WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology faculty fellows

  1. Instructional Technology Innovation in the Liberal Arts Classroom: A Conversation with the Maryville College Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Gina; Berry, Chad; Nugent, Chris; Wentz, Karen; Cowan, Peggy; O'Gorman, Mark

    Maryville College's (Tennessee) first Faculty Instructional Technology (FIT) Fellows, who received funding and release time to develop technology-based instructional materials for their courses, are developing and implementing exciting projects in history, religion, freshman seminar, and political sciences courses. In this paper, the FIT Fellows…

  2. John Brozovsky appointed Wayne E. Leininger Junior Faculty Fellow

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    John Brozovsky, associate professor of accounting and information systems in the Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech, has been appointed the Wayne E. Leininger Junior Faculty Fellow by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  3. Leo Piilonen appointed William E. Hassinger, Jr. Senior Faculty Fellow in Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Leo Piilonen, professor of physics in the College of Science at Virginia Tech, was recently appointed the William E. Hassinger, Jr., Senior Faculty Fellow in Physics by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  4. Student Research in Asia Overview of 2007 Student-Faculty Fellows Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Symons

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available During the summer of 2007, mentors from fourteen different small college/universities in North America, each with from two to five students, conducted undergraduate research in East and Southeast Asia as part of the 9th annual Student-Faculty Fellows Program. Each project was generously funded by the Freeman Foundation and administered by ASIANetwork.

  5. The Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center Summer Fellows Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depken, Diane E.; Zeman, Catherine L.; Lensch, Ellen Kabat; Brown, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the background, activities, and outcomes of the Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center (ATEEC) and its Summer Fellows Institutes as a model for disciplinary and cross-disciplinary infusion of environmental science and technology content, curriculum, and methods into the classroom. Presents experiences, themes, and activities…

  6. Faculty Adoption of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Franziska Zellweger

    2007-01-01

    Although faculty support has been identified as a critical factor in the success of educational-technology programs, many people involved in such efforts underestimate the complexities of integrating technology into teaching. In this article, the author proposes an adoption cycle to help tackle the complex issue of technology adoption for…

  7. Faculty and Technology: Implications for Faculty Training and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Kidd, Terry; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors affecting ICT adoption process and the implications for faculty training and technology leadership. Respondents represented a wide range of academic and professional positions. They identified themselves as Assistant, Associate, and Professor as well as Instructional Designer, Director of…

  8. Faculty and Technology: Implications for Faculty Training and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Kidd, Terry; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors affecting ICT adoption process and the implications for faculty training and technology leadership. Respondents represented a wide range of academic and professional positions. They identified themselves as Assistant, Associate, and Professor as well as Instructional Designer, Director of Technology, Information Manager, eLearning Manager, Assistant Department Chair, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs and Consultant. The respondents identified Organizational Support, Leadership, Training and Development, and Resources as the predominate themes affecting Information and Communication Technology (ICT) adoption process in higher education. Evidence from this study offers insights on how higher education administrators and technology leaders could help their faculty and staff to implement appropriate ICT tools and practices to improve student learning.

  9. The Science Teaching Fellows Program: A Model for Online Faculty Development of Early Career Scientists Interested in Teaching†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancaccio-Taras, Loretta; Gull, Kelly A.; Ratti, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    The American Society for Microbiology (ASM) has a history of providing a wide range of faculty development opportunities. Recently, ASM developed the Science Teaching Fellows Program (STF) for early career biologists and postdoctoral students to explore student-centered teaching and develop the skills needed to succeed in positions that have a significant teaching component. Participants were selected to STF through a competitive application process. The STF program consisted of a series of six webinars. In preparation for each webinar, participants completed a pre-webinar assignment. After each webinar, fellows practiced what they learned by completing a post-webinar assignment. In a survey used to assess the impact of STF, participants reported greater knowledge of the webinar-based instructional topics and a sense of being part of an educational community and were more confident about varied teaching methods. PMID:28101259

  10. Factors Explaining Faculty Technology Use and Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonghong; Meyer, Katrina A.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines factors related to technology use in teaching by university faculty. An EFA analysis of multiple questions of technology use in the classroom found two factors: one loaded with Web use and the second with email use. Therefore, three research questions were asked: What factors explain faculty use of the Web or email? Are these…

  11. Study of Faculty and Information Technology, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Eden; Brooks, D. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In this inaugural year of the faculty technology study, EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) partnered with 151 college/university sites yielding responses from 17,451 faculty respondents across 13 countries. The findings are exploratory in nature, as they cover new ground to help us tell a more comprehensive story about technology…

  12. Getting Started in Academic Careers: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Graduate Students, Postdoctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, R.; Ormand, C.; Manduca, C. A.; Wright-Dunbar, R.; Allen-King, R.

    2007-12-01

    The professional development program,'On the Cutting Edge', offers on-line resources and annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Pre- workshop surveys reveal that early career faculty, post-docs, and graduate students have many questions about teaching (e.g., what are effective teaching strategies, how to design a course, how to prepare a syllabus, how to teach large courses), research (e.g., initiate and fund future research, set up and manage a lab, obtain equipment), and career management (e.g., understand tenure requirements, balance all it all). The graduate students and post-docs also have questions about jobs and the job search process. Their questions show a lack of familiarity with the nature of academic positions at different kinds of educational institutions (two-year colleges, primarily undergraduate institutions, and research universities). In particular, they are uncertain about what educational setting will best fit their values and career goals and how teaching loads and research expectations vary by institution. Common questions related to the job search process include where to find job listings (the most common question in recent years), when to start the job search process, how to stand out as an applicant, and how to prepare for interviews. Both groups have questions about how to develop new skills: how to develop, plan and prepare a new course (without it taking all of their time), how to expand beyond their PhD (or postdoc) research projects, how to develop a research plan, and where to apply for funding. These are important topics for advisors to discuss with all of their students and postdocs who are planning on careers in academia. On the Cutting Edge offers workshops and web resources to help current and future faculty navigate these critical stages of their careers. The four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your

  13. Pathology resident and fellow education in a time of disruptive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziai, James M; Smith, Brian R

    2012-12-01

    The development of disruptive technologies is changing the practice of pathology. Their implementation challenges traditional educational paradigms. Training programs must adapt to these heuristic needs. The dual explosion of new medical knowledge and innovative methodologies adds new practice aspects to the pathologist's areas of expertise. This transformation potentially challenges the traditional core model of training. It raises questions as to how pathology should incorporate future expanding subspecialty needs into educational and practice models. This article examines the impact of these disruptive technologies on resident and fellow education and explores alternative educational and practice models that may better accommodate pathology's future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Technology Adoption in Higher Education: Overcoming Anxiety through Faculty Bootcamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Terri; Wisniewski, Mary Ann; Kuhlemeyer, Greg; Isaacs, Gerald; Krzykowski, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The reluctance to design and teach online courses in higher education is often attributed to technology anxiety in faculty. This article documents a faculty development model that has successfully helped faculty overcome this obstacle. "Bootcamps," faculty development programs held at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI, were specifically and…

  15. Launching an Academic Career: On the Cutting Edge Resources for Geoscience Graduate Students, Post-doctoral Fellows, and Early Career Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, R. M.; Ormand, C. J.; MacDonald, H.; Dunbar, R. W.; Allen-King, R. M.; Manduca, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    Launching an academic career presents a number of challenges. A recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education depicts academia as an “ivory sweatshop,” citing rising standards for tenure. Most graduate programs provide minimal training for life beyond graduate school. The professional development program “On the Cutting Edge” fills this gap by providing workshops and web resources on academic careers for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and early career faculty. These workshops and web resources address a wide range of topics related to teaching, research, and managing one’s career, tailored for each group. The Preparing for an Academic Career in the Geosciences workshop to help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows make the transition into an academic career has been offered annually since 2003. It provides a panel on academic careers in different institutional settings, sessions on research on learning, various teaching strategies, design of effective teaching activities, moving research forward to new settings, effective teaching and research statements, the job search process, negotiation, and presenting oneself to others. Complementary online resources (http://serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/careerprep/index.html) focus on these topics. The workshops and web resources offer guidance for each step of the job search process, for developing and teaching one’s own courses, and for making the transition from being a research student to being in charge of a research program. Online resources also include case studies of successful dual career couples, documenting their job search strategies. A four-day workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career, offered annually since 1999, provides sessions on teaching strategies, course design, developing a strategic plan for research, supervising student researchers, navigating departmental and institutional politics, preparing for tenure, time and

  16. TEACHING IN ONLINE COURSES: Experiences of Instructional Technology Faculty Members

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omur AKDEMIR

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The Internet and computer technology have altered the education landscape. Online courses are offered throughout the world. Learning about the experiences of faculty members is important to guide practitioners and administrators. Using qualitative research methodology, this study investigated the experiences of faculty members teaching online courses. A convenience sampling was used to select the instructional technology faculty members to investigate their experiences in online courses. Semi-structured interviews with faculty members teaching online courses were used as the primary source to collect data about the experiences of faculty members in online courses. Results of the study showed that faculty members' interest in using technology and the amount of time available to them for online course design affected the quality of online courses. The findings of this study also indicated that design quality of online courses is affected by the interest of faculty members to use the technology and the time that they can devote to planning, designing, and developing online courses. The poor design of existing online courses, high learning expectations of ndividuals from these courses, and the future of online courses are the concerns of faculty members. Higher education institutions should support workshops and trainings to increase the skills and interests of non-instructional design faculty members to design and develop online courses.

  17. Special Workshop of Marie Curie Fellows on Research and Training in Physics and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 0210004_1: Prof. Ugo Amaldi, University of Milano Bicocca and Tera Foundation, Italy. Addressing the Marie Curie Workshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002. Title of this talk:"Research Developments on Medical Physics". Photo 0210004_2: Marie Curie Fellows at CERN. Participating in Marie Curie Workshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002.

  18. The Relationship Between Student and Faculty Attitudes Toward Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine student and faculty attitudes toward computer technology in advanced arts classes at a southeastern university in the United States. This one semester study was focused on the traditional arts disciplines of art, dance, music, and theatre. This correlational analysis limited to faculty members and students…

  19. Special Workshop of Marie Curie Fellows on Research and Training in Physics and Technology

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 0210006_07a: Prof. L. Maiani, Director General of CERN. Addressing the Marie Curie Worshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002. Title of this talk:"Function of Large-scale Facilities and Centres of Excellence". Photo 0210006_14a: Prof. L. Maiani, Director General of CERN. Addressing the Marie Curie Worshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002. Title of this talk:"Function of Large-scale Facilities and Centres of Excellence". Photo 0210006_22: Dr. David Plane (CERN) introducing Dr. Theodore Papazoglou from the European Commission. Addressing the Marie Curie Worshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002. Title of this talk:"Marie Curie Fellowships in the 6th Framework Programme". Photo 0210006_28a: Dr. Nora Brambilla, Vice-President of Marie Curie Fellow Association, INFN and Dept. of Physics, University of Milan. Addressing the Marie-Curie Worshop held at CERN 3-4 October 2002. Title of this talk:"Marie Curie Fellows Association". Photo 0210006_29a: Dr. Nora Brambilla, Vice-President of Marie Curie Fellow Association, INFN a...

  20. The Congressional Science Fellow Program and Other Efforts to Help Congress and the Public Make Wiser Decisions on Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primack, Joel

    2004-05-01

    For thirty years the AAAS Congressional Science and Technology Fellow Program, with which the APS program is affiliated, has been bringing scientists and engineers to work on the staffs of Congress. During the same period, many independent technology policy groups at universities, professional societies including the APS, and non-profit organizations have prepared excellent reports. But despite these efforts, U.S. science and technology policy is often terrible! For example, the current Administration contends that there is not enough scientific evidence of global warming to actually begin to do something to slow the growth in fossil fuel use, but there is plenty of evidence to support deploying a missile defense system now, and we need to be ready to test new generations of nuclear weapons. We scientists must develop a bigger public constituency for good decisions. We need to present, not only sound recommendations backed up by convincing studies, but also wise moral leadership.

  1. 2011 Einstein Fellows Chosen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ASA has announced the selection of the 2011 Einstein Fellows who will conduct research related to NASA's Physics of the Cosmos program, which aims to expand our knowledge of the origin, evolution, and fate of the Universe. The Einstein Fellowship provides support to the awardees for three years, and the Fellows may pursue their research at a host university or research center of their choosing in the United States. The new Fellows will begin their programs in the fall of 2011. The new Einstein Fellows and their host institutions are listed below: * Akos Bogdan (Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Cambridge, Mass.) * Samuel Gralla (University of Maryland, College Park, Md.) * Philip Hopkins (University of California at Berkeley) * Matthew Kunz (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.) * Laura Lopez (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.) * Amy Reines (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, Virg.) * Rubens Reis (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor) * Ken Shen (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, Calif.) * Jennifer Siegal-Gaskins (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena) * Lorenzo Sironi (Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass.) NASA has two other astrophysics theme-based fellowship programs: the Sagan Fellowship Program, which supports research into exoplanet exploration, and the Hubble Fellowship Program, which supports research into cosmic origins. More information on the Einstein Fellowships can be found at: http://cxc.harvard.edu/fellows/

  2. Faculty Use and Integration of Technology in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyei-Blankson, Lydia; Keengwe, Jared; Blankson, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Although technology has become so pervasive on most college campuses today, it has not been heavily infused in the activities of teaching and learning (Grabe & Grabe, 2008). Additionally, growing investments in educational technology (Cuban, 2001; Oppenheimer, 2003) implies a close examination of the way faculty and students use and integrate…

  3. Understanding University Faculty Perceptions about Innovation in Teaching and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcha, Theodore J.; Rieber, Lloyd P.; Walker, Brandy B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to understand faculty perceptions about innovation in teaching and technology in a college of education in a research-intensive university. This study was motivated by the creation of a new initiative begun in a large college of education at a Carnegie Research-Intensive university to promote innovation in teaching…

  4. Faculty Narratives: Teaching, Technology, and the Nursing Professoriate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ava S.

    2010-01-01

    The use of the Internet and its associated technology in education are necessities at the 21st century university. Nursing faculty has, and continues to be, influenced by changes in the manner in which education is delivered. The changes are superimposed upon the traditional scholarship roles involving teaching, research, and service. In order to…

  5. Technology and Teaching: A Conversation among Faculty Regarding the Pros and Cons of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Andrew T.; Preston, John; Page, C. Steven; Harper, Rebecca; Dillard, Benita; Flynn, Joseph; Yamaguchi, Misato

    2014-01-01

    Technology is often touted as the savior of education (Collins & Haverson, 2009). However, is technology the panacea that it is made out to be? This paper is an extended conversation among a group of faculty members at three different universities and their attitudes and beliefs about technology and education. Three professors shared their…

  6. Influence of aspheric intraocular lens on frequency doubling technology and contrast sensitivity: a fellow eye study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo França de Espíndola

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate whether implantation of an aspheric intraocular lens (IOL results in reduced ocular aberrations and improved contrast sensitivity after cataract surgery and, therefore, changes on frequency-doubling technology (FDT testing. Methods: The present prospective clinical study enrolled 25 patients with bilateral cataract (50 eyes, who randomly received either an aspheric (Akreos AO or a spherical (Akreos Fit IOL in one eye and the other IOL in the second eye. Assessment 12 months postoperatively included photopic and mesopic contrast sensitivity testing. Higher-order aberrations (HOAs were computed. FDT testing was divided into four areas to evaluate the variation of the values at different points. The median values of the local pattern thresholds (median area contrast sensitivity [MACS] obtained with that division were calculated. Results: The Akreos AO group obtained statistically significantly lower values of HOAs and spherical aberration compared with the Akreos Fit group. There was a statistically significant between-group difference in contrast sensitivity under mesopic conditions at all spatial frequencies. No statistically significant differences were observed in mean deviation and pattern standard deviation. The aspheric IOL exhibited higher MACS in all areas, although a statistically significant difference was reached only in the 20-degree field area (P=0.043. Conclusion: Aspheric IOLs significantly reduced spherical aberration and HOAs, improving mesopic contrast sensitivity. Although there was a trend toward slightly improved FDT in the aspheric IOL group, it was not statistically significant.

  7. Disrupting Faculty Service: Using Technology to Increase Academic Service Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Perry; Shemroske, Kenneth; Khayum, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly attention regarding faculty involvement has primarily focused on faculty opinions of shared governance and faculty influence on institutional decision-making. There has been limited attention given to academic service productivity and the effectiveness of traditional approaches toward the accomplishment of faculty service requirements.…

  8. The identification, management, and prevention of conflict with faculty and fellows: A practical ethical guide for department chairs and division chiefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Frank A; McCullough, Laurence B

    2007-12-01

    The relationship between chairs and divisions chiefs with faculty colleagues in departments of obstetrics and gynecology has important but heretofore unexplored ethical dimensions. Based on the ethical concept of fiduciary responsibility and contractual obligations, this paper provides ethically justified practical guidance for academic physician leaders in the identification, management, and prevention of conflicts in their relationships with faculty colleagues. The framework is developed in contrast with the fiduciary-contractual dimensions of the physician-patient relationship and is articulated in terms of the ethical principles of beneficence, respect for autonomy, and justice. The distinctive nature of the academic physician leader-colleague relationship is that beneficence-based obligations and justice-based obligations to colleagues can often justifiably override autonomy-based obligations to colleagues, about which it is crucial for academic leaders to be transparent in making and implementing leadership decisions.

  9. NISE Fellows Program: Feedback from Past Fellows. Occasional Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paula A., Ed.

    The National Institute for Science Education (NISE) is an organization in which scholars from different disciplinary backgrounds work collaboratively to address the important issues in Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology (SMET) education. This document reports on NISE Fellows' experiences based on these questions: (1) How did you…

  10. Radiography Faculty Engaged in Online Education: Perceptions of Effectiveness, Satisfaction, and Technological Self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Shirley J; Flora, Bethany H

    2017-01-01

    To assess radiography faculty perceptions of the effectiveness of online courses. An original survey instrument was created by selecting items from 3 instruments used in prior research and adding unique questions designed to elicit demographic data from faculty. The sample included a national dataset of radiography faculty members employed in Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology-accredited programs in the United States. Findings showed that faculty perceptions of online course effectiveness are not affected significantly by faculty position, type of institution, faculty age, or years of teaching experience. Positive perceptions of the effectiveness of online courses moderately increased with years of teaching online courses, number of online courses taught in the past 5 years, and perceived competence with the use of technology. Faculty satisfaction with interaction in online courses moderately increased as the years of teaching online courses increased. However, the number of years of teaching online courses was not related to faculty satisfaction with teaching online courses or faculty satisfaction with institutional support. Online technology acceptance had a moderately positive relationship with perceived ease of use and a strong positive relationship with perceived usefulness of online technology. In addition, the use of technology-enhanced learning methods had a strong positive relationship with technological self-efficacy. Radiography faculty perceptions of the effectiveness of online courses improved with experience in teaching online courses and competence with use of technology. Perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of online technology were related directly to online technology acceptance. Furthermore, faculty members with technological self-efficacy were more likely to use technology-enhanced learning methods in the online environment.

  11. Investigating Faculty Technology Mentoring as a University-Wide Professional Development Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Evrim

    2016-01-01

    A growing and increasingly important area of research in higher education is the investigation of how different forms of support and training programs facilitate faculty adoption of technology into pedagogical practices. This study explored the implementation of a faculty technology mentoring (FTM) program as a university-wide professional…

  12. Analysis of Predictive Factors that Influence Faculty Members Technology Adoption Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ismail; Thompson, Ann

    2007-01-01

    This quantitative study used the Learning/Adoption Trajectory model of technology adoption as a scaffold to investigate whether a faculty adoption level of instructional technology in the College of Education (COE) at a large midwestern university in the US can be predicted by the faculty members' responses to questionnaire items in four areas:…

  13. Technology, Learning, and the Classroom: Longitudinal Evaluation of a Faculty Development Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Karen; Bolliger, Doris

    2012-01-01

    Technology, Learning, and the Classroom, a workshop designed to jump-start faculty's use of instructional technology in face-to-face classrooms, was offered as a week-long intensive workshop and once-a-week session over a semester. Faculty were interviewed five years after participation to determine the longitudinal effects, differences in opinion…

  14. Motivating Factors of Florida Community and State College Information Technology Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Wendy Louise

    2013-01-01

    In this study the core job characteristics that contribute to the internal motivational factors and job satisfaction of information technology faculty members working at a community or state college in Florida were investigated. Fifty-four information technology faculty members working at a community or state college in Florida completed the Job…

  15. Surface Mobility Technology (SMT) Team members and Students and Faculty from Case Western Reserve Un

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Surface Mobility Technology (SMT) Team members and Students and Faculty from Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) with the Modular Mobility Technology Demonstrator (MMTD) in the Simulated Lunar Operations (SLOPE) Laboratory

  16. Creating Integrated Facilities: Community College Radiologic Technology Faculty Attitudes towards Instructional Technology, Distance Education, and Continuing Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Lauren Brower

    This study aims to: (1) determine if a relationship exists between faculty characteristics and attitudes concerning various forms of instructional technology; (2) document information regarding instructional technology training; (3) determine if a relationship exists between faculty characteristics and attitudes concerning distance education; (4)…

  17. Stages of Faculty Concern about Teaching Online: Relationships between Faculty Teaching Methods and Technology Use in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, John H.

    2016-01-01

    As more online courses and programs are created, it is imperative institutions understand the concern of their faculty toward teaching online, the types of technology they use, and the methods they use to instruct students in order to provide appropriate resources to support them. This quantitative study measures these concerns, using the Stages…

  18. Stages of Faculty Concern about Teaching Online: Relationships between Faculty Teaching Methods and Technology Use in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, John H.

    2016-01-01

    As more online courses and programs are created, it is imperative institutions understand the concern of their faculty toward teaching online, the types of technology they use, and the methods they use to instruct students in order to provide appropriate resources to support them. This quantitative study measures these concerns, using the Stages…

  19. Incorporating climate change and technology into the science classroom: Lessons from my year as a GK-12 Fellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramoff, R. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is not included in the K-8 science standards in Massachusetts; as a result, students learn what climate is, but not how human activities affect it. Starting in 2010, Boston University launched the GK-12 GLACIER program, funded with 2.9M from the National Science Foundation. The purpose of the program is to incorporate the fundamentals of climate change into the K-12 curriculum, focusing on grades 5-8 when quantitative science enters the curriculum. Graduate students are partnered with teachers in Boston public schools for 10 hours a week of teaching with additional curriculum development. I will focus on the curriculum that I developed as a part of this program for the 5th grade science class at The Curley School in Jamaica Plain, MA, where I worked with Grades 3-5, ESL, and PACE autism program science teacher, Stephanie Selznick. The Curley School is an ethnically and economically diverse Boston public school with about 800 students and an 83% minority population. At the Curley, I taught two full days a week, meeting with all of the 5th grade classes and some of the 4th grade classes of all academic levels. The lessons that I created were designed to fit into the state standards and enrich student understanding plant ecology and earth science, as well as develop their capacity to design experiments and use technology. These include Question of the Day, Digital Field Guide to the Outdoor Classroom, Phototropism, Solar System Weather Report, Soil and Water, Local Landforms, and the Earth as a Closed System Unit for which materials and lesson plans are available on my website. Our secondary goals were to improve tech literacy at Curley. Due to funding restrictions, there were few technology resources available to the students at the beginning of the 2011/2012 school year. To improve technology resources at Curley, I organized a fundraiser at Boston University, selling donated items from graduate students and faculty; the 1000 raised was used to supply

  20. Perceptions of pharmacy students, faculty members, and administrators on the use of technology in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVall, Margarita V; Hayney, Mary S; Marsh, Wallace; Neville, Michael W; O'Barr, Stephen; Sheets, Erin D; Calhoun, Larry D

    2013-05-13

    To gather and evaluate the perceptions of students, faculty members, and administrators regarding the frequency and appropriateness of classroom technology use. Third-year pharmacy students and faculty members at 6 colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed to assess their perceptions about the type, frequency, and appropriateness of using technology in the classroom. Upper-level administrators and information technology professionals were also interviewed to ascertain overall technology goals and identify criteria used to adopt new classroom technologies. Four hundred sixty-six students, 124 faculty members, and 12 administrators participated in the survey. The most frequently used and valued types of classroom technology were course management systems, audience response systems, and lecture capture. Faculty members and students agreed that faculty members appropriately used course management systems and audience response systems. Compared with their counterparts, tech-savvy, and male students reported significantly greater preference for increased use of classroom technology. Eighty-six percent of faculty members reported having changed their teaching methodologies to meet student needs, and 91% of the students agreed that the use of technology met their needs. Pharmacy colleges and schools use a variety of technologies in their teaching methods, which have evolved to meet the needs of the current generation of students. Students are satisfied with the appropriateness of technology, but many exhibit preferences for even greater use of technology in the classroom.

  1. Competence and Usage of Web 2.0 Technologies by Higher Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Kamal Ahmed; Zai, Sajid Yousuf; Jafri, Iftikhar Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Literature on Web 2.0 experiences of higher education faculty in developing countries such as Pakistan is very limited. An insight on awareness and practices of higher education faculty with these tools can be helpful to map strategies and plan of action for adopting latest technologies to support teaching-learning processes in higher education of…

  2. Technology Acceptance in an Academic Context: Faculty Acceptance of Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Shanan G.; Harris, Michael L.; Colaric, Susan M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors surveyed faculty from a college of business and a college of education regarding their attitudes toward online education. Results of the survey were examined to determine the degree to which the technology acceptance model was able to adequately explain faculty acceptance of online education. Results indicate that perceived usefulness…

  3. Faculty Use and Perception of Mobile Information and Communication Technology (m-ICT) for Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Chung, Chung Joo; Park, Han Woo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider faculty use and perception of mobile information and communication technology (m-ICT) for teaching practices. The researchers examined qualitative responses about specific m-ICT use and efficiency amongst Korean and US faculty (n = 59) at three different institutions. Findings from multi-level textual…

  4. Faculty Use and Perception of Mobile Information and Communication Technology (m-ICT) for Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Chung, Chung Joo; Park, Han Woo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider faculty use and perception of mobile information and communication technology (m-ICT) for teaching practices. The researchers examined qualitative responses about specific m-ICT use and efficiency amongst Korean and US faculty (n = 59) at three different institutions. Findings from multi-level textual…

  5. Perceptions of Preservice Teachers regarding the Integration of Information and Communication Technologies in Turkish Education Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Yavuz; Odabasi, H. Ferhan; Kuzu, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the views of pre-service teachers regarding the indicators of information and communication technologies (ICT) at Turkish education faculties. A cross-sectional survey design was implemented with graduating students enrolled in Turkish education faculties. A combination of stratified random sampling and systematic sampling was…

  6. Competency Testing for Pediatric Cardiology Fellows Learning Transthoracic Echocardiography: Implementation, Fellow Experience, and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jami C; Geva, Tal; Brown, David W

    2015-12-01

    There is currently great interest in measuring trainee competency at all levels of medical education. In 2007, we implemented a system for assessing cardiology fellows' progress in attaining imaging skills. This paradigm could be adapted for use by other cardiology programs. Evaluation consisted of a two-part exercise performed after years 1 and 2 of pediatric cardiology training. Part 1: a directly observed evaluation of technical skills as fellows imaged a normal subject (year 1) and a patient with complex heart disease (year 2). Part 2: fellows interpreted and wrote reports for two echocardiograms illustrating congenital heart disease. These were graded for accuracy and facility with communicating pertinent data. After 5 years of testing, fellows were surveyed about their experience. In 5 years, 40 fellows were tested at least once. Testing identified four fellows who underperformed on the technical portion and four on the interpretive portion. Surveys were completed by 33 fellows (83 %). Most (67 %) felt that intermittent observation by faculty was inadequate for assessing skills and that procedural volume was a poor surrogate for competency (58 %). Posttest feedback was constructive and valuable for 90, and 70 % felt the process helped them set goals for skill improvement. Overall, fellows felt this testing was fair and should continue. Fellow performance and responses identified programmatic issues that were creating barriers to learning. We describe a practical test to assess competency for cardiology fellows learning echocardiography. This paradigm is feasible, has excellent acceptance among trainees, and identifies trainees who need support. Materials developed could be easily adapted to help track upcoming ACGME-mandated metrics.

  7. Orion: a web-based application designed to monitor resident and fellow performance on-call.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itri, Jason N; Kim, Woojin; Scanlon, Mary H

    2011-10-01

    Radiology residency and fellowship training provides a unique opportunity to evaluate trainee performance and determine the impact of various educational interventions. We have developed a simple software application (Orion) using open-source tools to facilitate the identification and monitoring of resident and fellow discrepancies in on-call preliminary reports. Over a 6-month period, 19,200 on-call studies were interpreted by 20 radiology residents, and 13,953 on-call studies were interpreted by 25 board-certified radiology fellows representing eight subspecialties. Using standard review macros during faculty interpretation, each of these reports was classified as "agreement", "minor discrepancy", and "major discrepancy" based on the potential to impact patient management or outcome. Major discrepancy rates were used to establish benchmarks for resident and fellow performance by year of training, modality, and subspecialty, and to identify residents and fellows demonstrating a significantly higher major discrepancy rate compared with their classmates. Trends in discrepancies were used to identify subspecialty-specific areas of increased major discrepancy rates in an effort to tailor the didactic and case-based curriculum. A series of missed-case conferences were developed based on trends in discrepancies, and the impact of these conferences is currently being evaluated. Orion is a powerful information technology tool that can be used by residency program directors, fellowship programs directors, residents, and fellows to improve radiology education and training.

  8. New procedures for Fellows nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eric

    On January 30, 2000, the Union Fellows Committee met and elected 37 new members for Fellowship.The Fellows Committee's selection of Fellows is the last step in a process that begins with the nomination of members by their colleagues.

  9. GSBPP Faculty Perceptions of Synchronous Distance Learning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    number of products in live Web conferencing and eLearning for the corporate and academic sectors. Elluminate Live is their specific product for DL...limitations of online learning in the context of the student, the instructor, and the tenured faculty. International Journal on ELearning , 7(1), 5. Berg...Building upon an interdependent system. International Journal on ELearning , 7(2), 245. Hagner, P. R., & Schneebeck, C. A. (2001). Engaging the faculty

  10. Perceptions of pharmacy students, faculty members, and administrators on the use of technology in the classroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DiVall, Margarita V; Hayney, Mary S; Marsh, Wallace; Neville, Michael W; O'Barr, Stephen; Sheets, Erin D; Calhoun, Larry D

    2013-01-01

    .... Third-year pharmacy students and faculty members at 6 colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed to assess their perceptions about the type, frequency, and appropriateness of using technology in the classroom...

  11. Faculty Online Technology Adoption: The Role of Management Support and Organizational Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui-Ting; Deggs, David M.; Jabor, M. Khata; Machtmes, Krisanna

    2011-01-01

    Although there is a plethora of online learning studies, relatively few studies have probed into teachers' online technology adoption. It is suggested that faculty resistance to technology be one of the key hindrances to the future development of distance learning. Several studies have argued that teachers' resistance to technology, one of the key…

  12. Faculty and Student Use of Technologies, User Productivity, and User Preference in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jensen J.; Alexander, Melody W.; Perreault, Heidi; Waldman, Lila; Truell, Allen D.

    2009-01-01

    The authors surveyed faculty and students in Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business-accredited U.S. business colleges on their use of information technologies in distance education and their perceptions of the technologies' effect on productivity and technology preference. The authors collected data from 140 professors across the…

  13. A Longitudinal Study of Information Technology Impact on Business Faculty in Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jensen, J.; Alexander, Melody W.; Perrreault, Heidi; Waldman, Lila

    2007-01-01

    This longitudinal study compared business faculty's use of information technology in distance education as well as their perception of the technology's impact on their productivity and technology preferences between 2000 and 2006. Data were collected from 81 professors in 2000 and 140 professors in 2006 at AACSB-accredited business colleges across…

  14. From novice to tech savvy teachers. A Report of Faculty Members’ Teaching with Technology Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennie M. Hwang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores faculty motivations to adopt technologies for their courses, their current uses of technologies and perceptions of teaching with technologies, as well as their suggestions for how their institutions can best support them. In particular, this investigation compares novice and tech savvy teachers by looking at differences in the technologies they use, how they integrate these technologies in their courses, and the challenges they experience in doing so.

  15. Physics Learning Achievement Study: Projectile, using Mathematica program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students

    OpenAIRE

    hutem, Artit -

    2013-01-01

    The propose of this study is to study Physics Learning Achievement, projectile motion, using the Mathematica program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students, comparing with Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students who study the projectile motion experiment set. The samples are Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University Technology students, studying in the first semester of academic year 2011, consistin...

  16. STUDENTS‘ PERCEPTIONS OF CHANGE READINESS OF A TURKISH EDUCATION FACULTY REGARDING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz AKBULUT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent study investigated the degree of involvement in new teaching and learning methods by the academic staff of a large privileged Turkish state university, and revealed that faculties of education and open education were better in terms of change readiness than other faculties. The current study builds on that study, and investigates the involvement of the institution and teaching staff in technology integration from observers’ perspectives through administering a personal information form and a 31-item Likert questionnaire to 475 senior students of the Faculty of Education. Findings revealed that what were reported by instructors in the previous study seem somewhat different from what is being reported by their students in the current study. More specifically, students found their instructors and the infrastructure of the faculty quite inadequate in terms of the integration of information and communication technologies (ICT within classroom settings. Implications and suggestions regarding the integration process are provided.

  17. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  18. Factors Influencing the Integration of Technology by Community College Adjunct Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paver, Jonathan David

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the factors that predict intention to integrate technology into instruction by community college adjunct faculty. For this study the integration of technology was defined as beyond simple occasional use, within the next academic year. The decomposed theory of planned behavior was tested for its predictive ability with this…

  19. Factors Influencing the Integration of Technology by Community College Adjunct Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paver, Jonathan David

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the factors that predict intention to integrate technology into instruction by community college adjunct faculty. For this study the integration of technology was defined as beyond simple occasional use, within the next academic year. The decomposed theory of planned behavior was tested for its predictive ability with this…

  20. AGU elects 1989 Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-two distinguished scientists have been elected Fellows of the Union. Fellows are scientists who are judged by their peers as having attained ackowledged eminence in a branch of geophysics. The number of Fellows elected each year is limited to 0.1 % of the total membership at the time of election. The newly elected Fellows are Walter Alvarez, University of California, Berkeley; John R. Booker, University of Washington, Seattle; Peter G. Brewer, Woods Hole Oceanographie Institution, Woods Hole, Mass.; Michael H. Carr, U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.; Gedeon Dagan, Tel Aviv University, Israel; James H. Dieterich, USGS, Menlo Park; Thomas Dunne, University of Washington, Seattle; Jack Fooed Evernden, USGS, Menlo Park; Edward A. Flinn, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C.; Arnold L. Gordon, Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Palisades, N.Y.; Gerhard Haerendel, Max Planck Institut, Garching, Federal Republic of Germany; David L. Kohlstedt, Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.; Robert A. Langel, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD; James G. Moore, USGS, Menlo Park; Marcia Neugebauer, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Robert C. Newton, University of Chicago, Illinois; John A. Orcutt, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, Calif.; Robert B. Smith, University of Utah, Salt Lake City; Bengt U. Sonnerup, Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H.; Martin A. Uman, University of Florida, Gainesville; Joe Veverka, Cornell University; and James C.G. Walker, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

  1. Exploring the Adoption of Instructional Technologies: The Mainstream Faculty Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Leslie C.

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades the adoption of digital technologies has grown from a few elite users to influencing and impacting almost all of modem society. Higher education is one area of society where digital technologies have become embedded in its instructional practices because digital technologies can enhance student engagement with innovative…

  2. Mentored Discussions of Teaching: An Introductory Teaching Development Program for Future STEM Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiduc, Rachael R.; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Ruggeri, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Today's science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate students and postdoctoral fellows are tomorrow's new faculty members; but these junior academicians often receive limited pedagogical training. We describe four iterations of an entry-level program with a low time commitment, Mentored Discussions of Teaching (MDT). The…

  3. Investigating IT Faculty Resistance to Learning Management System Adoption Using Latent Variables in an Acceptance Technology Model

    OpenAIRE

    Fatiha Bousbahi; Muna Saleh Alrazgan

    2015-01-01

    To enhance instruction in higher education, many universities in the Middle East have chosen to introduce learning management systems (LMS) to their institutions. However, this new educational technology is not being used at its full potential and faces resistance from faculty members. To investigate this phenomenon, we conducted an empirical research study to uncover factors influencing faculty members’ acceptance of LMS. Thus, in the Fall semester of 2014, Information Technology faculty mem...

  4. Fellows as teachers: a model to enhance pediatric resident education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles V. Smith

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Pressures on academic faculty to perform beyond their role as educators has stimulated interest in complementary approaches in resident medical education. While fellows are often believed to detract from resident learning and experience, we describe our preliminary investigations utilizing clinical fellows as a positive force in pediatric resident education. Our objectives were to implement a practical approach to engage fellows in resident education, evaluate the impact of a fellow-led education program on pediatric resident and fellow experience, and investigate if growth of a fellowship program detracts from resident procedural experience.This study was conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU where fellows designed and implemented an education program consisting of daily didactic teaching sessions before morning clinical rounds. The impact of a fellow-led education program on resident satisfaction with their NICU experience was assessed via anonymous student evaluations. The potential value of the program for participating fellows was also evaluated using an anonymous survey.The online evaluation was completed by 105 residents. Scores were markedly higher after the program was implemented in areas of teaching excellence (4.44 out of 5 versus 4.67, p<0.05 and overall resident learning (3.60 out of 5 versus 4.61, p<0.001. Fellows rated the acquisition of teaching skills and enhanced knowledge of neonatal pathophysiology as the most valuable aspects of their participation in the education program. The anonymous survey revealed that 87.5% of participating residents believed that NICU fellows were very important to their overall training and education.While fellows are often believed to be a detracting factor to residency training, we found that pediatric resident attitudes toward the fellows were generally positive. In our experience, in the specialty of neonatology a fellow-led education program can positively contribute to both

  5. Physics Learning Achievement Study: Projectile, Using Mathematica Program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutem, Artit; Kerdmee, Supoj

    2013-01-01

    The propose of this study is to study Physics Learning Achievement, projectile motion, using the Mathematica program of Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students, comparing with Faculty of Science and Technology Phetchabun Rajabhat University students who study the projectile motion experiment set. The samples are…

  6. Literature Review of Faculty-Perceived Usefulness of Instructional Technology in Classroom Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a literature review of the research concerning the role of faculty perspectives about instructional technology. Learning management systems, massive open online courses (MOOCs), cloud-based multimedia applications, and mobile apps represent the tools and the language of academia in the 21st century. Research examined…

  7. Implementing change thoughout the faculty: combining educational priciples, stategy and technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes key guidelines underlying a major change process occurring in the Faculty of Educational Science and Technology at the University of Twente in The Netherlands. The change process involves re-designing all of our courses, within a short period of time, to reflect a new instructio

  8. The Adoption of Instructional Technology by Chinese Women Faculty in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yixin

    2013-01-01

    While some institutions of higher learning encourage faculty adoption of newer instructional technologies into practice, various factors contribute to integration or hesitancy of acceptance. These base level factors are compounded when issues of culture and identity are considered. This quantitative study examined the characteristics of Chinese…

  9. Observations from the fire and collapse of the Faculty of Architecture Building, Delft University of Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelhardt, M.D.; Meacham, B.; Kodur, V.; Kirk, A.; Park, H.; Straalen, IJ.J. van; Maljaars, J.; Weeren, K. van; Feijter, R. de; Both, K.

    2013-01-01

    On May 13, 2008, a fire occurred at the Faculty of Architecture Building at the Delft University of Technology (TUD) in the Netherlands. The fire ultimately led to the collapse of a major portion of the building. Data was collected on this fire event by an international team that included

  10. Fire and collapse, Faculty of Architecture building, Delft University of Technology: Data collection and preliminary analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, B.; Park, H.; Engelhardt, M.; Kirk, A.; Kodur, V.; Straalen, IJ.J.; Maljaars, J.; Weeren, K. van; Feijter, R. de; Both, K.

    2010-01-01

    On the morning of May 13, 2008, a fire that started in a coffee vending machine on the 6th floor of the 13-story Faculty of Architecture Building at the Delft University of Technology (TUD), Delft, the Netherlands, quickly developed into an extreme loading event. Although all building occupants evac

  11. Faculty's Acceptance of Computer Based Technology: Cross-Validation of an Extended Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tunku Badariah Tunku; Madarsha, Kamal Basha; Zainuddin, Ahmad Marzuki; Ismail, Nik Ahmad Hisham; Nordin, Mohamad Sahari

    2010-01-01

    The first aim of the present study is to validate an extended technology acceptance model (TAME) on the data derived from the faculty members of a university in an ongoing, computer mediated work setting. The study extended the original TAM model by including an intrinsic motivation component--computer self efficacy. In so doing, the study…

  12. An Examination of Faculty Innovativeness in Relation to Inductive Teaching and the Use of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrer, Donald A.; Wyant, Nancey A.; Gordin, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    The conceptual framework for this research describes the processes faculty use to create an online course that meets learning outcomes while creating a positive learning experience for the online student. This involves acceptance of technology to create a course structured for inductive learning in addition to traditional deductive learning. The…

  13. Fire and collapse, Faculty of Architecture building, Delft University of Technology: Data collection and preliminary analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, B.; Park, H.; Engelhardt, M.; Kirk, A.; Kodur, V.; Straalen, IJ.J.; Maljaars, J.; Weeren, K. van; Feijter, R. de; Both, K.

    2010-01-01

    On the morning of May 13, 2008, a fire that started in a coffee vending machine on the 6th floor of the 13-story Faculty of Architecture Building at the Delft University of Technology (TUD), Delft, the Netherlands, quickly developed into an extreme loading event. Although all building occupants

  14. Scaling up a learning technology strategy: supporting student/faculty teams in learner-centred design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Carey

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for post-secondary institutions to think strategically about the application of learning technologies has been well documented. The strategy must plan to effect change in faculty approaches to teaching and learning, not just to 'add technology and stir'. An effective strategy will also address both content - the particular applications with the most leverage for institutional goals - and the process of obtaining commitment and moving forward (Daniel, 1996.

  15. Faculty and organizational characteristics associated with informatics/health information technology adoption in DNP programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Cathy R; Meek, Julie A; Walker, Patricia Hinton

    2014-01-01

    Nursing informatics/health information technology are key components of graduate nursing education and an accreditation requirement, yet little is known about the extent to which doctor of nursing practice (DNP) curricula include these content domains. The purpose of this descriptive study was to elicit perceptions of DNP program directors relative to (a) whether and how the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's (AACN's) Essential IV standard has been met in their DNP programs; (b) whether the Technology Informatics Guiding Educational Reform Initiative Foundation's Phase II competencies have been integrated in their programs; and (c) the faculty and organizational characteristics associated with the adoption of the AACN's Essential IV. In 2011, an electronic survey was sent to all 138 DNP program directors identified on the AACN Web site with an 81.2% response rate. Findings include variation in whether and how programs have integrated informatics/health information technology content, a lack of informatics-certified and/or master's-prepared faculty, and a perceived lack of faculty awareness of informatics curricular guidelines. DNP program director and dean awareness and support of faculty informatics education, use of informatics competency guidelines, and national policy and stimulus funding support are recommended to promote curricular inclusion and the engagement of nurses in strong informatics practices.

  16. Cloud-Based Technologies: Faculty Development, Support, and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    The number of instructional offerings in higher education that are online, blended, or web-enhanced, including courses and programs, continues to grow exponentially. Alongside the growth of e-learning, higher education has witnessed the explosion of cloud-based or Web 2.0 technologies, a term that refers to the vast array of socially oriented,…

  17. 2004 Fellows Citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    AGU congratulates the forty-one distinguished scientists who were selected by a committee of their peers to be AGU Fellows for 2004. This selection was based on the individuals' attainment of acknowledged eminence in a branch of geophysics. The number of Fellows selected annually is limited to no more than 0.1% of the AGU membership: Andrew D. Barry, Enrico Bonatti, Edward V. Bromwell, John P. Burrows, Philip R. Christensen, William B. Curry, Judith Curry, Margaret L. Delaney, Steven R. Emerson, Brian J. Evans, Donald H. Fairfield, Marvin Geller, David Green, William Holt, Roy Hyndman, David E. James, James F. Kasting, Peter Kelemen, Paul J. Kellogg, Michael J. Kirkby, Daniel Loucks, P.M. Mathews, Jean-Paul Montagner, William R. Normark, Gerald R. North, Michael O'Hara, Ronald S. Oremland, Roger A. Pielke, Sr., Joseph Prospero, Karsten Pruess, Edmond C. Roelof, Gary Rottman, Allan Rubin, Ernest H. Rutter, John H. Seinfeld, Sharon Smith, Pieter Tans, John M. Toole, Jean-Pierre Valet, Lionel Wilson, and E. L. Winterer

  18. A survey of nursing faculty needs for training in use of new technologies for education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Diane N; Zierler, Brenda; Nguyen, Huong Q

    2011-04-01

    This study describes nursing faculty's use, knowledge of, and training needs associated with distance learning, simulation, telehealth, and informatics tools in nursing education and practice. Web-based surveys were completed by 193 faculty members from nursing schools in the western United States. More than half of the respondents were frequent users of distance learning and informatics tools. Approximately 66% of faculty reported they were competent with distance learning and informatics tools. Training and technical support for the use of distance learning was highest, yet 69% of faculty still reported a need for additional training. The availability of training and financial and technical support was associated with greater use of distance learning technologies (p technologies, the findings suggest nursing faculty perceive a need for training and support to effectively use educational technologies in nursing education. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. The Critical Care Communication project: improving fellows' communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Robert M; Back, Anthony L; Barnato, Amber E; Prendergast, Thomas J; Emlet, Lillian L; Karpov, Irina; White, Patrick H; Nelson, Judith E

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an evidence-based communication skills training workshop to improve the communication skills of critical care fellows. Pulmonary and critical care fellows (N = 38) participated in a 3-day communication skills workshop between 2008 and 2010 involving brief didactic talks, faculty demonstration of skills, and faculty-supervised small group skills practice sessions with simulated families. Skills included the following: giving bad news, achieving consensus on goals of therapy, and discussing the limitations of life-sustaining treatment. Participants rated their skill levels in a pre-post survey in 11 core communication tasks using a 5-point Likert scale. Of 38 fellows, 36 (95%) completed all 3 days of the workshop. We compared pre and post scores using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Overall, self-rated skills increased for all 11 tasks. In analyses by participant, 95% reported improvement in at least 1 skill; with improvement in a median of 10 of 11 skills. Ninety-two percent rated the course as either very good/excellent, and 80% recommended that it be mandatory for future fellows. This 3-day communication skills training program increased critical care fellows' self-reported family meeting communication skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. National Academy of Engineering selects Engineering Education Fellows

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Jean

    2004-01-01

    Gary Downey, of Blacksburg, professor of science and technology in society in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences at Virginia Tech, has been named a Boeing Company Engineering Education Senior Fellow by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE).

  1. Fellows, Associates & Students Programmes

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    The present document reviews the CERN Fellows, Associates and Students Programmes emphasizing the developments since 2000, when the previous review was presented to the Scientific Policy Committee, Finance Committee and Council (CERN/2325), and makes proposals for the coming five years. In summary, it is proposed to â?¢ Simplify the payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme, which will no longer depend on candidateâ??s home support and age; â?¢ Broaden the scope of the Fellowship Programme, in order to facilitate the recruitment of young graduates in computing and engineering. Age-related eligibility conditions and payment levels will be replaced with experience-based criteria; â?¢ Modify subsistence rates for the Doctoral and Technical Student Programme in order to harmonize CERNâ??s payment levels with those offered by other research establishments. This document is presented for discussion and recommendation by the Scientific Policy Committee and approval by the Council. Additiona...

  2. Success factors of Black science, technology, engineering and mathematics faculty at predominantly White institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Michelle A.

    Black faculty at predominantly White institutions (PWIs) have historically been underrepresented and made to endure with academic isolation, scholarship marginalization and other challenges to the tenure process. When it comes to science, technology, engineering and math, also known as STEM, as it relates to race and success, little is known of how tenured Black STEM faculty have developed an interest in STEM, navigated the unfamiliar waters of academia and maintained longevity at their respective postsecondary institutions. The purpose of this study is to look at the similar experiences of this population and provide insight regarding any factors and or influences that have impacted their success. Grounded in critical race theory (CRT), this qualitative study will utilize a Delphi technique to determine the similar experiences and influences of 17 Black STEM, tenured (and tenure-track) faculty working at PWIs in a Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) states. The study highlighted the importance of: mentoring in college, graduate school and as a junior faculty and; STEM related opportunities such as summer camps or programs, internships, and research.

  3. Do Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (PHO) Fellows Receive Communication Training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, Wilson; Bylund, Carma L.; Kesselheim, Jennifer; Leonard, David; Leavey, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has established communication as a core competency for physicians in training. However, data suggest that most pediatric residents perceive inadequate training in the delivery of bad news and the majority of former trainees in pediatric oncology received no formal training in the delivery of bad news during fellowship. The study examines communication training in ACGME accredited US pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) fellowship programs. Methods An online survey was distributed to 315 PHO fellows in training via the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology (ASPHO) fellow email registry. Each fellow received an initial request to participate and 2 reminders, while participation was encouraged through a random incentive drawing. Results One hundred and ten fellows (35%) responded. Eighty percent of respondents perceived communication training to be important to fellow education, however only 32% reported receiving communication training (other than direct observation). The most common reported teaching method of fellowship communication training was formal lecture (42%). Twenty-three percent of respondents reported neither communication training nor frequent feedback on their communication skills from faculty observation. This same group was the least satisfied with their programs’ approach to teaching communication (P communication training in PHO fellowships despite ACGME requirements and fellows’ interest in this training. Didactic learning remains the most frequently described training method, yet educational theory identifies the limitation of didactic lectures alone. Communication training employing novel teaching methods and emphasizing communication challenges identified by fellows should be developed and evaluated. PMID:24039096

  4. Geritalk: communication skills training for geriatric and palliative medicine fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Amy S; Back, Anthony L; Arnold, Robert M; Goldberg, Gabrielle R; Lim, Betty B; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B; O'Neill, Lynn B

    2012-02-01

    Expert communication is essential to high-quality care for older patients with serious illness. Although the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatric and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. The current study drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges that geriatric and palliative medicine fellows face. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques before the course. Geriatric and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n = 18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on a 5-point scale). After the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, P skills practice (mean 4.3 on 5-point scale). In sum, the intensive communication skills program, customized for the specific needs of geriatric and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows' self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills.

  5. Fellows Celebrated at Joint Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    The 2007 AGU Fellows were presented at the recent Joint Assembly in Acapulco, Mexico. A formal ceremony was held on 25 May 2007, where President Tim Killeen introduced each Fellow and read a brief statement of the achievements for which each had been selected. The presentations were followed by an honors fiesta at which family members and close colleagues further feted the honorees.

  6. Faculty perception of medical council of India basic course workshop in medical education technologies as faculty development programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Kumar Yadav

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: BCW must be an integral part of the faculty development programme at institute level but its modules should be regularly updated time to time. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(3.000: 846-849

  7. The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic technology,…

  8. The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic technology,…

  9. Investigating IT Faculty Resistance to Learning Management System Adoption Using Latent Variables in an Acceptance Technology Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousbahi, Fatiha; Alrazgan, Muna Saleh

    2015-01-01

    To enhance instruction in higher education, many universities in the Middle East have chosen to introduce learning management systems (LMS) to their institutions. However, this new educational technology is not being used at its full potential and faces resistance from faculty members. To investigate this phenomenon, we conducted an empirical research study to uncover factors influencing faculty members' acceptance of LMS. Thus, in the Fall semester of 2014, Information Technology faculty members were surveyed to better understand their perceptions of the incorporation of LMS into their courses. The results showed that personal factors such as motivation, load anxiety, and organizational support play important roles in the perception of the usefulness of LMS among IT faculty members. These findings suggest adding these constructs in order to extend the Technology acceptance model (TAM) for LMS acceptance, which can help stakeholders of the university to implement the use of this system. This may assist in planning and evaluating the use of e-learning.

  10. Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) Talent Acquisition System, PMF-TAS (ACCESS CONTROLLED)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — Application and Assessment system for Presidential Management Fellows (PMF) and PMF Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programs. This sytem is access...

  11. Fellows Celebrated at Joint Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    The 2009 AGU Fellows were presented at the recent Joint Assembly in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. At a formal ceremony on 26 May 2009, AGU President Timothy L. Grove introduced each Fellow and read a brief statement of the achievements for which each had been selected. The presentations were followed by a reception for meeting attendees and a banquet at which family members and close colleagues further feted the honorees. AGU Fellows are scientists who have attained “acknowledged eminence in the geophysical sciences.” Election to AGU Fellowship is a very high recognition by one's peers. The number of Fellows elected may not exceed 0.1% of the membership in any given year.

  12. 5 CFR 315.708 - Conversion based on service as a Fellow or Senior Fellow in the Presidential Management Fellows...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CAREER AND CAREER-CONDITIONAL... Conversion based on service as a Fellow or Senior Fellow in the Presidential Management Fellows Program. (a... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Conversion based on service as a Fellow...

  13. Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK): An Educational Landscape for Tertiary Science Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavadia, Linda

    Earlier studies concluded that technology's strength is in supporting student learning rather than as an instrument for content delivery (Angeli & Valanides, 2014). Current research espouses the merits of the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework as a guide for educators' reflections about technology integration within the context of content and instructional practice. Grounded by two theoretical frameworks, TPACK (Mishra & Koehler, 2006; 2008) and Rogers' (1983, 1995) theory of diffusion of innovation, the purpose of this mixed-methods research was two-fold: to explore the perceived competencies of tertiary science faculty at higher education institutions with respect to their integration of technology within the constructs of pedagogical practice and content learning and to analyze whether these perceived competencies may serve as predictive factors for technology adoption level. The literature review included past research that served as models for the Sci-TPACK instrument. Twenty-nine professors of tertiary science courses participated in an online Likert survey, and four professors provided in-depth interviews on their TPACK practices. Quantitative analysis of data consisted of descriptive and reliability statistics, calculations of means for each of the seven scales or domains of TPACK, and regression analysis. Open-ended questions on the Likert survey and individual interviews provided recurrent themes of the qualitative data. Final results revealed that the participants integrate technology into pedagogy and content through a myriad of TPACK practices. Regression analysis supported perceived TPACK competencies as predictive factors for technology adoption level.

  14. Geritalk: Communication Skills Training for Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Amy S.; Back, Anthony L.; Arnold, Robert M.; Goldberg, Gabrielle R.; Lim, Betty B.; Litrivis, Evgenia; Smith, Cardinale B.; O’Neill, Lynn B.

    2011-01-01

    Expert communication is essential to high quality care for older patients with serious illness. While the importance of communication skills is widely recognized, formal curricula for teaching communication skills to geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows is often inadequate or unavailable. We drew upon the educational principles and format of an evidence-based, interactive teaching method, to develop an intensive communication skills training course designed specifically to address the common communication challenges faced by geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows. The 2-day retreat, held away from the hospital environment, included large-group overview presentations, small-group communication skills practice, and development of future skills practice commitment. Faculty received in-depth training in small-group facilitation techniques prior to the course. Geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows were recruited to participate in the course and 100% (n=18) enrolled. Overall satisfaction with the course was very high (mean 4.8 on 5-point scale). Compared to before the course, fellows reported an increase in self-assessed preparedness for specific communication challenges (mean increase 1.4 on 5-point scale, pskills practice (mean 4.3 on 5-point scale). In sum, the intensive communication skills program, tailored to the specific needs of geriatrics and palliative medicine fellows, improved fellows’ self-assessed preparedness for challenging communication tasks and provided a model for ongoing deliberate practice of communication skills. PMID:22211768

  15. River-Based Experiential Learning: the Bear River Fellows Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, D. E.; Shirley, B.; Roark, M. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Outdoor Recreation, and Parks and Recreation programs at Utah State University (USU) have partnered to offer a new, unique river-based experiential learning opportunity for undergraduates called the Bear River Fellows Program. The program allows incoming freshmen Fellows to experience a river first hand during a 5-day/4-night river trip on the nearby Bear River two weeks before the start of their first Fall semester. As part of the program, Fellows will navigate the Bear River in canoes, camp along the banks, interact with local water and environmental managers, collect channel cross section, stream flow, vegetation cover, and topological complexity data, meet other incoming freshmen, interact with faculty and graduate students, develop boating and leadership skills, problem solve, and participate as full members of the trip team. Subsequently, Fellows will get paid as undergraduate researchers during their Fall and Spring Freshman semesters to analyze, synthesize, and present the field data they collect. The program is a collaborative effort between two USU academic units and the (non-academic) division of Student Services and supports a larger National Science Foundation funded environmental modelling and management project for the lower Bear River, Utah watershed. We have advertised the program via Facebook and emails to incoming USU freshmen, received 35 applications (60% women), and accepted 5 Fellows into the program (3 female and 2 male). The river trip departs August 14, 2012. The poster will overview the Bear River Fellows Program and present qualitative and preliminary outcomes emerging from the trip and Fellows' work through the Fall semester with the field data they collect. We will also undertake more rigorous and longer longitudinal quantitative evaluation of Program outcomes (for example, in problem-solving and leadership) both in Spring 2013 and in subsequent 2013 and 2014 offerings of the

  16. University Faculty Members' Perceptions of the Factors That Facilitate Technology Integration into Their Instruction: An Exploratory Case Study in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkouti, Ibrahim Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative, exploratory case study was designed to elicit faculty members' perceptions of the factors that facilitate technology integration into their instruction. The study was conducted at a midsized higher education institution in Qatar. Davis's (1986) technology acceptance model (TAM) is the conceptual framework that guided this study…

  17. APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: Steps to Enhance the Use of Technology in Education through Faculty Development, Funding and Change Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M.; Benjamin, Sheldon; Briscoe, Gregory; Hales, Deborah J.; Boland, Robert J.; Luo, John S.; Chan, Carlyle H.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B.; Yellowlees, Peter M.; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article provides an overview of how trainees, faculty, and institutions use technology for acquiring knowledge, skills, and attitudes for practicing modern medicine. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on medical education, technology, and change, and identify the key themes and make recommendations for implementing…

  18. Attitudes of Female Faculty toward the Use of Computer Technologies and the Barriers that Limit Their Use of Technologies in Girls' Colleges in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuqayteeb, Taghreed Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine female faculty members' use of computer technologies, their attitudes toward computers, the factors that best predict their attitudes toward computers, and the barriers that limit their use of computer technologies in girls' colleges in Dammam and Jubail, Saudi Arabia. Also, this study examined how female…

  19. Training satisfaction for subspecialty fellows in internal medicine: Findings from the Veterans Affairs (VA Learners' Perceptions Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrne John M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Learner satisfaction assessment is critical in the design and improvement of training programs. However, little is known about what influences satisfaction and whether trainee specialty is correlated. A national comparison of satisfaction among internal medicine subspecialty fellows in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA provides a unique opportunity to examine educational factors associated with learner satisfaction. We compared satisfaction across internal medicine fellows by subspecialty and compared factors associated with satisfaction between procedural versus non-procedural subspecialty fellows, using data from the Learners' Perceptions Survey (LPS, a validated survey tool. Methods We surveyed 2,221 internal medicine subspecialty fellows rotating through VA between 2001 and 2008. Learners rated their overall training satisfaction on a 100-point scale, and on a five-point Likert scale ranked satisfaction with items within six educational domains: learning, clinical, working and physical environments; personal experience; and clinical faculty/preceptor. Results Procedural and non-procedural fellows reported similar overall satisfaction scores (81.2 and 81.6. Non-procedural fellows reported higher satisfaction with 79 of 81 items within the 6 domains and with the domain of physical environment (4.06 vs. 3.85, p Conclusions Internal medicine fellows are highly satisfied with their VA training. Nonprocedural fellows reported higher satisfaction with most items. For both procedural and non-procedural fellows, clinical faculty/preceptor and personal experience have the strongest impact on overall satisfaction.

  20. A Study To Determine the Job Satisfaction of the Engineering/Industrial Technology Faculty at Delgado Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterlee, Brian

    A study assessed job satisfaction among Engineering/Industrial Technology faculty at Delgado Community College (New Orleans, Louisiana). A secondary purpose was to confirm Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory of Job Satisfaction (1966) that workers derived satisfaction from the work itself and that causes of dissatisfaction stemmed from conditions…

  1. Faculty Perceptions about Teaching Online: Exploring the Literature Using the Technology Acceptance Model as an Organizing Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, Nancy Pope; Ivankova, Nataliya V.; Moss, Jacqueline A.

    2017-01-01

    Academic leaders can better implement institutional strategic plans to promote online programs if they understand faculty perceptions about teaching online. An extended version of a model for technology acceptance, or TAM2 (Venkatesh & Davis, 2000), provided a framework for surveying and organizing the research literature about factors that…

  2. A Quantitative Study of Faculty Perceptions and Attitudes on Asynchronous Virtual Teamwork Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolusky, G. Anthony

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study used a web-based questionnaire to assess the attitudes and perceptions of online and hybrid faculty towards student-centered asynchronous virtual teamwork (AVT) using the technology acceptance model (TAM) of Davis (1989). AVT is online student participation in a team approach to problem-solving culminating in a written…

  3. Evaluation of a web-based portal to improve resident education by neonatology fellows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Lakshmanan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Integration of web-based educational tools into medical training has been shown to increase accessibility of resources and optimize teaching. We developed a web-based educational portal (WBEP to support teaching of pediatric residents about newborn medicine by neonatology fellows. Objectives: 1 To compare residents’ attitudes about their fellow-led education in the NICU pre- and post-WBEP; including assessment of factors that impact their education and usefulness of teaching tools. 2 To compare fellow utilization of various teaching modalities pre- and post-WBEP. Design/methods: We queried residents about their attitudes regarding fellow-led education efforts and various teaching modalities in the NICU and logistics potentially impacting effectiveness. Based on these data, we introduced the WBEP – a repository of teaching tools (e.g., mock code cases, board review questions, journal articles, case-based discussion scenarios for use by fellows to supplement didactic sessions in a faculty-based curriculum. We surveyed residents about the effectiveness of fellow teaching pre- and post-WBEP implementation and the type of fellow-led teaching modalities that were used. Results: After analysis of survey responses, we identified that residents cited fellow level of interest as the most important factor impacting their education. Post-implementation, residents described greater utilization of various teaching modalities by fellows, including an increase in use of mock codes (14% to 76%, p<0.0001 and journal articles (33% to 59%, p=0.02. Conclusions: A web-based resource that supplements traditional curricula led to greater utilization of various teaching modalities by fellows and may encourage fellow involvement in resident teaching.

  4. Digital immigrants teaching digital natives: A phenomenological study of higher education faculty perspectives on technology integration with English core content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Robert C.

    In the last two decades, technology use has escalated and educators grapple with its advances and integration into the classroom. Issues surrounding what constitutes a literate society, the clarion calls for educational reform emanating from US presidents to parent teacher organizations, and educators' ability to cope with advances in technology in the classroom demand attention. Therefore, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and understand the professional and educational experiences of six English faculty members teaching undergraduate courses at Midwest universities. Using the framework of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge -- TPACK (Koehler and Mishra 2008), the major focus of the study was to determine how faculty members understood what characterized the nature of teaching with technology in undergraduate classrooms. Results of this study revealed five themes showing how the participants were introduced to technology, how they assimilated it into their pedagogy, and how they integrated it into teaching practice. This study has the potential to impact the nature of illustrating the methods and techniques used by the six participants as they merge technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge and set in motion classroom practices that assist faculty at all levels to develop and teach technology skills necessary for the 21st century and to better prepare students for thinking critically about how to use digital advances.

  5. Investigating IT Faculty Resistance to Learning Management System Adoption Using Latent Variables in an Acceptance Technology Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatiha Bousbahi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance instruction in higher education, many universities in the Middle East have chosen to introduce learning management systems (LMS to their institutions. However, this new educational technology is not being used at its full potential and faces resistance from faculty members. To investigate this phenomenon, we conducted an empirical research study to uncover factors influencing faculty members’ acceptance of LMS. Thus, in the Fall semester of 2014, Information Technology faculty members were surveyed to better understand their perceptions of the incorporation of LMS into their courses. The results showed that personal factors such as motivation, load anxiety, and organizational support play important roles in the perception of the usefulness of LMS among IT faculty members. These findings suggest adding these constructs in order to extend the Technology acceptance model (TAM for LMS acceptance, which can help stakeholders of the university to implement the use of this system. This may assist in planning and evaluating the use of e-learning.

  6. A COMPARISON OF UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY AND MILLENNIAL STUDENTS REGARDING THE UTILIZATION OF WEBLOG AND PODCAST TECHNOLOGY IN A TEACHER EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie STURDIVANT ENNIS

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the study was to compare the utilization of weblog and podcast technology by undergraduate university faculty and Millennial college students. The study was conducted to test the hypothesis, formed from existing literature, that there might be a difference in the utilization of weblog and podcast technology between faculty and Millennial students in a Teacher Education Department. Analysis of the data using descriptive statistics revealed that the mean of both populations was similar in their technological utilization.A technology survey was distributed to Millennial college students and undergraduate university faculty in a Teacher Education Department. One hundred surveys were utilized based upon the number of students currently enrolled in Teacher Education classes at the time of the study. Fifty-nine students and five undergraduate faculties participated in the survey. The average age of the student population was twenty-one, with a faculty average of forty-nine. Data were collected and analyzed using descriptive statistics regarding the utilization of weblog and podcast technology by faculty and students. The study refuted the hypothesis that there is a difference in weblog and podcast utilization between faculty and Millennial students. There was no significant difference in the utilization of weblogs and podcasts in the two populations. The results indicate that the perceived technological gap between Millennial students and university faculty is not as prevalent as theorized by the existing literature.

  7. A study on Factors Affecting Application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) by Faculty Members of

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Biglari; Hossein Agahi

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to investigate the factors affecting on ICT application by faculty members of University of Razi. A descriptive-correlative research survey method was used. The statistical population of this research consist of faculty members of University of Kermanshah (N=271). Sampling method was stratified randomization (n=116). Questionnaire was used for data collection, the validity of which was confirmed by the opinions of some of professionals and faculty members of Agricultu...

  8. The 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, J. R.; Karr, G.; Freeman, L. M.; Hassan, R.; Day, J. B. (Compiler)

    2005-01-01

    This is the administrative report for the 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the 40th consecutive year. The NFFP offers science and engineering faculty at U.S. colleges and universities hands-on exposure to NASA s research challenges through summer research residencies and extended research opportunities at participating NASA research Centers. During this program, fellows work closely with NASA colleagues on research challenges important to NASA's strategic enterprises that are of mutual interest to the fellow and the Center. The nominal starting and .nishing dates for the 10-week program were June 1 through August 6, 2004. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and operated under contract by The University of Alabama, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Alabama A&M University. In addition, promotion and applications are managed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and assessment is completed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The primary objectives of the NFFP are to: Increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to the Agency s space aeronautics and space science mission. Engage faculty from colleges, universities, and community colleges in current NASA research and development. Foster a greater public awareness of NASA science and technology, and therefore facilitate academic and workforce literacy in these areas. Strengthen faculty capabilities to enhance the STEM workforce, advance competition, and infuse mission-related research and technology content into classroom teaching. Increase participation of underrepresented and underserved faculty and institutions in NASA science and technology.

  9. Enhancing Sustainability Curricula through Faculty Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkin, L. W.; Kolbe, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although the number of higher education institutions adopting sustainability-focused faculty learning communities (FLCs) has grown, very few of these programs have published evaluation research. This paper aims to report findings from an evaluation of the University of Vermont's (UVM's) sustainability faculty fellows (SFF) program. It…

  10. Enhancing Sustainability Curricula through Faculty Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkin, L. W.; Kolbe, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although the number of higher education institutions adopting sustainability-focused faculty learning communities (FLCs) has grown, very few of these programs have published evaluation research. This paper aims to report findings from an evaluation of the University of Vermont's (UVM's) sustainability faculty fellows (SFF) program. It…

  11. Five Years of Research Into Technology-Enhanced Learning at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetský, Štefan; Moravčík, Oliver; Rusková, Dagmar; Balog, Karol; Sakál, Peter; Tanuška, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    The article describes a five-year period of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) implementation at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology (MTF) in Trnava. It is a part of the challenges put forward by the 7th Framework Programme (ICT research in FP7) focused on "how information and communication technologies can be used to support learning and teaching". The empirical research during the years 2006-2008 was focused on technology-driven support of teaching, i. e. the development of VLE (Virtual Learning Environment) and the development of database applications such as instruments developed simultaneously with the information support of the project, and tested and applied directly in the teaching of bachelor students. During this period, the MTF also participated in the administration of the FP7 KEPLER project proposal in the international consortium of 20 participants. In the following period of 2009-2010, the concept of educational activities automation systematically began to develop. Within this concept, the idea originated to develop a universal multi-purpose system BIKE based on the batch processing knowledge paradigm. This allowed to focus more on educational approach, i.e. TEL educational-driven and to finish the programming of the Internet application - network for feedback (communication between teachers and students). Thanks to this specialization, the results of applications in the teaching at MTF could gradually be presented at the international conferences focused on computer-enhanced engineering education. TEL was implemented at a detached workplace and four institutes involving more than 600 students-bachelors and teachers of technical subjects. Four study programmes were supported, including technical English language. Altogether, the results have been presented via 16 articles in five countries, including the EU level (IGIP-SEFI).

  12. The Use of Collaboration, Authentic Learning, Linking Material to Personal Knowledge, and Technology in the Constructivist Classroom: Interviews with Community College Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Dianne E.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored how faculty members implemented constructivist teaching methods after training. The student-centered teaching methods were interactions and collaborations, authentic learning and real-world experiences, linking material to previously learned information, and using technology in the classroom. Seven faculty members trained in…

  13. High-Impact Social Work Scholars: A Bibliometric Examination of SSWR and AASWSW Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, David R.; Kremer, Kristen P.; Vaughn, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to identify and describe the bibliometric contributions of high-impact social work faculty. Methods: Toward this end, we used a sample comprising fellows (N = 143) affiliated with the Society for Social Work and Research (SSWR) and the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare (AASWSW). To quantify…

  14. The technological convergence in the virtual classrooms at the faculty of distance education at Universidad Nueva Granada university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guillermo Cogollo Rincón

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of the research project entitled "Analysis, design and development of Social Network prototype as an observatory in the New Granada Military University " in which analyzes whether the academic community of the online education faculty if is ready to do technological convergence on the virtual course content.The purpose of the article is to study the feasibility of offering all virtual contents through mobile devices, and this way to have more coverage for formation processes.This study was based in teachers and students surveyed through the virtual platform  of Online Education Faculty; a qualitative analysis of the information collected through the use of technological tools and the object of study items were taken to the respective analysis was made.Teachers and Students showed skills in the use of electronic items, as mobile devices and virtual environments that can be reflected in the academic environment to achieve a higher qualityeducation.

  15. Fellow's Apéro

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Let's get together, meet each other, exchange experiences and ideas, and share useful information on CERN and the Staff Association. Join us for Fellow's Apéro, organised by the Staff Association on Tuesday 21 February at 16.30 in Restaurant 1. There will be drinks and snacks for everybody! We look forward to seeing you there! Please confirm your participation on Doodle http://doodle.com/poll/skvm7ucm2z78i6bt or alternatively on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/events/1862757017340069/. Your delegates in the Staff Association, Barbora & Jiri

  16. NASA Announces 2009 Astronomy and Astrophysics Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    searching for transits among hot Neptunes and super-Earths, microlensing planets through modeling algorithms, conducting high-contrast imaging surveys to detect planetary-mass companions, interferometrically imaging of the inner regions of protoplanetary disks, and modeling of super-Earth planetary atmospheres. The 10 fellows in the Einstein program conduct research broadly related to the mission of NASA's Physics of the Cosmos Program. Its science goals include understanding the origin and destiny of the universe, the nature of gravity, phenomena near black holes, and extreme states of matter. The Chandra X-ray Center in Cambridge, Mass., administers the Einstein Fellowships for NASA. The 17 awardees of the Hubble Fellowship pursue research associated with NASA's Cosmic Origins Program. The missions in this program examine the origins of galaxies, stars, and planetary systems, and the evolution of these structures with cosmic time. The Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Md., administers the Hubble Fellowships for NASA. The Sagan Fellowship, created in September 2008, supports five scientists whose research is aligned with NASA's Exoplanet Exploration Program. The primary goal of this program is to discover and characterize planetary systems and Earth-like planets around other stars. The NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, which is operated at the California Institute of Technology in coordination with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., administers the Sagan Fellowship Program

  17. Faculty Use of Tablet Computers at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Roland van Oostveen; William Muirhead

    2007-01-01

    This article describes instructor use of tablet computers for personal use, research activities and teaching practices within the Faculties of Science and Engineering at UOIT. The benefits of tablet use were evaluated on the basis of types of usage, personal and professional productivity and the “richness” of the overall computing experience. Major findings include the enhanced ubiquity of computer use by faculty as a result of increased mobility, and the modification of pedagogical practices...

  18. Econometric Fellows and Nobel Laureates in Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Ho Fai Chan; Benno Torgler

    2012-01-01

    An academic award is method by which peers offer recognition of intellectual efforts. In this paper we take a purely descriptive look at the relationship between becoming a Fellow of the Econometric Society and receiving the Nobel Prize in economics. We discover some interesting aspects: of all 69 Nobel Prize Laureates between 1969 and 2011, only 9 of them were not also Fellows. Moreover, the proportion of future Nobel winners among the Fellows has been quite high throughout time and a large ...

  19. Report on the 2009 ESO Fellows Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emsellem, Eric; West, Michael; Leibundgut, Bruno

    2009-09-01

    The fourth ESO Fellows Symposium took place in Garching from 8-10 June 2009. This year's symposium brought together 28 ESO Fellows from Chile and Germany to meet their colleagues from across the ocean, discuss their research and provide feedback on ESO's Fellowship programme. This year's symposium also included training workshops to enhance the practical skills of ESO Fellows in today's competitive job market.

  20. THE FLAG: A Web Resource of Innovative Assessment Tools for Faculty in College Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilik, M.; Mathieu, R. D.; National InstituteScience Education; College Level-One Team

    2000-12-01

    Even the most dedicated college faculty often discover that their students fail to learn what was taught in their courses and that much of what students do learn is quickly forgotten after the final exam. To help college faculty improve student learning in college Science, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology (SMET), the College Level - One Team of the National Institute for Science Education has created the "FLAG" a Field-tested Learning Assessment Guide for SMET faculty. Developed with funding from the National Science Foundation, the FLAG presents in guidebook format a diverse and robust collection of field-tested classroom assessment techniques (CATs), with supporting information on how to apply them in the classroom. Faculty can download the tools and techniques from the website, which also provides a goals clarifier, an assessment primer, a searchable database, and links to additional resources. The CATs and tools have been reviewed by an expert editorial board and the NISE team. These assessment strategies can help faculty improve the learning environments in their SMET courses especially the crucial introductory courses that most strongly shape students' college learning experiences. In addition, the FLAG includes the web-based Student Assessment of Learning Gains. The SALG offers a convenient way to evaluate the impact of your courses on students. It is based on findings that students' estimates of what they gained are more reliable and informative than their observations of what they liked about the course or teacher. It offers accurate feedback on how well the different aspects of teaching helped the students to learn. Students complete the SALG online after a generic template has been modified to fit the learning objectives and activities of your course. The results are presented to the teacher as summary statistics automatically. The FLAG can be found at the NISE "Innovations in SMET Education" website at www.wcer.wisc.edu/nise/cl1

  1. Identification of Preferred Sources of Information for Undertaking Studies in the Faculty of Engineering Management at Poznan University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Wyrwicka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010 a survey has been conducted among first-year students about sources of information which influence the decision of undertaking field studies in Safety Engineering, Management Engineering and Logistics in the Faculty of Engineering Management at Poznan University of Technology. The goal of these analyses is both to assess the effectiveness of promotion and also show trends in the use of diverse channels of information transfer of studies. The results of the investigation show that internet promotion via university and faculty website plays the dominant role but also direct promotion, such as opinion of older friends, is crucial. Furthermore, from year to year the analyses indicate the significant increase of official media and reveal that the prospective students rely on a few sources of information simultaneously.

  2. Impacts of a Faculty Abroad Experience on Teaching Style and Technology Use in a College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandlin, M'Randa R.; Murphrey, Theresa Pesl; Lindner, James R.; Dooley, Kim E.

    2013-01-01

    Faculty abroad programs are becoming a popular method to provide faculty in colleges of agriculture with international experiences so they may internationalize their curricula. These programs also serve to provide experiential faculty development opportunities. Eight faculty members from Texas A&M University participated in a faculty abroad…

  3. THE UTILIZATION OF WEB-BASED TECHNOLOGY AS PREDICTOR OF FACULTY INSIGHTS OF SUPPORT FOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF ELEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed GHAEMI

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available For the last three decades higher education institutions have been forced to undergo thorough transformation and revitalization. Parallel to society, a factor that has played a crucial role in transforming higher education is the advance of information technology (IT. The potential for use of IT in education has been increasingly recognized and higher education faculties have begun to use this technology in different ways in their teaching. Instructors today regularly include electronic technologies that extend instructional resources to their students: threaded discussion boards, websites, chat rooms, email, newsgroups, etc. Moreover, because the use of mobile technologies that join with web-based resources is becoming a more common practice, the lines differentiating web-based and face-to-face classroom teaching are becoming less distinguishable.

  4. Humanism and professionalism education for pediatric hematology-oncology fellows: A model for pediatric subspecialty training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Atlas, Mark; Adams, Denise; Aygun, Banu; Barfield, Ray; Eisenman, Kristen; Fulbright, Joy; Garvey, Katharine; Kersun, Leslie; Nageswara Rao, Amulya; Reilly, Anne; Sharma, Mukta; Shereck, Evan; Wang, Michael; Watt, Tanya; Leavey, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Humanism and professionalism are virtues intrinsic to the practice of medicine, for which we lack a standard, evidence-based approach for teaching and evaluation. Pediatric hematology-oncology (PHO) fellowship training brings new and significant stressors, making it an attractive setting for innovation in humanism and professionalism training. We electronically surveyed a national sample of PHO fellows to identify fellows' educational needs in humanism and professionalism. Next, we developed a case-based, faculty-facilitated discussion curriculum to teach this content within pilot fellowship programs. We assessed whether fellowships would decide to offer the curriculum, feasibility of administering the curriculum, and satisfaction of fellow and faculty participants. Surveys were completed by 187 fellows (35%). A minority (29%) reported that their training program offers a formal curriculum in humanism and/or professionalism. A majority desires more formal teaching on balancing clinical practice and research (85%), coping with death/dying (85%), bereavement (78%), balancing work and personal life (75%), navigating challenging relationships with patients (74%), and depression/burn out (71%). These six topics were condensed into four case-based modules, which proved feasible to deliver at all pilot sites. Ten fellowship programs agreed to administer the novel curriculum. The majority (90%) of responding fellows and faculty reported the sessions touched on issues important for training, stimulated reflective communication, and were valuable. Pediatric hematology-oncology fellows identify numerous gaps in their training related to humanism and professionalism. This curriculum offers an opportunity to systematically address these educational needs and can serve as a model for wider implementation. Pediatr Blood Cancer 2015;62:335-340. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Let's Talk Critical. Development and Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Critical Care Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hope, Aluko A; Hsieh, S Jean; Howes, Jennifer M; Keene, Adam B; Fausto, James A; Pinto, Priya A; Gong, Michelle Ng

    2015-04-01

    Although expert communication between intensive care unit clinicians with patients or surrogates improves patient- and family-centered outcomes, fellows in critical care medicine do not feel adequately trained to conduct family meetings. We aimed to develop, implement, and evaluate a communication skills program that could be easily integrated into a U.S. critical care fellowship. We developed four simulation cases that provided communication challenges that critical care fellows commonly face. For each case, we developed a list of directly observable tasks that could be used by faculty to evaluate fellows during each simulation. We developed a didactic curriculum of lectures/case discussions on topics related to palliative care, end-of-life care, communication skills, and bioethics; this month-long curriculum began and ended with the fellows leading family meetings in up to two simulated cases with direct observation by faculty who were not blinded to the timing of the simulation. Our primary measures of effectiveness were the fellows' self-reported change in comfort with leading family meetings after the program was completed and the quality of the communication as measured by the faculty evaluators during the family meeting simulations at the end of the month. Over 3 years, 31 critical care fellows participated in the program, 28 of whom participated in 101 family meeting simulations with direct feedback by faculty facilitators. Our trainees showed high rates of information disclosure during the simulated family meetings. During the simulations done at the end of the month compared with those done at the beginning, our fellows showed significantly improved rates in: (1) verbalizing an agenda for the meeting (64 vs. 41%; Chi-square, 5.27; P = 0.02), (2) summarizing what will be done for the patient (64 vs. 39%; Chi-square, 6.21; P = 0.01), and (3) providing a follow-up plan (60 vs. 37%; Chi-square, 5.2; P = 0.02). More than 95% of our participants (n = 27

  6. Quality management of medical education at the Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieter, Peter Erich

    2008-12-01

    The Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Germany, was founded in 1993 after the reunification of Germany. In 1999, a reform process of medical education was started together with Harvard Medical International. The traditional teacher and discipline-centred curriculum was replaced by a student-centred, interdisciplinary and integrative curriculum which has been named DIPOL (Dresden Integrative Patient/Problem- Oriented Learning). The reform process was accompanied and supported by a parallel-ongoing Faculty Development Program. In 2004, a Quality Management Program in medical education was implemented, and in 2005 medical education received DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification. Quality Management Program and DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification were/are unique for the 34 medical schools in Germany. The students played a very important strategic role in all processes. They were/are members in all committees like the Faculty Board, the Board of Study Affairs (with equal representation) and the ongoing audits in the Quality Management Program. Students are the only ones who experience all years of the curriculum and are capable of detecting, for example gaps, overlaps, inconsistencies of the curriculum and assessments. Therefore, the in-depth knowledge of students about the medical school's curriculum is a very helpful and essential tool in curriculum reform processes and Quality Management Programs of medical education. The reform in medical education, the establishment of the Quality Management program and the certification resulted in an improvement of quality and output of medical education and medical research.

  7. The effects of the addition of a pediatric surgery fellow on the operative experience of the general surgery resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Alexander; Garwe, Tabitha; Adeseye, Ademola; Ruiz-Elizalde, Alejandro; Churchill, Warren; Tuggle, David; Mantor, Cameron; Lees, Jason

    2015-06-01

    Adding fellows to surgical departments with residency programs can affect resident education. Our specific aim was to evaluate the effect of adding a pediatric surgery (PS) fellow on the number of index PS cases logged by the general surgery (GS) residents. At a single institution with both PS and GS programs, we examined the number of logged cases for the fellows and residents over 10 years [5 years before (Time 1) and 5 years after (Time 2) the addition of a PS fellow]. Additionally, the procedure related relative value units (RVUs) recorded by the faculty were evaluated. The fellows averaged 752 and 703 cases during Times 1 and 2, respectively, decreasing by 49 (P = 0.2303). The residents averaged 172 and 161 cases annually during Time 1 and Time 2, respectively, decreasing by 11 (P = 0.7340). The total number of procedure related RVUs was 4627 and 6000 during Times 1 and 2, respectively. The number of cases logged by the PS fellows and GS residents decreased after the addition of a PS fellow; however, the decrease was not significant. Programs can reasonably add an additional PS fellow, but care should be taken especially in programs that are otherwise static in size.

  8. Fellow As Teacher Curriculum: Improving Rheumatology Fellows' Teaching Skills During Inpatient Consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloslavsky, Eli M; Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa G; Jonas, Beth L; O'rourke, Kenneth S; McSparron, Jakob I; Bolster, Marcy B

    2016-06-01

    Enhancing rheumatology fellows' teaching skills in the setting of inpatient consultation may have a broad positive impact. Such efforts may improve fellows' clinical skills and overall patient care. Most importantly, effective resident-fellow teaching interactions may not only increase residents' knowledge of rheumatology but may influence their career choice. However, a number of barriers to the resident-fellow teaching interaction have been identified, including fellows' teaching skills. We developed the Fellow As Clinical Teacher (FACT) curriculum in order to enhance fellows' teaching skills during inpatient consultation. The FACT curriculum was delivered in two 45-minute workshops during the 3-day Winter Symposium of the Carolinas Fellows Collaborative. We evaluated its effect with self-assessment surveys and fellow performance on the objective structured teaching exercise (OSTE) before and after participation in the curriculum. Nineteen fellows from 4 rheumatology training programs participated in the pre- and post-curriculum OSTEs and 18 fellows completed pre- and post-curriculum surveys. OSTE scores improved on 5 of the 8 items assessed, and the total OSTE score improved as well (34.7 versus 29.5; P Rheumatology.

  9. Training residents/fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Emory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert M

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric cardiology fellowship is a very busy time, with new responsibilities, new knowledge, new technology and fast pace. Above and beyond the science and art of pediatric cardiology, we emphasize that our cardiology fellows are in the middle of the "people business", with additional roles and responsibilities as they serve their patients and communities. This manuscript provides insight into these opportunities for our pediatric cardiac professionals.

  10. Resources and practices to help graduate students and postdoctoral fellows write statements of teaching philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Katherine D; Sullivan, Carol Subiño

    2011-06-01

    Graduate students and postdoctoral fellows currently encounter requests for a statement of teaching philosophy in at least half of academic job announcements in the United States. A systematic process for the development of a teaching statement is required that integrates multiple sources of support, informs writers of the document's purpose and audience, helps writers produce thoughtful statements, and encourages meaningful reflection on teaching and learning. This article for faculty mentors and instructional consultants synthesizes practices for mentoring graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty members as they prepare statements of teaching philosophy. We review background information on purposes and audiences, provide writing resources, and synthesize empirical research on the use of teaching statements in academic job searches. In addition, we integrate these resources into mentoring processes that have helped graduate students in a Health Sciences Pedagogy course to collaboratively and critically examine and write about their teaching. This summary is intended for faculty mentors and instructional consultants who want to refine current resources or establish new mentoring programs. This guide also may be useful to graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, and junior faculty members, especially those who lack mentoring or who seek additional resources, as they consider the many facets of effective teaching.

  11. Training Psychiatry Addiction Fellows in Acupuncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Kelly; Bryant, Katurah; Ikomi, Jolomi; LaPaglia, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Objective Acupuncture has been studied as an adjunct for addictions treatment. Because many hospitals, outpatient clinics, and facilities are integrating acupuncture treatment, it is important that psychiatrists remain informed about this treatment. This manuscript describes the National Acupuncture Detoxification Association (NADA) protocol and its inclusion as part of the curriculum for psychiatry addictions fellows. Methods Psychiatry and psychology fellows completed the NADA training (N = 20) and reported on their satisfaction with the training. Results Overall, participants stated that they found the training beneficial and many were integrating acupuncture within their current practice. Conclusions Results support the acceptability of acupuncture training among psychiatry fellows in this program. PMID:26048457

  12. A Comparison of Undergraduate Faculty and Millennial Students regarding the Utilization of Weblog and Podcast Technology in a Teacher Education Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Leslie Sturdivant; Gambrell, Elizabeth Anne

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to compare the utilization of weblog and podcast technology by undergraduate university faculty and Millennial college students. The study was conducted to test the hypothesis, formed from existing literature, that there might be a difference in the utilization of weblog and podcast technology between faculty…

  13. THE USE OF EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION DESIGN TECHNOLOGY IN THE COURSE OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE DISTANCE LEARNING AT NON-PHILOLOGICAL FACULTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Ye. Kravets

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates the view that the intensification of information flows as one of the main factors entering the world in the era of the global information society actualizes the problem of the organization of educational information space in the classroom for foreign language in higher educational institutions. The authors have proposed the educational information design technology in foreign languages distance learning at non-philological faculties. The article analyzes the experimental results verification of the technological effectiveness used in the learning content design in a foreign language for professional purposes; it has been proved the basic criterion of effective informational product – information-oriented competence of professional foreign language knowledge.

  14. GUO Lei honored as IFAC Fellow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Prof. GUO Lei, an expert in systems science with the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science (AMSS) under CAS, was recently elected a Fellow of International Federation of Autonomic Control (IFAC).

  15. ESMD Space Grant Faculty Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiang; Whitmore, Stephen; Radcliff, Roger; Misra, Prabhakar; Prasad, Nadipuram; Conrad, James; Lackey, Ellen; Selby, Gregory; Wersinger, Jean-Marie; Lambright, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    and to bring out innovative and novel ideas that can be used to complement those currently under development at respective NASA Centers. Additionally, such academic involvement would better the prospects for graduating seniors to pursue graduate studies and to seek careers in the space industry with a strong sense for systems engineering and understanding of design concepts. Internships, on the other hand, are intended to provide hands-on experience to students by engaging them in diverse state-of-the-art technology development, prototype bread-boarding, computer modeling and simulations, hardware and software testing, and other activities that provide students a strong perspective of NASA's vision and mission in enhancing the knowledge of Earth and space planetary sciences. Ten faculty members, each from a Space Grant Consortium-affiliated university, worked at ten NASA Centers for five weeks between June 2 and July 3, 2008. The project objectives listed above were achieved. In addition to collecting data on Senior Design ideas and identifying possible internships that would benefit NASA/ESMD, the faculty fellows promoted and collected data when required for other ESMD-funded programs and helped the Center's Education Office, as,needed. 4

  16. Teaching geriatric fellows how to teach: a needs assessment targeting geriatrics fellowship program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Veronica; Yukawa, Michi; Aronson, Louise; Widera, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The entire healthcare workforce needs to be educated to better care for older adults. The purpose of this study was to determine whether fellows are being trained to teach, to assess the attitudes of fellowship directors toward training fellows to be teachers, and to understand how to facilitate this type of training for fellows. A nine-question survey adapted from a 2001 survey issued to residency program directors inquiring about residents-as-teachers curricula was developed and administered. The survey was issued electronically and sent out three times over a 6-week period. Of 144 ACGME-accredited geriatric fellowship directors from geriatric, internal medicine, and family medicine departments who were e-mailed the survey, 101 (70%) responded; 75% had an academic affiliation, 15% had a community affiliation, and 10% did not report. Academic and community programs required their fellows to teach, but just 55% of academic and 29% of community programs offered teaching skills instruction as part of their fellowship curriculum; 67% of academic programs and 79% of community programs felt that their fellows would benefit from more teaching skill instruction. Program directors listed fellow (39%) and faculty (46%) time constraints as obstacles to creation and implementation of a teaching curriculum. The majority of fellowship directors believe that it is important for geriatric fellows to become competent educators, but only approximately half of programs currently provide formal instruction in teaching skills. A reproducible, accessible curriculum on teaching to teach that includes a rigorous evaluation component should be created for geriatrics fellowship programs. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Exploring the Use of information and communication technologies and social networks among university nursing faculty staff. An opinion survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Fernández-Alemán

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This work sought to analyze the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs and social networks among the university nursing faculty staff in Spain. Methodology. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study using a questionnaire on ICT skills designed to comply with the research objective, which was evaluated by experts and which was subjected to exploratory analysis of principal components; the reliability of this instrument measured with Cronbach's alpha was 0.85. The information technology tool used to publish the questionnaire on line was Limesurvey. The sample comprised 165 professors from 25 Nursing Faculties and Schools from universities in Spain. Results. Seventy one percent of the total surveyed used internet services to look for information, 63% used the internet as a means for formation and learning, and 72% used it as a communication platform (e-mail and virtual platforms like Sakai and Moodle. Although 51% of the teaching staff surveyed had more than 120 students registered in their courses, hypothesis testing revealed that the number of students in class is not a determining factor for the teaching staff to have greater interest to update its knowledge in ICTs. Younger professors use new technologies more profusely and the most-valued advantage of using ICTs was quick access to information. Professors perceive that after the Bologna Declaration, which requires modifying their teaching-learning processes through the new teaching methodologies, a drop has been produced in their performance and that of their peers in their area of knowledge. Conclusion. The nursing teaching staff is making strong efforts to confront the new challenges posed by ICTs to train the professionals of the 21st century. It is fundamental to pay special attention to improving the university teaching staff's skills in managing ICTs, promoting the implementation of the knowledge acquired.

  18. Exploring the Use of information and communication technologies and social networks among university nursing faculty staff. An opinion survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Sánchez García, Ana Belén; López Montesinos, María José; Marqués-Sánchez, Pilar; Bayón Darkistade, Enrique; Pérez Rivera, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    This work sought to analyze the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and social networks among the university nursing faculty staff in Spain. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study using a questionnaire on ICT skills designed to comply with the research objective, which was evaluated by experts and which was subjected to exploratory analysis of principal components; the reliability of this instrument measured with Cronbach's alpha was 0.85. The information technology tool used to publish the questionnaire on line was Limesurvey. The sample comprised 165 professors from 25 Nursing Faculties and Schools from universities in Spain. Seventy one percent of the total surveyed used internet services to look for information, 63% used the internet as a means for formation and learning, and 72% used it as a communication platform (e-mail and virtual platforms like Sakai and Moodle). Although 51% of the teaching staff surveyed had more than 120 students registered in their courses, hypothesis testing revealed that the number of students in class is not a determining factor for the teaching staff to have greater interest to update its knowledge in ICTs. Younger professors use new technologies more profusely and the most-valued advantage of using ICTs was quick access to information. Professors perceive that after the Bologna Declaration, which requires modifying their teaching-learning processes through the new teaching methodologies, a drop has been produced in their performance and that of their peers in their area of knowledge. The nursing teaching staff is making strong efforts to confront the new challenges posed by ICTs to train the professionals of the 21st century. It is fundamental to pay special attention to improving the university teaching staff's skills in managing ICTs, promoting the implementation of the knowledge acquired.

  19. Technology-Induced Stressors, Job Satisfaction and Workplace Exhaustion Among Journalism and Mass Communication Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Randal A.; Kim, Eunseong; Voakes, Paul S.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that teaching journalism and mass communication has become a technology-intensive occupation. Reports on results of a national study of the use of technology in journalism and mass communication programs. Examines how technology-induced stress affects two aspects of work-life quality: job satisfaction and work-related exhaustion. (PM)

  20. Creation and Assessment of a Bad News Delivery Simulation Curriculum for Pediatric Emergency Medicine Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumpitazi, Corrie E; Rees, Chris A; Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Hsu, Deborah C; Doughty, Cara B; Lorin, Martin I

    2016-05-01

    Background  Bad news in the context of health care has been broadly defined as significant information that negatively alters people's perceptions of the present or future. Effectively delivering bad news (DBN) in the setting of the emergency department requires excellent communication skills. Evidence shows that bad news is frequently given inadequately. Studies show that trainees need to devote more time to developing this skill through formalized training. This program's objectives were to utilize trained standardized patients in a simulation setting to assist pediatric emergency medicine (PEM) fellows in the development of effective, sensitive, and compassionate communication with patients and family members when conveying bad news, and to recognize and respond to the patient/parent's reaction to such news. Methods PEM fellows participated in a novel curriculum utilizing simulated patients (SPs) acting as the patient's parent and immersive techniques in a realistic and supportive environment. A baseline survey was conducted to ascertain participant demographics and previous experience with simulation and DBN. Experienced, multi-disciplinary faculty participated in a training workshop with the SPs one week prior to course delivery. Three scenarios were developed for bad news delivery. Instructors watched via remote video feed while the fellows individually interacted with the SPs and then participated in a confidential debriefing. Fellows later joined for group debriefing. Fellow characteristics, experience, and self-perceived comfort pre/post-course were collected.   Results Baseline data demonstrated that 78% of fellows reported DBN two or more times per month. Ninety-three percent of fellows in this study were present during the delivery of news about the death of a child to a parent or family member in the six-month period preceding this course. Fellows' self-reported comfort level in DBN to a patient/family and dealing with patient and parent emotions

  1. Faculty Use of Tablet Computers at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland van Oostveen

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes instructor use of tablet computers for personal use, research activities and teaching practices within the Faculties of Science and Engineering at UOIT. The benefits of tablet use were evaluated on the basis of types of usage, personal and professional productivity and the “richness” of the overall computing experience. Major findings include the enhanced ubiquity of computer use by faculty as a result of increased mobility, and the modification of pedagogical practices before, during and after lectures. The article also reports on faculty speculation regarding the effects of tablet use by students as well as suggestions for improving tablet computer design. The article concludes with a number of recommendations for the expanded use of tablet computers within higher education settings. Résumé : Le présent article décrit l’utilisation par l’instructeur d’ordinateurs tablettes à des fins personnelles, pour des activités de recherche et la pratique de l’enseignement au sein des facultés de sciences et génie de l’UOIT. On a évalué les avantages de l’utilisation de la tablette en fonction des types d’utilisation, de la productivité personnelle et professionnelle et de la « richesse » de l’ensemble de l’expérience de traitement. Parmi les conclusions importantes, on trouve l’ubiquité améliorée de l’utilisation de l’ordinateur par la faculté en raison de la mobilité accrue et de la modification des pratiques pédagogiques avant, pendant et après les cours. Le présent article traite aussi des suppositions du corps professoral quant aux effets de l’utilisation des ordinateurs tablettes par les étudiants et de suggestions visant l’amélioration de la conception de ces ordinateurs. L’article termine sur des recommandations pour une utilisation accrue des ordinateurs tablettes en enseignement supérieur.

  2. Web-Based Resources to Help Students and Faculty Prepare to use Information Technology in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, D. W.

    2007-12-01

    Teaching in the field is undergoing a revolution as new information technologies are being used to support a wide range of instructional activities in geology, oceanography, ecology, and related disciplines. In particular, the use of ruggedized laptop and palmtop computers with integrated GPS, GIS, data management, imaging and note-taking software presents a fundamentally new way to map and collect other data in the field. By bringing information technologies into the field, it is now possible to integrate many types of data such as digital elevation maps, air photo and satellite imagery, a variety of geophysical and geochemical databases (e.g. chemical anomaly maps, aeromagnetics, gravity). This allows students to engage much deeper levels of decision-making, problem-solving, and critical-thinking while still in the field setting. This technology also allows instructors to more closely monitor the progress of student projects in the field, and to assess the process as well as the products of student field work. For professional geologists, data acquisition and interpretation using digital technology in the field will rapidly become the industry standard, and now is the time to begin to prepare students to regularly use these new capabilities. To address the new possibilities of teaching with information technology in the field, a workshop was convened in February 2007 at Montana State University to aggregate and disseminate the practical advice and experience of geoscience instructors already using this technology. The outcome of this workshop is a website that contains advice on "best practices" in using these information technologies in field instruction including sections on: definition of learning goals, thinking skills and problem solving strategies, student and faculty preparation, selecting hardware and software, data resources, logistical consideration, GPS and learning, taking e-notes, mobile collaborations, and examples of field exercises. This website

  3. The RSNA Editorial Fellows: Then and Now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edward Y; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Katz, Douglas S

    2015-09-01

    Since its establishment in 1998, the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Editorial Fellowship has been offering unique opportunities to radiologists from around the world who have a strong interest in radiologic journalism. For the past 16 years, the selected RSNA Editorial Fellows have learned essential processes involved in the production of Radiology and RadioGraphics by working closely with the editors, associate editors, and staff. The editorial fellowship for radiology attending physicians was renamed the RSNA William R. Eyler Editorial Fellowship, in honor of the founding editor of RadioGraphics, with the first Eyler fellow selected in 2005. Additionally, several years ago, a second fellowship was created for radiology trainees, which is now named the RSNA William W. Olmsted Editorial Fellowship for Trainees, in honor of the most recent emeritus editor of RadioGraphics. For the special centennial year of the journal Radiology, several former editorial fellows were interested in knowing what the previous fellows are up to presently and how their experience and learning from the fellowship influenced and contributed to their academic career development. The invitation to share their experience of the RSNA Editorial Fellowship was sent to 19 previous RSNA Editorial Fellows. We report the findings from 16 of these fellows who responded. We found that almost all previous RSNA Editorial Fellows (15 of 16, 94%) stayed in academic radiology, and each is currently leading a successful academic career. All of them are currently actively serving in one or more positions as an editor, associate editor, reviewer, and/or editorial board member of various radiology journals and clinical journals related to their area(s) of academic expertise. Among the 16 previous editorial fellows who responded, there are four chairs and six vice-chairs of their respective radiology departments. All of them reported that the experience and knowledge they gained from the RSNA

  4. Information and Communication Technology Use in the College Classroom: Adjunct Faculty Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Catherine A.

    2014-01-01

    The role of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in higher education has increased in recent years, and most university administrators consider ICT important in effective teaching practices. While administrators encourage the use of ICT, many teachers do not use technology. Most studies regarding ICT have been concerned with the…

  5. Global and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Changes in Library and Information Studies (LIS): Information Seeking Behaviors of LIS Faculty Members in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polparsi, Jomkwan

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an overview of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Library and Information Studies (LIS) education in Thailand, focusing on challenges and pressures in the information environment of Thai LIS faculty members. This study employed a qualitative research approach, naturalistic inquiry, and inductive data analysis.…

  6. Teaching-as-Research Internships: A Model for the Development of Future Chemistry Faculty and the Improvement of Teaching in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillian-Daniel, Donald L.; Walz, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-Madison) and Madison Area Technical College (Madison College) partnered to create an internship pathway for graduate students pursuing careers as future science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) faculty members. Since 2003, 10 doctoral students from the university completed…

  7. Assessment of Abilities of Gastroenterology Fellows to Provide Information to Patients With Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Noami; Lucero, Catherine; Villanueva, Gerald; Poles, Michael; Gillespie, Colleen; Zabar, Sondra; Weinshel, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    Patient education is critical in ensuring patient compliance and good health outcomes. Fellows must be able to effectively communicate with their patients, delivering enough information for the patient to understand their medical problem and maximize patient compliance. We created an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) with 4 liver disease cases to assess fellows' knowledge and ability to inform standardized patients (SPs) about their clinical condition. We developed 4 cases highlighting different aspects of liver disease and created a 4-station OSCE: hepatitis B, acute hepatitis C, new diagnosis of cirrhosis, and an end-stage cirrhotic nontransplant candidate. The SP with hepatitis B was minimizing the fact that she could not read English. The acute hepatitis C SP was a nursing student who is afraid that having hepatitis C might jeopardize her career. The SP with the new diagnosis of alcoholic cirrhosis needed to stop drinking, and the end-stage liver disease patient had to grapple with his advanced directives. Twelve fellows from 4 GI training programs participated. Our focus was to assess the fellows' knowledge about liver diseases and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies of health literacy, shared decision making, advanced directives, and goals of care. The goal for the fellows was to communicate effectively with the SPs, and acknowledge that each patient had an emotionally charged issue to overcome. The SPs used a checklist to rate fellows' performance. Faculty and the SPs observed the cases and provided feedback. The fellows were surveyed on their performance regarding the case. The majority of fellows were able to successfully summarize findings and discuss a plan with the patient in the new diagnosis of cirrhosis (76.92%) and hepatitis C case (100%), but were less successful in the hepatitis B case (30.77%) and the end-of-life case (41.67%). Overall, a small percentage of fellows reflected that they did a good

  8. ROLE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS: Perception of the Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad HUSSAIN

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Information technologies have affected every aspect of human activity and have a potential role to play in the field of education and training, specially, in distance education to transform it into an innovative form of experience. The need of new technologies in teaching learning process grows stronger and faster. The information age becomes an era of knowledge providing sound and unmatched feasibility for discovery, exchange of information, communication and exploration to strengthen the teaching learning process.Information technologies help in promoting opportunities of knowledge sharing throughout the world. These can help the teachers and students having up-to-date information and knowledge. Accurate and right information is necessary for effective teaching and learning; and information technologies (Haag, 1998; p.10 are “set of tools that can help provide the right people with the right information at the right time.” Students are independent and they can make best decisions possible about their studies, learning time, place and resources.Students are able to work in collaborative and interactive learning environments effectively communicating, sharing information and exchanging ideas and learning experiences with all in the environment.

  9. Factors That Affect Faculty Attitudes toward Adoption of Technology-Rich Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moukali, Khalid Hussain

    2012-01-01

    Universities worldwide are transitioning to blended learning where technology is used to enhance and augment traditional face-to-face instruction. Investigation of how well blended learning strategies are accepted and adopted in multicultural settings is needed to facilitate this transition. This study investigated factors and barriers that…

  10. African American Faculty Women Experiences of Underrepresentation in Computer Technology Positions in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    African American women are underrepresented in computer technology disciplines in institutions of higher education throughout the United States. Although equitable gender representation is progressing in most fields, much less information is available on why institutions are still lagging in workforce diversity, a problem which can be lessened by…

  11. From Communication Skills to Skillful Communication: A Longitudinal Integrated Curriculum for Critical Care Medicine Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roze des Ordons, Amanda L; Doig, Christopher J; Couillard, Philippe; Lord, Jason

    2017-04-01

    Communication with patients and families in critical care medicine (CCM) can be complex and challenging. A longitudinal curricular model integrating multiple techniques within classroom and clinical milieus may facilitate skillful communication across diverse settings. In 2014-2015, the authors developed and implemented a curriculum for CCM fellows at the Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, to promote the longitudinal development of skillful communication. A departmental needs assessment informed curriculum development. Five 4-hour classroom sessions were developed: basic communication principles, family meetings about goals and transitions of care, discussing patient safety incidents, addressing conflict, and offering organ donation. Teaching methods-including instructor-led presentations incorporating a consistent framework for approaching challenging conversations, simulation and clinical practice, and feedback from peers, trained facilitators, family members, and clinicians-supported integration of skills into the clinical setting and longitudinal development of skillful communication. Seven fellows participated during the first year of the curriculum. CCM fellows engaged enthusiastically in the program, commented that the framework provided was helpful, and highly valued the opportunity to practice challenging communication scenarios, learn from observing their peers, and receive immediate feedback. More detailed accounts of fellows', patients', and family members' experiences will be obtained to guide curricular development. The curriculum will be expanded to involve other members of the multidisciplinary intensive care unit team, and faculty education initiatives will be offered to enhance the quality of the feedback provided. The impact of the curriculum on initial skill development, retention, and progression will be assessed.

  12. Providing a setup and opportunities for better training of postdoctoral research fellows in an academic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghayur Muhammad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of young researchers come from different parts of the world every year to take up postdoctoral (postdoc research fellowship positions in the developed countries. In the US alone, there were 48,601 postdocs in the year 2005 working in different labs in the fields of science, health and engineering. Many pursue this option for lack of other alternatives. Expectedly, these individuals face a lot of difficulties in making this transition from being a student to becoming an employee of an institution. Many institutions are prepared to make this transition and period of stay easy for their fellows while others are not equipped at all. The presence of a postdoc office (established by an institution or an association (formed by the fellows can be of immense help to postdocs. Additionally, the availability of institutional professional development and leadership programs can also help to nurture and polish postdoc fellows into future faculty members and valuable members of the community at large. To name a few, these professional development programs can focus on communication and presentation skills, medical education, teaching and learning, bioethics and mentorship. There is an urgent need to address some or all of these issues so that better training environment and opportunities are available to this group of postdoc fellows.

  13. Faculty Use of Established and Emerging Technologies in Higher Education: A Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Carmen C.; Fretwell, Cherie E.; Ryan, Jim; Parham, James B.

    2013-01-01

    Our effectiveness as instructors lies ultimately in how well our students can understand and apply the concepts we teach. In response to the growing importance of accountability in the educational process and the abundance of social networking technology and communication tools available for possible classroom use, this paper will use The Unified…

  14. Direct Versus Indirect Supervision of Fellows Covering Football Events: A Survey of Fellows and Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascano, Charles A.; Stovak, Mark L.; Harvey, A. T.

    2010-01-01

    Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) program requirements mandate “adequate supervision,” of residents, but there is little guidance for sports medicine fellowship directors regarding the transition from direct to indirect supervision of fellows covering football games. Objective We sought to gather evidence of current supervision practices in the context of injury outcomes. Methods Fellows and program directors of ACGME-accredited sports medicine fellowship programs were invited to complete an online survey regarding their experience and current supervision practice at football games. Criteria for transition to autonomy and desired changes in supervision practice were elicited. Player safety was quantified by noting the number of field-side emergencies, whether an attending was present, and whether better outcomes might have resulted from the presence of an attending. Results A total of 80 fellows and 50 program directors completed the online survey. Direct supervision was lacking in about 50% of high school games and 20% of college games. A resulting cost in terms of player safety was estimated to apply to 5% of serious injuries by fellows' report but less than 0.5% by directors' report. Written criteria for transitioning from direct supervision to autonomy were the exception rather than the rule. The majority of fellows and directors expressed satisfaction with the current level of supervision, but 20% of fellows would prefer more supervision through postgame review. Conclusions Football games covered by fellows are often not directly supervised. Absence of an attending affected the outcomes of 5% or less of serious injuries. Transition to autonomy does not usually require meeting written criteria. Fellows might benefit from additional off-site supervision. PMID:21976096

  15. AN ACTIVITY THEORY APPROACH TO STUDY BARRIERS OF FACULTY REGARDING TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro Guzman, Willy

    2016-01-01

    Information and communication technologies are instruments for supporting new ways of teaching and learning. Nevertheless, its impact concerning scope has not reached the expected level. This strain between benefits and impact has been inquired from the perspective of barriers of teachers to use...... for a reconceptualization in the study of barriers arguing that the teaching process is a complex and dynamic activity that needs to be examined from a collective perspective. Cultural-Historical Activity Theory is the theoretical framework used in the study. It concludes with the necessity of overcoming the existing...

  16. Levels of crystalline silica dust in dental laboratorium of Dental Health Technology Study Program of Vocational Faculty, Universitas Airlangga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eny Inayati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Silicosis is an occupational lung disease caused by inhaling particles of crystalline silica in a long time. The disease then results in inflammation and defects in lung tissue. Prosthesis construction is usually conducted in dental laboratory using a lot of materials containing crystalline silica, such as gypsum, ceramics, planting material, sandblast and others. Purpose: This research aims to determine levels of crystalline silica dust in the dental laboratory of Dental Health Technology Diploma Study Program, Vocational Faculty, Universitas Airlangga. Method: Three measurement points was determined, namely point 1, point 2 and point 3 in each dental laboratory space (I and II. Suctioning dust was performed at those points using Low Volume Dust Sampler (LVDS. Samples taken were divided into two groups, namely X and Y. Taking dust samples were carried out for 30 minutes. Elements of crystalline silica contained in the dust were quantitatively measured using XR Defractometry tool, while size and morphology of silica were measured using SEM EDX tool. Data obtained were statistically analyzed by paired t test. Result: The results showed significant differences in the levels of the total dust measured and crystalline silica in the form of quartz and cristobalite among those two dental laboratory spaces. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the levels of the total dust and silica quartz dust in the dental laboratory spaces I and II were greater than the Threshold Limit Value (TLV determined.

  17. Use of information and communication technology among dental students and registrars at the faculty of dental sciences, University of Lagos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butali, A; Adeyemo, W L; Akinshipo, A O; Fashina, A; Savage, K O

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of information technology amongst dental students, dental nursing students and resident doctors in training at the faculty of dental Surgery University of Lagos. A structured questionnaire was distributed to 58 clinical dental students in 4 th and 5 th years of training in the 2010/2011 academic year, 36 dental nursing students and 63 resident doctors undergoing specialist training. All participants have access to the computers, 2.5% within the University and 31% at home and internet cafes and about 50% have the basic skills required. A significant difference was observed between the resident doctors and clinical dental students (P = 0.003), between resident doctors and dental nursing students (P = 0.0001) when the use of computer for study was compared. Over 95% of participants have access to internet and about 50% of them use the internet for their studies. A significant difference (P = 0.005) was observed between clinical dental students and dental nursing students that use the internet and word processing. The resident doctors used the computers for multimedia and MedLine search tools more than clinical dental students (P = 0.004) and dental nursing students (0.0006). The findings of the study show that dental students and resident doctors in training have the requisite knowledge to operate the computer for use in their study and personal activities.

  18. What should a fellow-in-training expect at national cardiovascular conferences? The interventional cardiology fellows' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiramijyan, Sarkis; Didier, Romain; Koifman, Edward; Negi, Smita I

    It has become challenging for cardiovascular fellows-in-training (FIT) to determine which national cardiovascular conference (NCC) to attend given the broad range of meetings and the breadth of information offered. The aim of this study was to report our own experiences of the utility and individual strengths of the NCCs and to further understand the interventional cardiology (IC) FITs' viewpoint regarding the benefits of the individual NCCs. A survey was formulated with questions and scenarios regarding topics deemed to be of highest importance for an IC-FIT. The survey emphasized experiences regarding the utility and benefits of the NCCs, time management, optimization of acquired education, and specific interests in clinical and research topics. The completely anonymous survey was sent via an email format to a total of 234, majority of IC (fourth and fifth years) and a minority of general (third year), FITs. A completed survey response was received from 131 of the fellows (56%). The results demonstrated that the IC-FITs endorsed that the small, focused sub-specialty interventional meetings vs. the large society general meetings were more beneficial in regard to the didactic education offered. In addition, the IC-FITs indicated that pre-planning for the meetings is the most beneficial approach in optimizing one's education and that the caliber of expert faculty, case-based and live-case presentations are among the most important aspects of the meetings. Interventional cardiology FITs prefer the small sub-specialty interventional meetings over the large society general NCCs in regard to the benefits of didactic learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Report on the ESO Fellows Days in Chile 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, M.; Emsellem, E.

    2012-03-01

    The 2011 ESO Fellows Days were held in Chile and brought together over 30 ESO Fellows from Garching and Chile. As well as presentations of research and social activities, the Fellows Days included a visit to San Pedro de Atacama and the ALMA site.

  20. PROMOTING SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNOLOGICAL LITERACY AMONG POSTGRADUATE STUDENTS AT THE FACULTY OF EDUCATION UTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Sulaiman

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One important issue in the Science Education debate over the last century was how to prepare a more relevant science education of the 21st Century that emphasizes on promoting scientific literacy through a more meaningful science education program. In response to this call, a general science education elective course code named MPS1163 Epistemological, Social and Ethical Issues in Science and Technology was designed and implemented starting in Semester 2 Session 2009/2010. By the end of Semester 2 Session 2012/2013 the course has been running for 7 semesters and had invited 128 postgraduate students from 7 different programs, including a PhD program. A questionnaire was distributed to 26 course participants at the end of semester 2 Session 2012/2013. The objective of the questionnaire was to seek their personal assessment on their knowledge and understanding on the eleven course contents taken during the whole semester. The results indicated that there was a mean increment of between 40- 50% on their knowledge and understanding on the topics covered compared to their knowledge and understanding before taking the course. The second part of the questionnaire consisted of six items, using five point Likert Scale, seeking their suggestions for improving a more relevant science education through the elective course. The response was commendable. Implications of the study related to course contents and students opinions on the course contents and suggestions for the improvement of the course are discussed in this paper.

  1. Enrichment of the educational environment with information and communication technologies: state of art at the Faculty of Pharmacy of Kaunas University of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrimiene, Edita; Stankeviciene, Nida

    2008-01-01

    Both traditional and new educational environments, the latter enriched with information and communication technologies, coexist in today's university. The goal of this article is to present the concept of educational environment enriched with information and communication technologies, to reveal the main features of such environment, and to present the results of certain investigation on the application of information technologies in teaching/learning processes at the Faculty of Pharmacy of Kaunas University of Medicine. The discussion object of this paper is the educational environment enriched with information and communication technologies. In designing the environments of this type, positive aspects of traditional teaching models are being developed by integrating them into the new educational environment. The concept of educational environment enriched with information and communication technologies is reviewed in the first part of this paper. The structure and main features of educational environments enriched with information and communication technologies are highlighted in the second part. The results of the study on the application of information technologies in teaching/learning processes at the Faculty of Pharmacy of Kaunas University of Medicine are presented in the third part.

  2. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  3. International Fellows of NCI at Frederick | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year, the Employee Diversity Team (EDT) acknowledges members of the NCI at Frederick Community for their achievements and contributions towards the mission of facility.  Historically, the team has profiled the “Women of NCI at Frederick,” but this year, the team decided to instead shed light on the diverse and successful individuals who make up the international fellows community.

  4. ATTENDANCE AND DESERTION IN GENERAL CHEMISTRY AT THE ENGINEERING COURSES OF THE NATIONAL TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY - CORDOBA REGIONAL FACULTY (UTN-FRC), ARGENTINA

    OpenAIRE

    María C. Oliver; Eimer,Griselda A.; Nancy F. Bálsamo; Mónica E. Crivello

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, it is analyzed the engineering students of the National Technological University - Cordoba Regional Faculty -academic achievement in the learning of Chemistry, as well as desertion , during academic year 2009. The requirement of an intensive and effective leveling course on Chemistry area with teaching tools that facilitate teaching and learning strategies is stated. Moreover, it is suggested to generate instances of coordination to improve the transition from high school to u...

  5. A comparison between amblyopic and fellow eyes in unilateral amblyopia using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araki S

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Syunsuke Araki,1 Atsushi Miki,1,2 Tsutomu Yamashita,1,2 Katsutoshi Goto,1,2 Kazuko Haruishi,1 Yoshiaki Ieki,1 Junichi Kiryu1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Japan; 2Department of Sensory Science, Faculty of Health Science and Technology, Kawasaki University of Medical Welfare, Kurashiki, Japan Purpose: To compare the macular retinal thickness and characteristics of optic nerve head (ONH parameters in amblyopic and fellow eyes in patients with unilateral amblyopia.Patients and methods: A total of 21 patients with unilateral amblyopia (14 patients with anisometropic amblyopia, four patients with strabismic amblyopia, and three patients with both were examined using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. The mean age of the patients was 8.5±3.5 years. The examined parameters included the mean macular (full, inner, and outer, ganglion cell complex and circumpapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (cpRNFL thicknesses, and ONH parameters (rim volume, nerve head volume, cup volume, rim area, optic disc area, cup area, and cup-to-disc area ratio.Results: The amblyopic eyes were significantly more hyperopic than the fellow eyes (P<0.001. Among the macular retinal thickness parameters, the cpRNFL thickness (P<0.01, macular full retinal thickness (3 mm region (P<0.01, and macular outer retinal thickness (1 and 3 mm regions (P<0.05 were significantly thicker in the amblyopic eyes than in the fellow eyes, while the ganglion cell complex thickness, macular full retinal thickness (1 mm region, and macular inner retinal thickness (1 and 3 mm regions were not significantly different. Among the ONH parameters, the rim area was significantly larger and the cup-to-disc area ratio was smaller in the amblyopic eyes than in the fellow eyes (P<0.05. None of the other ONH parameters were significantly different between the investigated eyes. The differences in the cpRNFL thickness and macular outer retinal thickness in the 1 mm

  6. Audiology: student perception of preceptor and fellow student ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Clifford; Vesely, Brian; White, Letitia; Mantie-Kozlowski, Alana; Franklin, Clay

    2014-01-01

    Health care professionals are expected to uphold high ethical standards. Recently, ethical practices in health care have received increased scrutiny and study in an effort to ensure that clinicians meet such high ethical standards in serving their patients and clients. The American Academy of Audiology's Code of Ethics establishes professional standards that allow for the proper discharge of an audiologist's responsibilities while maintaining the integrity of the profession. Under this code, student academy members are included and required to abide by the code, the same as practicing members. The code is composed of a preamble and eight principles. The present study provides an overview of students' perceptions across a broad spectrum of ethical topics governing our profession. Specifically, this study examined audiology students' perceptions of preceptor ethics relating to these eight principles using an online survey. Responses were collected from 143 of 600 audiology students contacted and indicated that they believed that their preceptors consistently followed each of the eight principles. Results also indicated that students believe fellow students also behave ethically and that it is the primary responsibility of academic faculty, not preceptors, to teach ethics. It can be concluded that preceptors are perceived by their students to be acting with high ethical standards. However, more research and discussion may be needed to determine who should teach these ethics to students.

  7. Building capacity for information and communication technology use in global health research and training in China: a qualitative study among Chinese health sciences faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Abdullah, Abu S; Ma, Zhenyu; Fu, Hua; Huang, Kaiyong; Yu, Hongping; Wang, Jiaji; Cai, Le; He, Huimin; Xiao, Jian; Quintiliani, Lisa; Friedman, Robert H; Yang, Li

    2017-06-28

    The demand to use information and communications technology (ICT) in education and research has grown fast among researchers and educators working in global health. However, access to ICT resources and the capacity to use them in global health research remains limited among developing country faculty members. In order to address the global health needs and to design an ICT-related training course, we herein explored the Chinese health science faculty members' perceptions and learning needs for ICT use. Nine focus groups discussions (FGDs) were conducted during December 2015 to March 2016, involving 63 faculty members working in areas of health sciences from six universities in China. All FGDs were audio recorded and analysed thematically. The findings suggest that the understandings of ICT were not clear among many researchers; some thought that the concept of ICT was too wide and ambiguous. Most participants were able to cite examples of ICT application in their research and teaching activities. Positive attitudes and high needs of ICT use and training were common among most participants. Recommendations for ICT training included customised training programmes focusing on a specific specialty, maintaining a balance between theories and practical applications, more emphasis on the application of ICT, and skills in finding the required information from the bulk information available in the internet. Suggestions regarding the format and offering of training included short training programmes, flexible timing, lectures with practicum opportunities, and free of charge or with very minimal cost to the participants. Two participants suggested the linking of ICT-related training courses with faculty members' year-end assessment and promotion. This study among health sciences faculty members in China demonstrated a high level of need and interest in learning about ICT use in research and training. The results have important implications for the design and implementation of

  8. In Search of the Active Site of PMMO Enzyme: Partnership between a K-12 Teacher, a Graduate K-12 Teaching Fellow, and a Research Mentor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearden, Katherine K.; Mainardi, Daniela S.; Culligan, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    The partnership between a K-12 teacher (Culligan), an NSF GK-12 Teaching Fellow graduate student (Bearden), and a Louisiana Tech faculty member (Mainardi) collaborating in a research and education project is described in this work. The unique grouping of these three researchers allows for maximum dissemination of developed modules. By the end of…

  9. Assessing the viewpoint of faculty members of medical record departments in Iran about the impact of Information Technology on health system 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza safdary

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding the potential impact of information technology on health system can be used as a basis for health promotion based on information technology (IT. Undoubtedly, faculty members of medical record departments in Iranian medical universities have a significant role in knowledge gain of college students about the effectiveness of information technology on health system. Methods: In order to assess the impact of IT on health system in the viewpoint of faculty members of medical record departments in Iranian medical universities, a cross sectional survey was conducted and questionnaires were sent to 17 universities with medical records departments. The questionnaire had three sections: The effect of IT on health information management (including: quantitative and qualitative promotion of documentations, follow up and referral, demand management and income and cost system, medical research and medical education. To investigate the correlations between variables of the study, X2 and exact fisher tests were used. Result: From 64 distributed questionnaires, a total of 49 were completed. The majority of faculty members (%40.81 believed that the use of IT enhances the utilization of paper documents. %26.53 believed that the use of IT has high impact on increase of medical errors. The majority of members (%36.75 considered IT to have a medium impact on self-therapy. The impact of information technology on medical research and medical education was believed to be very high by 83.67% and 79.59% of respondents, respectively. We did not find any correlation between the impact of IT on the studied variables and demographic data of participants such as age, gender and the years of teaching. Discussion: Most of faculty members of medical record departments have a high knowledge about the impact of IT on promotion of the management of health, research and education in medical sciences, but their knowledge about effectiveness of IT on quality

  10. May we eat our fellow creatures?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myskja, B.K.; Gjerris, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    for veganism holds that industrial meat production is by necessity cruel and partaking in it is not virtuous. Diamond agrees that fellow creatures should not be regarded as stages in the production of a meat product but she admits that this attitude to animals as worthy of respect and compassion does...... not necessarily lead to veganism. We suggest that one possible case of virtuous non-veganism is eating domestic animals that lead good lives and are humanely slaughtered. Another could be eating wild animals that could be worse off unless some of them are killed through humane hunting practices...

  11. Let’s Talk Critical. Development and Evaluation of a Communication Skills Training Program for Critical Care Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, S. Jean; Howes, Jennifer M.; Keene, Adam B.; Fausto, James A.; Pinto, Priya A.; Gong, Michelle Ng

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Although expert communication between intensive care unit clinicians with patients or surrogates improves patient- and family-centered outcomes, fellows in critical care medicine do not feel adequately trained to conduct family meetings. Objectives: We aimed to develop, implement, and evaluate a communication skills program that could be easily integrated into a U.S. critical care fellowship. Methods: We developed four simulation cases that provided communication challenges that critical care fellows commonly face. For each case, we developed a list of directly observable tasks that could be used by faculty to evaluate fellows during each simulation. We developed a didactic curriculum of lectures/case discussions on topics related to palliative care, end-of-life care, communication skills, and bioethics; this month-long curriculum began and ended with the fellows leading family meetings in up to two simulated cases with direct observation by faculty who were not blinded to the timing of the simulation. Our primary measures of effectiveness were the fellows’ self-reported change in comfort with leading family meetings after the program was completed and the quality of the communication as measured by the faculty evaluators during the family meeting simulations at the end of the month. Measurements and Main Results: Over 3 years, 31 critical care fellows participated in the program, 28 of whom participated in 101 family meeting simulations with direct feedback by faculty facilitators. Our trainees showed high rates of information disclosure during the simulated family meetings. During the simulations done at the end of the month compared with those done at the beginning, our fellows showed significantly improved rates in: (1) verbalizing an agenda for the meeting (64 vs. 41%; Chi-square, 5.27; P = 0.02), (2) summarizing what will be done for the patient (64 vs. 39%; Chi-square, 6.21; P = 0.01), and (3) providing a follow-up plan (60 vs. 37%; Chi

  12. An interprofessionally developed geriatric oncology curriculum for hematology–oncology fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ahmed; Hughes, Caren; Karuturi, Meghan; Reyes, Connie; Yorio, Jeffrey; Holmes, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Objective Because the cancer population is aging, interprofessional education incorporating geriatric principles is essential to providing adequate training for oncology fellows. We report the targeted needs assessment, content, and evaluation tools for our geriatric oncology curriculum at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Methods A team comprising a geriatrician, a medical oncologist, an oncology PharmD, an oncology advanced nurse practitioner, and two oncology chief fellows developed the geriatric oncology curriculum. First, a general needs assessment was conducted by reviewing the literature and medical societies’ publications and by consulting experts. A targeted needs assessment was then conducted by reviewing the fellows’ evaluations of the geriatric oncology rotation and by interviewing fellows and recently graduated oncology faculty. Results Geriatric assessment, pharmacology, and psychosocial knowledge skills were the three identified areas of educational need. Curriculum objectives and an evaluation checklist were developed to evaluate learners in the three identified areas. The checklist content was validated by consulting experts in the field. Online materials, including a curriculum, a geriatric pharmacology job aid, and pharmacology cases, were also developed and delivered as part of the curriculum. Conclusion An interprofessional team approach was a successful method for identifying areas of learners’ educational needs, which in turn helped us develop an integrated geriatric oncology curriculum. The curriculum is currently being piloted and evaluated. PMID:25487037

  13. A pharmacogenetics service experience for pharmacy students, residents, and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozda, Katarzyna; Labinov, Yana; Jiang, Ruixuan; Thomas, Margaret R; Wong, Shan S; Patel, Shitalben; Nutescu, Edith A; Cavallari, Larisa H

    2013-10-14

    To utilize a comprehensive, pharmacist-led warfarin pharmacogenetics service to provide pharmacy students, residents, and fellows with clinical and research experiences involving genotype-guided therapy. First-year (P1) through fourth-year (P4) pharmacy students, pharmacy residents, and pharmacy fellows participated in a newly implemented warfarin pharmacogenetics service in a hospital setting. Students, residents, and fellows provided genotype-guided dosing recommendations as part of clinical care, or analyzed samples and data collected from patients on the service for research purposes. Students', residents', and fellows' achievement of learning objectives was assessed using a checklist based on established core competencies in pharmacogenetics. The mean competency score of the students, residents, and fellows who completed a clinical and/or research experience with the service was 97% ±3%. A comprehensive warfarin pharmacogenetics service provided unique experiential and research opportunities for pharmacy students, residents, and fellows and sufficiently addressed a number of core competencies in pharmacogenetics.

  14. Design and Implementation of an Evaluation Methodology for the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, M. G.; Miller, M.; Freeman, M.; Watson, C.; Khalkho, M.; Smith, T.

    2005-12-01

    The NFFP was created in 2002 to accommodate the needs and capabilities of both NASA and the university community. The program combines aspects of two successful former NASA programs, the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program and the NASA/USRA JOint VEnture (JOVE) program. The NFFP contributes directly to NASA's strategic goal to "inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics", and NASA's Office of Education strategic objective to "strengthen NASA's involvement in higher education to enhance the nation's science and technology capability in NASA related fields to help meet NASA's future personnel needs." The primary goals of the NFFP are to increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to Agency research objectives; provide research opportunities for college and university faculty that serve to enrich their knowledge base; involve faculty in cutting-edge science and engineering challenges related to NASA's strategic enterprises, while providing exposure to the methods and practices of real-world research; facilitate interdisciplinary networking; and establish an effective education and outreach activity to foster greater awareness of the program. Participants are required to submit a research report and complete a program evaluation. The NFFP is evaluated using Web-based survey instruments in the NASA Education Evaluation Information System (NEEIS) that have been designed to collect data that measure program activities and accomplishments against program goals and NASA's education programs evaluation criteria. Data are collected from Faculty Fellows, NASA Colleagues, and students who accompanied Faculty Fellows. Participant Feedback Forms gather quantitative and qualitative information on research accomplishments, the benefits and impacts of the program, and overall program evaluation data. Follow-up feedback instruments are designed to

  15. A Study of a Functional Approach to Defining Instructional Competencies and Measuring Faculty Performance in Medical Laboratory Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesenfeld, Laura Adina

    In order to develop a humanistic approach to evaluating faculty, a pilot study was conducted of 27 students and 14 instructors in an associate degree program for medical laboratory technicians. Selected personal dimensions of the sample population were examined to chart each individual's personality, theoretical learning preferences, modalities of…

  16. Characteristics of American Psychological Association Division 40 (clinical neuropsychology) Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Greene, Doug; Collins, K C

    2011-11-01

    Fellow status is an honor bestowed on American Psychological Association (APA) members who have made unusual and outstanding contributions to the field of psychology that have had a national impact. Thus far no studies have examined the characteristics of the individuals who have received this honor. This study examined publicly available data for 157 Division 40 Fellows. Fellows comprise 3.7% of the 4273 members of the division compared to 5.7% of the entire APA membership. Fellows are predominantly male (73%). All but two fellows had earned a Ph.D. with the average time since granting of the doctoral degree of 17.1 ± 6 years (median=16 years) with a range of 7-40 years post-degree. Slightly over half of the fellows hold board certification (53%) in the American Board of Professional Psychology. The largest group of fellows reports their primary employment currently as a university-affiliated medical setting (48%). These data serve to characterize current Division 40 Fellows for the field of neuropsychology and may provide useful information to assist prospective fellow applicants.

  17. Electricity - Energy - Information. The history of the Faculty for Electrical Engineering and Information Technology at the RWTH Aachen; Elektrizitaet - Energie - Information. Die Geschichte der Fakultaet fuer Elektrotechnik und Informationstechnik an der RWTH Aachen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilson, Norbert; Kaiser, Walter

    2010-07-01

    The authors of the book under consideration report on the history of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology at the RWTH Aachen University (Aachen, Federal Republic of Germany). For the first time, electrical engineering was taught in 1883 was first taught as a subject of its own. The first three chapters of this book sum up the time until the Second World War. The focus of this book is on the description of the development of this faculty in the time period after the Second World War. The development of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology is described among the most important institutional, personal, contextual and social aspects. Due to the profound analysis of the reasons for the leading role of this faculty in a wide range of areas in the national and international scope, this book also is of great benefit for electrical engineers.

  18. Scientific writing courses for pediatrics fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, B G; Schatz, D A; Van Mierop, L H

    1990-10-01

    A six-week course in scientific writing and publishing was developed for pediatrics fellows at the University of Florida College of Medicine in 1984. It covered three areas: (1) grammar, syntax, and prose style; (2) construction of scientific papers; and (3) the submissions and review process. Increasing enrollment and the requests of course graduates led to the development of a second course, Advanced Scientific Writing; both courses are now offered annually. Class materials consist of texts in scientific writing, comprehensive syllabi, and handouts; the focus is on workshop activities, exercises, collaboration with peers, and individual consultations with the instructor. At the end of each course, participants complete detailed evaluation instruments, and the data obtained are used to modify the course's structure and content the following year.

  19. Development of New Faculty in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyden, Kathleen M.

    2000-01-01

    Nursing faculty are challenged by changing expectations of undergraduate education, decreasing resources, and widespread technology use. Stressors on new faculty include time, lack of peer support, inadequate feedback, and family-work imbalance. Suggestions for new faculty development include orientation, mentoring, and strategic planning for…

  20. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. Purpose: To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. Results: A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine–fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers (P Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest regions and at programs with a larger number of fellows. PMID:28210650

  1. Introducing the Newest APPA Fellows: Maggie Kinnaman and Mo Qayoumi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler-Carter, Ruth E.

    2010-01-01

    Few APPA members have contributed as much in as many areas over as many years as the 2010 recipients of APPA's highest individual honor, the APPA Fellow. This article introduces two recipients of the 2010 APPA Fellows, Margaret "Maggie" Kinnaman, who retired as director for business administration for the facilities division at the University of…

  2. Jack Colby Continues Stellar Legacy of APPA Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler-Carter, Ruth E.

    2011-01-01

    This article profiles 2011 APPA Fellow Jack K. Colby, assistant vice chancellor for facilities operations at North Carolina State University. Colby has a history of nonstop service to his profession and to APPA that makes that ever-active, never-stop rabbit look like a piker. Like previous APPA Fellows, Colby could easily rest on his laurels of…

  3. Recruiting post-doctoral fellows into global health research: selecting NIH Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimburger, Douglas C; Warner, Tokesha L; Carothers, Catherine Lem; Blevins, Meridith; Thomas, Yolanda; Gardner, Pierce; Primack, Aron; Vermund, Sten H

    2014-08-01

    From 2008 to 2012, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Fogarty International Clinical Research Fellows Program (FICRF) provided 1-year mentored research training at low- and middle-income country sites for American and international post-doctoral health professionals. We examined the FICRF applicant pool, proposed research topics, selection process, and characteristics of enrollees to assess trends in global health research interest and factors associated with applicant competitiveness. The majority (58%) of 67 US and 57 international Fellows were women, and 83% of Fellows had medical degrees. Most applicants were in clinical fellowships (41%) or residencies (24%). More applicants proposing infectious disease projects were supported (59%) than applicants proposing non-communicable disease (NCD) projects (41%), although projects that combined both topic areas were most successful (69%). The numbers of applicants proposing research on NCDs and the numbers of these applicants awarded fellowships rose dramatically over time. Funding provided to the FICRF varied significantly among NIH Institutes and Centers and was strongly associated with the research topics awarded. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  4. The SAFE-T assessment tool: derivation and validation of a web-based application for point-of-care evaluation of gastroenterology fellow performance in colonoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Navin L; Kugener, Guillaume; Perencevich, Molly L; Saltzman, John R

    2017-05-10

    Attending assessment is a critical part of endoscopic education for gastroenterology fellows. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a concise assessment tool to evaluate real-time fellow performance in colonoscopy administered via a web-based application. The Skill Assessment in Fellow Endoscopy Training (SAFE-T) tool was derived as a novel 5-question evaluation tool that captures both summative and formative feedback adapted into a web-based application. A prospective study of 15 gastroenterology fellows (5 fellows each from years 1 to 3 of training) was performed using the SAFE-T tool. An independent reviewer evaluated a subset of these procedures and completed the SAFE-T tool and Mayo Colonoscopy Skills Assessment Tool (MCSAT) for reliability testing. Twenty-six faculty completed 350 SAFE-T evaluations of the 15 fellows in the study. The mean SAFE-T overall score (year 1, 2.00; year 2, 3.84; year 3, 4.28) differentiated each sequential fellow year of training (P  0.90, P web-based means of assessing real-time gastroenterology fellow performance in colonoscopy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Unilateral Amblyopia Affects Two Eyes: Fellow Eye Deficits in Amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Kimberly; Giaschi, Deborah

    2017-03-01

    Unilateral amblyopia is a visual disorder that arises after selective disruption of visual input to one eye during critical periods of development. In the clinic, amblyopia is understood as poor visual acuity in an eye that was deprived of pattern vision early in life. By its nature, however, amblyopia has an adverse effect on the development of a binocular visual system and the interactions between signals from two eyes. Visual functions aside from visual acuity are impacted, and many studies have indicated compromised sensitivity in the fellow eye even though it demonstrates normal visual acuity. While these fellow eye deficits have been noted, no overarching theory has been proposed to describe why and under what conditions the fellow eye is impacted by amblyopia. Here, we consider four explanations that may account for decreased fellow eye sensitivity: the fellow eye is adversely impacted by treatment for amblyopia; the maturation of the fellow eye is delayed by amblyopia; fellow eye sensitivity is impacted for visual functions that rely on binocular cortex; and fellow eye deficits reflect an adaptive mechanism that works to equalize the sensitivity of the two eyes. To evaluate these ideas, we describe five visual functions that are commonly reported to be deficient in the amblyopic eye (hyperacuity, contrast sensitivity, spatial integration, global motion, and motion-defined form), and unify the current evidence for fellow eye deficits. Further research targeted at exploring fellow eye deficits in amblyopia will provide us with a broader understanding of normal visual development and how amblyopia impacts the developing visual system.

  6. Where Are They Now? A Survey of Woodrow Wilson Fellows and Woodrow Wilson Dissertation Fellows Elected Between 1945 and 1971.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation, Princeton, NJ.

    Woodrow Wilson Fellows and Dissertation Fellows elected between 1945 and 1971 were surveyed to trace their educational careers, judge the effectiveness of the selection process, and determine what they are now doing with their education. Some elements covered by other national studies were included to make possible a comparison of the Woodrow…

  7. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. The objectives are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty; to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teachning activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lecture and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topic.

  8. A Comparative Analysis of Preferred Learning and Teaching Styles for Engineering, Industrial, and Technology Education Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Fantz, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    In the spring semester of 2010, a materials process course was selected as a means to perform a preferred learning style research study. This course was selected because it contained three groups of students: technology education, engineering technology, and industrial technology. The researchers believed that the differences in the students'…

  9. Four-year experience with a regional program providing simulation-based endovascular training for vascular surgery fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, David L; Lee, Eugene S; Hedayati, Nasim; Pevec, William C

    2009-01-01

    High-fidelity procedure simulation has been found useful for training vascular surgery residents in endovascular procedures, but the costs of acquiring, maintaining, and operating simulators represent a barrier to routine use of endovascular simulation in vascular surgery programs. Providing simulation training opportunities through regional centers may make simulation more cost effective, but the costs and benefits of this approach have not been reported previously. We reviewed participation costs in a regional simulation program to provide a benchmark for comparison with other training options. Simulation-based training was offered annually from 2004 to 2007 to the 11 vascular surgery fellowships in Washington, Oregon, California, Arizona, and Utah. Participation was at the discretion of the program directors and fellows. Sessions were designed to offer individualized, hands-on training with 2-4 participants per 2-day session. SimSuite (Medical Simulation Corporation, Denver, Colorado) simulators were used. During the 4-year period, participation by invited programs averaged 75%. Ten of 11 programs in the western United States region participated, with 34 fellows participating during the 4 years of the program. In addition, 2 program directors or faculty attended sessions to participate as learners, and 8 other individuals were allowed to participate (including 7 senior surgery residents and 1 vascular surgery fellow from out of the region). The average participant costs for travel, which include transportation, lodging, and meals, were $571. Simulation facility expenses, which included use of the simulator, computer-based training modules, and instructional support by an educational specialist, averaged $1055 per participant. Surgical faculty spent 12 hours per 2-day session instructing and in other direct educational activities. Costs for this time were not calculated separately. Vascular surgery fellows' participation in simulation training at regional centers

  10. Woodrow Wilson Fellows--Who Are They Now?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, Richard K.

    1975-01-01

    The Woodrow Wilson Senior Fellows are prominent leaders in business and government that are sent to college campuses for a week instead of a one-night lecture. This program has proved to be immensely popular on campuses. (PG)

  11. Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses for Cardiology Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Munes; Alahdab, Fares; Alsaied, Tarek

    2016-07-01

    Participating in a scholarly activity is one of the training requirements for cardiology fellows. However, it can be very challenging to complete a research project during such a busy period of clinical training. To help the cardiology fellows in choosing and starting off a research project, a light has been shed on the process of conducting a systematic review, and the importance of this research activity, as well as its limitations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Double Fellowships in Radiology: A Survey of 2014 Graduating Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas Y; Moriarity, Andrew; Lall, Neil; Hoffmann, Jason C; Katz, Douglas S; Flug, Jonathan A

    Radiology fellowship training has evolved from being an uncommon option to being a near requisite for post-training employment in the United States. A subset of fellows elect to pursue second fellowships with potentially substantial implications on both the private sector and academic radiology workforce. The purpose of this study was to assess the proportion of current radiology fellows pursuing multiple years of post-residency fellowship training. After obtaining IRB approval, an anonymous web-based survey was emailed to 1,269 radiology fellows listed as "completing fellowship" in the American College of Radiology database in June 2014. Questions were asked regarding current fellowship training, post-fellowship employment plans, and individual experience pursuing employment. Results were analyzed using the survey analytical software. There were 219 responses received, representing a 17.3% response rate. Ten-percent of respondents were currently completing their second radiology fellowship. Of those completing their first year of fellowship training, 11% indicated plans to complete a second radiology fellowship. This survey provides a snapshot of the percentage of radiology trainees who pursue a second year of fellowship training, currently in the range of 10%. Pursuing a second radiology fellowship may represent a safety net to a substantial subset of fellows who are not able to obtain satisfactory employment following training. Academic programs who rely heavily on fellows should be aware of the proportion of fellows pursuing two fellowships and should be prepared to adapt should this change over time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Staff Experience and Attitudes towards Technology-Enhanced Learning Initiatives in One Faculty of Health and Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Further to earlier work carried out by the student union (SU) along with strategic discussions regarding technology-enhanced learning (TEL), this research aimed to identify the attitudes and experience of teaching staff in relation to specific uses of technology in learning and teaching. Data obtained through an online questionnaire (n = 100)…

  14. The DOE fellows program-a workforce development initiative for the US department of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagos, Leonel E. [Applied Research Center, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler St, EC2100, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only six years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 100 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management (WM) Symposia since 2008 with a total of 84 student

  15. Emerging Instructional Technologies: Exploring the Extent of Faculty Use of Web 2.0 Tools at a Midwestern Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Tareq; Lazarevic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide insight into the several aspects of instructional use of emerging web-based technologies. The study first explores the extent of Web 2.0 technology integration into face-to-face classroom activities. In this phase, the main focus of research interests was on the types and dynamics of Web 2.0 tools used by…

  16. ISOLDE PH team, from left to right: Jennifer Weterings (user support), Susanne Kreim (research fellow), Marek Pfützner (scientific associate), Maria Garcia Borge (team leader), Elisa Rapisarda (research fellow) , Magdalena Kowalska (physics coordinator), Jan Kurcewicz (applied fellow), Monika Stachura (applied fellow). Not in the photo: Kara Lynch (PhD student).

    CERN Multimedia

    Visual Media Office

    2013-01-01

    ISOLDE PH team, from left to right: Jennifer Weterings (user support), Susanne Kreim (research fellow), Marek Pfützner (scientific associate), Maria Garcia Borge (team leader), Elisa Rapisarda (research fellow) , Magdalena Kowalska (physics coordinator), Jan Kurcewicz (applied fellow), Monika Stachura (applied fellow). Not in the photo: Kara Lynch (PhD student).

  17. Digital Immigrants Teaching Digital Natives: A Phenomenological Study of Higher Education Faculty Perspectives on Technology Integration with English Core Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, technology use has escalated and educators grapple with its advances and integration into the classroom. Issues surrounding what constitutes a literate society, the clarion calls for educational reform emanating from US presidents to parent teacher organizations, and educators' ability to cope with advances in…

  18. Stirring the Pot: Supporting and Challenging General Education Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Faculty to Change Teaching and Assessment Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieha, Vicki; Shadle, Susan E.; Paterson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based instructional practices (ebips) have been associated with positive student outcomes; however, institutions struggle to catalyze widespread adoption of these practices in general education science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (stem) courses. Further, linking ebips with integrated learning assessment is rarely discussed…

  19. Maeve Boland selected as AGU Congressional Science Fellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chell, Kaitlin

    2009-10-01

    Maeve Boland, research assistant professor at the Colorado School of Mines, is AGU's 2009-2010 Congressional Science Fellow. Boland, who has a Ph.D. in geology from the Colorado School of Mines, is spending a year working in the office of U.S. Sen. Byron Dorgan (D-N. D.). She was selected in March by AGU's Committee on Public Affairs after a competitive interview process, and she is AGU's 32nd Congressional Science Fellow. In September, Boland and 31 other Congressional Science Fellows participated in a 2-week course in politics and the legislative process put on by the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She then interviewed with a number of congressional offices and was offered a position in the office of Sen. Dorgan, who chairs the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development and is a member of the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. Boland is working as a legislative fellow carrying out a range of duties such as organizing congressional hearings, crafting legislation, advising legislators on votes, meeting with lobbyists, and writing speeches. Fellows also are often asked to assist their senator or representative during committee hearings and on the U.S. House or Senate floors during legislative debates.

  20. Reflections on academic careers by current dental school faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogér, James M; Wehmeyer, Meggan M H; Milliner, Matthew S

    2008-04-01

    During the inaugural year (2006-07) of the Academic Dental Careers Fellowship Program (ADCFP), 110 faculty members at ten different dental schools were interviewed by dental students who were participating as ADCFP fellows in this year-long program designed to introduce them to faculty roles and activities and help them gain an appreciation for the rewards and issues associated with academic life. The goals, format, and components of the ADCFP are described in a companion article in this issue of the Journal of Dental Education. One of the fellows' assignments during the ADCFP was to interview faculty at various academic ranks who had differing degrees of work emphasis in teaching, research, service/patient care, and administration. Sixty-nine (63 percent of the total) of these interviews were reviewed and analyzed by the authors, who were student fellows in the ADCFP during 2006-07. The purpose of these interviews was to provide the fellows with insight into the positive aspects and challenges in becoming and remaining a dental school faculty member. This aggregate perspective of the interviews conducted at ten dental schools highlights the motivations and challenges that confront a dentist during the process of choosing a career in academic dentistry and determining if dental education is a good fit for each individual who elects to pursue this pathway. Thematic analysis of the interviews revealed several factors consistently identified by faculty across the schools as being positive influences on the quality of the academic work environment and career satisfaction: mentorship and student interaction, opportunities for scholarship (research and discovery), job diversity, intellectual challenge, satisfaction with the nature of academic work, lifestyle/family compatibility, flexibility, lifelong learning, professional duty, and lab responsibility. A series of negative themes were also consistently identified: bureaucracy/administrative burdens and barriers, time

  1. A jolly good call for Marie Curie Fellows

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    A new funding opportunity to train young researchers has just been announced by the European Commission. One of the calls within FP7 Marie Curie Actions requests proposals for Initial Training Network (ITN) projects, with a deadline of 22 December 2009. Project proposals are strongly encouraged at CERN and authors can receive support and guidance from the Marie Curie Steering Group. Winnie Wong: "I wouldn’t have considered a PhD if I hadn’t been a Marie Curie fellow" Dan Savu: "It’s the best of both worlds: training plus working in an international organisation" ITN projects have one key aim: training. Academic and industrial partners work together to form a network to recruit and train Marie Curie Fellows. Fellows are young researchers (typically PhD-level) from any country who combine project-based research with tailor-made training programmes, ...

  2. Educating residents in behavioral health care and collaboration: integrated clinical training of pediatric residents and psychology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Anthony R; leRoux, Pieter; Siegel, David M

    2011-02-01

    Pediatric residency practices face the challenge of providing both behavioral health (BH) training for pediatricians and psychosocial care for children. The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Rochester General Hospital developed a joint training program and continuity clinic infrastructure in which pediatric residents and postdoctoral psychology fellows train and practice together. The integrated program provides children access to BH care in a primary care setting and gives trainees the opportunity to integrate collaborative BH care into their regular practice routines. During 1998-2008, 48 pediatric residents and 8 psychology fellows trained in this integrated clinical environment. The program's accomplishments include longevity, faculty and fiscal stability, sustained support from pediatric leadership and community payers, the development in residents and faculty of greater comfort in addressing BH problems and collaborating with BH specialists, and replication of the model in two other primary care settings. In addition to quantitative program outcomes data, the authors present a case example that illustrates how the integrated program works and achieves its goals. They propose that educating residents and psychology trainees side by side in collaborative BH care is clinically and educationally valuable and potentially applicable to other settings. A companion report published in this issue provides results from a study comparing the perceptions of pediatric residents whose primary care continuity clinic took place in this integrated setting with those of residents from the same pediatric residency who had their continuity clinic training in a nonintegrated setting.

  3. Science, technology, society, and environment (STSE) and pre-service physics teacher education: Lessons for physics and education faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Katarin

    2015-12-01

    The science, technology, society, and environment (STSE) framework is well documented in educational research, policy, and science curricula development; fewer strides have been made in connecting this conceptual frame-work of science teaching into undergraduate physics courses via physics education research. Further, science teacher training programs must ensure pre-service teachers understand STSE so that they can teach in accordance with provincially mandated curriculums. This research points to possible ways that education and physics departments can work together to bridge student learning as well as explore ways that STSE can enrich the various physics courses we teach at the secondary and post-secondary levels.

  4. Faculty Perceptions of Basic Skills Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Michelle Moreau

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the perceptions of faculty regarding why they choose to attend basic skills faculty development; what they choose to implement in their classrooms; and how they determine the effectiveness of the strategies selected. A survey was completed by 173 full and part-time faculty from a large, suburban single-campus community…

  5. Are Home Offices Feasible in a University?: Faculty Perceptions of a Home Office Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Kathy J.; Halley, Richard D.

    1997-01-01

    Examines faculty perceptions of how the new technologies of e-mail and voice mail (widely adopted as a result of a university's home office experiment) changed faculty ways. Discusses first- and second-level effects of communication technologies in three areas: faculty interaction within the department and on campus; student/faculty interaction;…

  6. Preparing for an Academic Career Workshops: Resources for Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, R. W.; MacDonald, R.

    2004-12-01

    The professional development program, "On the Cutting Edge", offers annual multi-day workshops for graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing academic careers. Goals are to prepare participants to become more effective teachers, stronger candidates for academic positions, and more aware of the realities of academic jobs. Insights that participants especially hope to gain from these workshops include feedback on the application process, especially an understanding of how search committees work; the different realities of balancing teaching, research, and personal life in a range of academic institutions; and expectations for tenure. The ten-person leadership team represents, by design, a wide range of academic career paths and institutions, and provides approximately 1:6 leader: participant ratio. Specific sessions include research on learning, an introduction to course and lab design, effective teaching and assessment strategies, developing a teaching statement, time management and early career faculty success, and moving research forward into new settings. Optional workshop sessions and discussions include the following topics: dual-career couples; families and careers; teaching portfolios; effective negotiation strategies; tenure and promotion; effective field trips; getting started in undergraduate research; opportunities in K-12 education; career options beyond faculty positions. Highlights of the workshop are faculty panel discussions about career paths and the academic job search. By workshop end, participants complete a goal setting and action planning activity. Two years of evaluation data suggest our goals are being met. Participants particularly appreciate the practical ideas and the opportunity to interact with, and learn from, a diverse leadership team and other participants.

  7. Breaking the cycle: future faculty begin teaching with learner-centered strategies after professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert-May, Diane; Derting, Terry L; Henkel, Timothy P; Middlemis Maher, Jessica; Momsen, Jennifer L; Arnold, Bryan; Passmore, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    The availability of reliable evidence for teaching practices after professional development is limited across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines, making the identification of professional development "best practices" and effective models for change difficult. We aimed to determine the extent to which postdoctoral fellows (i.e., future biology faculty) believed in and implemented evidence-based pedagogies after completion of a 2-yr professional development program, Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching (FIRST IV). Postdocs (PDs) attended a 2-yr training program during which they completed self-report assessments of their beliefs about teaching and gains in pedagogical knowledge and experience, and they provided copies of class assessments and video recordings of their teaching. The PDs reported greater use of learner-centered compared with teacher-centered strategies. These data were consistent with the results of expert reviews of teaching videos. The majority of PDs (86%) received video ratings that documented active engagement of students and implementation of learner-centered classrooms. Despite practice of higher-level cognition in class sessions, the items used by the PDs on their assessments of learning focused on lower-level cognitive skills. We attributed the high success of the FIRST IV program to our focus on inexperienced teachers, an iterative process of teaching practice and reflection, and development of and teaching a full course.

  8. Breaking the Cycle: Future Faculty Begin Teaching with Learner-Centered Strategies after Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert-May, Diane; Derting, Terry L.; Henkel, Timothy P.; Middlemis Maher, Jessica; Momsen, Jennifer L.; Arnold, Bryan; Passmore, Heather A.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of reliable evidence for teaching practices after professional development is limited across science, technology, engineering, and mathematics disciplines, making the identification of professional development “best practices” and effective models for change difficult. We aimed to determine the extent to which postdoctoral fellows (i.e., future biology faculty) believed in and implemented evidence-based pedagogies after completion of a 2-yr professional development program, Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching (FIRST IV). Postdocs (PDs) attended a 2-yr training program during which they completed self-report assessments of their beliefs about teaching and gains in pedagogical knowledge and experience, and they provided copies of class assessments and video recordings of their teaching. The PDs reported greater use of learner-centered compared with teacher-centered strategies. These data were consistent with the results of expert reviews of teaching videos. The majority of PDs (86%) received video ratings that documented active engagement of students and implementation of learner-centered classrooms. Despite practice of higher-level cognition in class sessions, the items used by the PDs on their assessments of learning focused on lower-level cognitive skills. We attributed the high success of the FIRST IV program to our focus on inexperienced teachers, an iterative process of teaching practice and reflection, and development of and teaching a full course. PMID:26033870

  9. Theories of Specialized Discourses and Writing Fellows Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severino, Carol; Trachsel, Mary

    2008-01-01

    How much do specialized academic discourse communities matter to undergraduate writers? To what degree should theories of specialized discourses influence the design of undergraduate Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) programs? At the University of Iowa, where an undergraduate Writing Fellows program engages peer tutors in writing-intensive…

  10. Practicing Statistics by Creating Exercises for Fellow Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebermeier, Sarah; Reiss, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines the execution of a workshop in which students were encouraged to actively review the course contents on descriptive statistics by creating exercises for their fellow students. In a first-year statistics course in psychology, 39 out of 155 students participated in the workshop. In a subsequent evaluation, the workshop was…

  11. Former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow Served at U.S. Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brim, Cornelia P.

    2014-10-01

    Because of her training and professional experiences, Rosalyn Leitch, a Security Specialist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and former Nonproliferation Graduate Fellow with NIS (2012-2013) was able to transition into temporary assignment as UNVIE Acting Nuclear Security Attaché from November 2013 through February 2014.

  12. Physics GRE Scores of Prize Postdoctoral Fellows in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Emily M.; Bezanson, Rachel; Tremblay, Grant

    2017-01-01

    The Physics GRE has long been a required element of the graduate admissions process in many U.S. astronomy programs; however, its predictive power and utility as a means of selection "successful" applicants had not been quantitatively examined until recently. In the fall of 2015 we circulated a short questionnaire to 271 people who have held U.S. prize postdoctoral fellowships in astrophysics between 2010-2015, asking them to report their Physics GRE scores. The response rate was 64%, and the responding sample was unbiased with respect to the overall gender distribution of prize fellows. The responses revealed that the Physics GRE scores of prize fellows do not adhere to any minimum percentile score and show no statistically significant correlation with the number of first author papers published. As an example, a Physics GRE percentile cutoff of 60% would have eliminated 44% of 2010-2015 U.S. prize postdoctoral fellows, including 60% of the female fellows. From these data, we found no evidence that the Physics GRE could be used as an effective predictor of "success" either in or beyond graduate school. Following this work and last year's official recommendation from the AAS, several astronomy departments have recently decided to eliminate the Physics GRE as a requirement for graduate applicants.

  13. 34 CFR 1100.20 - How is a fellow selected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LITERACY NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR LITERACY: LITERACY LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.20 How is a fellow selected? (a) The Director selects applications for fellowships on the... Register and are applicable to the selection of applications. (b)(1) The Director may use experts from the...

  14. 77 FR 61791 - System of Records; Presidential Management Fellows Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... Personnel Management Human Resource Solutions will now be collected by a contractor. A routine use was added... existing OPM Human Resource Services (HRS) operated system in Macon, GA will continue to function in... MANAGEMENT System of Records; Presidential Management Fellows Program AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel...

  15. Why is Danish so difficult to understand for fellow Scandinavians?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schüppert, Anja; Hilton, Nanna; Gooskens, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    It has consistently been shown that among the three mainland Scandinavian languages, Danish is most difficult to understand for fellow Scandinavians. Recent research suggests that Danish is spoken significantly faster than Norwegian and Swedish. This finding might partly explain the asymmetric intel

  16. Communication skills training curriculum for pulmonary and critical care fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Jennifer W; Gustin, Jillian L; Wells-Di Gregorio, Sharla; Way, David P; Mastronarde, John G

    2015-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires physicians training in pulmonary and critical care medicine to demonstrate competency in interpersonal communication. Studies have shown that residency training is often insufficient to prepare physicians to provide end-of-life care and facilitate patient and family decision-making. Poor communication in the intensive care unit (ICU) can adversely affect outcomes for critically ill patients and their family members. Despite this, communication training curricula in pulmonary and critical care medicine are largely absent in the published literature. We evaluated the effectiveness of a communication skills curriculum during the first year of a pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship using a family meeting checklist to provide formative feedback to fellows during ICU rotations. We hypothesized that fellows would demonstrate increased competence and confidence in the behavioral skills necessary for facilitating family meetings. We evaluated a 12-month communication skills curriculum using a pre-post, quasiexperimental design. Subjects for this study included 11 first-year fellows who participated in the new curriculum (intervention group) and a historical control group of five fellows who had completed no formal communication curriculum. Performance of communication skills and self-confidence in family meetings were assessed for the intervention group before and after the curriculum. The control group was assessed once at the beginning of their second year of fellowship. Fellows in the intervention group demonstrated significantly improved communication skills as evaluated by two psychologists using the Family Meeting Behavioral Skills Checklist, with an increase in total observed skills from 51 to 65% (P ≤ 0.01; Cohen's D effect size [es], 1.13). Their performance was also rated significantly higher when compared with the historical control group, who demonstrated only 49% of observed skills

  17. Society News: RAS Fellows are honoured with awards; Patrick Moore Medal; Best theses win prizes; New Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    Congratulations to several Fellows of the RAS who have received prestigious awards this year. Congratulations to the winners of the annual prizes for the best PhD theses in astronomy and geophysics, awarded by the RAS and sponsored by Wiley-Blackwell. Winners receive a cheque for £1000, runners-up £50.

  18. WHERE Are the Faculty? Fulfilling the Traditional Faculty Role at a Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Felecia G

    2016-01-01

    Innovative approaches are needed to retain seasoned nursing faculty. Technology provides opportunities for faculty to fulfill the traditional roles of teaching, research, and service from a site removed from the traditional campus. The purpose of this article is to encourage faculty and administrators in traditional, land-based colleges and universities to thoughtfully consider the advantages and challenges of the remote worksite for faculty based on the experience of one faculty. Some faculty are better suited to a remote work environment than others. Long-term established faculty may be better able to successfully transition to the tripartite faculty roles with greater ease than novice nurse educators as a result of their familiarity with the institutional resources and comfort in the teaching role. Preparation for the remote experience must be diligent and thoughtful, considering equipment needs, connectivity, and support personnel and strategies for ensuring continued engagement within the nursing education program. Institutional policies must also be considered related to fulfillment of the faculty role via distance technology. A pilot experience for one faculty, as described here, may be useful for evaluating the cost-benefit to the individual and the institution.

  19. 1998 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, William P. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The program objectives include: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  20. 1999 NASA - ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program or summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  1. 1997 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives of the program are as follows: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program description is as follows: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  2. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Since 1964, NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 or 11 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members were appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow devoted approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program consisted of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topic.

  3. Hampton University/American Society for Engineering Education/NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 or 11 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society of Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university will be faculty members appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA-Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education or industry.

  4. 2001 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler); Hathaway, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises these programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4 To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellow's research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders wil be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education and industry.

  5. 2000 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, William P. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler); Hathaway, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend ten weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend ten weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry. A list of the abstracts of the presentations is provided.

  6. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goglia, G. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives of this program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to simulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as research fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The fellows will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the fellows' research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, the educational community, or industry.

  7. 1996 NASA-Hampton University American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives were: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, or industry.

  8. Fellow eye treatment in excimer photo refractive keratectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rao Srinivas

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe symmetry of response in fellow eyes of patients undergoing photorefractive keratectomy (PRK for myopia, analyse the risk factors leading to asymmetry in response and to determine if delayed treatment of the second eye increases safety and predictability of PRK. Methods: Retrospective review of case records of 133 patients who underwent bilateral myopic PRK and had a minimum follow up of 6 months in both eyes. Results: Postoperative uncorrected visual acuity, spherical equivalent (SE refraction within ±1D of emmetropia, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA and corneal haze were not significantly different in fellow eyes of patients undergoing PRK for myopia. Of 87 eyes in group 1 (myopia <6D, 96.6% had uncorrected visual acuity ≥6/ 12, 89.7% were within ±1D of emmetropia, none lost ≥1 line BCVA, and none had haze ≥grade 3. Similar results for 98 eyes in group II (myopia 6 to 9.9D were 75.6%, 55.1%, 2.0% and 2.0% respectively. For 81 eyes in group III (myopia ≥ 10D the results were 42.7%, 33.3%, 8.6%, and 4.9% respectively. Among 84 patients with similar preoperative myopia in both eyes, 54 (64.3% patients had a postoperative SE difference ≤ ID in fellow eyes. Risk factors for asymmetric response among fellow eyes included increasing preoperative myopia (p<0.001 and dissimilar treatment technique in the two eyes (p=0.03. Corneal haze did not increase significantly after the third postoperative month. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that considerable symmetry of response exists in fellow eyes of patients undergoing myopic PRK. Early PRK in the fellow eye of patients with < 6 D myopia is safe and allows quick visual rehabilitation of the patient. In patients with myopia ≥6D, a 3-month interval before treating the second eye may improve the safety of the procedure.

  9. 34 CFR 663.22 - How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows? 663.22 Section 663.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... Scholarship Board select fellows? The J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board selects fellows on...

  10. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) /American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The 1996 JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to (1) further the professional knowledge qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1996.

  11. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1993, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are as follows: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1993.

  12. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1994, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard; Sickorez, Donn G.

    1995-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to: (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1994.

  13. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1993, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participant's institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. A compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1993 is presented.

  14. New AGU Mass Media Fellow Initiated College Science Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Peter

    2010-10-01

    Marissa Weiss, this year's AGU Mass Media Fellow, feels so strongly about communicating science that she and a fellow graduate student started a course on the subject. Three years ago, she and the other student in the biogeochemistry and environmental biocomplexity program at Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y., developed—with the aid of mentors—a semester­long science communication class. The course has since become a regular offering at Cornell, where Weiss defended her dissertation in ecology this past August. A soil ecologist, Weiss showed in her thesis research that nitrogen pollution can cause slowing of soil decomposition because of a declining abundance of microbes that break the soil down.

  15. Faculty Motivation Toward Professional Improvement: A Study of Two-Year College Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Luene Holmes

    Faculty from 16 food service and hotel technology programs in New York two-year colleges were surveyed to determine the components of faculty decisions concerning participation in professional improvement activities aimed at updating knowledge, to explore the function and relationship of the components of a composite expectancy model which…

  16. Physics GRE Scores of Prize Postdoctoral Fellows in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Levesque, Emily M; Tremblay, Grant R

    2015-01-01

    The Physics GRE is currently a required element of the graduate admissions process in nearly all U.S. astronomy programs; however, its predictive power and utility as a means of selecting "successful" applicants has never been examined. We circulated a short questionnaire to 271 people who have held U.S. prize postdoctoral fellowships in astrophysics between 2010-2015, asking them to report their Physics GRE scores (this should not in any way be interpreted as a belief that a prize fellowship is the best or only metric of "success" in astronomy). The response rate was 64%, and the responding sample is unbiased with respect to the overall gender distribution of prize fellows. The responses reveal that the Physics GRE scores of prize fellows do not adhere to any minimum percentile score and show no statistically significant correlation with the number of first author papers published. As an example, a Physics GRE percentile cutoff of 60% would have eliminated 44% of 2010-2015 U.S. prize postdoctoral fellows, in...

  17. CERN Fellows, don’t splash that cash!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    When their CERN contracts expire and they leave the Organization, Fellows recoup the amounts paid into the Pension Fund by and for them every month. If they invest this money well, right from the outset, it can grow into a nice little nest-egg by the time they reach retirement age.   As employed members of the CERN personnel, Fellows are members of the Organization’s Pension Fund. Accordingly, a specific amount is withheld from their salary every month (see first box) and, as the months go by, this gradually accumulates into their transfer value (i.e. their capital). When their contracts expire, Fellows may opt to transfer that money directly into another pension fund (subject to the national laws of the destination country and, unfortunately, not possible everywhere), or take it in cash. This is because only employed members of the personnel who have at least five years of service with the Organization are entitled to remain beneficiaries of the CERN Pension Fund for life*. But the capi...

  18. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1996. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965 are to (1) further the professional knowledge qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA JSC colleague.

  19. Developing a Culture of Assessment through a Faculty Learning Community: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitz, Stephanie A.; O'Connor, Margaret; Pang, Yanhui; Stryker, Deborah; Markell, Stephen; Krupp, Ethan; Byers, Celina; Jones, Sheila Dove; Redfern, Alicia King

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how a diverse, interdisciplinary team of faculty formed a topic-based faculty learning community. Following an introduction to faculty learning communities and a brief discussion of their benefit to faculty engaged in the process of adopting new technology, we explain how our team, through a competitive mini-grant…

  20. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  1. Students Evaluation of Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thawabieh, Ahmad M.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate how students evaluate their faculty and the effect of gender, expected grade, and college on students' evaluation. The study sample consisted of 5291 students from Tafila Technical University Faculty evaluation scale was used to collect data. The results indicated that student evaluation of faculty was high (mean =…

  2. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  3. The Analysis of the Relationship between Organizational Structure and Information Technology (IT): And the Barriers to Its Establishment at the University of Isfahan from the Faculty Member's Viewpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, Yarmohammadzadeh; Mohsen, Allammeh Sayyed; Hassan, Ghalavandi; Aboulghassim, Farhang; Zaman, Ajdari

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the relationship between organizational structure between IT and the barriers to its establishment in University of Isfahan from faculty member's viewpoints in 2007-2008. The questionnaires were prepared and examined based on the organization dimensions of organizational structures (formality,…

  4. Computer Attitude, and the Impact of Personal Characteristics and Information and Communication Technology Adoption Patterns on Performance of Teaching Faculty in Higher Education in Ghana, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi-Apau, Josephine A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined computer attitude, and the impact of personal characteristics and ICT adoption patterns on performance of multidisciplinary teaching faculty in three public universities in Ghana. A cross-sectional research of mixed methods was applied in collecting data and information. Quantitative data from 164 respondents were analyzed…

  5. Social Responsibility of a Profession: An Analysis of Faculty Perception of Social Responsibility Factors and Integration into Graduate Programs of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Stephanie L.

    2009-01-01

    Although ethics are commonly regarded as an important characteristic and performance attribute, they are also regarded as a slippery or ill-defined topic leaving practitioners and faculty flat-footed in how to teach and assess ethics. This article reports part of the findings from an investigation on deriving an empirical definition of ethics,…

  6. Research Reports: 1997 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Dowdy, J. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    For the 33rd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period June 2, 1997 through August 8, 1997. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the program, which are in the 34th year of operation nationally, are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1997. The University of Alabama in Huntsville presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  7. Research Reports: 2001 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. (Editor); Pruitt, J. (Editor); Nash-Stevenson, S. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor); Karr, C. L. (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    For the thirty-seventh consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE (American Society for Engineering Education) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by The University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period May 29 - August 3, 2001. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA Centers, was sponsored by the University Affairs Office, NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the thirty-seventh year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. The Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 2001.

  8. Research Reports: 1995 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, G. R. (Editor); Chappell, C. R. (Editor); Six, F. (Editor); Freeman, L. M. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    For the 31st consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama in Huntsville and MSFC during the period 15 May 1995 - 4 Aug. 1995. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA centers, was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 32nd year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1995. The University of Alabama in Huntsville presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  9. Research Reports: 1996 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, M. (Editor); Chappell, C. R. (Editor); Six, F. (Editor); Karr, G. R. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    For the 32nd consecutive year, a NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The program was conducted by the University of Alabama and MSFC during the period May 28, 1996 through August 2, 1996. Operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education, the MSFC program, as well as those at other NASA centers, was sponsored by the Higher Education Branch, Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The basic objectives of the programs, which are in the 33rd year of operation nationally, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. The Faculty Fellows spent 10 weeks at MSFC engaged in a research project compatible with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/MSFC colleague. This document is a compilation of Fellows' reports on their research during the summer of 1996. The University of Alabama presents the Co-Directors' report on the administrative operations of the program. Further information can be obtained by contacting any of the editors.

  10. The National Pancreas Foundation fellows symposium program 2006 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelrud, Andres; Whitcomb, David C

    2010-04-01

    Clinical and translational research is critical for the development of improvement in care of pancreatic diseases. Major concerns are the lack of dedicated trainees in pancreatic research and the difficulty for the remaining trainees to develop independent research careers to be included into the pancreas research community. This article describes the efforts of Solvay Pharmaceuticals and American academic leaders working through the National Pancreas Foundation to facilitate the development and expansion of a new generation of pancreas-related clinical and translational researchers through a 3-year fellows symposium.

  11. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS): differentiating faculty knowledge and experience in assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I; Bauerle, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education reform efforts have called for widespread adoption of evidence-based teaching in which faculty members attend to student outcomes through assessment practice. Awareness about the importance of assessment has illuminated the need to understand what faculty members know and how they engage with assessment knowledge and practice. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS) is a new instrument for evaluating science faculty assessment knowledge and experience. Instrument validation was composed of two distinct studies: an empirical evaluation of the psychometric properties of the FRAS and a comparative known-groups validation to explore the ability of the FRAS to differentiate levels of faculty assessment experience. The FRAS was found to be highly reliable (α = 0.96). The dimensionality of the instrument enabled distinction of assessment knowledge into categories of program design, instrumentation, and validation. In the known-groups validation, the FRAS distinguished between faculty groups with differing levels of assessment experience. Faculty members with formal assessment experience self-reported higher levels of familiarity with assessment terms, higher frequencies of assessment activity, increased confidence in conducting assessment, and more positive attitudes toward assessment than faculty members who were novices in assessment. These results suggest that the FRAS can reliably and validly differentiate levels of expertise in faculty knowledge of assessment.

  12. Reasons of Aggressive Behaviour Against School Fellows, Its Frequency, Forms: Reaction of Schoolchildren, Teachers and Parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdas Pruskus

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article, which is based on conducted research data, analyzes an attitude of schoolchildren, teachers and parents towards the reasons of schoolchildren’s aggressive behaviour, its frequency and forms. Different factors and motives that stimulate the aggressiveness of schoolchildren, who go to the city, village and different professional (arts and technology schools are examined. Schoolchildren’s approach towards violence against school fellows and themselves is being discussed, as well as reaction of teachers and parents to this phenomenon. The article reveals opinion of schoolchildren, teachers, and parents about the means used to prevent violence towards schoolchildren and existing ways that can be used to make preventive means to be more effective.

  13. NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program: 2003 Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotnour, Tim (Editor); LopezdeCastillo, Eduardo (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 2003 NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program at the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC). This was the nineteenth year that a NASA/ASEE program has been conducted at KSC. The 2003 program was administered by the University of Central Florida (UCF) in cooperation with KSC. The program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and the Education Division, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The KSC program was one of nine such Aeronautics and Space Research Programs funded by NASA Headquarters in 2003. The basic common objectives of the NASA/ASEE Faculty Fellowship Program are: A) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; B) To stimulate an exchange of ideas between teaching participants and employees of NASA; C) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; D) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. The KSC Faculty Fellows spent ten weeks (May 19 through July 25, 2003) working with NASA scientists and engineers on research of mutual interest to the university faculty member and the NASA colleague. The editors of this document were responsible for selecting appropriately qualified faculty to address some of the many research areas of current interest to NASA/KSC. A separate document reports on the administrative aspects of the 2003 program. The NASA/ASEE program is intended to be a two-year program to allow in-depth research by the university faculty member. In many cases a faculty member has developed a close working relationship with a particular NASA group that had provided funding beyond the two-year limit.

  14. Training fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Harvard experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David W; Allan, Catherine K; Newburger, Jane W

    2016-12-01

    The Fellowship Program of the Department of Cardiology at Boston Children's Hospital seeks to train academically oriented leaders in clinical care and laboratory and clinical investigation of cardiovascular disease in the young. The core clinical fellowship involves 3 years in training, comprising 24 months of clinical rotations and 12 months of elective and research experience. Trainees have access to a vast array of research opportunities - clinical, basic, and translational. Clinical fellows interested in basic science may reverse the usual sequence and start their training in the laboratory, deferring clinical training for 1 or more years. An increasing number of clinical trainees apply to spend a fourth year as a senior fellow in one of the subspecialty areas of paediatric cardiology. From the founding of the Department to the present, we have maintained a fundamental and unwavering commitment to training and education in clinical care and research in basic science and clinical investigation, as well as to the training of outstanding young clinicians and investigators.

  15. Career choice selection and satisfaction among US adult nephrology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hitesh H; Jhaveri, Kenar D; Sparks, Matthew A; Mattana, Joseph

    2012-09-01

    Although many anticipate that there will be an eventual shortage of practicing nephrologists, a complete understanding is lacking regarding the current factors that lead US adult nephrology fellows to choose nephrology as a career and their satisfaction with this choice. It is of great concern that interest in obtaining nephrology fellowship training continues to decline in the United States, especially among US medical graduates, and the reasons for this are unclear. The exposure that students and residents have to nephrology is likely to play an important role in the career choices that they make and their ultimate satisfaction with this career choice is likely influenced by several factors, including job opportunities. Some of the findings presented here suggest that there may be a high percentage of nephrology fellows who are dissatisfied with their career choice. Failure to understand the factors that influence trainees to choose nephrology as a career and those that affect their satisfaction with this choice may impair the ability to graduate a sufficient number of nephrologists to meet projected demand. In this article, a number of variables related to the choice of nephrology as a career and satisfaction with a career in nephrology are discussed. Some steps that the nephrology training community might take to help promote interest in nephrology and optimize the satisfaction that nephrology graduates derive from their careers are also proposed.

  16. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1995.. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted at JSC, including the White Sands Test Facility, by Texas A&M University and JSC. The objectives of the program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. In addition to the faculty participants, the 1995 program included five students. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows and visiting students during the summer of 1995. The reports of two of the students are integral with that of the respective fellow. Three students wrote separate reports.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program: 1995. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, which began nationally in 1964 and at JSC in 1965, are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of the participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. In addition to the faculty participants, the 1995 program included five students. This document is a compilation of the first fifteen of twenty-seven final reports on the research projects completed by the faculty fellows and visiting students during the summer of 1995. The reports of two of the students are integral with that of the respective fellow. Three students wrote separate reports included in Volume 2.

  18. The faculty of pain medicine of the Australian and New Zealand college of anaesthetists - history and strategic plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipton, Edward A; Moore, Brendan; Cousins, Michael; Atkinson, Leigh

    2014-12-01

    Since its formation, the Faculty of Pain Medicine (FPM) has grown into an organization with 369 fellows. It has 29 accredited pain medicine training units in Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, and Singapore. This article reviews the history of its birth and subsequent growth. The FPM fellowship is widely recognized as a high-quality qualification, based on a sound curriculum, excellent clinical exposure, and robust continuing professional development. But how does the Faculty position itself for the future? The Faculty's 5-year Strategic Plan (from 2013 to 2017) sets out its vision "to reduce the burden of pain in society through education, advocacy, training and research."

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston. The basic objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching objectives of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. Volume 1 contains sections 1 through 14.

  20. Stress and burnout among critical care fellows: preliminary evaluation of an educational intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Kashani, Kianoush; Carrera, Perliveh; Gallo de Moraes, Alice; Sood, Amit; Onigkeit, James A; Ramar, Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite a demanding work environment, information on stress and burnout of critical care fellows is limited.Objectives: To assess 1) levels of burnout, perceived stress, and quality of life in critical care fellows, and 2) the impact of a brief stress management training on these outcomes.Methods: In a tertiary care academic medical center, 58 critical care fellows of varying subspecialties and training levels were surveyed to assess baseline levels of stress and burnout. Twenty-o...

  1. Accounting Faculty Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accounting professionals, business college accrediting bodies, and even accounting academics themselves acknowledge that there is a disconnect between academe and the rigors and requirements of the accounting profession. Among the suggestions proposed in the literature to reduce this gap is the faculty internship, where accounting faculty members work within the field as accountants. Heretofore, individual case studies report benefits of such internships that accrue to a variety of stakeholder groups beyond just the faculty intern and include the academic institution, students, and accounting profession through faculty internships. This research seeks wider support for these benefits. This descriptive study involved surveying a sample of accounting faculty members to get their opinions about the benefits and drawbacks of faculty internships, and to determine the level of use of faculty internships in accounting. In all, 128 usable responses were obtained, representing a 14.6% response rate. The results of this study reveal that although most faculty members acknowledge the benefits cited in the literature, too few take advantage of faculty internships.

  2. Opinion & special articles: a guide from fellowship to faculty: Nietzsche and the academic neurologist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, S Thomas

    2012-10-02

    The role of the physician scientist in biomedical research is increasingly threatened. Despite a clear role in clinical advances in translational medicine, the percentage of physicians engaged in research has steadily declined. Several programmatic efforts have been initiated to address this problem by providing time and financial resources to the motivated resident or fellow. However, this decline in physician scientists is due not only to a lack of time and resources but also a reflection of the uncertain path in moving from residency or postdoctoral training toward junior faculty. This article is a practical guide to the milestones and barriers to successful faculty achievement after residency or fellowship training.

  3. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Hodgson; David Irick

    2005-09-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its sixth year of operation. During this period the Center has involved thirteen GATE Fellows and ten GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center's focus area: hybrid drive trains and control systems. Eighteen GATE students have graduated, and three have completed their course work requirements. Nine faculty members from three departments in the College of Engineering have been involved in the GATE Center. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as internships, equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $4,000,000. Problem areas are discussed in the hope that future activities may benefit from the operation of the current program.

  4. Society News: Workshop helps new GJI authors; Free eBook for schools; EGU awards medal; AGU elects Fellow; Support your Society; New Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Early-career researchers and postgraduates are invited to attend an Author Workshop at the 2012 European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna. The following were elected Fellows of the Society on 10 February 2012:

  5. Faculty Compensation Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silander, Fred

    1983-01-01

    Faculty compensation policy is seen as one means by which an institution influences the faculty to work toward institutional goals. Among the broad criteria for compensation are worth, equity, need, and market measures. Benefits and issues in compensation including differentials in compensation, merit, part-time instruction, etc. are discussed.…

  6. Faculty Retirement Transitions Revitalized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ummersen, Claire; Duranleau, Lauren; McLaughlin, Jean

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost ten years since the American Council on Education (ACE) began to raise awareness of the importance of workplace flexibility in faculty careers and to encourage colleges and universities to support faculty in better integrating their professional and personal lives. With the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ACE…

  7. Faculty Growth Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Peter

    Growth contracts, described as faculty plans for personal and professional growth proposed by each member of the faculty, are examined. The rationale for growth contracts is explained and a list of some institutions using growth contracts or variations of the concept is provided. Growth contract advantages, the role of the evaluation committee or…

  8. Learner and Faculty Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Sharon; Stanford, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This chapter identifies effective ways to address learner and faculty support. It introduces methods for building a successful learner support system by providing sufficient resources and proactively addressing learner motivation. It also addresses effective faculty support through institutional policies, resources, training, and course…

  9. Academic Productivity of Faculty Associated With Craniofacial Surgery Fellowship Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qing Zhao; Ricci, Joseph A; Silvestre, Jason; Ho, Olivia A; Ganor, Oren; Lee, Bernard T

    2017-03-29

    The H-index is increasingly being used as a measure of academic productivity and has been applied to various surgical disciplines. Here the authors calculate the H-index of craniofacial surgery fellowship faculty in North America in order to determine its utility for academic productivity among craniofacial surgeons. A list of fellowship programs was obtained from the website of the American Society of Craniofacial Surgery. Faculty demographics and institution characteristics were obtained from official program websites and the H-index was calculated using Scopus (Elsevier, USA). Data were assessed using bivariate analysis tools (Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests) to determine the relationship between independent variables and career publications, H-index and 5-year H-index (H5-index) of faculty. Dunn test for multiple comparisons was also calculated. A total of 102 faculty members from 29 craniofacial surgery fellowship programs were identified and included. Faculty demographics reflected a median age of 48 (interquartile range [IQR] 13), a predominantly male sample (88/102, 89.7%), and the rank of assistant professor being the most common among faculty members (41/102, 40.2%). Median of career publications per faculty was 37 (IQR 52.5) and medians of H-index and H5-index were 10.0 (IQR 13.75) and 3.5 (IQR 3.25), respectively. Greater age, male gender, Fellow of the American College of Surgeons membership, higher academic rank, and program affiliation with ranked research medical schools were significantly associated with higher H-indices. Variables associated with seniority were positively associated with the H-index. These results suggest that the H-index may be used as an adjunct in determining academic productivity for promotions among craniofacial surgeons.

  10. Students Computer Skills in Faculty of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Caglar; Mukaddes Sakalli Demirok

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays; the usage of technology is not a privilege but an obligation. Technological developments influence structures andfunctions of educational institutions. It is also expected from the teachers that they integrate technology in their lessons inorder to educate the individuals of information society. This research has covered 145(68 female, 78 male) students, studying inNear East University Faculty of Education. The Computer Skills Scale developed by Güçlü (2010) was used as a data colle...

  11. 34 CFR 662.22 - How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows? 662.22 Section 662.22 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... Foreign Scholarship Board select fellows? (a) The J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board...

  12. Update and Expansion of the Center of Automotive Technology Excellence Under the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irick, David

    2012-08-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its seventh year of operation under this agreement, its thirteenth year in total. During this period the Center has involved eleven GATE Fellows and three GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center’s focus area: Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Control Systems. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $2,000,000.

  13. Faculty Development: A Stage Model Matched to Blended Learning Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetters, Michael L.; Duby, Tova Garcia

    2011-01-01

    Faculty development programs are critical to the implementation and support of curriculum innovation. In this case study, the authors present lessons learned from ten years of experience in faculty development programs created to support innovation in technology enhanced learning. Stages of curriculum innovation are matched to stages of faculty…

  14. Faculty Mentoring in Residence Halls: An Experiential Learning Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Hemlata

    2012-01-01

    As more demands are being placed on faculty inside of the classroom, the debate surrounding the feasibility of faculty having the time and resources to be involved outside the classroom continues. At the same time there is a growing concern that in light of current advancements in technology; oral communication skills, basic to human existence is…

  15. An Analysis of Academic Library Web Pages for Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Susan J.; Juricek, John Eric; Xu, F. Grace

    2008-01-01

    Web sites are increasingly used by academic libraries to promote key services and collections to teaching faculty. This study analyzes the content, location, language, and technological features of fifty-four academic library Web pages designed especially for faculty to expose patterns in the development of these pages.

  16. Stress and burnout among critical care fellows: preliminary evaluation of an educational intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kianoush Kashani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite a demanding work environment, information on stress and burnout of critical care fellows is limited. Objectives: To assess 1 levels of burnout, perceived stress, and quality of life in critical care fellows, and 2 the impact of a brief stress management training on these outcomes. Methods: In a tertiary care academic medical center, 58 critical care fellows of varying subspecialties and training levels were surveyed to assess baseline levels of stress and burnout. Twenty-one of the 58 critical care fellows who were in the first year of training at the time of this initial survey participated in a pre-test and 1-year post-test to determine the effects of a brief, 90-min stress management intervention. Results: Based on responses (n=58 to the abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory, reported burnout was significantly lower in Asian fellows (p=0.04 and substantially higher among graduating fellows (versus new and transitioning fellows (p=0.02. Among the intervention cohort, burnout did not significantly improve – though two-thirds of fellows reported using the interventional techniques to deal with stressful situations. Fellows who participated in the intervention rated the effectiveness of the course as 4 (IQR=3.75–5 using the 5-point Likert scale. Conclusions: In comparison with the new and transitioning trainees, burnout was highest among graduating critical care fellows. Although no significant improvements were found in first-year fellows’ burnout scores following the single, 90-min training intervention, participants felt the training did provide them with tools to apply during stressful situations.

  17. Postgraduate Education in Quality Improvement Methods: Initial Results of the Fellows' Applied Quality Training (FAQT) Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchester, David E; Burkart, Thomas A; Choi, Calvin Y; McKillop, Matthew S; Beyth, Rebecca J; Dahm, Phillipp

    2016-06-01

    Training in quality improvement (QI) is a pillar of the next accreditation system of the Accreditation Committee on Graduate Medical Education and a growing expectation of physicians for maintenance of certification. Despite this, many postgraduate medical trainees are not receiving training in QI methods. We created the Fellows Applied Quality Training (FAQT) curriculum for cardiology fellows using both didactic and applied components with the goal of increasing confidence to participate in future QI projects. Fellows completed didactic training from the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Open School and then designed and completed a project to improve quality of care or patient safety. Self-assessments were completed by the fellows before, during, and after the first year of the curriculum. The primary outcome for our curriculum was the median score reported by the fellows regarding their self-confidence to complete QI activities. Self-assessments were completed by 23 fellows. The majority of fellows (15 of 23, 65.2%) reported no prior formal QI training. Median score on baseline self-assessment was 3.0 (range, 1.85-4), which was significantly increased to 3.27 (range, 2.23-4; P = 0.004) on the final assessment. The distribution of scores reported by the fellows indicates that 30% were slightly confident at conducting QI activities on their own, which was reduced to 5% after completing the FAQT curriculum. An interim assessment was conducted after the fellows completed didactic training only; median scores were not different from the baseline (mean, 3.0; P = 0.51). After completion of the FAQT, cardiology fellows reported higher self-confidence to complete QI activities. The increase in self-confidence seemed to be limited to the applied component of the curriculum, with no significant change after the didactic component.

  18. Palliative care experience of US adult nephrology fellows: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Hitesh H; Monga, Divya; Caperna, April; Jhaveri, Kenar D

    2014-02-01

    Palliative care (PC) training and experience of United States (US) adult nephrology fellows was not known. It was also not clear whether nephrology fellows in the US undergo formal training in PC medicine during fellowship. To gain a better understanding of the clinical training and experience of US adult nephrology fellows in PC medicine, we conducted a national survey in March 2012. An anonymous on-line survey was sent to US adult nephrology fellows via nephrology fellowship training program directors. Fellows were asked several PC medicine experience and training questions. A total of 105 US adult nephrology fellows responded to our survey (11% response rate). Majority of the respondents (94%) were from university-based fellowship programs. Over two-thirds (72%) of the fellows had no formal PC medicine rotation during their medical school. Half (53%) of the respondents had no formal PC elective experience during residency. Although nearly 90% of the fellows had a division or department of PC medicine at their institution, only 46.9% had formal didactic PC medicine experience. Over 80% of the respondent's program did not offer formal clinical training or rotation in PC medicine during fellowship. While 90% of the responding fellows felt most comfortable with either writing dialysis orders in the chronic outpatient unit, seeing an ICU consult or writing continuous dialysis orders in the ICU, only 35% of them felt most comfortable "not offering" dialysis to a patient in the ICU with multi-organ failure. Nearly one out of five fellows surveyed felt obligated to offer dialysis to every patient regardless of benefit. Over two-thirds (67%) of the respondents thought that a formal rotation in PC medicine during fellowship would be helpful to them. To enhance clinical competency and confidence in PC medicine, a formal PC rotation during fellowship should be highly considered by nephrology training community.

  19. Overcoming Resistance to Instructional Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William G.; Anderson, Susan; Love, Don

    2000-01-01

    Administrators must convince and motivate faculty to adopt instructional technology if departments are to remain on the cutting edge. Describes seven actions to promote the use of instructional technology: know your faculty; be aware of faculty concerns; use technology yourself; review potential barriers; explore and obtain resources; communicate…

  20. MESSENGER Educator Fellows Taking the Nation on a Ride to the Innermost Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhala, H. A.; Goldstein, J. J.; Chapman, C. R.; Edmonds, J. P.; Hallau, K. G.; Hirshon, B.; Weir, H. M.; Solomon, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Exploration of the mysterious planet Mercury offers an unprecedented opportunity for teachers, students, and citizens to tag along for the ride, and the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) Educator Fellows are making sure classrooms across the U.S. are treated to quite a show. The Fellows, a nationally selected team of 30 master science educator volunteers, conduct workshops to teachers on how to bring educational materials developed in support of the mission into the classroom. The goal of the program is to provide teachers and school districts with exceptional educational materials and professional development strongly tied to the space science curriculum, and the materials are designed to inspire the next generation of America's scientists and engineers through NASA missions. Since the program's inception in 2003, more than 17,000 educators have been trained by the Fellows. On the basis of data gathered from the Fellows, this figure could translate to over two million student experiences. The success of the Fellowship program can also be gauged by determining how well it has maintained its volunteer corps over the years. The Fellows, selected to the program through a national announcement of opportunity every two years, reflect a geographically and institutionally diverse mix of individuals from a variety of settings such as science centers, museums, school districts, and universities. The Fellows sign up to the program for two years at a time, and at the end of their term they have the option to reapply. To keep the number of Fellows at 30 in each cadre, new Fellows are recruited to replace those who have retired. The current, fourth cadre of Fellows includes 30 individuals in 19 states and territories. Of these, seven have been in the program since the first cadre, and the other 23 include Fellows from the second, third, and fourth recruitment campaigns in 2006, 2008, and 2010. The current cadre is conducting its work

  1. Training Faculty to Teach in Hybrid Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Kathryn E.

    2017-01-01

    Based on the author's experiences developing and implementing a multi-week hybrid course design institute, this chapter outlines the components of training--both andragogical and technological--most helpful for faculty who are planning to teach a hybrid course.

  2. Plagiarism Among Faculty Applicants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beuy Joob; Viroj Wiwanitkit

    2012-01-01

    ....5 Re-education and re-emphasizing the importance of "no plagiarism" in academic work, as well as establishing standards for all present academic faculty members, including senior and administrative...

  3. Faculty Trends and Projected Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Barbara A.

    1983-01-01

    Matching faculty with projected staffing needs requires creation of a broad-based inventory of faculty talents and interests, but such a database also suggests a number of faculty placement alternatives, including more productive faculty use, increased industry outplacement, and combining academic and nonacademic employment or administrative…

  4. Faculty Trends and Projected Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Barbara A.

    1983-01-01

    Matching faculty with projected staffing needs requires creation of a broad-based inventory of faculty talents and interests, but such a database also suggests a number of faculty placement alternatives, including more productive faculty use, increased industry outplacement, and combining academic and nonacademic employment or administrative…

  5. Mass Media Fellow Westley spends summer publishing in Newsweek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifert, Harvey

    If you are a subscriber to Newsweek, you probably remember these stories from the past few months: “Vaccine Revolution,” “Aliens Invade America!,” “A Gymnast's Long Fall,” “Is AIDS Forever?,” and a cover story, “Science Finds God.” They all had something in common, aside from their science focus: at the end of each article was the credit line, “With Marian Westley.” In addition, a story titled “A Long, Wacky Summer,” on recent weather patterns, carried Marian Westley's byline. Who, you may have wondered, is this Marian Westley, who reports with equal aplomb on matters as diverse as epidemiology, meteorology, the predations of nonnative plant species, and the interface between scientists and theologians? Actually, Westley is a graduate student in biological oceanography at the University of Hawaii and a member of AGU. She spent the summer of 1998 as the AAAS/AGU Mass Media Fellow at Newsweek in New York.

  6. A pilot study of palliative medicine fellows' hospice home visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Laura K; Aktas, Aynur; Walsh, Declan; Hullihen, Barbara; Khan, Mohammed I Ahmed; Russell, Kraig M; Davis, Mellar P; Lagman, Ruth; LeGrand, Susan

    2012-12-01

    This was a prospective descriptive study of hospice physician home visits (HVs) conducted by Hospice and Palliative Medicine Fellows. Our objectives were 1) to improve our knowledge of hospice care at home by describing physician HVs 2) to identify the indications for physician HVs and the problems addressed during the HV. Data was collected on 58 consecutive patients using a standardized form completed before and after the home visit. More than half of the persons were women. Most were Caucasian. Median age was 75 years; 57% had cancer; 77% were do-not-resuscitate. 76% HV occurred in the home. The median visit duration was 60 minutes; median travel distance and time 25 miles and 42 minutes, respectively. A hospice nurse case manager was present in 95%. The most common issues addressed during HVs were: health education, symptom management, and psychosocial support. Medication review was prominent. Physicians identified previously unreported issues. Symptom control was usually pain, although 27 symptoms were identified. Medications were important; all home visits included drug review and two thirds drug change. Physicians had unique responsibilities and identified important issues in the HV. Physicians provided both education and symptom management. Physician HVs are an important intervention. HVs were important in continuity of care, however, time-consuming, and incurred considerable travel, and professional time and costs.

  7. Attitudes toward neuroscience education among psychiatry residents and fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Lawrence K; Akil, Mayada; Widge, Alik; Roberts, Laura Weiss; Etkin, Amit

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the attitudes of psychiatry trainees toward neuroscience education in psychiatry residency and subsequent training in order to inform neuroscience education approaches in the future. This online survey was designed to capture demographic information, self-assessed neuroscience knowledge, attitudes toward neuroscience education, preferences in learning modalities, and interest in specific neuroscience topics. Volunteers were identified through the American Psychiatric Association, which invited 2,563 psychiatry trainees among their members. Four hundred thirty-six trainees completed the survey. Nearly all agreed that there is a need for more neuroscience education in psychiatry residency training (94%) and that neuroscience education could help destigmatize mental illness (91%). Nearly all (94%) expressed interest in attending a 3-day course on neuroscience. Many neuroscience topics and modes of learning were viewed favorably by participants. Residents in their first 2 years of training expressed attitudes similar to those of more advanced residents and fellows. Some differences were found based on the level of interest in a future academic role. This web-based study demonstrates that psychiatry residents see neuroscience education as important in their training and worthy of greater attention. Our results suggest potential opportunities for advancing neuroscience education.

  8. Detection of Keratoconus in Clinically and Algorithmically Topographically Normal Fellow Eyes Using Epithelial Thickness Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, Dan Z.; Archer, Timothy J.; Urs, Raksha; Gobbe, Marine; RoyChoudhury, Arindam; Silverman, Ronald H.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE To assess the effectiveness of a keratoconus-detection algorithm derived from Artemis very high-frequency (VHF) digital ultrasound (ArcScan Inc., Morrison, CO) epithelial thickness maps in the fellow eye from a series of patients with unilateral keratoconus. METHODS The study included 10 patients with moderate to advanced keratoconus in one eye but a clinically and algorithmically topographically normal fellow eye. VHF digital ultrasound epithelial thickness data were acquired and a previously developed classification model was applied for identification of keratoconus to the clinically normal fellow eyes. Pentacam (Oculus Optikgeräte, Wetzlar, Germany) Belin-Ambrósio Display (BAD) data (5 of 10 eyes), and Orbscan (Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY) SCORE data (9 of 10 eyes) were also evaluated. RESULTS Five of the 10 fellow eyes were classified as keratoconic by the VHF digital ultrasound epithelium model. Five of 9 fellow eyes were classified as keratoconic by the SCORE model. For the 5 fellow eyes with Pentacam and VHF digital ultrasound data, one was classified as keratoconic by the VHF digital ultrasound model, one (different) eye by a combined VHF digital ultrasound and Pentacam model, and none by BAD-D alone. CONCLUSIONS Under the assumption that keratoconus is a bilateral but asymmetric disease, half of the ‘normal’ fellow eyes could be found to have keratoconus using epithelial thickness maps. The Orbscan SCORE or the combination of topographic BAD criteria with epithelial maps did not perform better. PMID:26544561

  9. Salary-Trend Studies of Faculty for the Years 1988-89 and 1991-92 in the Following Academic Disciplines/Major Fields: Engineering-Related Technologies; Foreign Language; Geography; Geology; History; Home Economics; Letters; Library and Archival Sciences; Life Sciences; Mathematics; Multi-Interdisciplinary Studies; Music; Nursing; Philosophy and Religion; and Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Richard D.; And Others

    This volume provides comparative data for faculty salaries in public and private colleges, based on an annual survey of over 600 colleges and universities. Data cover the following disciplines: Engineering Related Technologies, Foreign Languages, Geography, Geology, History, Home Economics, Letters, Library and Archival Sciences, Life Sciences,…

  10. Salary-Trend Studies of Faculty for the Years 1988-89 and 1991-92 in the Following Academic Disciplines/Major Fields: Engineering-Related Technologies; Foreign Language; Geography; Geology; History; Home Economics; Letters; Library and Archival Sciences; Life Sciences; Mathematics; Multi-Interdisciplinary Studies; Music; Nursing; Philosophy and Religion; and Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Richard D.; And Others

    This volume provides comparative data for faculty salaries in public and private colleges, based on an annual survey of over 600 colleges and universities. Data cover the following disciplines: Engineering Related Technologies, Foreign Languages, Geography, Geology, History, Home Economics, Letters, Library and Archival Sciences, Life Sciences,…

  11. Training gastroenterology fellows to perform gastric polypectomy using a novel ex vivo model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Jen Chen; Ching-Chung Lin; Chia-Yuan Liu; Chih-Jen Chen; Chen-Wang Chang; Ching-Wei Chang; Chien-Wei Lee; Shou-Chuan Shih; Horng-Yuan Wang

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of hands-on training of gastroenterology fellows in gastric polypectomy using an ex vivo simulator.METHODS: Eight gastroenterology fellows at Mackay Memorial Hospital, Taipei were evaluated in gastric polypectomy techniques using a pig stomach with artificial polyps created by a rubber band ligation device. The performance of four second year (year-2) fellows who had undergone one year of clinical training was compared with that of four first year (year-1) fellows both before and after a 4-h workshop using the ex vivo simulator. The workshop allowed for hands-on training in the removal of multiple artificial polyps and the placement of hemoclips at the excision site. Evaluation included observation of technical skills, procedure time, and the fellows' confidence scale.RESULTS: One week after the workshop, the year-1 fellows were re-evaluated and had significantly improved mean performance scores (from 17.9 ± 1.8 to 22.5 ± 0.7), confidence scale (from 4.5 ± 1.0 to 7.8 ± 0.5) and procedure time (from 615.0 ± 57.4 s to 357.5 ± 85.0 s) compared with their baseline performance. After 4 h of training using the ex vivo simulator, the skills of the year-1 fellows were statistically similar to those of the year-2 fellows.CONCLUSION: Use of this ex vivo simulator significantly improved the endoscopic gastric polypectomy skills of gastroenterology fellows who had not had previous clinical training in gastric polypectomy.

  12. It Is (More) about the Students: Faculty Motivations and Concerns Regarding Teaching Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, H. David; Davies, Kim; Richardson, Deborah; Hammock, Georgina; Akins, Maureen; Russ, Laura

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest, if not demand, from universities and students for faculty to teach using online technologies. However, many faculty members are reluctant to teach online. In this paper, we examine data collected from a broad range of faculty (part-time, tenure track, new and more experienced, in education, business, and liberal arts)…

  13. Faculty Learning Communities: A Model for Supporting Curriculum Changes in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engin, Marion; Atkinson, Fairlie

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a faculty learning community (FLC) as a professional development model for faculty in an English-medium university in the United Arab Emirates. The authors describe how the introduction of a new learning and teaching technology, in the form of iPads, resulted in many of the faculty feeling unsure about their pedagogy. A…

  14. MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGIES FOR TRAINING FOR "DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY AND ENGINEERING GRAPHICS" COURSE FOR STUDENTS OF THE FACULTY OF CIVIL ENGINEERING IN KUBGAU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serga G. V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the teaching descriptive geometry and engineering graphics on Faculty of Civil Engineering, higher-motivation of students to obtain needed competence to adopt competently compensation-drawings. The article describes the basic methods of conducting classes on the subject "Descriptive Geometry and Engineering Graphics" for students enrolled in the specialty 08.05.01 "Construction of unique buildings and structures." For lectures and laboratory classes in the department of descriptive geometry and graphics were developed multimedia courses with animation for all studied subjects, educational presentations that reveal the specifics of the discipline into account peculiarities of the educational process of learning in the Kuban State Agricultural university. Multimedia courses using enables us to model a situation that forces students to analyze, compare the solves of the task. Students develop an algorithmic way of thinking, formed the ability to think and act optimally variability. The use of multimedia development at the Department of Descriptive Geometry and Graphics showed an increase of performance results compared to the previous years of employment without presentation. It indicates that the use of multimedia lectures and laboratory exercises improves the efficiency and quality of education, as well as gives an opportunity to a greater extent to explain the learning material for students

  15. ABCs of Safety and Quality for the Pediatric Resident and Fellow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Emily; Sethuraman, Usha

    2016-04-01

    The role of resident and fellow trainees in patient-centered improvement processes is critical to a health care system's success. There is a growing impetus to incorporate patient safety and quality improvement into the educational framework of physicians in training. As part of the Next Accreditation System, practice-based learning and improvement and systems-based practice domains mandate that residents and fellows be assessed on their ability to enhance the quality of care and advocate for patient safety. Best practices for incorporating quality improvement and patient safety into the curriculum of residents and fellows remains an area of interest for educators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1998. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    JSC NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC, under ASEE. The objectives of the program are to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science members; stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants; and contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his/her interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the fellows' research projects performed during the summer of 1998. Volume 1, current volume, contains the first reports, and volume 2 contains the remaining reports.

  17. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The objective of the NASA/ASEE program were: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. Each faculty fellow spent 10 weeks at Johnson Space Center engaged in a research project commensurate with his/her interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. A compilation is presented of the final reports on the research projects done by the fellows during the summer of 1987. This is volume 1 of a 2 volume report.

  18. 5 February 2010: Romanian Former Minister of Justice V. Stoica (4th from left) visiting SM18 with, from left to right, University of Bucharest Faculty of Physics A. Costescu, DESY Hamburg C. Diaconu; Mrs Valeriu Stoica; Université de Montpellier II S. Ciulli; Technology Department Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group S. Ilie; Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Adviser for Russian Federation, Central and Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    5 February 2010: Romanian Former Minister of Justice V. Stoica (4th from left) visiting SM18 with, from left to right, University of Bucharest Faculty of Physics A. Costescu, DESY Hamburg C. Diaconu; Mrs Valeriu Stoica; Université de Montpellier II S. Ciulli; Technology Department Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group S. Ilie; Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Adviser for Russian Federation, Central and Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka.

  19. Maury Nussbaum reappointed as Hal G. Prillaman Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Maury Nussbaum, professor of industrial and systems engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been reappointed as the Hal G. Prillaman Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  20. Recent advances towards an International Year of Planet Earth——A letter to fellow geoscientist

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.J. de Mulder

    2006-01-01

    @@ Dear fellow geoscientist, I write to draw your attention to recent advances towards an International Year of Planet Earth, which is a joint initiative of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) and UNESCO.

  1. Frank Gwazdauskas honored with the American Dairy Science Association Fellow Award

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, Lori A.

    2008-01-01

    Frank C. Gwazdauskas of Blacksburg, Va., the David and Margaret Lincicome Professor in the Department of Dairy Science in Virginia Tech's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, received the 2008 American Dairy Science Association (ADSA) Fellow Award.

  2. Perspectives of female medical faculty in Ethiopia on a leadership fellowship program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvach, Elizabeth; Yesehak, Bethlehem; Abebaw, Hiwot; Conniff, James; Busse, Heidi; Haq, Cynthia

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate a leadership fellowship program through perspectives of Ethiopian women medical faculty participants. An intensive two-week leadership development fellowship was designed for women faculty from Ethiopian medical schools and conducted from 2011-2015 at the University of Wisconsin-School of Medicine and Public Health in Madison, Wisconsin. Nine Ethiopian women working in early- or mid-level academic positions were selected. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the fellows. Transcripts were reviewed through qualitative analysis to assess the perceived impact of the training on their careers. Three male academic leaders were interviewed to solicit feedback on the program. Eight of 9 fellows were interviewed. Themes describing the benefits of the fellowship included: increased awareness of gender inequities; enhanced motivation for career advancement; increased personal confidence; and improved leadership skills. Fellows provided suggestions for future training and scaling up efforts to promote gender equity. Male leaders described the benefits of men promoting gender equity within academic health centers. This paper provides evidence that targeted brief training programs can enhance women's motivation and skills to become effective leaders in academic medicine in Ethiopia. Promoting gender equity in academic medicine is an important strategy to address health workforce shortages and to provide professional role models for female students in the health professions.

  3. Graduate Medical Education in Humanism and Professionalism: A Needs Assessment Survey of Pediatric Gastroenterology Fellows

    OpenAIRE

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Kesselheim, Jennifer C.; Herrick, Daniel B; WOOLF, Alan D.; Leichtner, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The deterioration of humanism and professionalism during graduate medical training is an acknowledged concern, and programs are required to provide professionalism education for pediatric fellows. We conducted a needs assessment survey in a national sample of 138 first- and second-year gastroenterology fellows (82% response rate). Most believed that present humanism and professionalism education met their needs, but this education was largely informal (eg, role modeling). Areas for formal edu...

  4. Clinical performance and skill retention after simulation-based education for nephrology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahya, Shubhada N; Barsuk, Jeffrey H; Cohen, Elaine R; Tuazon, Jennifer; McGaghie, William C; Wayne, Diane B

    2012-07-01

    We previously demonstrated that simulation-based education (SBE) improved temporary hemodialysis catheter (THDC) insertion skills by nephrology fellows. SBE, featuring deliberate practice and rigorous achievement standards, was a powerful method to enhance THDC insertion skills in nephrology fellows. However, experts have called for further research to evaluate skill transfer from the simulated environment to actual clinical care and skill retention. This is a prospective observational cohort study of THDC insertion skills. Twelve nephrology fellows from three academic centers in Chicago were evaluated using a skills checklist from July 2008 to June 2009. Simulator-trained fellows were tested after the SBE intervention and expected to meet or exceed a minimum passing score (MPS) set by an expert panel. To assess transfer of skill to clinical care, three simulator-trained fellows were assessed at 6 months on actual patient THDC insertions using the checklist. To assess retention of skill, 11 of 12 simulator-trained fellows were reassessed at 1 year using the checklist and central venous catheter simulator. Outcomes were determined by THDC insertion skill performance. Simulator-trained fellows scored similarly during 6-month THDC insertions on actual patients and immediate posttest (M = 86.2%, SD = 22.3% vs. M = 93.5%, SD = 5.3%, p = 0.32). However, 1 year after SBE, simulated THDC insertion scores were significantly lower than at immediate posttest (M = 73.4%, SD = 22.2% vs. M = 93.5%, SD = 5.3%, p = 0.01). Our results show that nephrology fellows who completed SBE displayed high levels of performance during THDC insertions on actual patients 6 months later. At 1 year, there was statistically significant skills decay. We recommend booster training at 6 months.

  5. The Health Professions Education Pathway: Preparing Students, Residents, and Fellows to Become Future Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H Carrie; Wamsley, Maria A; Azzam, Amin; Julian, Katherine; Irby, David M; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2017-01-01

    Training the next generation of health professionals requires leaders, innovators, and scholars in education. Although many medical schools and residencies offer education electives or tracks focused on developing teaching skills, these programs often omit educational innovation, scholarship, and leadership and are narrowly targeted to one level of learner. The University of California San Francisco created the Health Professions Education Pathway for medical students, residents, and fellows as well as learners from other health professional schools. The Pathway applies the theoretical framework of communities of practice in its curricular design to promote learner identity formation as future health professions educators. It employs the strategies of engagement, imagination, and alignment for identity formation. Through course requirements, learners engage and work with members of the educator community of practice to develop the knowledge and skills required to participate in the community. Pathway instructors are faculty members who model a breadth of educator careers to help learners imagine personal trajectories. Last, learners complete mentored education projects, adopting scholarly methods and ethics to align with the broader educator community of practice. From 2009 to 2014, 117 learners participated in the Pathway. Program evaluations, graduate surveys, and web-based searches revealed positive impacts on learner career development. Learners gained knowledge and skills for continued engagement with the educator community of practice, confirmed their career aspirations (imagination), joined an educator-in-training community (engagement/imagination), and disseminated via scholarly meetings and peer-reviewed publications (alignment). Learners identified engagement with the learner community as the most powerful aspect of the Pathway; it provided peer support for imagining and navigating the development of their dual identities in the clinician and educator

  6. Burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being among US neurology residents and fellows in 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Kerry H; Shanafelt, Tait D; Keran, Christopher M; Busis, Neil A; Foster, Laura A; Molano, Jennifer Rose V; O'Donovan, Cormac A; Ratliff, Jeffrey B; Schwarz, Heidi B; Sloan, Jeff A; Cascino, Terrence L

    2017-08-01

    To study prevalence of and factors contributing to burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being in US neurology residents and fellows. A total of 938 US American Academy of Neurology member neurology residents and fellows were surveyed using standardized measures of burnout, career satisfaction, and well-being from January 19 to March 21, 2016. Response rate was 37.7% (354/938); about 2/3 of responders were residents and 1/3 were fellows. Median age of participants was 32 years and 51.1% were female. Seventy-three percent of residents and 55% of fellows had at least one symptom of burnout, the difference largely related to higher scores for depersonalization among residents. For residents, greater satisfaction with work-life balance, meaning in work, and older age were associated with lower risk of burnout; for fellows, greater satisfaction with work-life balance and effective support staff were associated with lower risk of burnout. Trainees experiencing burnout were less likely to report career satisfaction. Career satisfaction was more likely among those reporting meaning in work and more likely for those working in the Midwest compared with the Northeast region. Burnout is common in neurology residents and fellows. Lack of work-life balance and lack of meaning in work were associated with reduced career satisfaction and increased risk of burnout. These results should inform approaches to reduce burnout and promote career satisfaction and well-being in US neurology trainees. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Renal Ultrasound, Dialysis Catheter Placement, and Kidney Biopsy Experience of US Nephrology Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Mala; Ross, Daniel W; Shah, Hitesh H

    2016-08-01

    Procedures are a key component to the practice of nephrology. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires nephrology fellows to acquire skills and demonstrate competency in the performance of several procedures during fellowship training, including temporary hemodialysis catheter placement, biopsy of native and transplanted kidneys, and various dialytic therapies. It is also required that fellows acquire competency in the interpretation of renal imaging, including renal ultrasound, during their training. To gain a more recent perspective of nephrology fellows' experiences regarding renal ultrasonography, dialysis catheter placement, and kidney biopsies, we carried out a national survey of nephrology fellows in May 2014. A majority of the programs did not offer formal clinical training in renal ultrasonography. In addition, a significant percentage of fellows in adult nephrology may not be acquiring the required procedural skills and competency during fellowship training. In this perspective, we explore some of the reasons for this occurrence and propose some measures that the nephrology training community can take to enhance procedural skills and competency of fellows. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1985. [Space Stations and Their Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilton, R. G. (Editor); Williams, C. E. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    The 1985 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Research Program was conducted by Texas A&M University and the Johnson Space Center. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The faculty fellows spent the time at JSC engaged in research projects commensurate with their interests and background and worked in collaboration with NASA/JSC colleagues. This document is a compilation of the final reports of their research during the summer of 1985.

  9. Implementing Faculty Professional Development: The Product-Based Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ireh, Madu; Bell, Ed

    This report suggests that teacher education faculty must have opportunities to learn about technology and infuse it into the teacher education curriculum, noting the importance of identifying and designing meaningful technology applications to enhance student learning in the academic disciplines and make clear that technology is for everyone. The…

  10. Accuracy of remote chest X-ray interpretation using Google Glass technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaedy, Emily; Christakopoulos, Georgios E; Tarar, Muhammad Nauman J; Christopoulos, Georgios; Rangan, Bavana V; Roesle, Michele; Ochoa, Cristhiaan D; Yarbrough, William; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2016-09-15

    We sought to explore the accuracy of remote chest X-ray reading using hands-free, wearable technology (Google Glass, Google, Mountain View, California). We compared interpretation of twelve chest X-rays with 23 major cardiopulmonary findings by faculty and fellows from cardiology, radiology, and pulmonary-critical care via: (1) viewing the chest X-ray image on the Google Glass screen; (2) viewing a photograph of the chest X-ray taken using Google Glass and interpreted on a mobile device; (3) viewing the original chest X-ray on a desktop computer screen. One point was given for identification of each correct finding and a subjective rating of user experience was recorded. Fifteen physicians (5 faculty and 10 fellows) participated. The average chest X-ray reading score (maximum 23 points) as viewed through the Google Glass, Google Glass photograph on a mobile device, and the original X-ray viewed on a desktop computer was 14.1±2.2, 18.5±1.5 and 21.3±1.7, respectively (pGoogle Glass and mobile device, pGoogle Glass and desktop computer and p=0.0004 between mobile device and desktop computer). Of 15 physicians, 11 (73.3%) felt confident in detecting findings using the photograph taken by Google Glass as viewed on a mobile device. Remote chest X-ray interpretation using hands-free, wearable technology (Google Glass) is less accurate than interpretation using a desktop computer or a mobile device, suggesting that further technical improvements are needed before widespread application of this novel technology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Breaking through the glass ceiling: a survey of promotion rates of graduates of a primary care Faculty Development Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mindy A; Barry, Henry C; Dunn, Ruth Ann; Keefe, Carole; Weismantel, David

    2006-01-01

    Academic promotion has been difficult for women and faculty of minority race. We investigated whether completion of a faculty development fellowship would equalize promotion rates of female and minority graduates to those of male and white graduates. All graduates of the Michigan State University Primary Care Faculty Development Fellowship Program from 1989-1998 were sent a survey in 1999, which included questions about academic status and appointment. We compared application and follow-up survey data by gender and race/ethnicity. Telephone calls were made to nonrespondents. A total of 175 (88%) graduating fellows responded to the follow-up survey. Information on academic rank at entry and follow-up was obtained from 28 of 48 fellows with missing information on promotion. Male and female graduates achieved similar academic promotion at follow-up, but there was a trend toward lower promotion rates for minority faculty graduates compared to white graduates. In the multivariate analysis, however, only age, years in rank, initial rank, and type of appointment (academic versus clinical) were significant factors for promotion. Academic advancement is multifactorial and appears most related to time in rank, stage of life, and career choice. Faculty development programs may be most useful in providing skill development and career counseling.

  12. Using lecture capture: a qualitative study of nursing faculty's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Patricia E; Bertram, Julie E; McLaughlin, Dorcas E

    2014-04-01

    As lecture capture technology becomes widely available in schools of nursing, faculty will need to master new technological skills and make decisions about recording their classroom lectures or other activities. This study sought to understand faculty's experience of using a new lecture capture system. This qualitative study used Kruger's systematic approach to explore undergraduate nursing faculty's first-time experience using a lecture capture system purchased by the university. Four focus groups were conducted with a total of fourteen undergraduate faculty using lecture capture for the first-time. The interviews were recorded and transcribed and then analyzed by the researchers. Four themes were identified from the faculty interviews. Two of the themes expressed faculty's concerns about the teaching role, and two themes expressed the faculty's concerns about student learning. Participants experienced stress when learning to use the new lecture capture technology and struggled to resolve it with their own beliefs and teaching values. The impact of lecture capture on student learning, impact on class attendance, and the promotion of a culture of lecturing were revealed as important issues to consider when lecture capture becomes available. © 2013.

  13. Fulbright scholar international teaching and research opportunities for veterinary faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Mushtaq A; Garrison, Gary; Mashima, Ted Y; Chaddock, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The Fulbright program was established by the US Congress to "enable the government of the United States to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries." The Core Fulbright Scholar Program sends more than 800 US faculty and administrators to 125 countries to lecture or conduct research around the world each year. Unfortunately, only 28 faculty members from the US veterinary colleges have used Fulbright Scholar opportunities in the last 20 years (1989-2009). Considering recent worldwide events, such as the global dispersion of the Asian strain of highly pathogenic avian influenza and pandemic H1N1 2009 affecting human and animal species, the importance of awareness and education of veterinarians to such global issues is obviously urgent. Therefore, Fulbright scholarships represent an important opportunity to gain experience and bring this time-critical information back to fellow faculty and students. Veterinarians who wish to contribute to internationalization of the curricula and their campuses should consider applying for Fulbright Scholar support to launch their career in this pivotal direction. For details about the Fulbright Scholar Program, eligibility, and application procedures, please visit cies.org/us_scholars/>.

  14. Mentoring Faculty: Results from National Science Foundation's ADVANCE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty mentoring programs are common components of National Science Foundation ADVANCE awards. The ADVANCE program aims to increase the number of women on the faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) departments through grants to individuals and to entire institutions. These grants target a change in institutional culture so that faculty from non-majority groups will succeed and thrive. Mentoring programs are generally designed to fit the particular institution(s) or target population (e.g., meteorologists at the beginning of their careers). A successful mentoring program makes the implicit knowledge necessary for faculty success explicit: policies and practices are made transparent; routes for finding answers are clarified or generated with faculty input; faculty overcome a sense of isolation and develop a community. Mentoring programs may be formal, with assigned mentors and mentees, or informal, with opportunities for beginning, middle and advanced career STEM faculty to mingle, generally over food and sometimes with a formal speaker. The programs are formally evaluated; in general, attention to mentoring generates better outcomes for all faculty. Research indicates that most successful scientists have a network of mentors rather than relying on one person to help navigate department, institution, and profession. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's (UNL) award, ADVANCE-Nebraska, offered opportunities for faculty to informally network over luncheons with women speakers, advanced in their careers. We also offered after-hours networking receptions. In response to faculty feedback, we shifted to a series of panel discussions entitled "Conversations". Most panels were conducted by successful UNL faculty; about one-third had an outside expert on a given topic. Topics were chosen based on faculty feedback and targeted specifically to beginning faculty (How to Start Up a Lab; How to Balance Teaching and Writing), mid-career faculty (Putting

  15. University of Arizona's Collaboration to Advance Teaching Technology and Science (CATTS): lesson for photonics education collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall-Wallace, Michelle; Regens, Nancy L.; Pompea, Stephen M.

    2002-05-01

    CATTS is a National Science Foundation-funded partnership between the University of Arizona and local school districts to improve science, mathematics and technology teaching at all levels. The goals of the CATTS Program are to develop sustainable partnerships with Kindergarten through 12th grade level (K-12) educators that foster integration of science, mathematics, engineering and technology research in classroom learning experiences. The program also creates opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students to be active participants in K-12 education by providing training and fellowships. CATTS seeks to foster effective teaching and a greater understanding of learning at all levels. School districts and University of Arizona outreach programs propose fellowship activities that address identified educational needs; they work together with CATTS to create customized programs to meet those needs. CATTS Fellows, their faculty mentors and K - 12 partners participate in workshops to gain experience with inquiry-based teaching and understanding diverse learning styles. In the partnership, CATTS Fellows have an opportunity to share their research experiences with K - 12 educators and gain experience with inquiry teaching. On the other side of the partnership, professional educators share their knowledge of teaching with Fellows and gain deeper understanding of scientific inquiry. In the two years that this NSF funded program has been in operation, a variety of lessons have been learned that can apply to school, university, and industrial partnerships to foster education and training. In particular since each organization operates in its own subculture, particular attention must be paid to raising cultural awareness among the participants in ways that foster mutual respect and communication of shared goals. Proper coordination and sensible logistics are also critical for the success of a complex project such as this. Training of the partners and the project

  16. Learner-Centered Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To maximize their effectiveness, faculty developers should not merely advocate for an active learning approach but also enact it in their own workshops and service-oriented interactions with faculty, even extending to their use of outreach and social media.

  17. Contingent Faculty as Nonideal Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kezar, Adrianna; Bernstein-Sierra, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores how contingent faculty address the issue of work and family and demonstrates the importance of understanding the diversity of contingent faculty experiences and of underemployment rather than notions of the ideal worker to explain their work lives.

  18. Learner-Centered Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    To maximize their effectiveness, faculty developers should not merely advocate for an active learning approach but also enact it in their own workshops and service-oriented interactions with faculty, even extending to their use of outreach and social media.

  19. The Paradox of Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minter, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the weaknesses in university faculty development efforts when compared with corporate professional development practices. Suggestions are offered to think of faculty development as a process rather than as isolated development activities.

  20. [Man and his fellow-creatures under ethical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teutsch

    1999-01-01

    to animals presented in such completeness and thoroughness, together with the distance and objectivity originating in the legal stance. The book is of invaluable significance in particular for the commentators of the German animal protection law as amended in 1998: For the first time, they are now in a position to draw from an abundance of facts and evaluations relevant to animal protection. It appears as a fortunate circumstance in this context, that not only the traditional Lorz-commentary is being continued (Albert Lorz and Ernst Metzger: "Tierschutzgesetz" [Animal Protection Law], commentary, 5th edition) but also a completely new commentary is being developed by the team of Hans Georg Kluge, ed., Antoine F. Goetschel, Jörg Hartung, Eisenhart von Loeper, Jost Dietrich Ort and Kerstin Reckwell: "Kommentar zum Tierschutzgesetz" (Commentary to the Animal Protection Law). "Moral Status" is not only the title of an important investigation by Mary Anne Warren (in the introductory chapter she describes and evaluates the basics of the Status-discussion to date) but also a topic singularly dominating the scientific discourse. Out of rejection or reservation regarding the biocentrical position of Albert Schweitzer or Paul W. Taylor, time after time new restricting concepts have been introduced. In the same way, the criterion of the ability to suffer as developed by Bentham was considered by some as too far reaching. In considering animals ethically the line can be drawn so tightly that, aside from apes and maybe some large marine mammals, the whole of the animal kingdom can be degraded to at best, the ecological worthy resources of man; and all this without being suspected of an adversary position to animal protection. At times, the impression arises that science is seeking and finding ever new hurdles in order to keep the number of morally considered fellow-creatures as small as possible. Following common opinion, even animals with moral status are only entitled to

  1. Faculty-Librarian Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Renee

    1997-01-01

    A survey was designed to foster collaborative development of instructional strategies between education faculty and librarians at a state institution in California. Strategies from the survey results were utilized in developing instructional programs to teach education students information retrieval skills needed to access information from…

  2. Where Are the Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoskins, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses how faculty members feel about the growth and quality of distance, distributed, and online higher education. The twenty-first century university must innovate to survive as the Internet becomes the dominant source of knowledge and learning. The twenty-first century student connects with information differently than earlier…

  3. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  4. Faculty Demand in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Danielle

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the factors that shift the demand curve for faculty at not-for-profit private institutions. It is unique in that to the author's knowledge no other study has directly addressed the question of how the positive correlation between average faculty salaries and faculty-student ratios can be reconciled with…

  5. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  6. Colgate University Faculty Handbook, 1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgate Univ., Hamilton, NY.

    Designed to supplement the university catalog and handbook, this 1970 faculty handbook is primarily for the information and guidance of new members of the faculty. The community is described, and university organization and campus governance outlined. Specific details are reported on various topics, including: faculty use of college facilities,…

  7. Mentoring and Pretenure Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Alan A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The University of British Columbia (Canada) Dental School uses teaching and research mentors for new faculty, together with a structured semiannual review process, to clearly identify faculty expectations for tenure. Pretenure faculty have appreciated the clear and regular input concerning their progress, and mentors enjoy the interaction with…

  8. Faculty Development: The American Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Peter

    A growing movement to improve the quality of teaching has been called "faculty development." It is based on three assumptions: the primary professional activity of most faculty is teaching; instructional behaviors are learned skills, attitudes, and goals; and faculty can be taught how to improve their classroom performance. Interest in faculty…

  9. Faculty Perspectives on Administrator Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bess, James L.

    The sources of faculty perspectives on the personal effectiveness of administrators are analyzed. It is proposed that faculty will be predisposed to see administrators in different lights, depending on structural elements in decision making and the orientation of the faculty members. Attention is directed to Talcott Parson's theory for classifying…

  10. Faculty and medical student attitudes about preclinical classroom attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazulia, Allyson R; Goldhoff, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have diminished reliance on classroom attendance for mastering preclinical medical school course content, but nonattendance may have unintended consequence on the learning environment. Perceptions among educators and students regarding the value of attendance and implications of nonattendance have not been systematically studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in medical student and faculty attitudes regarding preclinical classroom attendance and the impact of nonattendance on educators and the learning environment. Using Internet-based surveys, we assessed attitudes about preclinical classroom attendance among medical students and teaching faculty at Washington University School of Medicine. Our primary hypothesis was that students would be less likely than faculty to place societal value on attendance and relate it to professionalism. A total of 382 (79%) of 484 eligible students and 248 (64%) of 387 eligible faculty completed the survey. Both groups recognized a negative impact of poor attendance on faculty enthusiasm for teaching (students 83%, faculty 75%), but faculty were significantly more likely to endorse a negative impact on effectiveness of lectures (75% vs. 42%, pattendance and professionalism (88% vs. 68%, plecture videos an adequate substitute for attendance (70% vs. 15%, pimportant functions in the professional socialization process. In this single-center cohort, medical student and teaching faculty attitudes differed regarding the importance of classroom attendance and its relationship to professionalism, findings that were at least partially explained by differing expectations of the purpose of the preclinical classroom experience.

  11. Assessment of email communication skills of rheumatology fellows: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuper, Sonal; Siva, Chokkalingam; Fresen, John L; Petruc, Marius; Velázquez, Celso R

    2010-01-01

    Physician–patient email communication is gaining popularity. However, a formal assessment of physicians' email communication skills has not been described. We hypothesized that the email communication skills of rheumatology fellows can be measured in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) setting using a novel email content analysis instrument which has 18 items. During an OSCE, we asked 50 rheumatology fellows to respond to a simulated patient email. The content of the responses was assessed using our instrument. The majority of rheumatology fellows wrote appropriate responses scoring a mean (±SD) of 10.6 (±2.6) points (maximum score 18), with high inter-rater reliability (0.86). Most fellows were concise (74%) and courteous (68%) but not formal (22%). Ninety-two percent of fellows acknowledged that the patient's condition required urgent medical attention, but only 30% took active measures to contact the patient. No one encrypted their messages. The objective assessment of email communication skills is possible using simulated emails in an OSCE setting. The variable email communication scores and incidental patient safety gaps identified, suggest a need for further training and defined proficiency standards for physicians' email communication skills. PMID:20962134

  12. Assessment of email communication skills of rheumatology fellows: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Mayank K; Dhuper, Sonal; Siva, Chokkalingam; Fresen, John L; Petruc, Marius; Velázquez, Celso R

    2010-01-01

    Physician-patient email communication is gaining popularity. However, a formal assessment of physicians' email communication skills has not been described. We hypothesized that the email communication skills of rheumatology fellows can be measured in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) setting using a novel email content analysis instrument which has 18 items. During an OSCE, we asked 50 rheumatology fellows to respond to a simulated patient email. The content of the responses was assessed using our instrument. The majority of rheumatology fellows wrote appropriate responses scoring a mean (±SD) of 10.6 (±2.6) points (maximum score 18), with high inter-rater reliability (0.86). Most fellows were concise (74%) and courteous (68%) but not formal (22%). Ninety-two percent of fellows acknowledged that the patient's condition required urgent medical attention, but only 30% took active measures to contact the patient. No one encrypted their messages. The objective assessment of email communication skills is possible using simulated emails in an OSCE setting. The variable email communication scores and incidental patient safety gaps identified, suggest a need for further training and defined proficiency standards for physicians' email communication skills.

  13. Professors online: The Internet’s impact on college faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Steve; Jones, Camille

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on findings from a nationwide survey of Internet use by U.S. college faculty. The survey asked about general Internet use, use of specific Internet technologies (e–mail, IM, Web, etc.), the Internet’s impact on teaching and research, its impact on faculty–student interactions, and about faculty perceptions of students’ Internet use. There is general optimism, though little evidence, about the Internet’s impacts on their professional lives. The findings show that institution...

  14. Faculty development needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Thomas K; Ferenchick, Gary S; Clark, Jeanne M; Bowen, Judith L; Branch, William T; Alguire, Patrick; Esham, Richard H; Clayton, Charles P; Kern, David E

    2004-04-01

    We compared prior training in 4 areas (general teaching skills, teaching specific content areas, teaching by specific methods and in specific settings, and general professional skills) among community-based teachers based in private practices (N = 61) compared with those in community sites operated by teaching institutions (N = 64) and hospital-based faculty (N = 291), all of whom attended one of three national faculty development conferences. The prevalence of prior training was low. Hospital-based faculty reported the most prior training in all 4 categories, teaching hospital affiliated community-based teachers an intermediate amount, and private practice community-based teachers the least (all P <.05). This association remained after multivariable adjustment for age, gender, and amount of time spent in teaching and clinical activities. Preferences for future training reported frequently by the private practice community-based teachers included: time management (48%); teaching evidence-based medicine (46%); evaluation of learners (38%); giving feedback (39%); outpatient precepting (38%); and "teaching in the presence of the patient" (39%).

  15. The writing retreat: a high-yield clinical faculty development opportunity in academic writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cable, Christian T; Boyer, Debra; Colbert, Colleen Y; Boyer, Edward W

    2013-06-01

    The need for consistent academic productivity challenges junior clinician-scholars, who often lack the aptitude to ensure efficient production of manuscripts. To solve this problem, an academic division of a major medical center developed an off-site writing retreat. The purpose of the retreat was not to teach writing skills, but to offer senior mentor assistance with a focus on the elements of manuscript writing. The retreat paired senior faculty members with junior staff. Senior faculty identified manuscript topics and provided real-time writing and editing supervision. Team-building exercises, midcourse corrections, and debriefing interviews were built into the retreat. The number of manuscripts and grant proposals generated during the 2008-2011 retreats was recorded, and the program was evaluated by using unstructured debriefing interviews. An average of 6 to 7 faculty members and fellows participated in each retreat. During the past 4 years, participants produced an average of 3 grant proposals and 7 manuscripts per retreat. After the writing retreat, each fellow and junior faculty member produced an average of 4 scholarly products per year, compared to fewer than 2 for prior years' retreats. Participant feedback indicated the success of the retreat resulted from protected time, direct mentorship by the scholars involved, and pairing of authors, which allows for rapid production of manuscripts and accelerated the editing process. More than 80% of mentors returned each year to participate. The writing retreat is a feasible, effective strategy to increase scholarship among faculty, acceptable to mentees and mentors, and sustainable over time.

  16. Attitudes and Knowledge of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Fellows Regarding Noninvasive Prenatal Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaney, Paul; Hardisty, Emily; Sayres, Lauren; Wiegand, Samantha; Vora, Neeta

    2016-02-01

    Using cell-free DNA in maternal serum to detect fetal aneuploidy has been shown to have high sensitivity and specificity. The purpose of this study was to assess attitudes and knowledge of Maternal-Fetal Medicine (MFM) fellows regarding noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). A 13 question survey was sent via listserv to US-based MFM fellows. One hundred sixteen fellows responded, a 42.3% response rate, with >75% reporting they are comfortable ordering NIPT. Most (82%) preferred that a patient discuss options with a provider or genetic counselor. Three common methods used to learn about NIPT were: formal educational activities (n = 78, 69%), self-review of the literature (n = 76, 67%), and discussions with peers (n = 73, 65%). On questions related to trisomy 21, accuracy was >70%. However, accuracy was lower regarding use in twin pregnancies (42%) and monosomy X screening (50%).

  17. Measuring pediatric hematology-oncology fellows' skills in humanism and professionalism: A novel assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Agrawal, Anurag K; Bhatia, Nita; Cronin, Angel; Jubran, Rima; Kent, Paul; Kersun, Leslie; Rao, Amulya Nageswara; Rose, Melissa; Savelli, Stephanie; Sharma, Mukta; Shereck, Evan; Twist, Clare J; Wang, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Educators in pediatric hematology-oncology lack rigorously developed instruments to assess fellows' skills in humanism and professionalism. We developed a novel 15-item self-assessment instrument to address this gap in fellowship training. Fellows (N = 122) were asked to assess their skills in five domains: balancing competing demands of fellowship, caring for the dying patient, confronting depression and burnout, responding to challenging relationships with patients, and practicing humanistic medicine. An expert focus group predefined threshold scores on the instrument that could be used as a cutoff to identify fellows who need support. Reliability and feasibility were assessed and concurrent validity was measured using three established instruments: Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Flourishing Scale (FS), and Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE). For 90 participating fellows (74%), the self-assessment proved feasible to administer and had high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's α = 0.81). It was moderately correlated with the FS and MBI (Pearson's r = 0.41 and 0.4, respectively) and weakly correlated with the JSPE (Pearson's r = 0.15). Twenty-eight fellows (31%) were identified as needing support. The self-assessment had a sensitivity of 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 31-69) and a specificity of 77% (95% CI: 65-87) for identifying fellows who scored poorly on at least one of the three established scales. We developed a novel assessment instrument for use in pediatric fellowship training. The new scale proved feasible and demonstrated internal consistency reliability. Its moderate correlation with other established instruments shows that the novel assessment instrument provides unique, nonredundant information as compared to existing scales. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A Nephrology Fellows' Communication Skills Course: An Educational Quality Improvement Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Robert A; Jackson, Vicki A; Norwich, Diana; Schell, Jane O; Schaefer, Kristen; Ship, Amy N; Sullivan, Amy M

    2016-08-01

    Nephrology fellows need expertise navigating challenging conversations with patients throughout the course of advanced kidney disease. However, evidence shows that nephrologists receive inadequate training in this area. This study assessed the effectiveness of an educational quality improvement intervention designed to enhance fellows' communication with patients who have advanced kidney disease. Quality improvement project. Full-day annual workshops (2013-2014) using didactics, discussion, and practice with simulated patients. Content focused on delivering bad news, acknowledging emotion, discussing care goals in dialysis decision making when prognosis is uncertain, and addressing dialysis therapy withdrawal and end of life. Participants were first-year nephrology fellows from 2 Harvard-affiliated training programs (N=26). Study assessed the effectiveness of an intervention designed to enhance fellows' communication skills. Primary outcomes were changes in self-reported patient communication skills, attitudes, and behaviors related to discussing disease progression, prognostic uncertainty, dialysis therapy withdrawal, treatments not indicated, and end of life; responding to emotion; eliciting patient goals and values; and incorporating patient goals into recommendations. Surveys measured prior training, pre- and postcourse perceived changes in skills and values, and reported longer term (3-month) changes in communication behaviors, using both closed- and open-ended items. Response rates were 100% (pre- and postsurveys) and 68% (follow-up). Participants reported improvement in all domains, with an overall mean increase of 1.1 (summed average scores: precourse, 2.8; postcourse, 3.9 [1-5 scale; 5 = "extremely well prepared"]; Pskills taught, such as "Ask-Tell-Ask" and using open-ended questions. Self-reported data may overestimate actual changes; small sample size and the programs' affiliation with a single medical school may limit generalizability. A day

  19. American Society for Engineering Education/NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1982

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1983-01-01

    A program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators is described. The program involves participation in cooperative research and study. Results of the program evaluation are summarized. The research fellows indicated satisfaction with the program. Benefits of the program cited include: (1) enhancement of professional abilities; (2) contact with professionals in a chosen area of research; (3) familiarity with research facilities; and (4) development of new research techniques and their adaptation to an academic setting. Abstracts of each of the research projects undertaken are presented.

  20. Overcoming Barriers for eLearning in Universities--Portfolio Models for eCompetence Development of Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneckenberg, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the role that eCompetence of faculty members play in the integration of eLearning in higher education. Learning technologies have the potential to enhance educational innovation, but the eLearning adoption rate of faculty in universities is so far disappointing. The motivation and capability of faculty to use information and…

  1. Fellow Eye Macular Edema Improvement after Intravitreal Bevacizumab for Radiation Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isis A. S. Brito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation retinopathy (RR is a progressive, chronic condition directly related to the amount of radiation administered to the retina. We report a 37-year-old patient with medulloblastoma that was treated with external beam radiation and presented to us with bilateral cystoid macular edema. He was treated with monthly bevacizumab injections only in his worst seeing eye. There was a significant improvement in his fellow eye, with marked retinal thickness reduction. Therefore, we present clinical evidence of systemic absorption and fellow eye activity of the drug (bevacizumab. One must be aware of distant side effects after intravitreal injections.

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program - 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerot, Richard B. (Editor); Sickorez, Donn G. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The 2000 Johnson Space Center (JSC) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of the ASEE. The program at JSC, as well as the programs at other NASA Centers, was funded by the Office of University Affairs, NASA Headquarters, Washington, D.C. The objectives of the program, which began in 1965 at JSC and 1964 nationally, are to (1) further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty, (2) stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA, (3) enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions, and (4) contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent at least 10 weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with her/his interests and background, and worked in collabroation with a NASA/JSC colleague. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 2000.

  3. IDENTIFICACIÓN DE RIESGOS AMBIENTALES EN EL LABORATORIO DE RADIOQUÍMICA DE LA FACULTAD DE CIENCIAS Y TECNOLOGÍAS NUCLEARES / IDENTIFICATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL RISKS IN THE RADIOCHEMISTRY LABORATORY OF THE FACULTY OF SCIENCE AND NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlen Mabel Lastre-Acosta

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Organizaciones de todo tipo están cada vez más interesadas en alcanzar y demostrar un sostenido desempeño ambiental mediante el control de los riesgos de sus actividades, productos y servicios sobre el ambiente. La presente investigación tiene como objetivo identificar los riesgos ambientales en el Laboratorio de Radioquímica de la Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnologías Nucleares (FCTN, permitiéndole a la organización evaluar, controlar, minimizar y/o eliminar dichos riesgos asociados al ambiente en el laboratorio. Para ello se realizó un diagnóstico ambiental de la situación actual del laboratorio y seguidamente se realizó la evaluación de los riesgos ambientales detectados mediante el Procedimiento de Gestión de Riesgos Integrados. Finalmente se proponen medidas para minimizar los riesgos ambientales significativos.

    Abstract

    Organizations of all kinds are more and more interested in reaching and demonstrating a sustainable environmental performance by means of the control of the risks of their activities, products and services on the environment. The main purpose of the present investigation is to identify the environmental risks in the Radiochemistry Laboratory of the Faculty of Science and Nuclear Technologies (FCTN, allowing the organization to evaluate, to control, to minimize and/or to eliminate the environmental associated risks at the laboratory. In order to achieve such purpose, it was carried out an environmental diagnosis of the current situation of the laboratory and afterwards, it was made the evaluation of the environmental risks detected by means of the Managerial Procedure of Integrated Risks. There were also set out measures to diminish significant environmental risks.

  4. Application of Robotic Surgery in the treatment of endometriosis: View point of an Indian OBGYN fellow in USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kavita Ramavath

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article is an observational experience of robotic surgery in USA by an Indian Obgyn fellow. Primary objective is to analyze retrospectively peri operative outcomes in stage 2 and 3 Endometriosis treated with robot assisted laparoscopy. Secondary objective is to report an Indian Obgyn, Physician observer fellows experience in USA with Robotic surgery. Methods: 29 women underwent robotic surgery at in the department of gynecology at Doctor's hospital, Baptist health, Miami. Pre-op time, console time, total operative time, blood loss, peri-operative complications noted. Results: Mean age is 42 +/- 8 years with BMI of 26.2 +/- 8 kg/m2. Eighteen patients (62% were age 40 and above. Twenty patients (69% presented with chronic pelvic pain. Dyspareunia in 16 (55.2%, bloating in five (17.2% and pelvic mass in thirteen (44.8% Unilateral pelvic mass in nine patients (31 % and bilateral in four patients (13.8%. CA 125 levels are elevated in nine patients (31% and significantly higher with endometriomas (76.1 +/- 49.2 U/ml. 38% underwent robot assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy and BSO. 14.8% underwent robot assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy with Robot (LSO/RSO. Mean operative time 64.7 min. Mean blood loss 40 ml. Conclusions: Robotic surgery is safe, with minimal blood loss and shorter hospital stay. Alike in the surgical techniques, though diverse in the work infrastructure and technology, East and West have common scenarios which can be tackled with exchange of training opportunities. This interchange of knowledge and skills will benefit patients with increased surgeon's efficiency. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(1.000: 202-209

  5. Junior faculty core curriculum to enhance faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, Ronnie; Holloway, Robert G; Gross, Robert A; Libby, Katie; Shapiro, Janine R

    2017-04-01

    Senior Instructors and Assistant Professors in their first academic appointment may not have all the tools for an efficient start to their careers. Although many institutions provide access to mentoring programs and seminars on faculty development, the timing and format of the offerings often conflict with ongoing responsibilities of the faculty, particularly clinical faculty. We established a collaboration between the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) and the University of Rochester Medical Center Office for Faculty Development with the goal of developing a week-long Junior Faculty Core Curriculum that would better suit faculty schedules. We convened focus groups and with their help, identified themes for inclusion in the course. Speakers were identified from among local senior faculty. University leadership was enlisted in promoting the course. Individual speakers and course content were evaluated daily, at the end of the week-long course, and 6 months later. Planning for subsequent years incorporated the feedback. Yearly evaluations and subsequent course modification continued. Junior faculty from nearly every department in the Medical Center were represented. There was high learner satisfaction and participation however several limitations were identified and addressed in subsequent years. The focus on principles and available resources, not specific skills or content was appropriate. Daily interactions among participants from a wide variety of departments fostered networking among faculty who may not otherwise have met and discussed common interests. The ultimate value of such an early, intensive faculty development program will depend on whether it equips junior faculty to organize, develop, and achieve their academic goals better than alternative formats. This will require further study.

  6. A decade of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy training: Time-based metrics and qualitative grading for fellows and residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altok, Muammer; Achim, Mary F; Matin, Surena F; Pettaway, Curtis A; Chapin, Brian F; Davis, John W

    2017-09-27

    As modern urology residency and fellowship training in robot-assisted surgery evolves toward standardized curricula (didactics, dry/wet-laboratory exercises, and surgical assistance), additional tools are needed to evaluate on-console performance. At the start of our robotics program in 2006, we set-up a time- and quality-based evaluation program and aim to consolidate this data into a simple set of metrics for self-evaluation. Using our index procedure of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP), we prospectively collected data on 2,215 cases over 10 years from 6 faculty surgeons and 94 trainees (43 urologic oncology fellows and 51 urology residents). The steps of the operation were divided into 11 consistent steps, and the metrics included time to completion and quality using a 6-level grading system. Time metrics were consolidated into quartiles for benchmarking. The median times for trainees to complete each step were 15% to 120% higher than those of the staff (Pstaff results. Steps performed by trainees were carefully chosen for a high success rate, and on our Likert-like scale were graded 4 to 5 in more than 95% of cases. There were no grade 0 (very poor) cases, and grades 1 (multiple technical errors) and 2 (could not be completed but without safety issues) were rare (staff. As a trainee progress through a rotation, these benchmarks can assist in prioritizing the need for more attention to a basic step vs. progression to more advanced steps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosler, E. Ramon (Editor); Valdes, Carol (Editor); Brown, Tom (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This document is a collection of technical reports on research conducted by the participants in the 1993 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program at KSC. The basic common objectives of the Program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA centers. 1993 topics include wide band fiber optic communications, a prototype expert/information system for examining environmental risks of KSC activities, alternatives to premise wiring using ATM and microcellular technologies, rack insertion end effector (RIEE) automation, FTIR quantification of industrial hydraulic fluids in perchloroethylene, switch configuration for migration to optical fiber network, and more.

  8. 2012 APPA Fellow Encourages Colleagues to Say Yes to Opportunities to Serve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler-Carter, Ruth E.

    2012-01-01

    It should be no surprise that the 2012 APPA Fellow is William (Bill) Elvey, P.E., FMP. He has served the association from the grassroots level up through its highest ranks and created a still-continuing legacy of excellence and engagement--his theme when serving as APPA President--that has led to new services, programs, and partnerships for the…

  9. Perceptions, attitudes, and experiences of hematology/oncology fellows toward incorporating geriatrics in their training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Ronald J; Gorawara-Bhat, Rita; Levine, Stacie K; Dale, William

    2014-01-01

    The aging of the U.S. population continues to highlight emerging issues in providing care generally for older adults and specifically for older adults with cancer. The majority of patients with cancer in the U.S. are currently 65 years of age or older; therefore, training and research in geriatrics and geriatric oncology are viewed to be integral in meeting the needs of this vulnerable population. Yet, the ways to develop and integrate best geriatrics training within the context of hematology/oncology fellowship remain unclear. Toward this end, the current study seeks to evaluate the prior and current geriatric experiences and perspectives of hematology/oncology fellows. To gain insight into these experiences, focus groups of hematology/oncology fellows were conducted. Emergent themes included: 1) perceived lack of formal geriatric oncology didactics among fellows; 2) a considerable amount of variability exists in pre-fellowship geriatric experiences; 3) shared desire to participate in a geriatric oncology-based clinic; 4) differences across training levels in confidence in managing older adults with cancer; and 5) identification of specific criteria on how best to approach older adults with cancer in a particular clinical scenario. The present findings will help guide future studies in evaluating geriatrics among hematology/oncology fellows across institutions. They will also have implications in the development of geriatrics curricula and competencies specific to hematology/oncology training. © 2013.

  10. Teach For America/Teaching Fellows and Effective Teaching in Secondary Math

    OpenAIRE

    Melissa Clark

    2013-01-01

    Secondary math teachers from Teach For America are more effective than other math teachers in the same schools; secondary math teachers from Teaching Fellows programs are as effective as, and in some cases more effective than, other math teachers in the same schools.

  11. Resources and Practices to Help Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Fellows Write Statements of Teaching Philosophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Katherine D.; Sullivan, Carol Subino

    2011-01-01

    Students and postdoctoral fellows currently encounter requests for a statement of teaching philosophy in at least half of academic job announcements in the United States. A systematic process for the development of a teaching statement is required that integrates multiple sources of support, informs writers of the document's purpose and audience,…

  12. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  13. Geriatric Medicine Fellows' Experiences and Attitudes toward an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagri, Anita S.; Zaw, Khin M.; Milanez, Marcos N.; Palacios, Juan J.; Qadri, Syeda S.; Bliss, Linda A.; Roos, Bernard A.; Ruiz, Jorge G.

    2009-01-01

    A total of 8 geriatric medicine fellows participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) assessing communication skills and clinical reasoning in common geriatric syndromes. To determine their perceptions about the experience, we conducted surveys and semistructured interviews. We analyzed the survey data using descriptive…

  14. Lilead Fellows Program: An Innovative Approach to Professional Development for School Library Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Christie; DiScala, Jeffrey; Weeks, Ann Carlson; Barlow, Diane L.; Jacobs, Leah; Hall, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the Lilead Fellows Program, funded by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). This innovative approach to professional development (PD) is for school district library supervisors. It is based upon widely accepted principles of quality PD, and is in its second year of operation with an…

  15. 34 CFR 535.40 - How does the Secretary select Fellows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does the Secretary select Fellows? 535.40 Section 535.40 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND MINORITY LANGUAGES AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BILINGUAL EDUCATION:...

  16. Second Year New York City Teaching Fellows: Navigating the Gap between Vision and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberg, Eliza S.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the teacher visions, or idealized images of classroom practices, held by second-year alternatively certified special education teachers. In particular, it explores the range of visions maintained by New York City Teaching Fellows who begin teaching in "hard-to-staff" subjects and schools after minimal pre-service…

  17. 34 CFR 1100.24 - What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.24 What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award directly to the fellow? (a) If the Director pays fellowship award directly to the fellow after the Director determines the amount of a fellowship award, the fellowship...

  18. 34 CFR 1100.25 - What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award through the fellow's employer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LEADER FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM How Does the Director Award a Fellowship? § 1100.25 What are the procedures for payment of a fellowship award through the fellow's employer? (a) If the Director pays a fellowship award through the fellow's employer, the employer shall submit a payment schedule to the Director for approval...

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1987, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, William B., Jr. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 Johnson Space Center (JCS) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship program was conducted by Texas A and M University and JSC. The 10-week program was operated under the auspices of ASEE. The basic objectives of the program are: to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and to contribute to the research objective of the NASA Centers. This document is a compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1987.

  20. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) summer faculty fellowship program, 1986, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcinnis, Bayliss (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program was conducted by the University of Houston and JSC. The ten week program was operated under the auspices of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE). The basic objectives of the program are (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. Each faculty fellow spent ten weeks at JSC engaged in a research project commensurate with his interests and background and worked in collaboration with a NASA/JSC colleague. The final reports on the research projects are presented. This volume, 2, contains sections 15 through 30.

  1. Faculty Agency: Departmental Contexts That Matter in Faculty Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Corbin M.; O'Meara, KerryAnn

    2014-01-01

    In a modern context of constrained resources and high demands, faculty exert agency to strategically navigate their careers (Baez 2000a; Neumann et al. 2006). Guided by the O'Meara et al. (2011) framework on agency in faculty professional lives, this study used Structural Equation Modeling to investigate which departmental factors…

  2. A selected bibliography for nursing faculty and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Paula

    2009-01-01

    This bibliography is prepared for nursing faculty and nursing students to acquaint them with some resources which might contribute to their success. The bibliography is divided into two parts: (1) resources for nursing faculty; and (2) resources for nursing students. The major content of the resources for nursing faculty are: mentoring; research and publishing; tenure and new information technologies. The resources for nursing students contain: study tips and skills; success of the NCLEX-RN exam and informational monographs. With the time constraints of nursing faculty and nursing students and the abundance of materials available, this bibliography provides a set of resources for them to peruse. Electronic resources, journal articles, and monographs are included.

  3. Tips for Young Scientists on the Junior Faculty/Independent Investigator Job Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kelsey C

    2017-02-22

    Landing a job as an assistant professor or independent investigator in neuroscience in an academic institution or research institute depends on the accomplishments young scientists make during years of training as graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. This training prepares scientists for an array of exciting job opportunities, one of which is as a faculty member or independent investigator. My goal in this NeuroView is to provide tips about the job search for young scientists who have decided to enter the junior faculty/independent investigator job market. Rather than serving as a "protocol for getting a job," these tips are aimed at providing information that will make each candidate better prepared for her or his job search.

  4. Exploring faculty perceptions towards electronic health records for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitlawakul, Y; Chan, S W C; Wang, L; Wang, W

    2014-12-01

    The use of electronic health records in nursing education is rapidly increasing worldwide. The successful implementation of electronic health records for nursing education software program relies on students as well as nursing faculty members. This study aimed to explore the experiences and perceptions of nursing faculty members using electronic health records for nursing education software program, and to identify the influential factors for successful implementation of this technology. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted using in-depth individual interviews at a university in Singapore. Seven faculty members participated in the study. The data were gathered and analysed at the end of the semester in the 2012/2013 academic year. The participants' perceptions of the software program were organized into three main categories: innovation, transition and integration. The participants perceived this technology as innovative, with both values and challenges for the users. In addition, using the new software program was perceived as transitional process. The integration of this technology required time from faculty members and students, as well as support from administrators. The software program had only been implemented for 2-3 months at the time of the interviews. Consequently, the participants might have lacked the necessary skill and competence and confidence to implement it successfully. In addition, the unequal exposure to the software program might have had an impact on participants' perceptions. The findings show that the integration of electronic health records into nursing education curricula is dependent on the faculty members' experiences with the new technology, as well as their perceptions of it. Hence, cultivating a positive attitude towards the use of new technologies is important. Electronic health records are significant applications of health information technology. Health informatics competency should be included as a required competency

  5. Survey of minimally invasive general surgery fellows training in robotic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaligram, Abhijit; Meyer, Avishai; Simorov, Anton; Pallati, Pradeep; Oleynikov, Dmitry

    2013-06-01

    Minimally invasive surgery fellowships offer experience in robotic surgery, the nature of which is poorly defined. The objective of this survey was to determine the current status and opportunities for robotic surgery training available to fellows training in the United States and Canada. Sixty-five minimally invasive surgery fellows, attending a fundamentals of fellowship conference, were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding their demographics and experiences with robotic surgery and training. Fifty-one of the surveyed fellows completed the questionnaire (83 % response). Seventy-two percent of respondents had staff surgeons trained in performing robotic procedures, with 55 % of respondents having general surgery procedures performed robotically at their institution. Just over half (53 %) had access to a simulation facility for robotic training. Thirty-three percent offered mechanisms for certification and 11 % offered fellowships in robotic surgery. One-third of the minimally invasive surgery fellows felt they had been trained in robotic surgery and would consider making it part of their practice after fellowship. However, most (80 %) had no plans to pursue robotic surgery fellowships. Although a large group (63 %) felt optimistic about the future of robotic surgery, most respondents (72.5 %) felt their current experience with robotic surgery training was poor or below average. There is wide variation in exposure to and training in robotic surgery in minimally invasive surgery fellowship programs in the United States and Canada. Although a third of trainees felt adequately trained for performing robotic procedures, most fellows felt that their current experience with training was not adequate.

  6. University Faculty Gender Roles Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Sue; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Surveyed 400 college faculty men and women to determine gender role preferences and perceptions. Perceptions of the ideal woman, ideal man, most women, most men, and self were measured. Results from the Sex Role Trait Inventory show that both men and women faculty preferences and perceptions were generally very similar. Implications are discussed.…

  7. Faculty Meetings: Hidden Conversational Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    In the everydayness of faculty meetings, collegial conversations mirror distinctive dynamics and practices, which either enhance or undercut organizational effectiveness. A cluster of conversational practices affect how colleagues connect, engage, interact, and influence others during faculty meetings in diverse educational settings. The…

  8. Reframing research on faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Irby, David M

    2011-04-01

    Research on faculty development has focused primarily on individual participants and has produced relatively little generalizable knowledge that can guide faculty development programs. In this article, the authors examine how current research on faculty development in medical education can be enriched by research in related fields such as teacher education, quality improvement, continuing medical education, and workplace learning. As a result of this analysis, the authors revise the old model for conceptualizing faculty development (preferably called professional development). This expanded model calls for research on educational process and outcomes focused on two communities of practice: the community created among participants in faculty development programs and the communities of teaching practice in the workplace (classroom or clinic) where teaching actually occurs. For the faculty development community, the key components are the participants, program, content, facilitator, and context in which the program occurs and in which the faculty teach. For the workplace community, associated components include relationships and networks of association in that environment, the organization and culture of the setting, the teaching tasks and activities, and the mentoring available to the members of that academic and/or clinical community of teaching practice. This expanded model of faculty development generates a new set of research questions, which are described along with six recommendations for enhancing research, including establishment of a national center for research in health professions education.

  9. Perspectives on nordic faculty developmet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Vinther, Ole; Andersson, Pernille;

    2004-01-01

    The chapter gives an introduction to the book "Faculty development in nordic engineering" education and describes todays challenges in developing engineering education.......The chapter gives an introduction to the book "Faculty development in nordic engineering" education and describes todays challenges in developing engineering education....

  10. Changing Practices in Faculty Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldin, Peter

    A guide to understanding and improving faculty evaluation procedures at all types of colleges and universities is presented. The causes of today's crisis in higher education and survival strategies are reviewed, and the search for solvency is related to major changes in assessing faculty performance. The proliferation of court challenges to…

  11. Professorship: A Faculty Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Todd M.; Davis, Jane F.

    1987-01-01

    A faculty development program at a traditionally black college was designed to enhance the ability of graduate faculty to supervise research activities of graduate students. Focus was on interpersonal problem solving in advisement and professional issues; classroom techniques of discussion teaching, case methods, and psychodrama encouraged the…

  12. Accreditation: Impact on Faculty Roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Daniel E.

    1994-01-01

    The new mission-linked accreditation standards of the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business represent a fundamental change in how business schools operate. Emphases on strategic planning, stakeholder participation, faculty teams, and continuous improvement will encourage institutional cultural change and help faculty respond with…

  13. Faculty Research and Publication Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Kate; Hines, Samantha; Keenan, Teressa; Samson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Understanding faculty work practices can translate into improved library services. This study documents how education and behavioral science faculty locate, retrieve, and use information resources for research and writing and how they publish and store their research materials. The authors interviewed twelve professors using a structured interview…

  14. Faculty Attitudes about Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smidt, Esther; McDyre, Brian; Bunk, Jennifer; Li, Rui; Gatenby, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in distance learning in higher education. Given this, it is extremely important to understand faculty attitudes about distance education, not only because they can vary widely, but also because it is the faculty, through their design and implementation of online courses, that will shape the…

  15. Faculty Retention in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Tariq Rahim; Ahmad, Reyaz

    2013-01-01

    Criteria for retaining or firing a highly qualified faculty in higher education in many cases are vague and unclear. This situation is neither a comfortable, nor a healthy, both for the faculty and the administration. Stakeholders have enough reason to blame each other in the absence of transparent mechanism. This paper proposes a transparent…

  16. Arkansas State University Beebe Branch Faculty Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas State Univ., Beebe.

    Arkansas State University Beebe Branch provides a liberal arts oriented program for traditional and nontraditional students. Its faculty handbook contains institutional goals, description of responsibilities of administrative officers and faculty committees, faculty employment policies, and administrative and instructional policies. The…

  17. Faculty development for community practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, T G

    1996-12-01

    Developing the academic skills of the individuals who will serve as educators and role models in the community is critical to pediatric resident education in community settings. The main focus of any faculty development program must be on teaching, although for a subset of individuals, the development of research skills should also be a consideration. The three key elements that must be considered for an effective faculty development program include: (1) creating a culture of mutual respect between full-time and community faculty; (2) basing the program on sound principles of education theory, especially adult learning theory, using appropriately trained faculty; and (3) establishing ongoing institutional financial and philosophical support. Effectively addressing these elements should create a faculty development program that will help the community practitioner become an effective role model and practitioner- preceptor-educator.

  18. Special Workshop of Marie Curie Fellows on Research and Training in Physics and Technology.

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loiez

    2002-01-01

    Photo 0210008_05a: Dr, Rolf Landua (CERN) explaining to participants of the Marie Curie Workshop (held at CERN 3-4 October 2002) the ATHENA experiment and the Antiproton Decelerator. Photo 0210008_06a: Dr, Rolf Landua (CERN) explaining to participants of the Marie Curie Workshop (held at CERN 3-4 October 2002) the ATHENA experiment and the Antiproton Decelerator. Photo 0210008_08a: Dr, Rolf Landua (CERN) explaining to participants of the Marie Curie Workshop (held at CERN 3-4 October 2002) the ATHENA experiment and the Antiproton Decelerator. Photo 0210008_09a: Dr, Rolf Landua (CERN) explaining to participants of the Marie Curie Workshop (held at CERN 3-4 October 2002) the ATHENA experiment and the Antiproton Decelerator.

  19. 75 FR 14128 - Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology Postdoctoral Researcher and Visiting Fellow...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... regarding the use of human embryonic stem cells in research. On July 30, 2009, President Obama issued a memorandum directing that agencies that support and conduct stem cell research adopt the ``National Institutes of Health Guidelines for Human Stem Cell Research'' (NIH Guidelines), which became effective on...

  20. Impact of GK-12 Fellows on Middle School Students Along the U.S.-Mexico Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, E. A.; Miller, K. C.; Kennedy, J.

    2009-12-01

    Here we present key results of a 3-year quasi-experimental impact study of NSF GK-12 fellows on middle school students. The GK-12 program at the University of Texas at El Paso, placed ten science or engineering graduate students into middle school science classrooms for 10 hours per week. In the first year, the fellows were placed with 6th grade students. In successive years, fellows were placed in 7th and then 8th grade classrooms. Most middle school students had a fellow in their classroom for two or three years. The five participating schools had demographic characteristics that included a greater than 75% Hispanic population and greater than 75% free and reduced lunch participation. Five similar middle schools were chosen as a control group. We hypothesized that participating students would not only learn more science than their control group peers but would express more interest in science careers. The graduate fellows and their partner teachers participated in an extensive professional development program focusing on using inquiry science methods effectively in the classroom. Teachers and fellows spent two weeks in a summer institute that included one week at a remote desert research facility and one week at the university. In addition to the summer institute, fellows took a weekly seminar course that focused on current science learning research and inquiry teaching. Several times per semester the teachers and fellows met for shared inquiry science workshops. Two critical components of our impact study were monitoring student progress in science through existing standardized tests (district benchmarks and the 8th grade state science exam) and a yearly open-ended questionnaire asking “what 3 things would you like to do when you are an adult?” We have statewide science test results for the 794 students who had a GK-12 fellow in their classroom for each of the 3 years and 854 students in the control group who had been in their same school for each of the 3

  1. Paging Doctor Google! Heuristics vs. technology [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/113

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenar D Jhaveri

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The most dramatic development in medical decision-making technology has been the advent of the Internet. This has had an impact not only on clinicians, but has also become an important resource for patients who often approach their doctors with medical information they have obtained from the Internet.  Increasingly, medical students, residents and attending physicians have been using the Internet as a tool for diagnosing and treating disease. Internet-based resources that are available take various forms, including informational websites, online journals and textbooks, and social media.  Search engines such as Google have been increasingly used to help in making diagnoses of disease entities. Do these search methods fare better than experienced heuristic methods? In a small study, we examined the comparative role of heuristics versus the 'Google' mode of thinking. Internal medicine residents were asked to “google” key words to come up with a diagnosis. Their results were compared to experienced nephrology faculty and fellows in training using heuristics and no additional help of internet. Overall, with the aid of Google, the novices (internal medicine residents correctly diagnosed renal diseases less often than the experts (the attendings but with the same frequency as the intermediates (nephrology fellows.  However, in a subgroup analysis of both common diseases and rare diseases, the novices correctly diagnosed renal diseases less often than the experts but more often than the intermediates in each analysis.  The novices correctly diagnosed renal diseases with the same frequency as nephrology fellows in training.

  2. Educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop on 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, M A; Villaseñor-Ovies, P; Harfush, L A; Navarro-Zarza, J E; Canoso, J J; Cruz-Domínguez, P; Vargas, A; Hernández-Díaz, C; Chiapas-Gasca, K; Camacho-Galindo, J; Alvarez-Nemegyei, J; Kalish, R A

    2016-05-01

    We aim to study the educational impact of a clinical anatomy workshop in 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. First-year rheumatology fellows (N = 17) and a convenience sample of 1st-year orthopedic fellows (N = 14) from Mexico City in the 9th month of training participated in the study. The pre- and the post- workshop tests included the same 20 questions that had to be answered by identification or demonstration of relevant anatomical items. The questions, arranged by anatomical regions, were asked in five dynamic stations. Overall, the 31 participants showed an increase of correct answers, from a median of 6 (range 1 to 12) in the pre-workshop test, to a median of 14 (range 7 to 19) in the post-workshop test. In the pre-workshop test, the correct median answers were 7 (range 2 to 12) in the orthopedic fellows and 5 (range 1 to 10) in the rheumatology fellows (p = 0.297). Corresponding scores in the post-workshop were 15 (range 10 to 19) and 12 (range 7 to 18) (p = 0.026) showing a significant difference favoring the orthopedic group. Our clinical anatomy workshop was efficacious, in the short term, as a teaching instrument for 1st-year orthopedic and rheumatology fellows. The post-workshop scores, although significantly improved in both groups, particularly in the orthopedic fellows, were still suboptimal. Further refinements of our workshop might yield better results.

  3. A Needs Assessment of Professional Development Activities for Probationary Faculty at Seneca College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Kerry

    Thirty-one probationary faculty from Seneca College of Applied Arts and Technology (Ontario, Canada) participated in a research study that examined their individual and collective professional development needs. The study was conducted in the fall of 1991. Probationary faculty completed a survey instrument that was comprised of three parts. Part 1…

  4. Student and Faculty Inter-Generational Digital Divide: Fact or Fiction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salajan, Florin D.; Schonwetter, Dieter J.; Cleghorn, Blaine M.

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the digital native-digital immigrant dichotomy based on the results of a small-scale study conducted at the University of Toronto, Faculty of Dentistry, regarding students' and faculty members' perceptions toward the implementation of digital learning technologies in the curriculum. The first element chosen for measurement…

  5. Investigating Veterinary Medicine Faculty Perceptions of Lecture Capture: Issues, Concerns, and Promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Alison C; Demirbilek, Muhammet

    2016-01-01

    Lecture capture technology is becoming more pervasive in today's classrooms. Students are demanding their lectures be recorded, but many instructors remain resistant. The goal of this study was to investigate faculty perceptions of lecture capture and to understand their concerns with the technology. Through a review of the existing literature, three common reasons for not recording were identified: impact on class attendance, incompatible pedagogy, and technical concerns. To test the hypotheses, an electronic survey was created and distributed to the faculty of a veterinary college in the southeastern US. The survey included both quantitative and qualitative questions. An invitation was emailed to all 134 faculty members, garnering 50 responses. Results were consistent with the hypotheses. Impact on class attendance, teaching styles, and technical considerations have dissuaded many instructors from adopting lecture capture technology. However, a fourth theme that emerged was faculty lack of awareness/familiarity. According to the qualitative responses, many faculty either did not know lecture recording was available in their teaching spaces or were not trained in how to use the technology. Recommendations for future research include distributing the survey campus-wide and providing more opportunities for faculty training. It would also be worthwhile to repeat the survey after providing more information and training materials to faculty, or after switching from an opt-in to an opt-out approach, to see whether perceptions have changed among the college's faculty.

  6. Latino Faculty in STEM Disciplines: Motivation to Engage in Research Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, Vicente M.

    2012-01-01

    The scarcity of underrepresented faculty members in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) disciplines is an issue of great concern to education researchers and scholars alike. Despite their low representation, many minority faculty are able to remain motivated, even when facing barriers due to their ethnicity. I present…

  7. Gender Differences in Career Satisfaction among Postsecondary Faculty in Stem Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Cynthia L.

    2011-01-01

    While years of effort to attract more women into higher education careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (collectively known as STEM disciplines) has shown some success, retaining women faculty once they are hired has been much less successful. Their retention is essential in order to maintain diversity among faculty.…

  8. Various Hints, Activities and Effects on Faculty Development Obtained from Inquiries about Instruction "FB enquete"

    OpenAIRE

    中原, 崇文

    2003-01-01

    Inquiries about instruction, so called "TB enquete", have been adopted in Aichi Institute of Technology from 1997. Various hints on faculty development are obtained from this action. Some examples of hint, activity and effect are described in the paper concerned with the instruction named "Mechanical Engineering Design 1 and 2" objected to sophomore of mechanical engineering faculty of the institute

  9. Evaluating Research in Context: Pilot Study at Faculty of Architecture TU Delft

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meulen, B.; Daemen, F.; Van Drooge, L.; De Jong, S.; Spaapen, J.; Wamelink, F.; Van den Besselaar, P.

    2010-01-01

    The vice chancellor of Delft University of Technology, Prof.dr.ir. J. Fokkema, introduced a pilot Evaluating Research in Context (ERiC) at the Faculty of Architecture. The Faculty of Architecture perceives a serious confl ict between the demands and criteria in evaluation procedures and the ambition

  10. Student and Faculty Perceptions of ICT Use in Undergraduate Agriculture Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Donald M.; Edgar, Leslie D.; Cox, Casandra K.

    2013-01-01

    Students and faculty in a land-grant college of agriculture were surveyed to determine their perceptions of current and future Information and Communication Technology (ICT) use in undergraduate agriculture courses. There was a large, positive relationship (r = 0.83) between student and faculty perceptions of the extent to which 40 specific ICT…

  11. The Utility of High-Fidelity Simulation for Training Critical Care Fellows in the Management of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Emergencies: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhary, Bishoy M; Kam, Lily M; Kaufman, Brian S; Felner, Kevin J

    2017-08-01

    Although extracorporeal membrane oxygenation volume has increased, proficiency in the technology requires extensive training. We compared traditional water-drill-based extracorporeal membrane oxygenation training with simulation-based extracorporeal membrane oxygenation training with the hypothesis that simulation-based training is superior. Randomized controlled trial. Academic medical center. Pulmonary/critical care fellows. Participants had a preintervention simulated extracorporeal membrane oxygenation emergency (Sim1-recirculation) then randomized into simulation and traditional groups. Each group participated in three teaching scenarios, via high-fidelity simulation or via water-drills. After 6 weeks and after 1 year, participants returned for two simulated extracorporeal membrane oxygenation emergencies (Sim2-pump failure and Sim3-access insufficiency). Sim2 was a case encountered during teaching, whereas Sim3 was novel. A critical action, necessary for resolution of each scenario, was preidentified for timing. Primary outcome was time required to perform critical actions. Twenty-one fellows participated in the study (simulation, 10; traditional, 11). Groups had similar scenario scores (p = 0.4) and times to critical action (p = 0.8) on Sim1. At 6 weeks, both groups had similar scenario scores on Sim2 (p = 0.5), but the simulation group scored higher on Sim3 (p = 0.03). Times to critical actions were shorter in the simulation group during Sim2 (127 vs 174 s, p = 0.004) and Sim3 (159 vs 300 s; p = 0.04). These findings persisted at 1 year. In novice critical care fellows, simulation-based extracorporeal membrane oxygenation training is superior to traditional training. Benefits transfer to novel scenarios and are maintained over the long term. Further studies evaluating the utility of simulation in other learner groups and for maintenance of proficiency are required.

  12. Development of future faculty teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penson, J B

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral and postdoctoral students considering a career as an educator would be well served by: (1) training in effective classroom communication skills, (2) the use of existing technology in teaching, (3) developing a new course or updating an existing course, and (4) availing themselves of campus teaching resources designed enhance their teaching portfolio. Universities need to place more attention on developing the teaching skills of their doctoral and postdoctoral students. This should include teaching methods and aids, communication skills, motivation, learning theory, testing, counselling and guidance, and course design. An important dimension from a guidance stand point is the conduct of a formal peer review process for beginning faculty.

  13. Difference in Outcomes between First-Operated vs. Fellow-Operated Eyes in Patients Undergoing Bilateral Trabeculectomies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Younhea Jung

    Full Text Available To compare the course and outcome of first- and fellow-operated eyes in patients who underwent bilateral trabeculectomies and to investigate the factors associated with the difference.Preoperative characteristics, including the interval between surgeries, were compared between the first- and fellow-operated eyes in 42 patients who underwent bilateral trabeculectomies. Postoperative intraocular pressure and bleb vascularity, using postoperative anterior segment photos, were compared at various time points between the first- and fellow-operated eyes. Surgical success was evaluated at 1 year after surgery and at the final follow-up. Factors affecting the difference between the first and fellow eyes were analyzed.There was no significant difference in success or failure rates at 1 year postoperatively and at the final follow-up between the first- and fellow-operated eyes. Early postoperative IOP and the degree of bleb vascularity were higher in the fellow-operated eyes (P = 0.001 and 0.003, respectively at week 1 postoperative. The difference in IOP between the first- and fellow-operated eyes was greater in patients whose interval between surgeries was shorter than 3 weeks (P = 0.026.In patients undergoing bilateral trabeculectomies, early postoperative IOP was higher in the fellow-operated eyes than the first-operated eyes; the difference was greater when the interval between surgeries was shorter. The first-operated eye may influence the early postoperative inflammatory response in the fellow-operated eye. Our findings have clinical implications for planning treatment of patients who may need bilateral surgery.

  14. Sunyit Visiting Faculty Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Quantum Computing/ Department of Physics and Astronomy/ Colgate University The activities of this research centered about producing and diagnosing...and Astronomy Colgate University The activities of this research centered about characterizing photon pairs in polarization entangled states for the...Whorsher Poly Tech Thomas Booth - Rochester Institute of Technology Matthew Hodge - Rochester Institute of Technology Timothy Yeskoo - Colgate

  15. Faculty as Border Crossers: A Study of Fulbright Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Pamela L.

    2014-01-01

    As adult learners, faculty members approach new experiences based on events of the past, but this underlying framework of understanding is challenged when they work abroad for an extended period of time.

  16. Case III: Managing conflict--the case of the faculty stuck in the middle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Robert M; Comer, Robert W; Villamil, Juanita E

    2002-04-01

    The need for administrative faculty members to have superior leadership and management skills to handle their increasingly complex responsibilities is well established. As a part of the 2000-01 ADEA Leadership Institute curriculum, fellows were responsible for developing situational case studies for a faculty development workshop to develop participants' leadership and management skills. The case presented here involved managing conflicts in the dental academic setting. The foundation of conflict management centers on communication techniques including transparent communication, open discussion, open confrontation, and active listening. Management options such as avoidance, accommodation, competition, negotiation, and collaboration are potential strategies for the faculty leader. This case study involves a fictitious public dental school, New Horizons University, which has embarked on solutions to address limited resources, but unwittingly has created conflicts between individuals and groups of faculty members. The case discussion analyzes the cause of conflicts, presents the positive and negative potential of the conflicts, reviews techniques of conflict management, and discusses specific management concepts regarding resource allocation and equity theory.

  17. Case-based education at the 2009 pediatric nephrology fellows conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, John D; Ferris, Maria E

    2010-01-01

    The hallmark of the professional is continued development and expanded expertise based on acquisition of new knowledge and refinement of clinical skills. Medical knowledge acquisition is a key component of professional development for fellows in training as well as practicing physicians. New medical knowledge may be acquired via experience/instruction in the clinical setting (clinic, hospital, etc), self-directed or teacher-directed reading, case-based discussions, lecture presentations, recorded enduring presentations (vodcasts, podcasts, etc.), online learning modules, review- and board-type questions/answers, and small-group discussions. All of these methods have value for continued expansion of medical knowledge, and for many learners, a combination of methods is far superior to reliance on one or two methods alone. The following four cases demonstrate the benefit of case-based discussions to further pediatri nephrology fellow education.

  18. Graduate medical education in humanism and professionalism: a needs assessment survey of pediatric gastroenterology fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Katharine C; Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Herrick, Daniel B; Woolf, Alan D; Leichtner, Alan M

    2014-01-01

    The deterioration of humanism and professionalism during graduate medical training is an acknowledged concern, and programs are required to provide professionalism education for pediatric fellows. We conducted a needs assessment survey in a national sample of 138 first- and second-year gastroenterology fellows (82% response rate). Most believed that present humanism and professionalism education met their needs, but this education was largely informal (eg, role modeling). Areas for formal education desired by >70% included competing demands of clinical practice versus research, difficult doctor-patient relationships, depression/burnout, angry parents, medical errors, work-life balance, and the patient illness experience. These results may guide curricula to formalize humanism and professionalism education in pediatric gastroenterology fellowships.

  19. Keeping Faculty [Happy]: The Critical Role of a Faculty Center in Developing and Retaining Quality, Collegial Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargis, Jace; Gilbertson, Phil

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative approach to retaining happy and healthy faculty members in a collegial, productive teaching and learning environment. A major portion of the paper shares how the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning plays a significant role in the faculty interview process, new faculty orientation, and subsequent mentoring of…

  20. My Experience of Interviewing a “Crusader Participant” Tips for Fellow Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama Garg

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the author describes the experience of interviewing a crusader participant where audio recording of the interview was not consented to, although she was allowed to take handwritten notes. A crusader participant is someone who is committed to the social justice aims of the research and wants to bring about change by his or her contribution to it. The author provides the lessons learned from this interview as tips for fellow researchers.

  1. My experience of interviewing a “Crusader Participant” : tips for fellow researchers.

    OpenAIRE

    Anupama Garg

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the experience of interviewing a crusader participant where audio recording of the interview was not consented to, although she was allowed to take handwritten notes. A crusader participant is someone who is committed to the social justice aims of the research and wants to bring about change by his or her contribution to it. The author provides the lessons learned from this interview as tips for fellow researchers.

  2. Robotic Pancreatoduodenectomy Biotissue Curriculum has Validity and Improves Technical Performance for Surgical Oncology Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vernissia; Zenati, Mazen; Novak, Stephanie; Chen, Yong; Zureikat, Amer H; Zeh, Herbert J; Hogg, Melissa E

    2017-06-01

    Obtaining the proficiency on the robotic platform necessary to safely perform a robotic pancreatoduodenectomy is particularly challenging. We hypothesize that by instituting a proficiency-based robotic training curriculum we can enhance novice surgeons' skills outside of the operating room, leading to a shorter learning curve. A biotissue curriculum was designed consisting of sewing artificial organs to simulate a hepaticojejunostomy (HJ), gastrojejunostomy (GJ), and pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ). Three master robotic surgeons performed each biotissue anastomosis to assess validity. Using video review, trainee performance on biotissue drills was evaluated for time, errors and objective structured assessment of technical skills (OSATS) by 2 blinded graders. This study is conducted at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (Pittsburgh, PA), a tertiary care academic teaching hospital. In total, 14 surgical oncology fellows completed the biotissue curriculum. Fourteen fellows performed 196 anastomotic drills during the first year: 66 (HJ), 64 (GJ), and 66 (PJ). The fellows' performances were analyzed as a group by attempt. The attendings' first attempt outperformed the fellows' first attempt in all metrics for every drill (all p < 0.05). More than 5 analyzed attempts of the HJ, there was improvement in time, errors, and OSATS (all p < 0.01); however, no metric reached attending performance. For the GJ, time, errors, and OSATS all improved more than 5 attempts (all p < 0.01), whereas only errors and OSATS reached proficiency. For the PJ, errors and OSATS both improved over attempts (p < 0.01) and reached proficiency; however, time did not statistically improve nor reach proficiency. The graders scoring correlated for errors and OSATS (p < 0.0001). A pancreatoduodenectomy biotissue curriculum has face and construct validity. The curriculum is feasible and improves errors and technical performance. Time is the most difficult technical parameter to improve. This

  3. The Professionalism of Critical Care Nurse Fellows After Completion of the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Emily; Click, Elizabeth; Douglas, Sara; Friedman, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is paramount to the formation and functioning of new graduate critical care nurses. In this project, a sample of 110 new graduate nurses used a descriptive self-report electronic survey with Hall's Professionalism Inventory Scale. A great percentage of these new graduate critical care nurse fellows with high professionalism scores may be related to their participation in the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship orientation program. Perhaps, Nursing Professional Development specialists should incorporate classes on professional advancement planning for new graduate nurses.

  4. Manual Skill Acquisition During Transesophageal Echocardiography Simulator Training of Cardiology Fellows: A Kinematic Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyal, Robina; Montealegre-Gallegos, Mario; Mitchell, John D; Kim, Han; Bergman, Remco; Hawthorne, Katie M; O'Halloran, David; Wong, Vanessa; Hess, Phillip E; Mahmood, Feroze

    2015-12-01

    To investigate whether a transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) simulator with motion analysis can be used to impart proficiency in TEE in an integrated curriculum-based model. A prospective cohort study. A tertiary-care university hospital. TEE-naïve cardiology fellows. Participants underwent an 8-session multimodal TEE training program. Manual skills were assessed at the end of sessions 2 and 8 using motion analysis of the TEE simulator's probe. At the end of the course, participants performed an intraoperative TEE; their examinations were video captured, and a blinded investigator evaluated the total time and image transitions needed for each view. Results are reported as mean±standard deviation, or median (interquartile range) where appropriate. Eleven fellows completed the knowledge and kinematic portions of the study. Five participants were excluded from the evaluation in the clinical setting because of interim exposure to TEE or having participated in a TEE rotation after the training course. An increase of 12.95% in post-test knowledge scores was observed. From the start to the end of the course, there was a significant reduction (pcardiology fellows can be complemented with kinematic analyses to objectify acquisition of manual skills during simulator-based training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Facebook activity of residents and fellows and its impact on the doctor-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubarak, Ghassan; Guiot, Aurélie; Benhamou, Ygal; Benhamou, Alexandra; Hariri, Sarah

    2011-02-01

    Facebook is an increasingly popular online social networking site. The purpose of this study was to describe the Facebook activity of residents and fellows and their opinions regarding the impact of Facebook on the doctor-patient relationship. An anonymous questionnaire was emailed to 405 residents and fellows at the Rouen University Hospital, France, in October 2009. Of the 202 participants who returned the questionnaire (50%), 147 (73%) had a Facebook profile. Among responders, 138 (99%) displayed their real name on their profile, 136 (97%) their birthdates, 128 (91%) a personal photograph, 83 (59%) their current university and 76 (55%) their current position. Default privacy settings were changed by 61% of users, more frequently if they were registered for >1 year (p=0.02). If a patient requested them as a 'friend', 152 (85%) participants would automatically decline the request, 26 (15%) would decide on an individual basis and none would automatically accept the request. Eighty-eight participants (48%) believed that the doctor-patient relationship would be altered if patients discovered that their doctor had a Facebook account, but 139 (76%) considered that it would change only if the patient had open access to their doctor's profile, independent of its content. Residents and fellows frequently use Facebook and display personal information on their profiles. Insufficient privacy protection might have an impact the doctor-patient relationship.

  6. Fellow eye changes in optic neuritis correlate with the risk of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klistorner, A; Arvind, H; Nguyen, T; Garrick, R; Paine, M; Graham, S; Yiannikas, C

    2009-08-01

    Recent studies demonstrate early diffuse central nervous system (CNS) inflammation in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The clinically unaffected (fellow) eye of patients with unilateral optic neuritis (ON) may reflect the status of normal-appearing white matter in the CNS, which can be assessed electrophysiologically. To study the relationship between electrophysiological parameters in the fellow eye of ON patients, and risk of conversion to MS. Forty-eight consecutive patients with acute unilateral ON were examined 12 months after ON of which 14 had MS, 19 remained high risk (HR) for MS, and 15 had low risk (LR) for MS according to McDonald's criteria. Twenty-five age-matched controls were also tested. Amplitude and latency of multifocal visual evoked potential (mfVEP) in the fellow eyes of patients at 12 months were analyzed and compared with controls. Average mfVEP amplitude was 240 +/- 35, 232 +/- 36, 181 +/- 38, and 169 +/- 48 nV for controls, LR, HR, and MS groups respectively. Average mfVEP latency for controls, LR, HR, and MS patients was 139.7 +/- 5.5, 141.7 +/- 3.6, 145.9 +/- 8.9, and 152.0 +/- 9.9 ms respectively. The magnitude of latency prolongation and amplitude decline 12 months after the initial episode was proportional to the risk of MS. The prognostic significance of these changes as predictors of subsequent MS should be investigated longitudinally.

  7. Intending the Faculty and its Relation with the City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vande Putte, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the preparation of the idea competition 'Building for Bouwkunde' that was held in 2008. The competition intended entrants to design a replacement building for the lost building of the Faculty of Architecture of the Delft University of Technology, based on the refle

  8. Intending the Faculty and its Relation with the City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vande Putte, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the preparation of the idea competition 'Building for Bouwkunde' that was held in 2008. The competition intended entrants to design a replacement building for the lost building of the Faculty of Architecture of the Delft University of Technology, based on the

  9. Society News: PhD theses could win prizes; Last chance for IYA2009 grants; New Fellows; RAS Fellows win prizes; Need a job? Need staff? RAS Library Saturdays

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Fellows who are PhD student supervisors should be on the lookout for exceptionally good work from research students submitting their theses this year, for nomination for the RAS Michael Penston Astronomy Prize and the RAS Keith Runcorn Prize. The RAS is offering one last chance to apply for grants towards International Year of Astronomy activities, but you'll have to apply soon. The Society sends congratulations to Fellows of the RAS who have recently received prestigious awards for their work.

  10. Gender Differences in Business Faculty's Research Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yining; Zhao, Qin

    2013-01-01

    The authors use expectancy theory to evaluate gender differences in key factors that motivate faculty to conduct research. Using faculty survey data collected from 320 faculty members at 10 business schools, they found that faculty members, both men and women, who displayed higher motivation were more productive in research. Among them, pretenured…

  11. Academic Incivility among Health Sciences Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Melissa; Hill, Lilian H.

    2015-01-01

    Academic health centers are under pressure to graduate more health professionals and, therefore, must retain talented faculty members who can educate students in respective disciplines. Faculty-to-faculty incivility is especially relevant to academic medical centers because faculty in the health professions must not only meet university tenure and…

  12. Resources for Developing Senior Faculty as Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Robert K.

    1993-01-01

    An annotated list of 38 resources is provided to help administrators, faculty developers, and faculty in designing effective renewal interventions for senior faculty. Topics include research on senior faculty, personnel policies (tenure, growth contracting), program strategies (mentoring, team teaching, motivation), and assessment of institutional…

  13. Dysfunction in the fellow eyes of strabismic and anisometropic amblyopic children assessed by visually evoked potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Pinheiro Andrade

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate visual acuity and transient pattern reversal (PR visual evoked potentials (VEPs in the fellow eyes of children with strabismic and/or anisometropic amblyopia. Methods: Children diagnosed with strabismic and/or anisometropic amblyopia were recruited for electrophysiological assessment by VEPs. Monocular grating and optotype acuity were measured using sweep-VEPs and an Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study chart, respectively. During the same visit, transient PR-VEPs of each eye were recorded using stimuli subtending with a visual angle of 60', 15', and 7.5'. Parameters of amplitude (in μV and latency (in ms were determined from VEP recordings. Results: A group of 40 strabismic and/or anisometropic amblyopic children (22 females: 55%, mean age= 8.7 ± 2.2 years, median= 8 years was examined. A control group of 19 healthy children (13 females: 68.4%, mean age= 8.2 ± 2.6 years, median= 8 years was also included. The fellow eyes of all amblyopes had significantly worse optotype acuity (p=0.021 than the control group, regardless of whether they were strabismic (p=0.040 or anisometropic (p=0.048. Overall, grating acuity was significantly worse in the fellow eyes of amblyopes (p=0.016 than in healthy controls. Statistically prolonged latency for visual angles of 15' and 7.5' (p=0.018 and 0.002, respectively was found in the strabismic group when compared with the control group. For the smaller visual stimulus (7.5', statistically prolonged latency was found among all fellow eyes of amblyopic children (p<0.001. Conclusions: The fellow eyes of amblyopic children showed worse optotype and grating acuity, with subtle abnormalities in the PR-VEP detected as prolonged latencies for smaller size stimuli when compared with eyes of healthy children. These findings show the deleterious effects of amblyopia in several distinct visual functions, mainly those related to spatial vision.

  14. Fellow travellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, E. P.; Skirnisson, K.; McGovern, T. H.

    2012-01-01

    Background: House mice (Mus musculus) are commensals of humans and therefore their phylogeography can reflect human colonization and settlement patterns. Previous studies have linked the distribution of house mouse mitochondrial (mt) DNA clades to areas formerly occupied by the Norwegian Vikings ...

  15. Fellow travellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, E.P.; Skirnisson, K.; McGovern, T.H.;

    2012-01-01

    mirroring the history of the European human host populations. If house mice arrived in Newfoundland with the Viking settlers at all, then, like the humans, their presence was also fleeting and left no genetic trace. The continuity of mtDNA haplotype in Iceland over 1000 years illustrates that mtDNA can...

  16. A Study of the Relationship between Key Factors of Academic Innovation and Faculties' Teaching Goals--The Mediatory Role of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Mehdi; Marzooghi, Rahmatullah; Dehghani, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    The following research tries to study the Relationship between key factors of academic innovations and faculties' teaching goals with the mediatory role of their pedagogical, technological and content knowledge. The statistical population in this research included faculty members of Shiraz University. By simple random sampling, 127 faculty members…

  17. Becoming urban science teachers by transforming middle-school classrooms: A study of the Urban Science Education Fellows Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman, Melina Gabriela

    The current scenario in American education shows a large achievement and opportunity gap in science between urban children in poverty and more privileged youth. Research has shown that one essential factor that accounts for this gap is the shortage of qualified science teachers in urban schools. Teaching science in a high poverty school presents unique challenges to beginner teachers. Limited resources and support and a significant cultural divide with their students are some of the common problems that cause many novice teachers to quit their jobs or to start enacting what has been described as "the pedagogy of poverty." In this study I looked at the case of the Urban Science Education Fellows Program. This program aimed to prepare preservice teachers (i.e. "fellows") to enact socially just science pedagogies in urban classrooms. I conducted qualitative case studies of three fellows. Fellows worked over one year with science teachers in middle-school classrooms in order to develop transformative action research studies. My analysis focused on how fellows coauthored hybrid spaces within these studies that challenged the typical ways science was taught and learned in their classrooms towards a vision of socially just teaching. By coauthoring these hybrid spaces, fellows developed grounded generativity, i.e. a capacity to create new teaching scenarios rooted in the pragmatic realities of an authentic classroom setting. Grounded generativity included building upon their pedagogical beliefs in order to improvise pedagogies with others, repositioning themselves and their students differently in the classroom and constructing symbols of possibility to guide their practice. I proposed authentic play as the mechanism that enabled fellows to coauthor hybrid spaces. Authentic play involved contexts of moderate risk and of distributed expertise and required fellows to be positioned at the intersection of the margins and the center of the classroom community of practice. In

  18. Risk of pseudophakic retinal detachment in 202 226 patients using the fellow nonoperated eye as reference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Søren S; Mikkelsen, Kim Lyngby; La Cour, Morten

    2013-01-01

    To study the risk of pseudophakic retinal detachment (PRD) after first-eye phacoemulsification cataract surgery in Denmark relative to the risk of retinal detachment (RD) in the patients' fellow nonoperated eyes.......To study the risk of pseudophakic retinal detachment (PRD) after first-eye phacoemulsification cataract surgery in Denmark relative to the risk of retinal detachment (RD) in the patients' fellow nonoperated eyes....

  19. Retaining nursing faculty beyond retirement age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Marvel L; Cook, Linda; Salmeron, Lois; Burton, Denise

    2010-01-01

    The number of nursing faculty planning to retire by 2020 is alarming. To develop strategies for retaining faculty, researchers asked: What factors influence the decision by nursing faculty to stay in the workforce past retirement age? What barriers could be removed that would encourage faculty to stay longer? Using Giorgi's analysis method, findings from 6 faculty teaching past retirement age revealed key meaning units and grand themes that match Maslow's Hierarchy of Inborn Needs.

  20. Teaching a Hypothesis-driven Physical Diagnosis Curriculum to Pulmonary Fellows Improves Performance of First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staitieh, Bashar S; Saghafi, Ramin; Kempker, Jordan A; Schulman, David A

    2016-04-01

    Hypothesis-driven physical examination emphasizes the role of bedside examination in the refinement of differential diagnoses and improves diagnostic acumen. This approach has not yet been investigated as a tool to improve the ability of higher-level trainees to teach medical students. To assess the effect of teaching hypothesis-driven physical diagnosis to pulmonary fellows on their ability to improve the pulmonary examination skills of first-year medical students. Fellows and students were assessed on teaching and diagnostic skills by self-rating on a Likert scale. One group of fellows received the hypothesis-driven teaching curriculum (the "intervention" group) and another received instruction on head-to-toe examination. Both groups subsequently taught physical diagnosis to a group of first-year medical students. An oral examination was administered to all students after completion of the course. Fellows were comfortable teaching physical diagnosis to students. Students in both groups reported a lack of comfort with the pulmonary examination at the beginning of the course and improvement in their comfort by the end. Students trained by intervention group fellows outperformed students trained by control group fellows in the interpretation of physical findings (P students improves the ability of students to interpret physical findings. This benefit should be confirmed using validated testing tools.

  1. Credibility and (disuse of feedback to inform teaching : a qualitative case study of physician-faculty perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carr TF

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation plays a central role in teaching in that physician-faculty theoretically use evaluations from clinical learners to inform their teaching. Knowledge about how physician-faculty access and internalize feedback from learners is sparse and concerning given its importance in medical training. This study aims to broaden our understanding. Using multiple data sources, this cross-sectional qualitative case study conducted in Spring of 2014 explored the internalization of learner feedback among physician-faculty teaching medical students, residents and fellows at a southwest academic medical center. Twelve one-on-one interviews were triangulated with observation notes and a national survey. Thematic and document analysis was conducted. Results revealed that the majority accessed and reviewed evaluations about their teaching. Most admitted not using learner feedback to inform teaching while a quarter did use them. Factors influencing participants use or disuse of learner feedback were the a reporting metrics and mechanisms, and b physician-faculty perception of learner credibility. Physician-faculty did not regard learners’ ability to assess and recognize effective teaching skills highly. To refine feedback for one-on-one teaching in the clinical setting, recommendations by study participants include: a redesigning of evaluation reporting metrics and narrative sections, and b feedback rubric training for learners.

  2. A national study on the attitudes of Irish dental faculty members to faculty development.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, E M

    2010-02-01

    International studies suggest that dental faculty are resistant to the concept and practice of faculty development. This paper analyses the demographic and educational profile of Irish Dental Faculty, exploring their attitudes to educational initiatives.

  3. Nigerian Journal of Technological Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Technological Development is a biannual publication of the Faculty of Engineering & Technology, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria. ... Mechanical properties of millet husk ash bitumen stabilized soil block · EMAIL ...

  4. A Faculty Toolkit for Formative Assessment in Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVall, Margarita V; Alston, Greg L; Bird, Eleanora; Buring, Shauna M; Kelley, Katherine A; Murphy, Nanci L; Schlesselman, Lauren S; Stowe, Cindy D; Szilagyi, Julianna E

    2014-11-15

    This paper aims to increase understanding and appreciation of formative assessment and its role in improving student outcomes and the instructional process, while educating faculty on formative techniques readily adaptable to various educational settings. Included are a definition of formative assessment and the distinction between formative and summative assessment. Various formative assessment strategies to evaluate student learning in classroom, laboratory, experiential, and interprofessional education settings are discussed. The role of reflective writing and portfolios, as well as the role of technology in formative assessment, are described. The paper also offers advice for formative assessment of faculty teaching. In conclusion, the authors emphasize the importance of creating a culture of assessment that embraces the concept of 360-degree assessment in both the development of a student's ability to demonstrate achievement of educational outcomes and a faculty member's ability to become an effective educator.

  5. Faculty development: principles and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; Mann, Karen V

    2006-01-01

    Instructors in the health professions today must acquire knowledge and competencies that go beyond disciplinary expertise. It is now generally accepted that educational training as a teacher is essential to a faculty member's effectiveness as an educator. The educational challenges across the health professions share many similarities. In this article, we draw on the medical education literature and focus on faculty development designed to enhance teaching effectiveness. We first address commonly included faculty development topics, including instructional improvement, organizational development, the development of professional academic skills, and the teaching of specific content areas. We then review a variety of educational approaches and formats that are described in the literature. Included in this discussion are commonly used workshops, seminars, short courses, and fellowships, as well as longitudinal programs, peer coaching, mentorship, self-directed learning, and computer-aided instruction. We also briefly explore learning at work and in communities of practice, and we discuss several frequently encountered challenges in designing and implementing faculty development activities, including motivating colleagues and assessing program effectiveness. We conclude the discussion by presenting a set of guidelines for the design of effective faculty development programs.

  6. Czech medical faculties and smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Králíková, E; Kozák, J; Rames, J; Zámecník, L; Wallenfels, I

    1995-05-01

    At the 1st Medical Faculty of Charles University in Prague the prevalence of smoking was investigated among the faculty, staff, students and among health professionals in the country. We found 38.1% smokers (current and occasional) among malephysicians (N = 625), 25.6% smokers among women physicians (N = 394), 48.7% smoking nurses (N = 729) and 42.3% smokers among paramedical staff (N = 298). We have also followed up smoking habits among our students since 1989 (N = 1235). The number of smokers among them rose from 7% in 1989 to 18% in 1994. Students were also asked about their opinion on smoking as a risk factor for coronary heart disease which has a rising trend. Trying to coordinate the anti-smoking activity at all seven medical faculties in the Czech Republic, in collaboration with the Faculty of Medicine of Masaryk University in Brno, the National Centre for Health Promotion and the Czech Commission of EMASH, present the main points of the anti-smoking strategy at Czech medical faculties.

  7. Student evaluation of teaching enhances faculty professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty McDonald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the role of Web 2.0 technologies in sourcing ongoing information from university students in an effort to assist faculty in their continuous professional development (PD, with the ultimate goal of incrementally improving teaching and learning. On a semester basis, students use an online program called CoursEvals to provide their opinions about the course and its instructor. The collected data are used to inform the content and delivery of faculty PD workshops. The interactive nature of CoursEvals, with Web features that facilitate information sharing and interoperatibility with Blackboard, a learning/course management system, make it ideal for impacting higher education. Students can complete student evaluation of teaching (SEOT online from any location (university, home, mobile, or overseas. This paper underscores the interactive nature of the feedback process that allows faculty, administration, policy makers, and other stakeholders to participate in the ongoing improvement of teaching and learning. We see how Web 2.0 technologies can impact the teaching/learning nexus in higher education, how online forums and Blackboard bulletin boards have helped popularize Web 2.0 technologies, how online social interactions have escalated through wikis, blogs, emails, instant messaging, and audio and video clips, and how faculty can retrieve their personal SEOT at any time and use the information to self- or peer-evaluate at their convenience. Faculty can compare their SEOT over time to determine stability and monitor their classroom effectiveness. They can also address reliability and validity issues and use the information judiciously without making unnecessary generalizations. Researchers will find useful information supporting the impact of Web 2.0 technologies in higher education.

  8. Blend or not to blend: a study investigating faculty members perceptions of blended teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet A Ocak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined faculty members’ perceptions of blended teaching from several perspectives. A total of 73 faculty members in Turkish Higher Education context participated in the study by completing an online survey that combined quantitative and qualitative approaches. Based on a data analysis, the faculty members’ perceptions were sorted into six categories: (a satisfaction with blended teaching, (b perceived impact on the role of the faculty, (c perceived impact on student learning, (d perceived impact on student motivation, (e advantages of blended teaching, and (f disadvantages of blended teaching. Findings indicated that faculty members were likely to agree that blended teaching provides a high degree of satisfaction and that it requires more time and commitment from the faculty. The faculty members perceived that blended teaching improves student learning and, to some extent, improves motivation. The faculty members also emphasized the importance of institutional support and the use of technology to mitigate student problems. This study presents these faculty members’ perceptions, which are helpful for those planning to implement a blended teaching approach, and makes suggestions for trouble-shooting and taking advantage of the opportunities in a blended environment successfully.

  9. Faculty and student perceptions of effective study strategies and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Katie J; Bell, Gillian C; Franks, Andrea S

    2011-12-15

    To evaluate faculty members' and students' perceptions of study strategies and materials. Focus groups were conducted with course directors and first- and second-year students to generate ideas relating to use of course materials, technology, class attendance, and study strategies for mastering class concepts. Students and faculty members differed in their opinions about the utility of textbooks and supplemental resources. The main learning method recommended by students and faculty members was repeated review of course material. Students recommended viewing classroom lectures again online, if possible. Course directors reported believing that class attendance is important, but students based their opinions regarding the importance of attendance on their perceptions of lecture and handout quality. Results did not differ by campus or by student group (first-year vs. second-year students). Students and faculty members have differing opinions on the process that could influence learning and course design. Faculty members should understand the strategies students are using to learn course material and consider additional or alternative course design and delivery techniques based on student feedback.

  10. An assessment of residents' and fellows' personal finance literacy: an unmet medical education need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Fahd A; White, Andrew J; Hiller, Katherine M; Amini, Richard; Jeffe, Donna B

    2017-05-29

    This study aimed to assess residents' and fellows' knowledge of finance principles that may affect their personal financial health. A cross-sectional, anonymous, web-based survey was administered to a convenience sample of residents and fellows at two academic medical centers.  Respondents answered 20 questions on personal finance and 28 questions about their own financial planning, attitudes, and debt. Questions regarding satisfaction with one's financial condition and investment-risk tolerance used a 10-point Likert scale (1=lowest, 10=highest).  Of 2,010 trainees, 422 (21%) responded (median age 30 years; interquartile range, 28-33). The mean quiz score was 52.0% (SD = 19.1). Of 299 (71%) respondents with student loan debt, 144 (48%) owed over $200,000.  Many respondents had other debt, including 86 (21%) with credit card debt. Of 262 respondents with retirement savings, 142 (52%) had saved less than $25,000. Respondents' mean satisfaction with their current personal financial condition was 4.8 (SD = 2.5) and investment-risk tolerance was 5.3 (SD = 2.3). Indebted trainees reported lower satisfaction than trainees without debt (4.4 vs. 6.2, F (1,419) = 41.57, p < .001).   Knowledge was moderately correlated with investment-risk tolerance (r=0.41, p < .001), and weakly correlated with satisfaction with financial status (r=0.23, p < .001). Residents and fellows had low financial literacy and investment-risk tolerance, high debt, and deficits in their financial preparedness.  Adding personal financial education to the medical education curriculum would benefit trainees.  Providing education in areas such as budgeting, estate planning, investment strategies, and retirement planning early in training can offer significant long-term benefits.

  11. Early Career Experience of Pediatric Orthopaedic Fellows: What to Expect and Need for Their Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzbecker, Michael P; Shore, Benjamin J; Fletcher, Nicholas D; Larson, A Noelle; Hydorn, Christopher R; Sawyer, Jeffery R

    2016-06-01

    A dramatic increase in the number of pediatric orthopaedic fellows being trained has led to concerns that there may be an oversupply of pediatric orthopaedists. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this perception is accurate and whether the practice expectations of recent pediatric fellowship graduates are being met by surveying recent pediatric fellowship graduates about their early practice experiences. A 36-question survey approved by the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA) leadership was electronically distributed to 120 recent graduates of pediatric orthopaedic fellowships; 81 responses were ultimately obtained (67.5% response rate). Almost all (91%) of the respondents were very or extremely satisfied with their fellowship experience. Half of the respondents had at least 1 job offer before they entered their fellowships. After completion of fellowships, 35% received 1 job offer and 62.5% received ≥2 job offers; only 2.5% did not receive a job offer. Most reported a practice consisting almost entirely of pediatric orthopaedics, and 93.5% thought this was in line with their expectations; 87% indicated satisfaction with their current volume of pediatric orthopaedics, and 85% with the complexity of their pediatric orthopaedic cases. Despite the high employment percentages and satisfaction with practice profiles, nearly a third (28%) of respondents replied that too many pediatric orthopaedists are being trained. Positive messages from this survey include the satisfaction of graduates with their fellowship training, the high percentage of graduates who readily found employment, and the satisfaction of graduates with their current practice environments; this indicates that the pediatric orthopaedic job environment is not completely saturated and there are continued opportunities for graduating pediatric fellows despite the increased number of fellows being trained. Although not determined by this study, it may be that the stable

  12. Is current surgery resident and GI fellow training adequate to pass FES?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Aimee K; Scott, Daniel J; Willis, Ross E; Van Sickle, Kent; Truitt, Michael S; Uecker, John; Brown, Kimberly M; Marks, Jeffrey M; Dunkin, Brian J

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the adequacy of current surgical residency and gastroenterology (GI) fellowship flexible endoscopy training as measured by performance on the FES examination. Fifth-year general surgery residents and GI fellows across six institutions were invited to participate. All general surgery residents had met ACGME/ABS case volume requirements as well as additional institution-specific requirements for endoscopy. All participants completed FES testing at the end of their respective academic year. Procedure volumes were obtained from ACGME case logs. Curricular components for each specialty and institution were recorded. Forty-eight (28 surgery and 20 GI) trainees completed the examination. Average case numbers for residents were 76 ± 26 colonoscopies and 45 ± 12 EGDs. Among GI fellows, PGY4 s (N = 10) reported 99 ± 64 colonoscopies and 147 ± 79 EGDs. PGY5 s (N = 3) reported 462 ± 307 colonoscopies and 411 ± 260 EGDs. PGY6 GI fellows (N = 7) reported 515 ± 111 colonoscopies and 418 ± 146 EGDs. The overall pass rate for all participants was 75 %, with 68 % of residents and 85 % of fellows passing both the cognitive and skills components. For surgery residents, pass rates were 75 % for manual skills and 85.7 % for cognitive. On the skills examination, Task 2 (loop reduction) was associated with the lowest performance. Skills scores correlated with both colonoscopy (r = 0.46, p < 0.001) and EGD experience (r = 0.46, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristics curves were examined among the resident cohort. The minimum number of total cases associated with passing the FES skills component was 103. Significant variability existed in curricular components across institutions. These data suggest that current flexible endoscopy training may not be sufficient for all trainees to pass the examination. Implementing additional components of the FEC may prove beneficial in achieving more uniform pass

  13. Work satisfaction, quality of life, and leisure time of neonatology fellows and senior neonatologists in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Michael

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To examine work satisfaction, quality of life, and leisure time of neonatology fellows and senior neonatologists in Israel. Methods A validated questionnaire was delivered during the second half of 2008 to all the neonatology fellows and senior neonatologists in Israel. Descriptive analysis, parametric Student’s t-test, and aparametric Mann Whitney and χ2 tests were conducted. Results Of 114 practicing neonatologists in that period in Israel (including both seniors and fellows, 112 (98.25% participated in the study. The majority of neonatologists were male (53.2%, married (91.7%, 40–60 years old (69.7%, and studied in Israeli medical schools (62.0%. Most did their pediatric residencies and fellowships in Israel (97.2% and 75.7%, respectively. The average number of night/on-call shifts of fellows and senior neonatologists was 8.8 per month (SD ± 3.425 and the number of active on-call shifts was 4.04 (SD ± 3.194. The satisfaction level of neonatologists in Israeli medical centers with patient care, self-reward, work relations, and quality of life was high, but their satisfaction level with workload, income and prestige, and leisure time was low. The general index of work satisfaction and the general index of indices were both high in relation to the mid-range values. The majority of neonatologists stated that they would choose to practice medicine again. Most of them would encourage medical students to choose the same specialty they had chosen. Only a few neonatologists were contemplating changing their choice of specialty. Most neonatologists want to continue practicing medicine; however, a significant number will not recommend that their children do so. Conclusions The satisfaction level of neonatologists in Israel is high, mainly due to satisfaction with their work. High satisfaction levels promise high quality patient care, as well as high satisfaction levels of patients and their families. However

  14. Student narratives of faculty incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasiter, Sue; Marchiondo, Lisa; Marchiondo, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Academic incivility remains a problem on college campuses. Nursing research has refocused from student impropriety to aberrant faculty behaviors. Our original study using the Nursing Education Environment Survey showed that 133 of 152 student participants experienced uncivil treatment. Latent, inductive content analysis was undertaken to analyze narratives about their "worst experience" of negative faculty behavior. Four categories were identified: "In front of someone," "Talked to others about me," "Made me feel stupid," and "I felt belittled." Incivility had a profound effect on students and is problematic because it increases already significant academic pressure; it interferes with learning and safe clinical performance; it is contrary to caring, a central nursing concept; and it decreases program satisfaction and retention. Few nursing schools have civility policies for faculty behavior. Formal procedures that promote professional interaction should be crafted and implemented. Equally important is creating ways for nursing students to document incivility without fear of retaliation.

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/american Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1991, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, William A. (Editor); Goldstein, Stanley H. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of the program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate an exchange of ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participant's institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Centers. A compilation of the final reports on the research projects done by the faculty fellows during the summer of 1991 are presented. Some of the topics covered include: collision avoidance for rover vehicles, bioinstrumentation, neural nets, total quality management of flexible space structures, project scheduling, nondestructive tests, orthostatic intolerance to bedrest, hypersonic reentry simulation, measuring human energy expenditure, tribological models, trace element movement in Anarctic ice, gastrointestinal function, and computer assisted instruction.

  16. A successful faculty development program for implementing a sociocultural ePortfolio assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Rachel L; Christner, Jennifer; Ross, Paula T; Lypson, Monica L

    2014-02-01

    Portfolios are emerging as a tool for documenting learning progression and assessing competency. ePortfolios are appealing as a portable and fluid means of documenting both learning and relevant experiences in a large number of students. Competence and learning can be especially difficult to document in important aspects of education and training, such as patient-centeredness, the cultural context of disease, and social determinants of health that do not lend themselves to fact-based assessment methods. Successful implementation of a method such as an ePortfolio requires explicit faculty development, as many faculty members have limited expertise with modern educational assessment technology. As part of the authors' introduction of a Sociocultural ePortfolio Assessment Tool in the undergraduate medical curriculum, three faculty development workshops were held to expand faculty skills in using this technology. In addition to gaining comfort using a new Web-based technology, faculty members also needed to develop skills with providing mentored feedback and stimulating student reflection. Workshops were modeled after other successful programs reported in the literature and allowed faculty to develop a structured format for evaluating student content. Faculty members were given multiple opportunities to practice their newly developed skills providing mentored reflections using an ePortfolio. The workshop evaluations were positive, suggesting that faculty participation in the workshops were a necessary component for them to develop sufficient assessment skills for providing mentored reflection. Faculty members who participated in this program-whether or not they had content expertise in sociocultural medicine-valued the hands-on faculty development program.

  17. Comparison of Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) Measure Adherence Between Oncology Fellows, Advanced Practice Providers, and Attending Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jason; Zhang, Tian; Shah, Radhika; Kamal, Arif H; Kelley, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    Quality improvement measures are uniformly applied to all oncology providers, regardless of their roles. Little is known about differences in adherence to these measures between oncology fellows, advance practice providers (APP), and attending physicians. We investigated conformance across Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures for oncology fellows, advance practice providers, and attending physicians at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center (DVAMC). Using data collected from the Spring 2012 and 2013 QOPI cycles, we abstracted charts of patients and separated them based on their primary provider. Descriptive statistics and the chi-square test were calculated for each QOPI measure between fellows, advanced practice providers (APPs), and attending physicians. A total of 169 patients were reviewed. Of these, 31 patients had a fellow, 39 had an APP, and 99 had an attending as their primary oncology provider. Fellows and attending physicians performed similarly on 90 of 94 QOPI metrics. High-performing metrics included several core QOPI measures including documenting consent for chemotherapy, recommending adjuvant chemotherapy when appropriate, and prescribing serotonin antagonists when prescribing emetogenic chemotherapies. Low-performing metrics included documentation of treatment summary and taking action to address problems with emotional well-being by the second office visit. Attendings documented the plan for oral chemotherapy more often (92 vs. 63%, P=0.049). However, after the chart audit, we found that fellows actually documented the plan for oral chemotherapy 88% of the time (p=0.73). APPs and attendings performed similarly on 88 of 90 QOPI measures. The quality of oncology care tends to be similar between attendings and fellows overall; some of the significant differences do not remain significant after a second manual chart review, highlighting that the use of manual data collection for QOPI analysis is an imperfect system, and there may

  18. Yüksek Öğrenimde Öğretim Elemanlarının Teknoloji Kabulü ve Kullanımı: Adnan Menderes Üniversitesinde Ampirik Bir Değerlendirme = Faculty's Acceptance and Use of Technology in Higher Education: An Empirical Assessment at Adnan Menderes University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Hamit TURAN, Bengü Emine ÇOLAKOĞLU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For more than 20 years, Information Technologies, especially personal computer and Internet have been employed in all phases of our lives, especially in education. In today's globalizing world, borders among countries have been dissolved as qualified workforce would easily travel from one country to another. These developments required higher education institutions to provide education by using the latest techniques and technologies and educate highly qualified individuals with worldwide accredited diplomas and certificates at an increasing pace. In order to have such graduates, first instructors and academicians at higher institutions should use new Information and Communication Technologies effectively and efficiently and to do that, we need to know why these faculty members would use or prefer not to use such technologies as a personal choice. In this study, Davis' (1989 Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, which has strong socio-psychological theoretical foundations, has been empirically tested with the help of data collected at one of the newly established universities in Turkey. The study is among the first that tests the TAM, and the results generally support the theory empirically.

  19. Exploring the Relationship between Faculty Concerns and Faculty Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myoungsook; Cho, YoonJung; Svinicki, Marilla D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore how college faculty characteristics are related to their teaching concerns based on Fuller's model of teacher concern (self, task, and impact concern). Fuller's model was supported by self and task concerns, though impact concern did not follow the model. Impact concern was the highest among the three…

  20. Faculty-Curriculum Development. Curriculum Design by Nursing Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Helen; And Others

    Faculty curriculum development, and specific applications to nursing education, are addressed in 37 papers and 6 discussion summaries from 1973 and 1974 workshops sponsored by the National League for Nursing. Attention is directed to: the curriculum development process, curriculum evaluation, the conceptual framework as a part of curriculum…

  1. Implementation and Outcomes of a Faculty-Based, Peer Review Manuscript Writing Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulage, Kristine M; Larson, Elaine L

    2016-01-01

    The publication of scholarly work and research findings is an important expectation for nursing faculty; however, academic writing is often neglected, leaving dissemination through manuscript writing an area of concern for the nursing profession. Writing initiatives have been utilized to promote scholarly dissemination in schools of nursing, but those described in the literature have been primarily non-United States based and student focused. This article describes a faculty-based manuscript writing workshop, assesses participants' impressions, and describes its impact on scholarly output. The workshop is a collaborative learning process utilizing peer review to improve manuscript quality and model behaviors for improving writing and peer-reviewing skills. Seventeen workshop participants including three predoctoral students, 6 postdoctoral fellows, and 8 faculty members completed an anonymous workshop survey (81% response rate). All but 1 of 17 manuscripts reviewed in the workshop are published, accepted, or in the review process. All participants indicated that the workshop was a valuable use of time and would recommend it to colleagues. The greatest reported workshop benefit was its function as an impetus to complete and submit manuscripts. We recommend the manuscript writing workshop model for other schools of nursing seeking ways to expand their scholarly output and create accountability for dissemination through manuscript writing.

  2. Ombud's Corner: fellows and students – a win-win equation

    CERN Multimedia

    Sudeshna Datta-Cockerill

    2014-01-01

    The hundreds of Fellows and students working at CERN bring precious new blood into the Laboratory. At the same time, CERN offers them invaluable work experience that will have a significant impact on their future careers. It is important that we all work together to make this a win-win situation with lasting positive effects for all concerned over the years to come.   Fellows and students are just setting out on a great professional adventure.  Some of them are very young, others are a bit more experienced … and what happens during this early period can have vast consequences on their approach to work and indeed on their overall careers. They all come here with their hard earned skills and a high degree of motivation, ready to make the most out of an internship at CERN. Sometimes, they are called to integrate into well-established units; at other times, they are asked to join complex collaborations. Almost always they have to deal with new information, new cultures, new t...

  3. Varying difficulty of Snellen letters and common errors in amblyopic and fellow eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Julia A; Shah, Sabah A; Simon, John W

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the varying difficulty of Snellen letters in children with amblyopia. We tabulated the letter-by-letter responses of amblyopic and nonamblyopic fellow eyes on random, computer-generated Snellen lines. Participants were 60 children, aged 5 to 13 years, with a history of amblyopia. Main outcome measures were relative difficulties of Snellen letters and common misidentifications. Errors were 7.5 times more common with certain letters (B, C, F, S) than with others (A, L, Z, T), this difference increasing to 17.6-fold at threshold. Similar relative letter difficulty was demonstrated at lines above and at visual acuity thresholds, and both difficult and easy letters were the same for amblyopic and nonamblyopic fellow eyes. Specific misidentification errors were often repeated and were often reciprocal (eg, B for E and E for B). Since therapeutic decisions in amblyopia management are often based on small differences in visual acuities, the relative difficulties of letters used in their measurement should be considered. The Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study system should be considered for use in this clinical setting.

  4. Residents' and Fellows' Knowledge and Attitudes About Eating Disorders at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kristen; Accurso, Erin C; Kinasz, Kathryn R; Le Grange, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This study examined physician residents' and fellows' knowledge of eating disorders and their attitudes toward patients with eating disorders. Eighty physicians across disciplines completed a survey. The response rate for this survey across disciplines was 64.5 %. Participants demonstrated limited knowledge of eating disorders and reported minimal comfort levels treating patients with eating disorders. Psychiatry discipline (p = 0.002), eating disorder experience (p = 0.010), and having ≥4 eating disorder-continuing medical education credits (p = 0.037) predicted better knowledge of anorexia nervosa but not bulimia nervosa. Psychiatry residents (p = 0.041), and those who had treated at least one eating disorder patient (p = 0.006), reported significantly greater comfort treating patients with eating disorders. These results suggest that residents and fellows from this sample may benefit from training to increase awareness and confidence necessary to treat patients with eating disorders. Sufficient knowledge and comfort are critical since physicians are often the first health care provider to have contact with patients who have undiagnosed eating disorders.

  5. In-hospital fellow coverage reduces communication errors in the surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mallory; Alban, Rodrigo F; Hardy, James P; Oxman, David A; Garcia, Edward R; Hevelone, Nathanael; Frendl, Gyorgy; Rogers, Selwyn O

    2014-06-01

    Staff coverage strategies of intensive care units (ICUs) impact clinical outcomes. High-intensity staff coverage strategies are associated with lower morbidity and mortality. Accessible clinical expertise, team work, and effective communication have all been attributed to the success of this coverage strategy. We evaluate the impact of in-hospital fellow coverage (IHFC) on improving communication of cardiorespiratory events. A prospective observational study performed in an academic tertiary care center with high-intensity staff coverage. The main outcome measure was resident to fellow communication of cardiorespiratory events during IHFC vs home coverage (HC) periods. Three hundred twelve cardiorespiratory events were collected in 114 surgical ICU patients in 134 study days. Complete data were available for 306 events. One hundred three communication errors occurred. IHFC was associated with significantly better communication of events compared to HC (Pcommunicated 89% of events during IHFC vs 51% of events during HC (PCommunication patterns of junior and midlevel residents were similar. Midlevel residents communicated 68% of all on-call events (87% IHFC vs 50% HC, Pcommunicated 66% of events (94% IHFC vs 52% HC, PCommunication errors were lower in all ICUs during IHFC (Pcommunication errors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Diversity in the Emerging Critical Care Workforce: Analysis of Demographic Trends in Critical Care Fellows From 2004 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane-Fall, Meghan B; Miano, Todd A; Aysola, Jaya; Augoustides, John G T

    2017-05-01

    Diversity in the physician workforce is essential to providing culturally effective care. In critical care, despite the high stakes and frequency with which cultural concerns arise, it is unknown whether physician diversity reflects that of critically ill patients. We sought to characterize demographic trends in critical care fellows, who represent the emerging intensivist workforce. We used published data to create logistic regression models comparing annual trends in the representation of women and racial/ethnic groups across critical care fellowship types. United States Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-approved residency and fellowship training programs. Residents and fellows employed by Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education-accredited training programs from 2004 to 2014. None. From 2004 to 2014, the number of critical care fellows increased annually, up 54.1% from 1,606 in 2004-2005 to 2,475 in 2013-2014. The proportion of female critical care fellows increased from 29.5% (2004-2005) to 38.3% (2013-2014) (p workforce reflect underrepresentation of women and racial/ethnic minorities. Trends highlight increases in women and Hispanics and stable or decreasing representation of non-Hispanic underrepresented minority critical care fellows. Further research is needed to elucidate the reasons underlying persistent underrepresentation of racial and ethnic minorities in critical care fellowship programs.

  7. Education: Chemistry Faculty Job Mobility Surveyed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Summarizes results of a survey undertaking to describe the extent of movement of chemistry faculty members (N=1207) from academic to industrial positions. Numbers of male and female faculty within categories of reasons for leaving are also reported. (CS)

  8. Faculty Changing Departments: Why, Who, and When?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, George

    1976-01-01

    Departmental changes by faculty staff are suggested to be one solution to the budgetary problems of some institutions, rather than the more prevalent practice of nonreappointment of untenured faculty. (LBH)

  9. Nursing faculty preparedness for clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suplee, Patricia Dunphy; Gardner, Marcia; Jerome-D'Emilia, Bonnie

    2014-03-01

    Nursing faculty who teach in clinical settings face complex situations requiring evidence-based educational and evaluative strategies, yet many have had limited preparation for these tasks. A convenience sample of 74 nursing faculty participated in a survey about clinical teaching in prelicensure nursing programs. Most faculty developed teaching skills through conferences (57%), orientation at their educational institution (53%), or exposure in graduate school (38%). Thirty-one percent reported having no preparation for clinical teaching. Faculty felt least prepared to manage students with learning, physical, or emotional disabilities and incivility. Twenty-six percent had no preparation for evaluating students in the clinical setting, and only 17% had worked with a faculty mentor. Few evidence-based teaching strategies were used by the faculty. These findings indicate gaps exist in the preparation of clinical faculty. Graduate education, comprehensive orientation programs, and continuing professional development may help to ensure faculty are effective in managing and evaluating student learning. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Faculty Satisfaction in Academic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, Julie G.; Hitchcock, Maurice A.; Teherani, Arianne

    2000-01-01

    Describes the challenges and elements of satisfaction in academic medicine. Proposes a model of academic faculty satisfaction which postulates that organizational, job-related, and personal factors combine to develop self-knowledge, social knowledge, and satisfaction with outcomes of productivity, retention, and learner-patient satisfaction. (DB)

  11. Faculty Organizational Commitment and Citizenship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Janet; Ott, Molly; Bell, Alli

    2012-01-01

    Building on a theoretical framework that links characteristics of individuals and their work settings to organizational commitment (OC) and citizenship behavior, this study considers why faculty may be disengaging from institutional service. Analyses of survey data collected from a state system of higher education suggest that job characteristics,…

  12. Faculty Preceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friskney, Doyle

    2014-01-01

    The project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  13. Faculty Perceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarapata, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    This project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  14. Teaching portfolios for faculty evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, H I; Volden, C M

    1996-01-01

    Teaching portfolios are stimulating much discussion as more comprehensive approaches to evaluating teaching are sought. Portfolios can be used effectively for both formative and summative evaluative purposes. The content of a portfolio may vary greatly, but commonly includes material that reflects student learning, evaluative materials, and a personal statement on the faculty's philosophy of education. Professional growth often accompanies developing a personal teaching portfolio.

  15. Electronic Portfolios for Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Marilyn; Cockerham, Steve

    This paper examines the conceptual process of creating an electronic professional portfolio for faculty development. The characteristics of electronic professional portfolios and the benefits of electronic portfolio development are discussed. Additional topics covered include: collection and selection of portfolio contents; reflection on portfolio…

  16. Faculty Rights to Scholarly Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Molly

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides a history of the scholarly publishing system, and explains how it has evolved to benefit corporate publishers to the detriment of faculty, universities, and the public. It offers the open access movement as a potential remedy for the publishing crisis, and the policy environment surrounding these new forms of communication.

  17. Paperless Grades and Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, James C.; Jones, Dennis; Turner, Sandy

    2003-01-01

    Provides overview of process of switching from paper-based grade reporting to computer-based grading. Authors found that paperless grading decreased number of errors, made student access more immediate, and reduced costs incurred by purchasing and storing grade-scanning sheets. Authors also argue that direct entry grading encourages faculty to…

  18. Faculty Workload: An Analytical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennison, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Recent discussions of practices in higher education have tended toward muck-raking and self-styled exposure of cynical self-indulgence by faculty and administrators at the expense of students and their families, as usually occurs during periods of economic duress, rather than toward analytical studies designed to foster understanding This article…

  19. Faculty Perceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarapata, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    This project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  20. Faculty Preceptions of Learning Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friskney, Doyle

    2014-01-01

    The project researched faculty perceptions of learning spaces and their possible impact on student persistence at two community colleges in Kentucky. The researchers found through literature review, surveys, and interviews that learning spaces that enhanced student engagement and collaboration could positively impact student persistence. The…

  1. Faculty Development: Assessing Learner Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Barbara A.; Overfield, Karen

    This study addressed the challenges of developing a faculty professional development workshop on assessment, measurement, and evaluation of achievement in adult learners. The setting for the workshop was a system of postsecondary career colleges throughout the United States. The curriculum development model of D. Kirkpatrick (1994) was used as a…

  2. Embedded Neoliberalism within Faculty Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, John S.; Aliyeva, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Although there are claims that neoliberalism has not only commandeered the agenda and actions of universities and colleges but also become identified with the work of academic professionals, there is little empirical evidence to show that neoliberalism has infiltrated the work of faculty. This qualitative field work investigation of three…

  3. Relationships between teaching faculty and teaching librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Every librarian who teaches in an academic library setting understands the complexities involved in partnering with teaching faculty. Relationships Between Teaching Faculty and Teaching Librarians recounts the efforts of librarians and faculty working together in disciplines across the board to create and sustain connections crucial to the success of library instruction. This unique collection of essays examines various types of partnerships between librarians and faculty (networking, coordination, and collaboration) and addresses the big issues involved, including teaching within an academic

  4. 大學教師與館員合作推廣圖書館 資源利用與服務之實例研究: 以景文科技大學為例 A Case Study of Faculty-Librarian Collaboration on Promoting the Use of Library Resources and Services in the Jinwen University of Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ti Yu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available 本研究先透過文獻探討,了解大學圖書館館員與授課教師建立關係的管道與方法,及解析館員與教師可以合作的具體方向與策略,進而藉助這些方法與策略,實際規畫運用於景文科技大學圖書館,建立一系列館員與教師合作推動圖書館服務之實驗計畫,最後再透過與這些參與該項實驗計畫教師進行問卷調查,進一步了解這種館員與教師合作方案的優缺點,以做為未來作法改進的參考依據。本研究由教師問卷回饋調查結果與現況運作問題,歸納分析出四大建議:(一以「合作資源」作為策略分析基礎,制定發展策略與運作機制;(二縮短「合作對象」的認知差異;(三重視「合作關係」的永續經營;(四強化「合作模式」的行銷推廣,作為同道制定教師與館員協同推廣實施策略時之參考。This study reviewed some literatures in relation to the methods of how to establish relationships and the strategies of how to build collaborated partnerships between teaching faculty and librarians. Furthermore, the Jinwen University of Science and Technology library referred these ethods and strategies to plan an experimental project for promoting the use of library resources and services. An open-ended questions survey was conducted in this study for collecting the perceptions and comments of teaching faculty on the project. Finally, four suggestions were proposed in this study: 1. Treat resources as the basis of analyzing and operating the strategies on faculty-librarian collaboration, 2.reduce the difference in recognition between teaching faculty and librarians, 3.emphasize the ollaborated relationships between teaching aculty and librarians, and 4. strengthen the marketing and promotion on the models of facultylibrarian collaboration.

  5. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  6. Faculty Learning Matters: Organizational Conditions and Contexts That Shape Faculty Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Rivera, Mark; Kuvaeva, Alexandra; Corrigan, Kristen

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between faculty scholarly learning, faculty teaching learning, institutional support, faculty demographics, disciplinary groups, working conditions, and career outcomes such as retention, productivity, satisfaction, and career agency. We found that the stronger the scholarly learning faculty members reported,…

  7. Faculty attitudes about interprofessional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Beck Dallaghan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interprofessional education (IPE is an important component to training health care professionals. Research is limited in exploring the attitudes that faculty hold regarding IPE and what barriers they perceive to participating in IPE. The purpose of this study was to identify faculty attitudes about IPE and to identify barriers to participating in campus-wide IPE activities. Methods: A locally used questionnaire called the Nebraska Interprofessional Education Attitudes Scale (NIPEAS was used to assess attitudes related to interprofessional collaboration. Questions regarding perceived barriers were included at the end of the questionnaire. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to analyze the results in aggregate as well as by college. In addition, open-ended questions were analyzed using an immersion/crystallization framework to identify themes. Results: The results showed that faculty had positive attitudes of IPE, indicating that is not a barrier to participating in IPE activities. Most common barriers to participation were scheduling conflicts (x24,285=19.17, p=0.001, lack of department support (4,285=10.09, p=0.039, and lack of awareness of events (x24,285=26.38, p=0.000. Narrative comments corroborated that scheduling conflicts are an issue because of other priorities. Those who commented also added to the list of barriers, including relevance of the activities, location, and prior negative experiences. Discussion: With faculty attitudes being positive, the exploration of faculty's perceived barriers to IPE was considered even more important. Identifying these barriers will allow us to modify our IPE activities from large, campus-wide events to smaller activities that are longitudinal in nature, embedded within current curriculum and involving more authentic experiences.

  8. Faculty Recruitment in an Era of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marilyn; Schimpf, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Faculty recruitment is a challenge for administration and departments, especially in an era of change in the academy. This article builds on information from an interactive conference panel session that focused on faculty recruitment best practices. The article addresses faculty recruitment strategies that focus on the optimization of search…

  9. Retrenchment Clauses in Faculty Union Contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhoades, Gary

    1993-01-01

    Examination of retrenchment clauses in the faculty union contracts at 42 colleges and universities focused on implications for tenure rights and the roles prescribed for faculty and administrators. Concepts of financial exigency and shared governance are highlighted. Contracts were found to provide faculty with a limited and reactive role during…

  10. A Faculty Code is not a Coda

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Robert M.

    1974-01-01

    Many college and university faculties have adopted codes of faculty responsibilities and self-regulation. Firsthand advice on creating a code precedes an example of one: the new University of California Policy on Faculty Conduct and the Administration of Discipline. (Editor/PG)

  11. Perceptions of Faculty Status among Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Quinn; Garrison, Melissa; Hales, Whitney

    2016-01-01

    This study measures the opinions of ARL librarians concerning the benefits and disadvantages of faculty status in academic librarianship. Average responses from faculty and nonfaculty librarians, as well as from tenured and tenure-track librarians, are analyzed to determine the general perceptions of each group. Overall, faculty librarians…

  12. Faculty Senates and the Fiscal Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Julia

    1993-01-01

    A 1993 conference of college faculty senate members is discussed, focusing on common difficulties in governance during a period of retrenchment and due to the faculty culture. Some recent research into the relationship of finances to academic freedom and tenure is examined. Strategies for enhancing faculty senate effectiveness are suggested. (MSE)

  13. Faculty Members on Boards of Trustees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Patterson, Richard W.; Key, Andrew V.

    2013-01-01

    During the 2011-12 academic year, a group of faculty and student researchers at the Cornell Higher Education Research Institute (CHERI) gathered information on which public and private institutions had faculty members on boards of trustees and obtained the names of the faculty members serving in these roles. In April and May 2012, the authors…

  14. Undergraduate Nursing Student Experiences with Faculty Bullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Incivility and bullying in nursing education has become an area of increased interest. Incivility literature has focused primarily on student-to-faculty incivility. Less focus has been placed on faculty-to-student bullying. This study examined the lived experiences of undergraduate nursing students with faculty bullying. Using descriptive…

  15. Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment Study Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.D.; Tyler, N.; Montrosse, B.E.; Young, C.; Robb, S.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the highlights of the Special Education Faculty Needs Assessment Study (SEFNA). Actions taken after the release of The 2001 Faculty Shortage Study demonstrate that supply-and-demand imbalances can be improved. The projected shortage of special education faculty will directly and negatively affect students with disabilities and…

  16. Iowa community college Science, Engineering and Mathematics (SEM) faculty: Demographics and job satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogotzke, Kathy

    Community college faculty members play an increasingly important role in the educational system in the United States. However, over the past decade, concerns have arisen, especially in several high demand fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), that a shortage of qualified faculty in these fields exists. Furthermore, the average age of community college faculty is increasing, which creates added concern of an increased shortage of qualified faculty due to a potentially large number of faculty retiring. To help further understand the current population of community college faculty, as well as their training needs and their satisfaction with their jobs, data needs to be collected from them and examined. Currently, several national surveys are given to faculty at institutions of higher education, most notably the Higher Education Research Institute Faculty Survey, the National Study of Postsecondary Faculty, and the Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement. Of these surveys the Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement is the only survey focused solely on community college faculty. This creates a problem because community college faculty members differ from faculty at 4-year institutions in several significant ways. First, qualifications for hiring community college faculty are different at 4-year colleges or universities. Whereas universities and colleges typically require their faculty to have a Ph.D., community colleges require their arts and science faculty to have a only master's degree and their career faculty to have experience and the appropriate training and certification in their field with only a bachelor's degree. The work duties and expectations for community college faculty are also different at 4-year colleges or universities. Community college faculty typically teach 14 to 19 credit hours a semester and do little, if any research, whereas faculty at 4-year colleges typically teach 9 to 12 credit

  17. Engaging Faculty in the Assessment and Improvement of Students' Critical Thinking Using the Critical Thinking Assessment Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Barry; Haynes, Ada

    2011-01-01

    Many assessment experts believe it is essential to develop faculty-driven assessment tools in order to engage faculty in meaningful assessment that can improve student learning. Tennessee Technological University (TTU) has been involved in an extended effort during the last ten years to develop, refine, and nationally disseminate an instrument to…

  18. ‘Uncrunching’ time: medical schools’ use of social media for faculty development

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    Peter S. Cahn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The difficulty of attracting attendance for in-person events is a problem common to all faculty development efforts. Social media holds the potential to disseminate information asynchronously while building a community through quick, easy-to-use formats. The authors sought to document creative uses of social media for faculty development in academic medical centers. Method: In December 2011, the first author (P.S.C. examined the websites of all 154 accredited medical schools in the United States and Canada for pages relevant to faculty development. The most popular social media sites and searched for accounts maintained by faculty developers in academic medicine were also visited. Several months later, in February 2012, a second investigator (C.W.S. validated these data via an independent review. Results: Twenty-two (22 medical schools (14.3% employed at least one social media technology in support of faculty development. In total, 40 instances of social media tools were identified – the most popular platforms being Facebook (nine institutions, Twitter (eight institutions, and blogs (eight institutions. Four medical schools, in particular, have developed integrated strategies to engage faculty in online communities. Conclusions: Although relatively few medical schools have embraced social media to promote faculty development, the present range of such uses demonstrates the flexibility and affordability of the tools. The most popular tools incorporate well into faculty members’ existing use of technology and require minimal additional effort. Additional research into the benefits of engaging faculty through social media may help overcome hesitation to invest in new technologies.

  19. The Learning Object Economy: Implications For Developing Faculty Expertise

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    The COHERE Group

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolving use of learning technologies and systems, such as learning object systems, to support more social learning environments in which learners have more agency than ever before to construct their own learning experiences is an innovation that involves both faculty and learners in a process of difficult sociocultural change. Programs of faculty support that acknowledge that faculty’s learning needs extend beyond the development of technical skills to the development of new pedagogical skills are indicated. This paper argues that the evolving concept of learning objects systems, and the "economy" that is emerging around the idea of sharable, reusable learning objects managed by repositories, presents new challenges and opportunities for our community. Faculty working with these systems may need to be supported through a personal process of reconceptualizing the nature of teaching and learning within these environments. This process of personal transformation has the potential for change in institutional policy and practice, the institutional cultural change of which Tony Bates (2000 and others speak (cf. Advisory Committee for Online Learning, 2000. The Collaboration for Online Higher Education Research (COHERE is an alliance of eight research-intensive Canadian universities that is examining these challenges through a multi-pronged research program, one focus of which is supporting faculty as they research their own practice related to technology-enhanced teaching innovations. More specifically, this paper is itself a collaboration among the COHERE partners to share our collective belief about the potential for faculty and institutional transformation through participation in these "e-learning evolutions".

  20. Students Computer Skills in Faculty of Education

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    Mehmet Caglar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays; the usage of technology is not a privilege but an obligation. Technological developments influence structures andfunctions of educational institutions. It is also expected from the teachers that they integrate technology in their lessons inorder to educate the individuals of information society. This research has covered 145(68 female, 78 male students, studying inNear East University Faculty of Education. The Computer Skills Scale developed by Güçlü (2010 was used as a data collectingtool. Data were analysed using SPSS software program. In this study, students’ computer skills were investigated; the variationsin the relationships between computer skills and (a gender, (b family’s net monthly income, (c presence of computers athome, (d presence of a computer laboratory at school and (e parents’ computer skills were examined. Frequency analysis,percentage and mean calculations were used. In addition, t-test and multi-variate analysis were used to look at the relationshipbetween different variables. As a result of this study, a statistically significant relationship between computer skills of studentswho had a computer at home and computer skills of those who didn’t have a computer at home were found.

  1. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  2. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  3. Motivational Factors Affecting the Integration of a Learning Management System by Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Gautreau

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Online courses taught using a learning management system are common in higher education. Teaching online requires a new set of skills, knowledge, and professional growth. Faculty development programs often overlook factors that promote or inhibit the use of technologies among professors. This study identified the motivation factors that faculty consider relevant to their personal decision to adopt a learning management system. A needs assessment evaluation methodology was applied to investigate two research questions. The first question analyzed the demographics of the participants in this study including gender, age, tenure status, department, and years of experience using a technology and using an LMS. The second research question investigated the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that motivate faculty to adopt a learning management system in their instruction. Participants (N = 42 were tenured and tenure track faculty instructing at a four-year public university in California.

  4. Experiences of faculty and students using an audience response system in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christine M; Monturo, Cheryl; Conroy, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The advent of innovative technologies, such as the audience response system, provides an opportunity to engage students and enhance learning. Based on their experiences, three nursing faculty evaluated the use of an audience response system in four distinct nursing courses through the use of informal survey results. When using the audience response system, the faculty experienced an increased perception of student attentiveness and engagement, high level of class attendance, and enhanced learning. Faculty feelings were mixed concerning the burden in adapting to increased classroom time and increased preparation time. Students' perception of the value of audience response system use was mostly positive, except when responses were included as part of the grade. The majority of the students indicated that use of the audience response system enhanced learning and was a helpful learning method when used with NCLEX-style questions. Overall, faculty believed that the benefits of student engagement and enhanced learning outweighed the burdens of incorporating this new technology in the classroom.

  5. What Is It "To Lead?": A Nuanced Exploration of Leadership by 3M National Student Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajer-Koulack, Ameena; Csorba, Emerson Thomas; Lee, Kyuwon Rosa; Smrke, Brianna; Smyth, Tristan

    2014-01-01

    In Canadian higher education, students from across the world interact within tight-knit communities, sharing ideas and developing a wealth of soft and disciplinary skills. With many universities playing host to dozens if not hundreds of student groups, the word "leadership" is uttered by students and faculty in hallways, gymnasiums,…

  6. The discovery of microorganisms by Robert Hooke and Antoni Van Leeuwenhoek, fellows of the Royal Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gest, Howard

    2004-05-01

    The existence of microscopic organisms was discovered during the period 1665-83 by two Fellows of The Royal Society, Robert Hooke and Antoni van Leeuwenhoek. In Micrographia (1665), Hooke presented the first published depiction of a microganism, the microfungus Mucor. Later, Leeuwenhoek observed and described microscopic protozoa and bacteria. These important revelations were made possible by the ingenuity of Hooke and Leeuwenhoek in fabricating and using simple microscopes that magnified objects from about 25-fold to 250-fold. After a lapse of more than 150 years, microscopy became the backbone of our understanding of the roles of microbes in the causation of infectious diseases and the recycling of chemical elements in the biosphere.

  7. Young geologist trades neptunium for newspapers as 2012 AGU Mass Media Fellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mary Catherine

    2012-05-01

    Though the lure of rocks, minerals, and radioactive elements took her away from her original studies, one geology Ph.D. candidate is returning to her journalism roots this summer as AGU's 2012 Mass Media Science and Engineering Fellow. Jessica Morrison is one of 12 young scientists nationwide who are trading in their lab coats for reporters' notebooks in mid-June as part of the program coordinated by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, which helps young scientists cultivate communication skills to help disseminate scientific information to general audiences. Morrison is a Ph.D. student in the Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences at the University of Notre Dame. She spends her days in a laboratory investigating the geochemistry of actinides, the radioactive elements in the "no man's land" of the periodic table—the section that often gets left off or moved to the bottom. These are elements like uranium, neptunium, and plutonium.

  8. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  9. Faculty development programs for medical teachers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANJAY ZODPEY

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: India has the highest number of medical colleges in the world and subsequently the higher number of medical teachers. There is a dire need of adopting a systematic approach to faculty development to enhance quality education to meet health challenges for 21st Century. This manuscript provides a landscape of faculty development programs in India, identifying gaps and opportunities for reforms in faculty development. Methods: Conventionally, FDPs are organized by medical colleges and universities through Basic Courses and Advanced Courses focusing on pedagogy. Medical Council of India is facilitating FDPs through 18 selected regional centers to enable medical teachers to avail modern education technology for teaching from July 2009. Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research has three Regional Institutes in India. Results: Recommendations include the need for formulating a national strategy for faculty development to not only enhance the quantity of medical teachers but also the quality of medical education; providing support for Departments of Medical Education/Regional Centers in terms of finance and staffing and incorporation of teaching skills in postgraduate training. Conclusion: Distance learning courses focusing on educational leadership and pedagogy for medical teachers can be an option to reach a wider audience. FDPs can be an asset in recruiting and retaining teachers as they offer valued professional development opportunities.

  10. Toward Inclusive STEM Classrooms: What Personal Role Do Faculty Play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killpack, Tess L; Melón, Laverne C

    2016-01-01

    Private and public policies are increasingly aimed at supporting efforts to broaden participation of a diverse body of students in higher education. Unfortunately, this increase in student diversity does not always occur alongside changes in institutional culture. Unexamined biases in institutional culture can prevent diverse students from thriving and persisting in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Given the daily personal interactions that faculty have with students, we suggest that individual educators have the opportunity, and responsibility, to improve the retention and persistence of diverse students. However, in our experience, faculty professional development programs often limit discussions of diversity to "comfortable" topics (such as learning styles) and miss opportunities to explore deeper issues related to faculty privilege, implicit bias, and cues for stereotype threat that we all bring to the classroom. In this essay, we present a set of social science concepts that we can extend to our STEM courses to inform our efforts at inclusive excellence. We have recommended strategies for meaningful reflection and professional development with respect to diversity and inclusion, and aim to empower faculty to be change agents in their classrooms as a means to broadening participation in STEM fields.

  11. Toward Inclusive STEM Classrooms: What Personal Role Do Faculty Play?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killpack, Tess L.; Melón, Laverne C.

    2016-01-01

    Private and public policies are increasingly aimed at supporting efforts to broaden participation of a diverse body of students in higher education. Unfortunately, this increase in student diversity does not always occur alongside changes in institutional culture. Unexamined biases in institutional culture can prevent diverse students from thriving and persisting in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. Given the daily personal interactions that faculty have with students, we suggest that individual educators have the opportunity, and responsibility, to improve the retention and persistence of diverse students. However, in our experience, faculty professional development programs often limit discussions of diversity to “comfortable” topics (such as learning styles) and miss opportunities to explore deeper issues related to faculty privilege, implicit bias, and cues for stereotype threat that we all bring to the classroom. In this essay, we present a set of social science concepts that we can extend to our STEM courses to inform our efforts at inclusive excellence. We have recommended strategies for meaningful reflection and professional development with respect to diversity and inclusion, and aim to empower faculty to be change agents in their classrooms as a means to broadening participation in STEM fields. PMID:27496362

  12. Organizational climate and family life: how these factors affect the status of women faculty at one medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shollen, S Lynn; Bland, Carole J; Finstad, Deborah A; Taylor, Anne L

    2009-01-01

    To compare men and women faculty's family situations and perceptions of organizational climate. In 2005, the authors sent an electronic survey to full-time faculty at the University of Minnesota Medical School to assess their perceptions of professional relationships, mentoring, obstacles to satisfaction, policies, circumstances that contribute to departure, gender equality, family situations, and work life. Of 615 faculty, 354 (57%) responded. Women and men were equally productive and worked similar total hours. Women were less likely to have partners/spouses, were more likely to have partners/spouses who were employed, and devoted more time to household tasks. Compared with men, women reported more experience with obstacles to career success and satisfaction and with circumstances that contribute to departure. More women than men perceived that they were expected to represent the perspective of their gender, that they were constantly under scrutiny by colleagues, that they worked harder than colleagues worked in order to be perceived as legitimate, and that there were "unwritten rules" and bias against women. Few faculty reported overt discrimination; however, more women than men perceived gender discrimination in promotion, salary, space/resources, access to administrative staff, and graduate student/fellow assignment. Work-life and family-life factors served as obstacles to satisfaction and retention of the women faculty studied. Many of these factors reflect challenges attributable to subtle gender bias and the intersection of work and family life. The authors provide examples showing that medical schools can implement policy changes that support faculty who must balance work and family responsibilities. Identification and elimination of gender bias in areas such as promotion, salary, and resource allocation is essential.

  13. Competency-based goals, objectives, and linked evaluations for rheumatology training programs: a standardized template of learning activities from the Carolinas Fellows Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criscione-Schreiber, Lisa G; Bolster, Marcy B; Jonas, Beth L; O'Rourke, Kenneth S

    2013-06-01

    American Council on Graduate Medical Education program requirements mandate that rheumatology training programs have written goals, objectives, and performance evaluations for each learning activity. Since learning activities are similar across rheumatology programs, we aimed to create competency-based goals and objectives (CBGO) and evaluations that would be generalizable nationally. Through an established collaboration of the 4 training programs' directors in North Carolina and South Carolina, we collaboratively composed CBGO and evaluations for each learning activity for rheumatology training programs. CBGO and linked evaluations were written using appropriate verbs based on Bloom's taxonomy. Draft documents were peer reviewed by faculty at the 4 institutions and by members of the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) Clinician Scholar Educator Group. We completed templates of CBGO for core and elective rotations and conferences. Templates detail progressive fellow performance improvement appropriate to educational level. Specific CBGO are mirrored in learning activity evaluations. Templates are easily modified to fit individual program attributes, have been successfully implemented by our 4 programs, and have proven their value in 4 residency review committee reviews. We propose adoption of these template CBGO by the ACR, with access available to all rheumatology training programs. Evaluation forms that exactly reflect stated objectives ensure that trainees are assessed using standardized measures and that trainees are aware of the learning expectations. The objectives mirrored in the evaluations closely align with the proposed milestones for internal medicine training, and will therefore be a useful starting point for creating these milestones in rheumatology. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Assessing faculty professional development in STEM higher education: Sustainability of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derting, Terry L; Ebert-May, Diane; Henkel, Timothy P; Maher, Jessica Middlemis; Arnold, Bryan; Passmore, Heather A

    2016-03-01

    We tested the effectiveness of Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching IV (FIRST), a professional development program for postdoctoral scholars, by conducting a study of program alumni. Faculty professional development programs are critical components of efforts to improve teaching and learning in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, but reliable evidence of the sustained impacts of these programs is lacking. We used a paired design in which we matched a FIRST alumnus employed in a tenure-track position with a non-FIRST faculty member at the same institution. The members of a pair taught courses that were of similar size and level. To determine whether teaching practices of FIRST participants were more learner-centered than those of non-FIRST faculty, we compared faculty perceptions of their teaching strategies, perceptions of environmental factors that influence teaching, and actual teaching practice. Non-FIRST and FIRST faculty reported similar perceptions of their teaching strategies and teaching environment. FIRST faculty reported using active learning and interactive engagement in lecture sessions more frequently compared with non-FIRST faculty. Ratings from external reviewers also documented that FIRST faculty taught class sessions that were learner-centered, contrasting with the teacher-centered class sessions of most non-FIRST faculty. Despite marked differences in teaching practice, FIRST and non-FIRST participants used assessments that targeted lower-level cognitive skills. Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of the FIRST program and the empirical utility of comparison groups, where groups are well matched and controlled for contextual variables (for example, departments), for evaluating the effectiveness of professional development for subsequent teaching practices.

  15. Preworkshop knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy of rheumatology fellows and rheumatologists of seven North, Central, and South American countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Zarza, José E; Hernández-Díaz, Cristina; Saavedra, Miguel A; Alvarez-Nemegyei, José; Kalish, Robert A; Canoso, Juan J; Villaseñor-Ovies, Pablo

    2014-02-01

    To report the baseline knowledge of clinical anatomy of rheumatology fellows and rheumatologists from Argentina, Chile, Ecuador, El Salvador, Mexico, the US, and Uruguay. The invitation to attend a workshop in clinical anatomy was an open call by national rheumatology societies in 4 countries or by invitation from teaching program directors in 3 countries. Prior to the workshop, a practical test of anatomic structures commonly involved in rheumatic diseases was administered. The test consisted of the demonstration of these structures or their function in the participant's or instructor's body. At one site, a postworkshop practical test was administered immediately after the workshop. There were 170 participants (84 rheumatology fellows, 61 rheumatologists, and 25 nonrheumatologists). The overall mean ± SD number of correct answers was 46.6% ± 19.9% and ranged from 32.5-67.0% by country. Rheumatology fellows scored significantly higher than nonrheumatologists. Questions related to anatomy of the hand scored the lowest of the regions surveyed. Rheumatology fellows and rheumatologists showed a deficit in knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy that is of central importance in rheumatologic assessment and diagnosis. This gap may hinder accurate and cost-effective rheumatologic diagnosis, particularly in the area of regional pain syndromes. Presently, widespread use of musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS) by rheumatologists may be premature, since a key component of expert-level MSUS is the integration of an accurate knowledge of anatomy with the views obtained with the ultrasound probe. Copyright © 2014 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  16. Practising What They Preach? An Investigation into the Pedagogical Beliefs and Online Teaching Practices of National Teaching Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Tessa

    2015-01-01

    National Teaching Fellows (NTFs) in the UK are celebrated individuals who have made a successful claim for teaching excellence to the Higher Education Academy. This paper reports the results of an empirical study of NTFs with expertise in online learning, which measured their pedagogical beliefs and online teaching practices, using a…

  17. Issues of Education at Community Colleges: Essays by Fellows in the Mid-Career Fellowship Program at Princeton University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princeton Univ., NJ. Mid-Career Fellowship Program.

    This document contains the following nine essays by fellows in the Mid-Career Fellowship Program at Princeton University, New Jersey: (1) Promotion Processes at the Public Community Colleges of New Jersey, by Harvey Braverman; (2) Plagiarism in ESL Contexts at the Community College, by Barrie Chi. Contains eight references; (3) Partnership and…

  18. Cultivating adjunct faculty: strategies beyond orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santisteban, Lisette; Egues, Aida L

    2014-01-01

    Schools of nursing across the country are using adjunct faculty to meet clinical, didactic, and online instructional needs of their nursing programs. While adjunct faculty are vital to the alleviation of the nursing shortage and the shortage of nursing faculty, and to the preparation of the current and future nursing workforce, little is known about cultivating adjunct faculty as nurse educators. To investigate the cultivation of adjunct nursing faculty, the authors engaged in a comprehensive review of the extant literature of primary databases and reports from accredited nursing programs and professional nursing organizations. Scant literature exists that seeks to identify issues associated with developing adjunct nursing faculty as educators, including role transition needs, and useful approaches to orientation, mentorship, or retention. Working toward cultivation of adjunct faculty includes innovative support measures beyond simple orientation. Orientation should be comprehensive, and move to mentorship as a key component that helps establish a sustainable nurse educator career for adjunct nursing faculty. It is incumbent upon schools of nursing to cultivate their adjunct faculty, and this article includes creative approaches to doing so, with recommendations for nursing education, nursing practice, and nursing research settings. While adjunct faculty may successfully meet some of the challenges faced by nursing programs, they themselves face many challenges that may hinder their success as nurse educators. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The research impact of school psychology faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Marley W; Chan-Park, Christina Y

    2015-06-01

    Hirsch's (2005) h index has become one of the most popular indicators of research productivity for higher education faculty. However, the h index varies across academic disciplines so empirically established norms for each discipline are necessary. To that end, the current study collected h index values from Scopus and Google Scholar databases for 401 tenure-track faculty members from 109 school psychology training programs. Male faculty tended to be more senior than female faculty and a greater proportion of the male faculty held professorial rank. However, female faculty members outnumbered males at the assistant and associate professor ranks. Although strongly correlated (rho=.84), h index values from Google Scholar were higher than those from Scopus. h index distributions were positively skewed with many faculty having low values and a few faculty having high values. Faculty in doctoral training programs exhibited significantly larger h index values than faculty in specialist training programs and there were univariate differences in h index values across academic rank and sex, but sex differences were not significant after taking seniority into account. It was recommended that the h index be integrated with peer review and diverse other indicators when considering individual merit. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adapting to a Computer-Oriented Society: The Leadership Role of Business and Liberal Arts Faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, David E.

    The need for higher education to take a proactive rather than a reactive stance in dealing with the impact of the computer is considered. The field of computerized video technology is briefly discussed. It is suggested that disparate groups such as the liberal arts and business faculties should cooperate to maximize the use of computer technology.…