WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology employee exit

  1. 29 CFR 1917.122 - Employee exits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee exits. 1917.122 Section 1917.122 Labor Regulations...) MARINE TERMINALS Terminal Facilities § 1917.122 Employee exits. (a) Employee exits shall be clearly marked. (b) If an employee exit is not visible from employees' work stations, directional...

  2. Technological Progress, Exit and Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp; Sørensen, Allan

    The dynamics of export market exit and firm closure have found limited attention in heterogeneous-firms trade models. Accordingly, several of the predictions on exit stemming from new-new trade theory are at odds with the stylized facts. Empirically, higher productivity firms survive longer, higher...... productivity exporters are more likely to continue to export, and market exit is typically preceded by periods of contracting market shares. We show that the simple inclusion of exogenous economy wide technological progress into the standard Melitz (2003) model generates a tractable dynamic framework...

  3. Technological Progress, Exit and Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp; Sørensen, Allan

    The dynamics of export market exit and firm closure have found limited attention in heterogeneous-firms trade models. Accordingly, several of the predictions on exit stemming from new-new trade theory are at odds with the stylized facts. Empirically, higher productivity firms survive longer, higher...

  4. Firm Exit, Technological Progress and Trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Philipp; Sørensen, Allan

    productivity firms survive longer, most firm closures are young firms, higher productivity exporters are more likely to continue to export compared to less productive exporters and market exits as well as firm closures are typically preceded by periods of contracting market shares. The present paper shows...... that the simple inclusion of exogenous economy wide technological progress into the standard Melitz (2003) model generates a tractable dynamic framework that generates endogenous exit decisions of firms in line with the stylized facts. Furthermore, we derive the effects of faster technological progress and trade...

  5. Why Do Some Employees Fall into and Fail to Exit a Job-Lock Situation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Huysse-Gaytandjieva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have paid little attention to the employees’ ability to exit a job-lock situation and factors that determine this ability. It remains unclear why some employees who experience job lock are able to exit this state while others remain in job lock. We use longitudinal data to identify employees who have fallen in the state of job lock and their subsequent behavior—exiting or remaining in job lock. By use of a first-order Markov transition models, we analyze the relevance of sociodemographic features, employment, occupational, sectoral, and contextual factors, as well as personality characteristics in explaining the transition or its absence. Overall the results show that both demographic factors and work-related aspects increase the likelihood that an employee enters the long-term job lock state (especially for older, married, full-time employed, those in a craft occupation and governmental sector, and in a region with high unemployment. Mental health problems and personality characteristics (low peak-end self-esteem and decisional procrastination have a significant effect on the probability to stay in long-term job lock. On the contrary, having a managerial, service, or associate occupation, working in the private sector, and having promotion opportunities increase the chance of an exit from the state of job lock.

  6. Employee engagement and job satisfaction in the information technology industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalanabhan, T J; Sai, L Prakash; Mayuri, Duggirala

    2009-12-01

    Employee engagement has been identified as being important to employee productivity and performance. Measures of employee engagement and job satisfaction in the context of information technology (IT) were developed to explore how employee engagement affects perceived job satisfaction. In a sample of IT professionals (N = 159), controlling for age, sex, job tenure, and marital status, employee engagement had a significant and positive correlation with job satisfaction.

  7. Exiting Use of Technology in Teaching Business Spanish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelm, Orlando

    1998-01-01

    Provides brief descriptions of what some of the Centers for International Business Education and Research (CIBERs) and several non-CIBERs are currently doing to incorporate technology into their curriculum for Business Spanish. The list also provides the name and e-mail address of a contact person at each institution who works with Business…

  8. Employee participation and cleaner technology: learning processes in environmental teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remmen, Arne; Lorentzen, Børge

    2000-01-01

    The approach to pollution prevention in Danish industries in the late-1980s and in the beginning of the 1990s met criticism, because the cleaner technology projects focused too narrowly on technical solutions implemented by experts. The objective of the project “Employee Participation in the Impl......The approach to pollution prevention in Danish industries in the late-1980s and in the beginning of the 1990s met criticism, because the cleaner technology projects focused too narrowly on technical solutions implemented by experts. The objective of the project “Employee Participation...... in the Implementation of Cleaner Technology” was to develop a more active role for employees in the environmental activities of companies. Based on practical experiments in five Danish firms within different industrial sectors, the project concluded that employee participation can have a strong effect on changing...

  9. Disagreements, Employee spinoffs and the Choice of Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Peter; Chen, Jing

    2011-01-01

    Most existing models of employee spinoffs assume they are driven by a desire to implement new ideas. However, history is replete with examples of spinoffs that were launched to continue with old ideas that their parents were in the process of abandoning. We develop a model of technology choice...... in which spinoffs may form to implement new or old technologies. A team of managers engaged in production using technology x, is considering switching to technology y. The value of y is not known and disagreements may emerge among team members. Managers who develop sufficiently strong disagreements...... with their colleagues choose to form new companies to implement their preferred strategy. Two distinct classes of spinoffs arise. In the first, a spinoff forms when an employee comes to believe it is worth adopting y but the firm does not. In the second, a spinoff arises when an employee sufficiently disagrees...

  10. Employee Access IDs Enhanced with Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2011-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, OUT OF THE CLASSROOM Alan Black’s course paper for Technology in Homeland Security addressed potential insider threats to airports and how a simple technological shift could mitigate those threats. Black, who is vice president...

  11. Monitoring Employee Behavior Through the Use of Technology and Issues of Employee Privacy in America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Moussa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the historic American love for privacy that has enhanced innovation and creativity throughout the country, encroachments on privacy restrain individual freedom. Noticeable, advances in technology have offered decision makers remarkable monitoring aptitudes that can be used in numerous tasks for multiple reasons. This has led scholars and practitioners to pose a significant number of questions about what is legitimate and illegitimate in the day-to-day affairs of a business. This article is composed of (a research about electronic monitoring and privacy concerns; (b definitions of, critiques of, and alternatives to electronic performance monitoring (EPM; (c motives behind employee monitoring and leadership behaviors; (d advice that makes monitoring less distressful; (e employee monitoring policies; (f reviewing policies and procedures; (g the role of human resource development (HRD in employee assessment and development; and (h conclusion and recommendations for further studies.

  12. The Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    After making a unique, non-obvious, and useful discovery, NIH researchers must immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention, and then consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Manager about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  13. Design, durability and low cost processing technology for composite fan exit guide vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecherman, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    A program was conducted to design, fabricate and test a durable, low cost, lightweight composite fan exit guide vane for high bypass ratio gas turbine engine application. Eight candidate material/design combinations were evaluated by NASTRAN finite element analysis. Four of these candidate systems were selected for composite vane fabrication by two vendors. A core and shell vane design was chosen in which the unidirectional graphite core fiber was the same for all candidates. The shell material, fiber orientation and ply configuration were varied. Material tests were performed on raw material and composite specimens to establish specification requirements. Composite vanes were nondestructively inspected and subsequently fatigue tested in both dry and 'wet' conditions. The program provided relevant data with respect to design analysis, materials properties, inspection standards, improved durability, weight benefits and part price of the composite fan exit guide vane.

  14. Exit Prostitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Theresa Dyrvig; Aslaug Kjær, Agnete; Christensen, Gunvor

    2015-01-01

    Dette midtvejsnotat omhandler projektet ”Exit prostitution”. Exit-projektet blev påbegyndt i april 2012 og løber til udgangen af 2015 og befinder sig i øjeblikket midtvejs i projektets afprøvningsfase. I projektet anvendes metoden Critical Time Intervention (CTI), der er en evidensbaseret...... til det. Exit-projektet er dermed en central socialpolitisk indsats overfor borgere i prostitution i det danske samfund. I dette notat belyser vi midtvejsresultater for, hvordan udviklingen er for de borgere, der er nået halvt igennem et CTI-forløb. I den afsluttende evaluering af projektet i 2015 vil...

  15. Exit Prostitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Theresa Dyrvig; Aslaug Kjær, Agnete; Christensen, Gunvor

    2015-01-01

    Dette midtvejsnotat omhandler projektet ”Exit prostitution”. Exit-projektet blev påbegyndt i april 2012 og løber til udgangen af 2015 og befinder sig i øjeblikket midtvejs i projektets afprøvningsfase. I projektet anvendes metoden Critical Time Intervention (CTI), der er en evidensbaseret...... til det. Exit-projektet er dermed en central socialpolitisk indsats overfor borgere i prostitution i det danske samfund. I dette notat belyser vi midtvejsresultater for, hvordan udviklingen er for de borgere, der er nået halvt igennem et CTI-forløb. I den afsluttende evaluering af projektet i 2015 vil...

  16. The practical paradox of technology: The influence of communication technology use on employee burnout and engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Hoeven, Claartje L.; van Zoonen, Ward; Fonner, Kathryn L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Technological advancements in the workplace frequently have produced contradictory effects by facilitating accessibility and efficiency while increasing interruptions and unpredictability. We combine insights from organizational paradoxes and the job demands–resources model to construct a framework identifying positive and negative mechanisms in the relationship between communication technology use (CTU) and employee well-being, operationalized as work engagement and burnout. In this study of Dutch workers, we demonstrate that CTU increases well-being through positive pathways (accessibility and efficiency) and decreases well-being through negative pathways (interruptions and unpredictability). We highlight the importance of (1) investigating CTU resources and demands simultaneously to grasp the relationship between CTU and employee well-being, and (2) considering CTU's downsides to successfully implement new communication technologies and flexible work designs. PMID:27226694

  17. The practical paradox of technology: The influence of communication technology use on employee burnout and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ter Hoeven, Claartje L; van Zoonen, Ward; Fonner, Kathryn L

    2016-04-02

    Technological advancements in the workplace frequently have produced contradictory effects by facilitating accessibility and efficiency while increasing interruptions and unpredictability. We combine insights from organizational paradoxes and the job demands-resources model to construct a framework identifying positive and negative mechanisms in the relationship between communication technology use (CTU) and employee well-being, operationalized as work engagement and burnout. In this study of Dutch workers, we demonstrate that CTU increases well-being through positive pathways (accessibility and efficiency) and decreases well-being through negative pathways (interruptions and unpredictability). We highlight the importance of (1) investigating CTU resources and demands simultaneously to grasp the relationship between CTU and employee well-being, and (2) considering CTU's downsides to successfully implement new communication technologies and flexible work designs.

  18. Exit prostitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Line; Aslaug Kjær, Agnete; Amilon, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Dette statusnotat for projektet ”Exit Prostitution” belyser de foreløbige resultater og tendenser for projektet. Exit Prostitution løb oprindeligt fra april 2012 til udgangen af 2015, men med en nylig forlængelse løber projektet til udgangen af 2016. Projektet befinder sig således i slutningen af...... afprøvet med succes i forhold til hjemløshed både nationalt og internationalt. Målet med anvendelsen af metoden i forhold til målgruppen for Exit Prostitution er, at borgere med prostitutionserfaring, som ønsker at ophøre med salg af seksuelle ydelser eller ønsker at opleve en forbedring af deres...

  19. Exit prostitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Line; Aslaug Kjær, Agnete; Amilon, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Dette statusnotat for projektet ”Exit Prostitution” belyser de foreløbige resultater og tendenser for projektet. Exit Prostitution løb oprindeligt fra april 2012 til udgangen af 2015, men med en nylig forlængelse løber projektet til udgangen af 2016. Projektet befinder sig således i slutningen af...... afprøvet med succes i forhold til hjemløshed både nationalt og internationalt. Målet med anvendelsen af metoden i forhold til målgruppen for Exit Prostitution er, at borgere med prostitutionserfaring, som ønsker at ophøre med salg af seksuelle ydelser eller ønsker at opleve en forbedring af deres...

  20. An Investigation of Employees' Use of E-Learning Systems: Applying the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Hsieh, Yi-Chuan; Chen, Yen-Hsun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply the technology acceptance model to examine the employees' attitudes and acceptance of electronic learning (e-learning) systems in organisations. This study examines four factors (organisational support, computer self-efficacy, prior experience and task equivocality) that are believed to influence employees'…

  1. Employee retention within the Information Technology Division of a South African Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Mohlala

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The information technology industry is faced with a shrinking pool of skilled employees causing demand to increase for these employees. This places organisations under pressure to devise retention strategies to retain these employees. This study was conducted in the Information Technology Division of a South African Bank.Research purpose: To understand the challenges faced by the bank’s information technology leadership team to retain employees.Motivation for the study: To understand the challenges faced in attracting and retaining information technology professionals, and how this can serve as input for reducing skills shortages in Information Technology Divisions.Research design, approach and method: An interpretive approach employing a case study strategy and qualitative methods was employed. Semi structured interviews were conducted with thirteen senior managers and four directors of the bank’s Information Technology Division, who were selected on a purposive basis. Data were subjected to Creswell’s four stage data analysis process.Main findings: Findings indicate that employee turnover is the main contributor of skills shortages within the studied division. The lack of a retention strategy is making it difficult for leadership to identify crucial skills that must be retained.Practical/managerial implications: Evidence suggests that this bank, although they would like to retain information technology professionals, is not creating an environment conducive to do this, as little attention is paid to the unique demands of this group of employees.Contribution/value-add: This study investigates a specific group of employees for which a unique retention strategy does not exist. In understanding the challenges that impact on attracting and retaining information technology professionals, this study can contribute to the development of a retention strategy for these employees.

  2. Employee problems and their consequences in the technology industry: evidence from surveys and counseling records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Wen; Lin, Po-Chang; Sha, Chyuan

    2014-06-01

    To support employees' work and health, organizations should help employees cope with common problems. Previous studies have focused primarily on work-related problems across multiple industries rather than on evaluating industry-specific issues. Here, two approaches identified common work and non-work employee problems in the technology industry with the strongest correlations with psychosomatic health and life satisfaction. Study 1 used questionnaires to identify the problems that were perceived as the most frequent by lower-level employees (N = 355) working in the technology industry. Study 2 evaluated employees' coping behaviors by analyzing (with permission) counseling records collected from an employee assistance service company (N = 276). Employees reported a variety of problems; work problems were the only problems (of the top 5 problems) reported in both studies. Several problems emerged in the counseling records (e.g., legal issues, career development, family and marriage problems, and emotional problems) but not in the surveys. Future research should apply these observations to develop scales for measuring employee stressors.

  3. Why Are Employees Leaving the Federal Government? Results of an Exit Survey. A Report to the President and the Congress of the United States. A Special Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merit Systems Protection Board, Washington, DC.

    The success of virtually every endeavor of the Federal Government depends on the skills, abilities, and motivations of its work force. Yet recent years have seen increasing concern about the quality of the Federal work force and the Government's ability to retain its most capable employees. In any given year, the Government loses nearly 120,000…

  4. Physical and Emotional Stresses of Technology on Employees in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Ali; Campbell, Stefanie Snider

    2012-01-01

    This article presents how today's technology permeates the planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling functions of human resources management. Certain industries or occupations are more reliant on technology and thus impose more physical and emotional stressors on employees. The effects of physical stressors and the physical…

  5. Physical and Emotional Stresses of Technology on Employees in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Ali; Campbell, Stefanie Snider

    2012-01-01

    This article presents how today's technology permeates the planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling functions of human resources management. Certain industries or occupations are more reliant on technology and thus impose more physical and emotional stressors on employees. The effects of physical stressors and the physical…

  6. The Differences in Career-Related Variables between Temporary and Permanent Employees in Information Technology Companies in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Jinkook; Lim, Beomsik

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in career-related variables, such as career commitment and career satisfaction, based on employment status (temporary vs. permanent employees) and job type (professional vs. nonprofessional employees). With a sample of 302 employees working in information technology companies in Korea, it was…

  7. Technical Education Transfer: Perceptions of Employee Computer Technology Self-Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated influences on employee self-efficacy of computer technologies resulting from computer-training programs that were intended to meet individual and organization objectives for university personnel. Influences on the transfer of training process included previous computer training, computer-use requirements, computer-use…

  8. The Lived Experiences of Federal Agency Information-Technology Employees in Times of Outsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudi, Linda

    2010-01-01

    United States (U.S.) federal agencies and other organizations are turning to Information Technology (IT) as a strategy for improving business productivity. Despite the rapid growth of outsourcing, few studies have been conducted on the effect of outsourcing on employees who remain with the company. In the current qualitative study, the effect of…

  9. The Lived Experiences of Federal Agency Information-Technology Employees in Times of Outsourcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudi, Linda

    2010-01-01

    United States (U.S.) federal agencies and other organizations are turning to Information Technology (IT) as a strategy for improving business productivity. Despite the rapid growth of outsourcing, few studies have been conducted on the effect of outsourcing on employees who remain with the company. In the current qualitative study, the effect of…

  10. Understanding and motivating health care employees: integrating Maslow's hierarchy of needs, training and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Suzanne G; Dundis, Stephen P

    2003-09-01

    This paper applies Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Model to the challenges of understanding and motivating employees in a rapidly changing health care industry. The perspective that Maslow's Model brings is an essential element that should be considered as the health care arena is faced with reorganization, re-engineering, mergers, acquisitions, increases in learning demands, and the escalating role of technology in training. This paper offers a new perspective related to how Maslow's Model, as used in business/organizational settings, can be directly related to current workforce concerns: the need for security and freedom from stress, social belongingness, self-esteem, self-actualization, altered work/social environments, and new opportunities for learning and self-definition. Changes in health care will continue at an accelerated pace and with these changes will come the need for more and more training. The use of technology in training has heightened access, faster distribution, innovation and increased collaboration. However, with this technology come attendant challenges including keeping up with the technology, the increased pace of training, depersonalization, and fear of the unknown. The Maslow model provides a means for understanding these challenges in terms of universal individual needs. How does one motivate employees in the face of increased demands, particularly when they are being asked to meet these demands with fewer resources? The answer is, in large part, to make the employee feel secure, needed, and appreciated. This is not at all easy, but if leaders take into consideration the needs of the individual, the new technology that provides challenges and opportunities for meeting those needs, and provides the training to meet both sets of needs, enhanced employee motivation and commitment is possible.

  11. EMPLOYEE PERCEPTION TOWARD THE IMPECT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Vinay Saxena; Rohit Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Human Resource Information technology is a software solution for small to mid-sized businesses to help automate and manage their HR, payroll, management and accounting, recruiting selecting and many others. In the present time the role of IT in HRM is very wide and special An IT in HRM generally should provide the capability to more effectively plan, control and manage HR costs; achieve improved efficiency and quality in HR decision making; and improve employee and managerial productivity...

  12. Employee Involvement, Technology, and Evolution in Job Skills: A Task-Based Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Francis Green

    2012-01-01

    The author investigates the evolution of job skill distribution using task data derived from the U.K. Skills Surveys of 1997, 2001, and 2006, and the 1992 Employment Survey in Britain. He determines the extent to which employee involvement in the workplace and computer technologies promote the use of higher order cognitive and interactive skills. He finds that literacy, other communication tasks, and self-planning skills have grown especially fast. Numerical and problem-solving skills have al...

  13. Employee Perception of the Impact of Information Technology Investment in Organisations: a survey of the hotel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Lo

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available To improve their operational efficiency and to maintain their competitiveness in the market place many organisations continue to invest substantially in their Information Technology (IT capability. But how do the employees themselves view the impact and the value of IT investment? This paper considers this question in the context of the hospitality industry. More specifically, it investigates the different perception of hotel employees on the impact of organisational IT investment on (a IT usage by employees, (b employee satisfaction with the IT systems, (c changes in the level of employee performance, and (d organisational performance of the hotel. 945 hotel employees in Bali, Indonesia were surveyed to assess their perception of the organisational impact of IT. Factor analysis, analysis of variance and regression analysis were performed on the data to examine the' range of employee viewpoints. Results showed that there were significant differences among the employees' perception with respect to age, educational level, position in the hotel, and individual income. These findings suggest that even senior management may regard the investment in IT is worthwhile, there may be a divergence of opinion among the employees as to what are the real benefits of IT. In order to fully leverage the potential of their IT investment, managers should pay particular attention to shaping the views of the employees who ultimately determine whether the IT capabilities in an organisation are put to use.

  14. The Factors Affecting Information Technology Usage Behavior of Tax Office Employees in the Black Sea Region of Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Yilmaz,

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors affecting information technology usage behavior of tax office employees in the Black Sea Region of Turkey. To accomplish this purpose, the data is gathered from 133 tax office employees who work in Black Sea Region of Turkey through a questionnaire that is formed with 5-point Likert-type scale. Research model is developed in the light of Theory of Reasoned Action, and a series of analyses is conducted. The predicted hypotheses are tested thought regression analyses. According to results, intention of tax office employees has the high predictive power on information technology usage. Additionally, attitude and subjective norms of tax office employees have an impact on their intention towards information technology usage. However, their attitude has the more predictive power than their subjective norms on their intentions towards information technology usage.

  15. Adding Innovation Diffusion Theory to the Technology Acceptance Model: Supporting Employees' Intentions to Use E-Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Hsieh, Yi-Chuan; Hsu, Chia-Ning

    2011-01-01

    This study intends to investigate factors affecting business employees' behavioral intentions to use the e-learning system. Combining the innovation diffusion theory (IDT) with the technology acceptance model (TAM), the present study proposes an extended technology acceptance model. The proposed model was tested with data collected from 552…

  16. 75 FR 65349 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From BWX Technologies Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-22

    ... evaluation, is as follows: ] Facility: BWX Technologies, Inc. Location: Lynchburg, Virginia. Job Titles and... HUMAN SERVICES Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees From BWX Technologies...: HHS gives notice as required by 42 CFR 83.12(e) of a decision to evaluate a petition to designate a...

  17. 75 FR 24957 - Decision to Evaluate a Petition to Designate a Class of Employees From BWX Technologies Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... evaluation, is as follows: Facility: BWX Technologies, Inc. Location: Lynchburg, Virginia. Job Titles and/or... HUMAN SERVICES Decision to Evaluate a Petition to Designate a Class of Employees From BWX Technologies...: HHS gives notice as required by 42 CFR 83.12(e) of a decision to evaluate a petition to designate a...

  18. Adding Innovation Diffusion Theory to the Technology Acceptance Model: Supporting Employees' Intentions to Use E-Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Hsieh, Yi-Chuan; Hsu, Chia-Ning

    2011-01-01

    This study intends to investigate factors affecting business employees' behavioral intentions to use the e-learning system. Combining the innovation diffusion theory (IDT) with the technology acceptance model (TAM), the present study proposes an extended technology acceptance model. The proposed model was tested with data collected from 552…

  19. Exit from contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oren Bar-Gill

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective to study the procedure of exiting the contract its costs and benefits. Methods statistical method comparative analysis. Results free exit from contract is one of the most powerful tools for the consumer rights protection. The procedure frees consumers from bad deals and keeps businesses honest. Yet consumers often choose transactions with lockin provisions trading off exit rights for other perks. This article examines the costs and benefits of free exit as compared to the lockin alternative. According to the authors the present regulation of exit penalties in the USA is poorly tailored to address concerns about lockin particularly in light of increasingly ubiquitous marketbased solutions. The article also calls regulatory attention to loyalty rewards which are shown to be as powerful as exit penalties and equally detrimental. Scientific novelty the article reveals a paradoxical state of the law exit regulations in the USA are used most where they are needed least. Termination penalties present an obvishyous target for regulatory intervention while loyalty programs seem benign not warranting any regulatory attention. Practical significance the article is of interest for the Russian juridical science and lawmaking authorities as in Russia the issue of exiting the contract is as topical as in the USA and requires solution which would impair neither the rights of consumers nor the rights of the sellers ofnbspproducts and services. nbsp

  20. What's that, you say? Employee expectations of privacy when using employer-provided technology--and how employers can defeat them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrin, Barry S

    2012-01-01

    Two 2010 court cases that determined the effectiveness of policies governing employees' use of employer-provided communication devices can be used to guide employers when constructing their own technology policies. In light of a policy that stated that "users should have no expectation of privacy or confidentiality," one case established that the employer was in the right. However, a separate case favored the employee due, in part, to an "unclear and ambiguous" policy. Ultimately, employers can restrict the use of employer-furnished technology by employees by: 1) clearly outlining that employees do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy in their use of company devices; 2) stating that any use of personal e-mail accounts using employer-provided technology will be subject to the policy; 3) detailing all technology used to monitor employees; 4) identifying company devices covered; 5) not exposing the content of employee communications; and 6) having employees sign and acknowledge the policy.

  1. The practical paradox of technology: The influence of communication technology use on employee burnout and engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Hoeven, C.L.; van Zoonen, W.; Fonner, K.L.

    2016-01-01

    Technological advancements in the workplace frequently have produced contradictory effects by facilitating accessibility and efficiency while increasing interruptions and unpredictability. We combine insights from organizational paradoxes and the job demands–resources model to construct a framework

  2. Exit-strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Line Lerche; Palm, Anne-Mette; Sys Møller-Andersen, Camilla

    This paper is about exit-strategies, constructing a theoretical and empirical informed analysis of current societal conditions that influence motor cycle gangs such as Hells Angels or Bandidos and other ‘wild' youth' possibilities and limitations for moving beyond criminal activities. We especially...... focus on the involved communities in the current Danish gang-conflict, which escalated with deadly killings in 2008, and thereby became a so called "gang-war". We will start out presenting different practice notions of exit, and we will extend and discuss understandings of "exit-strategies" by analyzing...... different empirical sources. To develop and extend an "exit-prototype" about conditions of importance for moving beyond a gang/criminal position, we have analyzed documents (from newspapers and books), involved ex-gang members, social workers and experts as co-researchers in interviews, "gang...

  3. Exit-strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Line Lerche; Palm, Anne-Mette; Sys Møller-Andersen, Camilla

    This paper is about exit-strategies, constructing a theoretical and empirical informed analysis of current societal conditions that influence motor cycle gangs such as Hells Angels or Bandidos and other ‘wild' youth' possibilities and limitations for moving beyond criminal activities. We especially...... focus on the involved communities in the current Danish gang-conflict, which escalated with deadly killings in 2008, and thereby became a so called "gang-war". We will start out presenting different practice notions of exit, and we will extend and discuss understandings of "exit-strategies" by analyzing...... to the diversity of the involved communities. This includes movements beyond thinking in dichotomies of either being criminal, ex-criminal or not criminal. 2) As pointed in the quote above, expanding conditions for exit is also about ending the gang-war, which includes police intervention and negotiations between...

  4. The Situational Leadership Approach Effects on Employee Motivation in Multi-Generational Information Technology Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Thaddaeus

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the three generations comprising today's IT organizations to determine whether the Situational Leadership approach is effective in motivating this diverse work force to perform project-related tasks. Baby Boomer employees, Generation X employees, and Generation Y employees are the three generations actively employed in IT…

  5. The Situational Leadership Approach Effects on Employee Motivation in Multi-Generational Information Technology Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Thaddaeus

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the three generations comprising today's IT organizations to determine whether the Situational Leadership approach is effective in motivating this diverse work force to perform project-related tasks. Baby Boomer employees, Generation X employees, and Generation Y employees are the three generations actively employed in IT…

  6. An Investigation of Employees' Use of E-Learning Systems: Applying the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Hsuan; Hsieh, Yi-Chuan; Chen, Yen-Hsun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply the technology acceptance model to examine the employees' attitudes and acceptance of electronic learning (e-learning) systems in organisations. This study examines four factors (organisational support, computer self-efficacy, prior experience and task equivocality) that are believed to influence…

  7. The Benchmarking of the Government to Employee (G2e) Technology Development: Theoretical Aspects of the Model Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Alvydas Baležentis; Gintarė Paražinskaitė

    2012-01-01

    Purpose—To fill the gap in the currently very rare discussion on the important topic of e-government research—design, development and usage of information and communication technologies for human resource management in the public sector and to formulate theoretical benchmarks for development of the government to employee (G2E) model.Design/methodology/approach—Literature analysis of mostly empirical research from the field of government to government (G2G), government to citizen (G2C) and bus...

  8. The influence of transformational leadership on employee well-being: results from a survey of companies in the information and communication technology sector in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Christine; Pfaff, Holger; Lehner, Birgit; Driller, Elke; Nitzsche, Anika; Stieler-Lorenz, Brigitte; Wasem, Jürgen; Jung, Julia

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a transformational leadership style on employee well-being. Data for the study were taken from an on-line survey of all employees from six German companies in the information and communication technology sector. The data obtained were analyzed using multiple logistic regressions. Analysis of data from a total of 318 employees (response rate 58.4%) revealed a significant relationship between transformational leadership and employee well-being (P = 0.00; OR = 1.13; 95% CI = 1.05 to 1.22). A higher degree of perceived transformational leadership is associated with greater well-being. The results of this study suggest that a transformational leadership style, which both conveys a sense of trust and meaningfulness and individually challenges and develops employees, also has a positive effect on employee well-being.

  9. Health problems and stress in Information Technology and Business Process Outsourcing employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padma, V.; Anand, N. N.; Gurukul, S. M. G. Swaminatha; Javid, S. M. A. Syed Mohammed; Prasad, Arun; Arun, S.

    2015-01-01

    Stress is high in software profession because of their nature of work, target, achievements, night shift, over work load. 1. To study the demographic profile of the employees. 2. To access the level of job stress and quality of life of the respondents. 3. To study in detail the health problems of the employees. All employees working in IT and BPO industry for more than two years were included into the study. A detailed questionnaire of around 1000 IT and BPO employees including their personal details, stress score by Holmes and Rahe to assess the level of stress and master health checkup profile were taken and the results were analysed. Around 56% had musculoskeletal symptoms. 22% had newly diagnosed hypertension,10% had diabetes, 36% had dyslipidemia, 54% had depression, anxiety and insomnia, 40% had obesity. The stress score was higher in employees who developed diabetes, hypertension and depression. Early diagnosis of stress induced health problems can be made out by stress scores, intense lifestyle modification, diet advice along with psychological counselling would reduce the incidence of health problems in IT sector and improve the quality of work force. PMID:26015763

  10. Health problems and stress in Information Technology and Business Process Outsourcing employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padma, V; Anand, N N; Gurukul, S M G Swaminatha; Javid, S M A Syed Mohammed; Prasad, Arun; Arun, S

    2015-04-01

    Stress is high in software profession because of their nature of work, target, achievements, night shift, over work load. 1. To study the demographic profile of the employees. 2. To access the level of job stress and quality of life of the respondents. 3. To study in detail the health problems of the employees. All employees working in IT and BPO industry for more than two years were included into the study. A detailed questionnaire of around 1000 IT and BPO employees including their personal details, stress score by Holmes and Rahe to assess the level of stress and master health checkup profile were taken and the results were analysed. Around 56% had musculoskeletal symptoms. 22% had newly diagnosed hypertension,10% had diabetes, 36% had dyslipidemia, 54% had depression, anxiety and insomnia, 40% had obesity. The stress score was higher in employees who developed diabetes, hypertension and depression. Early diagnosis of stress induced health problems can be made out by stress scores, intense lifestyle modification, diet advice along with psychological counselling would reduce the incidence of health problems in IT sector and improve the quality of work force.

  11. Leadership Perceptions of Information Technology (IT) Employee Career Development: A Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Timothy Michael

    2009-01-01

    The offshoring movement has had a profound effect on U.S. based IT employee career development and growth opportunities. This phenomenological study included an analysis of the central phenomenon through observations and lived experiences of 10 HR managers and 10 IT operational managers equally distributed between two U.S. based IT services…

  12. Employee Job Embeddedness: A Quantitative Study of Information Technology Personnel in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrios-Ortiz, Edwin J.

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the relationship between job embeddedness, self-efficacy, organizational commitment, and job satisfaction as predictors of an IT employee's desire to stay (turnover intentions) at his or her position with his or her current employer. A survey instrument was administered to a sample of a population of IT professionals…

  13. Perceived information and communication technology (ICT) demands on employee outcomes: the moderating effect of organizational ICT support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Arla; Paquet, Stephanie; Scott, Natasha; Hambley, Laura

    2012-10-01

    Although many employees are using more information communication technology (ICT) as part of their jobs, few studies have examined the impact of ICT on their well-being, and there is a lack of validated measures designed to assess the ICT factors that may impact employee well-being. Therefore, we developed and validated a measure of ICT demands and supports. Using Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling, we found support for 8 ICT demands (i.e., availability, communication, ICT control, ICT hassles, employee monitoring, learning, response expectations, and workload) and two facets of ICT support (personal assistance and resources/upgrades support). Jointly, the ICT demands were associated with increased strain, stress, and burnout and were still associated with stress and strain after controlling for demographics, job variables, and job demands. The two types of ICT support were associated with lower stress, strain, and burnout. Resources/upgrades support moderated the relationship between learning expectations and most strain outcomes and between ICT hassles and strain. Personal assistance support moderated the relationship between ICT hassles and strain.

  14. Promoting Exit from Violent Extremism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgaard-Nielsen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    A number of Western countries are currently adding exit programs targeting militant Islamists to their counterterrorism efforts. Drawing on research into voluntary exit from violent extremism, this article identifies themes and issues that seem to cause doubt, leading to exit. It then provides...... the influence attempt as subtle as possible, use narratives and self-affirmatory strategies to reduce resistance to persuasion, and consider the possibility to promote attitudinal change via behavioral change as an alternative to seek to influence beliefs directly....

  15. Exit Polls and Voter Turnout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Asger Lau; Jensen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    After the 2009 referendum on a proposed change to the Danish Law of Succession, it was widely claimed that the early publication of exit poll results changed the rate of turnout and eventually the outcome. We investigate this claim and contribute to the wider debate on the implications of exit...... they are published is often overlooked. We show that this can lead to premature conclusions about the impact of exit polls on electoral outcomes. In particular, in cases such as the Danish referendum where it clearly appears that exit polls changed the outcome, it could well be that the outcome would have been...

  16. Exit Polls and Voter Turnout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Asger Lau; Jensen, Thomas

    We set up a model of elections or referendums with two alternatives to study how voter turnout and election outcomes are affected by the publication of exit polls on election day. We find that the introduction of an exit poll influences the incentive to vote both before and after the poll...

  17. Innovation and venture capital exits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwienbacher, A.

    2008-01-01

    This article analyses how start-ups financed by venture capital choose their innovation strategy based on the investor's exit preferences and thereby form different outcomes in the product market. It considers innovation choices and venture capital exits (IPO vs trade sale) in a setting in which ent

  18. Employee Perspectives of Library and Information Technology Mergers: The Recursiveness of Structure, Culture, and Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Sara Bronner

    2010-01-01

    The practice of merging academic library and information technology (IT) units began in the early 1980s with the growth of technology applications in higher education. Mergers have been initiated for a variety of reasons, including streamlining services, consolidating budgets, maximizing information technologies for teaching and research, and new…

  19. Factors that Influence the Dissemination of Knowledge in Technology Transfer among Malaysian Manufacturing Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mughaneswari ap Sahadevan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The meaning of technology transfer is so wide but mostly involving some form of technology-re- lated exchange. However, in this particular paper, technology transfer is consider as a concept to examine the process of disseminating knowledge and skills that a person owned to another per- son in order to generate higher productivity with new approach of producing a particular prod- uct or service. Although, many researchers have explored the evolution of technology transfer, nonetheless some drivers are yet to be explored in a Malaysian manufacturing industry. This study, therefore attempts to determine the relationship between absorptive capacity, transfer capacity, communication motivation and learning intent and technology transfer performance. A survey methodology was used in a Japanese multinational company based in Klang Valley, Malaysia. A total of 117 questionnaires were received. Results show that absorptive capacity is the most signifi- cant to influence technology transfer performance.

  20. The relationship between organisational climate and employee satisfaction in a South African information and technology organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monia L. Castro

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Organisational climate and job satisfaction are distinct but related constructs, and both appear to influence employees’ understanding of the work environment and their level of job satisfaction.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between organisational climate and job satisfaction to determine whether employees’ perceptions of the work environment influence their level of job satisfaction.Motivation for the study: Organisations are facing more challenges than ever before. These challenges are not unique to any specific organisation or industry, but affect all organisations.Organisational climate in particular is constantly challenged by changes impacting organisations today.Research design, approach and method: An organisational climate questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 696 employees from a population of 1453 employees working in three regions in which the organisation was operational. Confirmatory and exploratory factor analyses were used to investigate the structure of the climate model.Main findings: The revised 12-factor model (after the confirmatory factor analysis fitted the data best and the researchers therefore decided to proceed with the revised 12-factor model (11 dimensions for further analysis. A stepwise regression was conducted and nine dimensions of organisational climate were found to predict job satisfaction. The results indicated a strong positive correlation (r = 0.813, p< 0.01 between organisational climate and the dependent variable of job satisfaction.Practical implications: This study provided support for the view that line managers and human resource practitioners should be aware that different biographical groups have different needs that can influence their job satisfaction levels and different perceptions of the climate within the organisation and that this impacts on their behaviour.Contribution: The findings of this study indicated a

  1. Exiting prostitution: an integrated model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Lynda M; Dalla, Rochelle L; Williamson, Celia

    2010-05-01

    Exiting street-level prostitution is a complex, convoluted process. Few studies have described this process within any formal conceptual framework. This article reviews two general models and two prostitution-specific models and their applicability to the exiting process. Barriers encountered as women attempt to leave the streets are identified. Based on the four models, the barriers, the prostitution literature, and the authors' experience with prostituted women, a new integrated six-stage model that is comprehensive in scope and sensitive to women's attempts to exit prostitution is offered as a foundation for continued research on the process of women leaving the streets.

  2. California Diploma Project Technical Report II: Alignment Study--Alignment Study of the Health Sciences and Medical Technology Draft Standards and California's Exit Level Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaughy, Charis; de Gonzalez, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The California Department of Education is in the process of revising the Career and Technical Education (CTE) Model Curriculum Standards. The Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC) conducted an investigation of the draft version of the Health Sciences and Medical Technology Standards (Health Science). The purpose of the study is to…

  3. Information Technology Cost Center Employee Perception of Their Contribution Value in a For Profit Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    A literature review revealed a lack of academic research related to cultural dynamics within organizations that influence information technology investments. The goal of this single descriptive case study of a for profit international company was to examine one area of cultural influence on investments. The aim was to gain an understanding of…

  4. How Employees' Perception of Information Technology Application and Their Knowledge Management Capacity Influence Organisational Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yen-Ku; Ye, Kung-Don

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates how workers' gender, work experience, designated division, and appointment affect (i) their perception of information technology (IT) within the organisation, (ii) their self-perceived capacity in knowledge management (KM), and (iii) their perception of organisational performance (OP). Furthermore, the study also examines…

  5. Information Technology Cost Center Employee Perception of Their Contribution Value in a For Profit Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    A literature review revealed a lack of academic research related to cultural dynamics within organizations that influence information technology investments. The goal of this single descriptive case study of a for profit international company was to examine one area of cultural influence on investments. The aim was to gain an understanding of…

  6. Horizontal career changes as an alternative to premature exit from work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrowicz, Paula; Zieschang, Hanna; Bräunig, Dietmar; Jahn, Frauke

    2014-01-01

    Certain workplaces are called jobs with limited tenure. Due to physical or psychosocial risk factors, often coupled with qualification mismatches, workers cannot grow old in them. That may lead to premature exit into retirement, to a period of drawing a work incapacity pension or to a long spell of unemployment. A horizontal career change, which enables the worker to move on to a less burdening workplace while preserving social status, is a possible solution. The objective of the "Horizontal career change-a new job opportunity for older employees" project is to develop a model of career changes for workers employed in jobs with limited tenure and to implement it in the form of an information- and communication technology-based tool. Possible applications range from individual career planning, through institutionalized vocational reintegration, to personnel development in small and medium-sized enterprises.

  7. Early exit: Estimating and explaining early exit from drug treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanders Melony

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early exit (drop-out from drug treatment can mean that drug users do not derive the full benefits that treatment potentially offers. Additionally, it may mean that scarce treatment resources are used inefficiently. Understanding the factors that lead to early exit from treatment should enable services to operate more effectively and better reduce drug related harm. To date, few studies have focused on drop-out during the initial, engagement phase of treatment. This paper describes a mixed method study of early exit from English drug treatment services. Methods Quantitative data (n = 2,624 was derived from three English drug action team areas; two metropolitan and one provincial. Hierarchical linear modelling (HLM was used to investigate predictors of early-exit while controlling for differences between agencies. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 53 ex-clients and 16 members of staff from 10 agencies in these areas to explore their perspectives on early exit, its determinants and, how services could be improved. Results Almost a quarter of the quantitative sample (24.5% dropped out between assessment and 30 days in treatment. Predictors of early exit were: being younger; being homeless; and not being a current injector. Age and injection status were both consistently associated with exit between assessment and treatment entry. Those who were not in substitution treatment were significantly more likely to leave treatment at this stage. There were substantial variations between agencies, which point to the importance of system factors. Qualitative analysis identified several potential ways to improve services. Perceived problems included: opening hours; the service setting; under-utilisation of motivational enhancement techniques; lack of clarity about expectations; lengthy, repetitive assessment procedures; constrained treatment choices; low initial dosing of opioid substitution treatment; and the routine requirement

  8. 14 CFR 25.807 - Emergency exits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... Type II exits must be floor-level exits unless located over the wing, in which case they must not have... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... exits. (a) Type. For the purpose of this part, the types of exits are defined as follows: (1) Type...

  9. 14 CFR 23.807 - Emergency exits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... persons using that exit. (b) Type and operation. Emergency exits must be movable windows, panels, canopies... emergency exit, except floor level exits, must be located over the wing or, if not less than six feet...

  10. Working conditions and health among employees at information technology - enabled services: A review of current evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesavachandran C

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Workers in information technology (IT - enabled services like business process outsourcing and call centers working with visual display units are reported to have various health and psycho social disorders. Evidence from previously published studies in peer- reviewed journals and internet sources were examined to explore health disorders and psycho-social problems among personnel employed in IT-based services, for a systematic review on the topic. In addition, authors executed a questionnaire- based pilot study. The available literature and the pilot study, both suggest health disorders and psychosocial problems among workers of Business Process Outsourcing. The details are discussed in the review.

  11. Destruction and Reallocation of Skills Following Large Company Exit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jacob Rubæk; Østergaard, Christian Richter; Olesen, Thomas Roslyng

    then becomes: under which conditions are the redundant workers and their skills reallocated to productive use elsewhere in the regional economy and when do the workers find a job where their specific skills are less valuable to the new employer and the worker must start over acquiring new skills, that is......, skill destruction. This study is based on the closure of four shipyards in Denmark from 1987-2000. The analysis is based on detailed longitudinal micro data from a matched employer-employee dataset that allow us to follow the mobility of the laid-off employees in great detail. The analysis shows......What happens to redundant skills and workers when a large company closes down in a region? The knowledge embodied in firms is lost when firms exit. However, the skills, competences and knowledge embodied in the displaced employees are suddenly released and can become channels of knowledge transfer...

  12. Occupational stress, ill health and organisational commitment of employees at a university of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua P. Viljoen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between occupational stress, ill health and organisational commitment. A survey design was used. The sample (N=353 consisted of academic (n=132 and support staff (n=221 at a university of technology. The Organizational Stress Screening Tool (ASSET and a biographical questionnaire were administered. The results showed that different organisational stressors contributed significantly to ill health and low organisational commitment. Stress about job security contributed to both physical and psychological ill health, whereas overload and job aspects contributed to psychological ill health. Stress about control and resources contributed to low organisational commitment. Low individual commitment to the organisation was predicted by five stressors, namely work-life balance, overload, control, job aspects and pay.

  13. First Degree Pacemaker Exit Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Francis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Usually atrial and ventricular depolarizations follow soon after the pacemaker stimulus (spike on the ECG. But there can be an exit block due to fibrosis at the electrode - tissue interface at the lead tip. This can increase the delay between the spike and atrial or ventricular depolarization.

  14. The Influence of the Use of the more prevalent Technology on the Wages of Older Employees in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Inez Weller

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The labor market of tomorrow will be determined by the transition from an industrial to a knowledge society. In this process, the accumulation of human capital becomes increasingly important whilst opportunities for low qualified staff steadily diminish. Globalization and technological advancement results in enhanced economic participation of highly qualified staff in the form of higher wages and better employment opportunities. In the literature, this is attributed to the “Skill-Biased Technological Change” (SBTC (Nikutowski, 2007. According to the “task approach” (Autor et al. 2003, the technological change due to falling computer prices (computerization leads to changes in task structures which favor a trend towards routinization (“routinization hypothesis”.Alongside these developments Germany faces the challenge of demographic change, which is reflected primarily in the shrinking and ageing of the population (Siegrist et al. 2005. Consequently, Germany anticipates a distinct decline in the number of economically active persons in the next few decades (Federal Statistical Office, 2009. With the objective of securing adequate labor force potential the pension age was raised to 67 years, although statistics confirm that the average retirement age in Germany is a long way off the present age limit of 65 years (German Statutory Pension Insurance, 2012; Stößel, 2008. From this starting point, the question derived concerns the influence of technological change on occupational success, as measured by the gross wages of older working persons. The study examines whether the increasing use of computers in workplaces is leading to a shift towards non-routine tasks among older workers to the same extent as younger workers in accordance with the routinization hypothesis. Moreover, it is analyzed if among older workers it is also primarily the highly qualified persons who benefit from this trend in the form of higher gross wages. The analyses

  15. Employee ownership

    OpenAIRE

    Mygind, Niels

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an overview over some theory and empirical evidence on employee ownership and other forms of employee financial participation and answers the following questions: What is employee ownership and what is the relation to other forms of financial participation? Why is employee ownership widespread in some developed market economies like US and in Italy, France and Spain, while it has a quite rare occurrence in the Scandinavian countries? What are the conditions favouring and what...

  16. Exit Creek Water Surface Survey, June 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of survey data from a longitudinal profile of water surface surveyed June 23-24, 2013 at Exit Creek, a stream draining Exit Glacier in Kenai...

  17. Exit Creek Transect Survey, June 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of survey data from transects surveyed June 10-12, 2013 along Exit Creek, a stream draining Exit Glacier in Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska....

  18. Exit Creek Particle Size, June 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset presents particle size data collected at the surface of gravel bars along Exit Creek, a stream draining Exit Glacier in Kenai Fjords National Park,...

  19. 14 CFR 27.807 - Emergency exits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... emergency exit must be shown by test. (d) Ditching emergency exits for passengers. If certification with ditching provisions is requested, the markings required by paragraph (b)(3) of this section must...

  20. Graceful Exit in String Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Brustein, Ram; Brustein, Ram; Madden, Richard

    1998-01-01

    The graceful exit transition from a dilaton-driven inflationary phase to a decelerated Friedmann-Robertson-Walker era requires certain classical and quantum corrections to the string effective action. Classical corrections can stabilize a high curvature string phase while the evolution is still in the weakly coupled regime, and quantum corrections can induce violation of the null energy condition, allowing evolution towards a decelerated phase.

  1. Employee reward

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: • To present the main historical and theoretical foundations underpinning contemporary employee reward practice. • To define employee reward and identify the key components of reward. • To explore the concept of reward management and the benefits and difficulties associated with introducing a strategic approach to reward. • To consider key employee reward choices facing organisations in the contemporary era. • To explore the economic and legal context for reward and the implicatio...

  2. Employee Rights

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    2016-01-01

    , on the one hand, and what is considered as equitable (in accordance with employment rights) by employees, on the other. Since equality in reward counts for more among a considerable fraction of employees, while equity in contribution counts more for most employers, this is an inherent dilemma, constantly...

  3. Nonlicensed employee turnover in a long-term care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, T; Bechtel, G A

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze nonlicensed employee turnover in a long-term care facility using Maslow's hierarchy of needs as a framework. During exit interviews, a convenience sample of 34 employees completed an attitudes and beliefs survey regarding their work environment. Findings were mixed; 39.6 percent of the employees stated positive personal relationships were a strength of the organization, although 24.3 percent resigned because of personal/staff conflicts. Financial concerns were not a major factor in their resignations. The study suggests that decreasing nonlicensed employee stress and increasing their personal satisfaction with patient care may decrease employee turnover.

  4. Effects of rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention on the perceptions of organizational climate and occupational risk management practices among electronics technology employees in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbuanya, Theresa Chinyere; Eseadi, Chiedu; Orji, Chibueze Tobias; Ede, Moses Onyemaechi; Ohanu, Ifeanyi Benedict; Bakare, Jimoh

    2017-05-01

    Improving employees' perception of organizational climate, and coaching them to remain steadfast when managing occupational risks associated with their job, might have an important effect on their psychosocial wellbeing and occupational health. This study examined the effects of a rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention program on the perceptions of organizational climate and occupational risk management practices. The participants were 77 electronics technology employees in the south-east of Nigeria. The study used a pretest-posttest control group design. The rational emotive occupational health therapy intervention program significantly improved perceptions of the organizational climate for the people in the treatment group compared to those in the waitlist control group at post-intervention and follow-up assessments. Occupational risk management practices of the employees in the treatment group were also significantly better than those in the waitlist control group at the same 2 assessments. Corporate application of a rational emotive behavior therapy as an occupational health therapy intervention program is essential for improving the perceptions of organizational climate and promoting the adoption of feasible occupational risk management strategies in the workplace.

  5. Exit From the High Street

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bly, Sarah; Gwozdz, Wencke; Reisch, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    by focusing on a previously under-researched group of consumers – ‘sustainable fashion consumption pioneers’ who actively engage and shape their own discourse around the notion of sustainable fashion consumption. These pioneers actively create and communicate strategies for sustainable fashion behaviour...... that can overcome the nebulous and somewhat paradoxical reality that sustainable development in the fashion industry presents. Specifically, we use passive netnography and semi-structured interviews to illuminate the role of motivational and contextual factors that help shape these consumers' definitions...... of sustainable fashion including such key behaviours as purchasing fewer garments of higher quality, exiting the retail market, purchasing only second-hand fashion goods and sewing or upgrading their own clothing. Central to much of these behaviours is the notion that personal style, rather than fashion, can...

  6. Topological inflation with graceful exit

    CERN Document Server

    Marunović, Anja

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a class of models of topological inflation in which a super-Hubble-sized global monopole seeds inflation. These models are attractive since inflation starts from rather generic initial conditions, but their not so attractive feature is that, unless symmetry is again restored, inflation never ends. In this work we show that, in presence of another nonminimally coupled scalar field, that is both quadratically and quartically coupled to the Ricci scalar, inflation naturally ends, representing an elegant solution to the graceful exit problem of topological inflation. While the monopole core grows during inflation, the growth stops after inflation, such that the monopole eventually enters the Hubble radius, and shrinks to its Minkowski space size, rendering it immaterial for the subsequent Universe's dynamics. Furthermore, we find that our model can produce cosmological perturbations that source CMB temperature fluctuations and seed large scale structure statistically consistent (within one standard...

  7. Employee relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demann, Eric T K; Stein, Pamela S; Levitt, Christine; Shelton, Keith E

    2008-07-01

    This review highlights some of the more important employee relation aspects involved in starting, establishing, or expanding an existing dental practice. Despite a competitive compensation package, staff-related conflicts can sometimes hamper the progress of a dental practice. Such conflicts can be reduced by having policies and procedures in place for each employee that set expectations concerning the hours of operation, professional manner, dress code, job tasks, performance evaluations, disciplinary actions, and termination if violations occur. Understanding the legal requirements set by various governmental agencies such as OSHA can help ensure that the rights and well-being of every employee are protected.

  8. Employee Handbook

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Civilian employee handbook governing Naval Postgraduate School, Naval Auxiliary Landing Field, Fleet Numerical Weather Central, and Navy Management Systems Center, and covering expected personal conduct, duties, dress code, and available services.

  9. Entrepreneurial exit in real and imagined markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Stam (Erik); A.R. Thurik (Roy); P.W. van der Zwan (Peter)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractEntrepreneurs exit their businesses due to selection pressures they experience in the market place. In addition to this well-known ex-post decision to exit, entrepreneurs select ex-ante whether they are willing to pursue an entrepreneurial career at all, or to give up their

  10. Exit and the duty to admit

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lenard, Patti Tamara

    2015-01-01

    .... I argue that receiving states are duty-bound to act in ways that enable migrants to exercise their right to exit. In particular, I argue that receiving states have a perfect duty to collectivize the process by which needy migrants can exercise the right to exit.

  11. Exit strategies for social venture entrepreneurs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuer, A.T.K.

    2015-01-01

    Key Words:  Social Venture Entrepreneurs, Exit, Ownership Social Venture Entrepreneurs invest in local and mostly bottom of pyramid (BoPs), and more so in developing economies. Different understanding  and meanings given to the term  exit and ownership, by social venture entrepreneurs

  12. Minimal Exit Trajectories with Optimum Correctional Manoeuvres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Srivastava

    1980-10-01

    Full Text Available Minimal exit trajectories with optimum correctional manoeuvers to a rocket between two coplaner, noncoaxial elliptic orbits in an inverse square gravitational field have been investigated. Case of trajectories with no correctional manoeuvres has been analysed. In the end minimal exit trajectories through specified orbital terminals are discussed and problem of ref. (2 is derived as a particular case.

  13. Exit strategies for social venture entrepreneurs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuer, A.T.K.

    2015-01-01

    Key Words:  Social Venture Entrepreneurs, Exit, Ownership Social Venture Entrepreneurs invest in local and mostly bottom of pyramid (BoPs), and more so in developing economies. Different understanding  and meanings given to the term  exit and ownership, by social venture entrepreneurs

  14. Strategies for Electronic Career Support to Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Paul

    As more organizations reduce their human resources management (HRM) staff and look for ways for fewer employees to do more work, interest in developing electronic career support for employees is increasing. An Intranet-based solution uses technology to provide the means for bringing career development support to employees' workstations or their…

  15. Employee Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bello, Madelyn

    2008-09-05

    Welcome to Berkeley Lab. You are joining or are already a part of a laboratory with a sterling tradition of scientific achievement, including eleven Nobel Laureates and thirteen National Medal of Science winners. No matter what job you do, you make Berkeley Lab the outstanding organization that it is. Without your hard work and dedication, we could not achieve all that we have. We value you and thank you for choosing to be part of our community. This Employee Handbook is designed to help you navigate the Lab. With over 3,000 employees, an additional 3,000 guests visiting from countries around the world, a 200-acre campus and many policies and procedures, learning all the ins and outs may seem overwhelming, especially if you're a new employee. However, even if you have been here for a while, this Handbook should be a useful reference tool. It is meant to serve as a guide, highlighting and summarizing what you need to know and informing you where you can go for more detailed information. The general information provided in this Handbook serves only as a brief description of many of the Lab's policies. Policies, procedures and information are found in the Lab's Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM), Summary Plan Descriptions, University of California policies, and provisions of Contract 31 between the Regents of the University and the U.S. Department of Energy. In addition, specific terms and conditions for represented employees are found in applicable collective bargaining agreements. Nothing in this Handbook is intended to supplant, change or conflict with the previously mentioned documents. In addition, the information in this Handbook does not constitute a contract or a promise of continued employment and may be changed at any time by the Lab. We believe employees are happier and more productive if they know what they can expect from their organization and what their organization expects from them. The Handbook will familiarize you with the

  16. Market entry and exit by biotech and device companies funded by venture capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Lawton R; Housman, Michael G; Robinson, Charles A

    2009-01-01

    Start-up companies in the biotechnology and medical device sectors are important sources of health care innovation. This paper describes the role of venture capital in supporting these companies and charts the growth in venture capital financial support. The paper then uses longitudinal data to describe market entry and exit by these companies. Similar factors are associated with entry and exit in the two sectors. Entries and exits in one sector also appear to influence entry in the other. These findings have important implications for developing innovative technologies and ensuring competitive markets in the life sciences.

  17. Delivering ideal employee experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Marjorie D; Tyink, Steve; Kubiak, Curt

    2009-05-01

    Employee-centric strategies have moved from employee satisfaction and brand awareness to employee "affinity" or "attachment." In today's marketplace, occupational health nurses understand that differentiation (i.e., the perception of uniqueness) is the direct result of superior employee interactions, which lead to better employee care, enduring employee relationships, loyal employees, and satisfied employers. What drives employees to occupational health nurse attachment? The answer is a passion for rising above the competition to create ideal employee experiences.

  18. Composite Control of Precalciner Exit Temperature in Cement Rotary Kiln

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晨; 诸静

    2003-01-01

    A composite control strategy for the precalciner exit temperature in cement kiln is introduced based on a mathematical model. In this model, the raw meal flow, coal powder flow and wind flow are taken as three input variables, the clinker fow and exit teperature of cement kiln are output variables, and other influencing factors are considered as disturbance. A composite control system is synthesied by integrating self-learning PID, fuzzy and feedforward function into a combined controller, and the arithmetics for the self-learning PID controller, fuzzy controller and feedforward controller are elaborated respectively. The control strategy has been realized by software in real practice at cement factory. Application results show that the composite control technology is superior to the general PID control in control effect, and is suitable to the industrial process control with slow parameter variation, nonlinearity and uncertainty.

  19. The increased use of information and communication technology (ICT) among employees: Implications for work-life interaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wihan De Wet; Eileen Koekemoer

    2016-01-01

    ...% of these users access this facility from their mobile devices. Statistics illustrate that South Africans are moving towards a continuously connected lifestyle, a situation in which information and communication technology (ICT...

  20. Exit and the duty to admit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patti Tamara Lenard

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, it is presumed that while citizens have the right to exit the state in which they are located, no particular state (except a citizen's home state is required to admit them. Yet, this convention has produced, and continues to produce, injustice; to understand why, I focus on defining and protecting a right to exit, as distinct from the right to move in general. This analysis leads me to propose that whereas the political theoretic literature appears to have converged on a commitment to decisive asymmetry (in favor of accepting a state's right to exclude, I propose that only a weak asymmetry is justified. I argue that receiving states are duty-bound to act in ways that enable migrants to exercise their right to exit. In particular, I argue that receiving states have a perfect duty to collectivize the process by which needy migrants can exercise the right to exit.

  1. Exit and Paradise Creek Fluvial Features, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset presents delineations of the braid plains of Exit and Paradise Creeks in Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska for 2012 conditions. A braid plain can be...

  2. Exit and Paradise Creek Fluvial Features, 1950

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset presents a delineation of the maximum extent of fluvial occupation detectable from vegetation patterns at Exit and Paradise Creeks in Kenai Fjords...

  3. Room evacuation through two contiguous exits

    CERN Document Server

    Sticco, I M; Dorso, C O

    2016-01-01

    Current regulations demand that at least two exits should be available for a safe evacuation during a panic situation. Although the "faster is slower" effect is expected to take place near the exits, the evacuation time will improve because of the additional exits. However, rooms having contiguous doors not always reduce the leaving time as expected. We investigated the relation between the doors separation and the evacuation performance. We found that there exists a separation distance range that does not really improve the evacuation time, or it can even worsen the process performance. To our knowledge, no attention has been given to this issue in the literature. This work reports how the pedestrians dynamics differ when the separation distance between two exit doors changes and how this affects the overall performance.

  4. Entry and exit decisions under uncertainty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, Hans Christian

    1996-01-01

    This paper establishes the general deterministic limit that corresponds to Dixit's model of entry and exit decisions under uncertainty. The interlinked nature of decisions is shown to be essential also in the deterministic limit. A numerical example illustrates the result......This paper establishes the general deterministic limit that corresponds to Dixit's model of entry and exit decisions under uncertainty. The interlinked nature of decisions is shown to be essential also in the deterministic limit. A numerical example illustrates the result...

  5. Motivation of employees and employee benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Haninger, David

    2011-01-01

    This bachelor's thesis examines the subject of employee motivation and employee benefits. The basic terms and theories needed to comprehend the subject are explained in the theoretical part of the work. The theoretical part of the work also focuses on employee benefits, mainly the goal of employee benefits and listing of currently available employee benefits. In the practical part of the work is an analysis and comparison of employee benefits used in two companies that are representing privat...

  6. The Ef fects of Technology Usabilitiy and Individual Technology Readiness on Utilization of Electronic Document Management System (EDMS: A Research on Employee of University Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asuman Atilla

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Electronic Document Management System (EDMS is software which is utilized for writing, sending and storing, briefly managing the processes and operations of the corporations and institutions. In this empirical research, the statistical differences are investigated between users’ concerns about usability of mentioned technology, users’ technological readiness levels and users’ utilization status of EDMS sample is formed by 189 administrative staff of a university hospital in Ankara. According to findings, significant statistical differences are found between some dimensions of technology usability (usability effectiveness, learnability,helpfulness satisfaction, some dimensions of technology readiness (discomfort and insecurity and the utilization status (user, nonuser of EDMS.

  7. RAISING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES COMPETENCE OF SCIENTIFIC AND PEDAGOGICAL EMPLOYEES - A KEY REQUIREMENT OF THE QUALITY OF EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia V. Morze

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article it was analyzed one of the basic conditions of providing the quality of higher education according to the system of internal quality assurance standards ESG (European quality assurance standards and guidelines to increase the ICT competence of scientific-pedagogical staff of the University. It was described the modular system of training for scientific and pedagogical staff of the Borys Grinchenko Kyiv University. Special attention is paid to the description of the system of raising the level of formation the ICT competence as one of the key competences of the modern teacher. The system of professional development, which is based on creating mixed studying and technology of "flipped classroom", formative assessment, innovative educational and ICT technologies according to the specially designed informative module "Informational and communication technologies", which allows scientific-pedagogical staff to use modern ICT and educational technologies effectively for their further applying in the provision of educational services and the development of quality of open educational content and open educational e-environment available to the student at any convenient time, which will significantly improve the quality of the educational process.

  8. Exit from Synchrony in Joint Improvised Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahan, Assi; Noy, Lior; Hart, Yuval; Mayo, Avi; Alon, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Motion synchrony correlates with effective and well-rated human interaction. However, people do not remain locked in synchrony; Instead, they repeatedly enter and exit synchrony. In many important interactions, such as therapy, marriage and parent-infant communication, it is the ability to exit and then re-enter synchrony that is thought to build strong relationship. The phenomenon of entry into zero-phase synchrony is well-studied experimentally and in terms of mathematical modeling. In contrast, exit-from-synchrony is under-studied. Here, we focus on human motion coordination, and examine the exit-from-synchrony phenomenon using experimental data from the mirror game paradigm, in which people perform joint improvised motion, and from human tracking of computer-generated stimuli. We present a mathematical mechanism that captures aspects of exit-from-synchrony in human motion. The mechanism adds a random motion component when the accumulated velocity error between the players is small. We introduce this mechanism to several models for human coordinated motion, including the widely studied HKB model, and the predictor-corrector model of Noy, Dekel and Alon. In all models, the new mechanism produces realistic simulated behavior when compared to experimental data from the mirror game and from tracking of computer generated stimuli, including repeated entry and exit from zero-phase synchrony that generates a complexity of motion similar to that of human players. We hope that these results can inform future research on exit-from-synchrony, to better understand the dynamics of coordinated action of people and to enhance human-computer and human-robot interaction. PMID:27711185

  9. Exploring the role of information and communication technology on employees' work and family domains / Johannes Willem de Wet

    OpenAIRE

    De Wet, Johannes Willem

    2015-01-01

    Technology has become part of society’s everyday functions, changing rapidly and providing widespread mobility. In South Africa alone, the amount of internet users grew from 8,5 million to 24,9 million in only three years (2011-2014). Currently 90% of these users access this facility from their mobile devices. This statistic illustrates the trend that South Africans are moving towards a continually connected lifestyle, a situation in which information and communication technolo...

  10. Exit Tickets Open the Door to University Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danley, Angela; McCoy, Ann; Weed, Rahila

    2006-01-01

    Four instructors from a mid-western university implemented exit tickets in their university courses. The exit tickets were based on Marzano's (2012) four types of exit tickets and were analyzed for patterns. Faculty completed a journal to reflect on what was learned examining the exit tickets. A survey was completed by both instructors and…

  11. Tritium in Exit Signs | RadTown USA | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Many exit signs contain tritium to light the sign without batteries or electricity. Using tritium in exit signs allows the sign to remain lit if the power goes out. Tritium is most dangerous when it is inhaled or swallowed. Never tamper with a tritium exit sign. If a tritium exit sign is broken, leave the area immediately and notify the building maintenance staff.

  12. Exploring the Reasons and Ways to Exit: The Entrepreneur Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parastuty, Zulaicha; Breitenecker, Robert J.; Schwarz, Erich J.; Harms, Rainer; Bögenhold, Dieter; Bonnet, Jean; Dejardin, Marcus; Garcia Perez de Lema, Domingo

    2016-01-01

    Research on entrepreneurial exit has received growing attention recently, attributing to the importance of exit in the entrepreneurial process. Yet, the complex phenomena of exit render the research scattered in the field. This research is aimed at understanding entrepreneurial exit at the

  13. 10 CFR 431.202 - Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. 431.202... COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Illuminated Exit Signs § 431.202 Definitions concerning illuminated exit signs. Basic model means, with respect to illuminated exit signs, all units of a given type...

  14. Employee Engagement, Fatigue and Happiness in IT Sector in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Indhira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Employee engagement has emerged as one of the most important topics in the sphere of human resource management. It stands for the extent to which the employees are committed to the vision, mission and goals of the organization and involved with the work they do. The aim is to assess the main factors encouraging or preventing employee engagement, create fatigue and happiness in ITES employees. The first phase will be a survey was conducted in 10 IT companies and sample Size is 800, using a structured questionnaire. Focus group interview discussion will be based on reasons for attrition and the unique problems of employee engagement, the happiness of ITES employees. Exit interview data will be analyzed using percentage analysis, factor analysis and content analysis using statistical tool SPSS.

  15. Exit Tickets Open the Door to University Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Danley, EdD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Four instructors from a mid-western university implemented exit tickets in their university courses. The exit tickets were based on Marzano’s (2012 four types of exit tickets and were analyzed for patterns. Faculty completed a journal to reflect on what was learned examining the exit tickets. A survey was completed by both instructors and university students to determine the benefits of the use of exit tickets as a formative assessment at the university. Researchers share the processes used for implementing exit tickets and the results of the data collected along with implications for the use of exit tickets at the university.

  16. Employee Ownership, Employee Attitudes, and Firm Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas Kruse; Joseph Blasi

    1995-01-01

    Employee ownership in U.S. companies has grown substantially in the past 20 years. This paper reviews and provides some meta-analyses on the accumulated evidence concerning the prevalence, causes, and effects of employee ownership, covering 25 studies of employee attitudes and behaviors, and 27 studies of productivity and profitability (with both cross-sectional and pre/post comparisons). Attitudinal and behavioral studies tend to find higher employee commitment among employee-owners but mixe...

  17. The Political Economy of Early Exit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Carina; Starke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale exit from the labour market began in the 1970s in many OECD countries. The literature indicates that individual early retirement decisions are facilitated by generous and accessible ‘pathways’ into retirement in the public pension system, unemployment insurance or disability benefits....... It is unclear, however, why early exit became so much more prevalent in some countries than in others and why such differences remain, despite a recent shift back towards higher employment rates and ‘active ageing’. We test a logic of sectoral cost-shifting politics involving cross-class alliances...... in the tradable sector, against a more traditional class-based logic of welfare state policy-making. Quantitative analysis of employment outcomes in 21 countries shows that the political economy of early exit clearly rests on the sectoral politics of cost-shifting....

  18. Exit strategies following percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cormio, Luigi; Gonzalez, Gaspar Ibarlucea; Tolley, David

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the characteristics and outcomes of exit strategies following percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) using the Clinical Research Office of the Endourological Society (CROES) PCNL Global Study database. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Two matched data sets were prepared in order to compare...... stent only versus NT only and TTL versus NT only. Patients were matched on the exit strategy using the following variables: case volume of the center where they underwent PCNL, stone burden, the presence of staghorn stone, size of sheath used at percutaneous access, the presence of bleeding during...

  19. Fired? Here's an exit strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, M M

    2000-01-01

    Who gets fired in a boom job market? People are fired more often for things they failed to do than for mistakes they made. The new rules of engagement are: There is no probationary period; resistance to technology is a quick ticket out; a lack of emotional commitment to the role you're hired to play is usually fatal; personality defects that keep others from producing are not tolerated. The most common reason for being fired, however, is lack of fit. Whether you're laid off or fired, don't ask for explanations. The fact is, the people with the power to get rid of you don't want you to stay. What matters is maximizing what they'll do for you on departure. To get the most favorable terms with the least financial and ego damage, here's a game plan: (1) Get a favorable reference--in writing--from your boss; (2) gather work samples and good performance appraisals you've received; (3) negotiate for as much severance pay as possible; (4) negotiate for outplacement assistance; (5) gather contact names from co-workers; and (6) leave in style.

  20. On the Bochner subordination of exit laws

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Hmissi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Let \\(\\mathbb{P}=(P_t_{t\\ge 0}\\ be a sub-Markovian semigroup on \\(L^2(m\\, let \\(\\beta=(\\beta_t_{t\\ge 0}\\ be a Bochner subordinator and let \\(\\mathbb{P}^{\\beta}=(P_t^{\\beta}_{t\\ge 0}\\ be the subordinated semigroup of \\(\\mathbb{P}\\ by means of \\(\\beta\\, i.e. \\(P^{\\beta}_s:=\\int_0^{\\infty} P_r\\,\\beta_s(dr\\. Let \\(\\varphi:=(\\varphi_t_{t\\gt 0}\\ be a \\(\\mathbb{P}\\-exit law, i.e. \\[ P_t\\varphi_s= \\varphi_{s+t}, \\qquad s,t\\gt 0\\] and let \\(\\varphi^{\\beta}_t:=\\int_0^{\\infty} \\varphi_s\\,\\beta_t(ds\\. Then \\(\\varphi^{\\beta}:=(\\varphi_t^{\\beta}_{t\\gt 0}\\ is a \\(\\mathbb{P}^{\\beta}\\-exit law whenever it lies in \\(L^2(m\\. This paper is devoted to the converse problem when \\(\\beta\\ is without drift. We prove that a \\(\\mathbb{P}^{\\beta}\\-exit law \\(\\psi:=(\\psi_t_{t\\gt 0}\\ is subordinated to a (unique \\(\\mathbb{P}\\-exit law \\(\\varphi\\ (i.e. \\(\\psi=\\varphi^{\\beta}\\ if and only if \\((P_tu_{t\\gt 0}\\subset D(A^{\\beta}\\, where \\(u=\\int_0^{\\infty} e^{-s} \\psi_s ds\\ and \\(A^{\\beta}\\ is the \\(L^2(m\\-generator of \\(\\mathbb{P}^{\\beta}\\.

  1. Exit Creek Bank Height Survey, June 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of survey data from bank profiles surveyed June 12 and June 24-26, 2013 at the edge of the active braid plain of Exit Creek, a stream draining...

  2. Processes with multiple entries and exits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Stefanescu, G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to integrate the algebra of communicating processes (ACP) and the algebra of flownomials (AF). Basically, this means to combine axiomatized parallel and looping operators. To this end we introduce a model of process graphs with multiple entries and exits. In this model the u

  3. Couplings and Asymptotic Exponentiality of Exit Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassesco, S.; Olivieri, E.; Vares, M. E.

    1998-10-01

    The goal of this note is simply to call attention to the resulting simplification in the proof of asymptotic exponentiality of exit times in the Freidlin-Wentzell regime (as proved by F. Martinelli et al.) by using the coupling proposed by T. Lindvall and C. Rogers.

  4. Determinants of Business Exits in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The annually increasing firm exits have significant financial, legal and social impacts on productivity, employment and economic growth in Australia. However, evidence of the impacts of firm exits is sparse. This paper undertakes a first-ever study that empirically investigates the determinants and their impacts on firm churn. This paper is innovative to the literature in four aspects: (1 Local Region Areas (LGAs data, rarely available in other countries, has been used for the analysis; (2 using LGAs as the basic analytical unit is able to eliminate the heterogeneity problems encountered by other studies which are based on national and cross-national data; (3 panel data modelling techniques identify robust evidence; (4 systematic statistical tests guarantees the robustness of the results. The dataset, provided by Australia Bureau of Statistics, include 3462 observations of 577 Local Government Areas (LGAs during 2004-2009. The research identifies variables positively and negatively affecting the exits and finds that size matters in determining business exits. The last section concludes with a discussion of limitations and future research directions.

  5. Exit problems for oscillating compound Poisson process

    CERN Document Server

    Kadankova, Tetyana

    2011-01-01

    In this article we determine the Laplace transforms of the main boundary functionals of the oscillating compound Poisson process. These are the first passage time of the level, the joint distribution of the first exit time from the interval and the value of the overshoot through the boundary. Under certain conditions we establish the asymptotic behaviour of the mentioned functionals.

  6. Epigenetics as a First Exit Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aurell, E.; Sneppen, K.

    2002-01-01

    We develop a framework to discuss the stability of epigenetic states as first exit problems in dynamical systems with noise. We consider in particular the stability of the lysogenic state of the λ prophage. The formalism defines a quantitative measure of robustness of inherited states.

  7. 14 CFR 121.585 - Exit seating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... this section, the suitability of each person it permits to occupy an exit seat, in accordance with this... public at all passenger loading gates and ticket counters at each airport where it conducts passenger...-holding district office. (o) Certificate holders shall assign seats prior to boarding consistent with...

  8. Exit from exit: resetting the cell cycle through Amn1 inhibition of G protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanchang; Shirogane, Takahiro; Liu, Dou; Harper, J Wade; Elledge, Stephen J

    2003-03-07

    In S. cerevisiae cells undergoing anaphase, a ras-related GTPase, Tem1, is located on the spindle pole body that enters the daughter cell and activates a signal transduction pathway, MEN, to allow mitotic exit. MEN activation must be reversed after mitotic exit to reset the cell cycle in G1. We find that daughter cells activate an Antagonist of MEN pathway (AMEN) in part through induction of the Amn1 protein that binds directly to Tem1 and prevents its association with its target kinase Cdc15. Failure of Amn1 function results in defects of both the spindle assembly and nuclear orientation checkpoints and delays turning off Cdc14 in G1. Thus, Amn1 is part of a daughter-specific switch that helps cells exit from mitotic exit and reset the cell cycle.

  9. Effect of exit locations on ants escaping a two-exit room stressed with repellent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujie; Cao, Shuchao; Wang, Qiao; Lian, Liping; Song, Weiguo

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the effect of the distance between two exits on ant evacuation efficiency and the behavior of ants escaping from a two-exit room, we conducted ant egress experiments using Camponotus japonicus in multiple situations. We found that the ants demonstrated the phenomenon of "symmetry breaking" in this stress situation. It was also shown that different locations for the exits obviously affected the ants' egress efficiency by measuring the time intervals between individual egress and flow rate in eight repeated experiments, each of which contained five different distance between the two exits. In addition, it is demonstrated that there are differences between the predictions of Social Force Model of pedestrians and the behaviors of ants in stress conditions through comparing some important behavioral features, including position, trajectory, velocity, and density map.

  10. Employee Retention: Organisational and Personal Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip; Michielsen, Maya; Moeyaert, Bastiaan

    2009-01-01

    In this continuously changing contemporary economy, companies have to be able to anticipate technological innovations and to compete with other companies worldwide. This need makes important a company's ability to evolve through its employees' learning and through continuous development. Securing and retaining skilled employees plays an important…

  11. A Behavior-Based Employee Performance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernathy, William B.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses human performance technology models for describing and understanding factors involved in day-to-day functioning of employees and then to develop specific remedial interventions as needed, and contrasts it to an organizational performance system perspective used to design an organization before employees are even hired to prevent bad…

  12. A Field Experiment in Motivating Employee Ideas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Gibbs (Michael); S. Neckermann (Susanne); C. Siemroth (Christoph)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ We study the effects of a field experiment designed to motivate employee ideas, at a large technology company. Employees were encouraged to submit ideas on process and product improvements via an online system. In the experiment, the company randomized 19 account teams

  13. Employee Retention: Organisational and Personal Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyndt, Eva; Dochy, Filip; Michielsen, Maya; Moeyaert, Bastiaan

    2009-01-01

    In this continuously changing contemporary economy, companies have to be able to anticipate technological innovations and to compete with other companies worldwide. This need makes important a company's ability to evolve through its employees' learning and through continuous development. Securing and retaining skilled employees plays an important…

  14. A Field Experiment in Motivating Employee Ideas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Gibbs (Michael); S. Neckermann (Susanne); C. Siemroth (Christoph)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ We study the effects of a field experiment designed to motivate employee ideas, at a large technology company. Employees were encouraged to submit ideas on process and product improvements via an online system. In the experiment, the company randomized 19 account teams

  15. Mathematical design of a highway exit curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakdemirli, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    A highway exit curve is designed under the assumption that the tangential and normal components of the acceleration of the vehicle remain constant throughout the path. Using fundamental principles of physics and calculus, the differential equation determining the curve function is derived. The equation and initial conditions are cast into a dimensionless form first for universality of the results. It is found that the curves are effected by only one dimensionless parameter which is the ratio of the tangential acceleration to the normal acceleration. For no tangential acceleration, the equation can be solved analytically yielding a circular arc solution as expected. For nonzero tangential acceleration, the function is complicated and no closed-form solutions exist for the differential equation. The equation is solved numerically for various acceleration ratios. Discussions for applications to highway exits are given.

  16. Dynamic exit pupil trackers for autostereoscopic displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akşit, Kaan; Baghsiahi, Hadi; Surman, Phil; Ölçer, Selim; Willman, Eero; Selviah, David R; Day, Sally; Urey, Hakan

    2013-06-17

    This paper describes the first demonstrations of two dynamic exit pupil (DEP) tracker techniques for autostereoscopic displays. The first DEP tracker forms an exit pupil pair for a single viewer in a defined space with low intraocular crosstalk using a pair of moving shutter glasses located within the optical system. A display prototype using the first DEP tracker is constructed from a pair of laser projectors, pupil-forming optics, moving shutter glasses at an intermediate pupil plane, an image relay lens, and a Gabor superlens based viewing screen. The left and right eye images are presented time-sequentially to a single viewer and seen as a 3D image without wearing glasses and allows the viewer to move within a region of 40 cm × 20 cm in the lateral plane, and 30 cm along the axial axis. The second DEP optics can move the exit pupil location dynamically in a much larger 3D space by using a custom spatial light modulator (SLM) forming an array of shutters. Simultaneous control of multiple exit pupils in both lateral and axial axes is demonstrated for the first time and provides a viewing volume with an axial extent of 0.6-3 m from the screen and within a lateral viewing angle of ± 20° for multiple viewers. This system has acceptable crosstalk (< 5%) between the stereo image pairs. In this novel version of the display the optical system is used as an advanced dynamic backlight for a liquid crystal display (LCD). This has advantages in terms of overall display size as there is no requirement for an intermediate image, and in image quality. This system has acceptable crosstalk (< 5%) between the stereo image pairs.

  17. Comparing Virtual Reference Exit Survey Results and Transcript Analysis: A Model for Service Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Joanne B.; MacKenzie, James C.

    2006-01-01

    This study uses virtual reference transcripts for which patrons completed exit surveys to seek any correlations between user and librarian satisfaction within virtual reference transactions. By analyzing transcripts with a focus on three elements-technology performance, preferred reference practices, and the demonstrated communication levels of…

  18. 14 CFR 27.805 - Flight crew emergency exits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 27.805 Flight crew emergency exits. (a) For rotorcraft with passenger emergency exits that are not convenient to the flight crew, there must be flight crew emergency exits, on both sides of the rotorcraft...

  19. 14 CFR 29.805 - Flight crew emergency exits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 29.805 Flight crew emergency exits. (a) For rotorcraft with passenger emergency exits that are... rotorcraft or as a top hatch, in the flight crew area. (b) Each flight crew emergency exit must be...

  20. 14 CFR 23.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency exit access. 23.813 Section 23... Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 23.813 Emergency exit access. (a) For commuter category airplanes, access to window-type emergency exits may not be obstructed by seats or seat backs. (b) In addition,...

  1. 14 CFR 25.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Emergency exit access. 25.813 Section 25... Emergency exit access. Each required emergency exit must be accessible to the passengers and located where... following must be provided for each Type III or Type IV exit—(1) There must be access from the nearest...

  2. Entry and Exit Stress Variation of Cold Rolling Strip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGDong—cheng

    2012-01-01

    The shortcomings of an exit stress variation formula which has been well accepted are analyzed~ it is found that the exit stress variation formula violates the premise of the law of volume constancy. The shortcomings of an en- try stress variation formula are analyzed too, and the basic assumption of the formula is uniform exit velocity. How- ever, for a rigid-plastic material uniform exit velocity implies that the lateral distributioi1 of elongation is uniform, so the exit stress must be uniform and any type of flatness defect is impossible, which is contrary to the practice. In fact, entry and exit velocity variation influence entry and exit stress variation, and entry and exit stress variation in- fluence entry and exit velocity variation too, so a precise explicit stress variation formula cannot be got easily. Con- sidering the relationship between stress variation and velocity variation, an iteration method is presented to calculate entry and exit stress variation of cold rolling strip. To avoid divergent phenomenon of the iteration course, a relaxa- tion factor method is adopted. The calculation results are compared with the entry and exit stress variation formula commonly used by many researchers. The difference is remarkable, while the result calculated agree more well with measured result if the exit elastic recovery zone is considered. Specially, the incoming flatnessI propagate efficiency calculated ~ives a more realistic result.

  3. Numerical analysis of two and three dimensional buoyancy driven water-exit of a circular cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshari Shahab

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the technology of underwater moving bodies, the need for developing the knowledge of surface effect interaction of free surface and underwater moving bodies is increased. Hence, the two-phase flow is a subject which is interesting for many researchers all around the world. In this paper, the non-linear free surface deformations which occur during the water-exit of a circular cylinder due to its buoyancy are solved using finite volume discretization based code, and using Volume of Fluid (VOF scheme for solving two phase flow. Dynamic mesh model is used to simulate dynamic motion of the cylinder. In addition, the effect of cylinder mass in presence of an external force is studied. Moreover, the oblique exit and entry of a circular cylinder with two exit angles is simulated. At last, water-exit of a circular cylinder in six degrees of freedom is simulated in 3D using parallel processing. The simulation errors of present work (using VOF method for maximum velocity and height of a circular cylinder are less than the corresponding errors of level set method reported by previous researchers. Oblique exit shows interesting results; formation of waves caused by exit of the cylinder, wave motion in horizontal direction and the air trapped between the waves are observable. In 3D simulation the visualization of water motion on the top surface of the cylinder and the free surface breaking on the front and back faces of the 3D cylinder at the exit phase are observed which cannot be seen in 2D simulation. Comparing the results, 3D simulation shows better agreement with experimental data, specially in the maximum height position of the cylinder.

  4. Employee Training: Current Trends, Future Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorovitz, Elizabeth

    1983-01-01

    Issues currently affecting employee training are the impact of high technology, worker adaptability, the communications revolution, job satisfaction, underinvestment in human capital, demographic shifts, and interest in productivity improvement. (SK)

  5. Employee personal Internet usage in the workplace

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Hemin

    2016-01-01

    Information technology (IT) devices connected to the Internet, such as computers, tablets, and smartphones, have become pervasive in the workplace. These IT devices have greatly facilitated the performance of job tasks for employees. At the same time, employees are increasingly using these technologies for non-work-related purposes during office hours, which is called personal Internet usage in the workplace (PIU). Examples of PIU include, but are not limited to, check...

  6. BST2/Tetherin Inhibition of Alphavirus Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw Shin Ooi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses such as chikungunya virus (CHIKV and Semliki Forest virus (SFV are small enveloped RNA viruses that bud from the plasma membrane. Tetherin/BST2 is an interferon-induced host membrane protein that inhibits the release of many enveloped viruses via direct tethering of budded particles to the cell surface. Alphaviruses have highly organized structures and exclude host membrane proteins from the site of budding, suggesting that their release might be insensitive to tetherin inhibition. Here, we demonstrated that exogenously-expressed tetherin efficiently inhibited the release of SFV and CHIKV particles from host cells without affecting virus entry and infection. Alphavirus release was also inhibited by the endogenous levels of tetherin in HeLa cells. While rubella virus (RuV and dengue virus (DENV have structural similarities to alphaviruses, tetherin inhibited the release of RuV but not DENV. We found that two recently identified tetherin isoforms differing in length at the N-terminus exhibited distinct capabilities in restricting alphavirus release. SFV exit was efficiently inhibited by the long isoform but not the short isoform of tetherin, while both isoforms inhibited vesicular stomatitis virus exit. Thus, in spite of the organized structure of the virus particle, tetherin specifically blocks alphavirus release and shows an interesting isoform requirement.

  7. To fish or not to fish: factors at multiple scales affecting artisanal fishers' readiness to exit a declining fishery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim M Daw

    Full Text Available Globally, fisheries are challenged by the combined impacts of overfishing, degradation of ecosystems and impacts of climate change, while fisheries livelihoods are further pressured by conservation policy imperatives. Fishers' adaptive responses to these pressures, such as exiting from a fishery to pursue alternative livelihoods, determine their own vulnerability, as well as the potential for reducing fishing effort and sustaining fisheries. The willingness and ability to make particular adaptations in response to change, such as exiting from a declining fishery, is influenced by economic, cultural and institutional factors operating at scales from individual fishers to national economies. Previous studies of exit from fisheries at single or few sites, offer limited insight into the relative importance of individual and larger-scale social and economic factors. We asked 599 fishers how they would respond to hypothetical scenarios of catch declines in 28 sites in five western Indian Ocean countries. We investigated how socioeconomic variables at the individual-, household- and site-scale affected whether they would exit fisheries. Site-level factors had the greatest influence on readiness to exit, but these relationships were contrary to common predictions. Specifically, higher levels of infrastructure development and economic vitality - expected to promote exit from fisheries - were associated with less readiness to exit. This may be due to site level histories of exit from fisheries, greater specialisation of fishing households, or higher rewards from fishing in more economically developed sites due to technology, market access, catch value and government subsidies. At the individual and household scale, fishers from households with more livelihood activities, and fishers with lower catch value were more willing to exit. These results demonstrate empirically how adaptive responses to change are influenced by factors at multiple scales, and

  8. Employee Stock Purchase Plans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gary V. Engelhardt; Brigitte C. Madrian

    2004-01-01

    Employee stock purchase plans (ESPPs) are designed to promote employee stock ownership broadly within the firm and provide another tax-deferred vehicle for individual capital accumulation in addition to traditional pensions, 401(k...

  9. Towards A Model of Identity and Role Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S. Milne

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Explanations of role exit often focus on how factors associated with a specific role that affect whether the individual will exit a role or not. Other research explains how identities affect our performance in a role. However, no one has yet to demonstrate the connection between role-set factors and identities, and role exit. Using data from a survey of 940 current and former soccer referees, this paper provides a model of role exit that involves a complex of processes that include role-set factors (structural and cultural factors associated with a specific role and identity processes. Specifically, this paper demonstrates that, other than role conflict, identity processes explain the relationship between role-set factors and role exit. The model provides a beginning method for understanding the connection between identities and role exit.

  10. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-05-11

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT- bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position.

  11. Managers Empowering Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. T.D. Carter

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This article looked at the behavior of organizations as an important factor for empowering employees. This allowed for a greater level of partnering between managers and employees. The more that top management wants an internal commitment from its employees, the more it must involve employees in defining work objectives, specifying how to achieve them and setting stretch targets. Develop and improved and practical empowerment model that applies systems theory and socialization theory. Approach: A series of focus group meetings were conducted with managers and employees of 310 companies throughout the United States, Europe and China and were asked questions regarding employee productivity when empowered by management, the importance of increased employee performance, measurement of employee performance, importance of socialized employees in organizations and the role of systemic thinking in management decision making. Results: The findings said that most employees were more productive when empowered by management, almost all firms recognize the importance of increased employee performance and measure it. Last, most firms find socialized employees important to have in their organizations many firms feel that systemic thinking assists managers with decision making. Conclusion: More responsibility generates greater productivity, morale and commitment. Empowerment fosters innovation, creativity, motivation and instills shared values to promote and atmosphere for learning and accomplishment.

  12. Documenting Employee Conduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Jason

    2009-01-01

    One of the best ways for a child care program to lose an employment-related lawsuit is failure to document the performance of its employees. Documentation of an employee's performance can provide evidence of an employment-related decision such as discipline, promotion, or discharge. When properly implemented, documentation of employee performance…

  13. ENTREPRENEURIAL EXIT AND REENTRY: AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF TURKISH ENTREPRENEURS

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This study attempts to develop a better understanding in an emerging economy of the exit and reentry processes of entrepreneurs. Twelve case studies were conducted in Turkey with entrepreneurs who, following entrepreneurial exit, re-entered with new ventures. Human and social capital perspectives are used to gain insights into the reentry process. The study indicates that reasons for and modes of exit influence the entrepreneur's decisions surrounding reentry. Results further reveal that expe...

  14. On the Bochner subordination of exit laws

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Hmissi; Wajdi Maaouia

    2011-01-01

    Let \\(\\mathbb{P}=(P_t)_{t\\ge 0}\\) be a sub-Markovian semigroup on \\(L^2(m)\\), let \\(\\beta=(\\beta_t)_{t\\ge 0}\\) be a Bochner subordinator and let \\(\\mathbb{P}^{\\beta}=(P_t^{\\beta})_{t\\ge 0}\\) be the subordinated semigroup of \\(\\mathbb{P}\\) by means of \\(\\beta\\), i.e. \\(P^{\\beta}_s:=\\int_0^{\\infty} P_r\\,\\beta_s(dr)\\). Let \\(\\varphi:=(\\varphi_t)_{t\\gt 0}\\) be a \\(\\mathbb{P}\\)-exit law, i.e. \\[ P_t\\varphi_s= \\varphi_{s+t}, \\qquad s,t\\gt 0\\] and let \\(\\varphi^{\\beta}_t:=\\int_0^{\\infty} \\varphi_s...

  15. Fatal exit the automotive black box debate

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalick, Tom

    2005-01-01

    "Fatal Exit: The Automotive Black Box Debate cuts through thirty years of political wrangling and institutional biases to provide an argument for the Motor Vehicle Event Data Recorder (MVEDR). This automotive equivalent of an airplane's flight recorder or black box is intended to solve the mysteries of car crashes and improve the safety of our roads. The reader is taken inside the automotive industry and the government highway safety establishment to foster an understanding of the politics and the positions on all sides of this safety debate. The author takes an unbiased approach, chronologically presenting each argument and uncovering the agendas and mandates of each of the stakeholders." "This publication is essential reading for all consumers who need to have their voices heard on this critical issue, as well as for attorneys, public safety advocates, public policy administrators, engineers, automotive professionals, journalists, and insurance executives."--Jacket.

  16. Chaperone binding at the ribosomal exit tunnel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Ole; Gajhede, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The exit tunnel region of the ribosome is well established as a focal point for interaction between the components that guide the fate of nascent polypeptides. One of these, the chaperone trigger factor (TF), associates with the 50S ribosomal subunit through its N-terminal domain. Targeting of TF...... to ribosomes is crucial to achieve its remarkable efficiency in protein folding. A similar tight coupling to translation is found in signal recognition particle (SRP)-dependent protein translocation. Here, we report crystal structures of the E. coli TF ribosome binding domain. TF is structurally related...... to the Hsp33 chaperone but has a prominent ribosome anchor located as a tip of the molecule. This tip includes the previously established unique TF signature motif. Comparison reveals that this feature is not found in SRP structures. We identify a conserved helical kink as a hallmark of the TF structure...

  17. Tertiary interactions within the ribosomal exit tunnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosolapov, Andrey; Deutsch, Carol

    2009-04-01

    Although tertiary folding of whole protein domains is prohibited by the cramped dimensions of the ribosomal tunnel, dynamic tertiary interactions may permit folding of small elementary units within the tunnel. To probe this possibility, we used a beta-hairpin and an alpha-helical hairpin from the cytosolic N terminus of a voltage-gated potassium channel and determined a probability of folding for each at defined locations inside and outside the tunnel. Minimalist tertiary structures can form near the exit port of the tunnel, a region that provides an entropic window for initial exploration of local peptide conformations. Tertiary subdomains of the nascent peptide fold sequentially, but not independently, during translation. These studies offer an approach for diagnosing the molecular basis for folding defects that lead to protein malfunction and provide insight into the role of the ribosome during early potassium channel biogenesis.

  18. Control of the mitotic exit network during meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Attner, Michelle A.; Amon, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic exit network (MEN) is an essential GTPase signaling pathway that triggers exit from mitosis in budding yeast. We show here that during meiosis, the MEN is dispensable for exit from meiosis I but contributes to the timely exit from meiosis II. Consistent with a role for the MEN during meiosis II, we find that the signaling pathway is active only during meiosis II. Our analysis further shows that MEN signaling is modulated during meiosis in several key ways. Whereas binding of MEN c...

  19. Resolution extension and exit wave reconstruction in complex HREM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wen-Kuo; Chen, Fu-Rong; Kai, Ji-Jung; Kirkland, A I

    2004-01-01

    Direct methods in real and reciprocal space are developed for structural reversion. The direct method in real space involves the use of a novel method to retrieve the phase in the image plane using transport of intensity equation/maximum entropy method (TIE/MEM) and exit wave reconstruction by self-consistent propagation. Since the exit wave is restored from the complex signal in the image planes, no image model between the exit wave and image is assumed. The structural information in the reconstructed exit wave is then further extended by a "complex" maximum entropy method as a direct method in reciprocal space to extrapolate the phase to higher frequencies.

  20. Comparison of exit site infection and peritonitis incidences between povidone-iodine and normal saline use for chronic exit site care in peritoneal dialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Mi Lee

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Exit site care using normal saline did not increase the incidence of exit site infection and peritonitis. Therefore, normal saline may be an alternative treatment for exit site care in patients receiving PD.

  1. Employee voice and private sector workplace outcomes in Britain, 1980-2004

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Non-union direct voice has replaced union representative voice as the primary avenue for employee voice in the British private sector. This paper provides a framework for examining the relationship between employee voice and workplace outcomes that explains this development. As exit-voice theory predicts, voice is associated with lower voluntary turnover, especially in the case of union voice. Union voice is also associated with greater workplace conflict and poorer productivity. Non-union vo...

  2. Spatially Dispersed Employee Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Kristian Anders; Torfadóttir, Embla

    2014-01-01

    Employee recovery addresses either employee well-being or management's practices in aiding employees in recovering themselves following a service failure. This paper surveys the cabin crew at a small, European, low-cost carrier and investigates employees' perceptions of management practices to aid...... personnel achieve service recovery. Employee recovery within service research often focuses on front-line employees that work in a fixed location, however a contribution to the field is made by investigating the recovery of spatially dispersed personnel, such as operational personnel in the transport sector......, who have a work place away from a fixed or central location and have minimal management contact. Results suggest that the support employees receive from management, such as recognition, information sharing, training, and strategic awareness are all important for spatially dispersed front...

  3. Employees, sustainability and motivation: Increasing employee ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... engagement by addressing sustainability and corporate social responsibility. ... Research in Hospitality Management ... social responsibility (CSR) issues and in this way lead employees to the perception of their jobs as being meaningful.

  4. Educational Inequalities in Exit from Paid Employment among Dutch Workers: The Influence of Health, Lifestyle and Work.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan J W Robroek

    Full Text Available Individuals with lower socioeconomic status are at increased risk of involuntary exit from paid employment. To give sound advice for primary prevention in the workforce, insight is needed into the role of mediating factors between socioeconomic status and labour force participation. Therefore, it is aimed to investigate the influence of health status, lifestyle-related factors and work characteristics on educational differences in exit from paid employment.14,708 Dutch employees participated in a ten-year follow-up study during 1999-2008. At baseline, education, self-perceived health, lifestyle (smoking, alcohol, sports, BMI and psychosocial (demands, control, rewards and physical work characteristics were measured by questionnaire. Employment status was ascertained monthly based on tax records. The relation between education, health, lifestyle, work-characteristics and exit from paid employment through disability benefits, unemployment, early retirement and economic inactivity was investigated by competing risks regression analyses. The mediating effects of these factors on educational differences in exit from paid employment were tested using a stepwise approach.Lower educated workers were more likely to exit paid employment through disability benefits (SHR:1.84, unemployment (SHR:1.74, and economic inactivity (SHR:1.53 but not due to early retirement (SHR:0.92. Poor or moderate health, an unhealthy lifestyle, and unfavourable work characteristics were associated with disability benefits and unemployment, and an unhealthy lifestyle with economic inactivity. Educational differences in disability benefits were explained for 40% by health, 31% by lifestyle, and 12% by work characteristics. For economic inactivity and unemployment, up to 14% and 21% of the educational differences could be explained, particularly by lifestyle-related factors.There are educational differences in exit from paid employment, which are partly mediated by health

  5. Educational Inequalities in Exit from Paid Employment among Dutch Workers: The Influence of Health, Lifestyle and Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robroek, Suzan J W; Rongen, Anne; Arts, Coos H; Otten, Ferdy W H; Burdorf, Alex; Schuring, Merel

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with lower socioeconomic status are at increased risk of involuntary exit from paid employment. To give sound advice for primary prevention in the workforce, insight is needed into the role of mediating factors between socioeconomic status and labour force participation. Therefore, it is aimed to investigate the influence of health status, lifestyle-related factors and work characteristics on educational differences in exit from paid employment. 14,708 Dutch employees participated in a ten-year follow-up study during 1999-2008. At baseline, education, self-perceived health, lifestyle (smoking, alcohol, sports, BMI) and psychosocial (demands, control, rewards) and physical work characteristics were measured by questionnaire. Employment status was ascertained monthly based on tax records. The relation between education, health, lifestyle, work-characteristics and exit from paid employment through disability benefits, unemployment, early retirement and economic inactivity was investigated by competing risks regression analyses. The mediating effects of these factors on educational differences in exit from paid employment were tested using a stepwise approach. Lower educated workers were more likely to exit paid employment through disability benefits (SHR:1.84), unemployment (SHR:1.74), and economic inactivity (SHR:1.53) but not due to early retirement (SHR:0.92). Poor or moderate health, an unhealthy lifestyle, and unfavourable work characteristics were associated with disability benefits and unemployment, and an unhealthy lifestyle with economic inactivity. Educational differences in disability benefits were explained for 40% by health, 31% by lifestyle, and 12% by work characteristics. For economic inactivity and unemployment, up to 14% and 21% of the educational differences could be explained, particularly by lifestyle-related factors. There are educational differences in exit from paid employment, which are partly mediated by health, lifestyle and work

  6. Employee Retention and Performance Improvement in High-Tech Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, B. Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Considers the benefits of employee retention and performance improvement in high technology, new economy companies. Discusses attracting and retaining top talent in information technology companies; targeted recruiting and hiring; employee achievement; learning and professional growth; recognition; nurturing careers; team collaboration; the TALENT…

  7. Assessing Undergraduate Curriculum Through Student Exit Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, C. M.; Gonzales, L.; Martinez, C.

    2008-12-01

    One aspect of assessing the undergraduate curriculum is recognizing that the exit vector of the student is a metric in the absence of a structured assessment program. Detailed knowledge across all geosciences departments regarding the disposition of their recent baccalaureate recipients has been at best inconsistent, and in the case of about half of geoscience programs, non-existent. However, through examining of multiple datasets, a pattern of disposition of geosciences BS recipients emerges, providing a snapshot of the system- wide response to the system-wide "average" program. This pattern can also be juxtaposed against several frameworks of desired skill sets for recent graduates and the employment sectors likely to hire them. The question remains is can one deduce the effectiveness of the undergraduate program in placing graduates in their next step, whether in graduate school or the workplace. Likewise, with an increasing scrutiny on the "value" of an education, is the resulting economic gain sufficient for the student, such that programs will be viewed as sustainable. A factor in answering this question is the importance of the undergraduate program in the ultimate destination of the professional. Clear pathways exist for "optimal" schools for the production of new faculty and new industry professionals, but is it possible to identify those trends further up the educational pipeline? One major mechanism to examine the undergraduate program effectiveness related to exit vectors is to look at hiring trends witnessed related to markedly different program structures, such as those at universities outside of the United States. Rectifying academic programs between the United States and other national systems is often a challenge, but even given the substantial differences between depth of technical knowledge and breadth of education across these programs, in the end, the sum product is often viewed as roughly comparable. This paper will look at end

  8. Going, Going, Gone. Innovation and Exit in Manufacturing Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Cefis (Elena); O. Marsili (Orietta)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines the effect of innovation on the risk of exit of a firm, distinguishing between different modes of exits. Innovation represents a resource and a capability that helps a firm to build competitive advantage and remain in the market. At the same time, the resources and

  9. Exit and Voice: Organizational Loyalty and Dispute Resolution Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Elizabeth A.

    2006-01-01

    This study compares workplace dispute resolution strategies (exit, voice and toleration) in matched pairs of conventional and worker-owned cooperative organizations operating in three industries--coal mining, taxicab driving and organic food distribution. Building on Hirschman's classic exit, voice and loyalty thesis, this research demonstrates…

  10. 14 CFR 29.813 - Emergency exit access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo... aisle to each Type III and Type IV exit, and (1) For rotorcraft that have a passenger seating... that exit of not less than the width of the narrowest passenger seat installed on the rotorcraft;...

  11. Exit and voice in dutch social health insurance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gress, S.; Delnoij, D.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2003-01-01

    According to Hirschmann's concept of exit and voice, people have two options to make sure that firms or organisations realise what they (their consumers or members) are interested in (Hirschmann 1970). In the Dutch public health insurance system voice existed for a long time, but exit was only intro

  12. 14 CFR 29.807 - Passenger emergency exits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... a crash landing must be extremely remote. (d) Ditching emergency exits for passengers. If certification with ditching provisions is requested, ditching emergency exits must be provided in accordance... shown through analysis, ditching demonstrations, or any other tests found necessary by the...

  13. First exit distribution and path continuity of Hunt processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui-zeng; KANG Xu-sheng; ZHAO Min-zhi

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives a characterization of a Hunt process path by the first exit left limit distribution. It is also showed that if the first exit left limit distribution leaving any ball from the center is a uniform distribution on the sphere, then the Lévy Processes are a scaled Brownian motion.

  14. High School Exit Exam Scores and University Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Jerome V.; Bonner, Sarah M.

    2009-01-01

    Many U.S. students must pass a standards-based exit exam to earn a high school diploma. The degree to which exit exams and state standards properly signal to students their preparedness for postsecondary schooling has been questioned. The alignment of test scores with college grades for students at the University of Arizona (n = 2,667) who took…

  15. Injustice and employees' destructive responses: The mediating role of of state negative affect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, N.W.; Hagedoorn, M.; Zweers, Michiel; Postma, Saapke

    2000-01-01

    The focus of this study was employees' destructive behavioral intentions (i.e., exit, neglect, and aggressive voice) as a result of perceived injustice. In order to get an indication of the generalizability of the results, two studies employing different methodologies were conducted among different

  16. Building and Consummating Employee Training System in High and New Technology Enterprises%建立和完善高新技术企业员工培训体系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜娟娟

    2016-01-01

    在当今“以人为本”的时代,企业管理者已深刻地认识到员工不仅仅是企业的资本,企业财富的创造者,也是企业的顾客,更是企业的灵魂。虽然企业管理者已经开始重视员工培训,但和国际知名企业相比还是有一定的差距。为增强员工的企业责任感和凝聚力,企业管理者应建立和完善有效的员工培训体系。文中将借鉴国际知名企业的培训体系,为高新技术企业建立和完善员工体系的建议。%In the people -oriented era,enterprise managers has already recognised that staff are not capital of the companies,but the treasure creators,the customers of the enterprises,even the soul of the corporations.There is an obvious deficiency when comparing with the international well -known companies,though managers began paying more attention on employee training.Managers need to build and consummate an effective employee training system in order to enhance organizational commitment and cohesiveness.This paper is going to use training system in international well-know enterprises for reference,and provide high and new technology enterprises a few suggestions on building and consummating an effective employee training system.

  17. Employee flourishing strategic framework

    OpenAIRE

    Stelzner, Samuel Georg Eric; Schutte, Corne S. L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper produces a preliminary version of a strategic framework for managing employee flourishing. ‘Flourishing’, a term from positive psychology, describes the experience of ‘the good life’. Providing this experience benefits employees. It also motivates them to sustain the enterprise that provides it. This positions employee flourishing as a strategy for long-term enterprise performance, a key concern of industrial engineering. The framework incorporates a systems approach and literature...

  18. Innovation and venture capital exit performance

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeau, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Venture capital is a potent source of R&D financing which contributes significantly to technological innovation output in the form of patented inventions. Scholars have argued that tighter protection of intellectual property rights reduces expropriation risks and encourages venture capitalists to invest in technology firms. Prior studies have showed that early stage technology investors give much weight to investment selection criteria related to innovation e.g. protection of intellectual pro...

  19. Employee flourishing strategic framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzner, Samuel Georg Eric

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper produces a preliminary version of a strategic framework for managing employee flourishing. ‘Flourishing’, a term from positive psychology, describes the experience of ‘the good life’. Providing this experience benefits employees. It also motivates them to sustain the enterprise that provides it. This positions employee flourishing as a strategy for long-term enterprise performance, a key concern of industrial engineering. The framework incorporates a systems approach and literature from a variety of bodies of knowledge, including organisational behaviour and human resource management. The framework includes a process, tools, and elements that assist enterprises to manage employee flourishing.

  20. 29 CFR 1910.36 - Design and construction requirements for exit routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... permitted occupant load of each floor served by the exit route. (4) Objects that project into the exit route... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Design and construction requirements for exit routes. 1910... construction requirements for exit routes. (a) Basic requirements. Exit routes must meet the following design...

  1. Employees as Customers: Exploring Service Climate, Employee Patronage, and Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abston, Kristie A.; Kupritz, Virginia W.

    2011-01-01

    The role of retail employees as customers was explored by quantitatively examining the influence of service climate and employee patronage on employee turnover intentions. Employees representing all shifts in two stores of a national retailer participated. Results indicated that employee patronage partially mediates the effects of service climate…

  2. Technological change and job redesign: implications for the quality of working life : a qualitative case study into employee experiences during the digitalization of radio and television program production

    OpenAIRE

    Rintala, Niina

    2005-01-01

    Technological advances have brought about extensive changes in work over the last few decades. In many industries, work has changed from specialized, often monotonous, manufacturing work to non-routine, complex and autonomous knowledge work that produces outputs characterized by information content. Simultaneously, job descriptions have increased in scope and autonomy. Technological development and job redesign continue to change work in many industries. Both the use of new technology at the ...

  3. Computing the Exit Complexity of Knowledge in Distributed Quantum Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A.Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Distributed Quantum computers abide from the exit complexity of the knowledge. The exit complexity is the accrue of the nodal information needed to clarify the total egress system with deference to a distinguished exit node. The core objective of this paper is to compile an arrogant methodology for assessing the exit complexity of the knowledge in distributed quantum computers. The proposed methodology is based on contouring the knowledge using the unlabeled binary trees, hence building an benchmarked and a computer based model. The proposed methodology dramatizes knowledge autocratically calculates the exit complexity. The methodology consists of several amphitheaters, starting with detecting the baron aspect of the tree of others entitled express knowledge and then measure the volume of information and the complexity of behavior destining from the bargain of information. Then calculate egress resulting from episodes that do not lead to the withdrawal of the information. In the end is calculated total egress complexity and then appraised total exit complexity of the system. Given the complexity of the operations within the Distributed Computing Quantity, this research addresses effective transactions that could affect the three-dimensional behavior of knowledge. The results materialized that the best affair where total exit complexity as minimal as possible is a picture of a binary tree is entitled at the rate of positive and negative cardinal points medium value. It could be argued that these cardinal points should not amass the upper bound apex or minimum.

  4. A Case Report of Rash at Peritoneal Dialysis Exit Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira O. Gosmanova MD, FASN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis recommends the regular application of topical antibiotic-containing preparations in addition to a routine exit site care to reduce the risk of exit site infection (ESI. Among these prophylactic antimicrobial preparations, topical gentamicin is one of the widely used and effective antibiotics for prevention of ESI and peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis (PD patients. Overall, topical gentamicin is well tolerated; however, its use can be associated with the development of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD. We describe a first reported case of PD catheter exit site contact ACD due to topical gentamicin mimicking ESI. The patient in this report developed worsening violaceous in color and pruritic rash surrounding the PD catheter exit site that appeared 3 weeks after the initiation of gentamicin cream. The association between development of rash and initiation of topical gentamicin led to a suspicion of local reaction to gentamicin rather than ESI. Skin biopsy confirmed ACD. Discontinuation of the provoking agent and subsequent treatment with topical hydrocortisone application led to a resolution of the exit site rash. Any rash at a PD catheter exit site should be considered infectious until proven otherwise. However, it is important to be aware of noninfectious etiologies of exit site rashes as the treatment of these 2 conditions differs.

  5. The Establishment and Research on Evaluation System for Core Competence and Technological Support Capability of International Travel and Healthcare Centers in Entry- Exit Inspection and Quarantine System%国际旅行卫生保健中心核心能力及技术支撑能力建设评价体系的建立与研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦佳; 章琪; 杨柳; 李俊; 周启明; 韩晓辉; 方筠; 叶魏

    2015-01-01

    Objective] To establish the evaluation system for core competence and technological support capability of International Travel and Healthcare centers in Entry-Exit Inspection and Quarantine system based on current situation and problem-oriented research,in order to provide a guidance and orientation in capacity building practice. [Methods] A literature research was made for literatures and relevant docu-ments of National Ministry of health and General Administration of Quality Supervision,Inspection and Quarantine(AQSIQ). An indicator system evaluation method was conducted from both theoretical and practical perspective according to the research result. Shanghai International Travel and Healthcare center was chosen as a sample. [Results] In accordance with the data,experiences and facts acquired,we es-tablished the evaluation system as target level,access level and indicator level. The case study showed that the core competence and technological support capability of Shanghai center was strong. But the in-formation management capability and public health emergency control ability should be enhanced. [Con-clusion] The evaluation system for core competence and technological support capability of International Travel and Healthcare centers has great practical significance and theory value,thus could play as a direc-tive role in the process of core competence and technology support ability construction.%[目的]对检验检疫系统国际旅行卫生保健中心的核心能力及技术支撑能力建设内涵及评价体系支持理论进行探索,建立与口岸卫生检疫技术保障要求相适应的评价体系。[方法]应用文献研究法分析国内外文献和上级部门印发的有关文件;根据分析结果,从理论和实践上阐述核心能力及技术支撑能力建设的具体内涵,构建其评价体系;搜集整理典型案例,应用案例研究法进行验证。[结果]经研究建立3个层次的指标体系,具体由目标层、

  6. Job-related motivational factors among Malaysian employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshor, Amat Taap; Abdullah, Adilah

    2002-12-01

    This study identified job-related motivational factors among Malaysian employees in several telecommunication companies. Responses were obtained from 1,179 employees at all levels up to senior managers and six different functional divisions, sales and marketing, human resources, finance, technical, information, technology, and support division. All employees were asked to rate the importance of Kovach's 10 job-motivational factors. These factors were good wages, job security, opportunity for career growth in the organization, good working conditions, interesting work, company loyalty to employees, tactful discipline, full appreciation of work done, sympathetic help with personal problems, and feeling of being involved in the organization. The top five factors employees identified as motivating them in their jobs were good wages, job security, company loyalty to employees, good working conditions, and full appreciation for work done. Findings were in accordance with Kovach for U.S. employees, in which the top motivational factors were good wages and job security.

  7. Entry and Exit Dynamics of Nascent Business Owners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rocha, Vera; Carneiro, Anabela; Varum, Celeste

    2015-01-01

    in the labor market and entry modes shape the post-entry dynamics of nascent business owners. By differentiating between different entry and exit routes, this paper provides new evidence on different human capital patterns among nascent business owners and on key determinants of entrepreneurial survival. Our...... results suggest that different exit modes can be predicted by business owners’ entry route. Furthermore, different exit modes exhibit different duration dependence patterns according to the entry mode. Additionally, the paper shows that businesses started after a displacement episode are not necessarily...

  8. Jet Engine Nozzle Exit Configurations and Associated Systems and Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengle, Vinod G. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods are disclosed. An aircraft system in accordance with one embodiment includes a jet engine exhaust nozzle having an internal flow surface and an exit aperture, with the exit aperture having a perimeter that includes multiple projections extending in an aft direction. Aft portions of individual neighboring projections are spaced apart from each other by a gap, and a geometric feature of the multiple can change in a monotonic manner along at least a portion of the perimeter.

  9. Intelligent Exit-Selection Behaviors during a Room Evacuation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zarita Zainuddin; Lim Eng Aik

    2012-01-01

    A modified version of the existing cellular automata (CA) model is proposed to simulate an evacuation procedure in a classroom with and without obstacles. Based on the numerous literature on the implementation of CA in modeling evacuation motions, it is notable that most of the published studies do not take into account the pedestrian's ability to select the exit route in their models. To resolve these issues, we develop a CA model incorporating a probabilistic neural network for determining the decision-making ability of the pedestrians, and simulate an exit-selection phenomenon in the simulation. Intelligent exit-selection behavior is observed in our model. From the simulation results, it is observed that occupants tend to select the exit closest to them when the density is low, but if the density is high they will go to an aiternative exit so as to avoid a long wait. This reflects the fact that occupants may not fully utilize multiple exits during evacuation. The improvement in our proposed model is valuable for further study and for upgrading the safety aspects of building designs.%A modified version of the existing cellular automata (CA) model is proposed to simulate an evacuation procedure in a classroom with and without obstacles.Based on the numerous literature on the implementation of CA in modeling evacuation motions,it is notable that most of the published studies do not take into account the pedestrian's ability to select the exit route in their models.To resolve these issues,we develop a CA model incorporating a probabilistic neural network for determining the decision-making ability of the pedestrians,and simulate an exit-selection phenomenon in the simulation.Intelligent exit-selection behavior is observed in our model.From the simulation results,it is observed that occupants tend to select the exit closest to them when the density is low,but if the density is high they will go to an alternative exit so as to avoid a long wait.This reflects the fact

  10. Employee retention: an issue of survival in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K; Collins, Kevin S

    2004-01-01

    Successful healthcare organizations emphasize attracting human resource assets and aggressively seek to resolve and prevent high employee turnover. Understanding the key components surrounding the importance of measuring employee turnover, learning how it affects patient care, and realizing what is needed to retain quality employees is central to the resolution. Measuring employee turnover in a healthcare department is fundamental to the success of the organization and the quality of care it delivers. Some studies indicate the cost of turnover can average 150% of the employee's annual salary. Furthermore, when employees leave, their duties are shifted to the remaining personnel who feel obligated to shoulder the additional burden. The most important impact of employee turnover may be the effect on patient care. Generally, all patients prefer to be cared for by the same members of a healthcare team each time they require treatment. This involves building relationships between the patients and their respective healthcare organizations. These relationships are important to the success of the facility, especially in cases where the same treatment/care can be received elsewhere. Creating an organizational environment that is dedicated to the retention of talented personnel is the first step in reducing employee turnover. Determining why employees are leaving an organization is an important part of developing an effective strategy. One way this information can be obtained is by conducting detailed exit interviews. Organizations should focus on the following issues in order to maintain their qualified workforce in the long term: communication; decision making; compensation, benefits, and career development; recruitment; appreciation and understanding; and management.

  11. Managing employee performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Charles R

    2004-01-01

    Performance management consists of significantly more than periodic evaluation of performance. It is the art and science of dealing with employees in a manner intended to positively influence their thinking and behavior to achieve a desired level of performance. It is essential for the manager to always model positive behavior concerning performance; what one does or says as a manager always has an influence on others. The kinds of employee behavior most likely encountered relative to performance management efforts stem from resistance to change and lack of complete understanding of what is expected. Employee participation must be elicited whenever possible for performance improvement; as far as the inner working details of a specific job are concerned, there is no one who knows the job better than the person who does it everyday. For each task to be done, an employee needs to know what output is expected, how this output will be measured, and what standards are applied in assessing the output. Managing employee performance requires ongoing contact with each employee, regular feedback, and whatever coaching, counseling, and training are necessary to bring an employee back on track when a problem appears. Sustaining efficient and effective employee performance requires the manager's ongoing attention and involvement.

  12. Understanding Generation X employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupperschmidt, B R

    1998-12-01

    Understanding Generation X employees--those born between 1961 and 1981--is essential if they are to be recruited into and retained in nursing and their potential maximized. The author discusses the times, characteristics, and work values and demands of Generation X. Armed with an enhanced understanding, nurse administrators are better prepared to maximize the potential of Generation X employees.

  13. Essays on Employee Ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faigen, Benjamin

    This thesis examines ownership of the firm by its employees, of varying stakes. It begins by identifying the existence of employee ownership in a Chinese context, presented in the form of a general analytical discussion which is informed by a review of the available evidence on the subject......, and barriers to, employee ownership in China at three levels of analysis: the societal, organisational and individual. Its intended contribution to the employee ownership literature is to organise the scattered evidence in order to provide a systematic and comprehensive coverage of the development...... of this phenomenon. Employee ownership is found to have played a role in Chinese economic transition as a transitory phase before non-state enterprises were afforded official recognition in a context of publicly-owned enterprise privatisation. Senior managers became the key beneficiaries in firm sales and most...

  14. Employees as social intrapreneurs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Catharina Juul

    2016-01-01

    Employees form an important but less explored and utilized resource in social innovation in social welfare organisations it the third and public sectors. The employees have important knowledge of the everyday challenges of the organisations, the wishes and needs of their users and customers......, and of the local communities which can inspire and refine innovations. They are active, albeit not always consciously so and potential social intrapreneurs. Although wider international research exists the Nordic research seems to dominate the field. The aim of this chapter is to contribute to the existing...... research on employees as social intrapreneurs (the fields of employee-driven innovation and social intrapreneurship) by conceptualizing active employee participation in social innovation and elucidate the potential and multiplicity of the phenomenon. The chapter is theoretical explorative....

  15. QUALITY OF WORKLIFE OF EMPLOYEES IN PRIVATE TECHNICAL INSTITUTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    T. S. Nanjundeswaraswamy; D.R. Swamy

    2013-01-01

    A high quality of work life (QWL) is essential for all organizations to continue to attract and retain employee. There is an impressive contribution by technical Institutions to the development of technology and economy of our nation. The study helps the technical institution employees to know the level of perception towards QWL and to enhance the same by the management. The sample consists of 109 employees of a technical institution. The questionnaire was designed based on nine important com...

  16. Exit, punishment and rewards in commons dilemmas: an experimental study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giangiacomo Bravo

    Full Text Available Commons dilemmas are interaction situations where a common good is provided or exploited by a group of individuals so that optimal collective outcomes clash with private interests. Although in these situations, social norms and institutions exist that might help individuals to cooperate, little is known about the interaction effects between positive and negative incentives and exit options by individuals. We performed a modified public good game experiment to examine the effect of exit, rewards and punishment, as well as the interplay between exit and rewards and punishment. We found that punishment had a stronger effect than rewards on cooperation if considered by itself, whereas rewards had a stronger effect when combined with voluntary participation. This can be explained in terms of the 'framing effect', i.e., as the combination of exit and rewards might induce people to attach higher expected payoffs to cooperative strategies and expect better behaviour from others.

  17. [Exit Strategy - Issues Summary : Rocky Mountain Arsenal : January 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is the Exit Strategy spreadsheet developed in a joint meeting between the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Council and the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Committee...

  18. Exit and Paradise Creek Braid Plain Kilometers, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of points designating braid plain kilometers, or distance along the braid plain centerline, for the 2012 active braid plain of Exit Creek and...

  19. Exit and Paradise Creek Drainage Area Boundaries, Alaska, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains drainage area boundaries for Exit Creek and Paradise Creek in Kenai Fjords National Park, Alaska. A drainage area boundary identifies the land...

  20. Behavior of Ants Escaping from a Single-Exit Room

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujie; Lv, Wei; Song, Weiguo

    2015-01-01

    To study the rules of ant behavior and group-formation phenomena, we examined the behaviors of Camponotus japonicus, a species of large ant, in a range of situations. For these experiments, ants were placed inside a rectangular chamber with a single exit that also contained a filter paper soaked in citronella oil, a powerful repellent. The ants formed several groups as they moved toward the exit to escape. We measured the time intervals between individual escapes in six versions of the experiment, each containing an exit of a different width, to quantify the movement of the groups. As the ants exited the chamber, the time intervals between individual escapes changed and the frequency distribution of the time intervals exhibited exponential decay. We also investigated the relationship between the number of ants in a group and the group flow rate. PMID:26125191

  1. Direct exit-wave reconstruction from a single defocused image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A J; Martin, A V; D'Alfonso, A J; Putkunz, C T; Allen, L J

    2011-01-01

    We propose a direct, non-iterative method for the exact recovery of the complex wave in the exit-surface plane of a coherently illuminated object from a single defocused image. The method is applicable for a wide range of illumination conditions. The defocus range is subject to certain conditions, which if satisfied allow the complex exit-surface wave to be directly recovered by solving a set of linear equations. These linear equations, whose coefficients depend on the incident illumination, are obtained by analyzing the autocorrelation function of an auxiliary wave which is related to the exit-surface wave in a simple way. This autocorrelation is constructed by taking the inverse Fourier transform of the defocused image. We present an experimental proof of concept by recovering the exit-surface wave of a microfiber illuminated by a plane wave formed using a HeNe laser.

  2. Exit, punishment and rewards in commons dilemmas: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Giangiacomo; Squazzoni, Flaminio

    2013-01-01

    Commons dilemmas are interaction situations where a common good is provided or exploited by a group of individuals so that optimal collective outcomes clash with private interests. Although in these situations, social norms and institutions exist that might help individuals to cooperate, little is known about the interaction effects between positive and negative incentives and exit options by individuals. We performed a modified public good game experiment to examine the effect of exit, rewards and punishment, as well as the interplay between exit and rewards and punishment. We found that punishment had a stronger effect than rewards on cooperation if considered by itself, whereas rewards had a stronger effect when combined with voluntary participation. This can be explained in terms of the 'framing effect', i.e., as the combination of exit and rewards might induce people to attach higher expected payoffs to cooperative strategies and expect better behaviour from others.

  3. USDA Rural Development Multi-Family Housing Program Exit Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Agriculture — This dataset provides loan-level information on when USDA Section 514 and 515 properties are projected to pay off their loans and exit USDA’s Multi-Family Housing...

  4. Is employee ownership so senseless ?

    OpenAIRE

    Aubert, Nicolas; Bernard, Grand; Lapied, André; Rousseau, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Since Enron and the ruin of thousands of its employees, employee ownership is harshly criticized. Investing savings in employer's stock would be equivalent to bet on only one asset. Moreover, employee ownership's debated efficiency would not justify employers to grant company stock to their employees. Still, employee ownership is put in place by thousands of companies and withhold by millions of employees throughout the world. This paper considers a moral hazard setting where a risk neutral e...

  5. Understanding human queuing behaviour at exits: an empirical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoum, A. U. Kemloh; Liao, W.

    2017-01-01

    The choice of the exit to egress from a facility plays a fundamental role in pedestrian modelling and simulation. Yet, empirical evidence for backing up simulation is scarce. In this contribution, we present three new groups of experiments that we conducted in different geometries. We varied parameters such as the width of the doors, the initial location and number of pedestrians which in turn affected their perception of the environment. We extracted and analysed relevant indicators such as distance to the exits and density levels. The results put in evidence the fact that pedestrians use time-dependent information to optimize their exit choice, and that, in congested states, a load balancing over the exits occurs. We propose a minimal modelling approach that covers those situations, especially the cases where the geometry does not show a symmetrical configuration. Most of the models try to achieve the load balancing by simulating the system and solving optimization problems. We show statistically and by simulation that a linear model based on the distance to the exits and the density levels around the exit can be an efficient dynamical alternative. PMID:28280588

  6. Effectiveness of a Batteryless and Wireless Wearable Sensor System for Identifying Bed and Chair Exits in Healthy Older People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Roberto Luis Shinmoto; Visvanathan, Renuka; Hoskins, Stephen; van den Hengel, Anton; Ranasinghe, Damith C

    2016-04-15

    Aging populations are increasing worldwide and strategies to minimize the impact of falls on older people need to be examined. Falls in hospitals are common and current hospital technological implementations use localized sensors on beds and chairs to alert caregivers of unsupervised patient ambulations; however, such systems have high false alarm rates. We investigate the recognition of bed and chair exits in real-time using a wireless wearable sensor worn by healthy older volunteers. Fourteen healthy older participants joined in supervised trials. They wore a batteryless, lightweight and wireless sensor over their attire and performed a set of broadly scripted activities. We developed a movement monitoring approach for the recognition of bed and chair exits based on a machine learning activity predictor. We investigated the effectiveness of our approach in generating bed and chair exit alerts in two possible clinical deployments (Room 1 and Room 2). The system obtained recall results above 93% (Room 2) and 94% (Room 1) for bed and chair exits, respectively. Precision was >78% and 67%, respectively, while F-score was >84% and 77% for bed and chair exits, respectively. This system has potential for real-time monitoring but further research in the final target population of older people is necessary.

  7. Effectiveness of a Batteryless and Wireless Wearable Sensor System for Identifying Bed and Chair Exits in Healthy Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Luis Shinmoto Torres

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aging populations are increasing worldwide and strategies to minimize the impact of falls on older people need to be examined. Falls in hospitals are common and current hospital technological implementations use localized sensors on beds and chairs to alert caregivers of unsupervised patient ambulations; however, such systems have high false alarm rates. We investigate the recognition of bed and chair exits in real-time using a wireless wearable sensor worn by healthy older volunteers. Fourteen healthy older participants joined in supervised trials. They wore a batteryless, lightweight and wireless sensor over their attire and performed a set of broadly scripted activities. We developed a movement monitoring approach for the recognition of bed and chair exits based on a machine learning activity predictor. We investigated the effectiveness of our approach in generating bed and chair exit alerts in two possible clinical deployments (Room 1 and Room 2. The system obtained recall results above 93% (Room 2 and 94% (Room 1 for bed and chair exits, respectively. Precision was >78% and 67%, respectively, while F-score was >84% and 77% for bed and chair exits, respectively. This system has potential for real-time monitoring but further research in the final target population of older people is necessary.

  8. Essays on Employee Ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faigen, Benjamin

    -method empirical research into the characteristics of individuals who have recently purchased shares in their employing firms in an Icelandic context, as well as their specific motives for doing so (or reasons for not doing so). Determinants of employee ownership, as well as direct insights into the considerations...... and age are found to influence ownership status. Furthermore, some support is found for financial motives outweighing non-financial motives behind share purchases in minority employee-owned firms relative to majority employee-owned firms. Internal barriers to ownership, together with a lack of funds...

  9. Tunneling time, exit time and exit momentum in strong field tunnel ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeny, Nicolas

    2016-10-18

    Tunnel ionization belongs to the fundamental processes of atomic physics. It is still an open question when does the electron tunnel ionize and how long is the duration of tunneling. In this work we solve the time-dependent Schroedinger equation in one and two dimensions and use ab initio quantum calculations in order to answer these questions. Additionally, we determine the exit momentum of the tunnel ionized electron from first principles. We find out results that are different from the assumptions of the commonly employed two-step model, which assumes that the electron ionizes at the instant of electric field maximum with a zero momentum. After determining the quantum final momentum distribution of tunnel ionized electrons we show that the two-step model fails to predict the correct final momentum. Accordingly we suggest how to correct the two-step model. Furthermore, we determine the instant at which tunnel ionization starts, which turns out to be different from the instant usually assumed. From determining the instant at which it is most probable for the electron to enter the tunneling barrier and the instant at which it exits we determine the most probable time spent under the barrier. Moreover, we apply a quantum clock approach in order to determine the duration of tunnel ionization. From the quantum clock we determine an average tunneling time which is different in magnitude and origin with respect to the most probable tunneling time. By defining a probability distribution of tunneling times using virtual detectors we relate both methods and explain the apparent discrepancy. The results found have in general an effect on the interpretation of experiments that measure the spectra of tunnel ionized electrons, and specifically on the calibration of the so called attoclock experiments, because models with imprecise assumptions are usually employed in order to interpret experimental results.

  10. A Modified EXIT-to-ECMO with Optional Reservoir Circuit for Use during an EXIT Procedure Requiring Thoracic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matte, Gregory S.; Connor, Kevin R.; Toutenel, Nathalia A.; Gottlieb, Danielle; Fynn-Thompson, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: A 34 year old mother with a history of polyhydraminos and premature rupture of membranes presented for an ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure to deliver her 34 week gestation fetus. The fetus had been diagnosed with a large cervical mass which significantly extended into the right chest. The mass compressed and deviated the airway and major neck vessels posteriorly. Imaging also revealed possible tumor involvement with the superior vena cava and right atrium. The plan was for potential extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) during the EXIT procedure (EXIT-to-ECMO) and the potential for traditional cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) for mediastinal tumor resection. A Modified EXIT-To-ECMO with Optional Reservoir (METEOR) circuit was devised to satisfy both therapies. A fetal airway could not be established during the EXIT procedure and so the EXIT-to-ECMO strategy was utilized. The fetus was then delivered and transferred to an adjoining operating room (OR). Traditional cardiopulmonary bypass with a cardiotomy venous reservoir (CVR) was utilized during the establishment of an airway, tumor biopsy and partial resection. The patient was eventually transitioned to our institution's standard ECMO circuit and then transferred to the intensive care unit. The patient was weaned from ECMO on day of life (DOL) eight and had a successful tumor resection on DOL 11. The patient required hospitalization for numerous interventions including cardiac surgery at 4 months of age. She was discharged to home at 5 months of age. PMID:27134307

  11. Understanding Employee Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, James R.

    1998-01-01

    Extension employees (n=23) ranked the following as the most important motivational factors: interesting work, good wages, appreciation, job security, and good working conditions. The findings were related to theories of motivation formulated by Herzberg, Adams, and Vroom. (SK)

  12. Ombuds’ corner: Employee silence

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2013-01-01

    Although around a hundred cases a year are reported to the Ombuds, several issues may still not be disclosed due to employee silence*. The deliberate withholding of concerns, escalating misunderstandings or genuine conflicts can impede the global process of learning and development of a better respectful organizational workplace environment, and prevent the detection and correction of acts violating the CERN Code of Conduct.   For the employee him/herself, such silence can lead to feelings of anger, resentment, helplessness and humiliation. These feelings will inevitably contaminate personal and interpersonal relations, and poison creativity and effectiveness. Employee silence can be explained by many factors; sometimes it is connected to organizational forces. In their published paper*, authors Michael Knoll and Rolf van Dick found four forms of employee silence. People may stay silent if they feel that their opinion is neither welcomed nor valued by their management. They have gi...

  13. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  14. Understanding Employee Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, James R.

    1998-01-01

    Extension employees (n=23) ranked the following as the most important motivational factors: interesting work, good wages, appreciation, job security, and good working conditions. The findings were related to theories of motivation formulated by Herzberg, Adams, and Vroom. (SK)

  15. Hiring the right employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigle, Dale A

    2014-01-01

    Current employees provide the best examples of the type of aptitude, attitude, motivation, and fit we are looking for, or not looking for, in new employees. All four of these attributes are present in star employees. Using what we know about our best and worst employees can assist us in developing questions and scoring templates that will help us categorize current applicants. Hiring managers should formulate questions in a way that elicits informative responses from candidates about past performance in situations similar to those they will face on the job. Nonverbal clues can help provide insight beyond the simple verbal answer given by candidates. Practice, critique, and critical review of the outcomes of our hiring decisions improve our ability to become good hiring managers.

  16. Transit Reconfigurable Exerciser - Intern Exit Abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebara, Christine A.

    2014-01-01

    The Transit Resistive Exerciser (TREX) was developed during a 16 week period in which a clutch device filled with smart material was built and began the testing phase. The clutch serves as a passive method of creating resistance. When paired with a series of springs, the device creates a rowing machine also capable of resistive exercise configurations. The device has loading profiles similar to the exercise devices used on the International Space Station today. The prototype created was designed in a modular fashion to support parallel development on various aspects of the project. Hardware and software are currently in development and make use of commercially available parts. Similar technologies have been used in the automotive industry but have never been explored in the context of countermeasure systems for space flight. If the work done leads to successful testing and further development, this technology has the potential to cut the size and weight of exercise devices by an order of magnitude or more.

  17. Employee motivation and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Obiekwe, Nduka

    2010-01-01

    The subject matter of this research; employee motivation and performance seeks to look at how best employees can be motivated in order to achieve high performance within a company or organization. Managers and entrepreneurs must ensure that companies or organizations have a competent personnel that is capable to handle this task. This takes us to the problem question of this research “why is not a sufficient motivation for high performance?” This therefore establishes the fact that money is f...

  18. Employee Motivation and Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Obiekwe, Nduka

    2010-01-01

    The subject matter of this research; employee motivation and performance seeks to look at how best employees can be motivated in order to achieve high performance within a company or organization. Managers and entrepreneurs must ensure that companies or organizations have a competent personnel that is capable to handle this task. This takes us to the problem question of this research “why is not a sufficient motivation for high performance?” This therefore establishes the fact that money is f...

  19. Exit interviews to reduce turnover amongst healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Flint, Anndrea

    2014-08-19

    Exit interviews are widely used in healthcare organisations to identify reasons for staff attrition, yet their usefulness in limiting turnover is unclear. To determine the effectiveness of various exit interview strategies in decreasing turnover rates amongst healthcare professionals. We searched the Cochrane EPOC Group Specialised Register; Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 11, 2012; MEDLINE, Ovid (1950- ); EMBASE, Ovid (1947- ); CINAHL, EbscoHost (1980- ), and PsycINFO, OVID (1806-) between October 31 and November 6, 2012. We also screened the reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews; and searched trial registries for planned and on-going studies. We did not restrict searches by language or publication date. Randomised controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies comparing turnover rates between healthcare professionals who had undergone one form of exit interview with another form of exit interview or with no interview. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. The original search identified 1560 citations, of which we considered 19 potentially relevant. The two authors independently reviewed the abstracts of these studies and retrieved the full texts of eight studies. We excluded all eight following independent assessment; they were either interviews, commentaries on how to do an exit interview or descriptive studies about reasons for leaving. We found no studies that matched our inclusion criteria. For this first update, we screened 2220 citations and identified no new studies. Evidence about the effectiveness of exit interviews to reduce turnover is currently not available. However, exit interviews may provide useful information about the work environment which, in turn, may be useful in the development of interventions to reduce turnover.

  20. Simulation of pedestrian evacuation with asymmetrical exits layout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Hao; Guan, Hongzhi; Shao, Chunfu; Zhang, Xu

    2011-01-01

    A simulation of pedestrian evacuation from a room with asymmetrical exit layout is presented based on the improved Dynamic Parameter Model in this paper. A special technique is introduced to compute two basic dynamic parameters: Direction- parameter and Empty- parameter considering the effects of pedestrian jam around exits and the width of exits on evacuation path selection in order to reduce evacuation imbalance caused by the asymmetry of exits layout. Two new coefficients: cognition coefficient and imbalance coefficient are introduced to respectively describe pedestrian cognitive ability and the layout imbalance of exits. The simulation results of the improved and original models are compared and analyzed. Simulation results show that evacuation time depends on the cognition coefficient and imbalance coefficient under normal evacuation condition with reasonable pedestrian. It is also found that there are phase transitions and critical points in the simulation curves of evacuation time against cognition coefficient and that the pedestrian flow shows distinctive characteristics at different phases. The values of critical cognition coefficient points depend on the initial pedestrian density and imbalance coefficient.

  1. Crossing the Border: Molecular Control of Motor Axon Exit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlene Bravo-Ambrosio

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms heavily rely on the function of motor circuits for their survival and for adapting to ever-changing environments. Unique among central nervous system (CNS neurons, motor neurons (MNs project their axons out of the CNS. Once in the periphery, motor axons navigate along highly stereotyped trajectories, often at considerable distances from their cell bodies, to innervate appropriate muscle targets. A key decision made by pathfinding motor axons is whether to exit the CNS through dorsal or ventral motor exit points (MEPs. In contrast to the major advances made in understanding the mechanisms that regulate the specification of MN subtypes and the innervation of limb muscles, remarkably little is known about how MN axons project out of the CNS. Nevertheless, a limited number of studies, mainly in Drosophila, have identified transcription factors, and in some cases candidate downstream effector molecules, that are required for motor axons to exit the spinal cord. Notably, specialized neural crest cell derivatives, referred to as Boundary Cap (BC cells, pre-figure and demarcate MEPs in vertebrates. Surprisingly, however, BC cells are not required for MN axon exit, but rather restrict MN cell bodies from ectopically migrating along their axons out of the CNS. Here, we describe the small set of studies that have addressed motor axon exit in Drosophila and vertebrates, and discuss our fragmentary knowledge of the mechanisms, which guide motor axons out of the CNS.

  2. Mitotic Exit Control as an Evolved Complex System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosl, W; Li, R

    2005-04-25

    The exit from mitosis is the last critical decision a cell has to make during a division cycle. A complex regulatory system has evolved to evaluate the success of mitotic events and control this decision. Whereas outstanding genetic work in yeast has led to rapid discovery of a large number of interacting genes involved in the control of mitotic exit, it has also become increasingly difficult to comprehend the logic and mechanistic features embedded in the complex molecular network. Our view is that this difficulty stems in part from the attempt to explain mitotic exit control using concepts from traditional top-down engineering design, and that exciting new results from evolutionary engineering design applied to networks and electronic circuits may lend better insights. We focus on four particularly intriguing features of the mitotic exit control system: the two-stepped release of Cdc14; the self-activating nature of Tem1 GTPase; the spatial sensor associated with the spindle pole body; and the extensive redundancy in the mitotic exit network. We attempt to examine these design features from the perspective of evolutionary design and complex system engineering.

  3. Saying goodbye: The nature, causes, and consequences of employee resignation styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klotz, Anthony C; Bolino, Mark C

    2016-10-01

    Although much is known about why employees decide to resign from their jobs, scant research has examined what occurs after employees decide to leave their jobs but before they exit their organizations. As such, employee resignations are not well understood. This is unfortunate, because the manner in which employees resign from their jobs may have important implications for both individuals and organizations. In this paper, we use social exchange theory to argue that exchange-based correlates of employee turnover influence the manner in which employees resign, and that resignation styles affect managers' emotional reactions to employee resignation. We test our hypotheses in 4 studies. In Study 1, we inductively identify a taxonomy of resignation styles among full-time MBA students who have recently resigned from a job. In Study 2, we qualitatively examine the extent to which this taxonomy of resignation styles is represented in the accounts of supervisors of recently resigned employees. In Study 3, using a sample of recently resigned professionals, we demonstrate that employees' exchange relationships with their organizations and their supervisors influence their resignation styles. Finally, in Study 4, we provide evidence that resignation styles affect supervisors' emotional reactions in a sample of managers. Directions for future research on resignation and practical implications are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. VIRTUAL ORGANISATIONS: EMPLOYEE COMPETENCY AND MANAGERIAL ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIRJANA RADOVIC-MARKOVIC

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available New technologies have led to a new information and knowledge based economy. In this context, technology has changed the work environment, where organisations have become increasingly complex and competitive. Namely, the technologically induced a “virtual” environment has resulted in the adoption of new organisational structures and work skills and practices. On the one hand, the workplace increasingly requires employee to work in teams,collaborating across companies, communities, and continents. These changes and the new organisational structures have also made an impact on role of managers and their management styles, on the other hand. In line with this, there a very rich collection of thinking and empirical research findings on the subject. The goal of our research was to recognize the importance of certain factors in motivating employees in organisations by managers . The other purpose was to investigate the job related motivation factors among senior and junior employees as well as explore issues in the workplace that may affect work demoralization. Furthemore, we explored the relationship between employees motivation and their competences.We also contributed to the topic in our research project-book with the new model of competency. Furthemore, we expect that our methodology will be implemented in practice. However, it should be also a good basis for further improvements in this area.

  5. Gas turbine combustor exit piece with hinged connections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charron, Richard C.; Pankey, William W.

    2016-04-26

    An exit piece (66) with an inlet throat (67) that conducts a combustion gas flow (36A) in a path (82) from a combustor (63) to an annular chamber (68) that feeds the first blade section (37) of a gas turbine (26). The exit piece further includes an outlet portion (69) that forms a circumferential segment of the annular chamber. The outlet portion interconnects with adjacent outlet portions by hinges (78A, 78B, 80A, 80B). Each hinge may have a hinge axis (82A, 82B) parallel to a centerline (21) of the turbine. Respective gas flows (36A) are configured by an assembly (60) of the exit pieces to converge on the feed chamber (68) into a uniform helical flow that drives the first blade section with minimal circumferential variations in force.

  6. Exit examination: a survey of UK psychiatrists' views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Nicholas S.; Haselgrove, Angela; Tovey, Matthew S.; Khokhar, Waqqas A.; Husain, Muj; Osman-Hicks, Victoria C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims and method The Royal College of Psychiatrists is considering how best to introduce a post-MRCPsych-examination assessment (‘exit examination’) in anticipation of external pressures to ensure patient safety through the use of such assessments. The Psychiatric Trainees' Committee conducted an online survey to gather the views of psychiatrists regarding the possible format and content of this examination in the hope that this information can be used to design a satisfactory assessment. Results Of the 2082 individuals who started the survey, 1735 completed all sections (83.3%). Participants included consultants and trainees from a range of subspecialties. There was general agreement that the content and structure of the exit examination should include assessment of clinical and communication skills. Clinical implications UK psychiatrists believe that an exit assessment should focus on clinical and communication skills. It should assess both generic and subspecialty-specific competencies and incorporate a mixture of assessment techniques. PMID:26755972

  7. Evaluation of Activity Recognition Algorithms for Employee Performance Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Successful Human Resource Management plays a key role in success of any organization. Traditionally, human resource managers rely on various information technology solutions such as Payroll and Work Time Systems incorporating RFID and biometric technologies. This research evaluates activity recognition algorithms for employee performance monitoring. An activity recognition algorithm has been implemented that categorized the activity of employee into following in to classes: job activities and...

  8. Exits from Temporary Jobs in Europe: A Competing Risks Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Addio, Anna Christina; Rosholm, Michael

    2005-01-01

    We study transitions out of temporary jobs using the waves 1994-1999 of the European Community Household Panel applying a discrete time duration model. Specifically, we use a multinomial logitmodel distinguishing between exits into permanent employment and non-employment. Two different specificat......We study transitions out of temporary jobs using the waves 1994-1999 of the European Community Household Panel applying a discrete time duration model. Specifically, we use a multinomial logitmodel distinguishing between exits into permanent employment and non-employment. Two different...... as a whole, very short contracts provide higher chances of labour market exclusion especially for men. We discuss potential implications of our findings....

  9. EXIT Chart Analysis of Binary Message-Passing Decoders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lechner, Gottfried; Pedersen, Troels; Kramer, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    Binary message-passing decoders for LDPC codes are analyzed using EXIT charts. For the analysis, the variable node decoder performs all computations in the L-value domain. For the special case of a hard decision channel, this leads to the well know Gallager B algorithm, while the analysis can...... be extended to channels with larger output alphabets. By increasing the output alphabet from hard decisions to four symbols, a gain of more than 1.0 dB is achieved using optimized codes. For this code optimization, the mixing property of EXIT functions has to be modified to the case of binary message-passing...

  10. Evaluation of Activity Recognition Algorithms for Employee Performance Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehreen Mumtaz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Successful Human Resource Management plays a key role in success of any organization. Traditionally, human resource managers rely on various information technology solutions such as Payroll and Work Time Systems incorporating RFID and biometric technologies. This research evaluates activity recognition algorithms for employee performance monitoring. An activity recognition algorithm has been implemented that categorized the activity of employee into following in to classes: job activities and non-job related activities. Finally, the algorithm will compute the time which employee spent in job related and non-job related activities. This paper presents a novel architecture based upon video analytics that can facilitate Human Resource Managers in real time.

  11. Employee Driven Innovation in Team (EDIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Marianne; Bloch-Poulsen, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    The article deals with employee driven innovation in regular teams from a critical, pragmatic action research perspective, referring to theories on innovation, dialogue, workplace learning, and organizational communication. It is based on an action research project "Innovation and involvement...... through strengthening dialogue in team based organizations" funded by the Danish Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation. 18 teams from one public and two private organizations participated in the project. The article defines the concept of employee driven innovation (EDI) in relation to theories...... innovations co-created across conflicting workplace interests in and between teams. The article argues that it is meaningful to assert that every employee has an innovative potential, no matter of what educational background or sector and that sometimes, this innovative potential might be facilitated through...

  12. Employee-driven innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to outline the “grand structure” of the phenomenon in order to identify both the underlying processes and core drivers of employee-driven innovation (EDI). Design/methodology/approach – This is a conceptual paper. It particularly applies the insights...... of contemporary research on routine and organizational decision making to the specific case of EDI. Findings – The main result of the paper is that, from a theoretical point of view, it makes perfect sense to involve ordinary employees in innovation decisions. However, it is also outlined that naıve or ungoverned...... participation is counterproductive, and that it is quite difficult to realize the hidden potential in a supportive way. Research limitations/implications – The main implication is that basic mechanisms for employee participation also apply to innovation decisions, although often in a different way. However...

  13. Embedment of Employee?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to discuss the influence of different approaches and work life conditions on the conception of embedment of employee participation. The discussion is based on three connected approaches: a theoretical research, a research into participation in working life and an empir......The purpose of the paper is to discuss the influence of different approaches and work life conditions on the conception of embedment of employee participation. The discussion is based on three connected approaches: a theoretical research, a research into participation in working life...... and an empirical case study. My starting point will be a case study of a Danish ABB company which will form the framework of my discussion and reflect my present experience. This analysis will emphasize the possibilities of making employee participation a permanent part of the company at all levels....

  14. How to Motivate Employees?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Kušar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Research Question (RQ: How to motivate employees and keep them motivated? Purpose: The purpose of this study is to find out what motivates employees and what motivates employees for work. Method: The results of the questionnaire are graphically presented and described. Random sampling was utilized that included participants from various professional areas and demographic characteristics. The results showed a relationship between individual motivational factors related to education, age and type of employment. All of the questions were closed - type questions except for the last question, which was an open question, in which the respondents answered in their own words. Questions were analyzed using frequency analysis of individual responses. Pearson's Chi - squared test, Spearman's rank correlation and Fisher’s Exact test was made using R Commander. Results: The research findings showed which motivational factors motivate employees the most. These are especially non - material motivational factors, such as good relationships, jobs with challenges, advancement opportunities, clear instructions, good work conditions, company reputation, etc. Organization: The study will help managers understand their role in motivating employees as well as the types of motivational factors. Society: The research shows how individuals are motivated. Originality: Certain motivators in the study are ranked differently than was found in previous literature. Most probably the reason is that the respondents in this study favored intangible motivators (good relations with leadership and their colleagues, good working conditions, etc.. Limitations/Future Research: The limitation of this study was that the sample included employees of different ages, gender and years of service in various organizations. To enhance the study and to find similar results as in previous literature, more questions should have been asked as well as increasing the sample size.

  15. 20 CFR 439.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee. 439.640 Section 439.640 Employees... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 439.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2)...

  16. The Optimal Performance of Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pureber

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The Revoz company set itself the following task: we will enable also our blue colllar workers to improve their ski lls and be promoted. So we started implementing a project of step-by-step education, The Optimal Performance of Employees. Improving the workers' knowledges and skills guarantees higher independence, responsibility, faster development of organisation structure and more trust between the employees because of better communication in bas ic working units. The Optimal Performance program offers blue collar workers a possibility to  improve their professional skills, to adapt themselves to changes in managing, organisation, technology and new approaches to their tasks. The program is based on the following principles: • voluntariness-every worker can participate; • adapted pedagogical approach - based on routine workers' activities, the rhythm of education is adapted to their abilities of absorbing new knowledges; • including of managerial structure - before, du ring and after education; • connection with working environment - the contents of education are linked to a specific working environment.

  17. Work Engagament of Older Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnė Gaurylienė

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aging of the labor force is observed in most developed and developing countries. The employment rate of older employees has been increasing every year and it appears to be not changed in the nearest future. The aging workforce is a serious challenge for organizations due to the prevailing stereotypical approach that older employees are less motivated, demonstrate lower labor productivity, they have more difficulties adopting new information, technologies and the lower ability to adapt to innovations. The aim of the paper is to investigate the impact of the work characteristics on the involvement in the work, the influence of employee’s characteristics on the work engagement, the influence of age and related factors on the involvement in the work and the relationship between age and achievements. The research is based on the analysis and synthesis of scientific literature, investigating to reveal the diversity of the concepts and methodologies and to systematize prevailing issues. The paper integrates the main researches in the field of older employees’ engagement and provides recommendations for future research.

  18. Embracing the Exit: Assessment, Trust, and the Teaching of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    Historically, the Composition Program at Eastern Washington University (EWU), a comprehensive university in Cheney, WA, required a single essay sample from each composition student as the final exit exam; in practice, a student passed or failed the course based on an in-class argumentative essay, written in three consecutive class periods. Such a…

  19. The reversibility of mitotic exit in vertebrate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapova, Tamara A; Daum, John R; Pittman, Bradley D; Hudson, Joanna R; Jones, Tara N; Satinover, David L; Stukenberg, P Todd; Gorbsky, Gary J

    2006-04-13

    A guiding hypothesis for cell-cycle regulation asserts that regulated proteolysis constrains the directionality of certain cell-cycle transitions. Here we test this hypothesis for mitotic exit, which is regulated by degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) activator, cyclin B. Application of chemical Cdk1 inhibitors to cells in mitosis induces cytokinesis and other normal aspects of mitotic exit, including cyclin B degradation. However, chromatid segregation fails, resulting in entrapment of chromatin in the midbody. If cyclin B degradation is blocked with a proteasome inhibitor or by expression of non-degradable cyclin B, Cdk inhibitors will nonetheless induce mitotic exit and cytokinesis. However, if after mitotic exit, the Cdk1 inhibitor is washed free from cells in which cyclin B degradation is blocked, the cells can revert back to M phase. This reversal is characterized by chromosome recondensation, nuclear envelope breakdown, assembly of microtubules into a mitotic spindle, and in most cases, dissolution of the midbody, reopening of the cleavage furrow, and realignment of chromosomes at the metaphase plate. These findings demonstrate that proteasome-dependent degradation of cyclin B provides directionality for the M phase to G1 transition.

  20. SEC16 in COPII coat dynamics at ER exit sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprangers, Joep; Rabouille, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the first step in protein transport through the secretory pathway, is mediated by coatomer protein II (COPII)-coated vesicles at ER exit sites. COPII coat assembly on the ER is well understood and the conserved large hydrophilic protein Sec16 clear

  1. Control of the mitotic exit network during meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attner, Michelle A.; Amon, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic exit network (MEN) is an essential GTPase signaling pathway that triggers exit from mitosis in budding yeast. We show here that during meiosis, the MEN is dispensable for exit from meiosis I but contributes to the timely exit from meiosis II. Consistent with a role for the MEN during meiosis II, we find that the signaling pathway is active only during meiosis II. Our analysis further shows that MEN signaling is modulated during meiosis in several key ways. Whereas binding of MEN components to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) is necessary for MEN signaling during mitosis, during meiosis MEN signaling occurs off SPBs and does not require the SPB recruitment factor Nud1. Furthermore, unlike during mitosis, MEN signaling is controlled through the regulated interaction between the MEN kinase Dbf20 and its activating subunit Mob1. Our data lead to the conclusion that a pathway essential for vegetative growth is largely dispensable for the specialized meiotic divisions and provide insights into how cell cycle regulatory pathways are modulated to accommodate different modes of cell division. PMID:22718910

  2. After exit: Academic achievement patterns of former English language learners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester J. de Jong

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available With few exceptions, accountability systems for programs for English language learners (ELLs have focused on the achievement patterns of ELLs who are still considered “limited English proficient” and program evaluations have been unable to answer the question whether ELLs actually catch up with English proficient peers after attending a bilingual or English as a Second Language (ESL program. Disaggregating data for former ELLs can therefore provide important information for long-term district and program accountability. The study was concerned with the achievement patterns in English language arts, Math, and Science of former ELLs who attended a bilingual and a English as a Second Language (ESL program. It also explored whether length of program participation and grade level exited played a significant role in predicting academic achievement patterns for these exited students. Results indicate that 4th grade students more closely paralleled non- ELL students’ achievement patterns than 8th grade students, particularly for the BE students. While length of program participation is not a significant predictor of former ELLs’ academic success, exit grade does emerge as an important variable to take into consideration in setting exit guidelines.

  3. 14 CFR 29.809 - Emergency exit arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... self-supporting slide or equivalent, and must be designed to meet the following requirements: (1) It... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo... rotorcraft emergency exit must have an approved slide as stated in paragraph (g) of this section, or...

  4. Control of the mitotic exit network during meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attner, Michelle A; Amon, Angelika

    2012-08-01

    The mitotic exit network (MEN) is an essential GTPase signaling pathway that triggers exit from mitosis in budding yeast. We show here that during meiosis, the MEN is dispensable for exit from meiosis I but contributes to the timely exit from meiosis II. Consistent with a role for the MEN during meiosis II, we find that the signaling pathway is active only during meiosis II. Our analysis further shows that MEN signaling is modulated during meiosis in several key ways. Whereas binding of MEN components to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) is necessary for MEN signaling during mitosis, during meiosis MEN signaling occurs off SPBs and does not require the SPB recruitment factor Nud1. Furthermore, unlike during mitosis, MEN signaling is controlled through the regulated interaction between the MEN kinase Dbf20 and its activating subunit Mob1. Our data lead to the conclusion that a pathway essential for vegetative growth is largely dispensable for the specialized meiotic divisions and provide insights into how cell cycle regulatory pathways are modulated to accommodate different modes of cell division.

  5. How extremist experiences become valuable knowledge in EXIT programmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tina Wilchen

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of a neo-Vygotskian approach the article analyses how former neo-Nazis, together with other staff at Fryshuset, a youth centre in Stockholm, Sweden, have developed the organisation EXIT, which helps people leave the extremist right. The article describes the processes former neo-Nazi...

  6. [Changes in labor market participation of older employees in Germany: the perspective of labor market research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brussig, M

    2009-08-01

    For many years, Germany has been regarded in international comparisons as an example of a generous early retirement culture, resulting in a low labor market participation of older employees. Recently, however, employment rates of older employees have increased remarkably. Reasons are the demographic structure of older persons in Germany, a long-term trend of increasing female labor market participation, and reforms in labor-market policies and pension policies during the last 10 years. Despite an increasing labor market participation of older employees, traditional labor market risks for older persons partly remained, but some new risks evolved as well. Therefore, social differentiation among older employees increased.Although detailed macro descriptions exist, the causes of labor market developments cannot be fully understood with cross-sectional data alone. An important stimulus is to be expected from individual longitudinal data which reflect employment histories and labor market transitions such as employment exit and retirement.

  7. Employee Perceptions of Quality Management: Effects of Employee Orientation Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdere, Mesut; Schmidt, Steven W.

    2008-01-01

    This empirical study examines employee perceptions of quality management at three different time periods. New employees at a large United States manufacturing organization were surveyed regarding their perceptions of their organization's quality management practices before they attended a new employee orientation training, immediately after the…

  8. Congenital Cervical Teratoma: Anaesthetic Management (The EXIT Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferruh Bilgin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT is a procedure performed during caesarean section with preservation of fetal-placental circulation, which allows the safe handling of fetal airways with risk of airways obstruction. This report aimed at describing a case of anaesthesia for EXIT in a fetus with cervical teratoma. A 30-year-old woman, 70 kg, 160 cm, gravida 2, para 1, was followed because of polyhydramniosis diagnosed at 24 weeks′ gestation. During a routine ultrasonographic examination at 35 weeks′ gestation, it was noticed that the fetus had a tumoral mass on the anterior neck, the mass had cystic and calcified components and with a size of was 10 x 6 x5 cm. The patient with physical status ASA I, was submitted to caesarean section under general anaesthesia with mechanically controlled ventilation for exutero intrapartum treatment (EXIT. Anaesthesia was induced in rapid sequence with fentanyl, propofol and rocuronium and was maintained with isoflurane in 2.5 at 3 % in O 2 and N 2 O (50%. After hysterotomy, fetus was partially released assuring uterus-placental circulation, followed by fetal laryngoscopy and tracheal intuba-tion. The infant was intubated with an uncuffed, size 2.5 endotracheal tube. Excision of the mass was performed under general anaesthesia. After surgical intervention, on the fourth postoperative day, the infant was extubated and the newborn was discharged to the pediatric neonatal unit and on the seventh day postoperatively to home without complications. Major recommendations for EXIT are maternal-fetal safety, uterine relaxation to maintain uterine volume and uterus-placental circulation, and fetal immobility to help airway handling. We report one case of cervical teratoma managed successfully with EXIT procedure.

  9. Mobbing, threats to employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Vene

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available RQ: Is there a connection among perception of hostile and unethical communication, timely removal of causes and employee satisfaction?Purpose: Perceived mobbing in the organization, analysing causes and timely removal of them without any effect; achieve an environment of satisfied employees. The purpose is to study the relationship amongthe categories: perceiving mobbing, removing the effects, employee satisfaction.Methods: Qualitative research approach, method of interview by using the seven steps principles.Results: The findings clearly state that being aware of the negative factors and psychological abuse in organizations was present. The interview participants perceived different negative behaviours especially by the female population and from the side of superiors. In some organizations perceived negative factors are insults,insinuations, low wages, inadequate working day, competition, lobbying, and verbal threats. All negative factors lead to serious implications for employees, in which the organization can lose its reputation, productivity is reduced, costs of employment can increase with more sick leaves and in extreme cases, the results can be soserious that the organization can end in bankruptcy or liquidation.Organization: The result of the study warns management to acceptcertain actions and remediate the situation in organizations. The employer and managers must do everything to protect their subordinates from violence and potential offenders.Society: The research study warns on the seriousness of mobbing among employees, the aim is to bring the issue to individuals and society. The victim usually needs help (health costs, losses in the pension system, increased unemployment, and lower productivity of the whole society.Originality: In view of the sensitivity of the issues, the author concludes that the existing research studies are based especially on closed questions (questionnaires; however, interviews create mutual trust between

  10. Employee Information Management System (EIMS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The EIMS is the Office of Human Resources' web-based employee information system. Direct-hire employees can access and review their USAID personnel information, such...

  11. Employee Training: An International Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Kapsalis, Constantine

    1997-01-01

    Canada’s training effort relative to the rest of the IALS countries, measured in terms of hours of training per employee, was found to be average. The average employee in Canada received 44 hours of training in 1994, similar to the hours of training per employee in Switzerland, the United States and Germany. However, Canada’s training effort was considerably less than the Netherlands (74 hours per employee). One finding of particular interest to Canada is the virtual equality of training ...

  12. Estimates of LGBT Public Employees

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, Brad; Mallory, Christy; Hunter, Nan D.

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the 2000 Census and the 2002 National Survey of Family Growth, in September 2009, the Williams Institute estimates that there are approximately 418,000 LGBT state government employees in the United States and 585,000 local government employees, totaling slightly more than 1 million state and local LGBT employees. There are just under 7 million LGBT private employees and just over 200,000 LGBT people working for the federal government.

  13. Employees' motivation and emloyees' benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Nedzelská, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this bachelor thesis is analysing methods how to stimulate and motivate employees. The theoretical part of the thesis deals with the concept of motivation, concepts close to motivation and selected existing theories of motivation. It also deals with employee benefits, function, division and benefits which are frequently offered to employees. The practical part of the thesis, mainly based on written and online questionnaires, concentrates on motivation of employees at Nedcon Boh...

  14. Direct Employee Involvement Quality (DEIQ)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torka, Nicole; Woerkom, van Marianne; Looise, Jan-Kees

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on one aspect of human resource management (HRM) that is important for innovative employee behaviour: direct employee involvement quality (DEIQ). However, research has also shown that employee involvement is often in serious need of improvement. This paper presents evidence from t

  15. Professional Employees Turn to Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamot, Dennis

    1976-01-01

    White-collar and professional employees are increasingly turning to unions to combat their loss of independence as employees of large organizations. Managers should realize that they and professional employees have different viewpoints about job situations and that the current trend toward white-collar unionism is apt to continue. (JG)

  16. Professional Employees Turn to Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamot, Dennis

    1976-01-01

    White-collar and professional employees are increasingly turning to unions to combat their loss of independence as employees of large organizations. Managers should realize that they and professional employees have different viewpoints about job situations and that the current trend toward white-collar unionism is apt to continue. (JG)

  17. Employee experience of structural change in two Norwegian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roald, J; Edgren, L

    2001-01-01

    Advances in medical and technological procedures, together with changes in demography, demand structural changes in the Nordic health care systems. Few studies have focused on employee perceptions of these structural changes. This study aims to describe employee reactions following a merger between two Norwegian hospitals. A Grounded theory approach has been used in this study. The theoretical model is based on empirical data collected from employees directly affected by the structural change process. Employee resistance was found to be the core category. Three categories were found in relation to this core category; goal uncertainty, organizational culture and individual insecurity. Different perceptions and interpretations of vaguely formulated goals lead to employee resistance. The difference between the organizational cultures in the two hospitals impeded the merger according to the project plan, and very few positive results could be seen. Individual insecurity regarding the future was experienced in connection with the implementation of structural change. The authors propose a strategy to counteract resistance in similar mergers.

  18. Analysis of employee satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cikrytová, Kateřina

    2009-01-01

    The thesis contains analysis of job satisfaction employees of call center. In the theoretical part is defined conception of job satisfaction, are described deteminants of job satisfaction and relationship between job satisfaction and work motivation. In the practical part are analysed results of questionnaire survey and there are presented suggestions measures to increas job satisfaction. The respondents were asked about satisfaction with the content of work, remuneration, work organization, ...

  19. Employee Engagement: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmendra MEHTA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Motivated and engaged employees tend to contribute more in terms of organizational productivity and support in maintaining a higher commitment level leading to the higher customer satisfaction. Employees Engagement permeates across the employee-customer boundary, where revenue, corporate goodwill, brand image are also at stake. This paper makes an attempt to study the different dimensions of employee engagement with the help of review of literature. This can be used to provide an overview and references on some of the conceptual and practical work undertaken in the area of the employee engagement practices.

  20. A Research on Employee Ethnocentrism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alptekin Sökmen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify ethnocentric behavior tendencies of 129 boundary spanning role employees, who works in 5 star hotels of Ankara, using Employee Ethnocentrism Survey. Also in this study, independent t-test and analysis of variance tests were used to investigate differences, among respondents’ demographic variables. The results demonstrated that, boundary spanning role employees of 5 star hotels in Ankara have moderately ethnocentric tendency, and several significant differences in terms of respondents’ age and gender. Male employees, 39 age and elders, and high school graduates show a higher ethnocentric tendency among the hotel employees.

  1. Detecting and detering employee theft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, E E

    1997-02-01

    Physician group practices can limit their vulnerability to employee theft by taking steps to detect theft when it occurs and to deter future occurrences. Steps for detecting theft include being wary of an employee's refusal to take earned time off, conducting periodic credit checks on employees, rotating employees' duties, and conducting impromptu reviews of the practice's finances. Steps for detering theft include routing the practice's checks to a lock box; reviewing cash reports; reconciling check with deposit statements; separating employees' duties; reviewing bank, credit card, and ATM statements; setting the tone for prudent financial management; and reporting cases of theft when they occur.

  2. Simulation of stochastic diffusion via first exit times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötstedt, Per; Meinecke, Lina

    2015-11-01

    In molecular biology it is of interest to simulate diffusion stochastically. In the mesoscopic model we partition a biological cell into unstructured subvolumes. In each subvolume the number of molecules is recorded at each time step and molecules can jump between neighboring subvolumes to model diffusion. The jump rates can be computed by discretizing the diffusion equation on that unstructured mesh. If the mesh is of poor quality, due to a complicated cell geometry, standard discretization methods can generate negative jump coefficients, which no longer allows the interpretation as the probability to jump between the subvolumes. We propose a method based on the mean first exit time of a molecule from a subvolume, which guarantees positive jump coefficients. Two approaches to exit times, a global and a local one, are presented and tested in simulations on meshes of different quality in two and three dimensions.

  3. Graceful Exit and Energy Conditions in String Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Brustein, Ram; Brustein, Ram; Madden, Richard

    1997-01-01

    String cosmology solutions are examined in a generalized phase-space including sources representing arbitrary corrections to lowest order string-dilaton-gravity effective action. We find a set of necessary conditions for a graceful exit transition from a dilaton-driven inflationary phase to a radiation dominated era. We show that sources allowing such a transition have to violate energy conditions similar to those appearing in singularity theorems of general relativity. Since familiar classical sources, excepting spatial curvature, obey these energy conditions we conclude that a generic graceful exit in string cosmology requires a new effective phase of matter. Our results clarify and generalize previous analyses and enable us to critically reexamine proposed non-singular cosmologies.

  4. Calcium Signaling and Meiotic Exit at Fertilization in Xenopus Egg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Tokmakov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is a universal messenger that mediates egg activation at fertilization in all sexually reproducing species studied. However, signaling pathways leading to calcium generation and the mechanisms of calcium-induced exit from meiotic arrest vary substantially among species. Here, we review the pathways of calcium signaling and the mechanisms of meiotic exit at fertilization in the eggs of the established developmental model, African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. We also discuss calcium involvement in the early fertilization-induced events in Xenopus egg, such as membrane depolarization, the increase in intracellular pH, cortical granule exocytosis, cortical contraction, contraction wave, cortical rotation, reformation of the nuclear envelope, sperm chromatin decondensation and sister chromatid segregation.

  5. Entrance, exit, and reentrance of one shot with a shotgun

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmann, C; Hougen, H P

    1999-01-01

    The case being reported is one of a homicidal shotgun fatality with an unusual wound pattern. A 34-year-old man was shot at close range with a 12-gauge shotgun armed with No. 5 birdshot ammunition. The shot entered the left axillary region, exited through the left infraclavicular region, and ther......The case being reported is one of a homicidal shotgun fatality with an unusual wound pattern. A 34-year-old man was shot at close range with a 12-gauge shotgun armed with No. 5 birdshot ammunition. The shot entered the left axillary region, exited through the left infraclavicular region......, and thereafter penetrated the left side of the neck, causing tearing of the left common carotid artery and the right internal carotid artery. The entrance wound in the axilla was larger than the other wounds, and before autopsy it was believed that the shotgun had been fired twice, causing one wound in the neck...

  6. Customer Protest: Exit, Voice or Negative Word of Mouth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solvang, B. K.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the three forms of protest the propensity of word of mouth (WOM seems to be the most common, and the most exclusive form of protest seems to be exit. The propensity for voice lies in between. The costs linked to voice influence the propensity for WOM. The customers seem to do an evaluation between the three forms of protest, yet the rational picture of the customers should be moderated.Leaders should improve their treatment of the customers making complaints. The more they can treat customer complaints in an orderly and nice way the less informal negative word of mouth activity they will experience and they will reduce the exit propensity and lead the customers to the complain organisation. They should also ensure that their customers feel they get equal treatment by the staff.

  7. Calcium Signaling and Meiotic Exit at Fertilization in Xenopus Egg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokmakov, Alexander A.; Stefanov, Vasily E.; Iwasaki, Tetsushi; Sato, Ken-Ichi; Fukami, Yasuo

    2014-01-01

    Calcium is a universal messenger that mediates egg activation at fertilization in all sexually reproducing species studied. However, signaling pathways leading to calcium generation and the mechanisms of calcium-induced exit from meiotic arrest vary substantially among species. Here, we review the pathways of calcium signaling and the mechanisms of meiotic exit at fertilization in the eggs of the established developmental model, African clawed frog, Xenopus laevis. We also discuss calcium involvement in the early fertilization-induced events in Xenopus egg, such as membrane depolarization, the increase in intracellular pH, cortical granule exocytosis, cortical contraction, contraction wave, cortical rotation, reformation of the nuclear envelope, sperm chromatin decondensation and sister chromatid segregation. PMID:25322156

  8. Effect of online social networking on employee productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ferreira

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The popularity of social networking sites is relatively recent and the effect of online social networking (OSN on employee productivity has not received much scholarly attention. The reason most likely lies in the social nature of social networking sites and OSN, which is assumed to have a negative effect on employee productivity and not bear organisational benefit. This reseach investigated recent Internet developments as seen in the social Web and specifically investigated the effect of OSN on employee productivity and what some of the consequences would be if employees were allowed unrestricted access to these networks. The findings concerning the nature of employees' OSN activities, employees' attitude or perceptions with regard to OSN in the workplace and how OSN can contribute or affect the productivity of employees are discussed in this article. Some of the basic misconceptions regarding OSN are highlighted and it is concluded that this technology can be used to increase collaboration between individuals who share a common interest or goal. Increased collaboration will stimulate knowledge sharing between individuals, with the possible effect of increased productivity. However, the risks associated with OSN should be noted, such as loss of privacy, bandwidth and storage consumption, exposure to malware and lower employee productivity.

  9. Enhancing wellbeing of employees through corporate social responsibility context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dežmar-Krainz Karmen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During last 25 years technological development has accelerated the globalization process which has caused dramatic changes within and across organization. Business performance is varying, complex, global and is changing faster than ever before. over the time, society expectations have changed, changes have affected customers, partners and employees as well. In order to retain on the global market, organizations integrate corporate social responsibility into their business performance with the objective to reinforce their competitiveness. In the knowledge economy, where knowledge is a significant resource and the demand for more highly skilled workers has increased, employees became the most important and in fact the only remaining realistic challenge of competitive ability. Workplace wellbeing refers to mental, psychological or emotional aspect of employee's life. The awareness of management on the employees' wellbeing which takes into consideration the employees satisfaction, health and professional development is an effective approach in strengthening of an organizational performance. The aim of this paper is to analyze and assess how socially responsible orientation also incorporated in strategic human resource management can contribute to the achievement of wellbeing of employees. Strategic management of human resources includes the necessary coordination between various employees' health and performance aspects. This contributes to the balance between private and working life. Social responsible activities coordinated through strategic human resource management significantly influence the employees' wellbeing as well as competitiveness of the organization. .

  10. Multiple ESD Risk On Geostationary Solar Arrays At Eclipse Exit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payan, D.; Balcon, N.; Paulmier, T.; Birassen, B.

    2011-10-01

    From charging process to ESD1, authors will explain that ESD risk on a spacecraft is a global problem where conductivity of different assemblies (including glue) is the main point. Improving general conductivity on a spacecraft, connecting metallic parts to the structure even those which are embedded in glue or dielectric and use of future meshed dielectric where the conductive meshing is dedicated to electrons bleeding, will be the next step to avoid ESD, even in risky configuration as eclipse exit.

  11. Exit Options in Corporate Finance: Liquidity versus Incentives

    OpenAIRE

    Aghion, Philippe; Bolton, Patrick; Tirole, Jean

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a first study of the optimal design of active monitors' exit options in a problem involving a demand for liquidity and costly monitoring of the issuer. Optimal incentives to monitor the issuer may involve restricting the monitor's right to sell her claims on the firm's cash-flow early. But the monitor will then require a liquidity premium for holding such an illiquid claim. In general, therefore, there will be a trade off between incentives and liquidity. The paper highlig...

  12. Peritonitis associated with exit site and tunnel infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, B; Bernardini, J; Piraino, B

    1996-09-01

    We reviewed all episodes of peritonitis associated with exit site and/or tunnel infection (n = 87; rate, 0.1/yr; 13% of all peritonitis episodes) occurring from 1979 to 1995. The exit site or tunnel infection was diagnosed at the time or shortly after the patient presented with peritonitis in 66% of the episodes. In the other one third the exit site or tunnel infection was diagnosed a median of 40 days prior to the development of peritonitis. Staphylococcus aureus accounted for 52% of episodes. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the next most common organism. In 63 (72%) of the episodes the catheter was removed to resolve the infection at a median of 8 days (range, 0 to 226 days) from the onset of peritonitis. Catheter removal after 5 days predominately for refractory peritonitis (n = 23; median time to removal, 8 days) or relapsing peritonitis (n = 11; median time to catheter removal, 103 days). Patients with relapsing peritonitis suffered two to four episodes prior to removal of the catheter. Patients with peritonitis associated with tunnel infection were more likely to lose their catheter than patients with peritonitis associated with exit site infection (86% v 58%), while Staphylococcus epidermidis infections were less likely to result in catheter loss compared with all other organisms (15% v 82%). After a protocol to reduce S aureus catheter infections was implemented in 1990, the rate of catheter-related peritonitis decreased from 0.14/yr to 0.05/yr due to a decrease in S aureus episodes. We conclude that peritonitis episodes associated with a tunnel infection infrequently resolve without catheter removal. Delayed catheter removal in such circumstances often results in refractory or relapsing peritonitis. Therefore, catheter removal should be done promptly. Antibiotic prophylaxis for S aureus can reduce catheter-related peritonitis.

  13. Exit Options in Corporate Finance: Liquidity versus Incentives

    OpenAIRE

    Aghion, Philippe; Bolton, Patrick; Tirole, Jean

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides a first study of the optimal design of active monitors' exit options in a problem involving a demand for liquidity and costly monitoring of the issuer. Optimal incentives to monitor the issuer may involve restricting the monitor's right to sell her claims on the firm's cash-flow early. But the monitor will then require a liquidity premium for holding such an illiquid claim. In general, therefore, there will be a trade off between incentives and liquidity. The paper highlig...

  14. How extremist experiences become valuable knowledge in EXIT programmers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tina Wilchen

    2015-01-01

    ’s engagement in a social practice alters his/her basis for reflection, allowing an alternative sense of identity to emerge. The reformulation of the individual’s past involved in this process, the article argues, is a requirement for their extremist experiences to become useable knowledge in an organisation...... like EXIT aimed at helping others leave what they have come to view as a destructive and anti-democratic lifestyle....

  15. 15 CFR 29.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 29.640 Section 29.640... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 29.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a... employees; (2) All indirect charge employees, unless their impact or involvement in the performance of...

  16. 43 CFR 43.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee. 43.640 Section 43.640 Public... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 43.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a... employees; (2) All indirect charge employees, unless their impact or involvement in the performance of...

  17. 31 CFR 20.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 20.640 Section 20.640 Money...-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 20.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of... charge employees; (2) All indirect charge employees, unless their impact or involvement in...

  18. 7 CFR 3021.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 3021.640 Section 3021.640 Agriculture... Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect charge employees, unless...

  19. 14 CFR 1267.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 1267.640 Section 1267.640... WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1267.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a... employees; (2) All indirect charge employees, unless their impact or involvement in the performance of...

  20. Discrete Element Crowd Model for Pedestrian Evacuation Through an Exit

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Peng; Lo, Siuming

    2016-01-01

    A series of accidents caused by crowd within the last decades evoked a lot of scientific interest in modeling the movement of pedestrian crowds. Based on discrete element method, a granular dynamic model, in which human body is simplified as self-driven sphere, is proposed to simulate the characteristics of crowd flow through an exit. In this model, the repulsive force among people is considered to have an anisotropic feature, and the physical contact force due to body deformation is quantified by the Hertz contact model. The movement of human body is simulated by applying the second Newton's law. The crowd flow through an exit at different desired velocities is studied and simulation results indicated that crowd flow exhibits three distinct states, i.e., smooth state, transition state and phase separation state. In the simulation, clogging phenomenon occurs more easily when the velocity of desired is high and the exit may as a result be totally blocked at a desired velocity of 1.6m/s or above, leading to fas...

  1. Suicidal cyanide ingestion as detailed in Final Exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cina, S J; Raso, D S; Conradi, S E

    1994-11-01

    Final Exit is an "informational aid" advocating the practice of active euthanasia and describing the proper method for the foolproof commission of suicide. Although it has been directed toward assisting the terminally ill patient who desires to terminate suffering, it has been suggested that the widespread availability of this book may result in its abuse. Specifically, there is growing concern that "do-it-yourself suicide manuals" could bring about the fruition of suicidal ideations that are relatively common among mentally ill patients and impressionable adolescents. Described is the suicidal ingestion of cyanide by a physically healthy 30-year-old man. His diary, found next to the body, contains a recipe for suicide copied verbatim from Derek Humphry's Final Exit. Although the decedent's history, the scene investigation, and the external examination strongly suggest an underlying psychiatric disorder, postmortem examination disclosed minimal underlying physical disease. This case graphically illustrates the abuse potential of this literary genre. To our knowledge, this is the first case of its kind to appear in the literature. We recommend that forensic pathologists and medical investigators familiarize themselves with the methods of suicide described in Final Exit.

  2. First exit times of harmonically trapped particles: a didactic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, Denis S.

    2015-01-01

    We revise the classical problem of characterizing first exit times of a harmonically trapped particle whose motion is described by a one- or multidimensional Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. We start by recalling the main derivation steps of a propagator using Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations. The mean exit time, the moment-generating function and the survival probability are then expressed through confluent hypergeometric functions and thoroughly analyzed. We also present a rapidly converging series representation of confluent hypergeometric functions that is particularly well suited for numerical computation of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the governing Fokker-Planck operator. We discuss several applications of first exit times, such as the detection of time intervals during which motor proteins exert a constant force onto a tracer in optical tweezers single-particle tracking experiments; adhesion bond dissociation under mechanical stress; characterization of active periods of trend-following and mean-reverting strategies in algorithmic trading on stock markets; relation to the distribution of first crossing times of a moving boundary by Brownian motion. Some extensions are described, including diffusion under quadratic double-well potential and anomalous diffusion.

  3. Discrete element crowd model for pedestrian evacuation through an exit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lin; Jian, Ma; Siuming, Lo

    2016-03-01

    A series of accidents caused by crowds within the last decades evoked a lot of scientific interest in modeling the movement of pedestrian crowds. Based on the discrete element method, a granular dynamic model, in which the human body is simplified as a self-driven sphere, is proposed to simulate the characteristics of crowd flow through an exit. In this model, the repulsive force among people is considered to have an anisotropic feature, and the physical contact force due to body deformation is quantified by the Hertz contact model. The movement of the human body is simulated by applying the second Newton’s law. The crowd flow through an exit at different desired velocities is studied and simulation results indicated that crowd flow exhibits three distinct states, i.e., smooth state, transition state and phase separation state. In the simulation, the clogging phenomenon occurs more easily when the desired velocity is high and the exit may as a result be totally blocked at a desired velocity of 1.6 m/s or above, leading to faster-to-frozen effect. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 71473207, 51178445, and 71103148), the Research Grant Council, Government of Hong Kong, China (Grant No. CityU119011), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant Nos. 2682014CX103 and 2682014RC05).

  4. Geometric Approaches for Reducing Burr Formation in Planar Milling by Avoiding Tool Exits

    OpenAIRE

    Dornfeld, David; Chu, Chih-Hsing

    2005-01-01

    One of the most effective methods for reducing milling exit burrs is to prevent the tool from exiting the workpiece. Exit here refers the condition in which a cutting edge is moving out of the workpiece while removing material. Only entrance burrs can occur under this circumstance, which are usually considered burr-free. This study proposes a set of geometric algorithms for avoiding tool exits in planar milling. Two distinct approaches are developed for tool path planning of 2-D polygons. The...

  5. Exit times for a class of random walks: exact distribution results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Martin

    2011-01-01

    the exit possible has a Laplace transform which is a rational function. The expected exit time is also determined and the paper concludes with exact distribution results concerning exits from bounded intervals. The proofs use simple martingale techniques together with some classical expansions...

  6. The Effect of Family on the Job Exits of Young Adults: A Competing Risk Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenigsberg, Judy; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Event history analysis and a competing risk model of occupational attainment indicate that, for men, marriage and children at job entry have negative effects on job exits; for women, they negatively affect exits to attend school but positively affect exits for other reasons, suggesting that young women with children may consider parenting their…

  7. Employee satisfaction and employee retention: catalysts to patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kevin S; Collins, Sandra K; McKinnies, Richard; Jensen, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years, most health care facilities have become intensely aware of the need to increase patient satisfaction. However, with today's more consumer-driven market, this can be a daunting task for even the most experienced health care manager. Recent studies indicate that focusing on employee satisfaction and subsequent employee retention may be strong catalysts to patient satisfaction. This study offers a review of how employee satisfaction and retention correlate with patient satisfaction and also examines the current ways health care organizations are focusing on employee satisfaction and retention.

  8. Organisational Stress and Employee Dissatisfaction at Work: A Case Study to Boost Employee Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Upma Goel

    2014-01-01

    Employee satisfaction is the terminology used to describe whether employees are happy and comfortable and fulfilling their desires and needs at work. Many measures purport that employee satisfaction is a factor in employee motivation, employee goal achievement, and positive employee morale in the workplace.Employee satisfaction, while generally a positive in your organization, can also be a downer if mediocre employees stay because they are satisfied with your work environment.Employee satisf...

  9. Organisational Stress and Employee Dissatisfaction at Work: A Case Study to Boost Employee Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Upma Goel

    2014-01-01

    Employee satisfaction is the terminology used to describe whether employees are happy and comfortable and fulfilling their desires and needs at work. Many measures purport that employee satisfaction is a factor in employee motivation, employee goal achievement, and positive employee morale in the workplace.Employee satisfaction, while generally a positive in your organization, can also be a downer if mediocre employees stay because they are satisfied with your work environment.Employee satisf...

  10. CAREER DEVELOPMENT OF TEXTILE INDUSTRY EMPLOYEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UROŠEVIĆ Snežana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is a very important industrial branch because it produces clothes for nearly seven billion people and textile materials for technical usage. It employs a huge number of competitive and qualified, mostly female work force. It is also technologically and technically challenging. Thus, it is vital to employ qualified and well trained employees with certain competences, knowledge and skills in order to respond to rapid technological and market changes. Here, we will consider the influence of the career development on doing business in the textile industry while acquiring the competitive advantage. Career development is a lifelong process and it is includes knowledge management. The term career has several meanings while nowadays it can mean advancement. The career usually reflects the professional development path of an individual during his or her working career. The career is that concept which connects and unifies most strongly and explicitly individual and organizational interests and needs. The theoretical part explains terms such as career development, importance and improvement of employees for an organization, the possibility for career development within the textile industry. The second part of the paper deals with research conducted among the employees of the textile sector in Leskovac, the town in Serbia with a long-lasting textile tradition.

  11. Experimental Study on the Effect of Exit Geometric Configurations on Hydrodynamics in CFB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Qiao

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The exit configurations of CFB strongly influence the bulk density profile and the internal circulation of the bed material, which is called the end effect. This study analyzes the influence of three exit geometries and two narrowed exit geometries on hydrodynamics. Experiments indicate that the exit with the projected roof in CFB may be used as a separator and the projected height has a maximum. Narrowing the bed cross section near the bed exit zone is a simple and effective way to enhance the internal circulation and reduce the circulation of bed material simultaneously.

  12. A predictive theory of intentions to exit street-level prostitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, Andrea N

    2012-10-01

    Street-level prostitution is notoriously difficult to escape and rarely do women exit prostitution on their first attempt or without experiencing serious negative consequences to their physical or mental health. Unfortunately, few theories exist that explain the exiting process and those that do exist are difficult to test quantitatively. This article applies the integrative model of behavioral prediction to examine intentions to exit prostitution through attitudes, norms, and self-efficacy beliefs that underlie a woman's intention to exit prostitution. Constructs unique prostitution--agency and societal context--enhance the model. This theory may explain and predict an exit from street-level prostitution.

  13. Making Sense of Employee Discourses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mona Agerholm

    In response to the growing interest in the field of organizational identification and the analysis of employee attachment in organizations, this paper presents a multidimensional reception model for analyzing the level of employee identification with corporate value statements. The identification...... of the complexity, nuances and diversities of employee identification with corporate texts in organizations. In addition to this, the model may help to uncover the positive and negative factors that influence the identification level....

  14. The Effect of the Attitude towards E-learning: The Employees' Intention to Use E-Learning in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sun Joo; Han, Seung-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine employees' acceptance levels towards e-learning in the workplace. By using "The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology" (UTAUT), our model captured the effect of factors influencing employees' intention to use e-learning in the workplace. Data was collected from 261 employees in a food…

  15. All Employee Census Survey (AES)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Office of Personnel Management requires government agencies, at a minimum, to query employees on job satisfaction, organizational assessment and organizational...

  16. Frontal MRI findings associated with impairment on the Executive Interview (EXIT25).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royall, D R; Rauch, R; Román, G C; Cordes, J A; Polk, M J

    2001-01-01

    We examined the association between the Executive Interview (EXIT25), a bedside measure of executive control, and regional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pathology among 52 consecutive geriatric patients presenting to a university dementia assessment clinic. Left frontal (p QED]. The EXIT25's associations with right hemisphere lesions did not persist after adjusting for left frontal lesions. Left posterior lesions did not significantly affect the EXIT25. Similarly, left frontal circuit pathology worsened EXIT25 scores (p < .05). Pathology in left anterior subcortical structures showed a trend (p = .052). EXIT25 scores were not affected by right subcortical pathology, nor by pathology in either hippocampus. We conclude that the EXIT25 is specifically affected by frontal system MRI lesions, particularly on the left. This conclusion is consistent with earlier functional neuroimaging studies associating EXIT25 performance with left mesiofrontal perfusion.

  17. Improved social force model based on exit selection for microscopic pedestrian simulation in subway station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑勋; 李海鹰; 孟令云; 许心越; 陈旭

    2015-01-01

    An improved social force model based on exit selection is proposed to simulate pedestrians’ microscopic behaviors in subway station. The modification lies in considering three factors of spatial distance, occupant density and exit width. In addition, the problem of pedestrians selecting exit frequently is solved as follows: not changing to other exits in the affected area of one exit, using the probability of remaining preceding exit and invoking function of exit selection after several simulation steps. Pedestrians in subway station have some special characteristics, such as explicit destinations, different familiarities with subway station. Finally, Beijing Zoo Subway Station is taken as an example and the feasibility of the model results is verified through the comparison of the actual data and simulation data. The simulation results show that the improved model can depict the microscopic behaviors of pedestrians in subway station.

  18. Characterization of Carbon Particulates in the Exit Flow of a Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert D.; Meyer, Marit E.; Agui, Juan H.; Berger, Gordon M.; Vijayakumar, R.; Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    The ISS presently recovers oxygen from crew respiration via a Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) that utilizes the Sabatier chemical process to reduce captured carbon dioxide to methane (CH4) and water. In order to recover more of the hydrogen from the methane and increase oxygen recovery, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is investigating a technology, plasma pyrolysis, to convert the methane to acetylene. The Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (or PPA), achieves 90% or greater conversion efficiency, but a small amount of solid carbon particulates are generated as a side product and must be filtered before the acetylene is removed and the hydrogen-rich gas stream is recycled back to the CRA. In this work, we present the experimental results of an initial characterization of the carbon particulates in the PPA exit gas stream. We also present several potential options to remove these carbon particulates via carbon traps and filters to minimize resupply mass and required downtime for regeneration.

  19. Do specialists exit the firm outsourcing its R&D?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wenjing

    employment of R&D specialists decreases with the deepening of R&D outsourcing but increases with the broadening of R&D outsourcing. These relations can be inferred from previous empirical studies as well as our theoretical analysis, and are supported by the empirical evidence from estimations of correlated......Do specialists exit the firm increasingly outsourcing its research and development (R&D) work? Although this question is critical in understanding how R&D outsourcing links to innovation performance, the answer is not yet clear. This paper proposes that the optimal level of firm's internal...

  20. CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING MONETARY AND FISCAL EXIT STRATEGIES FROM THE CRISIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA VASILESCU

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The recent financial crisis and all unusual monetary and fiscal policy reactions have stressed the importance to be given to understand macroeconomic consequences of policy interventions and their interactions. This profound crisis has led to both nonstandard policy actions of various authorities around the globe, but it has also revealed limitations of traditional modeling tools to guide policymakers’ actions until nowadays. The delicate state of governments’ accounts in many countries is a consequence of the strong fiscal policy reactions, giving rise to risks of a potential fiscal crisis. Issues regarding monetary and fiscal policy decisions interactions are, therefore, the key element for successful exit strategies from the crisis.

  1. Measurements of temperature profiles at the exit of small rockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, M; Harshbarger, F C

    1966-02-01

    The sodium line reversal technique was used to determine the reversal temperature profile across the exit of small rockets. Measurements were made on one 73-kg thrust rocket, and two 23-kg thrust rockets with different injectors. The large rocket showed little variation of reversal temperature across the plume. However, the 23-kg rockets both showed a large decrease of reversal temperature from the axis to the edge of the plume. In addition, the sodium line reversal technique of temperature measurement was compared with an infrared technique developed in these laboratories.

  2. UV laser spectroscopic measurements in jet engine combustion exit flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirley, J.A. (United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Laser diagnostic measurements, which are excited with a narrowband krypton fluoride laser, have been made at the exit of a jet engine combustor. Spectra of Raman scattering and laser induced fluorescence were measured with a 0.5 meter spectrograph equipped with a diode array detector. For these demonstration tests, the combustor was operated at two flow rates including conditions corresponding to the 90 percent power level, with jet fuel and methane. Nitrogen Raman spectra are free of band interference. However, the signal levels are lower than expected. Sources of signal losses are discussed. 27 refs.

  3. Morning employees are perceived as better employees: employees' start times influence supervisor performance ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Kai Chi; Fehr, Ryan; Barnes, Christopher M

    2014-11-01

    In this research, we draw from the stereotyping literature to suggest that supervisor ratings of job performance are affected by employees' start times-the time of day they first arrive at work. Even when accounting for total work hours, objective job performance, and employees' self-ratings of conscientiousness, we find that a later start time leads supervisors to perceive employees as less conscientious. These perceptions in turn cause supervisors to rate employees as lower performers. In addition, we show that supervisor chronotype acts as a boundary condition of the mediated model. Supervisors who prefer eveningness (i.e., owls) are less likely to hold negative stereotypes of employees with late start times than supervisors who prefer morningness (i.e., larks). Taken together, our results suggest that supervisor ratings of job performance are susceptible to stereotypic beliefs based on employees' start times. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Employee Perceived Training Effectiveness Relationship to Employee Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinidis, Alexandros G.; Bouris, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between perceived employee training effectiveness and job satisfaction, motivation and commitment. Design/methodology/approach: The study examined the responses of 134 employees and lower managers, of five large Greek organizations, after they had completed a training program.…

  5. Employee benefits or wage increase?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Duda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper comes from a survey done during the years 2007–2009. It focused on employee satisfaction with the provision of employee benefits. The research included 21 companies, 7 companies were from the engineering sector, 7 companies from the food industry, 3 companies represented the budgetary sphere, 3 companies the services sector and one company operates in pharmaceutical industry.The questionnaire survey consisted of 14 questions, including 5 identification-questions. The paper presents results of the questions on dealing with employees’ awareness of employee benefits and on choosing between employees’ preferences of wage increase or increase in value of benefits provided.Employees are informed about all options of providing employee benefits. Only in 3 cases employees stated dissatisfaction with information. This answer was related with the responses to the second monitored question. Employees of these companies preferred pay increases before benefits’ increases. There was no effect of gender of the respondents, neither the influence of the sector of operation, in the preference of increases in wages or in benefits. Exceptions were the employees of companies operating in the financial sector, who preferred employee benefits before a wage increase. It was found that employees of companies who participated in research in 2009, preferred wage increases before the extension of employee benefits, although the value of the net wage increase is lower than the monetary value of benefits increase.The paper is a part of solution of the research plan MSM 6215648904 The Czech economy in the process of integration and globalization, and the development of agricultural sector and the sector of services under the new conditions of the integrated European market.

  6. Factors influencing early exit from the labour market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, I.; Geuskens, G.

    2011-01-01

    According to a recent study based on the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey, Dutch employees are increasingly motivated to work until the official retirement age of 65 (42% in 2009). They also increasingly think they will be able to do so in their present job (45%). A poor social climate at work

  7. Factors influencing early exit from the labour market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtman, I.; Geuskens, G.

    2011-01-01

    According to a recent study based on the Netherlands Working Conditions Survey, Dutch employees are increasingly motivated to work until the official retirement age of 65 (42% in 2009). They also increasingly think they will be able to do so in their present job (45%). A poor social climate at work

  8. 75 FR 48412 - Proposed Information Collection (Six-Month Post-Exit Focus Interview of Former VHA Employees...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-10

    ... Form 10-0487)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Denise McLamb, Enterprise..., (202) 461-7485, FAX (202) 273-0443 or e-mail denise.mclamb@va.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No... Respondents: 1,500. Dated: August 5, 2010. By direction of the Secretary: Denise McLamb, Program...

  9. 75 FR 30914 - Proposed Information Collection (Six-Month Post-Exit Focus Interview of Former VHA Employees...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    ...The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) is announcing an opportunity for public comment on the proposed collection of certain information by the agency. Under the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995, Federal agencies are required to publish notice in the Federal Register concerning each proposed collection of information, including each new collection, and allow 60 days for public comment in response to the notice. This notice solicits comments on data needed to improve workforce recruitment and retention.

  10. Adoption of IT within an organization by employees

    OpenAIRE

    Tope Samuel Adeyelure; Edzai Kademeteme; Pieter Pretorius; Billy Mathias Kalema

    2014-01-01

    People live currently in a dynamic world where technology is at the center of everything. Organizations implement sophisticated information technologies in their businesses to achieve competitive advantage, and also to achieve their objective goals. Currently, information technologies aid organisation success as they support business processes and operational functions. This has placed a challenge on employees as they find themselves keeping up with the changes. This study will look at how ne...

  11. 10 CFR 607.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 607.640 Section 607.640 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 607.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2)...

  12. 13 CFR 147.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 147.640 Section 147.640... WORKPLACE (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 147.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees;...

  13. 45 CFR 1155.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee. 1155.640 Section 1155.640 Public Welfare...) Definitions § 1155.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect...

  14. 21 CFR 1405.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee. 1405.640 Section 1405.640 Food and Drugs... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1405.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2)...

  15. 22 CFR 133.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee. 133.640 Section 133.640 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 133.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2)...

  16. 22 CFR 1008.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Employee. 1008.640 Section 1008.640 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1008.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2)...

  17. 45 CFR 1173.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee. 1173.640 Section 1173.640 Public Welfare...) Definitions § 1173.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect...

  18. 29 CFR 94.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Employee. 94.640 Section 94.640 Labor Office of the... § 94.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect...

  19. 34 CFR 84.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 84.640 Section 84.640 Education Office of the...) Definitions § 84.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect...

  20. 22 CFR 312.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Employee. 312.640 Section 312.640 Foreign... § 312.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect...

  1. 22 CFR 210.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee. 210.640 Section 210.640 Foreign... (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 210.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees;...

  2. 22 CFR 1509.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Employee. 1509.640 Section 1509.640 Foreign... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1509.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2)...

  3. 49 CFR 32.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee. 32.640 Section 32.640 Transportation... ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 32.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All...

  4. 28 CFR 83.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 83.640 Section 83.640 Judicial...) Definitions § 83.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1) All direct charge employees; (2) All indirect...

  5. 10 CFR 1060.301 - Government employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Government employees. 1060.301 Section 1060.301 Energy... EMPLOYEES § 1060.301 Government employees. Nothing in this part shall be interpreted as being applicable to authorization or approval of payment of travel expenses of Government employees, including DOE employees....

  6. 20 CFR 404.1208 - Ineligible employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ineligible employees. 404.1208 Section 404.1208 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Coverage of Employees of State and Local Governments What Groups of Employees May...

  7. Motivating pharmacy employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S J; Generali, J A

    1984-07-01

    Concepts from theories of motivation are used to suggest methods for improving the motivational environment of hospital pharmacy departments. Motivation--the state of being stimulated to take action to achieve a goal or to satisfy a need--comes from within individuals, but hospital pharmacy managers can facilitate motivation by structuring the work environment so that it satisfies employees' needs. Concepts from several theories of motivation are discussed, including McGregor's theory X and theory Y assumptions, Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory, Herzberg's motivation hygiene theory, and Massey's value system theory. Concepts from the Japanese style of management that can be used to facilitate motivation, such as quality circles, also are described. The autocratic, participative, and laissez faire styles of leadership are discussed in the context of the motivation theories, and suggested applications of theoretical concepts to practice are presented.

  8. The Right of Exit in the Context of Multiculturalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria D'Ávila Lopes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2177-7055.2015v36n71p155 The terrorist attack on the Twin Towers in the United States provoked heated discussions about the need to limit and control the performance of some cultural minorities, as well as to create mechanisms to protect members of these minorities against the decisions taken by the group. In this context, this paper aims to analyze the possibilities and limits of the right of exit in the context of Multiculturalism. To this end, a literature research was performed in national and foreign doctrine. After analyzing the data, it was found that the right to exit is a valuable mechanism for protecting members of cultural minorities, however, there are situations, especially in cases where the values of the group are internalized by the members, in which this right is insufficient and should be supplemented by other human rights.

  9. Conservation of extrusion as an exit mechanism for Chlamydia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuck, Meghan; Sherrid, Ashley; Suchland, Robert; Ellis, Tisha; Hybiske, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    Chlamydiae exit via membrane-encased extrusion or through lysis of the host cell. Extrusions are novel, pathogen-containing structures that confer infectious advantages to Chlamydia, and are hypothesized to promote cell-to-cell spread, dissemination to distant tissues and facilitate immune evasion. The extrusion phenomenon has been characterized for several Chlamydia trachomatis serovars, but a thorough investigation of extrusion for additional clinically relevant C. trachomatis strains and Chlamydia species has yet to be performed. The key parameters investigated in this study were: (i) the conservation of extrusion across the Chlamydia genus, (ii) the functional requirement for candidate Chlamydia genes in extrusion formation i.e. IncA and CT228 and (iii) extrusion-mediated uptake, and consequent survival of Chlamydia inside macrophages. Inclusion morphology was characterized by live fluorescence microscopy, using an inverted GFP strategy, at early and mid-stages of infection. Enriched extrusions were used to infect bone marrow-derived macrophages, and bacterial viability was measured following macrophage engulfment. Our results demonstrate that extrusion is highly conserved across chlamydiae, including ocular, STD and LGV biovars and divergent Chlamydia species. Consequently, this exit mechanism for Chlamydia may fulfill common advantages important for pathogenesis.

  10. HOW EXTREMIST EXPERIENCES BECOME VALUABLE KNOWLEDGE IN EXIT PROGRAMMES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Wilchen Christensen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of a neo-Vygotskian approach the article analyses how former neo-Nazis, together with other staff at Fryshuset, a youth centre in Stockholm, Sweden, have developed the organisation EXIT, which helps people leave the extremist right. The article describes the processes former neo-Nazis must go through to alter their identity and self-understanding in order to become coaches/mentors capable of supporting others. In this connection, the article also illuminates EXIT’s practice for supporting their clients. The main reason for personal change, the article stresses, is that an individual’s engagement in a social practice alters his/her basis for reflection, allowing an alternative sense of identity to emerge. The reformulation of the individual’s past involved in this process, the article argues, is a requirement for their extremist experiences to become useable knowledge in an organisation like EXIT aimed at helping others leave what they have come to view as a destructive and anti-democratic lifestyle.

  11. Professional Employees and Collective Bargaining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Joel M., Ed.

    1987-01-01

    The status of professional employees at colleges and their role within the unionized workplace are considered in two articles. In "The Position of Professional Employees," Eliot Freidson discusses findings of a study on professionals and implications for college collective bargaining. Attention is directed to the validity of the position…

  12. Community College Employee Wellness Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, L. Jay; Johnson, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the prevalence and characteristics of employee wellness programs in public community colleges accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). A random sample of 250 public community colleges accredited by SACS was mailed a 46-item employee-wellness program survey. The survey solicited program information…

  13. Assessing New Employee Orientation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Jose M.; Yancey, George B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine the importance of new employee orientation (NEO) programs, the quality of typical NEOs, and how to improve NEOs. Design/methodology/approach: The paper provides a viewpoint of the importance of new employee orientation programs, the quality of typical NEOs, and how to improve NEOs. Findings: Although western…

  14. ORGANIZATION PERFORMANCE AND EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Milica Jakšiæ, Miloš Jakšiæ

    2014-01-01

    Employee satisfaction related to their job, possibilities of career development, mechanisms of performance measurement and reward, as remuneration systems are of growing importance. Expectations of highly educated workforce continuously increase, so recruiting and retention of such workers becomes key factor of success for modern companies. Success of companies is expected to change together with employee saticfaction.

  15. Impact of a smoke-free hospital campus policy on employee and consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, J Gary; Pulley, LeaVonne; Felix, Holly C; Bursac, Zoran; Siddiqui, Nadia J; Stewart, M Kathryn; Mays, Glen P; Gauss, C Heath

    2007-01-01

    Although smoke-free hospital campuses can provide a strong health message and protect patients, they are few in number due to employee retention and public relations concerns. We evaluated the effects of implementing a clean air policy on employee attitudes, recruitment, and retention; hospital utilization; and consumer satisfaction in 2003 through 2005. We conducted research at a university hospital campus with supplemental data from an affiliated hospital campus. Our evaluation included (1) measurement of employee attitudes during the year before and year after policy implementation using a cross-sectional, anonymous survey; (2) focus group discussions held with supervisors and security personnel; and (3) key informant interviews conducted with administrators. Secondary analysis included review of employment records and exit interviews, and monitoring of hospital utilization and patient satisfaction data. Employee attitudes toward the policy were supportive (83.3%) at both institutions and increased significantly (89.8%) at post-test at the university hospital campus. Qualitatively, administrator and supervisor attitudes were similarly favorable. There was no evidence on either campus of an increase in employee separations or a decrease in new hiring after the policy was implemented. On neither campus was there a change in bed occupancy or mean daily census. Standard measures of consumer satisfaction were also unchanged at both sites. A campus-wide smoke-free policy had no detrimental effect on measures of employee or consumer attitudes or behaviors.

  16. Firms' contribution to the internal and external employability of older employees: evidence from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisch, Anita

    2015-03-01

    In the examination of older employees' employability, one can distinguish between internal and external employability. Internal employability can be measured by individual employment stability, and external employability occurs when employees replace one employment relationship with another. Most studies focus on the personal skills and characteristics that are necessary to maintain employability. However, external factors also contribute to individual employability. Therefore, this study examines which organisational attributes of firms contribute to older employees' employability in Germany. Taking firm and individual characteristics into account, the results of discrete-time survival models show that in specific organisational structures, older employees have higher internal employability. Accordingly, older employees are more likely to maintain employment in the service sector and in recruiting organisations facing (skilled) labour shortages. However, the results also indicate that financially investing organisations facilitate early labour market exits. With regard to older employees' external employability, the results show only little evidence indicating an association between organisational attributes of firms and the likelihood of job change.

  17. Involving Employees in Strategy innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    some of its employees. Even if managers still dominate, some processes of direct involvement of employees occur. The employees are in particular active in supplementing overall strategic goals and directly shaping one sub strategy, that of ‘process’. Strategy practices include planning, Porterian......Strategy as a practice and continuous innovation approaches are combined to conceptualise dilemmas of short versus long term and to analyse a case of employee participation as a particular example of strategy innovation. The case is a medium size textile company developing its strategy involving...... and Balanced Score Card consultancy, an ‘open space’ workshop and organized strategy projects. Especially the latter two are important in facilitating the employee involvement. The case however also exhibit enterprise situated praxis’s like mitigation of taboos....

  18. Employees' Political Skill and Job Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zettler, Ingo; Lang, Jonas W.B.

    2015-01-01

    different sample characteristics (early career employees, established employees), job performance dimensions (overall, task, contextual, and adaptive performance), and rating sources (supervisors and colleagues) supported this idea. Across different analyses, employees with intermediate levels of political...

  19. Evaluation of employee training in retail business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Stehlíková

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological development and growing competition on the market asks for continuous improvement of knowledge and skills of employees, not only for securing their work places but also for increasing the companies’ competitiveness and economic development of the society. Company education is one of the main instruments, how the enterprises can improve their position in the market. The main criterion of success in business are in present especially employees’ skills. The main objective of this paper was to evaluate the most important topics, which are used for improving skills and working outcomes of employees in retail and wholesale branch. Their possibility for getting feedback was also commented and controllability was further checked. When we summarize all findings, the most important competencies of workers in retail and warehouse business are qualification (shopping skills and knowledge of products, behaviour (obliging attitude to customers, ability to compliment the customer of his/her choice, working reaction (ability to do daily tasks quickly, safety, precisely and punctually, neatness (well and clean dressed employees, different groups of workers are distinguishable from each other. Next step after the list of main competences in retail and warehouse business was creating questionnaire, which should serve for researching quality of company education and its possibility to improvement. This questionnaire can serve for all companies in this field, which want or need to evaluate their company education.

  20. Competitive electricity markets, prices and generator entry and exit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethier, Robert George

    The electric power industry in the United States is quickly being deregulated and restructured. In the past, new electric generation capacity was added by regulated utilities to meet forecasted demand levels and maintain reserve margins. With competitive wholesale generation, investment will be the responsibility of independent private investors. Electricity prices will assume the coordinating function which has until recently been the responsibility of regulatory agencies. Competitive prices will provide the entry and exit signals for generators in the future. Competitive electricity markets have a distinctive price formation process, and thus require a specialized price model. A mean-reverting price process with stochastic jumps is proposed as an appropriate long-run price process for annual electricity prices. This price process is used to develop an analytic real options model for private investment decisions. The required recursive infinite series solutions have not been widely used for real option models. Entry thresholds and asset values for competitive wholesale electricity markets, and exit decisions for plants with significant retirement costs (i.e. nuclear power plants), are examined. The proposed model results in significantly lower trigger prices for both entry and exit decisions, and higher asset values, when compared with other standard models. The model is used to show that the incentives for retiring a nuclear plant are very sensitive to the treatment of decommissioning costs (e.g. if plant owners do not face full decommissioning costs, retirement decisions may be economically premature.) An econometric model of short-run price behavior is estimated by the method of maximum likelihood using daily electricity prices from markets in the USA and Australia. The model specifies two mean reverting price processes with stochastic Markov switching between the regimes, which allows discontinuous jumps in electricity prices. Econometric tests show that a two

  1. Maximum forces sustained during various methods of exiting commercial tractors, trailers and trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathallah, F A; Cotnam, J P

    2000-02-01

    Many commercial vehicles have steps and grab-rails to assist the driver in safely entering/exiting the vehicle. However, many drivers do not use these aids. The purpose of this study was to compare impact forces experienced during various exit methods from commercial equipment. The study investigated impact forces of ten male subjects while exiting two tractors, a step-van, a box-trailer, and a cube-van. The results showed that exiting from cab-level or trailer-level resulted in impact forces as high as 12 times the subject's body weight; whereas, fully utilizing the steps and grab-rails resulted in impact forces less than two times body weight. An approach that emphasizes optimal design of entry/exit aids coupled with driver training and education is expected to minimize exit-related injuries.

  2. Employee occupational stress in banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidis, Maria; Georgiou, Yiota

    2005-01-01

    Occupational stress literature emphasizes the importance of assessment and management of work related stress. The recognition of the harmful physical and psychological effects of stress on both individuals and organizations is widely studied in many parts of the world. However, in other regions such research is only at the introductory stages. The present study examines occupational stress of employees in the banking sector. A sample of 60 bank employees at different organizational levels and educational backgrounds was used. Data collection utilized the Occupational Stress Indicator (OSI). Results of data analysis provided evidence that employees' educational levels affect the degree of stress they experience in various ways. Bank employees cannot afford the time to relax and "wind down" when they are faced with work variety, discrimination, favoritism, delegation and conflicting tasks. The study also shows the degree to which some employees tend to bring work-related problems home (and take family problems to work) depends on their educational background, the strength of the employees' family support, and the amount of time available for them to relax. Finally, the drinking habits (alcohol) of the employees were found to play a significant role in determining the levels of occupational stress.

  3. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  4. Every employee an owner. Really.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Corey; Case, John; Staubus, Martin

    2005-06-01

    Surveys indicate that when new rules on expensing stock options take effect, many companies are likely to limit the number of employees who can receive equity compensation. But companies that reserve equity for executives are bound to suffer in the long run. Study after study proves that broad-based ownership, when done right, leads to higher productivity, lower workforce turnover, better recruits, and bigger profits. "Done right" is the key. Here are the four most important factors in implementing a broad-based employee equity plan: A significant portion of the workforce--generally, most of the full-time people--must hold equity; employees must think the amounts they hold can significantly improve their financial prospects; managerial practices and policies must reinforce the plan; and employees must feel a true sense of company ownership. Those factors add up to an ownership culture in which employees' interests are aligned with the company's. The result is a workforce that is loyal, cooperative, and willing to go above and beyond to make the organization successful. A wide variety of companies have recorded exceptional business performance with the help of employee-ownership programs supported by management policies. The authors examine two: Science Applications International, a research and development contractor, and Scot Forge, which shapes metal and other materials for industrial machinery. At both companies, every employee with a year or so of service holds equity, and employees who stay on can accumulate a comfortable nest egg. Management's sharing of financial information reinforces workers' sense of ownership. So does the expectation that employees will accept the responsibilities of ownership. Workers with an ownership stake internalize their responsibilities and feel they have an obligation not only to management but to one another.

  5. Exiting the Emergency Medical Services Profession and Characteristics Associated with Intent to Return to Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Rebecca E; Crowe, Remle P; Agarwal, Riddhima; Rodriguez, Severo A; Panchal, Ashish R

    2017-06-28

    Inadequate staffing of agencies, increasing attrition rates, and frequent turnover of personnel make employee retention an ongoing concern for Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Faced with increasing demand for EMS, understanding the causes underlying turnover is critical. The objectives of this study were to describe the proportion of individuals that left EMS, likelihood of returning to the profession, and key factors contributing to the decision to leave EMS. This was a cross-sectional study of nationally-certified EMS professionals who left EMS. Respondents to a census survey who reported not practicing EMS were directed to a subsection of items regarding their choice to leave EMS. Demographic and employment characteristics, likelihood of returning to EMS, and factors influencing the decision to leave EMS were assessed. Descriptive and comparative statistics (Chi-square and nonparametric test of trend [p-trend]) and univariable odds ratios were calculated. The overall response rate for the full survey was 10% (n = 32,114). A total of 1247 (4%) respondents reported leaving the profession and completed the exit survey. The majority (72%) reported that they will likely return to EMS. A stepwise decrease in the reported likelihood of returning was seen with increasing years of EMS experience (e.g., 2 or less years of experience: 83%; 16 or more years: 52%; p-trend rate of approximately 4% among nationally certified EMS professionals; however, the majority reported that they intended to return to the EMS profession. Intention to return to EMS decreased as years of experience and months away from the profession increased. Important factors in the decision to leave EMS included a desire for better pay and benefits and the decision to pursue further education. Targeting the factors identified as important in this study should be a priority for key stakeholders in improving recruitment and retention of EMS professionals.

  6. Employee Wellness Program in a small rural industry: employee evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Melondie; Gaskins, Susan; Shaw, Lynda

    2005-06-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine employees' perceptions of a wellness program resulting from collaboration between a small rural industry and a College of Nursing. Focus group methods were used to elicit evaluative data from 27 employees. A semi-structured interview guide of open-ended questions was used to elicit information. The employees readily identified the screenings and information they had received related to hypertension, blood sugar, and cholesterol to be helpful. Health behavior changes the employees identified based on the health promotion activities and screenings included diet changes, different food preparations, and exercise. The screenings were found to be beneficial because they helped them to understand the significance of the results and how they could alter them with health behaviors. The repeated screenings provided an opportunity for them to see how health behavior changes had affected their results.

  7. A Model of Graceful Exit in String Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Brustein, Ram; Brustein, Ram; Madden, Richard

    1998-01-01

    We construct, for the first time, a model of graceful exit transition from a dilaton-driven inflationary phase to a decelerated Friedman-Robertson-Walker era. Exploiting a demonstration that classical corrections can stabilize a high curvature string phase while the evolution is still in the weakly coupled regime, we show that if additional terms of the type that may result from quantum corrections to the string effective action exist, and induce violation of the null energy condition, then evolution towards a decelerated Friedman-Robertson-Walker phase is possible. We also observe that stabilizing the dilaton at a fixed value, either by capture in a potential minimum or by radiation production, may require that these quantum corrections are turned off, perhaps by non-perturbative effects or higher order contributions which overturn the null energy condition violation.

  8. Predicting NCLEX-PN success with the HESI Exit Exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Anne; Willson, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Surveys were mailed to directors of 72 randomly selected practical nursing (PN) schools that administered Elsevier's HESI Exit Exam for Practical Nurses (E2-PN) during the 2006-2007 academic year. Data were collected regarding students' NCLEX-PN outcomes and the schools' benchmarking and remediation policies. The first version of the E2-PN was 99.48% accurate in predicting NCLEX-PN success. Versions two and three of the E2-PN, which were administered to students who were remediated because they did not achieve the faculty-designated benchmark, were also highly accurate in predicting NCLEX-PN success. Most faculties set 850 as their school's E2-PN benchmark, and 73% of the respondents required remediation for students who did not achieve the benchmark score. The most frequently cited remediation strategy was tutoring.

  9. The exit velocity of a compressed air cannon

    CERN Document Server

    Rohrbach, Z J; Madsen, M J

    2011-01-01

    The use of compressed air cannons in an undergraduate lab provides a way to illustrate the cooperation of diverse physics concepts, such as conservation of momentum, the work-kinetic energy theorem, expansion of gas, air drag, and elementary Newtonian mechanics. However, recent proposals have disagreed as to whether the expansion of the gas in the cannon should be modeled as an adiabatic or an isothermal process. We built an air cannon that utilized a diaphragm valve to release our pressurized gas and found that neither model accurately predicted the exit velocity of our projectile. We present a new model, based on the flow of air through the valve, that is in much better agreement with our data.

  10. Spanish exit polls. Sampling error or nonresponse bias?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavía, Jose M.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Countless examples of misleading forecasts on behalf of both pre-election and exit polls can be found all over the world. Non-representative samples due to differential nonresponse have been claimed as being the main reason for inaccurate exit-poll projections. In real inference problems, it is seldom possible to compare estimates and true values. Electoral forecasts are an exception. Comparisons between estimates and final outcomes can be carried out once votes have been tallied. In this paper, we examine the raw data collected in seven exit polls conducted in Spain and test the likelihood that the data collected in each sampled voting location can be considered as a random sample of actual results. Knowing the answer to this is relevant for both electoral analysts and forecasters as, if the hypothesis is rejected, the shortcomings of the collected data would need amending. Analysts could improve the quality of their computations by implementing local correction strategies. We find strong evidence of nonsampling error in Spanish exit polls and evidence that the political context matters. Nonresponse bias is larger in polarized elections and in a climate of fearExiste un gran número de ejemplos de predicciones inexactas obtenidas a partir tanto de encuestas pre-electorales como de encuestas a pie de urna a lo largo del mundo. La presencia de tasas de no-respuesta diferencial entre distintos tipos de electores ha sido la principal razón esgrimida para justificar las proyecciones erróneas en las encuestas a pie de urna. En problemas de inferencia rara vez es posible comparar estimaciones y valores reales. Las predicciones electorales son una excepción. La comparación entre estimaciones y resultados finales puede realizarse una vez los votos han sido contabilizados. En este trabajo, examinamos los datos brutos recogidos en siete encuestas a pie de urna realizadas en España y testamos la hipótesis de que los datos recolectados en cada punto

  11. Inflation with a graceful exit in a random landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedro, F.G. [Univ. Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Teorica y Inst. de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC; Westphal, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2016-11-15

    We develop a stochastic description of small-field inflationary histories with a graceful exit in a random potential whose Hessian is a Gaussian random matrix as a model of the unstructured part of the string landscape. The dynamical evolution in such a random potential from a small-field inflation region towards a viable late-time de Sitter (dS) minimum maps to the dynamics of Dyson Brownian motion describing the relaxation of non-equilibrium eigenvalue spectra in random matrix theory. We analytically compute the relaxation probability in a saddle point approximation of the partition function of the eigenvalue distribution of the Wigner ensemble describing the mass matrices of the critical points. When applied to small-field inflation in the landscape, this leads to an exponentially strong bias against small-field ranges and an upper bound N<<10 on the number of light fields N participating during inflation from the non-observation of negative spatial curvature.

  12. Employee Reward Systems in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Došenović Dragana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Employee rewarding is one of the activities of human resource management concerning the management of money, goods and services that employees receive from their employer in exchange for their work. Given that a properly designed reward system is one of the conditions for a stable business, successful performance of work activities and the achievement of set objectives in each organization, the basic theme of this paper is the employee reward system, with a special focus on different elements of it. The purpose of this paper is to describe the role and significance of the observed system and to draw attention to its role in employee’s motivation.

  13. 37 CFR 401.10 - Government assignment to contractor of rights in invention of government employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contractor of rights in invention of government employee. 401.10 Section 401.10 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR TECHNOLOGY POLICY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE RIGHTS TO INVENTIONS MADE BY... AGREEMENTS § 401.10 Government assignment to contractor of rights in invention of government employee. In any...

  14. Administrative Tasks and Skills Needed for Today's Office: The Employees' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Diane B.; Bentley, Jan; Richards, Kathleen; Krebs, Cynthia

    2005-01-01

    Educators need to know which skills and tasks administrative employers are using. The results of this study revealed that higher-level skills are used more by experienced than by entry-level employees. Experienced employees performed more computer tasks and embraced technology more readily. Neither group was required to have certificates or…

  15. Defense Acquisition University: A Study of Employee Perceptions on Web Based Learning Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, Carolyn W.

    2012-01-01

    Organizations invest heavily in training to ensure employees have the skills they need to be successful. One of the goals in business is to maximize the skills of the employees in the workplace, which creates a competitive advantage for the business. Traditional classroom training is still used in the workplace; however, technology-driven training…

  16. Managing Entrepreneurial Employees Who Bring Their Own IT to Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hudson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Why do some employees invest their own time and money to acquire consumer information technology (IT for use in the workplace as corporate IT? This behaviour occurs even when their firms already possess considerable IT resources. Moreover, IT governance policies typically oppose the use of unsanctioned IT within the firm. IT governance assumes that the only IT assets that are relevant to the firm are those that are owned by the firm. However, employees can create value for the firm by combining their personal IT assets with the firm's IT assets. Creating novel asset combinations is consistent with entrepreneurship but entrepreneurship theory does not address this type of voluntary employee entrepreneurship using personal IT assets. This article proposes a link between the theory of the firm and entrepreneurship theory to explain why employees act entrepreneurially. This link is significant because it advances the notion that employees of established firms can be entrepreneurial when they use their own consumer IT as corporate IT. This link is also significant because it suggests that managing employee entrepreneurship requires tolerance of value creation that is emergent and can occur within a firm.

  17. QUALITY OF WORKLIFE OF EMPLOYEES IN PRIVATE TECHNICAL INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Nanjundeswaraswamy

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A high quality of work life (QWL is essential for all organizations to continue to attract and retain employee. There is an impressive contribution by technical Institutions to the development of technology and economy of our nation. The study helps the technical institution employees to know the level of perception towards QWL and to enhance the same by the management. The sample consists of 109 employees of a technical institution. The questionnaire was designed based on nine important components of QWL. The research reveals that male employees are more satisfied than female employees. ChiSquare test show that there are no significance relationship between demographic characteristics of employees and QWL. Research also reveals that Adequacy of Resources are more correlated and Training & Development are less correlated with QWL in teaching staffs and in case of non teaching staffs Compensation & Rewards are more correlated and Work Environment are less correlated with QWL. The correlation analysis also reveals that all the dimensions of QWL are positively correlated with QWL of faculties, which indicates that enhancement in the dimensions of QWL can lead to increase the overall QWL of faculties.

  18. Organizational change, restructuring and downsizing: The experience of employees in the electric utility industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korns, Michael T.

    This research examines the experience of employees working in the electric utility industry during a time when it was undergoing significant transformation. It was undertaken to examine this phenomenon in the context of how the history and nature of the industry's environment, and specifically regulatory effect of regulation, led to an organizational form characterized by stability, structure and inertial resistance to change. A case study approach was used to examine the effect of deregulation on an organization in the industry, and specifically how their actions impacted employees working there. A phenomenological approach was used to explore employee perceptions of the organizational culture and employment relationship there both prior to and after implementation of a reorganization and downsizing that resulted in the first significant employee layoffs in the history of the organization. Data gathering consisted of conducting semi-structured interviews with current and former employees of the company who experienced the phenomena. Analysis of the data show that employees in this organization perceived an unusually strong psychological contract for stable employment and the expectation that it would continue, despite the prevalence of corporate downsizing and restructuring at the time. This psychological contract and the importance of career employment was found to be particularly significant for women who were hired during a period of time when gender and pregnancy discrimination was prevalent. Findings demonstrate that, given the historical stability and strong inertial resistance in the organization, company leadership did not effectively communicate the need, or prepare employees sufficiently for the significance of the changes or the effect they had on the organization. Findings also revealed that employees perceived the methods used to select individuals for layoff and exit from the company violated principles of organizational justice for distributional

  19. Creative benefits from well-connected leaders: leader social network ties as facilitators of employee radical creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramani, Vijaya; Richter, Andreas W; Clarke, Ronald

    2014-09-01

    Employee radical creativity critically depends on substantive informational resources from others across the wider organization. We propose that the social network ties of employees' immediate leaders assume a central role in garnering these resources, thereby fostering their employees' radical creativity both independent of and interactively with employees' own network ties. Drawing on data from 214 employees working in 30 teams of a public technology and environmental services organization, we find that team leaders' betweenness centrality in the idea network within their teams as well as among their peer leaders provides creative benefits beyond employees' own internal and external ties. Further, employees' and leaders' ties within and external to the team interactively predict employee radical creativity. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  20. TRANSFORMATIONAL LEADERSHIP AND EMPLOYEE SATISFACTION

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alisa Mujkic; Dzevad Sehic; Zijada Rahimic; Jasmin Jusic

    2014-01-01

      The main purpose of this paper was to carry out an empirical research on whether transformational leadership, in comparison to other contemporary leadership styles, contributes to higher employee satisfaction levels...

  1. Transformational leadership and employee satisfaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alisa Mujkić; Dževad Šehić; Zijada Rahimić; Jasmin Jusić

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper was to carry out an empirical research on whether transformational leadership, in comparison to other contemporary leadership styles, contributes to higher employee satisfaction levels...

  2. The Transformation of Employee Participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busck, Ole Gunni; Knudsen, Herman; Lind, Jens

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the research literature on the relationship between employee participation, influence and the work environment. The main part of the literature points to a positive connection in line with how it has been almost institutionalised in Karasek and Theorell´s demand control......-model. However, more recent research into psychosocial work environment problems questions the model’s assumption of high job control compensating for high job demands. Taking its point of departure in a `deconstruction´ of the concept of participation based on research on employee participation from the past...... few decades, the article discuss what factors and changes have resulted in that increased employee participation does not seem to result in a healthy work environment. The article concludes on the limitations of the demand control-model in modern working life given contextual changes in the employer-employee...

  3. Strategy Innovation with Employee Involvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2015-01-01

    if the managers still dominate, some processes of direct involvement of employees occur, in particular when employees are asked to supplement overall strategic goals and when they directly shape several sub-strategies. Strategy practices found include strategy planning, an open space workshop and organised......The purpose of this article is to investigate how employees can be involved in strategy innovation processes and how new strategy practices (new tools and procedures) are used to change strategy praxis in order to sustain value creation. In the strategizing actions, we found that even...... strategy projects. Especially the latter two are important in facilitating the employee involvement. The case, however, also exhibits enterprise-situated praxises related to unplanned events, like the mitigation of taboos....

  4. How Employee Turnover Affects Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Bo

    Research on employee turnover suggests that turnover results in negative organization-level outcomes. This paper provides a firm-level analysis of the impact of the in- and outflows of human resources on productivity and how the presence of organizational slack resources moderates the effects...... of employee turnover. Drawing on a unique longitudinal dataset of 2,926 Danish manufacturing firms that combine individual-level data with firm-level data, the paper shows that job turnover has a substantial negative effect on total productivity but that the firm’s size, its capital intensity, and its age...... moderate this effect so that the negative consequences of employee turnover are less severe for larger, older and capital intensive firms. These moderating variables indicate the presence of slack resources in the firm, and thus that the accumulation of slack reduces the efficiency losses from employee...

  5. Allegheny County Employee Salaries 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Employee salaries are a regular Right to Know request the County receives. Here is the disclaimer language that is included with the dataset from the Open Records...

  6. How Employee Turnover Affects Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Bo

    Research on employee turnover suggests that turnover results in negative organization-level outcomes. This paper provides a firm-level analysis of the impact of the in- and outflows of human resources on productivity and how the presence of organizational slack resources moderates the effects...... of employee turnover. Drawing on a unique longitudinal dataset of 2,926 Danish manufacturing firms that combine individual-level data with firm-level data, the paper shows that job turnover has a substantial negative effect on total productivity but that the firm’s size, its capital intensity, and its age...... moderate this effect so that the negative consequences of employee turnover are less severe for larger, older and capital intensive firms. These moderating variables indicate the presence of slack resources in the firm, and thus that the accumulation of slack reduces the efficiency losses from employee...

  7. Smart Learning Adoption in Employees and HRD Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghwan; Zo, Hangjung; Lee, Hwansoo

    2014-01-01

    The innovation of online technologies and the rapid diffusion of smart devices are changing workplace learning environment. Smart learning, as emerging learning paradigm, enables employees' learning to take place anywhere and anytime. Workplace learning studies, however, have focused on traditional e-learning environment, and they have failed…

  8. 29 CFR Appendix to Subpart E of... - Exit Routes, Emergency Action Plans, and Fire Prevention Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... such as when a local application fire suppression system discharge employee alarm is sounded. Employees... leaving, wardens should check rooms and other enclosed spaces in the workplace for employees who may be...) can be supplemented by the following to more effectively achieve employee safety and health in...

  9. Strategies for improving employee retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlander, Edward G; Evans, Martin R

    2007-03-28

    This article proposes a solution to the perennial problem of talent retention in the clinical laboratory. It includes the presentation of 12 strategies that may be used to significantly improve institutional identity formation and establishment of the psychological contract that employees form with laboratory management. Identity formation and psychological contracting are deemed as essential in helping reduce employee turnover and increase retention. The 12 conversational strategies may be used as a set of best practices for all employees, but most importantly for new employees, and should be implemented at the critical moment when employees first join the laboratory. This time is referred to as "retention on-boarding"--the period of induction and laboratory orientation. Retention on-boarding involves a dialogue between employees and management that is focused on the psychological, practical, cultural, and political dimensions of the laboratory. It is placed in the context of the modern clinical laboratory, which is faced with employing and managing Generation X knowledge workers. Specific topics and broad content areas of those conversations are outlined.

  10. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  11. Are Public Employees in Romania Prepared for eGovernment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Calin Velicu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An efficient administration can not be conceived without the advantages offered by the use of IT&C in the development of public services. However, once new technologies are adopted, the accumulation of specific capabilities by the public employees is mandatory. Guidelines in drawing up an eGovernment training plan were formulated herein using skill-sets detailed by the European Public Administration Network and the U.S. Information Technology Management Reform Act.

  12. 10 CFR 60.9 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 60.9 Section 60.9 Energy NUCLEAR... Provisions § 60.9 Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, an applicant for a...

  13. 10 CFR 61.9 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 61.9 Section 61.9 Energy NUCLEAR... Provisions § 61.9 Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, an applicant for a...

  14. 10 CFR 72.10 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... adverse action occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 72.10 Section 72.10 Energy NUCLEAR... Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, certificate holder, an applicant for a...

  15. 10 CFR 30.7 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 30.7 Section 30.7 Energy NUCLEAR... Provisions § 30.7 Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, an applicant for a...

  16. 10 CFR 63.9 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected activities... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 63.9 Section 63.9 Energy NUCLEAR... MOUNTAIN, NEVADA General Provisions § 63.9 Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee...

  17. 10 CFR 70.7 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 70.7 Section 70.7 Energy NUCLEAR... Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, an applicant for a Commission license, or...

  18. 10 CFR 50.7 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... occurs because the employee has engaged in protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 50.7 Section 50.7 Energy NUCLEAR... Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, an applicant for a Commission license, or...

  19. Perfectionism and clinical disorders among employees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, Nico W.; Verbraak, Marc; Spoor, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    We examined differences in perfectionism between burned-out employees (n = 77), depressed employees (n = 29), anxiety-disordered employees (n = 31), employees with comorbid disorders, that is, a combination of clinical burnout, depression, or anxiety disorder (n = 28), and individuals without clinic

  20. 25 CFR 502.14 - Key employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Key employee. 502.14 Section 502.14 Indians NATIONAL....14 Key employee. Key employee means: (a) A person who performs one or more of the following functions... gaming operation. (d) Any other person designated by the tribe as a key employee....

  1. 49 CFR 218.22 - Utility employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Utility employee. 218.22 Section 218.22... employee. (a) A utility employee shall be subject to the Hours of Service Act, and the requirements for... parts 217, 219, and 228 of this chapter. (b) A utility employee shall perform service as a member...

  2. 45 CFR 630.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Employee. 630.640 Section 630.640 Public Welfare... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 630.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1)...

  3. 29 CFR 825.110 - Eligible employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eligible employee. 825.110 Section 825.110 Labor... employee. (a) An “eligible employee” is an employee of a covered employer who: (1) Has been employed by the... worksite where 50 or more employees are employed by the employer within 75 miles of that worksite....

  4. 38 CFR 48.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 48.640 Section...) GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 48.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the...

  5. 29 CFR 2200.38 - Employee contests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee contests. 2200.38 Section 2200.38 Labor... Pleadings and Motions § 2200.38 Employee contests. (a) Secretary's statement of reasons. Where an affected employee or authorized employee representative files a notice of contest with respect to the...

  6. 41 CFR 105-74.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 105-74.640...-GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 105-74.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the...

  7. 34 CFR 32.4 - Employee response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee response. 32.4 Section 32.4 Education Office... FROM DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EMPLOYEES § 32.4 Employee response. (a) Voluntary repayment agreement. Within 7 days of receipt of the written notice under § 32.3, the employee may submit a request to...

  8. 29 CFR 1472.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 1472.640 Section 1472.640 Labor Regulations... DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1472.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including— (1)...

  9. 17 CFR 204.34 - Employee response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee response. 204.34... DEBT COLLECTION Salary Offset § 204.34 Employee response. (a) Introduction. An employee must respond to... ways discussed in § 204.34, Employee response, and § 204.35, Petition for pre-offset hearing....

  10. 2 CFR 182.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 2 Grants and Agreements 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee. 182.640 Section 182.640 Grants and... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 182.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the...

  11. 29 CFR 1201.4 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 1201.4 Section 1201.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD DEFINITIONS § 1201.4 Employee. The term employee as... that of an employee or subordinate official in the orders of the Interstate Commerce Commission now...

  12. 36 CFR 1212.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 1212.640 Section... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 1212.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the...

  13. 20 CFR 229.45 - Employee benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee benefit. 229.45 Section 229.45 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE Computation of the Overall Minimum Rate § 229.45 Employee benefit. The...

  14. 32 CFR 26.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 26.640 Section 26.640 National Defense... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 26.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including—...

  15. 40 CFR 36.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 36.640 Section 36.640... REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE) Definitions § 36.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including—...

  16. 20 CFR 404.1045 - Employee expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee expenses. 404.1045 Section 404.1045 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Wages § 404.1045 Employee expenses....

  17. 24 CFR 21.640 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Employee. 21.640 Section 21.640... GOVERNMENTWIDE REQUIREMENTS FOR DRUG-FREE WORKPLACE (GRANTS) Definitions § 21.640 Employee. (a) Employee means the employee of a recipient directly engaged in the performance of work under the award, including—...

  18. 14 CFR 1212.700 - NASA employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false NASA employees. 1212.700 Section 1212.700... Authority and Responsibilities § 1212.700 NASA employees. (a) Each NASA employee is responsible for adhering to the requirements of the Privacy Act and this regulation. (b) An employee shall not seek or...

  19. 29 CFR 516.28 - Tipped employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tipped employees. 516.28 Section 516.28 Labor Regulations... EMPLOYERS Records Pertaining to Employees Subject to Miscellaneous Exemptions Under the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.28 Tipped employees. (a) With respect to each tipped employee whose wages are...

  20. 7 CFR 97.154 - Government employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Government employees. 97.154 Section 97.154... PLANT VARIETY AND PROTECTION Attorneys and Agents § 97.154 Government employees. Officers and employees... eligible to represent applicants, except officers and employees whose official duties require...

  1. 31 CFR 0.107 - Employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employees. 0.107 Section 0.107 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EMPLOYEE RULES OF CONDUCT General Provisions Responsibilities § 0.107 Employees. (a) Employees are required...

  2. 29 CFR 779.114 - Transportation employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transportation employees. 779.114 Section 779.114 Labor... Coverage Employees Engaged in Commerce Or in the Production of Goods for Commerce § 779.114 Transportation employees. Transportation employees of retail businesses, such as truck drivers or truck drivers'...

  3. 49 CFR 199.245 - Contractor employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contractor employees. 199.245 Section 199.245... Prevention Program § 199.245 Contractor employees. (a) With respect to those covered employees who are... Administrator, any DOT agency with regulatory authority over the operator or covered employee, and, if...

  4. 45 CFR 1226.12 - Sponsor employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sponsor employees. 1226.12 Section 1226.12 Public... PROHIBITIONS ON ELECTORAL AND LOBBYING ACTIVITIES Sponsor Employee Activities § 1226.12 Sponsor employees. Sponsor employees whose salaries or other compensation are paid, in whole or in part, with agency...

  5. 25 CFR 700.549 - Employee organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...' constitutional form of government (5 U.S.C. 7311). Employees are also prohibited from striking against the Federal Government. With these restrictions, an employee has the right to form, join, or assist lawful employee organizations. Similarly, an employee has also the right to refrain from such activity. In...

  6. 28 CFR 105.24 - Employee's rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee's rights. 105.24 Section 105.24... Security Officer Employment § 105.24 Employee's rights. An employee is entitled to: (a) Obtain a copy from the authorized employer of any information concerning the employee provided under these regulations...

  7. 5 CFR 9701.507 - Employee rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee rights. 9701.507 Section 9701... RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Labor-Management Relations § 9701.507 Employee rights. Each employee has the... without fear of penalty or reprisal, and each employee must be protected in the exercise of such...

  8. 28 CFR 97.12 - Employee training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee training. 97.12 Section 97.12... OR DETAINEE SERVICES § 97.12 Employee training. Private prisoner transport companies must require the completion of a minimum of 100 hours of employee training before an employee may transport violent...

  9. Adoption of IT within an organization by employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tope Samuel Adeyelure

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available People live currently in a dynamic world where technology is at the center of everything. Organizations implement sophisticated information technologies in their businesses to achieve competitive advantage, and also to achieve their objective goals. Currently, information technologies aid organisation success as they support business processes and operational functions. This has placed a challenge on employees as they find themselves keeping up with the changes. This study will look at how new and changing information technology can be adopted by employees, as the success of implementation of any technology in an organisation lies in employees adapting to the change. The study will be investigated at Fan Milk PLC a leading manufacturer and marketer of healthy, nutritious and safe frozen dairy and non-frozen dairy food products with distribution channels across the length and breadth of Nigeria. The focus will be on factors that influence employee’s adopting changing information technology. User resistance, user acceptance, individual performance, individual experience, level of education and age difference will be the factors to be considered. The positive and negative influence of these factors on an organisation will be determined and discussed in this study.

  10. Wives' Relative Wages, Husbands' Paid Work Hours, and Wives' Labor-Force Exit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Emily Fitzgibbons

    2011-01-01

    Economic theories predict that women are more likely to exit the labor force if their partners' earnings are higher and if their own wage rate is lower. In this article, I use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 2,254) and discrete-time event-history analysis to show that wives' relative wages are more predictive of their exit than are…

  11. Non-lytic, actin-based exit of intracellular parasites from C. elegans intestinal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Kathleen A; Szumowski, Suzannah C; Troemel, Emily R

    2011-09-01

    The intestine is a common site for invasion by intracellular pathogens, but little is known about how pathogens restructure and exit intestinal cells in vivo. The natural microsporidian parasite N. parisii invades intestinal cells of the nematode C. elegans, progresses through its life cycle, and then exits cells in a transmissible spore form. Here we show that N. parisii causes rearrangements of host actin inside intestinal cells as part of a novel parasite exit strategy. First, we show that N. parisii infection causes ectopic localization of the normally apical-restricted actin to the basolateral side of intestinal cells, where it often forms network-like structures. Soon after this actin relocalization, we find that gaps appear in the terminal web, a conserved cytoskeletal structure that could present a barrier to exit. Reducing actin expression creates terminal web gaps in the absence of infection, suggesting that infection-induced actin relocalization triggers gap formation. We show that terminal web gaps form at a distinct stage of infection, precisely timed to precede spore exit, and that all contagious animals exhibit gaps. Interestingly, we find that while perturbations in actin can create these gaps, actin is not required for infection progression or spore formation, but actin is required for spore exit. Finally, we show that despite large numbers of spores exiting intestinal cells, this exit does not cause cell lysis. These results provide insight into parasite manipulation of the host cytoskeleton and non-lytic escape from intestinal cells in vivo.

  12. Wives' Relative Wages, Husbands' Paid Work Hours, and Wives' Labor-Force Exit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Emily Fitzgibbons

    2011-01-01

    Economic theories predict that women are more likely to exit the labor force if their partners' earnings are higher and if their own wage rate is lower. In this article, I use the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 2,254) and discrete-time event-history analysis to show that wives' relative wages are more predictive of their exit than are…

  13. Farm growth and exit: consequences of EU dairy policy reform for Dutch dairy farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peerlings, J.H.M.; Ooms, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse farm growth and exit and its interaction in Dutch dairy farming as consequences of the 2003 CAP reform and 2008 CAP Health Check. Results indicate that the decision to exit dairy farming is largely determined by household characteristics as age and the size of

  14. Firm resource characteristics and human capital as predictors of exit choice: An exploratory study of SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorraine Uhlaner; Lex van Teeffelen

    2013-01-01

    This research focuses on exit choices within SMEs. In this study, “exit choice” refers to the decision to opt for either liquidation or sale of the firm. The predictions focus on human-capital and firm-resource variables. The hypotheses are tested on a set of 158 owners of small firms, the majority

  15. Door locking and exit security measures on acute psychiatric admission wards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijman, H.L.I.; Bowers, L.; Haglund, K.; Muir-Cochrane, E.; Simpson, A.; Merwe, M. van der

    2011-01-01

    Locking the exit doors of psychiatric wards is believed to reduce the risk of patients absconding. The aims of the study were to investigate both the prevalence of door locking and other exit security measures on UK admission wards, as well as whether door locking appears to be effective in keeping

  16. 30 CFR 57.4530 - Exits for surface buildings and structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exits for surface buildings and structures. 57... Fire Prevention and Control Installation/construction/maintenance § 57.4530 Exits for surface buildings and structures. Surface buildings or structures in which persons work shall have a sufficient number...

  17. The EXIT for Prenatally Diagnosed Cervical Cystic Teratoma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Cansaran

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Ex-utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT is a procedure performed during caesarean section while on fetal-placental circulation. We present a prenatally diagnosed cervical cystic mass causing tracheal compression which was managed successfully with the EXIT procedure.

  18. Thermal regime, predation danger and the early marine exit of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katinic, P.J.; Patterson, D.A.; Ydenberg, R.C.

    2015-01-01

    Marine exit timing of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka populations on the Haida Gwaii Archipelago, British Columbia, Canada, is described, with specific focus on Copper Creek. Marine exit in Copper Creek occurs¿>¿130¿days prior to spawning, one of the longest adult freshwater residence periods r

  19. Visual Barriers to Prevent Ambulatory ALzheimer's Patients from Exiting through an Emergency Door.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Kevan H.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Conducted study on Alzheimer's unit to test seven different visual barrier conditions for reducing patient exits. Findings indicated that exiting was eliminated under two conditions. Results suggest visual agnosia, the inability to interpret what the eye sees, may be used as tool in managing wandering behavior of Alzheimer's patients. (Author/NB)

  20. Are happy employees healthy employees? Researching the effects of employee engagement on absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoxsey, Dann

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, a survey was conducted to measure the levels of workplace engagement for British Columbian civil servants. Following the Heskett et al. model of the “service profit chain” (1994, 2002), the government's primary concerns were the increasing attrition rates and their effects on service delivery. Essentially, the model demonstrated that employees who were more engaged were more committed to their work and more likely to stay within the civil service and that this culminated in improved customer service. Under the joint rubrics of absenteeism and job satisfaction, this study uses a construct of engagement (i.e., job satisfaction) to test whether different levels of engagement have any effect on the amount of sick time (absenteeism) an employee incurs. Specifically, the author looks at whether there is any correlation between the amount of sick time used and an individual's level of engagement and proposes that there is an inverse negative relationship: as job engagement increases, sick time used decreases. Testing the old adage “A happy employee is a healthy employee,” this research demonstrates that, though a more engaged employee may use less sick time, the differences in use between highly engaged employees and those not engaged are fairly marginal and that correlations are further confounded by a host of other (often missing) factors.

  1. 29 CFR 1960.59 - Training of employees and employee representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Training of employees and employee representatives. 1960.59... AND HEALTH PROGRAMS AND RELATED MATTERS Training § 1960.59 Training of employees and employee representatives. (a) Each agency shall provide appropriate safety and health training for employees...

  2. Below the Salary Line: Employee Engagement of Non-Salaried Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuck, Brad; Albornoz, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    This exploratory empirical phenomological study looks at employee engagement using Kahn (1990) and Maslow's (1970) motivational theories to understand the experience of non-salaried employees. This study finds four themes that seem to affect employee engagement: work environment, employee's supervisor, individual characteristics of the employee,…

  3. Employee Engagement in Hotel X & Y

    OpenAIRE

    Leppänen, Saara

    2015-01-01

    This thesis studies employee engagement in Hotel X and Y. For small businesses the engagement of employees is very important as this way businesses are able to reduce costs, ensure the professionalism of employees and obtain loyal customers. The research studies the current level of engagement and gives recommendations for further increasing the engagement. The theoretical framework introduces the concept employee engagement through Kahn 1990’s Employee Engagement Model and Maslow’s Hierarchy...

  4. Measuring Employee Engagement in Hotels: Survey Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Kolomiets, Arina

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this thesis are to understand nature of employee engagements, analyse popular theories used to understand this phenomenon and comprehend importance of employee engagement for organization; as well as to analyse Employee Engagement Survey conducted by leading hospitality organization, question its effectiveness and propose suggestion to improve measuring process of employee engagement to ensure live, valid data, thus the managers can understand where their employees stand in ...

  5. Business Ethics & Employee Turnover: CAFE Matrix

    OpenAIRE

    Sapovadia, Vrajlal; Patel, Sweta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: Business ethics is in discussion for its importance universally, so is the employee turnover in business. Unethical practices are unwanted, so is the high employee turnover. Unethical practices and high employee turnover in business is ubiquitous. No consensus exists on defining ethics. Employee turnover is well defined, but there is no consensus on when employee turnover is disadvantageous for the company. The Golden Rule or ethic of reciprocity, a maxim states that either ...

  6. Age differences in workplace intervention effects on employees' nighttime and daytime sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soomi; Almeida, David M; Berkman, Lisa; Olson, Ryan; Moen, Phyllis; Buxton, Orfeu M

    2016-12-01

    To examine the effects of a workplace flexibility/support intervention on employees' sleep quantity and quality during nights and days and whether the effects differ by employee age. Cluster-randomized controlled trial. Information technology industry workplaces. US employees (Mage = 46.9 years) at an information technology firm who provided actigraphy at baseline and a 12-month follow-up (N = 396; n = 195 intervention, n = 201 control). The Work, Family, and Health Study intervention aimed to increase workplace flexibility and support. The intervention consisted of facilitated discussions to help employees increase control over when and where they work as well as manager-specific training sessions to increase manager support for employees' work-family issues. Nighttime sleep duration, wake after sleep onset (WASO), and nap duration were measured with wrist actigraphy. Day-to-day variability in these variables (min(2)) was also estimated. Intervention employees increased nighttime sleep duration at 12 months, by 9 minutes per day, relative to control employees. There were interaction effects between the intervention and age on daytime nap duration and day-to-day variability in WASO. Older employees (56-70 years) in the intervention condition decreased nap duration at 12 months relative to older employees in the control condition. Older employees in the intervention condition also exhibited a greater decrease in day-to-day variability of WASO at 12 months compared with their baseline. The workplace flexibility/support intervention was effective in enhancing employees' sleep health by increasing nighttime sleep duration. Furthermore, the intervention was particularly effective for older employees in decreasing their daytime nap duration and day-to-day variability in WASO.

  7. Dropped out or pushed out? Insurance market exit and provider market power in Medicare Advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelech, Daria

    2016-11-30

    This paper explores how provider and insurer market power affect which markets an insurer chooses to operate in. A 2011 policy change required that certain private insurance plans in Medicare form provider networks de novo; in response, insurers cancelled two-thirds of the affected plans. Using detailed data on pre-policy provider and insurer market structure, I compare markets where insurers built networks to those they exited. Overall, insurers in the most concentrated hospital and physician markets were 9 and 13 percentage points more likely to exit, respectively, than those in the least concentrated markets. Conversely, insurers with more market power were less likely to exit than those with less, and an insurer's market power had the largest effect on exit in concentrated hospital markets. These findings suggest that concentrated provider markets contribute to insurer exit and that insurers with less market power have more difficulty surviving in concentrated provider markets.

  8. Aggregating job exit statuses of a plurality of compute nodes executing a parallel application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aho, Michael E.; Attinella, John E.; Gooding, Thomas M.; Mundy, Michael B.

    2015-07-21

    Aggregating job exit statuses of a plurality of compute nodes executing a parallel application, including: identifying a subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer to execute the parallel application; selecting one compute node in the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer as a job leader compute node; initiating execution of the parallel application on the subset of compute nodes; receiving an exit status from each compute node in the subset of compute nodes, where the exit status for each compute node includes information describing execution of some portion of the parallel application by the compute node; aggregating each exit status from each compute node in the subset of compute nodes; and sending an aggregated exit status for the subset of compute nodes in the parallel computer.

  9. Unveiling Leadership–Employee Performance Links: Perspective of Young Employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tehmina Fiaz Qazi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the impact of leadership style practiced by managers on their subordinates’ job performance. Emotional Intelligence of the employees has been considered as a moderator to the leadership-performance relationship. Self-administered questionnaire survey was conducted from convenient sampled 100 young employees of telecom and banking sector. They were asked to respond about their perception regarding their manager’s leadership style, job performance and their perceived level of emotional intelligence. 77 out of 100 distributed questionnaires were received back completely filled that yield response rate of 77%. Current research concluded that the style of leadership exhibited by a manager is significantly associated with the subordinates’ job performance while emotional intelligence of employees has no moderating effect on this leadership- performance relationship

  10. Compact Fixed-exit UHV DCM for XAFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickers, K.; Brüggmann, U.; Drube, W.; Herrmann, M.; Heuer, J.; Welter, E.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.; Schulz-Ritter, H.

    2007-01-01

    A double-crystal, UHV-compatible monochromator for XAFS applications at bending magnet beamlines has been designed. It uses two crystal sets, Si(111) and (311), on a common central rotation axis driven by an ex-vacuo goniometer. All mechanical and electrical components are mounted on a 400 mm UHV flange which is attached to a compact vacuum chamber. The first crystals are water cooled using connector- and bellowless tubing through the fluidic sealed feedthrough of the central rotation. The first crystal set is mounted off-axis and can be translated vertically to keep the fixed exit condition. The second crystal set uses small crystals of the same size as the first. In order to accept the reflected beam of the first crystal at small Bragg angles, it is tangentially translated along the beam. The angle can be varied from 5° to 55.5° resulting in a total energy range 2.4 - 43.4 keV for Si(111)/(311). Crystal sets are interchangeable by translating the vacuum chamber. Angle encoding is achieved by a Renishaw incremental optical encoder in vacuo.

  11. LTE1 promotes exit from mitosis by multiple mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Jill E; Campbell, Ian W; Joyce, Kelsey; Whalen, Jenna; Seshan, Anupama; Amon, Angelika

    2016-12-15

    In budding yeast, alignment of the anaphase spindle along the mother-bud axis is crucial for maintaining genome integrity. If the anaphase spindle becomes misaligned in the mother cell compartment, cells arrest in anaphase because the mitotic exit network (MEN), an essential Ras-like GTPase signaling cascade, is inhibited by the spindle position checkpoint (SPoC). Distinct localization patterns of MEN and SPoC components mediate MEN inhibition. Most components of the MEN localize to spindle pole bodies. If the spindle becomes mispositioned in the mother cell compartment, cells arrest in anaphase due to inhibition of the MEN by the mother cell-restricted SPoC kinase Kin4. Here we show that a bud-localized activating signal is necessary for full MEN activation. We identify Lte1 as this signal and show that Lte1 activates the MEN in at least two ways. It inhibits small amounts of Kin4 that are present in the bud via its central domain. An additional MEN-activating function of Lte1 is mediated by its N- and C-terminal GEF domains, which, we propose, directly activate the MEN GTPase Tem1. We conclude that control of the MEN by spindle position is exerted by both negative and positive regulatory elements that control the pathway's GTPase activity.

  12. Exiting Lepušićeva: Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela Dolenec

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article “Exiting Lepušićeva?” Kasapović engages once again with the very important issue of critical evaluation of the development of political science in Croatia, with a particular focus on the status of comparative politics within the discipline. The author takes an outside perspective in the approach to the analysis of the reasons why Croatia can rarely be found in international comparative studies, and inquires into the reasons why political scientists abroad, involved in large-scale international research programs, rarely include Croatia as one of their case studies? In addition to Kasapović’s argument, I begin by summing up the main problems, and afterwards I argue that the development of empirical political science in Croatia takes place in the absence of a comprehensive Science and research policy on the national level, but also in the context of insufficient concern of the scientists themselves for the conditions of knowledge production and the mechanisms of reproduction of the discipline.

  13. Entrance and Exit CSR Impedance for Non-Ultrarelativistic Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Rui; Tsai, Cheng Ying [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    For a high-brightness electron beam being transported through beamlines involving bending systems, the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and longitudinal space charge (LSC) interaction could often cause microbunching instability. The semi-analytical Vlasov solver for microbunching gain* depends on the impedances for the relevant collective effects. The existing results for CSR impedances are usually obtained for the ultrarelativistic limit. To extend the microbunching analysis to cases of low energies, such as the case of an ERL merger, or to density modulations at extremely small wavelength, it is necessary to extend the impedance analysis to the non-ultrarelativistic regime. In this study, we present the impedance analysis for the transient CSR interaction in the non-ultrarelativistic regime, for transients including both entrance to and exit from a magnetic dipole. These impedance results will be compared to their ultra-relativistic counterparts**, and the corresponding wakefield obtained from the impedance for low-energy beams will be compared with the existing results of transient CSR wakefield for general beam energies***.

  14. Mean Exit Time and Survival Probability within the CTRW Formalism

    CERN Document Server

    Montero, M; Montero, Miquel; Masoliver, Jaume

    2006-01-01

    An intense research on financial market microstructure is presently in progress. Continuous time random walks (CTRWs) are general models capable to capture the small-scale properties that high frequency data series show. The use of CTRW models in the analysis of financial problems is quite recent and their potentials have not been fully developed. Here we present two (closely related) applications of great interest in risk control. In the first place, we will review the problem of modelling the behaviour of the mean exit time (MET) of a process out of a given region of fixed size. The surveyed stochastic processes are the cumulative returns of asset prices. The link between the value of the MET and the timescale of the market fluctuations of a certain degree is crystal clear. In this sense, MET value may help, for instance, in deciding the optimal time horizon for the investment. The MET is, however, one among the statistics of a distribution of bigger interest: the survival probability (SP), the likelihood t...

  15. Exposure to violence in adolescence and precocious role exits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynie, Dana L; Petts, Richard J; Maimon, David; Piquero, Alex R

    2009-03-01

    Exposure to violence is a serious public health concern that compromises adolescents by affecting their behavior and psychological well-being. The current study advances knowledge about the consequences of exposure to violence in adolescence by applying a life course perspective to evaluate the developmental implications of adolescents' exposure to violence. In particular, drawing on a sample of 11,949 school-aged adolescents in the U.S., we examine whether exposure to violence in adolescence is associated with precocious role exits that some adolescents experience. Exposure to violence is conceptualized as including both direct (i.e., experiencing physical victimization) and indirect exposure (i.e., witnessing others' victimization). Three types of direct exposure to violence are examined: street, intimate partner, and family victimization, as well as four types of indirect exposure including: street, peer, and school violence as well as exposure to family/friend suicide. Using three waves of longitudinal data from the Add Health Study, we find that exposure to violence is associated with greater risks of running away from home, dropping out of high school, having a child, attempting suicide, and coming into contact with the criminal justice system in later adolescence. In addition, risks depend upon the relational context in which the exposure to violence occurred, risks increase with greater exposure to violence, and risks are, for the most part, highest for those youth exposed to both indirect and direct violence in adolescence.

  16. Inflation with a graceful exit in a random landscape

    CERN Document Server

    Pedro, Francisco G

    2016-01-01

    We develop a stochastic description of small-field inflationary histories with a graceful exit in a random potential whose Hessian is a Gaussian random matrix as a model of the unstructured part of the string landscape. The dynamical evolution in such a random potential from a small-field inflation region towards a viable late-time de Sitter (dS) minimum maps to the dynamics of Dyson Brownian motion describing the relaxation of non-equilibrium eigenvalue spectra in random matrix theory. We analytically compute the relaxation probability in a saddle point approximation of the partition function of the eigenvalue distribution of the Wigner ensemble describing the mass matrices of the critical points. When applied to small-field inflation in the landscape, this leads to an exponentially strong bias against small-field ranges and an upper bound $N\\ll 10$ on the number of light fields $N$ participating during inflation from the non-observation of negative spatial curvature.

  17. OPERATORS ON CORNER MANIFOLDS WITH EXIT TO INFINITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D. Calvo; B. W. Schulze

    2006-01-01

    We study (pseudo-)differential operators on a manifold with edge Z,locally modelled on a wedge with model cone that has itself a base manifold W with smooth edge Y. The typical operators A are corner degenerate in a specific way. They (σψ (A), σ∧ (A), σ∧ (A)), where σψ is the interior symbol and σ∧ (A)(y, η), (y, η) ∈ T*Y\\0,weighted Sobolev spaces on the infinite cone with base W. Since such a cone has edges with exit to infinity, the calculus has the problem to understand the behaviour of operators on a manifold of that kind.We show the continuity of corner-degenerate operators in weighted edge Sobolev spaces, and we investigate the ellipticity of edge symbols of second generation. Starting from parameter-dependent elliptic families of edge operators of first generation, we obtain the Fredholm property of higher edge symbols on the corresponding singular infinite model cone.

  18. POD- Mapping and analysis of hydroturbine exit flow dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Morten; Finstad, Pal Henrik

    2012-11-01

    Pairwise radial dynamic measurements of the swirling draft tube flow have been made at the 25 MW Svorka power plant in Surnadal operating at 48% load at 6 radial and 7 angular positions. The data is analyzed with traditional methods as well as with POD. The measurements were made in the turbine draft tube/exit flow in an axial measurement plane about 1200mm downstream the turbine runner. The draft tube diameter in the measurement plane is about 1300mm. The flow rate during measurements was close to 5.8m3/s. Two probes were used; both of length Le=700 mm and made of stainless steel with an outer diameter of Do=20 mm and inner diameter Di=4mm. At the end of each probe a full bridge cylindrical KULITE xcl152, 0-3.5, was mounted. 90 seconds samples at 10 kS/s were taken. The POD analysis largely follows that of Tutkun et al. (see e.g. AIAA J., 45,5,2008). The analysis shows that 26% of the pressure pulsation energy can be addressed to azimuthal mode 1. The work has been supported by Energy Norway.

  19. Core compressor exit stage study. 1: Aerodynamic and mechanical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdsall, E. A.; Canal, E., Jr.; Lyons, K. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of aspect ratio on the performance of core compressor exit stages was demonstrated using two three stage, highly loaded, core compressors. Aspect ratio was identified as having a strong influence on compressors endwall loss. Both compressors simulated the last three stages of an advanced eight stage core compressor and were designed with the same 0.915 hub/tip ratio, 4.30 kg/sec (9.47 1bm/sec) inlet corrected flow, and 167 m/sec (547 ft/sec) corrected mean wheel speed. The first compressor had an aspect ratio of 0.81 and an overall pressure ratio of 1.357 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.3% with an average diffusion factor or 0.529. The aspect ratio of the second compressor was 1.22 with an overall pressure ratio of 1.324 at a design adiabatic efficiency of 88.7% with an average diffusion factor of 0.491.

  20. [Bullous rash around a peritoneal dialysis catheter exit site].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasset, F; Pecquet, C; Cury, K; Sesé, L; Moguelet, P; Francès, C; Gharbi, C; Senet, P

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous eruption around a peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter exit site is a rare complication. Herein we report a case of bullous eruption; we discuss the diagnostic approach and the related therapeutic implications. A 63-year-old man presented a bullous periumbilical eruption two months after initiation of PD. Cultures of laboratory samples ruled out an infectious origin and systemic corticosteroids initiated at 0.5mg/kg for suspected eosinophilic peritonitis produced significant improvement of the cutaneous eruption. Recurrence of the bullous eruption was observed upon dose-reduction of the corticosteroid. Skin histology showed a clinical picture of eczema and direct immunofluorescence was negative. Patch testing was carried out using the European Standard Battery comprising antiseptic, cosmetic and plastic series; a semi-open test was performed with the dressing used for PD, and ROAT was carried out on the povidone iodine (Betadine™) 10% used for topical care during PD. The patch testing and ROAT were positive (++), confirming contact dermatitis due to Betadine™. The eruption totally disappeared on substitution of Betadine™ by chlorhexidine for topical antisepsis of the PD catheter, thus enabling PD to be continued rather than instituting hemodialysis. Allergic contact dermatitis around a PD catheter is a rare and little-known complication. In the present case, ROAT testing showed sensitization to Betadine™ and enabled an alternative antisepsis solution to be found, allowing PD to be continued. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. A comparison of two nursing program exit exams that predict first-time NCLEX-RN outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, Lisa D; Mills, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    This retrospective descriptive correlational study compared the predictive accuracy of the Health Education Systems, Inc, Exit Exam (Elsevier) and Assessment Technologies Institute's RN Comprehensive Predictor, both of which were administered to nursing students in an upper-division baccalaureate nursing program during their final semester of study. Using logistic regression analyses, it was determined that the two examinations were statistically significant but weak predictors of success on the RN licensure examination. The RN Comprehensive Predictor had a slightly better odds ratio; however, both examinations had similar sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy. Because the RN Comprehensive Predictor was included in the Assessment Technologies Institute's Comprehensive Assessment and Review Program already being used by the BSN program, based on the results of this study, the nursing faculty decided to use only the RN Comprehensive Predictor during its NCLEX-RN preparation course.

  2. Firm-level innovation activity, employee turnover and HRM practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor; Qin, Zhihua; Wang, Wenjing

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between employee turnover, HRM practices and innovation in Chinese firms in five high technology sectors. We estimate hurdle negative binomial models for count data on survey data allowing for analyses of the extensive as well as intensive margins of firms....... Innovating firms are more likely to have adopted high performance HRM practices, and the impact of employee turnover varies with the number of HRM practices implemented by the firm......' innovation activities. Innovation is measured both by the number of ongoing projects and new commercialized products. The results show that higher R&D employee turnover is associated with a higher probability of being innovative, but decreases the intensity of innovation activities in innovating firms...

  3. Making Sense of Employee Discourses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mona Agerholm

    In response to the growing interest in the field of organizational identification and the analysis of employee attachment in organizations, this paper presents a multidimensional reception model for analyzing the level of employee identification with corporate value statements. The identification...... model extends a multidimensional model for media reception originally proposed by Schrøder in the field of media reception studies. The proposed model combines the reception dimensions Comprehension, Discrimination, Implementation, Motivation, and Position. This model allows the analysis...... of the complexity, nuances and diversities of employee identification with corporate texts in organizations. In addition to this, the model may help to uncover the positive and negative factors that influence the identification level....

  4. Employee-Driven Innovation (EDI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Ulhøi, John Parm

      The responsibility to be innovative and think of useful ideas and the privilege of making decisions in processes of innovation are typically restricted to specifically assigned R&D functions and/or upper echelon managers. Given the importance of innovation to most organizations, it may seem...... illogical to reserve such a 'license' to so few individuals. This paper argues that some parts of that license should indeed be extended to include 'ordinary' employees, as they are potential drivers of innovation. Research on Employee Driven Innovation (EDI) is still at its beginnings. In the paper we...... outline the 'grand structure' of the phenomenon in order to identify underlying processes as well as the most relevant drivers of EDI. Based on these insights we identify open research questions and make suggestions for the next steps. Our main argument is that 'ordinary' employees can specially...

  5. (Mis)managing employee motivation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Hvidtved, Johan; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    Motivated employees are crucial to all organizations, but some management initiatives may actually decrease motivation. Motivation crowding theory thus expects that command and incentives – if they are perceived as controlling - crowd out intrinsic motivation. The perception is thus expected...... to be vital, and this paper investigates how the perception of a specific command system – obligatory student plans – is associated with two types of employee motivation (public service motivation and intrinsic task motivation). Using a dataset with 3439 school teachers in Denmark, the analysis shows...... that the perception of obligatory student plans as controlling is negatively associated with different types of employee motivation, indicating that motivation crowding happens. Although the strength of the associations varies between the investigated types of motivation, the findings imply that practitioners should...

  6. (Mis)managing employee motivation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Hvidtved, Johan; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    Motivated employees are crucial to all organizations, but some management initiatives may actually decrease motivation. Motivation crowding theory thus expects that command and incentives – if they are perceived as controlling - crowd out intrinsic motivation. The perception is thus expected...... to be vital, and this paper investigates how the perception of a specific command system – obligatory student plans – is associated with two types of employee motivation (public service motivation and intrinsic task motivation). Using a dataset with 3439 school teachers in Denmark, the analysis shows...... that the perception of obligatory student plans as controlling is negatively associated with different types of employee motivation, indicating that motivation crowding happens. Although the strength of the associations varies between the investigated types of motivation, the findings imply that practitioners should...

  7. Employee share ownership in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortlieb, Renate; Matiaske, Wenzel; Fietze, Simon

    2016-01-01

    on an institutional theoretical framework, this article examines what aims firms pursue through the provision of ESO. The data originate from a survey of firms in Germany. The cluster analytic findings indicate distinctive patterns of relationships between aims and firm characteristics. Aims related to employee...... performance are most important to foreign-owned firms, financial aims are most important to non-public small and medium-sized firms and aims related to corporate image are most important to big firms and to firms that do not provide profit sharing. Aims related to employee attraction and retention are almost...

  8. Exploring Employee Engagement from the Employee Perspective: Implications for HRD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuck, M. Brad; Rocco, Tonette S.; Albornoz, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine an employee's unique experience of being engaged in their work. Design/methodology/approach: Following Yin's case study design method, researchers collected documents, conducted semi-structured interviews and recorded observations at a large multinational service corporation ranked as one of the…

  9. EMPLOYEE RETENTION: COMPONENTS OF JOB SATISFACTION OF GREEN INDUSTRY EMPLOYEES

    OpenAIRE

    Bitsch, Vera; Hogberg, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Fourteen businesses participated in case studies of labor management practices. Fifteen non-supervisory employee interviews were analyzed regarding components of job satisfaction. Components were family values, achievement, recognition, work itself, involvement, personal life, interpersonal relationships, job security, supervision, working conditions, organization, safety, compensation and information.

  10. GUTKA-A MALIGNANT ENTITY SEEKS BENIGN EXIT IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kharat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Tobacco and its products have been a household entit y since a long time specially in Indian houses either as a pride to be snuffed thr ough the pipes or the traditional hookahs by the rajas maharajas, or if not through the smoke it took place in many untowardly customs and rituals associated. It has spread through the subcon tinent, and even to the other countries. Promoted by a slick and many- tentacled advertising campaign, gutka, an indigenous form of smokeless tobacco, has become a fixture in the mout hs of millions of Indians over the last two decades. But what has prompted particular concern her e is the way that in the last 10 years, gutka as portable as chewing gum and sometimes as sw eet as candy has found its way into the mouths of Indian children. Out of fad and style quo tient, it made its way in exchange of mere money in pockets of many turning into one of the maj or concerns for health problems particularly in India. Various social workers and he alth professionals have urged for ban of tobacco products, especially the gutka as it is the n eed of the hour to stop chewing to avoid future regret of oral health. In that context, gove rnment too is starting a ban of sale and supply of such products considering the youth in terms of its addiction and child labour associated. However, with the increasing awareness regarding it s pros and cons, alarming many of this fad, it’s slowly and gradually making its way to exit to create smiles with disease and addiction free life to man

  11. Resolving the time when an electron exits a tunnelling barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafir, Dror; Soifer, Hadas; Bruner, Barry D; Dagan, Michal; Mairesse, Yann; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Ivanov, Misha Yu; Smirnova, Olga; Dudovich, Nirit

    2012-05-16

    The tunnelling of a particle through a barrier is one of the most fundamental and ubiquitous quantum processes. When induced by an intense laser field, electron tunnelling from atoms and molecules initiates a broad range of phenomena such as the generation of attosecond pulses, laser-induced electron diffraction and holography. These processes evolve on the attosecond timescale (1 attosecond ≡ 1 as = 10(-18) seconds) and are well suited to the investigation of a general issue much debated since the early days of quantum mechanics--the link between the tunnelling of an electron through a barrier and its dynamics outside the barrier. Previous experiments have measured tunnelling rates with attosecond time resolution and tunnelling delay times. Here we study laser-induced tunnelling by using a weak probe field to steer the tunnelled electron in the lateral direction and then monitor the effect on the attosecond light bursts emitted when the liberated electron re-encounters the parent ion. We show that this approach allows us to measure the time at which the electron exits from the tunnelling barrier. We demonstrate the high sensitivity of the measurement by detecting subtle delays in ionization times from two orbitals of a carbon dioxide molecule. Measurement of the tunnelling process is essential for all attosecond experiments where strong-field ionization initiates ultrafast dynamics. Our approach provides a general tool for time-resolving multi-electron rearrangements in atoms and molecules--one of the key challenges in ultrafast science.

  12. Influences of exit and stair conditions on human evacuation in a dormitory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wenjun; Li, Angui; Gao, Ran; Wang, Xiaowei

    2012-12-01

    Evacuation processes of students are investigated by experiment and simulation. The experiment is performed for students evacuating from a dormitory with an exit and stairs. FDS+Evac is proposed to simulate the exit and stair dynamics of occupant evacuation. Concerning the exit and stair widths, we put forward some useful standpoints. Good agreement is achieved between the predicted results and experimental results. With the increase of exit width, a significant stratification phenomenon will be found in flow rate. Stratification phenomenon is that two different stable flow rates will emerge during the evacuation. And the flow rate curve looks like a ladder. The larger the exit width, the earlier the stratification phenomenon appears. When exit width is more than 2.0 m, the flow rate of each exit width is divided into two stable stages, and the evacuation times show almost no change. The judgment that the existence of stairs causes flow stratification is reasonable. By changing the width of the stairs, we proved that judgment. The smaller the width of BC, the earlier the stratification appears. We found that scenario 5 is the most adverse circumstance. Those results are helpful in performance-based design of buildings.

  13. Mechanics of sequential jamming and unjamming phenomena in a multi-exit orifice silo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunte, Amit; Orpe, Ashish; Doshi, Pankaj

    2013-11-01

    We have investigated the flow of a two dimensional granular assembly draining through a flat bottomed silo having multiple exit orifices using DEM simulations. The width of the central orifice of the silo is fixed at 3 . 5 d which is small enough to cause jamming (or no-flow) through the orifice. Here d is the mean particle diameter. The width of the other nearby orifices is kept much more than 3 . 5 d , thus, ensuring continuous flow of particles through them. Interestingly, this continuous flow of particles in the vicinity interacts with the assembly of jammed particles above the central orifice causing rearrangements and ultimately unjamming the assembly leading to a smooth flow. During the entire drainage of the silo, the central orifice undergoes this sequence of jamming-unjamming event several times, the frequency of which depends on its proximity to the nearby orifices. We focus primarily on understanding this jamming-unjamming transition by investigating the contact force network and the normal force distributions. Our preliminary results show that the tails of the force distributions in the jammed region decay slower than those for the flowing regions. This qualitative behaviour is found to be independent of any prior rearrangement history. Department of Science and Technology, India, (Grant No. SR/S3/CE/037/2009).

  14. Bionic approach for the prevention of exit-site infections of percutaneous devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großhauser, Johannes; Reiter, Katja; Große-Siestrup, Christian; Kikhney, Judith; Kertzscher, Ulrich; Affeld, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    Exit-site infections remain one of the main complications for percutaneous devices, such as catheters for peritoneal dialysis or drivelines for ventricular assist devices. Many efforts have been made to create a biological seal, yet without long-term success. This study investigates a new kind of percutaneous device which is coated with an extricable polymeric membrane. The bionic approach applies the naturally outwards directed growth of skin structures to technology: by pulling the protective membrane it slowly grows out of the body and a developing sulcus is exposed to dry air and an infection is avoided. In a feasibility study this kind of device was shown to reduce the rate of infection. To further investigate these devices, they were implanted in the skin of goats and observed for a period of more than 500 days. The membranes were pulled with a force of up to 2 N and the resulting movement was recorded. When being pulled, the membranes moved 0.4-0.9 mm per week, showing that the application of a continuously acting, defined force on the protective membrane causes the desired slow movement.

  15. Managing employee motivation: Exploring the connections between managers' enforcement actions, employee perceptions, and employee intrinsic motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Maria Falk; Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    2017-01-01

    ” enforcement of a command system (obligatory teacher-produced student plans) is associated with teacher intrinsic motivation. Results show that teachers experiencing a “hard” enforcement have lower intrinsic motivation than teachers experiencing a “soft” enforcement. As expected by motivation crowding theory......A number of studies show that the use of external interventions, such as command systems and economic incentives, can decrease employee intrinsic motivation. Our knowledge of why the size of “the hidden cost of rewards” differs between organizations is, however, still sparse. In this paper, we...... analyze whether local managers—the primary enforcers of external interventions—affect how employees perceive a command system and thereby affect employee intrinsic motivation. Using a multilevel dataset of 1,190 teachers and 32 school principals, we test whether principals’ use of “hard”, “mixed” or “soft...

  16. Can exit prizes induce lame ducks to shirk less? Experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Helland

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Elected representatives serving their final period face only weak incentives to provide costly effort. However, overlapping generations (OLG models suggest that exit prizes sustained by trigger strategies can induce representatives in their final period to provide such effort. We evaluate this hypothesis using a simple OLG public good experiment, the central treatment being whether exit prizes are permitted. We find that a significantly higher number of subjects in their final period contribute when exit prizes are permitted. However, this result does not originate from use of trigger strategies. More likely explanations include gift-exchange and focal-point effects.

  17. Jet engine nozzle exit configurations, including projections oriented relative to pylons, and associated systems and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengle, Vinod G. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Nozzle exit configurations and associated systems and methods are disclosed. An aircraft system in accordance with one embodiment includes a jet engine exhaust nozzle having an internal flow surface and an exit aperture, with the exit aperture having a perimeter that includes multiple projections extending in an aft direction. Aft portions of individual neighboring projections are spaced apart from each other by a gap, and a geometric feature of the multiple can change in a monotonic manner along at least a portion of the perimeter. Projections near a support pylon and/or associated heat shield can have particular configurations, including greater flow immersion than other projections.

  18. Mean Exit Time and Escape Probability for a Tumor Growth System under Non-Gaussian Noise

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Jian; Gao, Ting; Kan, Xingye; Duan, Jinqiao

    2011-01-01

    Effects of non-Gaussian $\\alpha-$stable L\\'evy noise on the Gompertz tumor growth model are quantified by considering the mean exit time and escape probability of the cancer cell density from inside a safe or benign domain. The mean exit time and escape probability problems are formulated in a differential-integral equation with a fractional Laplacian operator. Numerical simulations are conducted to evaluate how the mean exit time and escape probability vary or bifurcates when $\\alpha$ changes. Some bifurcation phenomena are observed and their impacts are discussed.

  19. Static performance of an axisymmetric nozzle with post-exit vanes for multiaxis thrust vectoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Mason, Mary L.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the static test facility of the Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel to determine the flow-turning capability and the nozzle internal performance of an axisymmetric convergent-divergent nozzle with post-exit vanes installed for multiaxis thrust vectoring. The effects of vane curvature, vane location relative to the nozzle exit, number of vanes, and vane deflection angle were determined. A comparison of the post-exit-vane thrust-vectoring concept with other thrust-vectoring concepts is provided. All tests were conducted with no external flow, and nozzle pressure ratio was varied from 1.6 to 6.0.

  20. Organizational Silence in Sports Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastug, Gulsum; Pala, Adem; Yilmaz, Taner; Duyan, Mehdi; Gunel, Ilker

    2016-01-01

    Organizational silence can be defined as a way of behaviour belonging to men and women employees in the organization exhibited without reflecting their feelings, ideas, concerns and suggestions related with their workplaces, works for which they are responsible or other activities of the organization. In the period of organizational silence,…

  1. SEA - A Simplified Employee Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, L

    2001-04-23

    This paper presents a proposal for modifying the current employee annual evaluation process in SCAD. It purports to simplify that process, primarily by breaking up the resultant document into a set of more or less independent components. It claims to reduce the overall time and effort required from each actor.

  2. Employees in Total Quality Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Matlhape

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Companies have become very disillusioned with Total Quality Management (TQM as a solution to their quality related problems. Part of the problem has been that companies' expectations from TQM is as a solution to their existing problems rather than as a new philosophy towards creating value for shareholders, employees, and customers. Employee involvement is usually the element in the TQM philosophy that is most difficult to manage. Central to employee participation within the TQM philosophy is teamwork. In the attempt to facilitate total quality management, this article explores specific South African challenges to achieving this. These areaffirmative action and divers ity management skills shortages, training and development low levels of employee well-being. Working with people requires fundamental understanding of the uniqueness of each individual with their own identity and set of preferences. It also requires an understanding of teams and the mechanisms of making a group of individuals work well or poorly together. This will assist managers to realise active participation, quality output from their workers through individualised, and team based motivational processes.

  3. How Employee Turnover Affects Productivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Bo

    Research on employee turnover suggests that turnover results in negative organization-level outcomes. This paper provides a firm-level analysis of the impact of the in- and outflows of human resources on productivity and how the presence of organizational slack resources moderates the effects...

  4. Involving Employees in Strategy innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ole Uhrskov; Koch, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Strategy as a practice and continuous innovation approaches are combined to conceptualise dilemmas of short versus long term and to analyse a case of employee participation as a particular example of strategy innovation. The case is a medium size textile company developing its strategy involving...

  5. Teaching Employees to Solve Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lauren E.; Feggestad, Kurt

    1987-01-01

    John Deere's systematic problem-solving training for its employees is applicable in the vocational classroom. The process includes stating the problem, writing its specifications, identifying distinctions, determining changes that occurred at the time, identifying possible causes, testing the possibilities, verifying the most probable cause, and…

  6. Association Between Health Plan Exit From Medicaid Managed Care and Quality of Care, 2006-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndumele, Chima D; Schpero, William L; Schlesinger, Mark J; Trivedi, Amal N

    2017-06-27

    State Medicaid programs have increasingly contracted with insurers to provide medical care services for enrollees (Medicaid managed care plans). Insurers that provide these plans can exit Medicaid programs each year, with unclear effects on quality of care and health care experiences. To determine the frequency and interstate variation of health plan exit from Medicaid managed care and evaluate the relationship between health plan exit and market-level quality. Retrospective cohort of all comprehensive Medicaid managed care plans (N = 390) during the interval 2006-2014. Plan exit, defined as the withdrawal of a managed care plan from a state's Medicaid program. Eight measures from the Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set were used to construct 3 composite indicators of quality (preventive care, chronic disease care management, and maternity care). Four measures from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems were combined into a composite indicator of patient experience, reflecting the proportion of beneficiaries rating experiences as 8 or above on a 0-to-10-point scale. Outcome data were available for 248 plans (68% of plans operating prior to 2014, representing 78% of beneficiaries). Of the 366 comprehensive Medicaid managed care plans operating prior to 2014, 106 exited Medicaid. These exiting plans enrolled 4 848 310 Medicaid beneficiaries, with a mean of 606 039 beneficiaries affected by plan exits annually. Six states had a mean of greater than 10% of Medicaid managed care recipients enrolled in plans that exited, whereas 10 states experienced no plan exits. Plans that exited from a state's Medicaid market performed significantly worse prior to exiting than those that remained in terms of preventive care (57.5% vs 60.4%; difference, 2.9% [95% CI, 0.3% to 5.5%]), maternity care (69.7% vs 73.6%; difference, 3.8% [95% CI, 1.7% to 6.0%]), and patient experience (73.5% vs 74.8%; difference, 1.3% [95% CI, 0.6% to 1

  7. 10 CFR 431.204 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of illuminated exit signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... consumption of illuminated exit signs. 431.204 Section 431.204 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Illuminated Exit Signs Test Procedures § 431.204 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy consumption of illuminated exit...

  8. Employee Driven Innovation in Team (EDIT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Marianne; Bloch-Poulsen, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    through strengthening dialogue in team based organizations" funded by the Danish Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation. 18 teams from one public and two private organizations participated in the project. The article defines the concept of employee driven innovation (EDI) in relation to theories...... Dialogic Helicopter Team Meetings (DHTM) with a dissensus approach. During the action research process, it became important to organize a special kind of DHTMs as a supplement to ordinary team action meetings close to day-to-day operations, but separated in time and space. They focus on how to improve...... existing organizational routines and work practice in order to produce value for the organization, better work flow, and improved work life quality. These meetings are discussed in relation to similar organizational constructs within Scandinavian action research. The action research process made it clear...

  9. Employee Capital:Resource or Reoccurring Nightmare

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, James Peter

    2005-01-01

    Employee capital need not be a reoccurring nightmare for bar owners if they create a system for managing their employee capital which deals with recruitment, placement, training and development for all hospitality staff members.

  10. The "Seven Cs" for Employee Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Sherrie Gong

    2001-01-01

    Defines the "Seven Cs," traditional yet effective business fundamentals used to engage employees. Discusses how many companies are leveraging the basics of good employee relations in order to inspire staff productivity and loyalty. (GCP)

  11. The "Seven Cs" for Employee Retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Sherrie Gong

    2001-01-01

    Defines the "Seven Cs," traditional yet effective business fundamentals used to engage employees. Discusses how many companies are leveraging the basics of good employee relations in order to inspire staff productivity and loyalty. (GCP)

  12. Improve employee engagement to retain your workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullar, Jessica M; Amick, Benjamin C; Brewer, Shelley; Diamond, Pamela M; Kelder, Steven H; Mikhail, Osama

    2016-01-01

    Turnover hurts patient care quality and is expensive to hospitals. Improved employee engagement could encourage employees to stay at their organization. The aim of the study was to test whether participants in an employee engagement program were less likely than nonparticipants to leave their job. Health care workers (primarily patient care technicians and assistants, n = 216) were recruited to participate in an engagement program that helps employees find meaning and connection in their work. Using human resources data, we created a longitudinal study to compare participating versus nonparticipating employees in the same job titles on retention time (i.e., termination risk). Participants were less likely to leave the hospital compared to nonparticipating employees (hazard ratio = 0.22, 95% CI [0.11, 0.84]). This finding remained significant after adjusting for covariates (hazard ratio = 0.37, 95% CI [0.17, 0.57]). Improving employee engagement resulted in employees staying longer at the hospital.

  13. Developing Your Employee Handbook: Job Descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Joe

    1988-01-01

    A job description is a brief document that conveys to employees the importance of their jobs to the overall success of the day-care center. If properly written, it can contribute to effective employee motivation and supervision. (RJC)

  14. Quality assurance - how to involve the employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1996-01-01

    An overview of strategies for involvement of employees in quality assurance developement and implementation.......An overview of strategies for involvement of employees in quality assurance developement and implementation....

  15. Employee retention and integrated disability management practices as demand side factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habeck, Rochelle; Hunt, Allan; Rachel, Colleen Head; Kregel, John; Chan, Fong

    2010-12-01

    Demand-side employment research on company policies and practices related to retention and absence and disability management (ADM) can contribute to our understanding of employment issues related to people with disabilities from the employers' perspective. To examine company ADM and retention practices and their effectiveness, as well as how these company policies and practices might influence hiring of people with disabilities. Disability Management Employer Coalition employer members (N = 650) were surveyed by internet and the survey data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation, and multiple regression. Ninety-five participants responded to the survey resulting in a response rate of 14%. Retention practice was found to be associated with retention effectiveness (r = .39, P employees at every level, seeking the ideas and involvement of employees, and assuring they know how their work and performance support the mission. ADM practice was related to improving health and managing health conditions (r = .26, P employee-oriented culture (r = .23), safety/risk prevention (r = .21), and very early intervention (r = .21) correlated with delaying/preventing employment exits related to health impairment. Retention practice, ADM practice, retention effectiveness, ADM effectiveness and disability attitudes comprised a model to predict the hiring of people with disabilities. The six-predictor model was significant, F(6, 86) = 13.54, P employees who develop potentially disabling conditions; but they are not directly connected to hiring people with disabilities. These appear to be two different policy and practice issues within most companies.

  16. HIV-positive shopper who bit employee gets 10 years in jail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-31

    Judge John Goshgarian sentenced John [name removed] to 10 years in prison for biting a store employee and then declaring he was HIV-positive. An unidentified employee at the Sam's Club store in Gurnee, IL tried to block [name removed] from exiting during questioning about a check he had just written. The bite [name removed] made on the employee's arm left teeth marks and drew blood. [Name removed] was charged with criminal transmission of HIV, a charge rarely used. He pled guilty to a lesser offense-aggravated battery in a public way, as well as related charges of forgery, possession of a fictitious driver's license, and obstruction of justice. The judge sentenced [name removed] to the maximum of 10 years in prison on the battery charge; criminal transmission punishment is 3 to 7 years in prison. [Name removed]'s test results remain sealed, although the store employee has been notified of the results and is undergoing monthly testing for HIV antibodies. Thus far, the results show he does not have the virus.

  17. Does Employee Ignorance Undermine Shared Capitalism?

    OpenAIRE

    John W. Budd

    2008-01-01

    The potential of shared capitalism to improve individual and organizational performance through financial incentives depends on employees knowing about and participating in compensation plans that link rewards to performance. This paper therefore analyzes a survey of employees from multiple companies to assess the extent to which employees are ignorant about company, group, and individual-based incentive pay plans and ESOPs. The findings reveal significant amounts of employee ignorance in bot...

  18. Employee engagement: The role of psychological conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rothmann, Sebastiaan; Welsh, Coen

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the antecedents of employee engagement in the context of a developing country. A cross-sectional survey design was used with a sample of 309 employees in organisations in Namibia. A biographical questionnaire and questionnaires that measure employee engagement and antecedents of engagement were administered. Work-role fit and job enrichment showed the strongest relationships with employee engagement, while rewards, co-worker relations, resources, s...

  19. Employee Engagement at the Company X

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Enia

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to measure the employee engagement at the company X. I have introduced different studies that have proven the employee engagement to have a positive influence on organizations performances worldwide and explain why the employee engagement is crucial for every successful organization nowadays. The purpose of this thesis is to help the company x to improve their performance through employee engagement. I have gathered information to support the argument that ...

  20. Psychological empowerment, job insecurity and employee engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Marius W. Stander; Sebastiaan Rothmann

    2010-01-01

    Orientation: The psychological empowerment of employees might affect their engagement. However, psychological empowerment and employee engagement might also be influenced by job insecurity.Research purposes: The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between psychological empowerment, job insecurity and employee engagement.Motivation for the study: Employee engagement results in positive individual and organisational outcomes and research information about the antecedents wil...

  1. NAD+ Is a Food Component That Promotes Exit from Dauer Diapause in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylenko, Mykola; Boland, Sebastian; Penkov, Sider; Sampaio, Julio L.; Lombardot, Benoit; Vorkel, Daniela; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Kurzchalia, Teymuras V.

    2016-01-01

    The free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans adapts its development to the availability of food. When food is scarce and population density is high, worms enter a developmentally arrested non-feeding diapause stage specialized for long-term survival called the dauer larva. When food becomes available, they exit from the dauer stage, resume growth and reproduction. It has been postulated that compound(s) present in food, referred to as the “food signal”, promote exit from the dauer stage. In this study, we have identified NAD+ as a component of bacterial extract that promotes dauer exit. NAD+, when dissolved in alkaline medium, causes opening of the mouth and ingestion of food. We also show that to initiate exit from the dauer stage in response to NAD+ worms require production of serotonin. Thus, C. elegans can use redox cofactors produced by dietary organisms to sense food. PMID:27907064

  2. Temporal and compartment-specific signals coordinate mitotic exit with spindle position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Khmelinskii, Anton; Duenas-Sanchez, Rafael; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Knop, Michael; Pereira, Gislene

    2017-01-24

    The spatiotemporal control of mitotic exit is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In budding yeast, the mitotic exit network (MEN) drives cells out of mitosis, whereas the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) blocks MEN activity when the anaphase spindle is mispositioned. How the SPOC operates at a molecular level remains unclear. Here, we report novel insights into how mitotic signalling pathways orchestrate chromosome segregation in time and space. We establish that the key function of the central SPOC kinase, Kin4, is to counterbalance MEN activation by the cdc fourteen early anaphase release (FEAR) network in the mother cell compartment. Remarkably, Kin4 becomes dispensable for SPOC function in the absence of FEAR. Cells lacking both FEAR and Kin4 show that FEAR contributes to mitotic exit through regulation of the SPOC component Bfa1 and the MEN kinase Cdc15. Furthermore, we uncover controls that specifically promote mitotic exit in the daughter cell compartment.

  3. Determinants of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Entry and Exit in the Mid-2000s

    OpenAIRE

    James Mabli; Thomas Godfrey; Laura Castner; Stephen Tordella; Priscilla Foran

    2011-01-01

    This study looks at the factors associated with SNAP entry and exit from 2004 to 2006 by examining individual and family demographic and economic characteristics, as well as state economic measures and SNAP policies.

  4. MEN, destruction and separation: mechanistic links between mitotic exit and cytokinesis in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeong, Foong May; Lim, Hong Hwa; Surana, Uttam

    2002-07-01

    Cellular events must be executed in a certain sequence during the cell division in order to maintain genome integrity and hence ensure a cell's survival. In M phase, for instance, chromosome segregation always precedes mitotic exit (characterized by mitotic kinase inactivation via cyclin destruction); this is then followed by cytokinesis. How do cells impose this strict order? Recent findings in budding yeast have suggested a mechanism whereby partitioning of chromosomes into the daughter cell is a prerequisite for the activation of mitotic exit network (MEN). So far, however, a regulatory scheme that would temporally link the initiation of cytokinesis to the execution of mitotic exit has not been determined. We propose that the requirement of MEN components for cytokinesis, their translocation to the mother-daughter neck and triggering of this translocation by inactivation of the mitotic kinase may be the three crucial elements that render initiation of cytokinesis dependent on mitotic exit.

  5. 49 CFR 571.217 - Standard No. 217; Bus emergency exits and window retention and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... the seat faces. Passenger compartment means space within the school bus interior that is between a... required emergency exit shall be outlined around its outside perimeter with a retroreflective tape with a...

  6. Little Ice Age Maximum Glacier Extent, Exit and Paradise Glaciers, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset is a single polyline file that depicts the boundary of the Little Ice Age maximum advance of the terminus of Exit and Paradise Glaciers. The data were...

  7. Exit, voice, and loyalty in the Italian public health service: macroeconomic and corporate implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Adelaide; Impagliazzo, Cira; Zoccoli, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyses how customers of public health organizations can express their dissatisfaction for the services offered to them. The main aim is to evaluate the effects that possible dissatisfaction of Italian public health service customers can have on public health organizations. We adopted the methodological scheme developed by Hirschman with exit, voice, and loyalty, considering the macroeconomic and corporate implications that it causes for Italian public health organizations. The study investigated the effects developed by exit of the patients on the system of financing of local health authorities considering both the corporate level of analysis and the macroeconomic level. As a result, local health authority management is encouraged to pay greater attention to the exit phenomena through the adoption of tools that promote loyalty, such as the promotion of voice, even if exit is not promoting, at a macroeconomic level, considerable attention to this phenomenon.

  8. Siah regulation of Pard3A controls neuronal cell adhesion during germinal zone exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famulski, Jakub K; Trivedi, Niraj; Howell, Danielle; Yang, Yuan; Tong, Yiai; Gilbertson, Richard; Solecki, David J

    2010-12-24

    The brain's circuitry is established by directed migration and synaptogenesis of neurons during development. Although neurons mature and migrate in specific patterns, little is known about how neurons exit their germinal zone niche. We found that cerebellar granule neuron germinal zone exit is regulated by proteasomal degradation of Pard3A by the Seven in Absentia homolog (Siah) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Pard3A gain of function and Siah loss of function induce precocious radial migration. Time-lapse imaging using a probe to measure neuronal cell contact reveals that Pard3A promotes adhesive interactions needed for germinal zone exit by recruiting the epithelial tight junction adhesion molecule C to the neuronal cell surface. Our findings define a Siah-Pard3A signaling pathway that controls adhesion-dependent exit of neuronal progenitors or immature neurons from a germinal zone niche.

  9. Exit, Voice, and Loyalty in the Italian Public Health Service: Macroeconomic and Corporate Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impagliazzo, Cira; Zoccoli, Paola

    2013-01-01

    The paper analyses how customers of public health organizations can express their dissatisfaction for the services offered to them. The main aim is to evaluate the effects that possible dissatisfaction of Italian public health service customers can have on public health organizations. We adopted the methodological scheme developed by Hirschman with exit, voice, and loyalty, considering the macroeconomic and corporate implications that it causes for Italian public health organizations. The study investigated the effects developed by exit of the patients on the system of financing of local health authorities considering both the corporate level of analysis and the macroeconomic level. As a result, local health authority management is encouraged to pay greater attention to the exit phenomena through the adoption of tools that promote loyalty, such as the promotion of voice, even if exit is not promoting, at a macroeconomic level, considerable attention to this phenomenon. PMID:24348148

  10. The effect of the introduction of an exit tube on the separation efficiency in a cyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cernecky

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the analysis of the effect of introduction of an exit tube into the cylindrical part of a cyclone on the flow velocity, pressure losses and, above all, the separation efficiency. We made measurements and carried out CFD simulations for three levels of the exit tube introduction. The ratios of the depth of the exit tube introduction to the cyclone diameter (Hp/D were 0.4, 0.475 and 0.89 at three velocity settings of 8 m.s-1, 13 m.s-1 and 15 m.s-1. The Reynolds Stress Model (RSM, which was compatible with the experimental results, was used for numerical solutions. The efficiency of cyclone separation was explored on a sample of oak sawdust. The efficiency of cyclone separation increased with the geometric size of the particles, the inlet velocity and a deeper introduction of the exit tube.

  11. The ex utero intrapartum treatment procedure: Looking back at the EXIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Shinjiro; Farmer, Diana L; Lee, Hanmin; Nobuhara, Kerilyn K; Harrison, Michael R

    2004-03-01

    The ex utero intrapartum treatment (EXIT) procedure was developed originally for management of airway obstruction after fetal surgery, and indications have continued to expand for a variety of fetal anomalies. The authors review their single-institution experience with EXIT. Retrospective review of all patients who underwent an EXIT procedure from 1993 to 2003 (n = 52) was performed. Variables evaluated include indication for EXIT, gender, gestational age at EXIT, birth weight, maternal blood loss, operative complications, operative time, and survival rate. Technique, personnel, and anesthesic management were reviewed. Long-term follow-up was available for all patients. Fifty-one of 52 patients were born alive; currently, 27 of 52 patients (52%) are alive. All deaths have been in patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Forty-five patients underwent EXIT for reversal of tracheal occlusion for congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Of these patients, 30 underwent tracheal clip removal. Two patients had repair of tracheal injury from clipping at EXIT. Fifteen patients underwent bronchoscopy and tracheal balloon removal. Five patients underwent EXIT procedure for neck masses. Tracheostomy was performed in 3 of these patients. One patient was intubated successfully, and 1 patient underwent resection of the neck mass while on placental support. Two patients underwent EXIT procedure and tracheostomy for congenital high-airway obstruction syndrome. Average gestational age at delivery was 31.95 +/- 2.55 weeks. Average birth weight was 1,895 +/- 653 g. Average maternal blood loss was 970 +/- 510 mL. Average operating time on placental support was 45 +/- 25 minutes with a maximum of 150 minutes. EXIT procedures can be performed with minimal maternal morbidity and with good outcomes. It is an excellent strategy for establishing an airway in a controlled manner, avoiding "crash" intubation or tracheostomy. Longer procedures on placental support allowing for definitive

  12. Employee motivation: training, idea generation, incentive approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, M S

    1986-05-01

    If the terms "skill-building," "idea generation" and "rewards programming system" are not part of your vocabulary or strategy to motivate employees in your medical record department, this article will provide some valuable insights. A successful motivation program based on these elements will benefit both employee and employer by providing stronger employee participation, more job satisfaction, enhanced productivity and overall increased success.

  13. 10 CFR 71.9 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... An employee's engagement in protected activities does not automatically render him or her immune from... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 71.9 Section 71.9 Energy NUCLEAR... § 71.9 Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by a Commission licensee, certificate holder, an...

  14. 10 CFR 40.7 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... protected activities. An employee's engagement in protected activities does not automatically render him or... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 40.7 Section 40.7 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL General Provisions § 40.7 Employee protection. (a...

  15. 10 CFR 76.7 - Employee protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    .... An employee's engagement in protected activities does not automatically render him or her immune from... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee protection. 76.7 Section 76.7 Energy NUCLEAR... Employee protection. (a) Discrimination by the Corporation, a contractor, or a subcontractor of the...

  16. Managing human resources to improve employee retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Edwin

    2005-01-01

    Managers face increased challenges as the demand for health care services increases while the supply of employees with the requisite skills continues to lag. Employee retention will become more important in the effort to service health care needs. Appropriate human resource management strategies and policies implemented effectively can significantly assist managers in dealing with the employee retention challenges ahead.

  17. 22 CFR 171.41 - Covered employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE ACCESS TO INFORMATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC Ethics in Government Act Provisions § 171.41 Covered employees. (a) Officers and employees (including special Government employees as defined in 18 U.S.C. 202) whose positions are classified at...

  18. 22 CFR 901.17 - Charged employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Charged employee. 901.17 Section 901.17 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD GENERAL Meanings of Terms As Used in This Chapter § 901.17 Charged employee. Charged employee means a member of the Senior Foreign Service or a member of the Service...

  19. 29 CFR 401.6 - Employee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employee. 401.6 Section 401.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.6 Employee. Employee means any individual employed by an...

  20. 75 FR 5697 - Employee Protection Program; Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... Office of the Secretary 14 CFR Part 314 RIN 2105-AD94 Employee Protection Program; Removal AGENCY: Office... removes the procedural regulations of the Department of Transportation Employee Protection Program. These.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Congress in 1978 established the Employee Protection Program, to be...