Anthropometrics of 101 first year university students were measured at both the beginning of the first (T1) and second (T2) s...

  1. Zinc Deficiency in First Year Female Students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedyeh Haghollahi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Zinc deficiency is an important health problem in developing countries. The aim of this study was diagnosis of zinc deficiency among young female students of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.Materials and methods: This cross sectional study evaluated 420 medical and paramedical students of Tehran University in 2005. All of them were female and in the first year of their education. Serum concentrations of zinc were measured by enzymatic method students in whom had sufficient criteria to enroll in the study. Zinc concentration more than 85 µ/dl was considered as normal value.  Concentration less than 50 µ/dl was defined as severe zinc deficiency. Mild and moderate  deficiencies were described as zinc levels between 50 to 85 µ/dl. Analysis was performed by t-test, chi-square and ANOVA using SPSS software. Results: Zinc deficiency was found in 7.1% of the participants. In women with body weights between 50.1-60 kg, zinc deficiency was less than patients with body weight of ≤ 50 Kg (p=0.04. In zinc deficient group acne was observed more frequently (p=0.01. Also anemic participants (Hb<12 had lower zinc level than non anemic women (Hb≥12 (p=0.001.Conclusion: This study found severe and mild to moderate zinc deficiency in 1.4% and 5.7% of female students, respectively. Zinc deficiency is common in anemic students. Zinc supplementation is recommended in anemic patients and in cases of confirmed zinc deficiency.

  2. Contextual Shaping of Student Design Practices: The Role of Constraint in First-Year Engineering Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncher, Andrea M.

    thResearch on engineering design is a core area of concern within engineering education, and a fundamental understanding of how engineering students approach and undertake design is necessary in order to develop effective design models and pedagogies. This dissertation contributes to scholarship on engineering design by addressing a critical, but as yet underexplored, problem: how does the context in which students design shape their design practices? Using a qualitative study comprising of video data of design sessions, focus group interviews with students, and archives of their design work, this research explored how design decisions and actions are shaped by context, specifically the context of higher education. To develop a theoretical explanation for observed behavior, this study used the nested structuration. framework proposed by Perlow, Gittell, & Katz (2004). This framework explicated how teamwork is shaped by mutually reinforcing relationships at the individual, organizational, and institutional levels. I appropriated this framework to look specifically at how engineering students working on a course-related design project identify constraints that guide their design and how these constraints emerge as students interact while working on the project. I first identified and characterized the parameters associated with the design project from the student perspective and then, through multi-case studies of four design teams, I looked at the role these parameters play in student design practices. This qualitative investigation of first-year engineering student design teams revealed mutual and interconnected relationships between students and the organizations and institutions that they are a part of. In addition to contributing to research on engineering design, this work provides guidelines and practices to help design educators develop more effective design projects by incorporating constraints that enable effective design and learning. Moreover, I found

  3. Raising the science awareness of first year undergraduate students via an earthquake prediction seminar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, T. D.

    2011-12-01

    The public is fascinated with and fearful of natural hazards such as earthquakes. After every major earthquake there is a surge of interest in earthquake science and earthquake prediction. Yet many people do not understand the challenges of earthquake prediction and the need to fund earthquake research. An earthquake prediction seminar is offered to first year undergraduate students to improve their understanding of why earthquakes happen, how earthquake research is done and more specifically why it is so challenging to issue short-term earthquake prediction. Some of these students may become scientists but most will not. For the majority this is an opportunity to learn how science research works and how it is related to policy and society. The seminar is seven weeks long, two hours per week and has been taught every year for the last four years. The material is presented conceptually; there is very little quantitative work involved. The class starts with a field trip to the Randolph College Seismic Station where students learn about seismographs and the different types of seismic waves. Students are then provided with basic background on earthquakes. They learn how to pick arrival times using real seismograms, how to use earthquake catalogues, how to predict the arrival of an earthquake wave at any location on Earth. Next they learn about long, intermediate, short and real time earthquake prediction. Discussions are an essential part of the seminar. Students are challenged to draw their own conclusions on the pros and cons of earthquake prediction. Time is designated to discuss the political and economic impact of earthquake prediction. At the end of the seven weeks students are required to write a paper and discuss the need for earthquake prediction. The class is not focused on the science but rather the links between the science issues and their economical and political impact. Weekly homework assignments are used to aid and assess students' learning. Pre and

  4. Hope, Optimism and Loneliness among First-Year College Students with Learning Disabilities: A Brief Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstreich, Eyal; Feldman, David B.; Davidson, Oranit B.; Maza, Etai; Margalit, Malka

    2015-01-01

    The goals of the study were to examine personal resources and social distress during the first month in college among students with learning disabilities (LD) and to compare their experiences with non-LD peer. The sample consisted of 335 first-year undergraduate students falling into two groups: 85 students with LD and 250 non-LD students.…

  5. Hope, Optimism and Loneliness among First-Year College Students with Learning Disabilities: A Brief Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstreich, Eyal; Feldman, David B.; Davidson, Oranit B.; Maza, Etai; Margalit, Malka

    2015-01-01

    The goals of the study were to examine personal resources and social distress during the first month in college among students with learning disabilities (LD) and to compare their experiences with non-LD peer. The sample consisted of 335 first-year undergraduate students falling into two groups: 85 students with LD and 250 non-LD students.…

  6. What Does It Mean for a Student to Understand the First-Year Calculus? Perspectives of 24 Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronas, Kimberly S.; DeFranco, Thomas C.; Vinsonhaler, Charles; Gorgievski, Nicholas; Schroeder, Larissa; Hamelin, Chris

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the views of 24 nationally recognized authorities in the field of mathematics, and in particular the calculus, on student understanding of the first-year calculus. A framework emerged that includes four overarching end goals for understanding of the first-year calculus: (a) mastery of the fundamental concepts and-or skills of…

  7. What Does It Mean for a Student to Understand the First-Year Calculus? Perspectives of 24 Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofronas, Kimberly S.; DeFranco, Thomas C.; Vinsonhaler, Charles; Gorgievski, Nicholas; Schroeder, Larissa; Hamelin, Chris

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the views of 24 nationally recognized authorities in the field of mathematics, and in particular the calculus, on student understanding of the first-year calculus. A framework emerged that includes four overarching end goals for understanding of the first-year calculus: (a) mastery of the fundamental concepts and-or skills of…

  8. Does the Confidence of First-Year Undergraduate Students Change over Time According to Achievement Goal Profile?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, David W.; Sander, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the changes in students' academic behavioural confidence over the course of their first year of academic study and whether changes differ by their achievement goal profile. Self-report data were collected from 434 participants in three waves: at the beginning of the first semester of their first year of undergraduate study, at…

  9. Teaching Fundamental Skills in Microsoft Excel to First-Year Students in Quantitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Samuel J.; Abrams, Binyomin

    2015-01-01

    Despite their technological savvy, most students entering university lack the necessary computer skills to succeed in a quantitative analysis course, in which they are often expected to input, analyze, and plot results of experiments without any previous formal education in Microsoft Excel or similar programs. This lack of formal education results…

  10. An Analysis into Metacognition and Family History of Diabetes Mellitus among First Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priya, Ak Sunitha; Babu, Rose; Panchu, Pallavi; Bahuleyan, Biju

    2017-07-01

    Medical course requires immense effort by the students to deal with vast curriculum and hence, the need to adopt metacognitive skill to cope up. Diabetes mellitus has an impact on cognition. Metacognition, being a component of cognition, is likely to be affected by diabetes. Children of diabetic parents have demonstrated insulin resistance which may contribute to metacognitive dysfunction. Hence, it is important to focus into the link between family history of diabetes and metacognition. To evaluate the impact of family history (parents and grandparents) of diabetes mellitus on metacognition in medical students. The present study was a questionnaire based cross-sectional study. Hundred first year medical students were recruited and they filled the Metacognitive Awareness (MA) questionnaire along with the details of the family history of diabetes. The metacognitive awareness questionnaire evaluated MA, its components (metacognitive knowledge and regulation) and their subcomponents. Positive history of diabetes in parents and grandparents were taken into account. The participants were then divided into two groups: with family history of diabetes (n=73) and without family history of diabetes (n=27). The metacognitive awareness and its subcomponents between the two groups were analysed using Student t-test between the groups (with and without family history). Pearson correlation was done to analyse the association between metacognition and family history of diabetes. Metacognitive knowledge (global score) was significantly lower in group with family history of diabetes (10.25±3.01 vs 12.04±3.2, p-valuemetacognitive regulation global score (7.08±1.83 vs 7.99±1.36, p-valueMetacognitive knowledge showed a significant negative correlation with family history of diabetes (correlation coefficient = -0.263, p-valuemetacognitive awareness. The awareness that metacognitive dysfunction can occur in early age in individuals with family history of diabetes would help us to

  11. First Year Medical Students Use Library Resources Emphasized During Instruction Sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Newton Miller

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine if library instruction has an effect on resources cited in student reports. Design – Citation analysis. Setting – The study took place in the medical school of a large American university. Subjects - One hundred eighteen of 120 first-year medical student reports were analyzed. Two reports did not include any works cited and were excluded from the study. Methods - Over the course of 3 years, 15 20-minute library instruction sessions were conducted. The sessions, based on five clinical cases presented each year were conducted approximately two weeks before each report due date. Eighty-five case-specific resources were demonstrated, with teaching plans being modified from year to year based on the frequency of citation of a particular resource cited the prior year. A LibGuide online course guide also directed students to specific resources shown in the class, with content updated every year based on citation trends from the previous year. Every citation referenced in a report was then categorized into a those that were discussed during an instruction session, b those found on a course guide, c those accessible through the library, d those available from course material (i.e., PowerPoint presentation, lecture notes, or e those which did not fall under any of the other categories. A citation could be included in multiple categories. Main Results – The 118 reports included 2983 citations. Over the 3 year period, an average of 77.51% of all citations were from library resources, 49.55% of the citations from a resource demonstrated in the class, and 21.68% from resources found in the course guide. Although citations from sources discussed in class did not increase significantly from year to year, the percent of citations from resources on the course guide significantly increased from 19.40% to 25.63%. Conclusion – Medical students cite library resources emphasized during instruction sessions.

  12. Exploring writing apprehension amongst Afrikaans-speaking first-year students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Writing apprehension relates to a reluctance to write or even fear of writing and little research has been done on this phenomenon in the South African context, especially in terms of compulsory academic literacy and academic linguistic modules. This article aimed at determining the nature of writing apprehension in these two modules in terms of the Daly and Miller’s Writing Apprehension Test (DM-WAT, essay marks and gender at a South African university. The DM-WAT was conducted with two groups of first-year students. An exploratory factor analysis was administered and this led to the identification of four distinct factors which are also associated with related aspects in the literature: positivity towards writing, negativity towards writing, evaluation apprehension and selfefficacy and writing. It is evident that in the context of this study, the chosen instrument could not be used to measure writing apprehension, rather the four identified factors. No linear relationships between essay marks and the identified constructs were clear. Also a practical significant difference between genders was found in terms of the identified constructs. Significantly, students in the compulsory academic literacy module showed a greater tendency towards apprehension in terms of the four identified factors than students from the linguistics module. The chosen instrument could be used to gauge the identified factors. Writing in compulsory academic literacy modules should be taught through individualised student-centred methods, affective support and reflective instruction, positive personal feedback, with additional support through counselling as well as effective modelled writing behaviour from lecturers.

  13. Encouraging Critical Clinical Thinking (CCT) Skills in First-Year Veterinary Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Duncan C; McNeil, Leslie Klis; Schaeffe, David J; Mills, Eric M

    2017-01-01

    First-year didactic course instructors at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine leverage earlier clinical rotation experiences with weekly "Clinical Correlations" exercises to provide early exposure to critical clinical thinking (CCT). This study evaluated the efficacy of individual and paired group exercises on CCT development. Before and after instruction, the Cornell Critical Thinking Test (Level Z) (CCTTZ) was administered. Based on the hypothesis that students with higher scores would coach lower-scoring colleagues during group exercises, heterogeneous groups with similar mean scores were established for the year. Students completed 14 individual and paired group exercises over 6 months. Exercises were designed to increase in complexity and decline in scaffolding. Seven of the exercises were cases using the Applied Learning Platform (ALP) at http://www.whenknowingmatters.com . Student analyses were scored according to a six-category critical-thinking rubric using a 5-point scale. Consistent with our hypothesis, individual and group rubric scores increased significantly, plateauing near the end of the year. Contrary to our hypothesis, mean overall CCTTZ scores did not change, but there was a small statistically significant increase in the ability to assess the validity of an argument. Student attitudes were mixed. Positive comments focused on reinforcement of prior didactic instruction, while negative comments focused on preparation time needed to conduct research on clinical concepts, and on a lack of explicit evaluation by summative examinations. Nonetheless, end-of-year GPAs correlated linearly with cumulative individual rubric scores. In summary, the value of early curriculum CCT training was confirmed when discipline-specific criteria were applied.

  14. A person-centered approach to understanding negative reinforcement drinking among first year college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Laura J; Armeli, Stephen; Tennen, Howard; Austad, Carol S; Raskin, Sarah A; Fallahi, Carolyn R; Wood, Rebecca; Rosen, Rivkah I; Ginley, Meredith K; Pearlson, Godfrey D

    2013-12-01

    The current study used a person-centered approach (i.e. latent profile analysis) to identify distinct types of college student drinkers based on the predictions of motivational, social learning, and stress and coping theories of maladaptive drinking. A large sample (N=844; 53% female) of first-year undergraduates from two institutions, public and private, who reported consuming one or more drinks in the last three months completed measures of depressive and anxiety symptoms, positive alcohol-outcome expectancies, negative life events, social support, drinking motives, drinking level and drinking-related problems. Latent profile analysis revealed a small subgroup of individuals (n=81, 9%) who conformed to the anticipated high-risk profile; specifically, this group demonstrated high levels of negative affect, coping motives, drinks per week, and drinking-related problems. However, additional groups emerged that showed patterns inconsistent with the proposed vulnerability profile (e.g., high negative affect, positive expectancies, and negative life events, but relatively low drinking levels). Findings from our person-centered approach showing the presence of groups both consistent and inconsistent with the predictions of motivational, social learning, and stress and coping theories highlight the need to identify and target certain college students for prevention and intervention of negative affect-related drinking.

  15. Empathy levels among first year Malaysian medical students: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopakumar A

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aji Gopakumar,1 Jayadevan Sreedharan,1 Gamini Premadasa,2 Jayakumary Muttappallymyalil3 1Statistical Support Facility, 2Medical Education Unit, 3Department of Community Medicine, Gulf Medical University, Ajman, United Arab EmiratesThis letter is in response to the article by Williams et al titled “Empathy levels among first year Malaysian medical students: An observational study” published in Advances in Medical Education and Practice, May 2014.1This observational study addresses the issue of educating medical students about empathy as an attribute – a matter which is often not given enough importance – and including the topic in the academic curriculum, in view of the declining empathy levels observed in clinical practice. We would like to raise some concerns regarding the methods used for data analysis in the paper. The authors have analyzed the data using descriptive statistics such as means and standard deviation (SD that are not appropriate parameters since the instrument used a seven-point Likert scoring scale. It would have been better if they had used median with minimum and maximum rather than the mean and SD. View orignal paper by Williams et al.

  16. Financial socialization of first-year college students: the roles of parents, work, and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Soyeon; Barber, Bonnie L; Card, Noel A; Xiao, Jing Jian; Serido, Joyce

    2010-12-01

    This cross-sectional study tests a conceptual financial socialization process model, specifying four-levels that connect anticipatory socialization during adolescence to young adults' current financial learning, to their financial attitudes, and to their financial behavior. A total of 2,098 first-year college students (61.9% females) participated in the survey, representing a diverse ethnic group (32.6% minority participation: Hispanic 14.9%, Asian/Asian American 9%, Black 3.4%, Native American 1.8% and other 3.5%). Structural equation modeling indicated that parents, work, and high school financial education during adolescence predicted young adults' current financial learning, attitude and behavior, with the role played by parents substantially greater than the role played by work experience and high school financial education combined. Data also supported the proposed hierarchical financial socialization four-level model, indicating that early financial socialization is related to financial learning, which in turn is related to financial attitudes and subsequently to financial behavior. The study presents a discussion of how the theories of consumer socialization and planned behavior were combined effectively to depict the financial development of young adults. Several practical implications are also provided for parents, educators and students.

  17. Transition in, Transition out: a sustainable model to engage first year students in learning. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Chester

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Peer mentoring, presented as an inclusive teaching approach, embedded in the curriculum, has been successfully implemented to support first year student learning. Developing sustainable and scalable models for large first year cohorts, however, provides a challenge. The Transition in, Transition out model is a sustainable peer mentoring model supporting the transition of both first and final year students. The model has been implemented in two Australian psychology programs, one face-to-face and one delivered online. The focus in this Practice Report will be on the outcome data for on-campus first year student at one university. Participants were 231 first year students (166 females and 65 males. Results suggest positive changes in academic performance and learning approaches as well as positive endorsement of the model.

  18. Student Project in Anatomy (SPA) – Making the First Year Medical Students Responsible and Creative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Snigdha; George, Bincy M; Kumar, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Creativity is a combination of ones’ capacity to think outside the box, the gained knowledge and the passion for creating something. It very easily and effectively provides the creator a chance to be responsible for his/her creation and acts as a confidence booster for him/her. Creativity is inherent, but needs to be polished and nurtured. If nurtured well through proper motivation, the creator excels leaps and bounds. It develops an empathetic behaviour in the creator, when he allows his creations to be used by others. Aim The study was done to generate learning resources through academically good students and make them available for the entire class. Materials and Methods Academically, top 16 students were involved in a project of their choice. The projects included preparation of question answers, powerpoint presentations, cross-word puzzles, videos, models, atlases and wall hangers etc., ten weeks were given to finish the project. The project was guided and monitored by teachers. The end product of the project was given to the entire class for use. The perception of users of the end products of the projects was recorded through mini interviews. Results All the students who took part in the project liked working on the project. They felt motivated, rewarded and had mastery on the topic which they used in the project. The students who did not do the project but used the end product of the project also liked the project work. They felt that the end products of the projects were simple, informative and creative. Conclusion By participating in Student Project in Anatomy (SPA), the students get to show their total potential through these creative ways. It provides a fresh and welcome change from the common routine followed otherwise in medical schools. The outcome of the projects can help the entire class. This type of projects can be easily tailored into existing curriculum and in disciplines other than anatomy too. PMID:27790469

  19. Current Alcohol Use is Associated with Sleep Patterns in First-Year College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Reen, Eliza; Roane, Brandy M; Barker, David H; McGeary, John E; Borsari, Brian; Carskadon, Mary A

    2016-06-01

    To examine whether differences exist in self-reported sleep patterns and self-reported alcohol use for first-semester college students who do or do not report drinking during the last 6 months (mo) of high school. Participants were 878 first-year college students. Students completed a survey in late May/early June about alcohol use and consequences, during the last 6 mo of high school; they later completed a daily record of sleep behavior and alcohol use across the first 9 weeks of the first semester of college. High school drinking status (past 6 mo) was classified as positive (HS-6 mo+) or negative (HS-6mo-) based on any indication of drinking on the May/June survey. Collegiate drinking was determined from first-semester daily diary alcohol reports as non-drinkers (0 reported drinks), drinkers (one or fewer heavy episodic drinking episodes (HED)), and drinkers reporting more than one HED episode. Sleep patterns were compared for non-drinkers, drinkers, and HED with no high school drinking history (HS-6mo-/HED). In addition, a separate analysis compared sleep patterns for college HED with (HS-6mo+/HED) and without (HS-6mo-/HED) high school self-reported alcohol use. Increased alcohol consumption in the first semester of college was associated with later bedtimes and rise times. We found no association of high school alcohol use and sleep in those with collegiate HED. Later sleep timing in those with greater alcohol use, supports a connection between sleep patterns and alcohol use. Such an early appearance of this connection may herald the development of alcohol use disorder in some individuals. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  20. Individual lifestyle profile of first-year dental students from the University of Aracatuba, Brazil - 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tânia Adas Saliba

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lifestyle is a factor related to the wellbeing of the individual which alters his or her morbidity and mortality. Objective: To analyze the lifestyle of young people who entered the dentistry program in 2015 and its association with demographic factors. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional analytical observational study was conducted with 114 first-year dental students. The data were collected with two instruments: Individual Lifestyle profile (ILP which evaluated nutrition, physical activity, preventative behavior, social relationship and stress control; and a validated questionnaire that included sociodemographic variables, working condition and the departure from home on the basis of entering higher education. Maximum likelihood statistical tests and U of Mann-Withney were applied, considering a significance α = 0.05. Results: The majority of participants were women with an average age of 20.06 (± 2.65 and 18.96 (± 1.78 in the night and day courses, respectively. 81.57%, left home to enter the university and 7% carried out a paid activity. They presented an undesirable lifestyle profile in relation to nutrition, physical activity and stress control. Nutrition was influenced by the socioeconomic profile (P = 0.014. The consumption of alcohol and tobacco (p = 0.017 and the time dedicated to rest (P = 0.018 were significantly higher in students of in the night program. Conclusion: The lifestyle of young people who entered dentistry was not the desirable one. Living away from parents and the financial dependency of students are factors that affect their lifestyle.

  1. Identifying High-Risk Alcohol Users in First-Year College Students: Attitude, Intention, and Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumper, Megan A; Moreno, Megan A

    2013-07-29

    It is challenging to identify older adolescents at risk for alcohol dependence. This study investigated first-year college students who scored as dependent alcohol users (DAU), and examined their alcohol use and Facebook displays. This longitudinal study recruited college students at two universities to complete a phone interview prior to college (Time 1) and one year later (Time 2). Interviews assessed lifetime and current alcohol use, and attitude (scale of 0=very negative to 6=very positive) and intention (scale of 0=not at all likely to 5=very likely) toward alcohol use. The alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) was administered at Time 2. Facebook profiles were evaluated for the presence of references to alcohol use and intoxication/problematic drinking (I/PD) prior to and throughout the participants first year at the university. Analyses included Chi-squared tests and Wilcoxon sign rank tests. Of 315 participants in the study, a total of 21 (6.7%) of participants met criteria as a DAU at Time 2. DAUs were 54.5% female, 86.4% Caucasian, and 73.7% from University A. At Time 1 all DAUs reported lifetime alcohol use and 91.1% were current drinkers. At Time 2, 95.7% were current drinkers. At Time 1, DAU's mean attitude toward alcohol was 4.0 (SD=1.0) and mean intention was 4.0 (SD=1.4); by Time 2 attitude was 4.6 (SD=0.9), p=0.02, and intention was 4.9 (SD=0.3). At Time 1, 39.1% of DAUs displayed alcohol references on Facebook but only one referenced I/PD. By Time 2, 20 DAU profile owners (90.4%) displayed some reference to alcohol and 52.2% referenced I/PD. Findings suggest areas in which dependence could be identified early, specifically attitude towards alcohol and assessment of Facebook profiles for references to alcohol. These findings have the potential to guide future intervention efforts for this high-risk population.

  2. Technology Supported Facilitation and Assessment of Small Group Collaborative Inquiry Learning in Large First-Year Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrie, Gwendolyn A.; Gahan, Lawrence R.; Matthews, Kelly E.; Weaver, Gabriela C.; Bailey, Chantal; Adams, Peter; Kavanagh, Lydia J.; Long, Phillip D.; Taylor, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative learning activities offer the potential to support mutual knowledge construction and shared understanding amongst students. Introducing collaborative tasks into large first-year undergraduate science classes to create learning environments that foster student engagement and enhance communication skills is appealing. However,…

  3. "Quit School and Become a Taxi Driver": Reframing First-Year Students' Expectations of Assessment in a University Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niven, Penelope

    2009-01-01

    The context of this research is an academic writing course for first-year Social Science students on a four-year extended curriculum at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. This course traditionally uses written formative feedback on drafts of students' assignments and the lecturers were frustrated by the students' negative, minimal responses to the…

  4. Rise and Fall of Sleep Quantity and Quality with Student Experiences across the First Year of University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galambos, Nancy L.; Howard, Andrea L.; Maggs, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    Covariations of self-reported sleep quantity (duration) and quality (disturbances) with affective, stressful, academic, and social experiences across the first year of university in 187 Canadian students (M age=18.4) were examined with multilevel models. Female students reported sleeping fewer hours on average than did male students. In months…

  5. The Effect of a Learner Autonomy Training on the Study Habits of the First-Year ELT Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merç, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the possible effects of a learner autonomy training on the study habits of first-year university students as future EFL teachers. To this end, a questionnaire was used as the research instrument to elicit the study habits of the students. The questionnaire was administered to 122 students enrolled in a…

  6. Relationship between the Phonological Awareness Skills and Writing Skills of the First Year Students at Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Ozge

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the phonological awareness skills and writing skills of the first year students at primary school. In the study, the phonological awareness skills and writing skills of the students were measured at the beginning of the term. Students' writing skills were measured in the middle of…

  7. A Retention Intervention for First-Year Students with Disabilities in an Art and Design Institution: A Program Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnien, Taffey

    2016-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are experiencing historic enrollment of students with disabilities. The focus of this evaluation report was Jumpstart, a transition program for students with disabilities entering their first year of college. The Jumpstart program prepares talented students with disabilities to navigate the college environment at a…

  8. They Do Not Buy It: Exploring the Extent to Which Entering First-Year Students View Themselves as Customers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    While a number of scholars have discussed the pervasiveness of the conceptualization of students as customers, to date there has been limited reliable research examining the extent to which students actually view themselves as customers. Using a survey that was administered to a census of entering first-year students at a large public research…

  9. A Comparison of Student Retention and First Year Programs among Liberal Arts Colleges in the Mountain South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jeff S.; Flora, Bethany H.

    2015-01-01

    First year students, like all students at a university, comprise a diverse mixture of personal traits, backgrounds, experiences, and assorted learning styles. Each of these unique student characteristics can either enhance or inhibit successful integration to the campus community. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of various…

  10. Building Cultural Capital in ­First-Year ­Students at ­Residential Colleges and ­Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Matthew S.; Erb, Natalee M.; Braxton, John M.

    2016-01-01

    College student persistence continues to be a vexing problem for colleges and universities. In Rethinking College Student Persistence (2014), Braxton, Doyle, Hartley, Hirshy, Jones, and McLendon explored the indirect role between cultural capital and first-year student persistence. The significance of this role becomes more important when one…

  11. Life Satisfaction and Perceived Meaningfulness of Learning Experience among First-Year Traditional Graduate Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakunmoju, Sunday; Donahue, Gilpatrick R.; McCoy, Shandria; Mengel, Alison S.

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about life satisfaction and learning experience among first-year graduate students is sparse, despite its relevance to instructional decisions, academic support, and success of students. Adequate knowledge is crucial, as it may help graduate students manage personal and professional life changes associated with graduate education. Using…

  12. A Multilevel Examination of the Influence of Institutional Type on the Moral Reasoning Development of First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of institutional type on the moral reasoning development of 1,469 first-year students. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to account for students nested within institutions. Moral reasoning gains were related to, but not dependent upon, institutional type, with students at liberal arts…

  13. Leadership Attitudes and Beliefs of Incoming First-Year College Students: A Multi-Institutional Study of Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielkiewicz, Richard M.; Fischer, Donald V.; Stelzner, Stephen P.; Overland, Maribeth; Sinner, Alyssa M.

    2012-01-01

    Incoming first-year college students (N = 4,292) were surveyed regarding attitudes and beliefs about leadership. Students' opinions about their leadership ability were high and were related to having an outgoing personality, as well as the number of high school activities in which they had been involved. In addition, students' understanding of…

  14. The Impact of Organizational Features and Student Experiences on Spiritual Development during the First Year of College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovik, Eric G.

    2011-01-01

    The researcher analyzed National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) data for over 7,000 first-year students at nearly 450 institutions to examine the impacts on spiritual development. International, Asian, and first generation students reported gains in spirituality. Participating in worshipful activities, engaging in service learning and…

  15. If It's Going to Be, It's up to Me: First-Year Psychology Students' Experiences Regarding Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naude, Luzelle; Nel, Lindi; van der Watt, Ronel; Tadi, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Student life is marked by substantial growth in areas such as self-regulation abilities. In this article, the experiences of first-year Psychology students are explored through the lenses of the self-determination theory. Both content and thematic analyses were done with 79 students' reflections on the aspects they regarded as…

  16. If It's Going to Be, It's up to Me: First-Year Psychology Students' Experiences Regarding Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naude, Luzelle; Nel, Lindi; van der Watt, Ronel; Tadi, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Student life is marked by substantial growth in areas such as self-regulation abilities. In this article, the experiences of first-year Psychology students are explored through the lenses of the self-determination theory. Both content and thematic analyses were done with 79 students' reflections on the aspects they regarded as…

  17. Engaging First-year University Students in Research: Promise, Potentials, and Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Sangster

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, the Undergraduate Research Initiative at the University of Saskatchewan implemented a pilot project to organize, support, and promote curriculum-based research experience as an integral aspect of participating first-year courses. The framework for the course-based initiative was the research arc; usually in groups, students in these classes would develop a research question, investigate it using discipline-appropriate methodologies, and disseminate the results. Nine classes (Agriculture, Animal Bioscience, Environmental Science, Women’s and Gender Studies, Psychology, Kinesiology, and Interdisciplinary Studies participated in this program pilot. There were four key agents in the program: faculty instructors, research coaches, students in participating first-year classes, and university administrative staff. This preliminary evaluation of the pilot suggests that first-year undergraduate research experiences have potential to benefit the undergraduate student participants as well as the faculty and research coaches involved. The primary benefits that faculty reported experiencing included an increased interest in ways to engage learners, reexamination of and reflection on their teaching strategies, the pragmatic support of a research coach helping with their work load, and an invigoration of their research. The primary benefits to research coaches included enhancement of their professional skills, experience in lesson planning and facilitation, CV building, and an ideology shift in how to best facilitate learning for undergraduate students. The most prominent benefits for undergraduate students appeared to be that they gained a better idea about how researchers think and work, that they increased their understanding of how research works, and that their own research and professional skills had improved. Early, bottom-up evaluation identified characteristics of implementation that appear to best facilitate achievement of the initiative

  18. MAPs to Success: Improving the First Year Experience of alternative entry mature age students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Christensen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Successfully supporting wider participation in higher education requires a coherent blend of administrative, social and academic support.  Access is a necessary but insufficient element of equitable participation.  This is a vital distinction given the outcomes of the Bradley Report and the expectation that higher education institutions will significantly increase the enrolment and participation of equity target groups.  Our project, MAPs to Success, was designed to achieve the best possible outcomes for underprepared mature age students who have been granted alternative entry to the University of Western Australia through the Mature age Access Pathway (MAP.  This alternative entry pathway was first offered in July 2008.  In late 2009 we secured a Learning Teaching Performance Fund Grant to provide support for the original and subsequent cohorts. This paper outlines the theoretical perspectives underpinning this project's social and academic components, and evaluates the impact this project has achieved after its first year of operation. 

  19. Racial and gender disparities in sugar consumption change efficacy among first-year college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Marino A; Beech, Bettina M; Thorpe, Roland J; Mincey, Krista; Griffith, Derek M

    2017-02-01

    Reducing excess dietary sugar intake among emerging adults involves replacing sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs) and sugary snacks (SSN) with healthier options. Few studies have assessed the perceived degree of difficulty associated with making lifestyle modifications among a diverse group of emerging adults. The purpose of this study was to assess race and gender disparities in SSB and SSN behavioral modification efficacy among African American and White first year college students. A self-administered, cross-sectional survey was completed by a subsample of freshmen (n = 499) at a medium-sized southern university. Key outcome variables were self-efficacy in reducing consumption of SSBs and SSNs, respectively. Primary independent variables were BMI, concerns about weight, and attempts to lose weight, takeout food consumption frequency, and physical activity. Half of the sample was African American (50.1%) and a majority of participants were female (59.3%). Fewer African Americans than Whites were very sure they could substitute SSBs with water (48.8% vs 64.7%, p consumption. These findings highlight the need to consider race and gender in interventions seeking to increase self-efficacy to make lifestyle modifications.

  20. Predictors of first-year GPA of medical students: a longitudinal study of 1285 matriculates in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying-Xue; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Li, Li; Wan, Cheng-Song; Peng, Cheng-Hua; Yang, Jun; Ou, Chun-Quan

    2014-04-23

    Although medical education has developed rapidly in the last decade, and the National College Entrance Examination (NCEE) is used as the "gold standard" for admission to medical college in mainland China, there is a lack of literature regarding the influence of NCEE score and other factors on the academic performance of medical students. This study aimed to examine potential predictors of first-year grade point average (GPA) for medical students. This study included 1,285 students who matriculated at a first-tier medical university in mainland China in 2011. The precollege motivational attitudes for each matriculate were investigated via questionnaire. A hierarchical linear model was fitted to regress first-year GPA on a 100-point scale on NCEE score and other student-level and major-level characteristics. NCEE score was a significant predictor of both within-major and between-major variation of first-year GPA for medical students. Majors with higher mean NCEE scores had higher mean GPAs, and higher GPAs were observed among those individuals with higher NCEE scores after controlling for major-level characteristics. First-year GPA differed by certain individual socio-demographic variables. Female students had a 2.44-higher GPA on average than did male students. NCEE repeaters had a 1.55-lower GPA than non-repeaters. First-year GPA was associated negatively with parental income but positively with academic self-concept. NCEE score is an important predictor of the first-year GPA of medical students, but it is not the sole determinant. Individual socio-demographic characteristics and major-level characteristics should be taken into account to understand better and improve the first-year GPA of medical students.

  1. The First Year College Village: How Academic Affairs and Student Affairs Works Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, John; Hauschild, Karen; Ruppe, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    This article will highlight the partnership between First Year College and University Housing at North Carolina State. We will address how an academic college has evolved into a living and learning community including information about our Resident Mentor position, First Year Inquiry (FYI) courses and our linked-course program, the Student…

  2. Knowledge, Attitude and Determinants of Safe Abortion among first year students in Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selam Desalegn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: students are becoming aware of the availability and seeking of safe abortion services in their communities. However, unsafe abortion still remains globally major health problem especially in developing countries like Ethiopia. It is becoming one of the leading direct obstetric causes of maternal morbidity and mortality. In many low income countries lack of knowledge about the consequences of unsafe abortion and having negative attitude towards abortion service resulted in unsafe abortion practices. This study is important to identify area for improvement and encourage better communication with student clients who need safe abortion services. Objective: The aim of this study is to assess knowledge, attitude and factors associated with safe abortion among first year students in Mekelle University, Tigray, Ethiopia. Methods: Institution based-cross-sectional study design involving both quantitative and qualitative methods was employed. The sample size was 772 and the sampling technique used was multistage cluster sampling technique. To proportionally allocate the sample size to each department, population proportion to size allocation was used. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. Bivariate analysis was made to see the relations of independent variables with knowledge and attitude towards safe abortion. At bivariate logistic regression analysis, independent variables with cut off P-value<0.25 was included. In the multivariable binary logistic regression, P- value< 0.05 was used to declare the significance of the variables. Thematic analysis was used for the Qualitative method. Finally both qualitative and quantitative data was triangulated. The analyzed data was presented using figures, tables, graphs and texts. Result: Out of 752 students who heard about safe abortion, more than half 300 (55.9% have inadequate knowledge. Sex, (AOR= 1.7, 95% CI: 1.160-2.725, department (AOR=0.37, 95% CI: 0.169-0.809, family education level (AOR

  3. Analyzing the Effect of Technology-Based Intervention in Language Laboratory to Improve Listening Skills of First Year Engineering Students (El uso de la tecnología en el laboratorio de idiomas para el mejoramiento de las habilidades de escucha de estudiantes de ingeniería de primer año)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasupathi, Madhumathi

    2013-01-01

    First year students pursuing engineering education face problems with their listening skills. Most of the Indian schools use a bilingual method for teaching subjects from primary school through high school. Nonetheless, students entering university education develop anxiety in listening to classroom lectures in English. This article reports an…

  4. The intuitive use of laryngeal airway tools by first year medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fries Michael

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Providing a secured airway is of paramount importance in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Although intubating the trachea is yet seen as gold standard, this technique is still reserved to experienced healthcare professionals. Compared to bag-valve facemask ventilation, however, the insertion of a laryngeal mask airway offers the opportunity to ventilate the patient effectively and can also be placed easily by lay responders. Obviously, it might be inserted without detailed background knowledge. The purpose of the study was to investigate the intuitive use of airway devices by first-year medical students as well as the effect of a simple, but well-directed training programme. Retention of skills was re-evaluated six months thereafter. Methods The insertion of a LMA-Classic and a LMA-Fastrach performed by inexperienced medical students was compared in an airway model. The improvement on their performance after a training programme of overall two hours was examined afterwards. Results Prior to any instruction, mean time to correct placement was 55.5 ± 29.6 s for the LMA-Classic and 38.1 ± 24.9 s for the LMA-Fastrach. Following training, time to correct placement decreased significantly with 22.9 ± 13.5 s for the LMA-Classic and 22.9 ± 19.0 s for the LMA-Fastrach, respectively (p Conclusion Untrained laypersons are able to use different airway devices in a manikin and may therefore provide a secured airway even without having any detailed background knowledge about the tool. Minimal theoretical instruction and practical skill training can improve their performance significantly. However, refreshment of knowledge seems justified after six months.

  5. The Influence of a Technology-Based Internship on First-Year Teachers' Instructional Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Curby; Kjellstrom, William

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the influence of technology-based internships on teachers' instructional decision-making during their first year in the classroom. Field experiences offer preservice teachers opportunities to observe and practice teaching, yet they rarely target technology. Using a case study design, this study explored the…

  6. The Influence of a Technology-Based Internship on First-Year Teachers' Instructional Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Curby; Kjellstrom, William

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the influence of technology-based internships on teachers' instructional decision-making during their first year in the classroom. Field experiences offer preservice teachers opportunities to observe and practice teaching, yet they rarely target technology. Using a case study design, this study explored the…

  7. Alcohol expectancy responses from first year medical students: Are they prone to alcoholism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganaraja B

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Context : Modern life style and affluence lead to changes in people′s outlook on various habits, including alcohol intake. Some of them will fall prey to the addictive nature of the drink. Aims: Present study was done to evaluate the responses to comprehensive alcohol expectancy questionnaire (comprehensive effects of alcohol - CEOA in order to test the tendency towards alcohol intake among the First Year Medical (MBBS students of our college - that is, to assess the positive or negative reinforcement they would expect if they consumed alcohol. Settings and Design : The study was done by giving a set of questionnaires to be answered by the students. Materials and Methods : Questionnaires of CEOA had 38 responses, in which both negative and positive feelings were represented. All questions were again grouped into four groups of positive and three groups of negative responses. Each question was rated to what degree they agreed, by 4-point Likert-type scale (1 = disagree, 2 = slightly disagree, 3 = slightly agree, 4 = agree. The positive and negative responses were analyzed to group them into agreeing or disagreeing type. Statistical Analysis Used : Analysis of responses by Student ′t′ test and 2-way ANOVA was done to analyze the results. ′P′< 0.05 was accepted as significant. Results : Results showed that negative expectancies outweighed positives significantly (2.8017 ± 0.58554 vs. 2.3055 ± 0.67604, t = 7.526; P< 0.001.. Females rated the negatives more firmly (P< 0.001. However, there was no statistically significant difference with respect to different religious beliefs, places of origin or incomes of the respondents. An experience of alcohol had a significant effect on the responses where they had stronger positive expectancy, which is an important point revealed in this study. Conclusions : In this study, we have observed a general acceptance that alcohol could provide positive reinforcement, especially among those who have had a

  8. Wageningse eerstejaars studenten 1975 [First-year students at the University of Wageningen 1975

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mussen, G.; Zee, van der J.

    1979-01-01

    Motivation for study ( scientific interest, occupational perspective, general education ) / other studies considered / future direction of study / perceived features of university of Wageningen / preferred occupations after study / educational purpose of first year / occupational perspectives.

  9. Feedback Codes and Action Plans: Building the Capacity of First-Year Students to Apply Feedback to a Scientific Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Fiona L.; Yucel, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Effective feedback can build self-assessment skills in students so that they become more competent and confident to identify and self-correct weaknesses in their work. In this study, we trialled a feedback code as part of an integrated programme of formative and summative assessment tasks, which provided feedback to first-year students on their…

  10. Attitudes of First-Year Pharmacy Students and Preceptors to a "Mini-Externship" in Hospital and Community Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivey, Michael P.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The University of Montana School of Pharmacy has included a miniexternship experience in a required introductory course. Goals of a survey of 67 first year students and 17 preceptors included students' demographic profile and prior exposure to pharmacy practice, assessment of the influence of the externship on career goals, etc. (MLW)

  11. Sleep and Behavioral Correlates of Napping among Young Adults: A Survey of First-Year University Students in Madrid, Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vela-Bueno, Antonio; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Olavarrieta-Bernardino, Sara; Vgontzas, Alexandros N.; Bixler, Edward O.; de la Cruz-Troca, Juan Jose; Rodriguez-Munoz, Alfredo; Olivan-Palacios, Jesus

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Between November 2002 and March 2003, the authors assessed the prevalence and correlates of napping among Spanish university students. Participants: The sample comprised 1,276 first-year university students; the mean age was 18.74 [plus or minus] 1.24 years, and 35.45% were men. Methods: The study was cross-sectional, and the students…

  12. Writing Hope, Self-Regulation, and Self-Efficacy as Predictors of Writing Ability in First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieben, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    Using a social cognitive theory framework, this single-subject, correlational study examined to what extent writing self-regulation, writing efficacy, hope, and writing hope predicted first-year college students' writing abilities. Past research reveals that a large part of teaching students to be successful in completing writing tasks is related…

  13. Preliminary Examination of First Year Female University Students: Smoking Practices and Beliefs in a City with No-Smoking Legislation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Paula C.; Camblin, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Young adults between the ages of 20 to 24 are reported to have the highest smoking rates of any other age group. A questionnaire was used to assess the smoking practices and beliefs of 323 female university students. All participants were first year students entering university in a city where smoke-free legislation had been enacted. Results…

  14. First Year Master of Education (M.Ed.) Students' Experiences of Part-Time Study: A South African Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikoko, V.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports on a study of how a group of first year M.Ed. students in the Faculty of Education of the University of KwaZulu-Natal experienced part-time study. Literature suggests that each year, South Africa suffers significant student departures from universities without completing their studies. Apart from the cost and manpower…

  15. Why Did They Come Here?--"The Influences and Expectations of First-Year Students' College Experience"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Semmelroth, Carrie; Martinez, Gregory; Featherstone, Matthew; Fuhriman, Casey Alex; Sell, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Students' expectations and experiences with university life are influenced by a number of variables. Many universities develop programs or promote aspects of existing programs to market the university's image. This research was motivated by our desire to determine the relationships between first-year students' college expectations and experiences,…

  16. Feedback Codes and Action Plans: Building the Capacity of First-Year Students to Apply Feedback to a Scientific Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Fiona L.; Yucel, Robyn

    2015-01-01

    Effective feedback can build self-assessment skills in students so that they become more competent and confident to identify and self-correct weaknesses in their work. In this study, we trialled a feedback code as part of an integrated programme of formative and summative assessment tasks, which provided feedback to first-year students on their…

  17. Promoting Healthy Transition to College through Mindfulness Training with First-Year College Students: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvoráková, Kamila; Kishida, Moé; Li, Jacinda; Elavsky, Steriani; Broderick, Patricia C.; Agrusti, Mark R.; Greenberg, Mark T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Given the importance of developmental transitions on young adults' lives and the high rates of mental health issues among U.S. college students, first-year college students can be particularly vulnerable to stress and adversity. This pilot study evaluated the effectiveness and feasibility of mindfulness training aiming to promote…

  18. Attitudes about Help-Seeking Mediate the Relation between Parent Attachment and Academic Adjustment in First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Although numerous studies have documented an association between parent attachment and college student adjustment, less is known about the mechanisms that underlie this relation. Accordingly, this short-term longitudinal study examined first-year college students' attitudes about academic help-seeking as one possible mechanism. As predicted,…

  19. How the First Year of College Influences Moral Reasoning Development for Students in Moral Consolidation and Moral Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Seifert, Tricia A.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the developmental issues first-time college students face is critical for scholars and educators interested in learning and development. This purpose of this study was to investigate the differential impact of first-year college experiences on the moral reasoning development of 1,469 students in moral transition versus those in moral…

  20. The Effects of Gratitude Journaling on Turkish First Year College Students' College Adjustment, Life Satisfaction and Positive Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Serife; Ergüner-Tekinalp, Bengü

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of gratitude journaling on first-year college students' adjustment, life satisfaction, and positive affect. Students who scored high (i.e., scores between 35 and 56) on the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen et al. in "Journal of Health and Social Behavior," 24, 385-396, 1983) and low (i.e., scores between 48…

  1. The Use of Non-Cognitive Constructs to Predict Success of First-Year Students in a College of Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauer, Staci Lyn

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between academic hardiness, emotional and social competencies, academic success (as measured by grade point average), and persistence, in a sample of 178 first-year College of Business students at North Dakota State University. Students were administered the Emotional and Social Competency Inventory-University…

  2. How the First Year of College Influences Moral Reasoning Development for Students in Moral Consolidation and Moral Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Seifert, Tricia A.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the developmental issues first-time college students face is critical for scholars and educators interested in learning and development. This purpose of this study was to investigate the differential impact of first-year college experiences on the moral reasoning development of 1,469 students in moral transition versus those in moral…

  3. Evaluation of a Peer Mentoring Program for a Mature Cohort of First-Year Undergraduate Paramedic Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryciw, Deanne H.; Tangalakis, Kathy; Supple, Briony; Best, Gill

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a peer-assisted study session (PASS) program for a large class of Bachelor of Health Science (Paramedic) students. This cohort was made up predominantly of mature aged students who have not undertaken any study for many years. Within a bioscience first-year core subject, student…

  4. If First-Year Students Are Afraid of Public Speaking Assessments What Can Teachers Do to Alleviate Such Anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Gregory; Crimmins, Gail; Oprescu, Florin

    2016-01-01

    Public speaking and oral assessments are common in higher education, and they can be a major cause of anxiety and stress for students. This study was designed to measure the student experience of public speaking assessment tasks in a mandatory first-year course at a regional Australian university. The research conducted was an instrumental case…

  5. First-Generation College Student Achievement and the First-Year Seminar: A Quasi-Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Angela; Parra, Janessa; Lalonde, Trent

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown consistently that first-generation college students are less prepared academically for college, have a higher risk for dropping out, and are less likely to obtain a degree. This study investigated the effect of first-generation students' participation in a first-year seminar (FYS) on academic achievement and persistence to the…

  6. Teaching Independent Learning Skills in the First Year: A Positive Psychology Strategy for Promoting Law Student Well-Being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Rachael; Duffy, James; Huggins, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Empirical evidence in Australia and overseas has established that in many university disciplines, students begin to experience elevated levels of psychological distress in their first year of study. There is now a considerable body of empirical data that establishes that this is a significant problem for law students. Psychological distress may…

  7. First-Year Students' Perceptions of Extended National Diploma Programmes: The Case of a Comprehensive South African University (2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavunga, George; Cachalia, Fahmida

    2014-01-01

    This study compared how the cohort of extended diploma students enrolled at a comprehensive South African university in 2012 perceived the programmes for which they were enrolled at the beginning of their first year and towards the end of the year. Data were gathered using questionnaires and semi-structured interviews involving students enrolled…

  8. If First-Year Students Are Afraid of Public Speaking Assessments What Can Teachers Do to Alleviate Such Anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Gregory; Crimmins, Gail; Oprescu, Florin

    2016-01-01

    Public speaking and oral assessments are common in higher education, and they can be a major cause of anxiety and stress for students. This study was designed to measure the student experience of public speaking assessment tasks in a mandatory first-year course at a regional Australian university. The research conducted was an instrumental case…

  9. Acceptability of the Conceptions of Higher Education Quality to First Year Students of the Study Field of Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žibeniene, Gintaute; Savickiene, Izabela

    2014-01-01

    The article presents which conceptions of higher education quality are most acceptable to first-year students of the study field of pedagogy. It is significant to analyse students' opinions as more than 10 years ago the EU member states agreed that higher education institutions bear responsibility for the quality of higher education. Being members…

  10. Research and Teaching: Impact of a First-Year Seminar in Science on Student Writing and Argumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birol, Gülnur; Han, Andrea; Welsh, Ashley; Fox, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    We designed and implemented a first-year seminar in science course at the University of British Columbia to allow students to develop and improve their scientific writing and argumentation skills. To evaluate the efficacy of the course, we examined the progression that students made between the beginning and the end of the course as assessed by…

  11. Using student feedback to improve student attitudes and mathematical confidence in a first year interdisciplinary quantitative course: from the ashes of disaster!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everingham, Yvette; Gyuris, Emma; Sexton, Justin

    2013-09-01

    Today's scientist is faced with complex problems that require interdisciplinary solutions. Consequently, tertiary science educators have had to develop and deliver interdisciplinary science courses to equip students with the skills required to solve the evolving real-world challenges of today and tomorrow. There are few reported studies of the lessons learned from designing and delivering first year compulsory interdisciplinary science subjects at regional universities. Even fewer studies assess the impact that teaching interventions within interdisciplinary courses have on students' attitudes towards mathematics and technology, and mathematics anxiety. This paper discusses the feedback received from the first student cohort of a new compulsory, first year interdisciplinary science subject at a regional Australian university which resulted in curricular revisions. These revisions included a greater emphasis on the subject relevance and increased student support in tutorials. Assessment practices were also dramatically modified. The change in student attitudes and anxiety levels a priori and a posteriori to the interventions was measured quantitatively and qualitatively. Post-intervention, female and non-mathematics major students had grown in mathematical confidence and were less anxious. It is important that positive and negative research findings are reported, so science educators can learn from one another, and can better prepare their students for the challenges they will face in bringing interdisciplinary solutions to contemporary real-world problems.

  12. Conceptions of a Good College Student, Parent-Student Communication About College, First-Year Grades, and College Retention Among First- and Non-First-Generation College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Palbusa, Julienne Marie Alipio

    2016-01-01

    This study examined conceptions of a good college student, parent-student communication about college, academic achievement, college student retention, and college generation status among first-year college students. 344 undergraduates described the characteristics and skills of a good college student. In addition, they reported the frequency, perceived helpfulness, and quality (instrumental and emotional support) of parent-student communication about college. Student GPA and second year rete...

  13. First-Year Science Education Student Teachers' Beliefs about Student- and Teacher-Centeredness: Parallels and Differences between Chemistry and Other Science Teaching Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markic, Silvija; Eilks, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines quantitative differences among groups of first-year science education students regarding student- or teacher-centeredness while teaching. Our research sample comprised four groups of first-year students from university-level teacher-training programs for both primary school science and for secondary school in the subjects of…

  14. Bridging the gap between textbook and maternity patient: a nurse-developed teaching model for first-year medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooksey, Nancy Rumsey

    2010-12-01

    Providing more opportunities for first-year medical students to interact with patients in clinical settings is a current discussion topic in medical student education reform. Early clinical experience helps students bridge the gap between textbook and patient while observing patient-centered care, and serves as a first step for students to develop the skills needed to work cooperatively as members of a multidisciplinary health care team. The author developed a model to provide perinatal education to first-year medical students, consistent with the concept of interprofessional education. Primarily first-year medical students participated in the nurse-developed education model, a component of a noncredit extracurricular, student-run perinatal program at a Midwestern university medical center. Students were placed at the bedsides of hospitalized women to provide support and education to them during perinatal procedures, labor, childbirth, and cesarean delivery. A total of 350 students participated over a period of 13 school calendar years. Students remarked that participation in the program reinforced the importance of their concurrent anatomy and physiology classes. They observed interdependence and cooperation among the members of the health care team caring for women, and their evaluations of their experiences at the bedside were highly positive. Women consistently expressed appreciation for the additional individualized attention and education received from our student and nurse team. Nurses can enhance the learning of first-year medical students in the maternity care clinical setting. This nurse-developed education program provided students with a variety of vivid clinical experiences with maternity patients. © 2010, Copyright the Author. Journal compilation © 2010, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The First-Year University Experience for Sexual Minority Students: A Grounded Theory Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Edward J.; Sapiro, Beth; Kahn, Sarilee; Craig, Shelley L.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study used grounded theory to understand the role of minority stress on the first-year experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, and questioning emerging adults attending a university in the Northeastern part of the United States. Twenty-one lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, and questioning sophomores participated in focus groups…

  16. Perceptions of Body Image and Psychosocial Development: An Examination of First-Year Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Jennifer Lynne

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to help higher education practitioners and researchers better understand the role that body image plays in first-year traditional-aged college females' development of physical competence and also provide new insights regarding the role that body image plays in the psychosocial development of first-year…

  17. The First-Year University Experience for Sexual Minority Students: A Grounded Theory Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Edward J.; Sapiro, Beth; Kahn, Sarilee; Craig, Shelley L.

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study used grounded theory to understand the role of minority stress on the first-year experience of lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, and questioning emerging adults attending a university in the Northeastern part of the United States. Twenty-one lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, and questioning sophomores participated in focus groups…

  18. Online Preparation Resources Help First Year Students to Benefit from Practical Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Sue R.; Bickerdike, Sue R.

    2015-01-01

    Practical skills are important for the employability of biosciences graduates; however, first year science undergraduates often struggle to adapt to university practical classes, affecting skills development and decreasing their enthusiasm for laboratory work. This study describes the effects of introducing online multimedia practical support…

  19. Join the Conversation: Teaching Students to "Cook"--Promoting Reading in the First Year Experience Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Self Trand, Patsy A.; Eberly, Charlene

    2009-01-01

    The current trend in First Year Experience (FYE) courses is to add critical thinking through reading and writing. Research now suggests this design for a learning strategy based FYE course improves retention rates. This paper provides methods of incorporating critical thinking through reading and learning into the FYE course curriculum through a…

  20. "My Work Is Bleeding": Exploring Students' Emotional Responses to First-Year Assignment Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Sam

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the emotional responses that assignment feedback can provoke in first-year undergraduates. The literature on the link between emotions and learning is well established, but surprisingly research on the relationship between emotions and feedback is still relatively scarce. This article aims to make an additional contribution to…

  1. Weight, socio-demographics, and health behaviour related correlates of academic performance in first year university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Tom; Clarys, Peter; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte

    2013-12-17

    This study aimed to examine differences in socio-demographics and health behaviour between Belgian first year university students who attended all final course exams and those who did not. Secondly, this study aimed to identify weight and health behaviour related correlates of academic performance in those students who attended all course exams. Anthropometrics of 101 first year university students were measured at both the beginning of the first (T1) and second (T2) semester of the academic year. An on-line health behaviour questionnaire was filled out at T2. As a measure of academic performance student end-of-year Grade Point Averages (GPA) were obtained from the university's registration office. Independent samples t-tests and chi2-tests were executed to compare students who attended all course exams during the first year of university and students who did not carry through. Uni- and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to identify correlates of academic performance in students who attended all course exams during the first year of university. Students who did not attend all course exams were predominantly male, showed higher increases in waist circumference during the first semester and consumed more French fries than those who attended all final course exams. Being male, lower secondary school grades, increases in weight, Body Mass Index and waist circumference over the first semester, more gaming on weekdays, being on a diet, eating at the student restaurant more frequently, higher soda and French fries consumption, and higher frequency of alcohol use predicted lower GPA's in first year university students. When controlled for each other, being on a diet and higher frequency of alcohol use remained significant in the multivariate regression model, with frequency of alcohol use being the strongest correlate of GPA. This study, conducted in Belgian first year university students, showed that academic performance is associated with a wide range

  2. [Jigsaw Method Is Used to Promote a First Year-student's Understanding of Integrated Subjects at Kobe Pharmaceutical University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Noriko; Koyama, Junko

    2016-01-01

    In the School of Pharmacy, collaborative learning that includes both problem-based learning (PBL) and team-based learning (TBL) methods, has been introduced as an active learning method into the education of first-year pharmacy students. These methods are an educational approach to teaching and learning that involve groups of students working collaboratively to resolve a problem, complete a task, or develop a product. However, these methods might not aid students who focus more on the results than on the problem-solving process. In addition, the self-efficacy and learning motivation of students who dislike these learning methods might decrease. The Jigsaw Method respects the individuality of students and is a collaborative learning approach that decreases conflict among students with varied learning styles. Upon applying this method in the first-year course at Kobe Pharmaceutical University, it was observed that most students who attended the life science class increased their self-efficacy, and their passive learning attitudes transformed into active ones. The introduction of the Jigsaw Method to the education of first-year students can help them acquire an effective technique for learning integrated subjects.

  3. First year medical students' learning style preferences and their correlation with performance in different subjects within the medical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Torrano, Daniel; Ali, Syed; Chan, Chee-Kai

    2017-08-08

    Students commencing their medical training arrive with different educational backgrounds and a diverse range of learning experiences. Consequently, students would have developed preferred approaches to acquiring and processing information or learning style preferences. Understanding first-year students' learning style preferences is important to success in learning. However, little is understood about how learning styles impact learning and performance across different subjects within the medical curriculum. Greater understanding of the relationship between students' learning style preferences and academic performance in specific medical subjects would be valuable. This cross-sectional study examined the learning style preferences of first-year medical students and how they differ across gender. This research also analyzed the effect of learning styles on academic performance across different subjects within a medical education program in a Central Asian university. A total of 52 students (57.7% females) from two batches of first-year medical school completed the Index of Learning Styles Questionnaire, which measures four dimensions of learning styles: sensing-intuitive; visual-verbal; active-reflective; sequential-global. First-year medical students reported preferences for visual (80.8%) and sequential (60.5%) learning styles, suggesting that these students preferred to learn through demonstrations and diagrams and in a linear and sequential way. Our results indicate that male medical students have higher preference for visual learning style over verbal, while females seemed to have a higher preference for sequential learning style over global. Significant associations were found between sensing-intuitive learning styles and performance in Genetics [β = -0.46, B = -0.44, p styles and performance in Genetics [β = 0.36, B = 0.43, p learning techniques. Instructors can also benefit by modifying and adapting more appropriate teaching approaches in these

  4. A method of providing engaging formative feedback to large cohort first-year physiology and anatomy students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston-Green, Katrina; Wallace, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    A growing body of evidence demonstrates a critical role for effective, meaningful feedback to enhance student learning. Effective feedback can become part of the learning cycle that is not only a learning opportunity for the student but can also be used to inform the teacher and ongoing curriculum development. Feedback is considered particularly important during the first year of university and can even be viewed as a retention strategy that can help attenuate student performance anxieties and solidify perceptions of academic support. Unfortunately, the provision of individualized, timely feedback can be particularly challenging in first-year courses as they tend to be large and diverse cohort classes that pose challenges of time and logistics. Various forms of generic feedback can provide rapid and cost-effect feedback to large cohorts but may be of limited benefit to students other than signaling weaknesses in knowledge. The present study describes a method that was used to provide formative task-related feedback to a large cohort of first-year physiology and anatomy students. Based on student evaluations presented in this study, this method provided feedback in a manner that engaged students, uncovered underlying misconceptions, facilitated peer discussion, and provided opportunity for new instruction while allowing the lecturer to recognize common gaps in knowledge and inform ongoing curriculum development. Copyright © 2016 The American Physiological Society.

  5. Body Image, Self-Esteem, and Health-Related Behaviors among Male and Female First Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Sarah E.; Kurpius, Sharon E. Robinson; Befort, Christie; Blanks, Elva Hull; Sollenberger, Sonja; Nicpon, Megan Foley; Huser, Laura

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among self-esteem, body image, and health-related behaviors of 267 female and 156 male first-year college students. Data were collected in 23 classrooms. Instruments included a demographic sheet, the Objectified Body Consciousness Scale, the Weight and Appearance Visual Analogue Scales, the Contour Drawing…

  6. Changing the First-Year Chemistry Laboratory Manual to Implement a Problem-Based Approach that Improves Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laredo, Thamara

    2013-01-01

    For students who are not science majors, problem-based (PB) laboratories for first-year chemistry provide a more comprehensive experience than conventional expository ones. Implementing PB labs is reasonably easy, as the lab experiments may not need to change; what changes is the way the lab manual is set up and how the actual session is carried…

  7. Vegetarian Students in Their First Year of College: Are They at Risk for Restrictive or Disordered Eating Behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Julianne; Rau, Stephanie I.; Wilson, Mardell A.; Walters, Connor

    2008-01-01

    This study compared restrictive and disordered eating behaviors in vegetarian versus non-vegetarian first-year college students. The Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and the abbreviated Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) were used to assess eating behaviors (n=330). The mean restrictive DEBQ and the EAT-26 scores of vegetarians were…

  8. Grades and Attendance: Is There a Link between Them with Respect to First Year Undergraduate Criminology Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, John Martyn

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of research concerned with analysing the relationship between student attendance to core first year undergraduate criminology and criminal justice modules and the grades they receive in their first summative assessed coursework task for these modules. The research took place against the background of a concern…

  9. (Latent) Transitions to Learning at University: A Latent Profile Transition Analysis of First-Year Japanese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Luke K.

    2017-01-01

    During the past decade, quantitative researchers have examined the first-year university experience from both variable-centred and person-centred perspectives. These studies have, however, generally been cross-sectional and therefore often failed to address how student learning changes during this transition. Furthermore, research has been…

  10. Reading, Learning, and Growing: An Examination of the Benefits of Common Book Programs for First-Year Students' Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the continued growth of common book reading programs on college and university campuses, little is known about the benefits of such programs on first-year students' development. Using a multi-institutional survey of undergraduates attending six large, public universities (n = 1,237), the present study examined relationships between…

  11. Approaches to Learning of First-Year and Fifth-Year Student Teachers: Are There Any Differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušic, Iris; Jugovic, Ivana; Loncaric, Darko

    2017-01-01

    The motivation, skills and professional identity of future teachers develop during their initial teacher education. The aim of this research is to assess the differences between first-year and fifth-year student teachers on a number of personality and motivational variables that are indicative of their approaches to learning, using a…

  12. Enhancement of Anatomical Learning and Developing Clinical Competence of First-Year Medical and Allied Health Profession Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keim Janssen, Sarah A.; VanderMeulen, Stephane P.; Shostrom, Valerie K.; Lomneth, Carol S.

    2014-01-01

    Hands-on educational experiences can stimulate student interest, increase knowledge retention, and enhance development of clinical skills. The Lachman test, used to assess the integrity of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), is commonly performed by health care professionals and is relatively easy to teach to first-year health profession…

  13. Body Image, Self-Esteem, and Health-Related Behaviors among Male and Female First Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Sarah E.; Kurpius, Sharon E. Robinson; Befort, Christie; Blanks, Elva Hull; Sollenberger, Sonja; Nicpon, Megan Foley; Huser, Laura

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among self-esteem, body image, and health-related behaviors of 267 female and 156 male first-year college students. Data were collected in 23 classrooms. Instruments included a demographic sheet, the Objectified Body Consciousness Scale, the Weight and Appearance Visual Analogue Scales, the Contour Drawing…

  14. Grades and Attendance: Is There a Link between Them with Respect to First Year Undergraduate Criminology Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, John Martyn

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of research concerned with analysing the relationship between student attendance to core first year undergraduate criminology and criminal justice modules and the grades they receive in their first summative assessed coursework task for these modules. The research took place against the background of a concern…

  15. The Impact of Perceived Barriers, Academic Anxiety, and Resource Management Strategies on Achievement in First-Year Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Monica L.; Cassady, Jerrell C.

    2017-01-01

    The current study explored the impact of internal and external barriers (e.g., academic anxiety, employment) that place subgroups of college students at risk for academic failure in the first year. The mitigating potential of academic resource management strategies (e.g., time-study environment) was also examined. In a sample of 885 first-semester…

  16. Using Quantum Mechanics to Facilitate the Introduction of a Broad Range of Chemical Concepts to First-Year Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    deSouza, Romualdo T.; Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    2013-01-01

    A first-year undergraduate course that introduces students to chemistry through a conceptually detailed description of quantum mechanics is outlined. Quantization as arising from the confinement of a particle is presented and these ideas are used to introduce the reasons behind resonance, molecular orbital theory, degeneracy of electronic states,…

  17. Vegetarian Students in Their First Year of College: Are They at Risk for Restrictive or Disordered Eating Behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautmann, Julianne; Rau, Stephanie I.; Wilson, Mardell A.; Walters, Connor

    2008-01-01

    This study compared restrictive and disordered eating behaviors in vegetarian versus non-vegetarian first-year college students. The Dutch Eating Behavior Questionnaire (DEBQ) and the abbreviated Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26) were used to assess eating behaviors (n=330). The mean restrictive DEBQ and the EAT-26 scores of vegetarians were…

  18. Integrating Academic and Mentoring Support for the Development of First-Year Chemical Engineering Students in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Edmond I.; Chau, Ying

    2010-01-01

    An academic and professional development course has been introduced to help first-year chemical engineering students to deal proactively with the transition from secondary school to university and to develop professional skills. The course uses the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) as a personality model to facilitate skills development and many…

  19. Using Quantum Mechanics to Facilitate the Introduction of a Broad Range of Chemical Concepts to First-Year Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    deSouza, Romualdo T.; Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    2013-01-01

    A first-year undergraduate course that introduces students to chemistry through a conceptually detailed description of quantum mechanics is outlined. Quantization as arising from the confinement of a particle is presented and these ideas are used to introduce the reasons behind resonance, molecular orbital theory, degeneracy of electronic states,…

  20. The first year experience of occupational therapy students at an Australian regional university: Promoting student retention and developing a regional and remote workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Jackie; Cordier, Reinie; Thomas, Yvonne; Tanner, Bronwyn; Salata, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Student retention at regional universities is important in addressing regional and remote workforce shortages. Students attending regional universities are more likely to work in regional areas. First year experience at university plays a key role in student retention. This study aimed to explore factors influencing the first year experience of occupational therapy students at a regional Australian university. Surveys were administered to 58 second year occupational therapy students in the first week of second year. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (Pearson χ(2) ; Spearman rho) and summarising descriptive responses. An Australian regional university. Second year undergraduate occupational therapy students. Factors influencing students' decisions to study and continue studying occupational therapy; factors enhancing first year experience of university. Fifty-four students completed the survey (93.1%). A quarter (25.9%) of students considered leaving the course during the first year. The primary influence for continuing was the teaching and learning experience. Most valued supports were orientation week (36.7%) and the first year coordinator (36.7%). The importance of the first year experience in retaining occupational therapy students is highlighted. Engagement with other students and staff and academic support are important factors in facilitating student retention. It is important to understand the unique factors influencing students' decisions, particularly those from regional and remote areas, to enter and continue in tertiary education to assist in implementing supports and strategies to improve student retention. © 2015 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  1. When hope and fear collide: Expectations and experiences of first-year doctoral students in the natural sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C. Sean

    Although there is a significant body of research on the process of undergraduate education and retention, much less research exists as it relates to the doctoral experience, which is intended to be transformational in nature. At each stage of the process students are presented with a unique set of challenges and experiences that must be negotiated and mastered. However, we know very little about entering students' expectations, beliefs, goals, and identities, and how these may or may not change over time within a doctoral program. Utilizing a framework built upon socialization theory and cognitive-ecological theory, this dissertation examines the expectations that incoming doctoral students have about their programs as well as the actual experiences that these students have during their first year. Interviews were conducted with twelve students from the departments of Botany, Chemistry, and Physics prior to matriculation into their respective doctoral programs. These initial interviews provided information about students' expectations. Interviews were then conducted approximately every six to eight weeks to assess students' perceptions about their actual experiences throughout their first year. The findings of this study showed that new doctoral students tend to have uninformed and naive expectations about their programs. In addition, many of the specific policies or procedures necessary for navigation through a doctoral program were unknown to the students. While few differences existed in terms of students' expectations based on gender or discipline, there were significant differences in how international students described their expectations compared to American students. The two primary differences between American and international students revolved around the role of faculty members and the language barrier. It is clear that the first year of doctoral study is indeed a year of transition. The nature and clarity of the expectations associated with the role of

  2. First year nursing students' experiences of social media during the transition to university: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Caleb; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Saliba, Bernard; Green, Janet; Moorley, Calvin; Wyllie, Aileen; Jackson, Debra

    2016-10-01

    Social media platforms are useful for creating communities, which can then be utilised as a mean for supportive, professional and social learning. To explore first year nursing student experiences with social media in supporting student transition and engagement into higher education. Qualitative focus groups. Ten 1st year Bachelor of Nursing students were included in three face-to-face focus groups. Data were analysed using qualitative thematic content analysis. Three key themes emerged that illustrates the experiences of transition and engagement of first year student nurses using social media at university. (1) Facilitating familiarity and collaboration at a safe distance, (2) promoting independent learning by facilitating access to resources, and (3) mitigating hazards of social media. This study has demonstrated the importance of social media in supporting informal peer-peer learning and support, augmenting online and offline relationships, and building professional identity as a nurse.

  3. Teaching a Hypothesis-driven Physical Diagnosis Curriculum to Pulmonary Fellows Improves Performance of First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staitieh, Bashar S; Saghafi, Ramin; Kempker, Jordan A; Schulman, David A

    2016-04-01

    Hypothesis-driven physical examination emphasizes the role of bedside examination in the refinement of differential diagnoses and improves diagnostic acumen. This approach has not yet been investigated as a tool to improve the ability of higher-level trainees to teach medical students. To assess the effect of teaching hypothesis-driven physical diagnosis to pulmonary fellows on their ability to improve the pulmonary examination skills of first-year medical students. Fellows and students were assessed on teaching and diagnostic skills by self-rating on a Likert scale. One group of fellows received the hypothesis-driven teaching curriculum (the "intervention" group) and another received instruction on head-to-toe examination. Both groups subsequently taught physical diagnosis to a group of first-year medical students. An oral examination was administered to all students after completion of the course. Fellows were comfortable teaching physical diagnosis to students. Students in both groups reported a lack of comfort with the pulmonary examination at the beginning of the course and improvement in their comfort by the end. Students trained by intervention group fellows outperformed students trained by control group fellows in the interpretation of physical findings (P students improves the ability of students to interpret physical findings. This benefit should be confirmed using validated testing tools.

  4. Scaling Up: Adapting a Phage-Hunting Course to Increase Participation of First-Year Students in Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staub, Nancy L.; Poxleitner, Marianne; Braley, Amanda; Smith-Flores, Helen; Pribbenow, Christine M.; Jaworski, Leslie; Lopatto, David; Anders, Kirk R.

    2016-01-01

    Authentic research experiences are valuable components of effective undergraduate education. Research experiences during the first years of college are especially critical to increase persistence in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. The Science Education Alliance Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science…

  5. Using Simulation to Improve First-Year Pharmacy Students' Ability to Identify Medication Errors Involving the Top 100 Prescription Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atayee, Rabia S; Awdishu, Linda; Namba, Jennifer

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To evaluate first-year pharmacy students' ability to identify medication errors involving the top 100 prescription medications. Design. In the first quarter of a 3-quarter pharmacy self-care course, a didactic lecture on the most common prescribing and dispensing prescription errors was presented to first-year pharmacy students (P1) in preparation for a prescription review simulation done individually and as a group. In the following quarter, they were given a formal prescription review workshop before a second simulation involving individual and group review of a different set of prescriptions. Students were evaluated based on the number of correctly checked prescriptions and a self-assessment of their confidence in reviewing prescriptions. Assessment. All 63 P1 students completed the prescription review simulations. The individual scores did not significantly change, but group scores improved from 79 (16.2%) in the fall quarter to 98.6 (4.7%) in the winter quarter. Students perceived improvement of their prescription checking skills, specifically in their ability to fill a prescription on their own, identify prescribing and dispensing errors, and perform pharmaceutical calculations. Conclusion. A prescription review module consisting of a didactic lecture, workshop and simulation-based methods to teach prescription analysis was successful at improving first year pharmacy students' knowledge, confidence, and application of these skills.

  6. The impact of self-concept and college involvement on the first-year success of medical students in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying-Xue; Ou, Chun-Quan; Zhao, Zhi-Tao; Wan, Cheng-Song; Guo, Cui; Li, Li; Chen, Ping-Yan

    2015-03-01

    Students' first-year academic success plays a critical role on their overall development in college, which implies the need to concentrate on identifying ways to improve students' first-year academic success. Different from most research on the subject, this study attempted to combine the sociological perspective of college impact with a psychological perspective to synthetically explore the causal relationship of specific types of self-concept and college involvement with academic success of medical students. A longitudinal study was conducted using 519 matriculates at a medical university in mainland China. We conducted the Cooperative Institutional Research Program freshmen survey and the Your First College Year survey to collect data of the pre-college and college academic and social self-concept, college involvement components, and some input characteristics. The academic success was measured by the first-year grade point average. A pathway analysis was conducted and showed the following results. Having high academic self-concept, being engaged in class and putting effort in homework or study directly contributes to increasing college achievement. Students' pre-college achievement and self-concept, faculty interaction, and homework involvement positively affected students' college academic self-concept development, which indirectly improved average grade point. These findings contribute to our understanding of a student's ability to interact with his or her collegiate environment and to experience academic success.

  7. An Elective Course for First-Year Students Based on the "New England Journal of Medicine."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Owen W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A course to develop medical students' capacity to read medical journal articles critically is described. The course's background, organization, and aims; faculty members' impressions of the course; and students' responses to an evaluation questionnaire are discussed. (MLW)

  8. Role Perceptions of Science Academics Who Teach to First-Year Students: The Influence of Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Melanie; Jacobs, Gerrie J.

    2014-01-01

    A marked increase in student enrolments in South African public universities over the last two decades have admitted substantially more 'non-traditional' students to the sector. These students typically have unsatisfactory levels of school performance, lack communication skills (especially in English) and mostly have first-generation status. The…

  9. Metacognitive Components of Students' Difficulties in the First Year of University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costabile, Angela; Cornoldi, Cesare; De Beni, Rossana; Manfredi, Paola; Figliuzzi, Sante

    2013-01-01

    Metacognition is a good predictor of University students' achievement and should be more systematically considered since it might also help reduce student drop outs. In particular drop out is a dramatic problem for Italian Universities since it may concern more than 40% of students. The identification of factors that lead to academic failure and…

  10. Students' Evaluation of the First Year Experience at Bowie State College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Wanda E.; And Others

    An instrument was designed to survey students' impressions of Bowie State College (Maryland), with attention to administration, counseling and academic support services, and course loads. The research population consisted of students participating in the Special Services project at the college. Questionnaires were returned by six students, five…

  11. The Quantitative Effect of Students Using Podcasts in a First Year Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Grant; Barry, Tim

    2007-01-01

    This study reports the quantitative effect of students using podcasts in a 1st year undergraduate exercise physiology module. From a cohort of 70 students, 50 volunteered and completed the study. Using a pre-post random allocation research design, students were allocated to either a podcast group (PG) or control group (CG) based on a 32-question…

  12. Alcohol Consumption and Academic Retention in First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Gary; Lonbaken, Barb

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study attempted to identify relationships between alcohol consumption and first-to-second-year student retention among college students. Methods: 820 students in general education courses completed an online wellness assessment at four separate time points, including questions related to alcohol consumption. Data were analyzed…

  13. The Economics of Authorship: Online Paper Mills, Student Writers, and First-Year Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Kelly

    2005-01-01

    Using sample student analyses of online paper mill Web sites, student survey responses, and existing scholarship on plagiarism, authorship, and intellectual property, this article examines how the consumerist rhetoric of the online paper mills construes academic writing as a commodity for sale, and why such rhetoric appeals to students in…

  14. Efficacy of alcohol interventions for first-year college students: a meta-analytic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Sheldon, Lori A J; Carey, Kate B; Elliott, Jennifer C; Garey, Lorra; Carey, Michael P

    2014-04-01

    Alcohol use established during the first-year of college can result in adverse consequences during the college years and beyond. In this meta-analysis, we evaluated the efficacy of interventions to prevent alcohol misuse by first-year college students. Studies were included if the study reported an individual- or group-level intervention using a randomized controlled trial, targeted 1st-year college students, and assessed alcohol use. Forty-one studies with 62 separate interventions (N = 24,294; 57% women; 77% White) were included. Independent raters coded sample, design, methodological features, and intervention content. Weighted mean effect sizes, using fixed- and random-effects models, were calculated. Potential moderators, determined a priori, were examined to explain variability in effect sizes. Relative to controls, students receiving an intervention reported lower quantity and frequency of drinking and fewer problems (d(+)s = 0.07-0.14). These results were more pronounced when the interventions were compared with an assessment-only control group (d(+)s = 0.11-0.19). Intervention content (e.g., personalized feedback) moderated the efficacy of the intervention. Behavioral interventions for 1st-year college students reduce alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems. Interventions that include personalized feedback, moderation strategies, expectancy challenge, identification of risky situations, and goal-setting optimize efficacy. Strategies to prevent alcohol misuse among first-year students are recommended.

  15. Financial Literacy of First-Year University Students: The Role of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francka Lovšin Kozina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an insight into the characteristics of how students manage their finances and their general financial literacy. The study was carried out by surveying 259 students from two different faculties. Students from the study programs with economics subjects were statistically better at defining inflation, liquidity and real income. Statistically significant differences between courses were seen also in the area of investment decisions, business students prefer riskier investments like an investment in bonds or gold, whereas non-business students prefer saving the money in a savings account. The results show that students who had economics content in their program more often state they control their finance and have on average better financial knowledge. The results suggest that participation in economic/financial courses increases financial literacy and also feelings of mastery of financial areas, which is important to transfer knowledge into the practice.

  16. Analysis of Survey Data on First-Year Students at Our University (2)

    OpenAIRE

    木下, 栄二

    2014-01-01

    Through an annual survey of all freshmen at this university, we gather excellent data on our students. One purpose of this project is to analyze and utilize this data, which is useful for investigating changes among our students. Here, we have analyzed survey data gathered from 2004 to 2010. In this paper, we report on analysis results regarding changes in student economic situation and reading activity. We hope that this information will be helpful to our faculties and sections, and of use i...

  17. Profiling first-year students in STEM programs based on autonomous motivation and academic self-concept and relationship with academic achievement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolien Van Soom

    Full Text Available The low success rate of first-year college students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM programs has spurred many academic achievement studies in which explanatory factors are studied. In this study, we investigated from a person-oriented perspective whether different motivational and academic self-concept profiles could be discerned between male and female first-year college students in STEM and whether differences in early academic achievement were associated with these student groups. Data on autonomous motivation, academic self-concept, and early academic achievement of 1,400 first-year STEM college students were collected. Cluster analyses were used to distinguish motivational profiles based on the relative levels of autonomous motivation and academic self-concept for male and female students. Differences in early academic achievement of the various profiles were studied by means of ANCOVA. Four different motivational profiles were discerned based on the dimensions of autonomous motivation (A and academic self-concept (S: students scoring high and respectively low on both dimensions (HA-HS or LA-LS, and students scoring high on one dimension and low on the other (HA-LS or LA-HS. Also gender differences were found in this study: male students with high levels of academic self-concept and autonomous motivation had higher academic achievement compared to male students with low levels on both motivational dimensions. For female students, motivational profiles were not associated with academic achievement. The findings partially confirm the internal and external validity of the motivational theories underpinning this study and extend the present insights on identifying subgroup(s of at risk students in contemporary STEM programs at university level.

  18. Profiling first-year students in STEM programs based on autonomous motivation and academic self-concept and relationship with academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Soom, Carolien; Donche, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The low success rate of first-year college students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs has spurred many academic achievement studies in which explanatory factors are studied. In this study, we investigated from a person-oriented perspective whether different motivational and academic self-concept profiles could be discerned between male and female first-year college students in STEM and whether differences in early academic achievement were associated with these student groups. Data on autonomous motivation, academic self-concept, and early academic achievement of 1,400 first-year STEM college students were collected. Cluster analyses were used to distinguish motivational profiles based on the relative levels of autonomous motivation and academic self-concept for male and female students. Differences in early academic achievement of the various profiles were studied by means of ANCOVA. Four different motivational profiles were discerned based on the dimensions of autonomous motivation (A) and academic self-concept (S): students scoring high and respectively low on both dimensions (HA-HS or LA-LS), and students scoring high on one dimension and low on the other (HA-LS or LA-HS). Also gender differences were found in this study: male students with high levels of academic self-concept and autonomous motivation had higher academic achievement compared to male students with low levels on both motivational dimensions. For female students, motivational profiles were not associated with academic achievement. The findings partially confirm the internal and external validity of the motivational theories underpinning this study and extend the present insights on identifying subgroup(s) of at risk students in contemporary STEM programs at university level.

  19. Profiling First-Year Students in STEM Programs Based on Autonomous Motivation and Academic Self-Concept and Relationship with Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Soom, Carolien; Donche, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The low success rate of first-year college students in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) programs has spurred many academic achievement studies in which explanatory factors are studied. In this study, we investigated from a person-oriented perspective whether different motivational and academic self-concept profiles could be discerned between male and female first-year college students in STEM and whether differences in early academic achievement were associated with these student groups. Data on autonomous motivation, academic self-concept, and early academic achievement of 1,400 first-year STEM college students were collected. Cluster analyses were used to distinguish motivational profiles based on the relative levels of autonomous motivation and academic self-concept for male and female students. Differences in early academic achievement of the various profiles were studied by means of ANCOVA. Four different motivational profiles were discerned based on the dimensions of autonomous motivation (A) and academic self-concept (S): students scoring high and respectively low on both dimensions (HA-HS or LA-LS), and students scoring high on one dimension and low on the other (HA-LS or LA-HS). Also gender differences were found in this study: male students with high levels of academic self-concept and autonomous motivation had higher academic achievement compared to male students with low levels on both motivational dimensions. For female students, motivational profiles were not associated with academic achievement. The findings partially confirm the internal and external validity of the motivational theories underpinning this study and extend the present insights on identifying subgroup(s) of at risk students in contemporary STEM programs at university level. PMID:25390942

  20. Parent-Child Communication to Reduce Heavy Alcohol Use among First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremeens, Jennifer L.; Usdan, Stuart L.; Brock-Martin, Amy; Martin, Ryan J.; Watkins, Ken

    2008-01-01

    With extreme rates of binge drinking among young adults, college students continue to be a primary focus for a range of alcohol prevention efforts. Most universities are attempting to change the alcohol environment by implementing a variety of strategies to reduce heavy drinking among college students. With the exception of parental notification…

  1. Self- and Peer Assessments of Oral Presentations by First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryadoust, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Forty science students received training for 12 weeks on delivering effective presentations and using a tertiary-level English oral presentation scale comprising three subscales (Verbal Communication, Nonverbal Communication, and Content and Organization) measured by 18 items. For their final project, each student was given 10 to 12 min to present…

  2. Development of Emotional Intelligence in First-Year Undergraduate Students in a Frontier State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedy, Gail M.; Smith, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) has been defined as knowing the emotional state of self and others. Its relevance for college student development is only beginning to be researched. In the present research, the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory was administered to college students at the beginning and end of a semester-long course designed…

  3. Tracking Undergraduate Student Achievement in a First-Year Physiology Course Using a Cluster Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S. J.; White, S.; Power, N.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster analysis data classification technique was used on assessment scores from 157 undergraduate nursing students who passed 2 successive compulsory courses in human anatomy and physiology. Student scores in five summative assessment tasks, taken in each of the courses, were used as inputs for a cluster analysis procedure. We aimed to group…

  4. Predicting Academic Success of Health Science Students for First Year Anatomy and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Ryan S.; Evans, Tess; Chivers, Paola T.

    2016-01-01

    Students commencing tertiary education enter through a number of traditional and alternative academic pathways. As a result, tertiary institutions encounter a broad range of students, varying in demographic, previous education, characteristics and academic achievement. In recent years, the relatively constant increase in tertiary applications in…

  5. College Freshmen with Chronic Illness: A Comparison with Healthy First-Year Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herts, Kate L.; Wallis, Elizabeth; Maslow, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Over the past four decades, advances in medicine have decreased the mortality rates of many previously fatal chronic diseases. Children who would have died early in life are now living well into adulthood, and many are matriculating as college students. Data regarding the prevalence of chronic illness among college students, the college experience…

  6. Magnetism Teaching Sequences Based on an Inductive Approach for First-Year Thai University Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narjaikaew, Pattawan; Emarat, Narumon; Arayathanitkul, Kwan; Cowie, Bronwen

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the impact on student motivation and understanding of magnetism of teaching sequences based on an inductive approach. The study was conducted in large lecture classes. A pre- and post-Conceptual Survey of Electricity and Magnetism was conducted with just fewer than 700 Thai undergraduate science students, before and after…

  7. Influence of community experiences on first-year medical students' reflective writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beylefeld, Adriana A; Nena, Kali D; Prinsloo, Engela A M

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the usefulness of providing students with community-located experiences as a basis for reflection by observing the degree to which community-located experiences influenced the quality of a reflective writing exercise. Students were prepared for reflection by means of a lecture and a handout on the meaning, function and process of reflection. One hundred and twenty-eight students (66 Afrikaans-speaking, and 62 English-speaking) took part in the study. Initially, most students (71%) who revealed affect prior to the visit reported negative emotional states. For 54% of the students who revealed emotions upon arrival, positive emotional states replaced the negative and this increased to 67% as the visit continued. This represented the most important stage of the personal growth continuum, signifying awareness of perspective 'distortions'. The majority (94.3%) regarded the visit as being important prior to immersing themselves in the theory of primary healthcare. In the questionnaire survey, students were asked for their opinions on the value of reflective writing as a tool for promoting deep learning, as students' attitudes were considered an important determinant of increased uptake of this kind of activity. Reflective writing can be promoted through using a real-world experience as stimulus, and a framework for guiding students' thoughts.

  8. Online Reflective Group Discussion--Connecting First Year Undergraduate Students with Their Third Year Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Annetta K. L.

    2011-01-01

    University professional programs seek to develop students as reflective practitioners. The ability to critically reflect is often assumed to occur along the way. The explicit development of critical reflective skills among students is challenging. This study describes the utilization of online group discussion for critical reflection and provides…

  9. Drawing First-Year Students: Seven Inventive Programs Attract Newcomers on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boule, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Each new school year, academic librarians are given a fresh crop of students and faculty to entice through the doors, both physical and virtual. Librarians create clever marketing that appeals to their students' intelligence. They devise games to highlight services. They foster a sense of ownership, offer exemplary service that makes their users'…

  10. Measuring the Effects of Peer Learning on Students' Academic Achievement in First-Year Business Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, Diane; Morrison, Kellie; Tarr, Garth

    2015-01-01

    Peer-assisted study session (PASS) programs have been shown to positively affect students' grades in a majority of studies. This study extends that analysis in two ways: controlling for ability and other factors, with focus on international students, and by presenting results for PASS in business statistics. Ordinary least squares, random effects…

  11. The College Transition for First-Year Students from Rural Oregon Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganss, Karen M.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the lived experiences of 10 students entering college from rural Oregon communities. Using narrative inquiry, the author examines students' transition, common experiences, and enrollment barriers. Resulting themes include: (a) unexpected emotional and social transition, (b) motivations for enrolling, (c) lack of social and…

  12. Self- and Peer Assessments of Oral Presentations by First-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryadoust, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Forty science students received training for 12 weeks on delivering effective presentations and using a tertiary-level English oral presentation scale comprising three subscales (Verbal Communication, Nonverbal Communication, and Content and Organization) measured by 18 items. For their final project, each student was given 10 to 12 min to present…

  13. Computerized Assessment System for Academic Satisfaction (ASAS) for First-Year University Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Leonardo Adrian; Liporace, Mercedes Fernandez; Perez, Edgardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computerized tests have become one of the most widely used and efficient educational assessment methods. Increasing efforts to generate computerized assessment systems to identify students at risk for drop out have been recently noted. An important variable influencing student retention is academic satisfaction. Accordingly, the…

  14. Predictors of First-Year Student Retention in the Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fike, David S.; Fike, Renea

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzed predictors of fall-to-spring and fall-to-fall retention for 9,200 first-time-in-college students who enrolled in a community college over a four-year period. Findings highlight the impact of developmental education programs and internet-based courses on student persistence. Additional predictors include financial aid, parents'…

  15. The Accuracy of Student Grading in First-Year Engineering Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hattum-Janssen, Natascha; Pacheco, Jose Augusto; Vasconcelos, Rosa Maria

    2004-01-01

    Assessment has become a powerful tool to change student learning. In a project of the Council of Engineering Courses of the University of Minho, Portugal, students of textile engineering, apparel engineering and industrial electronics increased their participation in every aspect of their assessment process. The traditional exam was changed to…

  16. Profiling Learning Style Preferences of First-Year University Students: Implications for Course Design and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cekiso, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    Widening access to higher education has meant an increasing need for flexibility in instruction and course design to accommodate students who utilize a wide range of learning style preferences. The purpose of this study was to identify the preferred learning styles of students and to plan instruction and course design accordingly. In addition, a…

  17. Tracking Undergraduate Student Achievement in a First-Year Physiology Course Using a Cluster Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S. J.; White, S.; Power, N.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster analysis data classification technique was used on assessment scores from 157 undergraduate nursing students who passed 2 successive compulsory courses in human anatomy and physiology. Student scores in five summative assessment tasks, taken in each of the courses, were used as inputs for a cluster analysis procedure. We aimed to group…

  18. The Transition Experience of First-Year University Track and Field Student Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracey, Jill; Corlett, John

    1995-01-01

    A study of the transition from high school to university of 16 freshman track and field athletes investigated academic, athletic, and social aspects. Student challenges included feeling overwhelmed by responsibilities, loneliness, and need to balance freedom and responsibility. Students used two main strategies to maintain perspective: (1) time…

  19. First-Year Japanese University Students' Language Learning Beliefs: Continuity and Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonesaka, Suzanne M.; Tanaka, Hiroya

    2013-01-01

    Japan's government has mandated a shift from traditional to communicative methodologies in secondary English classrooms (Tanabe, 2004), but it is unclear whether this has affected student beliefs about language learning. This study investigates the beliefs of 315 incoming university students at a large private university in Japan from 2006 through…

  20. Evaluation of Two Service Opportunity Programs for Junior High School Students: First Year Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Joel M.; And Others

    Cross-Age Tutoring and School Store, two courses combining classroom learning and application of specific skills outside the classroom are evaluated. Students in Cross-Age Tutoring were taught tutoring and communication skills and spent four days per week tutoring at nearby elementary schools; students in School Store were taught business and…