WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology education graduates

  1. Examining the Nature of Technology Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Nathan; Sarapin, Marvin; Bertoline, Gary; Sarapin, Susan H.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. This work presents a general discussion of the theoretical foundation for graduate education in technology followed by specific applications of research activities within graduate education in technology. This paper represents the authors' view of the role of graduate education in (a) advancing the knowledge…

  2. Historiography in Graduate Technology Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jim; Hunt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A proposal is made suggesting the inclusion of historiography (i.e., historical research and the writing of history) into graduate technology teacher education. In particular, a strategy is forwarded to have graduate students in technology teacher education, who are working at schools in different locations, conduct historical research and write…

  3. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Hodgson; David Irick

    2005-09-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its sixth year of operation. During this period the Center has involved thirteen GATE Fellows and ten GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center's focus area: hybrid drive trains and control systems. Eighteen GATE students have graduated, and three have completed their course work requirements. Nine faculty members from three departments in the College of Engineering have been involved in the GATE Center. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as internships, equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $4,000,000. Problem areas are discussed in the hope that future activities may benefit from the operation of the current program.

  4. Introducing Mobile Technology in Graduate Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gopesh; Chhajed, Dilip; Hong, Seung Won; Scagnoli, Norma

    2014-01-01

    The insertion of mobile technology in educational settings is becoming more prevalent, making it important to understand the effectiveness of such technology in enhancing students' learning and engagement. This article is based on research conducted to study the effects of the use of mobile technology--specifically iPads--by students in a graduate…

  5. Graduate Programs in Instructional Technology: Their Characteristics and Involvement in Public Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Shirl S.; Gansneder, Bruce M.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews survey of graduate programs in instructional technology which was conducted to determine (1) the similarities and differences among programs, and (2) their involvement in teacher education and school systems. Faculty specialization is discussed, placement of graduates is examined, and future research possibilities are suggested. (LRW)

  6. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program: Center of Automotive Technology Excellence in Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology at West Virginia University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigle N. Clark

    2006-12-31

    This report summarizes the technical and educational achievements of the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at West Virginia University (WVU), which was created to emphasize Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology. The Center has supported the graduate studies of 17 students in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering. These students have addressed topics such as hybrid modeling, construction of a hybrid sport utility vehicle (in conjunction with the FutureTruck program), a MEMS-based sensor, on-board data acquisition for hybrid design optimization, linear engine design and engine emissions. Courses have been developed in Hybrid Vehicle Design, Mobile Source Powerplants, Advanced Vehicle Propulsion, Power Electronics for Automotive Applications and Sensors for Automotive Applications, and have been responsible for 396 hours of graduate student coursework. The GATE program also enhanced the WVU participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Student Design Competitions, in particular FutureTruck and Challenge X. The GATE support for hybrid vehicle technology enhanced understanding of hybrid vehicle design and testing at WVU and encouraged the development of a research agenda in heavy-duty hybrid vehicles. As a result, WVU has now completed three programs in hybrid transit bus emissions characterization, and WVU faculty are leading the Transportation Research Board effort to define life cycle costs for hybrid transit buses. Research and enrollment records show that approximately 100 graduate students have benefited substantially from the hybrid vehicle GATE program at WVU.

  7. [Construction of a healthcare-related information technology education praxis for graduate school].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Jefferson Paixão; Rosa, Valéria Argolo; Lopes, Claudia Ribeiro Santos; Vilela, Alba Benemérita Alves; de Santana, Aurisan Souza; da Silva, Sandro Tonini

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of an information technology education practice for healthcare practitioners in graduate school. Based on hands-on experience of the Information Technology Applied to Healthcare classes at the Jequié Campus of the Southeast Bahia State University (UESB) for the Nursing and Physiotherapy courses, an experience is reported that stresses the importance of teaching information technology by establishing links between Information and Communications Technologies and the praxis of the healthcare practitioners, enhancing the educational process and allowing students to 'visualize' how such technologies could be used for producing and qualifying impacts on their professional activities.

  8. Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Howard S.

    1987-01-01

    Maintains that graduate training in sociology is an uneasy compromise between teaching new sociologists practical knowledge and doing what a department's various constituencies demand. Suggests that faculty should develop a continuing dialogue with students and incorporate them, formally and informally, in their work. (Author/DH)

  9. Applications of VoiceThread(©) Technology in Graduate Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Mary K; Kverno, Karan S; Belcher, Anne E; Ledebur, Lindsay R; Gerson, Linda D

    2016-11-01

    Online graduate courses provide opportunities for faculty to use technology and digital applications to enhance student learning and learning environments. In nursing education, as we become increasingly dependent on technology, it is important to ensure that both faculty and students add digital literacy to their repertoire of knowledge and skills. VoiceThread(©), one type of Web-based digital application tool, allows students and faculty to verbally communicate and collaborate asynchronously. This article discusses the use of VoiceThread technology in graduate nursing education and offers four examples of VoiceThread teaching methods: personal introductions, issues discussions, case presentations, and the elevator speech. Student participation in VoiceThread assignments is evaluated using leveled rubrics. A poll of the students in one of the graduate courses showed high overall satisfaction with VoiceThread in the online classroom. Strategies for effective use of VoiceThread technology to enhance student engagement and learning are recommended. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(11):655-658.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Holloway

    2005-09-30

    Beginning the fall semester of 1999, The University of Maryland, Departments of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and the Institute for Systems Research served as a U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies. A key goal was to produce a graduate level education program that educated and prepared students to address the technical challenges of designing and developing hybrid electric vehicles, as they progressed into the workforce. A second goal was to produce research that fostered the advancement of hybrid electric vehicles, their controls, and other related automotive technologies. Participation ended at the University of Maryland after the 2004 fall semester. Four graduate courses were developed and taught during the course of this time, two of which evolved into annually-taught undergraduate courses, namely Vehicle Dynamics and Control Systems Laboratory. Five faculty members from Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and the Institute for Systems Research participated. Four Ph.D. degrees (two directly supported and two indirectly supported) and seven Master's degrees in Mechanical Engineering resulted from the research conducted. Research topics included thermoelectric waste heat recovery, fuel cell modeling, pre- and post-transmission hybrid powertrain control and integration, hybrid transmission design, H{sub 2}-doped combustion, and vehicle dynamics. Many of the participating students accepted positions in the automotive industry or government laboratories involved in automotive technology work after graduation. This report discusses the participating faculty, the courses developed and taught, research conducted, the students directly and indirectly supported, and the publication list. Based on this collection of information, the University of Maryland firmly believes that the key goal of the program was met and that the majority of the

  11. A new model for graduate education and innovation in medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Youseph; Acharya, Soumyadipta

    2013-09-01

    We describe a new model of graduate education in bioengineering innovation and design- a year long Master's degree program that educates engineers in the process of healthcare technology innovation for both advanced and low-resource global markets. Students are trained in an iterative "Spiral Innovation" approach that ensures early, staged, and repeated examination of all key elements of a successful medical device. This includes clinical immersion based problem identification and assessment (at Johns Hopkins Medicine and abroad), team based concept and business model development, and project planning based on iterative technical and business plan de-risking. The experiential, project based learning process is closely supported by several core courses in business, design, and engineering. Students in the program work on two team based projects, one focused on addressing healthcare needs in advanced markets and a second focused on low-resource settings. The program recently completed its fourth year of existence, and has graduated 61 students, who have continued on to industry or startups (one half), additional graduate education, or medical school (one third), or our own Global Health Innovation Fellowships. Over the 4 years, the program has sponsored 10 global health teams and 14 domestic/advanced market medtech teams, and launched 5 startups, of which 4 are still active. Projects have attracted over US$2.5M in follow-on awards and grants, that are supporting the continued development of over a dozen projects.

  12. Graduate Training in Educational Computing: Training the Next Generation of Technology Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Jerry

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of graduate programs in educational computing highlights six models of educational computing programs: (1) the computer science model, which stresses programing; (2) the educational psychology model; (3) the programed instruction model; (4) the instructional design model; (5) the information center model; and (6) the audiovisual…

  13. Assessing the Value of Embedded Librarians in an Online Graduate Educational Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mary; Kumar, Swapna; Ochoa, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    The increase in online programs has been accompanied by the need for library instruction and support for online students. Students enrolled in off-campus programs have to be able to successfully access and use digital library resources to complete course requirements. An embedded librarian project in an online graduate educational technology…

  14. Perioperative post graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapnoullas, J

    1997-04-01

    This article describes post-graduate perioperative education in Australia at the Australian Catholic University and St. Vincent's Public Hospital: The Graduate Certificate in Perioperative Practice. The Australian Catholic University operates from eight campuses along the east coast of Australia. There are approximately 9000 students along with 1000 staff. The University consists of major faculties that all have clear relevance to the workplace-namely Arts and Sciences, Education and Health Sciences. Qualifications are offered at Certificate of Doctoral level studies in the areas of business, education, ethics, human movement, management, information systems, music, nursing, religion, social work and theology.

  15. Graduate Education's Trying Times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    As more and more people in China attend graduate schools, experts are raising questions about the quality of the education students receive, and some view the outlook as relatively bleak unless major changes are made. At the National Association for the Study of Higher Education's 2005 annual meeting in November at Shanghai Jiao Tong University (Xuhui campus), a task force led by Yang Jie,

  16. Electives in Graduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Zayapragassarazan, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Modern curricula have both compulsory portions and electives or portions chosen by students. Electives have been a part of graduate and postgraduate general higher education. Electives are included in various standards for graduate medical education and are also included in proposed Medical Council of India Regulations on Graduate Medical…

  17. GIS Technology and E-Learning for Exposing College Graduates to Transcultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalra, Rajrani; Gupta, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, one form of technology that has become quite popular in schools and higher education is the Geographical Information Systems (GIS). GIS is one kind of management information system. It includes both the hardware and software components and includes programming of real world problems. It provides support to managers in day-to-day…

  18. Engineering Design Education Program for Graduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbuchi, Yoshifumi; Iida, Haruhiko

    The new educational methods of engineering design have attempted to improve mechanical engineering education for graduate students in a way of the collaboration in education of engineer and designer. The education program is based on the lecture and practical exercises concerning the product design, and has engineering themes and design process themes, i.e. project management, QFD, TRIZ, robust design (Taguchi method) , ergonomics, usability, marketing, conception etc. At final exercise, all students were able to design new product related to their own research theme by applying learned knowledge and techniques. By the method of engineering design education, we have confirmed that graduate students are able to experience technological and creative interest.

  19. The evolution and evaluation of videoconferencing technology for graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Kay Marie; Campbell-Heider, Nancy; Blyth, John B

    2004-01-01

    The Integrated Services Digital Network H.323 (ISDN), which has been in use for the past 20 years often requires a dedicated telephone line and other equipment to implement. Consequently, expansion of ISDN-based videoconferencing requires infrastructure not always accessible in those areas that are most in need of technological connections. New H.323 technology using Internet Protocol H.320 (IP) connectivity can accommodate the use in a variety of videoconferencing software and fill this void as demonstrated by an experiment conducted live at the Syllabus Web '99 conference. When a faculty group were unable to secure ISDN connections to demonstrate their clinical evaluation of Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) students using videoconferencing technology, an ad hoc group of computer experts, educators, instructional design specialists, and corporate sponsors collaborated to design a multipoint PC-based connection using IP connectivity. This article describes the first application of this technology, the evolution of ISDN and IP systems in nursing education and practice, and suggests appropriate future trends for their utility in nursing.

  20. The pattern of performance management of community service learning empowerment in improving the entrepreneurship on the graduation candidate of Vocational Technology Education Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadromi

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to evaluate the pattern of performance management of Community Service Empowerment Learning-Universitas Negeri Semarang in improving the entrepreneurship of the graduate candidate of Vocational Technology Education Institution. This evaluation research uses Context Evaluation, Input evaluation, Process evaluation and Product evaluation method (CIPP) to evaluate the performance management of Community Service of Empowerment Learning-Universitas Negeri Semarang. The location of research was in Kandri Subdistrict-Indonesia. The subject of research is the Kandri Subdistrict community, especially the groups of the youth, students, subdistrict organizers, community organization, and culinery and handicraft industry, as well as the students who join the program of Community Service of Empowerment Learning-Universitas Negeri Semarang. The object of research is the pattern of perfomance management of Community Service Empowerment Learning-Universitas Negeri Semarang in improving the entrepreneurship of the graduation candidate of Vocational Technology Education Institution. The research result shows the pattern of Community Service Empowerment Learning-Universitas Negeri Semarang is able to improve the enterpreneurship of graduate candidate of Vocational Technology Education Institution. The pattern of Community Service Empowerment Community-Universitas Negeri Semarang which is Education for Sustainable Development (ESD)in the field of education, training, and assistance continuously can grasp and develop competency and balance mindset of students including triple bottom line which mutually connectedamong the sectors of social, economic, cultural, and environment so that it can increase the entrerpreneurship on the graduates candidate of Vocational Technology Education Institution

  1. Exploring graduate education reform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ An opening ceremony was held for new students at the Yuquan Campus of the Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (GUCAS) on Sept. 12, 2006 in the westem outskirt of Beijing. Some 11,350 graduate students enrolled this year, including about 5,000 doctoral candidates, will set out their journey for scientific investigations in the coming semesters.

  2. Trends and Issues in Technology Education Research in Taiwan: A Co-Word Analysis of 1994-2013 Graduate Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Fang, Yu-Shen

    2015-01-01

    In Taiwan, the Technology Education for 1-12 graders is comprised of two courses--Living Technology (LT) and Information Technology (IT). With its ever-changing feature, Technology Education needs on-going research to support its decisions and actions. The education-related academic programs in universities regularly concern about the development…

  3. Update and Expansion of the Center of Automotive Technology Excellence Under the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irick, David

    2012-08-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its seventh year of operation under this agreement, its thirteenth year in total. During this period the Center has involved eleven GATE Fellows and three GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center’s focus area: Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Control Systems. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $2,000,000.

  4. Rethinking Instructional Technology to Improve Pedagogy for Digital Literacy: A Design Case in a Graduate Early Childhood Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langub, Lee Woodham; Lokey-Vega, Anissa

    2017-01-01

    Digital literacy is an important aspect to consider within teacher education as a way to address twenty-first century learner needs, particularly in early childhood contexts where developmental concerns should be paramount in making instructional design decisions. This article is a design case of a graduate level early childhood education…

  5. Geospatial Technologies as a Vehicle for Enhancing Graduate Education and Promoting the Value of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Alex P.; Joseph, Sue A.; May, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Geospatial technologies (GSTs), such as geographic information systems, global positioning systems and remote sensing, present an avenue for expanding the already strong interdisciplinary nature of geography. This paper discusses how GSTs served as a common thread for a crosscutting faculty institute that was established to enhance graduate…

  6. Graduate Education in Ecological Economics

    OpenAIRE

    John M. Polimeni

    2004-01-01

    Interest in graduate education in ecological economics is increasing. However, no formal plan of study for a Ph.D. in ecological economics has been disseminated. The lack of a formal plan is problematic as the field of ecological economics matures, interest grows, and new programs are being developed. This paper attempts to fill a void by creating a program of study addressing the proficiencies a graduate student in ecological economics should have upon completion of his/her Ph.D. based on th...

  7. Reshaping Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Phillip A.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses needed changes in the training of doctoral science and engineering students to prepare them for the jobs they are likely to find. Discussion includes introducing flexibility in the conduct of science, better career information and guidance, and a new class of education and training grants. (MKR)

  8. Plagiarism in graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Ariel Forrester

    2007-06-01

    The act of overt plagiarism by graduates of accredited residency programs represents a failure in personal integrity. It also indicates a lack of professionalism, one of the six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies for graduate medical education. A recent experience at one geriatric fellowship indicates that the problem of plagiarism may be more prevalent than previously recognized. A situation was discovered at the geriatric medicine fellowship at Florida Hospital Family Medicine Residency Program in Orlando, Fla, in which three of the personal statements included in a total of 26 applications to the fellowship in the past 2 years contained portions plagiarized from a single Web site. The aim in documenting this plagiarism is to raise awareness among medical educators about the availability of online sources of content and ease of electronic plagiarism. Some students and residents may not recognize copying other resources verbatim as plagiarism. Residency programs should evaluate their own need for education about plagiarism and include this in the training of the competency of professionalism.

  9. Graduate Deans and Graduate Education: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, David M.; Bowker, Lee H.

    The responsibility for graduate education and the power and authority structure among graduate deans, college or school deans, departments, and faculty were studied using a sample of 338 schools. Attention was directed to the following concerns: institutional characteristics that are related to the organization and administration of graduate…

  10. A SAMPLE FOR GUIDANCE APPLICATION OF DISTANCE EDUCATION TECHNOLOGIES: A Case Study on Graduate Students’ Opinions About Web-Assisted Career Guidance Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin KESICI

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe purpose of this study was to analyze the use of distance education technologies in career guidance and counseling. Using qualitative research methods, web-assisted systems in career guidance were studied and feedback gained graduate students completing their no-thesis master program in the Program of Psychological Counseling and Guidance in the Institute of Social Sciences at Selcuk University during spring semester in 2007 was analyzed from. Purposeful sampling was administered to collect data from semi-structured interviews with these graduate students. Data were coded using Nvivo2 software and then themes were determined. Based on related literature, findings from this research were discussed and some suggestions were provided.

  11. Traditional and Applied Graduate Education: Special Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, William G.; Love, Don E.

    1999-01-01

    Addresses the differences in philosophy and instruction methods while offering a means of complementary support. Discusses the traditional and applied communication graduate education models. Concludes that educators must establish and focus upon mutual respect for the commonalities held by the two approaches to graduate education and the support…

  12. Proceedings of the Conference on Graduate Student Research in Engineering and Technology Education (Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 22, 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Engineering and Technology Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    As part of the usual end of year meeting that has been a feature of the National Center for Engineering and Technology Education (NCETE) project, a conference intending to provide a forum for young voices in an outside of the Center was organized. The basic model for the gathering was borrowed from track and field. This was to be an intellectual…

  13. Graduates' Transition from Study to Employment of Radiologic Technology Graduates of the Lyceum University of the Philippines--Batangas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Anacleta P.

    2012-01-01

    A ten-year tracer study of Radiologic Technology graduates of Lyceum of the Philippines University SY 1997-2007 using a survey-structured questionnaire was conducted to examine retrospective contribution of their education to their current work. The objectives of the study included the determination of graduates' job-placement profile; how…

  14. Roles of Modern Information Technology in Graduate Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruixian; Gao, Song

    2009-01-01

    Introduction of information technology into the education field has greatly enriched teaching content and forms, and facilitated transformation of teaching mode, teaching approaches and training concepts. Especially for training of graduates, its introduction seems extraordinarily prominent. In this paper, the authors will analyze and discuss…

  15. Catalyzing curriculum evolution in graduate science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutlerner, Johanna L; Van Vactor, David

    2013-05-09

    Strategies in life science graduate education must evolve in order to train a modern workforce capable of integrative solutions to challenging problems. Our institution has catalyzed such evolution through building a postdoctoral Curriculum Fellows Program that provides a collaborative and scholarly education laboratory for innovation in graduate training.

  16. Competencies for global heath graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Judith G; Spencer, Harrison C; Buekens, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    Competency specification and competency-based education (CBE) are increasingly being viewed as essential for optimizing educational outcomes for the next generation of global health workers. An overview is provided of this movement in graduate health professions education in the United States, the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) contributions to advancing and researching related CBE processes and best practices, and the evolving ASPH competency model for graduate global health education.

  17. Technology and Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neighbors, Marianne; Eldred, Evelyn E.

    1993-01-01

    A study to isolate some of the complex skills that nurses are expected to perform in current practice identified 54 skills and surveyed 167 staff nurses and 53 nurse executives to classify the expected level of performance for a new graduate. Results indicated that educators bear responsibility for learning about technology and incorporating it…

  18. Information Source Preferences of Education Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Vanessa J.

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades the literature dealing with graduate students and library use, including bibliographic instruction, information-seeking behavior, and information literacy has grown. However, there still appears to be a lack of research and resources available on the information-seeking behavior skills of graduate education students, which can…

  19. Information Source Preferences of Education Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Vanessa J.

    2008-01-01

    In recent decades the literature dealing with graduate students and library use, including bibliographic instruction, information-seeking behavior, and information literacy has grown. However, there still appears to be a lack of research and resources available on the information-seeking behavior skills of graduate education students, which can…

  20. The Philosophy and Future of Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankena, William K., Ed.

    Focusing on critical issues facing graduate education, these papers presented at a conference sponsored by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) examine areas such as declining enrollments, job shortage among college teachers, and the role of graduate schools in relation to the various intellectual disciplines. The overview paper,…

  1. Acute IPPS - Direct Graduate Medical Education (DGME)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Section 1886(h) of the Act, establish a methodology for determining payments to hospitals for the costs of approved graduate medical education (GME) programs.

  2. Higher Education Leadership Graduate Program Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Sydney, Jr.; Chambers, Crystal Renée; Newton, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Graduate programs in higher education administration and leadership have sought to equip students with the knowledge, skills, and competencies for higher education leadership; that is, to prepare globally minded leaders who can navigate the internal and external demands of, and for, higher education. With the use of the Lattuca and Stark model of…

  3. Educational Democracy in Graduate Education: Public Policies and Affirmative Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos Medeiros, Hugo Augusto; Mello Neto, Ruy de Deus e; Mendes Catani, Afrânio

    2017-01-01

    This paper is a discussion on the possibilities of educational democracy in Brazilian Graduate Education, with a focus on the current Graduate Education Field regulations and the recent affirmative actions and public policies of access. We analyzed laws, decrees, government plans and selections edicts, through categories derived from historical…

  4. Cultural competencies for graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lauren; Calvillo, Evelyn; Dela Cruz, Felicitas; Fongwa, Marie; Kools, Susan; Lowe, John; Mastel-Smith, Beth

    2011-01-01

    Nursing is challenged to meet the health needs of ethnic and socioculturally diverse populations. To this end, American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) charged an expert nursing faculty advisory group to formulate competencies for graduate nursing education, expanding them to integrate leadership and scholarship. The Cultural Competency in Baccalaureate Nursing Education served as the springboard for the initiative. In formulating the graduate cultural competencies and the toolkit, the advisory group reviewed all AACN Essentials documents and the cultural competency literature, drew upon their collective experiences with cultural diversity, and used cultural humility as the supporting framework. Six core competencies were formulated and endorsed by the AACN board of directors and key professional nursing organizations. A companion toolkit was compiled to provide resources for the implementation of the competencies. A 1-day conference was held in California to launch the cultural competencies and toolkit. Dissemination to graduate nursing programs is in process, with emphasis on faculty readiness to undertake this graduate educational transformation. The AACN Cultural Competencies for Graduate Nursing Education set national standards to prepare culturally competent nurses at the graduate level who will contribute to the elimination of health disparities through education, clinical practice, research, scholarship, and policy.

  5. Graduate Physics Education Adding Industrial Culture and Methods to a Traditional Graduate Physics Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Ken

    2005-03-01

    The education and training of the workforce needed to assure global competitiveness of American industry in high technology areas, along with the proper role of various disciplines in that educational process, is currently being re-examined. Several academic areas in science and engineering have reported results from such studies that revealed several broad themes of educational need that span and cross the boundaries of science and engineering. They included greater attention to and the development of team-building skills, personal or interactive skills, creative ability, and a business or entrepreneurial where-with-all. We will report in this paper the results of a fall 2000 Department of Education FIPSE grant to implement changes in its graduate physics program to address these issues. The proposal goal was to produce next-generation physics graduate students that are trained to evaluate and overcome complex technical problems by their participation in courses emphasizing the commercialization of technology research. To produce next-generation physics graduates who have learned to work with their student colleagues for their mutual success in an industrial-like group setting. And finally, to produce graduates who can lead interdisciplinary groups in solving complex problems in their career field.

  6. CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING ROMANIAN HIGHER EDUCATION GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovici (Barbulescu Adina

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at analyzing the dynamics of in Romanian higher education graduates in the 2006-2010 period, both in Romania and by the Romanian development regions. After highlighting the importance of human capital and its education, the paper analyzes the dynamics of Romanian higher education graduates in the targeted period, at both of the above-mentioned levels. The conclusions reveal that, during the analysed period: 2006-2010, the number of female, and, respectively, male higher education graduates, as well as the total number of higher education graduates, continuously increased in the 2006-2010 period at the whole country level and registered an increase trend, as well, by the eight development regions of Romania in the 2006-2010 period, with very few exceptions in some years of the period, in some of the the eight development regions of Romania. Therefore, the Romanian higher education system must correlate the graduates number with the number of work places in the Romanian economy, and take into account the necessities imposed by the participation at international competition.

  7. Recent RN graduate perceptions of educational preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Lori; Bowles, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Nursing education programs strive to deliver curricula that prepare and transition graduates not just to survive but to truly thrive in any workplace environment. It is therefore important to reach out to those who have recently entered the nursing workforce to understand their views on educational preparation for practice. The purpose of this descriptive survey was to examine the perceptions of recent nurse graduates with regard to how well their educational programs prepared them for practice in their first jobs as registered nurses. Three hundred fifty-two nurses registered in the state of Nevada who graduated from a basic nursing program within the past five years completed the Survey of Nurses' Perceptions of Educational Preparation. Respondents perceived they were inadequately prepared in pharmacology, clinical practice, leadership/management, and the use of patient electronic medical records. In addition, respondents felt their programs prepared them more for success on the NCLEX-RN than for practice. Recommendations for addressing these issues are offered.

  8. Multidisciplinary Graduate Education in Bioprocess Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Eiteman

    2006-04-18

    This report describes the accomplishments of the University of Georgia in establishing an academic program geared toward the emerging biobased products industry. By virtue of its strengths and structure, the University of Georgia is particularly well-suited for developing a program focused on plant- and microbial-based bioproducts, and it was in this general area that this program was developed. The program had several unique characteristics. First, we implemented a distinguished lecture series that brought outstanding scientists and engineers to our University to interact with students and share their vision of the biobased economy. Second, we offered industrially-oriented and multidisciplinary courses that provided students with a broad background on various facets of biobased business and technology. Third, we provided the students with opportunities to expand beyond the classroom by engaging in research lab rotations and industrial internships. Fourth, each student was engaged in a creative research project as led by a multidisciplinary faculty team. Throughout the implementation of these activities, we maintained a student-centered, mentoring approach to education. The most tangible outcome of this project was the graduation of two students who participated in a variety of scholarly activities, culminating in research toward the completion of a thesis and dissertation. Both research projects involved the use of microorganisms to produce industrial products from agricultural substrates via fermentation processes. The research advanced our understanding of microorganisms as used for industrial processes and products, as described in several articles published in scholarly journals and presentations made at scientific conferences (see information on pp. 14-15). Another outcome is one graduate course, Fermentation Engineering Laboratory, which is a unique experiential and multidisciplinary course. This course will be offered in the future as an elective to

  9. Graduate Education in Medical Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, A. J.

    1963-01-01

    During the last five years, 48 graduates have taken the formal Diploma in Bacteriology course offered by the School of Hygiene, University of Toronto. This course provides instruction by lectures, seminars, and practical work in bacteriology, virology, immunology, parasitology, sanitary bacteriology, and statistics. A graduate course of this type presents many advantages as it is possible to cover a considerable area of knowledge in the relatively short space of one academic year. Of the 48 students, 23 held degrees in medicine, and 25 in veterinary science, arts, or science. Eleven diplomates continued further formal studies by enrolling in Master's or Ph.D. programs. Twenty diplomates are now engaged in university teaching in Canada or overseas. Almost all of the remaining 28 are employed in hospital, public health, or veterinary laboratories. PMID:13981970

  10. Employers’ Feedbacks on the Performance of Teacher Education Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anania B. Aquino

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Higher education institutions in the Philippines play a vital role in the economic, social and cultural advancement of the country. As they are entrusted with the responsibility of turning in graduates with employable skills and good attitudes, they experience pressure to enhance their curricula and improve the quality of instruction. This study was conducted to investigate the performance of Batangas State University ARASOF College of Teacher Education graduates through the feedbacks given by their employers as employers’ feedback of teachers, which can generate evidence on the quality of graduates, their capabilities and performance in the school, and, as a consequence, the quality of education provided by a teacher education institution. Descriptive in nature, it utilized a survey questionnaire to collect assessment of principal and school heads of 18 schools about the level of satisfaction on graduates’ application of teacher proficiencies in the areas of foundations, research, subject matter, learning and development, reflective skills, technologies, pedagogical and professional skills, assessment, dispositions, diversity, collaboration and initiative. The findings showed that employers are satisfied with teachers prepared at BatStateU ARASOF. Employers find the proficiencies explored in the study as very useful for an entry level teacher. When responses are compared, a gap exists between the employers’ assessment of graduates and the degree of usefulness of these proficiencies. In spite of this gap, principals and school heads are very much willing to continue hiring graduates of the school of study.

  11. Graduate Experience in Science Education: the development of a science education course for biomedical science graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, Dina G; DuPré, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The University of Rochester's Graduate Experience in Science Education (GESE) course familiarizes biomedical science graduate students interested in pursuing academic career tracks with a fundamental understanding of some of the theory, principles, and concepts of science education. This one-semester elective course provides graduate students with practical teaching and communication skills to help them better relate science content to, and increase their confidence in, their own teaching abilities. The 2-h weekly sessions include an introduction to cognitive hierarchies, learning styles, and multiple intelligences; modeling and coaching some practical aspects of science education pedagogy; lesson-planning skills; an introduction to instructional methods such as case studies and problem-based learning; and use of computer-based instructional technologies. It is hoped that the early development of knowledge and skills about teaching and learning will encourage graduate students to continue their growth as educators throughout their careers. This article summarizes the GESE course and presents evidence on the effectiveness of this course in providing graduate students with information about teaching and learning that they will use throughout their careers.

  12. Global Changes: Re-envisioning Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Doris; Woolridge, Deborah; Humphrey, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    Reports on a qualitative study of perceived needs of counselors in training at Southeast Missouri State University and proposes a model of graduate education to meet local and global needs that is comprised of: (1) curriculum enhancement; (2) partnership between the university and a professional development school; (3) international professional…

  13. A Theory of Innovation in Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmon, Lewis C.

    1984-01-01

    Market forces suggest that this should be a period of extensive innovation in graduate education, but the importance of relative prestige to universities mutes incentives to innovate. Some predictions about the prospects for innovation in colleges and universities are provided. (Author/MLW)

  14. The Returns to Quality in Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Adam

    2016-01-01

    This paper estimates the monetary return to quality in US graduate education, controlling for cognitive ability and self-selection across award level, program quality, and field-of-study. In most program types, I cannot reject the hypothesis of no returns to either degree completion or program quality. Important exceptions include master's…

  15. Educational Trajectories of Graduate Students in Physics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dusen, Ben; Barthelemy, Ramón S.; Henderson, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Physics education research (PER) is a rapidly growing area of PhD specialization. In this article we examine the trajectories that led respondents into a PER graduate program as well as their expected future trajectories. Data were collected in the form of an online survey sent to graduate students in PER. Our findings show a lack of visibility of…

  16. Accreditation of undergraduate and graduate medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Deborah J; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2006-01-01

    Accreditation organizations such as the Liaison Committee for Medical Education (LCME), the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) are charged with the difficult task of evaluating the educational quality...... of medical education programs in North America. Traditionally accreditation includes a more quantitative rather than qualitative judgment of the educational facilities, resources and teaching provided by the programs. The focus is on the educational process but the contributions of these to the outcomes...... are not at all clear. As medical education moves toward outcome-based education related to a broad and context-based concept of competence, the accreditation paradigm should change accordingly. Udgivelsesdato: 2006-Aug...

  17. Fostering significant learning in graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocco, Geraldine F

    2014-03-01

    Faculty who want to energize graduate students with creative classes that lead to long-lasting learning will benefit by designing course objectives, learning activities, and assessment tools using Fink's taxonomy of significant learning and Wiggins's insights on performance-based or educative assessments. Research shows that course designs relying on content-driven lectures and written examinations do not promote significant learning among adult learners. This article reviews six types of significant learning using Fink's taxonomy and examines Wiggins's "backward" approach to designing courses using performance-based assessments that gauge true learning and learning that promotes a lasting change. When designing courses, educators should ask: "What do I really want students to get out of this course?" The answers will direct the design of objectives, learning activities, and assessment tools. Designing graduate courses using Fink's taxonomy and Wiggins's backward approach can lead to significant learning to better prepare nurse practitioners for the future of health care. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Graduate education of library science in China:Current status and recommendations for improvement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE; Ping; WANG; Ping; TANG; Chengxiu

    2008-01-01

    More than twenty years ago,Wuhan University and Nanjing University offered library science(LS)graduate programs.Since then,LS graduate education has been growing quickly in many aspects.At the same time,however,LS graduate education was also facing enormous challenges stemming from the dynamic development and wide applications of information technologies into the pedagogical arena of teaching and learning at all levels.Social evolution also made it necessary for LS educators to re-examine once again their graduate education model,curricular composition,educational philosophy and educational missions.In analyzing the present situation of LS graduate education in China,this paper focuses on the following issues:1)Growing size of LS graduate education(quantity and quality);2)educational objectives,including research direction and placement for graduates;3)structure of knowledge and curricular construction;4)conditions of administering a library school of high quality and 5)the management of teaching resources.The keystone of this paper is to pinpoint where current library science curricular deficiencies are lying.It is hoped that more serious scholarly discussions and perhaps also even concerted efforts among LS scholars and library practioners may be evoked in having the graduate education system of library and information science thoroughly realigned for the informational needs of the 21stcentury.

  19. Global Management Education Graduate Survey, 2011. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Gregg

    2011-01-01

    Each year for the past 12 years, the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) has conducted a survey of graduate management education students in their final year of business school. This Global Management Education Graduate Survey is distributed to students at participating business schools. The survey allows students to express their…

  20. 2012 Global Management Education Graduate Survey. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Each year for the past 13 years, the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) has conducted a survey of graduate management education students in their final year of business school. The Global Management Education Graduate Survey is distributed to students at participating schools. The survey allows students to express their opinions about…

  1. The Efficacy of Entrepreneurship Education: Perspectives of Irish Graduate Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Mary; Barry, Almar

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the views of Irish graduate entrepreneurs on the efficacy of entrepreneurship education in fostering their development as entrepreneurs. It answers three key questions: (a) what was the graduate entrepreneurs' experience of undergraduate entrepreneurship education; (b) what was the graduate entrepreneurs'…

  2. Incorporating LGBT Issues into Student Affairs Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, D. M.; Viento, Wanda L. E.

    2005-01-01

    The authors address the need for including lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) issues in student affairs graduate education, sharing current practices in select graduate programs and recommending a model for best practice.

  3. Incorporating LGBT Issues into Student Affairs Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, D. M.; Viento, Wanda L. E.

    2005-01-01

    The authors address the need for including lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) issues in student affairs graduate education, sharing current practices in select graduate programs and recommending a model for best practice.

  4. Assessing outcomes of industrial hygiene graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseau, Lisa; Fredrickson, Ann

    2009-05-01

    To ensure that industrial hygiene professionals continue to be prepared for current and future trends, it is important to regularly assess the value of their education. Described here are the results of discussions with employers and a mailed survey of graduates. Comparisons are made with past mailed surveys of both groups. Two sets of discussions were held in late 2005 with employers of industrial hygienists and other health and safety professionals. Twenty-eight participants were asked to discuss current and future needs for professionals in their organization and economic sector, their expectations for knowledge and skills when hiring professionals, methods for finding and hiring, and the importance of ABET accreditation. At the same time, a survey was mailed to 71 industrial hygiene students graduating in the last 15 years. Respondents were asked to rank the value of and their proficiency in 42 competencies. Questions also assessed employment experience, certification, the importance of ABET accreditation, and demographic characteristics. There was a lot of agreement between the two stakeholder groups (employers and graduates) about the most important skill and knowledge areas. Most employers identified communicating effectively and exposure assessment among the most important skills, with designing and initiating research as among the least. Hazard recognition, exposure measurement principles, and personal protective equipment were the most highly ranked knowledge areas. Employers discussed the need for good "business skills" such as teamwork, communication, and project management, and the importance of problem-solving skills. Graduates reported that skills in the areas of recognition, evaluation, and control were most valuable in their first jobs and generally reported high levels of proficiency in these skill areas. There was a similar dichotomy in opinions about accreditation within each stakeholder group. The reputation of the academic program was

  5. A GRADUATE CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN NUCLEAR SAFEGUARDS TECHNOLOGY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FISHBONE, L.; SISKIND, B.; PEPPER, S.

    2005-07-10

    While there are a number of university graduate-education programs that address non-proliferation and safeguards policy issues; there are none in the United States that train students in the specific technical aspects of nuclear safeguards. Formal education of this kind is necessary to sustain the flow of technically trained individuals to diverse programs in safeguards, nonproliferation, and national security. In response to this need, the University of Missouri-Columbia, with assistance from Brookhaven National Laboratory, is initiating a Graduate Certificate Program in Nuclear Safeguards Technology: Students seeking advanced degrees in a variety of technical areas will complete a required sequence of courses in order to receive the certification. Required course work covers topics such as Nuclear Material Control and Accountability (MC&A), Physical Protection (PP); nuclear measurements, and a variety of other relevant subjects. Laboratory-based instruction will be included which will utilize the University of Missouri Research Reactor(MURR). MURR is the largest university-based research reactor and has extensive laboratory resources including a Canberra Aquila MPC&A Operational Monitoring demonstration system.

  6. Listen Up! Be Responsible! What Graduate Students Hear about University Teaching, Graduate Education and Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenlieder, Erin; Kloet, Marie Vander

    2014-01-01

    What we hear at universities and in public conversations is that there is a crisis in graduate student education and employment. We are interested here in the (re)circulation of the discourses of crisis and responsibility. What do graduate students hear about their education, their career prospects, and their responsibilities? How does work in…

  7. Further Education of Higher Education Graduates--The More, the Better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Susanne; Leuze, Kathrin

    2013-01-01

    In times of rapid technological and organisational change, it is argued that lifelong further education becomes more and more important for labour market success. Especially in labour market segments for the highly qualified, it is essential to constantly update one's qualifications. This is reflected in the finding that graduates with tertiary…

  8. Educational trajectories of graduate students in physics education research

    CERN Document Server

    Van Dusen, Ben; Henderson, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Physics education research (PER) is a rapidly growing area of PhD specialization. In this article we examine the trajectories that led respondents into a PER graduate program as well as their expected future trajectories. Data were collected in the form of an online survey sent to graduate students in PER. Our findings show a lack of visibility of PER as a field of study, a dominance of work at the undergraduate level, and a mismatch of future desires and expectations. We suggest that greater exposure is needed so PER is known as a field of inquiry for graduates, that more emphasis should be placed on research beyond the undergraduate level, and that there needs to be stronger communication to graduate students about potential careers.

  9. Current Trends in Graduate Education in Astronomy in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, J. R.; Douglas, K. A.

    2002-12-01

    We begin by describing the infrastructure for graduate education and research in astronomy in Canada. We then describe recent and current trends and issues, including facilities, funding, curriculum, and job prospects. This information has been collected through two channels: through graduate coordinators in astronomy departments and groups in Canadian universities, and through the Graduate Student Committee of the Canadian Astronomical Society (CAS). We emphasize the benefits of having a graduate student chapter in societies such as the CAS and the AAS.

  10. Restructuring STM (Science, Technology, and Mathematics) Education for Entrepreneurship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeudu, F. O.; Ofoegbu, T. O.; Anyaegbunnam, N. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discussed the need to restructure STM (science, technology, and mathematics) education to reflect entrepreneurship. This is because the present STM education has not achieved its aim of making graduates self-reliant. Entrepreneurship education if introduced in the STM education will produce graduate who can effectively manage their…

  11. Optimizing Low Temperature Diesel Combustion (LTC-D) "FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Solicitation for University Research and Graduate Automotice Technology Education (GATE) Centers of Excellence"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rolf Reitz; P. Farrell; D. Foster; J. Ghandhi; C. Rutland; S. Sanders

    2009-07-31

    The engine industry is currently facing severe emissions mandates. Pollutant emissions from mobile sources are a major source of concern. For example, US EPA mandates require emissions of particulate and nitrogen oxides (NOx) from heavy-duty diesel engine exhaust to drop at least 90 percent between 1998 and 2010. Effective analysis of the combustion process is required to guide the selection of technologies for future development since exhaust after-treatment solutions are not currently available that can meet the required emission reduction goals. The goal of this project is to develop methods to optimize and control Low Temperature Combustion Diesel technologies (LTC-D) that offers the potential of nearly eliminating engine NOx and particulate emissions at reduced cost over traditional methods by controlling pollutant emissions in-cylinder. The work was divided into 5 Tasks, featuring experimental and modeling components: 1.) Fundamental understanding of LTC-D and advanced model development, 2.) Experimental investigation of LTC-D combustion control concepts, 3.) Application of detailed models for optimization of LTC-D combustion and emissions, 4.) Impact of heat transfer and spray impingement on LTC-D combustion, and 5.) Transient engine control with mixed-mode combustion. As described in the final report (December 2008), outcomes from the research included providing guidelines to the engine and energy industries for achieving optimal low temperature combustion operation through using advanced fuel injection strategies, and the potential to extend low temperature operation through manipulation of fuel characteristics. In addition, recommendations were made for improved combustion chamber geometries that are matched to injection sprays and that minimize wall fuel films. The role of fuel-air mixing, fuel characteristics, fuel spray/wall impingement and heat transfer on LTC-D engine control were revealed. Methods were proposed for transient engine operation during

  12. Highlights From the Second Conference on Graduate Education in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Renee

    2014-03-01

    The Second Conference on Graduate Education in Physics was held in January 2013 with more than 100 participants from 74 different institutions. The participants comprised a diverse group faculty from large and small departments, staff from industry and national labs, and graduate students and postdocs. The conference was aimed at fostering innovation and creativity in our approach to graduate education in physics. Because the majority of physics PhDs ultimately find permanent employment outside academia, and because of the many competing demands on new faculty, many departments are reviewing their graduate programs. The presentations and discussions at the conference included the increasing attention being paid to broader and more flexible graduate curricula, forming industrial partnerships, strategies to increase diversity, professional skills training for graduate students and postdocs, and improving mentoring practices and instituting family-friendly policies for graduate students.

  13. Higher Education System and Jobless Graduates in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndyali, Lyata

    2016-01-01

    The Tanzania's higher education institutions haven't raised much of expectations the graduates lack the skills required by the labor market and this trend results in mass graduate unemployment, otherwise this would have assisted them to be more self-reliant. The study explores the importance of higher-level business education human resources…

  14. Gender Segregation in the Employment of Higher Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuorinen-Lampila, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the employment and placement in the working life of Finnish higher education graduates (i.e. graduates from universities and polytechnics), focusing on gender equality. It reports a study on gender segregation in higher education and working life, considered in relation to Nordic gender equality policies. The data were…

  15. School Social Workers' Perceptions of Graduate Education Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovak, Karen; Joseph, Alfred Louis, Jr.; Broussard, Anne

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions of school social workers' (SSWers') graduate education training on contemporary issues facing students in schools as well as issues related to this host practice setting. SSWers who completed a specific school social work program were compared with those who did not on perceived graduate education preparation…

  16. Trends in pathology graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, C B

    2001-07-01

    Comprehensive data show trends in graduate medical education in pathology with regard to the numbers of accredited programs, persons certified from those programs, and demographics of the population of first year-trainees in pathology. Experience with US seniors and foreign-trained physicians in the PGY match process for pathology from 1991 through 2000 is presented, along with data on the types of medical schools generating pathology trainees for the PGY-1 year and the top medical schools of origin of US medical graduates who completed the program and became certified in pathology between 1995 and 1999. The impact of reimbursement of the credentialing year is also addressed through data collected from the PRODS Survey 2000, and those results are reviewed. Finally, turnover rates among pathology program directors of combined AP/CP programs and subspecialty programs since 1994 are presented. An analysis of these trends is provided, along with suggestions to improve both the perception of careers in pathology and the actual choice of a career in pathology.

  17. 75 FR 79006 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education...-463), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: Name: Council on Graduate Medical Education... of presentations covering various aspects of graduate medical education, Bureau of Health...

  18. Graduate Education, as One Dean Sees It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereness, Dorothy A.

    1975-01-01

    All too often baccalaureate graduates move directly into graduate study and then into teaching positions, with little or no nursing practice and the opportunity to gain basic clinical competence. (Author)

  19. Graduate Education in a Small Business Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A., III; Longmier, B.; Giambusso, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports on the issues that confront a professor when supervising graduate students and postdocs whose research work is done on site at a small business. The advantages include relative freedom from having to write proposals; the excitement of working on topics that have clear, direct uses; more extensive engineering support than many students get; and hands on day to day mentoring from the rest of the team. Students get direct instruction in technology transfer and small business processes. The disadvantages include isolation from the rest of the students in your Department and campus life, physical isolation from resources such as the seminar program, library, health center, and other student services. In addition, students who need "introduction to research" practicum instruction in electronics and computer skills will not do well. Finally, care must be taken to avoid including proprietary data in the core argument of the work.

  20. Profile of graduates of Israeli medical schools in 1981--2000: educational background, demography and evaluation of medical education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterman, Noemi; Shalev, Ilana

    2005-05-01

    In light of changes in the medical profession, the different requirements placed on physicians and the evolving needs of the healthcare system, the need arose to examine the medical education curriculum in Israel. This survey, conducted by the Samuel Neaman Institute for Science and Technology, summarizes 20 years of medical education in Israel's four medical schools, as the first stage in mapping the existing state of medical education in Israel and providing a basis for decision-making on future medical education programs. To characterize the academic background of graduates, evaluate their attitudes towards current and alternative medical education programs, and examine subgroups among graduates according to gender, medical school, high school education, etc. The survey included graduates from all four Israeli medical schools who graduated between the years 1981 and 2000 in a sample of 1:3. A questionnaire and stamped return envelope were sent to every third graduate; the questionnaire included open and quantitative questions graded on a scale of 1 to 5. The data were processed for the entire graduate population and further analyzed according to subgroups such as medical schools, gender, high school education, etc. The response rate was 41.3%. The survey provided a demographic profile of graduates over a 20 year period, their previous educational and academic background, additional academic degrees achieved, satisfaction, and suggestions for future medical education programs. The profile of the medical graduates in Israel is mostly homogenous in terms of demographics, with small differences among the four medical schools. In line with recommendations of the graduates, and as an expression of the changing requirements in the healthcare system and the medical profession, the medical schools should consider alternative medical education programs such as a bachelor's degree in life sciences followed by MD studies, or education programs that combine medicine with

  1. The future of the pharmaceutical sciences and graduate education: recommendations from the AACP Graduate Education Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu-Pong, Susanna; Gobburu, Jogarao; O'Barr, Stephen; Shah, Kumar; Huber, Jason; Weiner, Daniel

    2013-05-13

    Despite pharma's recent sea change in approach to drug discovery and development, U.S. pharmaceutical sciences graduate programs are currently maintaining traditional methods for master's and doctoral student education. The literature on graduate education in the biomedical sciences has long been advocating educating students to hone soft skills like communication and teamwork, in addition to maintaining excellent basic skills in research. However, recommendations to date have not taken into account the future trends in the pharmaceutical industry. The AACP Graduate Education Special Interest Group has completed a literature survey of the trends in the pharmaceutical industry and graduate education in order to determine whether our graduate programs are strategically positioned to prepare our graduates for successful careers in the next few decades. We recommend that our pharmaceutical sciences graduate programs take a proactive leadership role in meeting the needs of our future graduates and employers. Our graduate programs should bring to education the innovation and collaboration that our industry also requires to be successful and relevant in this century.

  2. Who Graduates from Irish Distance University Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines results from an online survey of recent distance graduates. The study, based in Dublin City University (DCU) addresses a gap in the research on this cohort of graduates. Findings indicate that distance graduates are primarily from lower socio economic backgrounds, a group largely under-represented in full-time university…

  3. What is the value of graduate education? An economic analysis of Army Medical Department Graduate Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Lee W; Broom, Kevin D; Bonica, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Current and forward-looking resource constraints within the federal health system and general health market are generating questions of fiscal or economic viability of a number of programs including graduate education. This article establishes a framework for assessing economic value among graduate health-related programs within the Army Medical Department. The findings of this analysis indicated that the programs evaluated in the study generate positive economic value based on a market-based valuation of extrinsic benefits compared to extrinsic costs for conducting graduate education within each of the programs. Suggestions for future research and policy application are also discussed.

  4. Matching of Developed Generic Competences of Graduates in Higher Education with Labour Market Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukelis, Kestutis; Pileicikiene, Nora

    2012-01-01

    Higher education provides graduates with both monetary and non-monetary benefits. Globalization and technological developments foster utilitarian approach, therefore the transmission of competences that are relevant in labour market is an important target for higher education institutions. The paper presents findings of research on the match of…

  5. Dental hygienists' perceptions of barriers to graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Linda D; Bailey, Angela

    2011-08-01

    To advance the profession of dental hygiene, graduate education is necessary to support growth in research, education, administration, and practice in the discipline and to sustain credibility in a climate in which other health professions require entry-level master's and doctoral degrees. The purpose of this study was to explore what dental hygienists perceive as barriers to pursuing a graduate degree. A survey was developed based on the literature and other national surveys. Data were collected from 160 respondents to the survey: 50 percent held an entry-level baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene, while the rest held an entry-level associate degree (48 percent) or certificate (2 percent) in dental hygiene. All respondents had completed a bachelor's degree. The top five barriers these respondents identified in pursuing graduate education were as follows: 1) cost of graduate education, 2) family responsibilities are too great, 3) concerns about personal funding to pay for graduate education, 4) finding time for graduate school while working, and 5) fear of thesis research. Dental hygiene is one of the few health professions that still have entry-level degrees at the associate and baccalaureate levels. The profession needs to reduce such barriers to enable dental hygienists to pursue graduate education and thus ensure an adequate supply of future leaders, educators, and researchers.

  6. Educational technology in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Resch, David S; Kovach, Regina A

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review the past practices of educational technology and envision future directions for medical education. The discussion starts with a historical review of definitions and perspectives of educational technology, in which the authors propose that educators adopt a broader process-oriented understanding of educational technology. Future directions of e-learning, simulation, and health information technology are discussed based on a systems view of the technological process. As new technologies continue to arise, this process-oriented understanding and outcome-based expectations of educational technology should be embraced. With this view, educational technology should be valued in terms of how well the technological process informs and facilitates learning, and the acquisition and maintenance of clinical expertise.

  7. Educational Technology in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meifeng, Liu; Jinjiao, Lv; Cui, Kang

    2010-01-01

    This paper elaborates the two different academic views of the identity of educational technology in China at the current time--advanced-technology-oriented cognition, known as Electrifying Education, and problem-solving-oriented cognition, known as Educational Technology. It addresses five main modes of educational technology in China: as a…

  8. Tracing Graduates through Reunion Parties: Secondary Technical Education in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziderman, Adrian

    1997-01-01

    A review of enrollments, graduates, and costs for Mozambique secondary technical schools and the results of a follow-up employment survey conducted at graduate reunion parties indicate low internal and external efficiency and high unit costs in the technical education system, particularly "basic" technical schools. Three possible types…

  9. When Graduate Degrees Prostitute the Educational Process: Degrees Gone Wild

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumadue, Richard T.

    2006-01-01

    Graduate degrees prostitute the educational process when they are sold to consumers by unaccredited degree/diploma mills as being equivalent to legitimate, bona-fide degrees awarded by accredited graduate schools. This article carefully analyzes the serious problems of bogus degrees and their association with the religious higher education…

  10. Program Design and Student Outcomes in Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Jeffrey A.; Jakubson, George H.; Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Condie, Scott; Liu, Albert Y.

    2008-01-01

    Doctoral programs in the humanities and related social sciences are characterized by high attrition and long times to degree. In 1991 the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation launched the Graduate Education Initiative (GEI) to improve the quality of graduate programs and in turn reduce attrition and shorten time-to-degree. Over a 10-year period, the…

  11. Development of Graduate Course Education by Industry Collaboration in Center for Engineering Education Development, CEED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Toru; Yoshikawa, Kozo; Nakamura, Masato; Kaneko, Katsuhiko

    New education programs for engineering graduate courses, and the achievements are described. Following the previous reports on overseas and domestic internship2) , 3) , this article states other common programs ; seminars on state of technologies in industries, practical English and internationalization programs, and a program to accept overseas internship students. E-learning system to assist off-campus students is also described. All these programs are developed and conducted by specialist professors invited from industries and national institutions, in collaboration with faculty professors. Students learn how the engineering science apply to the practical problems, acquire wider view and deeper understanding on industries, and gain abilities to act in global society including communication skill, those are not taught in classrooms and laboratories. Educational effects of these industry collaborated programs is significant to activate the graduate course education, although the comprehensive evaluation is the future subject.

  12. Contractor Annual Report and Summary of the Cross-Site Monitoring of the NSF Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) Program: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alina; Chase, Anne; Carney, Jennifer; Boulay, Beth; Chawla, Deepika; Layzer, Carolyn; Litin, Lisa; Zotov, Natasha; Goldsmith, Sharon; Haviland, Don

    2006-01-01

    In 1998 the National Science Foundation launched the Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) program, a major initiative aimed at Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) graduate education. IGERT was developed to meet the challenges of educating U.S. Ph.D. scientists, engineers, and educators with…

  13. Educational Perspectives on Digital Communications Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Clare

    2009-01-01

    This article examines key issues in how new technologies are impacting upon how we teach, learn and collaborate, and uses an educational research project called GRAIL (Graduate Researcher's Academic Identity Online) under development to illustrate some fundamental issues in adopting new technologies. A significant challenge to the effective use of…

  14. A Study on Graduate School Common Education : the University of Tokyo as a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Graduate school common education’ means a program consisting of classes that are taught commonly among graduate schools in a university. It is practiced mainly at research universities in order to provide liberal arts education and career education at the graduate school level as well as the undergraduate level, and it is an important component of graduate education when a university plans to reform its graduate education. This article first reviews earlier studies about graduate school comm...

  15. A New Approach to Developing Interactive Software Modules through Graduate Education

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Nathan E; Goodman, Alyssa A

    2013-01-01

    We discuss a set of fifteen new interactive, educational, online software modules developed by Harvard University graduate students to demonstrate various concepts related to astronomy and physics. Their achievement demonstrates that online software tools for education and outreach on specialized topics can be produced while simultaneously fulfilling project-based learning objectives. We describe a set of technologies suitable for module development and present in detail four examples of modules developed by the students. We offer recommendations for incorporating educational software development within a graduate curriculum and conclude by discussing the relevance of this novel approach to new online learning environments like edX.

  16. Thinking Styles: Teaching and Learning Styles in Graduate Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Tricia A.; Lesh, Jennifer J.; Trocchio, Jennie S.; Wolman, Clara

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between two intellectual styles approaches: Sternberg's thinking styles of teachers and Felder and Silverman's learning styles. Ninety-five graduate students majoring in special education, reading, educational leadership and curriculum, and elementary education completed the Thinking Styles in Teaching…

  17. Closing the Gap: Using Graduate Attributes to Improve Indigenous Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter J.; Atkinson, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Peter J. Anderson and Bernadette Atkinson teach Indigenous and Traditionally Education in a Global World as a fourth year unit in the Faculty of Education at Monash University, Clayton. This paper is a self reflective piece of work where they discuss the use of graduate attributes relating to Indigenous Education, put forward by the Australian…

  18. Thinking Styles: Teaching and Learning Styles in Graduate Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Tricia A.; Lesh, Jennifer J.; Trocchio, Jennie S.; Wolman, Clara

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between two intellectual styles approaches: Sternberg's thinking styles of teachers and Felder and Silverman's learning styles. Ninety-five graduate students majoring in special education, reading, educational leadership and curriculum, and elementary education completed the Thinking Styles in Teaching…

  19. Educational Development for Responsible Graduate Students in the Neoliberal University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Kloet, Marie; Aspenlieder, Erin

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we examine how our work in educational development, specifically in graduate student training, enacts the logic of neoliberalism in higher education in Canada. We approach this examination through a collaborative autoethnographic consideration of and reflection on our practices and experiences as educational developers, the design…

  20. Existing and Future Educational Needs in Graduate and Postgraduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eardley, Ian; Reisman, Yacov; Goldstein, Sue; Kramer, Andrew; Dean, John; Coleman, Eli

    2017-04-01

    This review was designed to make recommendations on future educational needs, principles of curricular development, and how the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) should address the need to enhance and promote human sexuality education around the world. To explore the ways in which graduate and postgraduate medical education in human sexuality has evolved and is currently delivered. We reviewed existing literature concerning sexuality education, curriculum development, learning strategies, educational formats, evaluation of programs, evaluation of students, and faculty development. We reviewed literature relating to four main areas: (i) the current status of the international regulation of training in sexual medicine; (ii) the current delivery of education and training in sexual medicine; (iii) resident and postgraduate education in sexual medicine surgery; and (iv) education and training for allied health professionals. The main findings in these four areas are as follows. Sexual medicine has grown considerably as a specialty during the past 20 years, with many drivers being identified. However, the regulatory aspects of training, assessment, and certification are currently in the early stages of development and are in many ways lagging behind the scientific and clinical knowledge in the field. However, there are examples of the development of curricula with accompanying assessments that have attempted to set standards of education and training that might underlie the delivery of high-quality care to patients in sexual medicine. The development of competence assessment has been applied to surgical training in sexual medicine, and there is increasing interest in simulation as a means of enhancing technical skills training. Although the focus of curriculum development has largely been the medical profession, there is early interest in the development of standards for training and education of allied health professionals. Organizations of professionals

  1. Defining Scholarly Activity in Graduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Erin C.; Roise, Adam; Barr, Daniel; Lynch, Douglas; Lee, Katherine Bao-Shian; Daskivich, Timothy; Dhand, Amar; Butler, Paris D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Scholarly activity is a requirement for accreditation by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. There is currently no uniform definition used by all Residency Review Committees (RRCs). A total of 6 of the 27 RRCs currently have a rubric or draft of a rubric to evaluate scholarly activity. Objective To develop a definition of scholarly activity and a set of rubrics to be used in program accreditation to reduce subjectivity of the evaluation of scholarly activity at the level of individual residency programs and across RRCs. Methods We performed a review of the pertinent literature and selected faculty promotion criteria across the United States to develop a structure for a proposed rubric of scholarly activity, drawing on work on scholarship by experts to create a definition of scholarly activity and rubrics for its assessment. Results The literature review showed that academic institutions in the United States place emphasis on all 4 major components of Boyer's definition of scholarship: discovery, integration, application, and teaching. We feel that the assessment of scholarly activity should mirror these findings as set forth in our proposed rubric. Our proposed rubric is intended to ensure a more objective evaluation of these components of scholarship in accreditation reviews, and to address both expectations for scholarly pursuits for core teaching faculty and those for resident and fellow physicians. Conclusion The aim of our proposed rubric is to ensure a more objective evaluation of these components of scholarship in accreditation reviews, and to address expectations for scholarly pursuits for core teaching faculty as well as those for resident and fellow physicians. PMID:24294446

  2. The Future of the Core Curriculum in Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoennessen, Michael

    2006-12-01

    The recent report of the Joint AAPT/APS Task Force on Graduate Education in Pysics reported that the traditional graduate physics curriculum consists of a “core” of required courses that includes Classical Electrodynamics, Quantum Mechanics, Classical Mechanics, and Statistical Mechanics. Anecdotal evidence suggests that some graduate physics departments have changed or eliminated these requirements, or made other changes such as the elimination or “watering down” of the comprehensive exam. It also has been argued that physics departments need to modernize the curriculum, noting that the traditional core has not changed for 50 years. A panel consisting of Prof. Ken Heller (University of Minnesota), Prof. Michael Paessler (North Carolina State) and Minesh Bacrania (LLNL) as the chair of the APS Forum on Graduate Student Affairs representing the graduate students will discuss the future of the core curriculum.

  3. 34 CFR 535.1 - What is the Bilingual Education: Graduate Fellowship Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Bilingual Education: Graduate Fellowship... (Continued) OFFICE OF BILINGUAL EDUCATION AND MINORITY LANGUAGES AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION BILINGUAL EDUCATION: GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM General § 535.1 What is the Bilingual Education: Graduate...

  4. Collaboration through Role Play among Graduate Students in Educational Leadership in Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Barbara B.; McClannon, Terry W.; Wallace, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    This project addresses the challenge of preparing educational leaders for future roles in administration in K-12 schools. Through a project-based learning scenario set in a 3-D virtual world, graduate students in school administration and instructional technology worked together in simulated school teams to develop proposals for integrating…

  5. Costs of a medical education: comparison with graduate education in law and business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Jason R; Brown, Jeffrey J

    2006-02-01

    The costs of graduate school education are climbing, particularly within the fields of medicine, law, and business. Data on graduate level tuition, educational debt, and starting salaries for medical school, law school, and business school graduates were collected directly from universities and from a wide range of published reports and surveys. Medical school tuition and educational debt levels have risen faster than the rate of inflation over the past decade. Medical school graduates have longer training periods and lower starting salaries than law school and business school graduates, although physician salaries rise after completion of post-graduate education. Faced with an early debt burden and delayed entry into the work force, careful planning is required for medical school graduates to pay off their loans and save for retirement.

  6. Connecting undergraduate science education with the needs of today's graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callier, Viviane; Singiser, Richard H; Vanderford, Nathan L

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate science programs are not providing graduates with the knowledgebase and skills they need to be successful on today's job market. Curricular changes relevant to today's marketplace and more opportunities for internships and work experience during students' secondary education would facilitate a smoother transition to the working world and help employers find graduates that possess both the hard and soft skills needed in the workplace. In this article, we discuss these issues and offer solutions that would generate more marketplace-ready undergraduates.

  7. [Graduate Medical Education - Structured, competency based training in Anesthesiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Wenning, Markus

    2016-07-01

    The "Joint Commission of BDA and DGAI for Graduate Medical Education and Further Education" presents a concept for postgraduate training in anesthesiology. Aiming at a different and demanding generation of young physicians it proposes a new approach to an attractive training in anesthesiology e. g. by simulation as one key concept. It is also intended to meet the guidelines of the German Medical Association of competency based rather than time based or procedure based graduate medical education. A clear structure and the competency based approach shall facilitate a process of professional teaching. The article describes the new concept of graduate medical education by the German Medical Association and the respective aims and objectives of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany. An existing implementation in a hospital is given as an example of feasibility.

  8. Evaluation of Orthodontic Education by Recent Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brin, Ilana; Ben-Bassat, Yocheved

    1990-01-01

    A survey of 138 Hebrew University Hadassah School of Dental Medicine graduates gathered information on demographic characteristics, assessment of the adequacy of time devoted to each subject taught in the orthodontic curriculum, the relative contribution of the program to daily professional activities, and practice styles. Results are reported and…

  9. Evaluation of Orthodontic Education by Recent Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brin, Ilana; Ben-Bassat, Yocheved

    1990-01-01

    A survey of 138 Hebrew University Hadassah School of Dental Medicine graduates gathered information on demographic characteristics, assessment of the adequacy of time devoted to each subject taught in the orthodontic curriculum, the relative contribution of the program to daily professional activities, and practice styles. Results are reported and…

  10. Undergraduate and Graduate Preparation in Educational Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcikowski, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    The advent of high stakes state testing in K-12 education and The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, with its focus on "scientifically-based research" (SBR), has opened new challenges for both undergraduate and graduate preparation programs in education. This address will report on how we are currently preparing our undergraduate and graduate…

  11. 78 FR 52537 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education...-463), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: Name: Council on Graduate Medical Education... education training, and the development of performance measures and longitudinal evaluation of...

  12. Analysis of the Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education Program Fund Allocations for Indirect Medical Education Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Barbara O.; Kawata, Jennifer

    This study analyzed issues related to estimating indirect medical education costs specific to pediatric discharges. The Children's Hospital Graduate Medical Education (CHGNE) program was established to support graduate medical education in children's hospitals. This provision authorizes payments for both direct and indirect medical education…

  13. Evaluating interactive technology for an evolving case study on learning and satisfaction of graduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Marjorie A; Schaffner, Barbara H

    2016-07-01

    Nursing education is challenged to prepare students for complex healthcare needs through the integration of teamwork and informatics. Technology has become an important teaching tool in the blended classroom to enhance group based learning experiences. Faculty evaluation of classroom technologies is imperative prior to adoption. Few studies have directly compared various technologies and their impact on student satisfaction and learning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate technology enhanced teaching methods on the learning and satisfaction of graduate students in an advanced pharmacology class using an unfolding case study. After IRB approval, students were randomly assigned to one of three groups: blogging group, wiki group or webinar group. Students completed the evolving case study using the assigned interactive technology. Student names were removed from the case studies. Faculty evaluated the case study using a rubric, while blinded to the assigned technology method used. No significant difference was found on case study grades, the range of grades on the assignment demonstrated little differences between the methods used. Students indicated an overall positive impact related to networking and collaboration on a satisfaction survey. Impact of technology methods needs to be explored in other areas of graduate nursing education.

  14. Factors of persistence among graduates of athletic training education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G; Dodge, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Previous researchers have indicated that athletic training education programs (ATEPs) appear to retain students who are motivated and well integrated into their education programs. However, no researchers have examined the factors leading to successful persistence to graduation of recent graduates from ATEPs. To determine the factors that led students enrolled in a postprofessional education program accredited by the National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) to persist to graduation from accredited undergraduate ATEPs. Qualitative study. Postprofessional education program accredited by the NATA. Fourteen graduates (12 women, 2 men) of accredited undergraduate entry-level ATEPs who were enrolled in an NATA-accredited postprofessional education program volunteered to participate. We conducted semistructured interviews and analyzed data through a grounded theory approach. We used open, axial, and selective coding procedures. To ensure trustworthiness, 2 independent coders analyzed the data. The researchers then negotiated over the coding categories until they reached 100% agreement. We also performed member checks and peer debriefing. Four themes emerged from the data. Decisions to persist to graduation from ATEPs appeared to be influenced by students' positive interactions with faculty, clinical instructors, and peers. The environment of the ATEPs also affected their persistence. Participants thought they learned much in both the clinic and the classroom, and this learning motivated them to persist. Finally, participants could see themselves practicing athletic training as a career, and this greatly influenced their eventual persistence. Our study gives athletic training educators insight into the reasons students persist to graduation from ATEPs. Specifically, athletic training programs should strive to develop close-knit learning communities that stress positive interactions between students and instructors. Athletic training educators also must work to

  15. Education, employment and practice: Midwifery graduates in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moores, Alison; Puawe, Paula; Buasi, Nancy; West, Florence; Samor, Mary K; Joseph, Nina; Rumsey, Michele; Dawson, Angela; Homer, Caroline S E

    2016-10-01

    Papua New Guinea has a very high maternal mortality rate (773/100,000), low rates of supervised births and a critical shortage of skilled midwives. A midwifery education initiative commenced in 2012, funded by the Australian Government and led by the National Department of Health. One specific objective of the initiative was to improve the standard of clinical teaching and practice in four schools of midwifery. There were 394 midwives educated over the 4 year period (2012-2015) representing half of all midwives in Papua New Guinea. A study was undertaken to describe the educational programme, employment, practices and experiences of graduates who studied midwifery in 2012 and 2013 as part of the initiative. the aim of this paper is to explore the education, employment and practice of newly graduated midwives in Papua New Guinea. a mixed methods descriptive study design was used. Surveys and focus groups were used to gather data. Ethical approval was granted by the relevant Human Research Ethics Committees. all midwifery graduates in 2012 and 2013 from the four midwifery schools in Papua New Guinea were included in the study and almost 80% were contacted. nearly 90% of graduates were working as midwives, with an additional 3% working as midwifery or nursing educators. This study discovered that graduates exhibited increased skills acquisition and confidence, leadership in maternal and newborn care services and a marked improvement in the provision of respectful care to women. The graduates faced challenges to implement evidence based care with barriers including the lack of appropriate resources and differences of opinion with senior staff. factors affecting the quality of midwifery education will need to be addressed if Papua New Guinea is to continue to improve the status of maternal and newborn health. Specifically, the length of the midwifery education, the quality of clinical practice and the exposure to rural and remote area practice need addressing in many

  16. Gateways to Positioning Information and Communication Technology in Accounting Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, N.

    2012-01-01

    In terms of technology, accounting education has not evolved to the extent required by industry and has created a gap in the knowledge and skills of accounting graduates. This article reports on how an educational research tool assisted in finding a place for information and communication technology in accounting education. This article also…

  17. Gateways to Positioning Information and Communication Technology in Accounting Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, N.

    2012-01-01

    In terms of technology, accounting education has not evolved to the extent required by industry and has created a gap in the knowledge and skills of accounting graduates. This article reports on how an educational research tool assisted in finding a place for information and communication technology in accounting education. This article also…

  18. Implementing an Industrial Approach into Physics Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Ken

    2006-04-01

    Physics graduate education has attracted a student population with a both high independence and interest in individual professional work. These personality tendencies have been validated in the students' eyes by both the observed professional behaviors of the majority of their faculty, and by the public acceptance of the persona of ``eccentric but brilliant'' physics students. This has resulted in a self-perpetuating cycle of professionals entering the academic workplace whose interest in whole-organization optimization, as well as the skills needed to optimize organizations, are low to non-existent. But at the same time the needs of the country's technical work force, as defined by national gatherings of prominent leaders from academic, industrial, and governmental communities, continue to list human interaction ``soft skills'' as one of the most important professional traits needed by professionals in their careers. This gap between the physics graduate education and requirements needed by next generation physicists provided an opportunity for experimental approaches to graduate physics education. The University of Arkansas' Physics Department lead the formation of a new experimental approach to interdisciplinary education in the broad field of microelectronics and photonics (microEP) in 1998, resulting in the formation of a stand-alone MS/PhD microEP program. This program implemented an industrial work group approach to graduate education, and won several educational grants including a NSF IGERT and a Department of Education FIPSE. The FIPSE grant in 2001 supported the modification of the industrial work group approach for implementation by the UA physics graduate program to address the gap between national need and current education. This talk will address the key goals of this implementation, the tactics that were put in place to address the goals, and the results of this educational approach since its implementation with the Fall 2001 entering class.

  19. Human Sexuality Education in Marriage and Family Therapy Graduate Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Brian D; Zaid, Samantha J

    2017-02-20

    Given the likelihood that marriage and family therapists will encounter clients with sexual concerns, it is important to know how graduate training programs are preparing future clinicians to work with this domain of life. Sixty-nine marriage and family therapy (MFT) program directors completed an online survey to examine how sexual health education is integrated into graduate training programs. Findings indicate that while the majority of program directors value sexuality curriculum, and most programs require at least one course in this area, there are barriers to privileging sex topics in MFT graduate programs. Barriers include few MFT faculties with expertise in human sexuality and marginalized sexual health topics. Implications for training MFT graduate students and their work with future clients are discussed.

  20. Sociological Support for the Job Placement of Students and Graduates of Higher Educational Institutions: The Experience of the Moscow Institute of Aviation and Technology (MATI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotin, I. S.; Basalai, S. I.; Pugach, V. F.; Mikhailov, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The weak connection between Russia's system of higher education and the labor market in Russia requires that greater attention be paid to preparing students for successful, employment. This will require more careful research into best practices, and the development of more effective links between employers and educational institutions.

  1. Information And Communication Technology (Ict: Catalyst For Enhancing The Intellectual Capacities of Educationists And Closing Observed Skill Gaps of Graduates In Higher Education Institutions In Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusanya Olufunso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the challenges facing the adoption of e-learning and utilization of ICT infrastructure in Nigerian tertiary education. It also looks at the effect of e-learning in tertiary education and the support offered by other ICT infrastructures to the activities of teaching, learning and research.

  2. Technology in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, Kasi

    2011-01-01

    This paper was written to support a position on using technology in education. The purpose of this study was to support the use of technology in education by synthesizing previous research. A variety of sources including books and journal articles were studied in order to compile an overview of the benefits of using technology in elementary,…

  3. Education Technology Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Darrell M.; Bleiberg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology are enabling dramatic changes in education content, delivery, and accessibility. Throughout history, new technologies have facilitated the exponential growth of human knowledge. In the early twentieth century, the focus was on the use of radios in education. But since then, innovators have seen technology as a way to improve…

  4. Advanced Technology for Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Technology for Engineering Education, held at the Peninsula Graduate Engineering Center, Hampton, Virginia, February 24-25, 1998. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the status of advanced technologies for engineering education and to explore the possibility of forming a consortium of interested individuals/universities for curriculum reform and development using advanced technologies. The presentations covered novel delivery systems and several implementations of new technologies for engineering education. Certain materials and products are identified in this publication in order to specify adequately the materials and products that were investigated in the research effort. In no case does such identification imply recommendation or endorsement of products by NASA, nor does it imply that the materials and products are the only ones or the best ones available for this purpose. In many cases equivalent materials and products are available and would probably produce equivalent results.

  5. Triennial Reproduction Symposium: 2012 Casida Award recipient: philosophy for graduate education in reproductive physiology and endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randel, R D

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of graduate education in reproductive physiology and endocrinology is to develop scientists and educators who will create new knowledge and impart this knowledge to appropriate end users in animal agriculture. Technology changes over time but the scientific method remains constant. Society needs scientists and educators who are grounded in the fundamentals of biology as well as in animal agriculture. Students in reproductive physiology and endocrinology require a blending of fundamental sciences with application to agricultural species in their training. My philosophy has been to treat each student as a unique individual needing a program designed to eliminate weaknesses and to magnify strengths. Each student must have a background in statistics and biochemistry. These 2 fundamental areas of science are of such importance that they must be included early in the educational process to assure competence in research or teaching. Students must be involved in their own research as early as possible. Collaborative and interdisciplinary research has been a key factor in developing successful scientists and educators in my graduate education program. Success of students after graduation has been a rewarding aspect of training graduate students.

  6. Graduate Education Program of Design and Integration Capability at Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kikuo

    Department of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University is now developing “Graduate Education Program of Design and Integration Capability” under the MEXT's scheme entitled “Initiatives for Attractive Education in Graduate Schools”. Maturation of society and life, globalization of manufacturing industry, latest demands of human's welfare have changed the meaning of design from functional ensureance to value creation. This requests graduate education of mechanical engineering to turn its definition over both synthesis and analysis and to learning and communication capabilities beyond knowledge itself. With recognizing such a background, the program aims to reform the education curriculum of mechanical engineering by introducing a product design subject which integrates design methodology education and project-based learning over industry- sponsored design problems, several graduate-level fundamental subjects, and the depth area system in which elective subjects are categorized into several areas based on their specialty. This paper describes the objectives, undertakings, promises, etc. of the program.

  7. Financing higher education : the case for a graduate tax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dietsch

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The debate whether university education should be “free” seems misconstrued. Even in a system without tuition fees, someone will have to foot the bill. This paper argues that from the viewpoint of justice, a strong case can be made in higher education for adopting the beneficiary pays principle, and for institutionalising it in the form of a graduate tax. My evaluation from the perspective of justice will focus on the comparison between a “free” university system funded through the general tax system on the one hand, and one financed through a graduate tax on the other. On the beneficiary pays principle defended here, the regressive nature of the general-tax-funded higher education system renders it unjust. Furthermore, I believe we have three reasons to favour a graduate tax in practice. First, I will suggest that it does a better job at implementing the beneficiary pays principle. Second, I will argue that even though the distributive outcome of a corrected general-tax-funded education may be just, it is unlikely to be perceived to be just. A third point of comparison between the two approaches to fund higher education will be international mobility, which will reinforce the case for a graduate tax from the viewpoint of justice.

  8. Perception of Nursing Education Uses of Second Life by Graduate Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benham-Hutchins, Marge; Lall, Maureen P

    2015-09-01

    Although virtual reality platforms, such as Second Life, have been used in academic settings for more than a decade, little is known about how students perceive or adapt to this technology. This article presents the results of a research study that examined the experiences and perceptions of graduate nursing students as they explored the educational applications of Second Life. The students created avatars, interacted with one another in the virtual world, explored healthcare and educational uses, and maintained a reflective blog (online journal) of their experiences. Conventional content analysis was used to analyze the reflective blogs, and four themes were identified: (1) mastering Second Life, (2) technological challenges, (3) social interaction, and (4) knowledge dissemination. The results support the use of virtual reality in education, as even novice graduate students were able to overcome initial challenges and learn to navigate within a virtual world.

  9. Making graduate research in science education more scientific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firman, Harry

    2016-02-01

    It is expected that research conducted by graduate students in science education provide research findings which can be utilized as evidence based foundations for making decisions to improve science education practices in schools. However, lack of credibility of research become one of the factors cause idleness of thesis and dissertation in the context of education improvement. Credibility of a research is constructed by its scientificness. As a result, enhancement of scientific characters of graduate research needs to be done to close the gap between research and practice. A number of guiding principles underlie educational researchs as a scientific inquiry are explored and applied in this paper to identify common shortages of some thesis and dissertation manuscripts on science education reviewed in last two years.

  10. Teacher Education Graduates' Choice (Not) to Enter the Teaching Profession: Does Teacher Education Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, Isabel; Aelterman, Antonia; Devos, Geert

    2014-01-01

    In an era of recurring teacher shortages, Flanders struggles with a considerable proportion of teacher education graduates who do not enter the teaching profession. This study identifies the predictors of teacher education graduates' choice on job entry (teaching profession or not). A prospective research design with two data collection phases is…

  11. The Contribution of Graduate Student Research to "Adult Education"/"Adult Education Quarterly," 1969-1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Adrian; Lee, Jo-Anne

    1994-01-01

    Two surveys (1979, n=129; 1989, n=117) give responses from graduate students who contributed to "Adult Education"/"Adult Education Quarterly," 1969-88. Total of 113 students published 128 articles; 70 were sole author; 46% of all articles were by graduate students. Nine departments accounted for 60% of articles. Males and…

  12. Graduates of Character - Values and Character: Higher Education and Graduate Employment

    OpenAIRE

    Arthur, James; Wilson, Kenneth; Godfrey, Ray; Gray, Ben; Newton, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    Graduates of Character is the product of an empirical enquiry into the values, virtues, dispositions and attitudes of a sample of students and employees who volunteered to be involved. The research team sought host sites which would offer a diverse set of interviewees in gender, ethnicity, religion and aspiration. In this study we discuss what character is taken to mean by students and employees in their years of higher education and employment. We examine what their values are, what...

  13. Entrepreneurship Education and Graduates Unemployment in Oyo State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emunemu, B. O.; Kasali, O. J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated entrepreneurship and graduates' unemployment in Nigeria.The problem of unemployment in Nigeria has become endemic. There have been reported cases of under-employment, seasonal, casual and full blown unemployment. Previous studies on unemployment and factors influencing it in Nigeria identify poor educational standards,…

  14. High Graduate Unemployment Rate and Taiwanese Undergraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chih-Chun

    2011-01-01

    An expansion in higher education in combination with the recent global economic recession has resulted in a high college graduate unemployment rate in Taiwan. This study investigates how the high unemployment rate and financial constraints caused by economic cutbacks have shaped undergraduates' class choices, job needs, and future income…

  15. Reviving Reification: Education, Indoctrination, and Anxiety in "The Graduate"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    This article takes its inspiration and method from Slavoj Zizek's work that reads and integrates social theory with popular culture through the medium of film. I use the film "The Graduate" (Nichols 1967) as a prism to illuminate the concept of reification as a fundamental, defining feature of modern societies and their educational systems. The…

  16. The Enigma of Graduate Nursing Education: Advanced Generalist? Specialist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Suellen B.; Hoffman, Sharon E.

    1986-01-01

    To pin down the appropriate parameters for graduate nursing education, the authors say we must explore the meanings of advanced generalist and specialist. They discuss the focus, scope, and depth of the community health major, psychiatric mental health nursing, nursing care of children, maternity nursing, medical-surgical nursing, and nursing…

  17. Graduate Design Education: The Case for an Accretive Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walliss, Jillian; Greig, Joan

    2009-01-01

    In 2008 the University of Melbourne began implementation of the Melbourne Model, its new vision for higher education in Australia. Six broad undergraduate university degrees have been introduced and graduate schools created. Students may now progress from an undergraduate generalist degree, with major, to a professional Masters. Alternatively,…

  18. Graduate Programmes in Educational Administration: The Commonwealth Caribbean and Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olembo, Jotham Ombisi

    The availability and characteristics of graduate programs in educational administration offered by universities in African and Caribbean countries belonging to the Commonwealth are summarized in this paper. The programs reviewed are offered by universities in the West Indies, Guyana, Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Kenya, and Nigeria. The paper notes that…

  19. Cartographies: Graduate Education, SOTL and the Third Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremonte, Colleen M.

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the ways in which the scholarship of teaching and learning (SOTL) can be integrated into graduate education in the humanities to support future faculty preparation in teaching. Drawing on data from a multi-year project at a research-1 institution in the United States, and theories from postmodern geography and postcolonial…

  20. ESTIMATION OF RADIOANXIETY OF MEDICAL HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Baltrukova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to an estimation of the level of radioanxiety of graduates of medical higher educational institutions and degree of their knowledge of negative influence of ionizing irradiation on the personnel and patients is considered. As their future trade directly or indirect – through patients, is connected with ionizing irradiation sources.

  1. TRIENNIAL REPRODUCTION SYMPOSIUM: American Society of Animal Science L. E. Casida Award for Excellence in Graduate Education: Thoughts on mentoring graduate students in reproductive biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M F

    2016-07-01

    Programs in animal science are particularly well suited for graduate education because students can receive comprehensive training in the laboratory as well as with the whole animal. Furthermore, graduate students in animal science have the opportunity to understand how their research relates to a real world problem. Graduate students need to take ownership of their education by identifying training goals, choosing a mentor who will help them achieve their goals, and becoming engaged in research as soon as possible. In my own graduate program, I emphasize concepts more than techniques and I believe that graduate course work should focus on the basic areas of science that underlie reproductive biology (e.g., endocrinology, biochemistry, physiology, immunology, and statistics). Based on the increase in technology available for scientific investigation and the diversity of expertise required to address important research problems, graduate students need to learn the importance of establishing productive collaborations and begin building a scientific network. Preparation for graduate school frequently begins early with a curiosity and passion for understanding how biology works. Undergraduate courses can facilitate scientific thinking by providing opportunities in lectures and laboratories for students to transition from passive learners to thinking of themselves as animal scientists. There is a profound difference between individuals who view themselves as practitioners of a discipline and those who are simply trying to complete a course requirement. Teachers of undergraduate courses should incorporate experiential learning exercises into their lectures and laboratories to provide undergraduate students the opportunity to function as animal scientists and to embrace their scientific education. Graduate training has been the most enjoyable aspect of my career and it has been a joy to witness the achievements of students following completion of their degree!

  2. 78 FR 27407 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education...-463), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: Name: Council on Graduate Medical Education...: The meeting will be open to the public. Purpose: The Council on Graduate Medical Education...

  3. JOB EXPERIENCES OF 2010 RIZAL TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY BUSINESSMANAGEMENT GRADUATES: CORE ESSENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renilda A. Magsino

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred eighty-nine 2010 business management graduates of the Rizal Technological University, a state university in the Philippines were traced and their employment experiences solicited using the social networking site, the Facebook (FB. Using the descriptive research design, the data were used to portray the traced graduates’ employment profiles and capture their reflections to explore a wider array of dimensions and be able to give light on the graduate employment situation that would contribute to solving the government’s education and economic problems. One hundred eighty-six or 64% of the 289 traced graduates were found to have verifiable employment data. Out of the 186, 43 or 23% were working for banking and finance-related sector and 39 or 21% were in trading and merchandising. The study showed that most of the graduates were able to start a career path by gaining entry to prestigious companies. Five themes emerged from the 16 reflections: self confidence in performing assigned tasks, positive attitude, value of experience, traits developed in school and financial considerations. The themes that emerged reflected three core essences or factors that made them stay or contributory to their being retained by their employers on the job: financial or being able to buy what they want and help the family in the daily expenses; attitude, self-confidence and skills developed in school, as contributory to their work performance and retention; and experience, the main reason for staying on the job despite physical and emotional difficulties.

  4. Delayed Effects of Graduate Education on Increased Productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Simister

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available ‘Human Capital Theory’ shows that education is a vital part of improving productivity.  This paper investigates effects of tertiary education (post-school education: at universities, higher-education colleges, and similar institutions on how productive an employee is.  A problem with such research is to identify which variable is the cause, and which is the effect.  This paper uses time-series regression analysis of World Bank data, on the fraction of a country’s workforce with tertiary education, and productivity.  This paper also uses Britain as a case study: the British Household Panel Study shows what happens to a graduate in the years after they leave university.  The delayed effects of education on output makes clear that education is a cause (rather than an effect of improvements in productivity.  In conclusion, university-level education is beneficial to economic growth.

  5. Technology based Education System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant Hiran, Kamal; Doshi, Ruchi; Henten, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded in the acad...

  6. Building a Graduate Professional Culture: A Case for Student Involvement in Developing and Sustaining an Adult Education Graduate Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crew, Edith; Lewis, John L.

    A proposed approach to the generation of a graduate professional culture is grounded in the planned, systematic involvement of students in developing and sustaining a graduate adult education program. The approach has a conceptual basis in the works of Jahns and Urbano (1986), who presented a framework of developmental stages toward completion of…

  7. A new graduate education program in radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beldham-Collins, Rachael [Radiation Oncology Network, Department of Radiation Oncology, Westmead Hospital, PO Box 533, Wentworthville NSW 2145 (Australia); School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia); Milinkovic, Danielle [School of Medical Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW 1825 (Australia)], E-mail: d.milinkovic@fhs.usyd.edu.au

    2009-02-15

    Purpose: The evaluation of the Radiation Oncology Network's (RON) in house professional development year (PDY) support program was implemented to determine the appropriate teaching, learning and transfer of learning strategies that assist the newly practicing radiation therapists' transition into the busy working environment. As the AIR program saw little clinical support offered to participating new graduates and thus a need for further educational support was felt. The RON support program was initially introduced as the clinical education support component of the NSW PDY program that was introduced in 1995 by the Australian Institute of Radiography. Method: Following the facilitation of the RON PDY program over a twelve month period, qualitative feedback was obtained using a focus group consisting of new graduates from the program. Two moderators facilitated the focus group: one moderator facilitated the discussion while the second moderator transcribed it. The graduate practitioners were asked a number of questions related to the teaching and learning strategies employed by the program as well as the structure of the program. Results/discussion: The responses were analysed into the following themes: teaching and learning strategies, transfer of learning, facilitation and future learning needs. Overall the graduate practitioners found the program nurtured their skill, knowledge and attitudes appropriately at such a critical stage in their career.

  8. Diversity in graduate nursing education: an experience in collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Gloria; Courage, Myrna; Yearwood-Dixon, Alma

    2003-01-01

    The recent shift in public policy away from the use of affirmative action programs in the admissions process of institutes of higher learning has motivated colleges and universities to explore alternative means for achieving their goal to increase the diversity of their student bodies. The imperative to promote diversity is particularly relevant in nursing education because there is an emphasis on preparing students to enter a profession that is committed to providing health care to all regardless of gender, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic background. In 1997, the nursing programs at 2 Florida schools-Bethune-Cookman College (B-CC), a historic African-American college, and the University of Florida (UF), a land-grant university-initiated a collaborative relationship with the goals of improving access to graduate education for B-CC graduates and increasing the diversity of the graduate student body at UF. A central component of the collaboration is the Gator-Cats Mentoring Program in which students are recruited through career counseling and financial planning, mentored through the application process and the program, and offered continuing support in the skills required in graduate studies. This collaboration can serve as a model for other institutions seeking effective ways of increasing the diversity of their student populations.

  9. [Academic misconduct of graduates and the credit education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaoyan; Tang, Xiaoya; Fan, Xuegong

    2011-10-01

    Nowadays the phenomenon of academic misconduct (such as plagiarism, fabrication, falsification, etc.) is very frequent. The reasons for academic misconduct are involved in the problems in graduate education system, social environment and students themselves. Therefore, colleges and universities should place great emphasis on constructing a healthy school environment and academic atmosphere for failure tolerance with the help of high-tech modern means. It also needs to improve the academic supervision and evaluation system, strengthen the punishments for academic misconduct and enhance the mentor's exemplary role in education. The eventual goal for our education is to obtain innovative talents who are integrity, respect science and truth, and are good samples for academic performances.

  10. Educational technology, reimagined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Michael

    2010-01-01

    "Educational technology" is often equated in the popular imagination with "computers in the schools." But technology is much more than merely computers, and education is much more than mere schooling. The landscape of child-accessible technologies is blossoming in all sorts of directions: tools for communication, for physical construction and fabrication, and for human-computer interaction. These new systems and artifacts allow educational designers to think much more creatively about when and where learning takes place in children's lives, both within and outside the classroom.

  11. The Contribution of Graduate Student Research Published in "The Journal of Adult Education/Adult Education Quarterly," 1969-1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Adrian; And Others

    A study determined the extent to which graduate students have contributed to the body of adult education knowledge through published research. It described content of graduate research articles and identified graduate programs, faculty who supported its production, and levels of graduate study involved in research publication. The study also…

  12. Graduate Education in Kinesiology: Are We Part of "America's Backbone for Competitiveness and Innovation"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2008-01-01

    Graduate education in the United States has been identified as being the backbone of American competitiveness and innovation in a recent report by the Council of Graduate Schools. The report provides a framework for examining the role of graduate education in partnership with business and government to advance an action agenda for achieving…

  13. Graduate Education in Kinesiology: Are We Part of "America's Backbone for Competitiveness and Innovation"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePauw, Karen P.

    2008-01-01

    Graduate education in the United States has been identified as being the backbone of American competitiveness and innovation in a recent report by the Council of Graduate Schools. The report provides a framework for examining the role of graduate education in partnership with business and government to advance an action agenda for achieving…

  14. What is expected of higher education graduates in the 21st century?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humburg, M.; van der Velden, R.K.W.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on the skills higher education graduates are expected to have in today’s economy and the role of higher education in equiping graduates with these skills. First, we identify 6 trends which form the basis of the changing role of graduates in economic life. These trends are t

  15. What is expected of higher education graduates in the 21st century?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humburg, M.; van der Velden, R.K.W.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we reflect on the skills higher education graduates are expected to have in today’s economy and the role of higher education in equipping graduates with these skills. First, we identify 6 trends which form the basis of the changing role of graduates in economic life. These trends are

  16. Graduate Ethics Education: A Content Analysis of Syllabi

    OpenAIRE

    Grifith, Shannon M; Domenech Rodriguez, Melanie M.; Anderson, Austin J

    2014-01-01

    Ethical practice of psychology is emphasized by APA accreditation requirements. The current study is a content analysis of 53 ethics courses syllabi from all APA accredited programs listed in the American Psychologist 2011 annual report. This article is a companion to Domenech Rodríguez et al. (2013) and contributes knowledge on the current state of graduate ethics education. Of the parent project respondents (N = 364), 14% returned syllabi for the present study. General information (e.g., ob...

  17. Lessons of Educational Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Repetto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Reception of the book "Lessons of Educational Technology." The book contains materials work in certain aspects relevant to the formation of a teacher who is able to meet the challenges of society 'knowledge.

  18. Evaluating a Graduate Professional Development Program for Informal Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jeremy Paul

    This study is an examination and evaluation of the outcomes of a series of courses that I helped build to create a graduate certificate. Specifically, I wanted to evaluate whether or not the online iteration of the Informal Science Institutions Environmental Education Graduate Certificate Program truly provided the long term professional development needed to enhance the skills of the formal and informal educators participating so that they could contribute meaningfully to the improvement of science literacy in their respective communities. My role as an internal evaluator provided an extraordinary opportunity to know the intent of the learning opportunities and why they were constructed in a particular fashion. Through the combination of my skills, personal experiences both within the certificate's predecessor and as an educator, I was uniquely qualified to explore the outcomes of this program and evaluate its effectiveness in providing a long-term professional development for participants. After conducting a literature review that emphasized a need for greater scientific literacy in communities across America, it was evident that the formal education enterprise needs the support of informal educators working on the ground in myriad different settings in ways that provide science as both content and process, learning science facts and doing real science. Through a bridging of informal science educators with formal teachers, it was thought each could learn the culture of the other, making each more fluent in accessing community resources to help make these educators more collaborative and able to bridge the classroom with the outside world. This bridge promotes ongoing, lifelong learning, which in turn can help the national goal of greater scientific literacy. This study provided insight into the thinking involved in the learners' growth as they converted theory presented in course materials into practice. Through an iterative process of reviewing the course

  19. The unintended consequences of portfolios in graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, Alisa; Andolsek, Kathryn; Padmore, Jamie S

    2009-11-01

    Portfolios have emerged in graduate medical education despite lack of consensus on their definition, purpose, or usefulness. Portfolios can be used as a tool for residents to record their accomplishments, reflect on their experiences, and gain formative feedback. This exercise may help prepare physicians for lifelong learning as well as enhance patient care. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has endorsed and may soon require the use of portfolios as an assessment tool to evaluate resident competence. However, using portfolios for summative evaluation purposes such as making high-stakes decisions on resident promotion or matriculation may deter resident candidness. In addition, the use of portfolios in clinical settings raises issues unique to the health care setting such as patient privacy, disclosure of clinical information, and professional liability exposure of physicians. It is not clear that peer-review statutes that sometimes protect educational materials used in teaching and evaluation of residents would also bar disclosure and/or evidentiary use of portfolio contents. Is the teaching institution, resident, or graduate vulnerable to requests and subpoenas for the portfolio contents? If so, then a resident's documentation of insecurities, suboptimal performance, or bad outcomes would be ripe for discovery in a medical malpractice lawsuit. If embraced too quickly and without sufficient reflection on the nuances of implementation, this well-intentioned initiative may present unintended legal consequences.

  20. From students to researchers: The education of physics graduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuhfen

    This dissertation aims to make two research contributions: (1) In physics education research, this work aims to advance our understanding of physics student learning at the graduate level. This work attempts to better understand how physics researchers and teachers are produced, and what factors support or encourage the process of becoming a researcher and a teacher. (2) In cognitive science research in the domain of expert/novice differences, researchers are interested in defining and understanding what expertise is. This work aims to provide some insight into some of the components of expertise that go into becoming a competent expert researcher in the domain of physics. This in turn may contribute to our general understanding of expertise across multiple domains. Physics graduate students learn in their classes as students, teach as teaching assistants, and do research with research group as apprentices. They are expected to transition from students to independent researchers and teachers. The three activities of learning, teaching, and research appear to be very different and demand very different skill-sets. In reality, these activities are interrelated and have subtle effects on each other. Understanding how students transition from students to researchers and teachers is important both to PER and physics in general. In physics, an understanding of how physics students become researchers may help us to keep on training physicists who will further advance our understanding of physics. In PER, an understanding of how graduate students learn to teach will help us to train better physics teachers for the future. In this dissertation, I examine physics graduate students' approaches to teaching, learning, and research through semi-structured interviews. The collected data is interpreted and analyzed through a framework that focuses on students' epistemological beliefs and locus of authority. The data show how students' beliefs about knowledge interact with their

  1. Innovation in Graduate Education for Health Professionals in Humanitarian Emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Dabney P; Anderson, Mark; Shahpar, Cyrus; Del Rio, Carlos; Curran, James W

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this report was to show how the Center for Humanitarian Emergencies (the Center) at Emory University (Atlanta, Georgia USA) has trained graduate students to respond to complex humanitarian emergencies (CHEs) through innovative educational programs, with the goal of increasing the number of trained humanitarian workers. Natural disasters are on the rise with more than twice as many occurring from 2000-2009 as there were from 1980-1989. In 2012 alone, 144 million people were affected by a natural disaster or displaced by conflict worldwide. This has created an immense need for trained humanitarian workers to respond effectively to such disasters. The Center has developed a model for educational programming that targets learners along an educational continuum ranging from the undergraduate level through continuing professional education. These programs, based in the Rollins School of Public Health (RSPH) of Emory University, include: a competency-based graduate certificate program (the Certificate) in humanitarian emergencies; a fellowship program for mid-career professionals; and funded field practica. The competency-based Certificate program began in 2010 with a cohort of 14 students. Since then, 101 students have received the Certificate with 50 more due for completion in 2016 and 2017 combined. The fellowship program for mid-career professionals has hosted four fellows from conflict-affected or resource-poor countries, who have then gone on to assume leadership positions with humanitarian organizations. From 2009-2015, the field practicum program supported 34 students in international summer practicum experiences related to emergency response or preparedness. Students have participated in summer field experiences on every continent but Australia. Together the Certificate, funded field practicum opportunities, and the fellowship comprise current efforts in providing innovative education and training for graduate and post-graduate students of public

  2. Global challenges of graduate level Ayurvedic education: A survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Kishor; Gehlot, Sangeeta; Singh, Girish; Rathore, H C S

    2010-01-01

    In the present day scenario, Ayurveda is globally being perceived in several contradictory ways. Poor quality of Ayurveda graduates produced as a result of poorly structured and poorly regulated education system is at least one of the important factors responsible for this scenario. The present study was carried out to evaluate the 'Global challenges of graduate level Ayurvedic education' and is based on the responses of Ayurvedic students and Ayurvedic teachers from various educational institutions of India to a methodically validated questionnaire. As the study indicates, the poor standard of Ayurvedic education in India is definitely a cause of concern. The curriculum of Bachelor of Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery (BAMS) course of studies is required to be reviewed and restructured. The syllabi are required to be updated with certain relevant topics like laws governing the intellectual property rights, basic procedures of standardization of medicinal products, fundamental methods of evaluating the toxicity of the medicinal products, essentials of healthcare management and the basics of cultivation and marketing of medicinal plants. Furthermore, the study suggests that the Ayurvedic academicians are required to be trained in standard methods of research and documentation skills, and the educational institutions are required to be encouraged to contribute their share in building up the evidence base for Ayurveda in the form of quality education and research.

  3. 75 FR 14447 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... patient-centered primary care collaborative; and (5) the relationship between primary care, population... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education...-463), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: ] Name: Council on Graduate Medical...

  4. 75 FR 34464 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education...-463), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: Name: Council on Graduate Medical...

  5. Technology and Educational Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boocock, Sarane S.

    2012-01-01

    Most current debate on instructional technology is characterized either by grandiose speculation on the salvation of education through automation (without specification of "what" and "how" technological innovations will actually be introduced in specific classroom situations, and how the changes will be financed), or by jargon-filled hairsplitting…

  6. Educational Technology Funding Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Amy E.

    2008-01-01

    Library and cross-disciplinary literature all stress the increasing importance of instructional technology in higher education. However, there is a dearth of articles detailing funding for library instructional technology. The bulk of library literature on funding for these projects focuses on one-time grant opportunities and on the architecture…

  7. The Educational Technology Myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, David

    2012-01-01

    If one wants to teach youth to think, one has to restrain himself from doing all their thinking for them. One has to refrain from specifying in advance what they are going to think. Yet, this is just what educational technologists are consistently guilty of doing. Educational technology is committed to excluding the possibility of anything new or…

  8. Teaching Graduate Students How To Do Informal Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, S. A.; Crone, W.; Dunwoody, S. L.; Zenner, G.

    2011-12-01

    One of the most important skills a student needs to develop during their graduate days is the skill of communicating their scientific work with a wide array of audiences. That facility will serve them across audiences, from scientific peers to students to neighbors and the general public. Increasingly, graduate students express a need for training in skills needed to manage diverse communicative environments. In response to that need we have created a course for graduate students in STEM-related fields which provides a structured framework and experiential learning about informal science education. This course seeks to familiarize students with concepts and processes important to communicating science successfully to a variety of audiences. A semester-long course, "Informal Science Education for Scientists: A Practicum," has been co-taught by a scientist/engineer and a social scientist/humanist over several years through the Delta Program in Research, Teaching, & Learning at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The course is project based and understanding audience is stressed throughout the class. Through development and exhibition of the group project, students experience front end, formative and summative evaluation methods. The disciplines of the participating students is broad, but includes students in the geosciences each year. After a brief description of the course and its evolution, we will present assessment and evaluation results from seven different iterations of the course showing significant gains in how informed students felt about evaluation as a tool to determine the effectiveness of their science outreach activities. Significant gains were found in the graduate students' perceptions that they were better qualified to explain a research topic to a lay audience, and in the students' confidence in using and understanding evaluation techniques to determine the effectiveness of communication strategies. There were also increases in the students

  9. INCREASE OF DEMAND FOR GRADUATES OF HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslan A. Abramov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the research is identification of the objective and subjective factors influencing professional self-realization of graduates of the field of study «Public and Municipal Administration».Methods. The authors have conducted anonymous opinion survey of prestigious economic universities undergraduates (bachelor and master degree course and graduates specialized in this sphere. The questions were about correspondence of gained academic qualification and actual occupation, the importance of degree certificate, satisfaction with education quality, attitude to different aspects of studying etc. In order to make relevant conclusions, the authors apply comparative, statistical, eneralization and induction methods.Results. Informants’ answers helped to count out the percentage of graduates whose occupation is connected with public administration, understand the reasons of choosing relevant master course, assess the significance of acquired competence and qualification for job placement at governmental organizations. The main scientific result of the research is working out a system of recommendations aimed at increasing demand for graduates specialized in the sphere of civil service, and, consequently, improving the efficiency of investment in management training. It is specified that the most important issues in this regard are forethought of career choice, students’ vision of academic planning, and approach to teaching, practice-oriented type of education.Scientific novelty. Having organized the data and compared it with previous surveys’ results, the authors reveal the factors essential to professional success and application of knowledge as well as correlation of these factors which means meeting the objective of the research.Practical significance. The presented materials can be used for the further modernization of the process of educational planning and taken into notice while developing academic programs for the

  10. Graduate Nurse Education in Haiti: Lessons Taught and Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Steven L; Alexandre, Margarett S

    2016-10-01

    The plight of the people of Haiti that came to the world's attention following the devastating earthquake there in 2010 has for the most part receded into the background amid other issues despite their continuing economic and health problems. The purpose of this article is to explore the experiences of the first graduate nurse students in Haiti. The program is funded and operated by a nonprofit, nongovernment nursing organization, Promoting Health in Haiti, based in New York City. A narrative was generated by doing focus groups and interviews with 10 of the students in the program. Three themes found in the narrative are pressing on amid uncertainty and unanswered questions, living and learning amid competing responsibilities, and enjoying support while learning new skills that can make a difference. The implications for graduate nurse education in low-resource countries are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Use of learning styles to enhance graduate education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Cindy

    2011-01-01

    This study was carried out to help occupational therapy students utilize learning strategies necessary to be successful at the graduate level. Students completed The Kolb Learning Style Inventory and Motivation Strategies for Learning Questionnaire to identify their personal learning preferences. These preferences were used as the basis for a remediation program carried out during the second semester of the curriculum following less than adequate performance during the first semester in basic science content. At mid-term, all but one student was satisfied with her performance in neuroanatomy. Following a closer scrutiny of the dissatisfied student's approach to learning, the student and program developer devised a more comprehensive plan. By the end of the semester, all students successfully passed neuroanatomy while adequately balancing other courses within the semester. Given the initial positive results, the utilization of attention to learning styles as a means to direct student learning may be a promising model for struggling students in graduate education.

  12. Vocational Indecision in College Graduates. Educational Assessment Center Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunneborg, Patricia W.

    This study compared 127 vocationally undecided college graduates matched by sex, age, and major with graduates who had selected an occupation on a Survey of Graduating Seniors. Undecideds had a significantly lower GPA than decideds, intended noncareer activities following graduation, less often were going to graduate school, and were far less…

  13. Graduate Student Preference for Instructor Feedback in MBA Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Morgan

    2011-01-01

    Distance education is an accepted delivery option for education at all levels today. In this environment, education is delivered via one of many course management platforms (CMP), which support a variety of technologies. This provides a great opportunity to apply and test the various facets of Media Richness Theory. This paper describes the result…

  14. Kenya and distance education: a model to advance graduate nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutea, Naomi; Cullen, Deborah

    2012-08-01

    Africa is faced with a myriad of challenges, such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and a variety of political and historical complications that have affected the educational system for advanced nursing practice. In Kenya, the current situation in the higher education sector does not give nurses an opportunity to pursue graduate education after they have acquired the basic diploma in nursing due to limited government support and the type of education system existing in the country today. Although distance education has been available in Kenya for professionals such as teachers, in public universities, this kind of opportunity is unreachable for nurses who are working and need to further their education. Nurses desire to have access to advanced practice education to equip them with the relevant knowledge to cope and address the complex health issues arising in the management and care of patients. A collaborative model is presented as a potential solution for this need. Four major constituents are identified including hospitals and agencies, communities of interest, Kenyan universities and international education partners. Each has a part to play including contributions to information, communication of opinion and expertise, money and support, infrastructure and in-kind resources. Distance education is cost-effective and will help in building capacity at various levels of nursing including leadership in clinical practice, teaching, administration and research.

  15. Educational challenges faced by international medical graduates in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashim A

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed Hashim Gastroenterology Department, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Brighton, UK Introduction: International medical graduates (IMGs in the UK constitute approximately one-quarter of the total number of doctors registered in the General Medical Council (GMC. The transition of IMGs into the health care system in the UK is accompanied by significant sociocultural and educational challenges. This study aims to explore the views of IMGs in medical training on the educational challenges they face.Methods: This study was conducted in the Kent, Surrey and Sussex region in 2015. All IMGs who work in medical (physicianly training programs were included. Data were collected through a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Thematic approach was used to analyze the qualitative data.Results: Of the total 61 IMGs included, 17 responded to the survey and 3 were interviewed. The common educational barriers faced by IMGs were related to lack of appreciation of the values and structure of the National Health Service (NHS, ethical and medicolegal issues, receiving feedback from colleagues and the different learning strategies in the UK. IMGs suggested introduction of a mandatory dedicated induction program in the form of formal teaching sessions. They also believed that a supervised shadowing period prior in the first job in the UK would be beneficial. Further assessment areas should be incorporated into the prequalifying examinations to address specific educational needs such as NHS structure and hospital policies. Other measures such as buddying schemes with senior IMGs and educating NHS staff on different needs of IMGs should also be considered.Conclusion: This study highlighted important educational challenges faced by IMGs and generated relevant solutions. However, the opinions of the supervisors and other health care professionals need to be explored. Keywords: international medical graduates, IMG, educational barriers

  16. Tablet Technologies and Education

    OpenAIRE

    Heidi L. Schnackenberg

    2013-01-01

    Recently, tablet technologies have grown tremendously in popularity. They lend themselves to a myriad of learning modalities and therefore may be well suited to use in schools and universities. While teachers work to find useful applications for tablets, students have already begun using them at home and, in secondary and higher education, in classes. Unfortunately, sometimes when students use tablets for courses they play with “apps,” rather than using the technology as a useful and powerful...

  17. Evaluation of the Sustainable Development Graduation Track at Delft University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Werk, G.; Kamp, L. M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the sustainable development graduation track at TU Delft. This track can be followed by all students of TU Delft. It consists of an interdisciplinary colloquium "Technology in Sustainable Development", 300 h of self-chosen courses on sustainable development and a graduation project in which sustainable development is…

  18. Evaluation of the Sustainable Development Graduation Track at Delft University of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Werk, G.; Kamp, L. M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper evaluates the sustainable development graduation track at TU Delft. This track can be followed by all students of TU Delft. It consists of an interdisciplinary colloquium "Technology in Sustainable Development", 300 h of self-chosen courses on sustainable development and a graduation project in which sustainable development is…

  19. Educating vocationally trained family physicians: a survey of graduates from a postgraduate medical education programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Wayne K; Dovey, Susan M

    2016-06-01

    INTRODUCTION Since 1991 the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand has offered postgraduate qualifications specifically designed to educate general practitioners (GPs) about their unique work environment. AIM To determine motivations and impacts of postgraduate education for practising GPs. METHODS Survey of the 100 graduates of the University of Otago, Dunedin postgraduate general practice programme. Ninety five living graduates were approached and 70 (73.7%) responded. Quantitative data about disposition of respondents before enrolling and after completion of the programme were analysed using chi-square and paired t-tests. Free text responses about motivations, impacts and outcomes of the program were thematically analysed. RESULTS 64 GPs graduated with a postgraduate diploma and 36 with a masters degree in general practice. Although the mean number of graduates was 3.5 and 2.0 (respectively), annual enrolments averaged 25.1. Most graduates (60.9%) were aged in their 40s when they started studying and most (94.3%) had a spouse and/or children at home. DISCUSSION This voluntary postgraduate medical education complements traditional medical training but has low external value despite personal, practising and professional benefits. Graduates valued engagement above completion of a qualification. KEYWORDS Medical education; general practitioners; scholarship; professionalism.

  20. Assuring Graduate Competency: A Technology Acceptance Model for Course Guide Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Amara; Richards, Deborah; Busch, Peter; Bilgin, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Higher education institutions typically express the quality of their degree programs by describing the qualities, skills, and understanding their students possess upon graduation. One promising instructional design approach to facilitate institutions' efforts to deliver graduates with the appropriate knowledge and competencies is curriculum…

  1. School-to-Work Transition of Career and Technical Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Becky Wai-Ling; Leach, Miki; Ruiz, Yedalis; Nelson, Consuelo; DiCocco, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed the career development of career and technical education (CTE) high school graduates during their school-to-work transition, specifically their adaptability in the face of barriers. Forty graduates (22 men, 18 women) from working-class backgrounds participated in baseline surveys at graduation and phenomenological interviews 1…

  2. Efficiency in Graduate Education: An Attempted Reform. A Report to the Ford Foundation. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, David W.

    The results of a seven-year program designed to reform graduate education in the humanities and social sciences sponsored by the Ford Foundation and 10 leading university graduate schools are reported. Evaluation focused on the Ford Foundation Graduate Program, original proposals submitted by the 10 universities, annual reports and data submitted…

  3. Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education. Graduate Plan for Enhancing Diversity: Oklahoma State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Molly

    This report describes Oklahoma State University's (OSU's) Graduate Plan for Enhancing Diversity (GPED), a program designed to increase the number of minority group graduate students at OSU. GPED goals are: the population of OSU graduate students pursuing degrees will reflect the demographics of the state population by the year 2004; and the…

  4. Pediatric disaster simulation in graduate and undergraduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Elizabeth N; Hannafin, Nancy M; Nelson, H Wayne

    2013-01-01

    A university partnered with community agencies to include children and parents in a mass casualty full scale exercise on an academic campus. Nursing undergraduate students provided care to students in a multidisciplinary environment that involved hundreds of victims and health care personnel. One graduate nursing student worked with a youth theater group to provide disaster preparedness education to the children, culminating in their participation in the disaster exercise. Parents reported that the exercise was positive, that they would participate again, and that their children enjoyed the experience. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Teaching development in undergraduate and graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Geri; Katz, Debra A; Eddins-Folensbee, Florence F; Folensbee, Rowland W

    2007-01-01

    Faculty members from three different institutions, each with long-standing experience teaching development, present strategies for teaching normal development in undergraduate and graduate medical education. This article provides an overview of licensing body requirements, teaching methodology, audiovisual and textbook resources, goals and objectives (knowledge, skills, and attitudes), and sample curricula for teaching human development to medical students, general psychiatry residents, and child and adolescent psychiatry residents. The challenges of teaching development to various groups of trainees with different required course lengths and expected levels of competency, using lifespan and topical approaches, are reviewed.

  6. Providing the Pathway to Success for Graduate Education: Undergraduate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K. C.; Velasco, A. A.; Andronicos, C. L.; Langford, R. P.; Carrick, T. L.

    2005-12-01

    The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) lies along the U.S.-Mexico border and has one of the largest Hispanic student populations in the country. Since 2002, the faculty of Geological Sciences have provided research opportunities for undergraduate students with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Opportunities for Enhancing Diversity in the Geosciences (OEDG) program. The program, called Pathways Research Experience Program (PREP), funds stipends, which allows undergraduate students to work closely with a faculty mentor and participate in workshops on applying to graduate schools, obtaining financial aid, and establishing effective study habits. Our overall goal is to mentor students through an undergraduate degree in geosciences and prepare them for graduate education. Student research has covered a wide range of geoscience topics: paleontology, structural geology, hydrogeology, environmental geology, seismology, and geomicrobiology, with students presenting results at national meetings including the Annual Meetings of the Geological Society of America and the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in the Sciences, as well as research expos at UTEP. Students are selected for the program based on GPA, letters of recommendation, and a research proposal, and they must maintain good academic standing during their tenure as a PREP fellow. Since its inception (Spring 2002), 21 students have participated in the program, which has included 13(62 percent) women and 12(57 percent) Hispanics. Of these 21 students, 13 have graduated. Of the 13, 5 have continued onto graduate programs at other institutions and 2 have remained at UTEP, thus highlighting that to build a pipeline of students willing to obtain an advanced degree, a structured research experience must be a key component.

  7. Gamification as a tool for enhancing graduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Christa R; Westfall, Andrew O; Rodriguez, J Martin; Dempsey, Donald M; Cherrington, Andrea; Roy, Brita; Patel, Mukesh; Willig, James H

    2014-12-01

    The last decade has seen many changes in graduate medical education training in the USA, most notably the implementation of duty hour standards for residents by the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education. As educators are left to balance more limited time available between patient care and resident education, new methods to augment traditional graduate medical education are needed. To assess acceptance and use of a novel gamification-based medical knowledge software among internal medicine residents and to determine retention of information presented to participants by this medical knowledge software. We designed and developed software using principles of gamification to deliver a web-based medical knowledge competition among internal medicine residents at the University of Alabama (UA) at Birmingham and UA at Huntsville in 2012-2013. Residents participated individually and in teams. Participants accessed daily questions and tracked their online leaderboard competition scores through any internet-enabled device. We completed focus groups to assess participant acceptance and analysed software use, retention of knowledge and factors associated with loss of participants (attrition). Acceptance: In focus groups, residents (n=17) reported leaderboards were the most important motivator of participation. Use: 16 427 questions were completed: 28.8% on Saturdays/Sundays, 53.1% between 17:00 and 08:00. Retention of knowledge: 1046 paired responses (for repeated questions) were collected. Correct responses increased by 11.9% (p<0.0001) on retest. Differences per time since question introduction, trainee level and style of play were observed. Attrition: In ordinal regression analyses, completing more questions (0.80 per 10% increase; 0.70 to 0.93) decreased, while postgraduate year 3 class (4.25; 1.44 to 12.55) and non-daily play (4.51; 1.50 to 13.58) increased odds of attrition. Our software-enabled, gamification-based educational intervention was well accepted

  8. 42 CFR 422.324 - Payments to MA organizations for graduate medical education costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.324 Payments to MA organizations for graduate medical education costs. (a) MA organizations may receive direct graduate medical education payments for the time that... medical education payments if all of the following conditions are met: (1) The resident spends his or...

  9. TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TONDOW, MURRAY

    PAPERS ON THE PRESENT AND FUTURE USE OF TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION IS PRESENTED. HARRY F. SILBERMAN, IN "EVALUATIVE CRITERIA FOR AUTOMATED TEACHING PROGRAMS," PRESENTS COMMENTS, CRITERIA, AND TABLES ON AUTOMATED TEACHING PROGRAMS. HE DESCRIBES EXPERIMENTS ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF BRANCHING AND FIXED SEQUENCE PROGRAMS, ON A FOLLOWUP…

  10. Educational Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Scott

    2008-01-01

    As districts look at the millennials in their classrooms and plan for the most effective educational strategies to reach them, it is clear that technology can enable learning in ways that never before have been possible. It is also clear that this generation grew up with tools and techniques that are well integrated with their lifestyles. To these…

  11. TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TONDOW, MURRAY

    PAPERS ON THE PRESENT AND FUTURE USE OF TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION IS PRESENTED. HARRY F. SILBERMAN, IN "EVALUATIVE CRITERIA FOR AUTOMATED TEACHING PROGRAMS," PRESENTS COMMENTS, CRITERIA, AND TABLES ON AUTOMATED TEACHING PROGRAMS. HE DESCRIBES EXPERIMENTS ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF BRANCHING AND FIXED SEQUENCE PROGRAMS, ON A FOLLOWUP…

  12. Educational Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Scott

    2008-01-01

    As districts look at the millennials in their classrooms and plan for the most effective educational strategies to reach them, it is clear that technology can enable learning in ways that never before have been possible. It is also clear that this generation grew up with tools and techniques that are well integrated with their lifestyles. To these…

  13. Globalization of Gerontology Education: Current Practices and Perceptions for Graduate Gerontology Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Samuel M.; Yamashita, Takashi; Ewen, Heidi H.; Manning, Lydia K.; Kunkel, Suzanne R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document current practices and understandings about globalization of gerontology education in the United States. Better understanding of aging requires international perspectives in global communities. However, little is known about how globalization of gerontology education is practiced in U.S. graduate-level…

  14. Entrepreneurial Skills and Education-job Matching of Higher Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucel, Aleksander; Róbert, Péter; Buil, Màrian; Masferrer, Núria

    2016-01-01

    This article studies entrepreneurial education and its impact on job-skills matches for higher education graduates. Those who possess entrepreneurial skills are assumed to be more market aware and creative in their job search. They are also expected to foresee which job offers would and would not, match their skills. Using a large comparative…

  15. Globalization of Gerontology Education: Current Practices and Perceptions for Graduate Gerontology Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Samuel M.; Yamashita, Takashi; Ewen, Heidi H.; Manning, Lydia K.; Kunkel, Suzanne R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document current practices and understandings about globalization of gerontology education in the United States. Better understanding of aging requires international perspectives in global communities. However, little is known about how globalization of gerontology education is practiced in U.S. graduate-level…

  16. Factors Affecting Academic Achievement in Graduate Management Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieker, Richard F.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of the academic achievement of 71 business administration graduates indicated that scores on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) are more significant predictors of graduate performance than undergraduate performance is. The relationship between graduate performance and GMAT score differs for black students and white students.…

  17. Factors Affecting Academic Achievement in Graduate Management Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieker, Richard F.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of the academic achievement of 71 business administration graduates indicated that scores on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) are more significant predictors of graduate performance than undergraduate performance is. The relationship between graduate performance and GMAT score differs for black students and white students.…

  18. Challenges in Implementing Engineering Technology Education in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosmah Ali

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.As Malaysia races against time to achieve Vision 2020 to be a developed nation, there is an urgent need for highly-skilled human resources to fulfill the requirements of the industry. This calls for an expansion of the engineering technology program to increase the number of technical graduates.  However, various challenges are faced by the institutions in the implementation of the Engineering Technology programs, which have significant negative impact on the nation in general and in particular the graduates from the programs. Data was collected from a brainstorming session between six organizations involved in providing engineering technology education in Malaysia and the UniversitiTeknologi Malaysia (UTM and a convention on Engineering Technology Future in Malaysia. These challenges are categorized into four and discussed in this paper.Keywords: Accreditation, Challenges, Engineering technology; Human resources, Technical graduates.

  19. INNOVATIVE EDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF UNIVERSITIES AND COMPETENCIES OF GRADUATES-INNOVATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. GLUKHIKH

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on innovative activities, formation of competences of graduates-innovators and presents a different view of the problem, which is based on the ultimate goal of higher education - training graduates as innovators, i.e. people who are able to generate, discover, and implement innovations. It is noted that activities of innovators create innovations - technological, food, organizational and marketing innovations. The authors highlight the term "Innovation", which is regarded as a set of novelties which are not only unique, but perhaps subjectively new and are brought to the point when these innovations become clear, useful and demanded by consumers. As a result of the study, a comparative analysis was made of the competences of graduates in different fields and levels of education. It is concluded that competences of graduates-innovators must include not only ntegration of different knowledge and skills from different spheres of activities, but also the competences which are invariant of the relevant field. The authors stress the necessity to use interactive methods of learning certain disciplines and make suggestions for the formation of innovative educational environment. It is noted that innovative projects must not neglect such issues as feasibility study, business planning, investment attraction, organization of processes enhancing the transformation of projects into practical innovative business.

  20. Instructional Methods for Neuroscience in Nurse Anesthesia Graduate Programs: A Survey of Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-10-01

    i INSTRUCTIONAL METHODS FOR NEUROSCIENCE IN NURSE ANESTHESIA GRADUATE PROGRAMS : A SURVEY OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS Michael R. Sanchez APPROVED... GRADUATE PROGRAMS : A SURVEY OF EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Michael R...certifies that the use of any copyrighted material in the thesis entitled: Instructional methods for neuroscience in nurse anesthesia graduate programs : A

  1. Globalization of Gerontology Education: Current Practices and Perceptions for Graduate Gerontology Education in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    MWANGI, SAMUEL M.; Yamashita, Takashi; EWEN, HEIDI H.; Manning, Lydia K.; KUNKEL, SUZANNE R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to document current practices and understandings about globalization of gerontology education in the United States. Better understanding of aging requires international perspectives in global communities. However, little is known about how globalization of gerontology education is practiced in U.S. graduate-level degree programs. The authors conducted qualitative interviews with representatives of the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education, the major nati...

  2. Lateral Thinking and Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Shlomo

    1997-01-01

    Presents an analysis of technology education and its relevance to lateral thinking. Discusses prospects for utilizing technology education as a platform and a contextual domain for nurturing lateral thinking. Argues that technology education is an appropriate environment for developing complementary incorporation of vertical and lateral thinking.…

  3. 76 FR 30950 - Council on Graduate Medical Education; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Council on Graduate Medical Education...-463), notice is hereby given of the following meeting: Name: Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME). Date and Time: June 14, 2011, 1 p.m.-4 p.m. Eastern Time; June 15, 2011, 9 a.m.-Noon...

  4. Employers Assessment of Work Ethics Required of University Business Education Graduates in South-South Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, James

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the employers assessment of work ethics required of university Business Education graduates in south south Nigeria. One research question and three hypotheses guided the study. The design of this study was a descriptive survey. The population of the study comprised 318 identified employers of Business Education graduates in…

  5. Job Search as a Determinant of Graduate Over-Education: Evidence from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, David; Tani, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the relationship between job search and over-education for recent Australian bachelor degree graduates using data from the 2011 Beyond Graduation Survey. Results from panel estimation suggest that jobs found through university careers offices are associated with lower probability of over-education relative to jobs found through…

  6. Job Search as a Determinant of Graduate Over-Education: Evidence from Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, David; Tani, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the relationship between job search and over-education for recent Australian bachelor degree graduates using data from the 2011 Beyond Graduation Survey. Results from panel estimation suggest that jobs found through university careers offices are associated with lower probability of over-education relative to jobs found through…

  7. Action Research in Graduate Teacher Education: A Review of the Literature 2000-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Michelle; Burnaford, Gail

    2016-01-01

    This review explores the goals and challenges as well as the policy and programmatic implications of action research in graduate teacher education as evidenced in the published literature. This literature review looks specifically at how action research is being used in graduate teacher education programs as a content area and as a methodology in…

  8. The Value of Assessment and Accreditation for Hospitality and Tourism Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Richard D., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Graduate education in hospitality is a growing field with a number of different approaches and philosophies which inform the decisions and directions put forth by program administrators. A case study explains the methods and justifications used by one institution to conduct a self assessment to assure high quality graduate hospitality education.…

  9. Entrepreneurs, the Self-Employed and Employees amongst Young European Higher Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Daniel; Mora, Jose-Gines; Vila, Luis E.

    2007-01-01

    We shall analyse the different characteristics of entrepreneurs, the self-employed, and employees in public, private and non-profit organisations, based on a sample of young European higher education graduates. Using graduates self-assessment from a survey, several sets of characteristics such as social-demographic traits, educational and…

  10. Employers Assessment of Work Ethics Required of University Business Education Graduates in South-South Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoro, James

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the employers assessment of work ethics required of university Business Education graduates in south south Nigeria. One research question and three hypotheses guided the study. The design of this study was a descriptive survey. The population of the study comprised 318 identified employers of Business Education graduates in…

  11. The Enduring Effects of a United World College Education as Seen through a Graduate's Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsumagari, Maki Ito

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a study that examined evidence of the enduring effects of United World Colleges (UWC) education, arguably the only purely ideology-driven international education model. The study adopted an interpretive phenomenological analysis of an autoethnography by a UWC graduate. The study found that the graduate has incubated her own…

  12. Environmental Education in Graduate Professional Degrees: The Case of Urban Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stacey Swearingen; Mayo, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Environmental education (EE) is a prominent aspect of graduate-level master's programs in urban and regional planning. This article draws on the results of a survey of 66 environmental planning educators in urban and regional planning programs to show what types of EE are most prevalent in these graduate professional programs and in planning…

  13. Ethnic Disparities in Graduate Education: A Selective Review of Quantitative Research, Social Theory, and Quality Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Somer L.; Slate, John R.; Joyner, Sheila A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we analyzed research studies in the field of graduate education. In particular, we explored the issue of inequity in graduate education through three key lenses of social science analyses. Furthermore, we analyzed selected quantitative research studies that undertook a comparative examination of aggregate trends in enrollment and…

  14. A Study of Four Federal Graduate Fellowship Programs: Education and Employment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Lewis E.; Henke, Robin R.; Nevill, Stephanie; Linnard, David; Pflueger, Jeff; Mattox, Tiffany

    2008-01-01

    The Office of Postsecondary Education (OPE) in the U.S. Department of Education (ED) sponsors four graduate fellowship programs: the Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad (DDRA) fellowship program, the Foreign Language and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowship program, the Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need (GAANN) fellowship …

  15. Environmental Education in Graduate Professional Degrees: The Case of Urban Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stacey Swearingen; Mayo, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Environmental education (EE) is a prominent aspect of graduate-level master's programs in urban and regional planning. This article draws on the results of a survey of 66 environmental planning educators in urban and regional planning programs to show what types of EE are most prevalent in these graduate professional programs and in planning…

  16. Graduate Education in the People's Republic of China: New Steps, New Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidel, Mark

    1983-01-01

    Resumption and development of graduate education since 1976 are described, with attention to admissions, examinations, stress on science and engineering, institution types, curriculum, dissertations, the new degree system, and teaching and research employment patterns. Interrelationships of graduate study and the educational and political debate,…

  17. Critical Friends: An Investigation of Shared Narrative Practice between Education and Nursing Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguley, Margaret; Brown, Andy

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a pilot research project that investigated the perceived educational value of sharing narrative practice amongst graduate students from the School of Education and the School of Nursing and Midwifery at the University of Tasmania. During a semester the graduate students reflected upon and wrote about a…

  18. Mathematics education graduate students' understanding of trigonometric ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiǧit Koyunkaya, Melike

    2016-10-01

    This study describes mathematics education graduate students' understanding of relationships between sine and cosine of two base angles in a right triangle. To explore students' understanding of these relationships, an elaboration of Skemp's views of instrumental and relational understanding using Tall and Vinner's concept image and concept definition was developed. Nine students volunteered to complete three paper and pencil tasks designed to elicit evidence of understanding and three students among these nine students volunteered for semi-structured interviews. As a result of fine-grained analysis of the students' responses to the tasks, the evidence of concept image and concept definition as well as instrumental and relational understanding of trigonometric ratios was found. The unit circle and a right triangle were identified as students' concept images, and the mnemonic was determined as their concept definition for trigonometry, specifically for trigonometric ratios. It is also suggested that students had instrumental understanding of trigonometric ratios while they were less flexible to act on trigonometric ratio tasks and had limited relational understanding. Additionally, the results indicate that graduate students' understanding of the concept of angle mediated their understanding of trigonometry, specifically trigonometric ratios.

  19. TRAINING THE COMPETITIVE GRADUATES OF PEDAGOGICAL HIGHER SCHOOLS VIA THE SYSTEM OF ADDITIONAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Amirova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the problem of professional selfdetermination, which involves selection of and enrolment in a particular educational institution, as well as preparation for a job placement after graduation in the fast changing labor market. Additionally, the authors point out the related complications, caused by deformations in the professional orientation system, and leading to a professional self-identification crisis. The aim of the research is to demonstrate that fostering the competitive university graduates -the priority task of the modern higher school - requires psycho-pedagogical facilitation, and flexible alternative application of available resources of time, content, organization, and technology. However, the necessity to follow the Federal State Educational Standards and other regulatory procedures slows down the higher school’s response to changing realities, and hinders the prompt development of mobile and adaptive educational programs. As an effective tool for solving the problem of professional selfidentification, the author recommends the variational programs of additional education, regarded as an option to the major specialization. The paper discusses the “SchoolofProfessional Success” project, approbated inBashkirskyStatePedagogicalUniversity, based on the competence and person-oriented approaches, and analytical monitoring of students’ requirements for additional skills and knowledge. The above experience can be further extrapolated to different fields of training.

  20. Taking Business Intelligence to Business Education Curriculum: Graduate Students’ Concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Kissi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Business intelligence systems are widely employed in industries. However, students concerns about Business Intelligence course are largely missed in the business education curriculum. To take a proper decision on Business intelligence integration in business education, it is important to understand students’ concerns. This study employed a survey questionnaire to investigate 142 graduate students concerns about integrating business intelligence into business education curriculum. The survey questionnaire was adopted from previous studies to measure students’ concerns on a Business Intelligence job opportunity, interest and relevance in the Business intelligence education. The survey items have a reliability scales of Cronbach’s alpha (α = 0.818, factor loading > 0.5, and Average Variance Extracted (AVE ≥ 0.5, and Composite Reliability (CR ≥ 0.6. Descriptive statistics and Independent sample t-test and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA test were performed on the survey data. Students revealed that Business intelligence knowledge is relevant (mean = 4.29, SD = 0.710, has several job opportunities (mean = 4.16, SD = 0.675, and should be integrated into business education curriculum (mean = 3.95.08, SD = 0.79. In addition, there was no statistically significant difference (t (140 = –0.027, p > 0.05 between the concerns of students with Business Intelligence lecture experience and those without. Further, perceived importance and job opportunity significantly, F = 24.601 and p = .000(< .05 relates to the Business intelligence integration in Business Education. The findings draw implications for university management and business institutions in updating curriculum so as to equip business students with the essential Business Intelligence knowledge and skills for the betterment of the business organizations.

  1. Retention Effects of Immediate Graduate Education in the Nuclear Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    GENERAL UNRESTRICTED LINE OFFICERS ..........................................................15  B.  COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF EARLY GRADUATE PROGRAMS FOR...51  Table 30.  Annual Cost of Fully Funded Graduate Programs ...........................................51...Table 31.  Average Cost of Graduate Programs ...............................................................52  xiii LIST OF ACRONYMS AND

  2. DISTANCE EDUCATION IN NURSING GRADUATION COURSES: APPLICATION AND EFFECTIVENESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Zambrano Tanaka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Distance education (EaD was first recognized in the Law of Guidelines and Bases of Education (LBD in 1996 and refers to a teaching-learning modality where students and tutors are separated yet connected through various technologies, like the internet. Distance Education has been growing steadily over the years, and its use has been constant in various modalities of courses, whether technical, undergraduate or postgraduate. Nursing courses, as well as other courses in the health area, have used it in order to facilitate access to learning, offering the student quality teaching and knowledge of new technologies. This study was developed with the purpose of analyzing Distance Education, as well as its application in the nursing courses. For that, a qualitative literature review was carried out. National databases published from 2002 to 2014 were withdrawn.

  3. Accounting for graduate medical education funding in family practice training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Frederick M; Phillips, Robert L; Schneeweiss, Ronald; Andrilla, C Holly A; Hart, L Gary; Fryer, George E; Casey, Susan; Rosenblatt, Roger A

    2002-10-01

    Medicare provides the majority of funding to support graduate medical education (GME). Following the flow of these funds from hospitals to training programs is an important step in accounting for GME funding. Using a national survey of 453 family practice residency programs and Medicare hospital cost reports, we assessed residency programs' knowledge of their federal GME funding and compared their responses with the actual amounts paid to the sponsoring hospitals by Medicare. A total of 328 (72%) programs responded; 168 programs (51%) reported that they did not know how much federal GME funding they received. Programs that were the only residency in the hospital (61% versus 36%) and those that were community hospital-based programs (53% versus 22%) were more likely to know their GME allocation. Programs in hospitals with other residencies received less of their designated direct medical education payment than programs that were the only residency in the sponsoring hospital (-45% versus +19%). More than half of family practice training programs do not know how much GME they receive. These findings call for improved accountability in the use of Medicare payments that are designated for medical education.

  4. Organizing graduate medical education programs into communities of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing-You, Robert G.; Varaklis, Kalli

    2016-01-01

    Background A new organizational model of educational administrative support was instituted in the Department of Medical Education (DME) to better meet increasing national accreditation demands. Residency and fellowship programs were organized into four ‘Communities of Practice’ (CoOPs) based on discipline similarity, number of learners, and geographic location. Program coordinator reporting lines were shifted from individual departments to a centralized reporting structure within the DME. The goal of this project was to assess the impact on those most affected by the change. Methods This was a mixed methods study that utilized structured interviews and the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI). Eleven members of the newly formed CoOPs participated in the study. Results Three major themes emerged after review and coding of the interview transcripts: improved group identity, improved availability of resources, and increased opportunity for professional growth. OCAI results indicated that respondents are committed to the DME and perceived the culture to be empowering. The ‘preferred culture’ was very similar to the culture at the time of the study, with some indication that DME employees are ready for more creativity and innovation in the future. Conclusion Reorganization within the DME of residency programs into CoOPs was overwhelmingly perceived as a positive change. Improved resources and accountability may position our DME to better handle the increasing complexity of graduate medical education. PMID:27712619

  5. Organizing graduate medical education programs into communities of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Bing-You

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: A new organizational model of educational administrative support was instituted in the Department of Medical Education (DME to better meet increasing national accreditation demands. Residency and fellowship programs were organized into four ‘Communities of Practice’ (CoOPs based on discipline similarity, number of learners, and geographic location. Program coordinator reporting lines were shifted from individual departments to a centralized reporting structure within the DME. The goal of this project was to assess the impact on those most affected by the change. Methods: This was a mixed methods study that utilized structured interviews and the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI. Eleven members of the newly formed CoOPs participated in the study. Results: Three major themes emerged after review and coding of the interview transcripts: improved group identity, improved availability of resources, and increased opportunity for professional growth. OCAI results indicated that respondents are committed to the DME and perceived the culture to be empowering. The ‘preferred culture’ was very similar to the culture at the time of the study, with some indication that DME employees are ready for more creativity and innovation in the future. Conclusion: Reorganization within the DME of residency programs into CoOPs was overwhelmingly perceived as a positive change. Improved resources and accountability may position our DME to better handle the increasing complexity of graduate medical education.

  6. Is Twitter an Effective Pedagogical Tool in Higher Education? Perspectives of Education Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Krishna

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the perspectives of education graduate students of using Twitter as a pedagogical tool for 15 weeks as a required social media activity in class. The results indicated that participants in each course reported a positive learning experience of using Twitter. Although this was their first experience with Twitter, participants…

  7. ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY GRADUATES TOWARDS THE INTERNSHIP TRAINING PERIOD AT KING FAISAL UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    Bashawri, Layla A.M.; Mirghani A Ahmed; Bahnassy, Ahmed A.L.; Al-Salim, Jawaher A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this present survey was to look into the attitudes of medical laboratory technology (MLT) graduates towards the internship training period of the MLT Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Faisal University. Material and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and distributed for this purpose. The study period was from December 1st 2002 – 31st December 2004. Two-hundred questionnaires were distributed to recent graduates, and 115 wer...

  8. Exploration of mobile educational technology

    OpenAIRE

    Hosny, W.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in mobile and wireless technology could be utilised to enhance the delivery of educational programmes. The use of this technology is known as “Mobile Education”. Mobile education technology provides unique opportunities for educators to flexibly deliver their educational material to learners via mobile services anywhere at any time. Moreover, the material delivered could be adapted to the learners’ needs and preferences. Examples of mobile devices which could be used in mobile...

  9. Frustrations among graduates of athletic training education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G; Dodge, Thomas M

    2013-01-01

    Although previous researchers have begun to identify sources of athletic training student stress, the specific reasons for student frustrations are not yet fully understood. It is important for athletic training administrators to understand sources of student frustration to provide a supportive learning environment. To determine the factors that lead to feelings of frustration while completing a professional athletic training education program (ATEP). Qualitative study. National Athletic Trainers' Association (NATA) accredited postprofessional education program. Fourteen successful graduates (12 women, 2 men) of accredited professional undergraduate ATEPs enrolled in an NATA-accredited postprofessional education program. We conducted semistructured interviews and analyzed data with a grounded theory approach using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. We negotiated over the coding scheme and performed peer debriefings and member checks to ensure trustworthiness of the results. Four themes emerged from the data: (1) Athletic training student frustrations appear to stem from the amount of stress involved in completing an ATEP, leading to anxiety and feelings of being overwhelmed. (2) The interactions students have with classmates, faculty, and preceptors can also be a source of frustration for athletic training students. (3) Monotonous clinical experiences often left students feeling disengaged. (4) Students questioned entering the athletic training profession because of the fear of work-life balance problems and low compensation. In order to reduce frustration, athletic training education programs should validate students' decisions to pursue athletic training and validate their contributions to the ATEP; provide clinical education experiences with graded autonomy; encourage positive personal interactions between students, faculty, and preceptors; and successfully model the benefits of a career in athletic training.

  10. Beginning & Graduating Student-Teachers' Beliefs about Physical Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpot, Rod; Smith, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a case-study that examined the different beliefs about the nature and purpose of physical education of beginning and graduating physical education teacher education students. Four themes emerged from the findings: "physical education as sport versus physical education as more than sport"; "the…

  11. Exploration of Experiences and Perceptions of Three Botswana Basic Education Stakeholders on Employment and Unemployment of Graduates of Basic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidimane, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study used a phenomenological approach to explore the lived experiences of three groups of stakeholders of the Botswana basic education program related to the employment and unemployment of graduates of basic education. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 participants from three groups of stakeholders, graduates of basic…

  12. Exploration of Experiences and Perceptions of Three Botswana Basic Education Stakeholders on Employment and Unemployment of Graduates of Basic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidimane, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study used a phenomenological approach to explore the lived experiences of three groups of stakeholders of the Botswana basic education program related to the employment and unemployment of graduates of basic education. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 participants from three groups of stakeholders, graduates of basic…

  13. CLOUD TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Dukkardt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the review of main features of cloud computing that can be used in education. Particular attention is paid to those learning and supportive tasks, that can be greatly improved in the case of the using of cloud services. Several ways to implement this approach are proposed, based on widely accepted models of providing cloud services. Nevertheless, the authors have not ignored currently existing problems of cloud technologies , identifying the most dangerous risks and their impact on the core business processes of the university. 

  14. Comic Relief: Graduate Students Address Multiple Meanings for Technology Integration with Digital Comic Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockman, Beth Rajan; Sutton, Rhonda; Herrmann, Michele

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the usefulness of digital comic creation with 77 graduate students in a teacher technology course. Students completed an assigned reading and created digital comics that addressed technology integration concerns in the schools and society. Using practical action research, 77 student-created comics were analyzed. The findings…

  15. Comic Relief: Graduate Students Address Multiple Meanings for Technology Integration with Digital Comic Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockman, Beth Rajan; Sutton, Rhonda; Herrmann, Michele

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the usefulness of digital comic creation with 77 graduate students in a teacher technology course. Students completed an assigned reading and created digital comics that addressed technology integration concerns in the schools and society. Using practical action research, 77 student-created comics were analyzed. The findings…

  16. A Comparative Study of Proficiencies Utilized by Electrical Engineering Graduates of the University of Alabama and the Core Curricula in Electrical Engineering and Electrical Engineering Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, William S.

    A survey of 531 electrical engineering graduates of the University of Alabama who had received bachelor's degrees in the years 1950 through 1974 showed that the educational needs of a majority of the respondents could have been adequately served by the mathematics levels present in the engineering technology program. In addition, certain subjects…

  17. The Current State of U.S. Geropsychiatric Graduate Nursing Education: Results of the National Geropsychiatric Graduate Nursing Education Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Caroline E; Harris, Melodee; Buron, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) must be prepared to care for the rapidly increasing numbers of older adults with mental health needs. All 363 graduate nursing programs in the United States were surveyed regarding the nature and extent of geropsychiatric nursing (GPN) content across program curricula and their perceptions of the influence that the APRN Consensus Model has exerted on preparing the next generation of APRNs to meet the growing needs of the older adult population. Of the 202 schools responding, 138 reported GPN content in one or more clinical programs, with the majority of content in non-PMHNP programs. Only 17 schools reported offering a GPN program, track, or minor. The majority of schools (n = 169) perceived that they were adequately well-prepared to meet the APRN Consensus Model's guidelines regarding inclusion of aging-related didactic and clinical educational experiences in all APRN education programs; nearly two thirds (n = 132) perceived a moderate to significant influence of the Consensus Model on institutional infusion of GPN into curricula. Compared with a similar survey 10 years ago, there was little change in the proportion of schools reporting GPN in clinical programs and few schools provide GPN programs, tracks, or minors. Implications for nursing education and practice are discussed.

  18. Exploring the Alignment between Post-Secondary Education Programs and Earnings: An Examination of 2005 Ontario Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Kristyn; Walters, David

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the influence that field of study and level of post-secondary education have on the earnings of recent graduates in Ontario. Graduates of trades, community college, and university programs are compared. Results suggest that graduates of applied and technical programs obtain higher earnings within two years of graduation than…

  19. Disruptive Technologies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of "disruptive" innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally…

  20. Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-01

    This document outlines activities for educating key target audiences, as suggested by workshop participants. Held December 4-5, 2002, the Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop kicked off a new education effort coordinated by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  1. Improving Technology and Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Improving Technology and Engineering Education for All Students: A Plan of Action is the theme of this year's International Technology and Engineering Educators Association (ITEEA) annual conference, which meets March 7-9 in Columbus, OH. The theme is aligned with ITEEA's 2012-15 Strategic Plan: Investing in People as Educational Change Agents.…

  2. Multigenerational Challenges and the Future of Graduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Philip G.; Daste, Laurie; Northern, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Demographics are changing on a global scale. In the United States, an aging population continues to work, either by preference or because of insufficient resources to retire. Of even greater importance, a younger generation, referred to as the Millennial Generation, will soon predominate in the workforce and even now accounts for nearly 100% of resident physicians. By the year 2020, there will be 5 generations in the workplace. Methods: This paper defines and details the characteristics of the 5 generations and examines how the vision, attitudes, values, and expectations of the most recent generations will reshape the workforce and graduate medical education. Results: The need for change is imminent to educate the next generation of physicians. Among the changes necessary to adapt to the multigenerational challenges ahead are adopting mobile devices as preferred communication tools; using social networking sites to recruit residents; adding games, simulations, and interactive videos to the curriculum to engage students; breaking down departmental silos and forming learning teams that come from different specialties; developing benchmarks and milestones to measure progress; extending the social learning ecosystem beyond the resident years; embracing diversity as the norm for both practice and learning; and providing both coaching and mentoring. Conclusion: For decades, resident physicians have shown commitment, tenacity, and selflessness while shouldering the dual responsibility of patient care and the pursuit of their own education and skills development. Resident engagement has been shown to drive change in undergraduate medical education and in the learning and performance of their teachers. The latter is evidence of reverse mentoring that will be a major factor for improvement in this digital age. We have only to embrace this opportunity to the benefit of our patients, our learners, and ourselves. PMID:27046415

  3. Innovative Outcome Assessment in Graduate Business Education and Continuous Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Satya P.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The changed environment of global economy with painful austerity and restructuring measures causing severe economic dislocations in many diverse parts of the world have brought into focus the usefulness and value of management education in general and graduate management education in particular. The various accrediting bodies in America, Europe and Asia in recent years have shifted their emphasis to ensuring that learning outcomes of students in the program are tied to the goals and missions of the academic institution and meet the needs of the external partners of the academic enterprise that the students go on to serve. This has resulted in rapid advances in the field of innovative outcome assessment, and measurement of competency in performing higher order tasks as well as demonstration of traits related to successful transition into the business world and contribution to the success of the enterprise where the students are employed. The mere assessment/measurement of traits is not the end, but rather the first step in the cycle of continuous improvement in the tradition of the Plan-Do-Study-Act tradition of TQM. The goal is to identify shortcomings or opportunities for improvement via the assessment process and then to “close the loop” by introducing planned changes to improve system performance.

  4. Demonstration of a Benchmarking Technique to Compare Graduate Education Level of Air Force Project Managers and Selected Benchmarking Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-09-01

    the 1,450th file. This 46 technique sampled files on a nonprobability representation basis; some files did not have a nonzero chance of being reviewed...04 ELECTE: 4 t- OF A DEMONSTRATION OF A BENCHMARKING * ’~ TECHNIQUE TO COMPARE GRADUATE EDUCATION LEVELS OF AIR FORCE PROJECT MANAGERS AND SELECTED...8217,- -AIR FORCE INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY .Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio AFIT/GSM/LAS/94S-3 A DEMONSTRATION OF A BENCHMARKING TECHNIQUE TO COMPARE

  5. Ideological and political education for clinical graduates on the basis of medical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-chuan JING

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Along with the reform of medical system, medical education in China is also undergoing great changes. Due to the special characteristics of medical education, it differs from other educational characteristics. It carries with the characteristics of clinical practice on the basis distributed learning, physical and mental development along with ages, enrollment expansion and medical requirement, and standardization training for resident doctors. So, ideological and political education of clinical graduates showed many new characteristics. First, medical ethics education is the basic step, combined with the related disciplines of medical humanity connotation. Second, flexible and diversified form of ideological and political education on the basis of medical work is necessary. Third, establish a system of ideological and political education for clinical graduates, to build up new education concept, and to develop ideological and political education activities for clinical graduates in depth.

  6. Educational technology and the new technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Pløn W.; Plomp, Tjeerd

    1989-01-01

    Like everywhere in our culture, new technologies gradually penetrate the field of education. This may be seen as a problem area, which asks for appropriate, actions by teachers, curriculum experts, instructional designers and others. As "technology" seems to be the main issue,one may quation whether

  7. Considerations for The Instruction Of Research Methodologies In Graduate-Level Distance Education Degree Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cleveland-INNERS

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Considerations for The Instruction Of Research Methodologies In Graduate-Level Distance Education Degree Programs Tom JONES, Ph.D. Associate Professor Centre for Distance Education Athabasca University, CANADA M. Cleveland-INNERS, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Centre for Distance Education Athabasca University, CANADA ABSTRACT The growth of basic and applied research activity in distance education requires redirection on several fronts, including the instruction of research methods in the education of graduate students. The majority of graduate students in distance education are practitioners whose goals range from carrying out original research to acquiring the concepts and skills necessary to become a practitioner. We argue that the best foundation for achieving both of those goals in distance education is developed by means of an understanding and internalization of sound research design methodologies, primarily acquired by formal instruction, and that an emphasis on research in graduate programs in distance education will encourage theory development. This paper presents the rationale for a general curricular model that attempts to address the sets of research competencies for graduate students in graduate-level distance education programs while at the same time moving students toward an appreciation and understanding of the epistemological foundations for social science research.

  8. Technological literacy and innovation education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala

    2014-01-01

    , and a heavy digitization of the health care sector. These developments have actualized the fundamental question of how new technologies change and challenge the professions and their professional relationships? As one way to deal with this question, health education programmes have begun to focus...... on innovation education and educational activities fostering technological literacy. While focus on technological literacy has often (historically) taken a functionalist direction, and mainly been related to ICT and development of non- vocational curricula, more recent developments of approaches...

  9. Emerging technologies in physics education

    CERN Document Server

    Krusberg, Z A C

    2007-01-01

    Three emerging technologies in physics education are evaluated from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science and physics education research. The technologies - Physlet Physics, the Andes Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS), and Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) Tools - are assessed particularly in terms of their potential at promoting conceptual change, developing expert-like problem-solving skills, and achieving the goals of the traditional physics laboratory. Pedagogical methods to maximize the potential of each educational technology are suggested.

  10. Gestalt and Figure-Ground: Reframing Graduate Attribute Conversations between Educational Developers and Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knewstubb, Bernadette; Ruth, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Academics implementing graduate attributes, and the educational developers who support those academics, may experience graduate attributes and disciplinary knowledge and skills as unrelated dimensions of curriculum. Gestalt conceptions of curriculum, together with a figure-ground understanding of the relationship between disciplinary understanding…

  11. Quality of Education Outcomes: The Role of the Graduate Management Admission Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamala, Robert; Buyinza, Mukadasi

    2013-01-01

    Although the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is considered by leading business institutions worldwide as a predictor of success in graduate programs, an issue of contention is whether the introduction of the examination enhances the quality of education outcomes. This study sought to obtain an understanding of this issue, focusing on…

  12. 2013 Graduate Management Education in Canada. GMAC® Data-to-Go Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graduate Management Admission Council, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This latest report in the GMAC® Data-to-Go Series provides an overview of trends in graduate management education in Canada and a brief look at jobs and employment trends for recent 2013 business school graduates in Canada. Key themes of internationalization, program portfolio, and student recruitment appear in data throughout. Data presented here…

  13. Dilemmas of Expansion: The Growth of Graduate Education in Malaysia and Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, David W.; Chien, Chiao-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Faced with escalating demand for instructional staff to serve the expanding undergraduate enrolments, many middle income countries in Southeast Asia are investing heavily in expanding their provision of graduate education. An attractive secondary benefit is that graduate programmes contribute to a local university-based research capacity that…

  14. Career Advancement, Career Enhancement, and Personal Growth of Pepperdine University's Educational Leadership Academy Graduate Program Alumni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Ruth I.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was two-fold: (a) to explore and describe the perceived impact of Pepperdine University's Educational Leadership Academy (ELA) on 2003-2006 ELA graduates' career advancement, career enhancement, and personal growth; and (b) to obtain ELA graduates' suggestions for ELA program improvement to better prepare…

  15. Linkages among top-ranked graduate programs in special education: a brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, J H; Bair, R K

    1998-02-01

    The 10 top-ranked graduate programs in special education, based on national surveys of deans, top administrators, and senior faculty, were substantially linked to one another by hiring one another's graduates. We suggested that this linkage helps these programs to maintain and enhance their prestige.

  16. Enhancing Graduate Education: Promoting a Scholarship of Teaching and Learning through Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, Bahira Sherif; Marotz-Baden, Ramona; Settles, Barbara; Gentry, Deborah; Berke, Debra

    2009-01-01

    This article highlights the importance of mentoring processes in the education of future scholars. The purpose is to recommend that scholars link the process of mentoring graduate students with promoting a scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). It suggests that through this process graduate students will acquire some of the skills they need…

  17. Asia-Born New Zealand-Educated Business Graduates' Transition to Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vivienne; McGrath, Terry; Butcher, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In 2008 the Asia New Zealand Foundation commissioned a three-year project examining Asia-born New Zealand-educated business graduates' study to work transitions. Data were collected through annual online surveys and in-depth interviews. Graduates were asked to discuss their post-study experiences, reflections on studying in New Zealand, and…

  18. Using Assessment to Develop Social Responsibility as a Graduate Attribute in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Kerry; Fitzallen, Noleine; Adams, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Australian higher education institutions have struggled to develop clear strategies for developing and assessing graduate attributes within their specific disciplinary contexts. Using the example of the graduate attribute of social responsibility, this paper explores the outcomes of using assessment tasks to raise the awareness of development of…

  19. Improving the Climate for Graduate Education at a Major Research University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschutz, Susan S.

    1988-01-01

    The graduate school at the University of Michigan (UM) is seeking to identify the characteristics of a high quality graduate education, taking into account various aspects of quality that are susceptible to numerical analysis as well as those that are not. Contemporary research universities are composed of many autonomous spheres (undergraduate…

  20. Gestalt and Figure-Ground: Reframing Graduate Attribute Conversations between Educational Developers and Academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knewstubb, Bernadette; Ruth, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Academics implementing graduate attributes, and the educational developers who support those academics, may experience graduate attributes and disciplinary knowledge and skills as unrelated dimensions of curriculum. Gestalt conceptions of curriculum, together with a figure-ground understanding of the relationship between disciplinary understanding…

  1. CONDITIONS REQUIRED FOR CREATING SOCIETAL INTELLIGENCE IN STUDENTS OF A GRADUATE SCHOOL OF TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Vladimirovich GULYAKIN

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considered both the outer circumstances globally shaped and the learning environment set at a graduate school of technologies being both conditions entailing creation of societal intelligence in students of the college. The outer circumstances globally shaped mean the general features of the modern society that enters into the era of information society, reflecting the course of information processing and supply, of global-ized standards and communication round the world.Learning preconditions represent the settled circum-stances manifesting the social humanism targets for the learning environment at a graduate school of technolo-gies.

  2. Investment in Graduate and Professional Degree Education: Evidence of State Workforce Productivity Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Nasrin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of investment in graduate and professional education on the subsequent growth in state workforce productivity. The independent variables of this study were investment in master's degree education, investment in doctoral degree education, investment in professional degree education, initial…

  3. Disruptive technologies in higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Flavin, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the role of ‘‘disruptive’’ innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally adopted and used by students and staff. Instead, other technologies not owned or controlled by HEIs are widely used to support learning and teaching. According...

  4. Entrustable Professional Activities for Pathology: Recommendations From the College of American Pathologists Graduate Medical Education Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Cindy B; Domen, Ronald E; Conran, Richard M; Hoffman, Robert D; Post, Miriam D; Brissette, Mark D; Gratzinger, Dita A; Raciti, Patricia M; Cohen, David A; Roberts, Cory A; Rojiani, Amyn M; Kong, Christina S; Peterson, Jo Elle G; Johnson, Kristen; Plath, Sue; Powell, Suzanne Zein-Eldin

    2017-01-01

    Competency-based medical education has evolved over the past decades to include the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Accreditation System of resident evaluation based on the Milestones project. Entrustable professional activities represent another means to determine learner proficiency and evaluate educational outcomes in the workplace and training environment. The objective of this project was to develop entrustable professional activities for pathology graduate medical education encompassing primary anatomic and clinical pathology residency training. The Graduate Medical Education Committee of the College of American Pathologists met over the course of 2 years to identify and define entrustable professional activities for pathology graduate medical education. Nineteen entrustable professional activities were developed, including 7 for anatomic pathology, 4 for clinical pathology, and 8 that apply to both disciplines with 5 of these concerning laboratory management. The content defined for each entrustable professional activity includes the entrustable professional activity title, a description of the knowledge and skills required for competent performance, mapping to relevant Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Milestone subcompetencies, and general assessment methods. Many critical activities that define the practice of pathology fit well within the entrustable professional activity model. The entrustable professional activities outlined by the Graduate Medical Education Committee are meant to provide an initial framework for the development of entrustable professional activity-related assessment and curricular tools for pathology residency training.

  5. Graduate Programs in Education: Impact on Teachers' Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Janice; Fushell, Marian

    2013-01-01

    This paper examined teachers' decisions to pursue graduate programs and their career choices following completion of their studies. Based on document analysis and statistical examination of teacher questionnaire responses, this study determined that teachers choose graduate studies for different reasons, their program choice influences future…

  6. Parental leave policies in graduate medical education: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Laura S; Lyon, Sarah; Garza, Rebecca; Butz, Daniel R; Lemelman, Benjamin; Park, Julie E

    2017-10-01

    A thorough understanding of attitudes toward and program policies for parenthood in graduate medical education (GME) is essential for establishing fair and achievable parental leave policies and fostering a culture of support for trainees during GME. A systematic review of the literature was completed. Non-cohort studies, studies completed or published outside of the United States, and studies not published in English were excluded. Studies that addressed the existence of parental leave policies in GME were identified and were the focus of this study. Twenty-eight studies addressed the topic of the existence of formal parental leave policies in GME, which was found to vary across time and ranged between 22 and 90%. Support for such policies persisted across time. Attention to formal leave policies in GME has traditionally been lacking, but may be increasing. Negative attitudes towards parenthood in GME persist. Active awareness of the challenges faced by parent-trainees combined with formal parental leave policy implementation is important in supporting parenthood in GME. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Graduate Students' Perceptions of Needed Personal Characteristics for Family Life Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Alice Elrod

    1973-01-01

    Graduate seminar students reviewed recommended academic and field work experiences needed by family life educators. Students felt that personal characteristics are intermingled with the subject content and are influential in the process of learning. (Author)

  8. Technology Education Professional Enhancement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Thomas A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The two goals of this project are: the use of integrative field of aerospace technology to enhance the content and instruction delivered by math, science, and technology teachers through the development of a new publication entitled NASA Technology Today, and to develop a rationale and structure for the study of technology, which establishes the foundation for developing technology education standards and programs of the future.

  9. Ubiquitous Computing Technologies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Wu, Ting-Ting; Chen, Yen-Jung

    2007-01-01

    The prosperous development of wireless communication and sensor technologies has attracted the attention of researchers from both computer and education fields. Various investigations have been made for applying the new technologies to education purposes, such that more active and adaptive learning activities can be conducted in the real world.…

  10. Technology Education and the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    One hears quite frequently how the arts continually suffer in the academic day. Many long-time technology education champions certainly know what this is all about; but there may be some ways to use technology education to bring the arts into the classroom. This article offers a series of activities and suggestions that will help students better…

  11. Towards an Alternative Educational Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Roger; Nunan, E. E.

    1978-01-01

    Outlines an alternative form of educational technology based on an analysis of criticism levelled at the subject, both from within and without. Article contends that the future of educational technology rests on an expansion of its concerns, rather than a refinement or modification of its existing content. (Author)

  12. Emerging Technologies in Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusberg, Zosia A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Three emerging technologies in physics education are evaluated from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science and physics education research. The technologies--Physlet Physics, the Andes Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS), and Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) Tools--are assessed particularly in terms of their potential at promoting…

  13. Life in the "Real World": A Profile of Queensland University of Technology Library and Information Science Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Tracey; Partridge, Helen

    2010-01-01

    A graduate destination survey can provide a snap shot in time of a graduate's career progression and outcome. This paper will present the results of a Queensland University of Technology study exploring the employment outcomes of students who had completed a library and information science course from the Faculty of Information Technology between…

  14. Towards a Gender Inclusive Information and Communications Technology Curriculum: A Perspective from Graduates in the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppi, Tony; Sheard, Judy; Naghdy, Fazel; Edwards, Sylvia L.; Brookes, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    An online survey was conducted of recent information and communications technology (ICT) graduates from 21 Australian universities. A range of abilities including personal/interpersonal, cognitive, business and technical were examined in relation to importance in the workplace and university preparation of those abilities. In addition, a set of…

  15. Towards a Gender Inclusive Information and Communications Technology Curriculum: A Perspective from Graduates in the Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppi, Tony; Sheard, Judy; Naghdy, Fazel; Edwards, Sylvia L.; Brookes, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    An online survey was conducted of recent information and communications technology (ICT) graduates from 21 Australian universities. A range of abilities including personal/interpersonal, cognitive, business and technical were examined in relation to importance in the workplace and university preparation of those abilities. In addition, a set of…

  16. Achieving graduate outcomes in undergraduate nursing education: following the Yellow Brick Road.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Adele; Bentley, Karyn; Langtree, Tanya; Mills, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Nursing practice is a dynamic and constantly changing field within healthcare, with well-documented challenges to maintaining a suitably skilled workforce to meet the needs of the community it serves. Undergraduate nursing education provides the mandatory minimum requirements for professional registration. Each nursing program has clearly stated graduate attributes, qualities that their graduates will possess on graduation. The aim of this paper is to stimulate discussion about graduate attributes for nurses, a transferrable set of specific attributes that make nursing graduates work ready. This paper focuses on identifying specific attributes, the embedding of those attributes in nursing education, particularly through role modelling, with the aim of producing a future workforce that is knowledgeable, compassionate and confident. The graduate attributes are likened to the qualities sought by the characters in 'The Wizard of Oz'; brains, heart and courage and the learning process as the 'Yellow Brick Road'. There is a relative lack of discussion about role modelling by nurse educators for nursing students, a potentially undervalued learning experience that we believe must be brought to the forefront of discussions pertaining to undergraduate nursing education and achieving graduate outcomes.

  17. Technology for Education and Learning

    CERN Document Server

    2012 international conference on Technology for Education and Learning (ICTEL 2012)

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains 108 selected papers presented at the 2012 international conference on Technology for Education and Learning (ICTEL 2012), Macau, China, March 1-2, 2012. The conference brought together researchers working in various different areas of Technology for Education and Learning with a main emphasis on technology for business and economy in order to foster international collaborations and exchange of new ideas. This proceedings book has its focus on Technology for Economy, Finance and Education representing some of the major subareas presented at the conference.

  18. Graduate education in Canada and China: What enrolment data tells us

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony DiPetta

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available China’s emergence as a global economic and political power is in part due to the country’s renewed involvement with, and commitment to, graduate higher education (Harris, 2005. Graduate education in China is viewed as the means of producing the essential scientists, engineers and skilled workforce needed to sustain the country’s rapid industrial growth and economic development. But how does China’s graduate education system compare with North American graduate higher education and what can each learn from the other? This paper examines the trends and patterns in Master’s level graduate education programs in China and Canada based on enrolment data gathered from 1999 to 2005. Initial comparisons of the data find that Master’s level enrolments in China are growing faster than in Canada; enrolment pattern distributions for both countries are unbalanced geographically and from a disciplinary perspective the highest number of Master’s level enrolments in Canada were in the business and management disciplines while in China the greatest Master’s level enrolments were in engineering. The comparisons provided by this study help identify some of the trends and challenges of graduate education at both the national and the regional levels of both countries.

  19. Analysis of the Postsecondary Educational Attainment of Agricultural Education Graduates of the High School Class of 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Howard R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Agricultural education graduates' postsecondary educational attainment was investigated through a secondary analysis of data in the National Longitudinal Study, High School Class of 1971. Although participation in agricultural education had no substantive effect on postsecondary educational attainment, the effect of background variables should be…

  20. [Comment on "Meeting Ph.D. Graduates' needs in a changing global environment"] Challenges to fostering interdisciplinary graduate education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Beaudry

    C. Susan Weiler's article ("Meeting Ph.D. graduates' needs in a changing global environment," Eos, 55(13), 149, 151) calling for more care and attention to interdisciplinary graduate education illuminated an important and neglected issue. Weiler makes the excellent point that for society to manage complex natural systems effectively, it is imperative that we establish stronger connections between science and public policy. However, as a nation, the United States lacks the institutional research culture to foster this. Nor are we training sufficient numbers of professionals with the skills to make these connections; and when the small number of truly interdisciplinary scientists emerge annually into the workforce, there are few positions that fit them.I echo Weiler's call for increased interdisciplinary collaboration, and the necessary training to support this increase. However, there are some fundamental obstacles her article does not explore.

  1. Education and Professional Outreach as an Integrated Component of Science and Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staudigel, H.; Koppers, A. A.

    2007-12-01

    Education and Professional Outreach (EPO) is increasingly becoming a substantive and much needed activity for scientists. Significant efforts are expended to satisfy funding agency requirements, but such requirements may also develop into a mutually beneficial collaboration between scientists and K-16 educators with a minimal impact on science productivity. We focus here on two particularly high impact EPO opportunities, hosting of high school interns and the inclusion of an educational component to a graduate student's&pthesis work. We emphasize the importance of hands-on collaboration with teachers and teacher-educators, and the substantive benefits of highly leveraged customized internet-distribution. We will present two examples for how we integrated this K-12 EPO into our university-based science and education efforts, what types of products emerged from these activities, and how such products may be widely produced by any scientist and disseminated to the educational community. High school seniors offer a unique resource to university EPO because some of them can substantively contribute to the science, and they can be very effective peer-mentors for high and middle schools. Extended internships may be built easily into the schedule of many senior high school student programs, and we were able to involve such interns into a three-week seagoing expedition. The seniors were responsible for our EPO by maintaining a cruise website and video conferencing with their high school. They added substantially to the science outcome, through programming and participating in a range of shipboard science chores. Graduate theses may be augmented with an educational component that places the main theme of the thesis into an educational setting. We designed and supervised such a Master's graduate thesis with an educational component on the geochronology of hot spot volcanoes, including a high school lesson plan, enactment in the classroom and preparation of a wide range of web

  2. Faculty Adoption of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Franziska Zellweger

    2007-01-01

    Although faculty support has been identified as a critical factor in the success of educational-technology programs, many people involved in such efforts underestimate the complexities of integrating technology into teaching. In this article, the author proposes an adoption cycle to help tackle the complex issue of technology adoption for…

  3. Assistive Technology and Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Joseph P.; Beard, Lawrence A.

    2014-01-01

    Educators and caregivers now have the opportunity to individualize and differentiate instructions with many technological devices never before available. Assistive Technology is being introduced in the classroom at all levels as a tool for teachers to help deliver instruction to all students. Assistive Technology is widely used to ensure…

  4. Student and Graduate Migration and Its Effect on the Financing of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussen, Tina; Uebelmesser, Silke

    2016-01-01

    In higher education systems that are partly tax funded, a country might not be willing to subsidize the education of international students who might leave after graduation. This paper analyzes how student migration affects governmental decisions regarding the private funding share of higher education for 22 OECD countries for the period of…

  5. Estimating the Effect of Entrepreneur Education on Graduates' Intention to Be Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Noorkartina; Lim, Hock-Eam; Yusof, Norhafezah; Soon, Jan-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies on the effect of entrepreneur education are not comprehensive. Thus, estimating the effect of entrepreneur education is imperative. According to the Malaysian Ministry of Education (MoE), only 1.7 percent (as of 2013) of university graduates are self-employed, that is managing one's own business or known as graduate…

  6. A DIRECTORY OF GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN ADULT EDUCATION, COMPILED AS OF JANUARY 1968.

    Science.gov (United States)

    THOMAS, ALAN M., ED.

    A DIRECTORY IS PRESENTED OF GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN ADULT EDUCATION (INTERPRETED TO INCLUDE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION, RURAL AND URBAN LEADERSHIP TRAINING, LABOR EDUCATION, INDUSTRIAL TRAINING, COOPERATIVE EDUCATION, AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT) IN CANADA, THE UNITED STATES, GREAT BRITAIN, AND THE COMMONWEALTH AT LARGE. THE DEGREES OR CERTIFICATES…

  7. Productivity as an Indication of Quality in Higher Education: The Views of Employed Graduates in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliophotou Menon, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The paper investigates the views of Greek university graduates on the link between higher education and productivity in order to determine the extent to which productivity can be considered to be an indication of quality in higher education. It also investigates the perceived effect of the type and content of higher education on productivity;…

  8. Globalization and the Internationalization of Graduate Education: A Macro and Micro View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerad, Maresi

    2010-01-01

    Since the 1990s, globalization has become a central phenomenon for all of society, including graduate education and particularly doctoral education. Globalization takes place in a context where doctoral education and research capacity are unevenly distributed and where a few research universities, mainly in wealthy countries, have become powerful…

  9. A Quantitative Examination of Philosophical Predilections of Adult Education Graduate Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoux, Valerie; And Others

    To examine the relationship among the Principles of Adult Learning Scale (PALS), Educational Orientation Questionnaire (EOQ), and Philosophy of Adult Education Inventory (PAEI), the three instruments were administered to 111 graduate adult education students. The instruments had similar purposes: PAEI measured philosophical orientation relative to…

  10. 77 FR 37890 - Submission for OMB Review; Office of Postsecondary Education; Graduate Assistance in Areas of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Submission for OMB Review; Office of Postsecondary Education; Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need... Departmental review of the information collection. The Department of Education is especially interested...

  11. Teacher Education Graduates' Entrance into the Teaching Profession: Development and Test of a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, Isabel; Aelterman, Antonia

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to advance insight into the relationship between teacher education and graduates' intended and actual entrance into the teaching profession. Moreover, it indicates how this relationship varies between teacher training for primary education (i.e., programs for class teachers-to-be) and teacher training for secondary education (i.e.,…

  12. Does Higher Education Level the Playing Field? Socio-Economic Differences in Graduate Earnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Claire; van der Erve, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Education--and in particular higher education--is often regarded as a route to social mobility. For this to be the case, however, the link between family background and adult outcomes must be broken (or at least reduced) once we take account of an individual's education history. This paper provides new evidence on differences in graduates'…

  13. Computer Technology and Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Council on Collegiate Education for Nursing, Atlanta, GA.

    The influences of computer technology on college nursing education programs and health care delivery systems are discussed in eight papers. The use of computers is considered, with attention to clinical care, nursing education and continuing education, administration, and research. Attention is also directed to basic computer terminology, computer…

  14. Preparing a Future Graduate Workforce for Work: An Assessment of the Standard of Graduates from the Public Authority of Applied Education and Training in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ali, Salah

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a study that examined factors which had a direct impact on the quality of graduates from the Public Authority of Applied Education and Training (PAAE&T) in Kuwait. The study also examined the extent to which the graduates met the requirements of local employers. It consisted of a review of the literature; a questionnaire…

  15. Occupational mobility networks of female and male higher education graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza-Olivia LUNGU

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We employ a network based approach to explore occupational mobility of the Romanian university graduates in the first years after graduation. This representation of data permits us to use the novel statistical techniques developed in the framework of weighted directed networks in order to extract a set of stylized facts that highlight patterns of occupational mobility: centrality, degree and network density. We find that the gender plays a significant role in shaping the patterns of occupational mobility.

  16. Cultural Competency Training Requirements in Graduate Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Adrian Jacques H.; Lin, Susan Y.; Chun, Maria B. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultural competency is an important skill that prepares physicians to care for patients from diverse backgrounds. Objective We reviewed Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) program requirements and relevant documents from the ACGME website to evaluate competency requirements across specialties. Methods The program requirements for each specialty and its subspecialties were reviewed from December 2011 through February 2012. The review focused on the 3 competency domains relevant to culturally competent care: professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, and patient care. Specialty and subspecialty requirements were assigned a score between 0 and 3 (from least specific to most specific). Given the lack of a standardized cultural competence rating system, the scoring was based on explicit mention of specific keywords. Results A majority of program requirements fell into the low- or no-specificity score (1 or 0). This included 21 core specialties (leading to primary board certification) program requirements (78%) and 101 subspecialty program requirements (79%). For all specialties, cultural competency elements did not gravitate toward any particular competency domain. Four of 5 primary care program requirements (pediatrics, obstetrics-gynecology, family medicine, and psychiatry) acquired the high-specificity score of 3, in comparison to only 1 of 22 specialty care program requirements (physical medicine and rehabilitation). Conclusions The degree of specificity, as judged by use of keywords in 3 competency domains, in ACGME requirements regarding cultural competency is highly variable across specialties and subspecialties. Greater specificity in requirements is expected to benefit the acquisition of cultural competency in residents, but this has not been empirically tested. PMID:24404264

  17. EVALUATION OF DISTANCE EDUCATION IN DENTISTRY GRADUATION COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helbert Eustáquio Cardoso da Silva

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The curricula of Dentistry are in the process of modernization , to suit the labor market geared to the needs of the population . The changes seek a teaching method that is conducive to student elfmanagement of their knowledge through a transdisciplinary vision. Objective: To examine about the training of teachers responsible for the disciplines of dentistry , as well as new possibilities of knowledge transmission . In this context, the distance is shown as an alternative to the continuing education of future dentists , covering new technologies and new methods of teaching adults. Methods: Through a literature review , we discuss about the goals of the national curriculum guidelines and the training of teachers of courses in dentistry and also surveys are presented in distance education in healthcare. Results: The study shows successful application of distance learning for adult learners courses in Dentistry .

  18. [Nursing competences and basic education: descriptive study on new-graduate nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecugni, Daniela; Sforacchi, Federica; Amaducci, Giovanna; Iemmi, Marina; Finotto, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The pressing need by the health organizations of new-graduate nurses immediately able to take full charge of the ward, together with the radical changes of nursing education, led the professional community to discuss the education of new-graduate nurses. To describe if new-graduate nurses at the Nursing Degree Course in Reggio Emilia, have the competences adequate to the demands of the health care organizations. Fifty ward Nursing Manager of a National health Service, where new-graduate nurses of the 2009-2010 academic year were emploied by at least one month were interviewed by phone. A list of 34 competences were identified and grouped into six skill areas (taking care, technical, managerial, communication, professional ethics, education and professional updating); for each, respondents had to rank the level of compentence on a Likert scale from 1 not able to 5 fully able. According to Nursing Managers new-graduate nurses are able to identify the patient care problems (mean score 4.1+0.8), to perform nursing techniques (mean score 4.4+0.7) and to meet the deadlines of the organizations (mean score 4.2+0.8). All Nursing Managers agree that new-graduate nurses have required skills and knowledge to work in their units. The level of expertise of by new-graduates in the areas investigated appears adequate to fulfill the role of nurse in health care organizations after a short period of coaching by a senior nurse.

  19. Information Technology Skills Development for Accounting Graduates: Intervening Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senik, Rosmila; Broad, Martin

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings on factors perceived to mitigate educators from incorporating IT skills in their taught unit(s). The factors are discussed under three main categories, which are academic staff-based barriers, environmental-based barriers and student-based barriers. These barriers should be considered in order to encourage the…

  20. Graduate and post- graduate education – the interaction and balance of purposes in modern conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Михайло Филимонович Степко

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main trends to create the conditions for staff training and retraining throughout life in the systems of higher education and additional professional education are analyzed in the article. Versions of curricula diversification, a change of provider types and forms of additional professional education, including teacher education system, and improve interaction with the labor market are analyzed

  1. Impacts of social economic status on higher education opportunity and graduate employment in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Dong-mao

    2006-01-01

    Based on a nation-wide survey of higher education graduates,this paper analyzes the impact of family background,using paternal occupation and education as indicators,on their scores in the National College Entrance Examination,the level and type of higher education institutions they attend,their employment after graduation,and the income they receive from their first job.It has been found that there are wide disparities among students with different family backgrounds in both access to higher education and their potential employment in China nowadays.This paper also studies how those influences happen.

  2. Patient safety and technology-driven medication - A qualitative study on how graduate nursing students navigate through complex medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Fabricius, Pia; Lefevre, Rikke S; Møller, Tom

    2015-05-01

    The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26-38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the systematic horizontal phenomenological-hermeneutic template methodology. The interviews uncovered that understanding the technologies; professionalism and patient safety are three crucial elements in the medication process. The students expressed positivity and confidence in using technology, but were fearful of committing serious medication errors. From the nursing students' perspective, experienced nurses deviate from existing guidelines, leaving them feeling isolated in practical learning situations. Having an unclear nursing role model for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient adherence to the medication process, still remains to be studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Teacher Education Graduate Tracer Study from 2010 to 2014 in One State University in Batangas, Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anania B. Aquino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Teacher Education institutions primarily aim of producing competent and highly qualified graduates employable here and abroad. Tracer studies on graduates can appropriately provide valuable information for evaluating the results of the education and training of a specific institution of higher education. It collects essential information concerning the employment profile of graduates, their undergraduate experience, the first and current jobs of graduates and the relevance of their educational background and skills required in their job. The main objective of this study was to trace the employment profile of the graduates after they obtained their teacher education degree. The descriptive survey method of research was applied to this research with a survey questionnaire as the main data gathering instrument. It analyzed data from 129 respondents characterized by a preponderance of females over male as females and unmarried or single graduates as opposed to those who were married. The study found that there were more respondents who finished Bachelor of Secondary Education (BSED over Bachelor of Elementary Education. They obtained this degree as they believed that teaching is a rewarding and challenging profession, Majority are Licensure Examination for Teachers (LET passers and are employed in public schools at the time of the study. Their present job, mostly professional in nature, was also their first job and relevant to their degree. It took only a moderate period of time for most graduates to land a job. Most stay in their job for economic reason, finding communication skills and human relation skills as part of their teacher education preparation very relevant to their jobs.

  4. Disruptive technologies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Flavin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the role of “disruptive” innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally adopted and used by students and staff. Instead, other technologies not owned or controlled by HEIs are widely used to support learning and teaching. According to Christensen's theory of Disruptive Innovation, these disruptive technologies are not designed explicitly to support learning and teaching in higher education, but have educational potential. This study uses Activity Theory and Expansive Learning to analyse data regarding the impact of disruptive technologies. The data were obtained through a questionnaire survey about awareness and use of technologies, and through observation and interviews, exploring participants’ actual practice. The survey answers tended to endorse Disruptive Innovation theory, with participants establishing meanings for technologies through their use of them, rather than in keeping with a designer's intentions. Observation revealed that learners use a narrow range of technologies to support learning, but with a tendency to use resources other than those supplied by their HEIs. Interviews showed that participants use simple and convenient technologies to support their learning and teaching. This study identifies a contradiction between learning technologies made available by HEIs, and technologies used in practice. There is no evidence to suggest that a wide range of technologies is being used to support learning and teaching. Instead, a small range of technologies is being used for a wide range of tasks. Students and lecturers are not dependent on their HEIs to support learning and teaching. Instead, they self-select technologies, with use weighted towards established brands. The

  5. Assessing graduate programs for healthcare information management/technology (HIM/T) executives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Rick A; Berner, Eta S

    2004-03-18

    This paper describes a methodology to assess health/medical informatics graduate-level education curricula. The authors used the Certified Professional in Healthcare Information Management Systems (CPHIMS) exam objectives published by the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) as the basis for their assessment. The authors compared the 69 CPHIMS exam objectives against four health/medical informatics program course objectives as stated in the selected program's online graduate catalog. Results showed that the two programs with management as a focus addressed the majority (67 and 59%) of the CPHIMS objectives within core and elective courses combined. Overall, the other two programs addressed closer to a third of the CPHIMS objectives (36 and 32%). This methodology could prove to be useful in assisting students interested in graduate-level training programs with a tool by which to measure the congruence of the curricula of different programs with the mission of the programs and with their own professional interests.

  6. Graduate Ethics Curricula for Future Geospatial Technology Professionals (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, D. J.; Dibiase, D.; Harvey, F.; Solem, M.

    2009-12-01

    Professionalism in today's rapidly-growing, multidisciplinary geographic information science field (e.g., geographic information systems or GIS, remote sensing, cartography, quantitative spatial analysis), now involves a commitment to ethical practice as informed by a more sophisticated understanding of the ethical implications of geographic technologies. The lack of privacy introduced by mobile mapping devices, the use of GIS for military and surveillance purposes, the appropriate use of data collected using these technologies for policy decisions (especially for conservation and sustainability) and general consequences of inequities that arise through biased access to geospatial tools and derived data all continue to be challenging issues and topics of deep concern for many. Students and professionals working with GIS and related technologies should develop a sound grasp of these issues and a thorough comprehension of the concerns impacting their use and development in today's world. However, while most people agree that ethics matters for GIS, we often have difficulty putting ethical issues into practice. An ongoing project supported by NSF seeks to bridge this gap by providing a sound basis for future ethical consideration of a variety of issues. A model seminar curriculum is under development by a team of geographic information science and technology (GIS&T) researchers and professional ethicists, along with protocols for course evaluations. In the curricula students first investigate the nature of professions in general and the characteristics of a GIS&T profession in particular. They hone moral reasoning skills through methodical analyses of case studies in relation to various GIS Code of Ethics and Rules of Conduct. They learn to unveil the "moral ecologies" of a profession through actual interviews with real practitioners in the field. Assignments thus far include readings, class discussions, practitioner interviews, and preparations of original case

  7. Motion sensor technologies in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bratitsis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to raise a discussion regarding motion sensor technologies, mainly seen as peripherals of contemporary video game consoles, by examining their exploitation within educational context. An overview of the existing literature is presented, while attempting to categorize the educational approaches which involve motion sensor technologies, in two parts. The first one concerns the education of people with special needs. The utilization of motion sensor technologies, incorporated by game consoles, in the education of such people is examined. The second one refers to various educational approaches in regular education, under which not so many research approaches, but many teaching ideas can be found. The aim of the paper is to serve as a reference point for every individual/group, willing to explore the Sensor-Based Games Based Learning (SBGBL research area, by providing a complete and structured literature review.

  8. Transforming the Academic Faculty Perspective in Graduate Medical Education to Better Align Educational and Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brian M; Holmboe, Eric S

    2016-04-01

    The current health care delivery model continues to fall short in achieving the desired patient safety and quality-of-care outcomes for patients. And, until recently, an explicit acknowledgment of the role and influence of the clinical learning environment on professional development had been missing from physician-based competency frameworks. In this Perspective, the authors explore the implications of the insufficient integration of education about patient safety and quality improvement by academic faculty into the clinical learning environment in many graduate medical education (GME) programs, and the important role that academic faculty need to play to better align the educational and clinical contexts to improve both learner and patient outcomes. The authors propose a framework that closely aligns the educational and clinical contexts, such that both educational and clinical outcomes are centered around the patient. This will require a reorganization of academic faculty perspective and educational design of GME training programs that recognizes that (1) the dynamic interplay between the faculty, learner, training program, and clinical microsystem ultimately influences the quality of physician that emerges from the training program and environment, and (2) patient outcomes relate to the quality of education and the success of clinical microsystems. To enable this evolution, there is a need to revisit the core competencies expected of academic faculty, implement innovative faculty development strategies, examine closely faculty's current clinical super vision practices, and establish a training environment that supports bridging from clinician to educator, training program to clinical microsystem, and educational outcomes to clinical outcomes that benefit patients.

  9. The Role of Educators in Preparing the Confident Graduate Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geri Dickey, PhD

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available With large numbers of non-BSW graduates gravitating toward MSW programs of study, BSWs must demonstrate their ability to handle the rigor of graduate school in order to remain competitive in the classroom and field. This study utilized an online survey of MSW students (N=107 from four different universities to examine how well students believe their particular undergraduate degree program prepared them to meet the academic demands of the MSW programs. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed and results indicate BSW graduates feel more prepared than non-BSWs to complete their MSW program. The exception for BSWs was found in areas of research and statistics when compared specifically to those with psychology bachelor degrees.

  10. Implementing Educational Technology in Higher Education:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia C. Roberts

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the move toward implementing technology in higher education is driven by an increasing number of competitors as well as student demand, there is still considerable resistance to embracing it. Adoption of technology requires more that merely installing a product. This paper outlines a framework for a strategic change process that can be utilized by educators for the purpose of the selection as well as successful implementation of educational technologies within their setting, in particular, online course management systems. The four steps of this process include strategic analysis, strategy making, strategic plan design, and strategic plan implementation. The choice to embrace a new system and the extent and speed of its implementation depends upon internal factors such as resources, organizational culture, faculty readiness, anticipated degree of resistance, and the degree of variance from the status quo. A case from the author’s experience provides one example of how the use of distance learning technology was strategically implemented.

  11. The Graduate Education of Warrant Officers by AMSP Provides Benefits to the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    Corps in 1988. International officers began attending in 1998. In 2010, the Army allowed matriculation of the first three warrant officers into AMSP...something of an expert in the topic of study. A good graduate program also teaches advanced skills in such areas as problem solving, mathematics , writing...to mathematics , writing, oral presentations, and technology.51 These subjects taught at the graduate level amplify the warrant officer’s experience

  12. Distance education: the humanization of technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Rodrigues Ferreira, Orlando

    2015-08-01

    The Distance Education [DE] presents significant growth in graduates and postgraduates programs. Regarding this fact, new challenges arise and others must be considered, as the generation gap between digital immigrants and digital natives, the establishment of a population increasingly accustomed to Information and Communication Technologies [ICT] and teaching methodologies that should be used and developed. Vygotsky’s model of social interaction related to mediation can and should be used in DE, and concerning historical, social and cultural approaches affecting Brazilian reality, Paulo Freire is still up-to-date, integrating humanization into the use of ICT. This work only proceeds with analyses of these elements, being an excerpt of the master’s dissertation of one of the authors [Ferreira], under the guidance of another [Voelzke].

  13. Articulation between University and Public School: the case of the graduate course in sociology education at UFRJ

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anita Handfas; Julia Polessa Maçaira

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss the continuing education of teachers, based on the experience of a graduate course with a specialization in sociology education at the School of Education...

  14. Distance Education in Technological Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R .C. SHARMA

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance Education in Technological AgeRomesh Verma (Editor, New Delhi: Anmol Publications, 2005, ISBN 81-261-2210-2, pp. 419 Reviewed by R C SHARMARegional DirectorIndira Gandhi National Open University-INDIA The advancements in information and communication technologies have brought significant changes in the way the open and distance learning are provided to the learners. The impact of such changes is quite visible in both developed and developing countries. Switching over to online mode, joining hands with private initiatives and making a presence in foreign waters, are some of the hallmarks of the open and distance education (ODE institutions in developing countries. The compilation of twenty six essays on themes as applicable to ODE has resulted in the book, “Distance Education in Technological Age”. These essays follow a progressive style of narration, starting from describing conceptual framework of distance education, how the distance education was emerged on the global scene and in India, and then goes on to discuss emergence of online distance education and research aspects in ODE. The initial four chapters provide a detailed account of historical development and growth of distance education in India and State Open University and National Open University Model in India . Student support services are pivot to any distance education and much of its success depends on how well the support services are provided. These are discussed from national and international perspective. The issues of collaborative learning, learning on demand, life long learning, learning-unlearning and re-learning model and strategic alliances have also given due space by the authors. An assortment of technologies like communication technology, domestic technology, information technology, mass media and entertainment technology, media technology and educational technology give an idea of how these technologies are being adopted in the open universities. The study

  15. Politics and Graduate Medical Education in Internal Medicine: A Dynamic Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardrop, Richard M; Berkowitz, Lee R

    2017-02-01

    The promotion of change and growth within medical education is oftentimes the result of a complex mix of societal, cultural and economic forces. Graduate medical education in internal medicine is not immune to these forces. Several entities and organizations can be identified as having a major influence on internal medicine training and graduate medical education as a whole. We have reviewed how this is effectively accomplished through these entities and organizations. The result is a constantly changing and dynamic landscape for internal medicine training. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nanocommunication design in graduate-level education and research training programs at Osaka University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Mizuki; An, SoonHwa; Ata, Masafumi

    2014-09-01

    After more than ten years of strategic investment research and development supported by government policies on science and technology, nanotechnology in Japan is making a transition from the knowledge creation stage of exploratory research to the stage of making the outcomes available for the benefit of society as a whole. Osaka University has been proactive in discussions about the relationship between nanotechnology and society as part of graduate and continuing education programs. These programs are intended to fulfill the social accountability obligation of scientists and corporations involved in R&D, and to deepen their understanding of the relationship between science and society. To meet those aims, the program has covered themes relating to overall public engagement relating to nanotechnology governance, such as risk management of nanomaterials, international standardization for nanotechnology, nanomeasurement, intellectual property management in an open innovation environment, and interactive communication with society. Nanotechnology is an emerging field of science and technology. This paper reports and comments on initiatives for public engagement on nanotechnology at Osaka University's Institute for NanoScience Design, which aims to create new technologies based on nanotechnology that can help realize a sustainable society.

  17. TECHNOLOGY OF EDUCATIONAL EVENTS DESIGNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Volkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to prove and disclose the essence of the author’s technology of educational events designing.Methodology and methods of research. Methodological basis of work is humanitarian approach. The method of pedagogical modeling was used for the model development of educational events influence on pedagogical activity formation. The content analysis of texts descriptions, case-study method, expert estimations of event projects were applied as the main methods of efficiency confirmation of the technology of educational events design.Results and scientific novelty. The characteristics of an educational event are emphasized by means of an empirical way: opening (what a person opens for himself; generation (a result of a personal action; and participation in creation of something "new" (new communications, relations and experience. The structure of technology of educational events design including work with concepts (an educational event, substantial and procedural components is presented. The technology of educational events designing is considered as the process of the well-grounded choice of designing technologies, mutual activity, pedagogical communication, components of educational activity: contents, methods, means, and organizational forms depending on educational aims due to age-specific peculiarities of participants of the educational event. The main conditions providing successful use of the technology are the involvement into joint cognitive activity of all its participants and importance of the events for each of them that qualitatively change the nature of a cognitive process and generate real transformations of the reality.Practical significance. The author’s experience in teaching testifies to introduction of the module «Technology of Design of Educational Events» into the basic educational subject-module «Design Competence of the Teacher» (degree program «Pedagogical Education», considering this module as

  18. Computers: Educational Technology Paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hajah Rugayah Hj.; Mustapha, Wan Narita

    2005-01-01

    As we move further into the new millennium, the need to involve and adapt learners with new technology have been the main aim of many institutions of higher learning in Malaysia. The involvement of the government in huge technology-based projects like the Multimedia Super Corridor Highway (MSC) and one of its flagships, the Smart Schools have…

  19. A Win-Win Model for Outreach and Graduate Education: Research Findings on Professional Development Outcomes for STEM Graduate Students Participating in K-12 Classroom Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, S.; Thiry, H.; Liston, C.

    2006-12-01

    National attention has recently focused on the failures of STEM graduate education in preparing Ph.D. graduates to think broadly, communicate effectively, work in interdisciplinary settings, and succeed in a variety of careers beyond tenure-track academic positions at research universities. We will report findings on a study of a school outreach program that also enhances the graduate education and career preparation of a group of STEM graduate students interested in science education. The Science Squad at the University of Colorado at Boulder is a group of university STEM graduate students who develop and present hands-on, inquiry-based science sessions in local K-12 schools. Squad members hold the position as an alternative to a standard teaching assistantship, typically spending two days a week in the schools. Our ethnographic interview study examines the benefits and costs to the K-12 students, teachers, and graduate students who participate. The program provides significant benefits to the K-12 students and teachers that it serves, but even more importantly offers significant professional development in teaching and learning to a group of STEM graduate students who seek to develop their science careers as communicators and educators. Findings elucidate how the design of the program enables the graduate Squad members to develop teaching, communication, and organizational skills; deepen their understanding of K-12 education and diversity issues; grow in professional confidence; and apply these gains to their career development. In addition, over 80% of the Squad members interviewed reported that participation in the Squad influenced their careers in one of two ways. Members who were pursuing academic positions emphasizing teachers found the Squad experience to confirm their interest in this career and enhance their ability to earn a suitable academic position. Members who were reconsidering their career options and rejecting their initial plans to pursue

  20. "Grand Possibilities and Perilous Business": Academic Autobiographers on Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Steven

    1998-01-01

    The accounts of several autobiographers concerning the graduate student experience reveal how students find meaning in their academic apprenticeships. Academic autobiographers, now speaking as teachers themselves. focus on what was given to them by their teachers when they were students. (MSE)

  1. Impediment or Stimulant? Marital Status and Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Saul D.

    1973-01-01

    There is conflict between the role of wife and the role of full time graduate student. It appears that marital status has an effect upon the student roles of both men and women; greatest success'' obtains upon married men and divorced women. (Author/JB)

  2. Resource Letter EPGA-1: The Education of Physics Graduate Assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jossem, E. Leonard

    2000-01-01

    Provides nearly 200 resources for programs for the preparation of physics graduate students for their responsibilities as teachers. Resources are listed under the following categories: (1) General Resources; (2) Resources Focused on Particular Aspects of Instruction; (3) National Conference Proceedings; (4) International TAs; (5) Institutional…

  3. Maori University Graduates: Indigenous Participation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodore, Reremoana; Tustin, Karen; Kiro, Cynthia; Gollop, Megan; Taumoepeau, Mele; Taylor, Nicola; Chee, Kaa-Sandra; Hunter, Jackie; Poulton, Richie

    2016-01-01

    Maori, the indigenous population of New Zealand, are gaining university qualifications in greater numbers. This article describes the history of Maori university graduates, their current situation and the implications for indigenous futures. Section one provides a brief overview of historical policies and practices that, similar to those used on…

  4. PERSISTENCE IN TEACHING AMONG MALE SPECIAL AREA GRADUATES IN EDUCATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MACLEOD, ROBERT N.

    ANALYSIS OF PERSISTENCE IN TEACHING IN RELATION TO (1) SIZE AND TYPE OF HIGH SCHOOL, (2) SIZE OF COMMUNITY, (3) AGE AT COLLEGE GRADUATION, (4) HIGH SCHOOL RANK, (5) THREE GRADE POINT AVERAGES, (6) PROBATIONARY HISTORY, AND (7) TEST BATTERY SCORES (ACE, COOPERATIVE ENGLISH EXAMINATION, MILLER ANALOGIES, COOPERATIVE READING TEST, AND THE MTAI) WAS…

  5. Mobility of Graduates from Indiana Public Postsecondary Education. Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiana State Commission for Higher Education, Indianapolis.

    This report addresses the extent to which graduates of Indiana's colleges and universities remain in Indiana, as opposed to moving to another state. Using public institution data from the Commission's Student Information System (SIS) and Driver's License data from the Bureau of Motor Vehicles (BMV), staff tracked the 1990-91 degree recipients to…

  6. Graduate Education Is the Dubai of Higher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Mark C. Taylor's op-ed in the "New York Times," "End the University as We Know It," struck a nerve among both faculty and graduate students, as shown by the numerous blog posts and letters to the editor it inspired. Taylor, chair of the religion department at Columbia University, spoke directly to their deepest insecurities by describing graduate…

  7. Online Graduate Education: Developing Scholars through Asynchronous Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Randall

    2012-01-01

    Considerable effort has been placed on understanding and enhancing online interaction to increase student learning, examine teaching strategies, and build learning communities. This research explored another aspect of interaction: the emergence of scholarship by graduate students through asynchronous discussion. Qualitative analysis of archived…

  8. Graduate Education Is the Dubai of Higher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Mark C. Taylor's op-ed in the "New York Times," "End the University as We Know It," struck a nerve among both faculty and graduate students, as shown by the numerous blog posts and letters to the editor it inspired. Taylor, chair of the religion department at Columbia University, spoke directly to their deepest insecurities by…

  9. The Impact of Affirmative Action Bans in Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garces, Liliana M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines whether bans on affirmative action across four states-- Texas (during "Hopwood v. State of Texas"), California (with Proposition 209), Washington (with Initiative 200), and Florida (with One Florida Initiative)--have reduced the enrollment rates of underrepresented students of color in graduate studies and in a…

  10. Transformative Graduate Education through the Use of Restorative Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailie, John W.; Adamson, Craig W.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter discusses key findings from two recent studies that examine transformative learning experiences in a restorative practices-based graduate program at the International Institute for Restorative Practices (IIRP). Restorative practices is a new interdisciplinary social science that studies the development and maintenance of relationships…

  11. Expectations and Influencing Factors of IS Graduates and Education in Thailand: A Perspective of the Students, Academics and Business Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teay Shawyun Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As academic we have always been entrusted with developing the knowledge, skills, and capability of our IS students. In the strive for excellence in education, there is always the question of what has been implemented is appropriate and finally achieves its ultimate goals of delivering quality, capable and intellectual students as workforce for the business. To this end, this exploratory research tries to discover what knowledge, skills and capability are expected of an IS graduate, the facilities expected to develop these qualities and what influencing factors make the students go for an IS education. The research will be based on the perspectives of the student, academic and business community. The major findings highlight the overall tendency of higher mean expectation of the business community in most of the fundamental expectations of the type of knowledge, skills and capability and the facilities essential to the development of these attributes. The academics are normally supportive of the business community’s perspectives except in the dimensions of skill expectation and attitudinal factors. Overall, it also appears that the students show a lower average means on most attributes as compared to the academics and business community. Based on this research, there appears to be distinctive expectations of an IS graduate. Based on the balanced technology approach of looking at the development of the IS graduate from degree of sophistication of the Technoware (T, Humaware (H, Inforware (I and Orgaware (O, it is hoped that the following can be achieved: 1. A newly revised and revamped IS curriculum, 2. A linkage of the THIO to develop the IS graduate and 3. A linkage of the academia-industry THIO linkage to develop the IS graduate.

  12. Knowledge Expansion in Engineering Education: Engineering Technology as an Alternative

    OpenAIRE

    Kamsiah Mohd Ismail; Noor Hamizah Hussain; Norhayati Mohamed Nor; Normah Mulop; Zainai Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. The current and rising challenges in engineering education demand graduate engineers who are well-prepared to provide innovative solutions as technical specialists, system integrators and change agents. Realizing the importance of producing a highly competent manpower, the Malaysian Government has put considerable pressure to the universities to produce engineers who are competitive in the global market. Hence, this assignment of developing a highly competence engineering technologi...

  13. Why are you here? Needs analysis of an interprofessional health-education graduate degree program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cable C

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Christian Cable,1,2 Mary Knab,3,4 Kum Ying Tham,5,6 Deborah D Navedo,3 Elizabeth Armstrong3,7,81Scott and White Healthcare, Temple, 2Texas A&M University Health Science Center, TAMHSC College of Medicine, Bryan, TX, 3MGH Institute of Health Professions, 4Physical and Occupational Therapy Services Department, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; 5Emergency Department, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, 6Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 7Harvard Macy Institute, 8Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Little is known about the nature of faculty development that is needed to meet calls for a focus on quality and safety with particular attention to the power of interprofessional collaborative practice. Through grounded-theory methodology, the authors describe the motivation and needs of 20 educator/clinicians in multiple disciplines who chose to enroll in an explicitly interprofessional master's program in health profession education. The results, derived from axial coding described by Strauss and Corbin, revealed that faculty pursue such postprofessional master's degrees out of a desire to be better prepared for their roles as educators. A hybrid-delivery model on campus and online provided access to graduate degrees while protecting the ability of participants to remain in current positions. The added benefit of a community of practice related to evidence-based and innovative models of education was valued by participants. Authentic, project-based learning and assessment supported their advancement in home institutions and systems. The experience was described by participants as a disruptive innovation that helped them attain their goal of leadership in health profession education.Keywords: health education

  14. The Effects of Academic Career Magnet Education on High Schools and Their Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Robert L.; Allen, Anna; Thaler, Robert; Sullivan, Debora; Zellman, Gail L.; Little, Judith Warren; Quigley, Denise D.

    This book contains eight papers on a study of the effects of academic career magnetic education on high schools and their graduates. "Introduction" (Robert L. Crain) explains the study's objectives and methodology, which included an analysis of data files on 9,176 students who applied to 59 different academic career magnet education and…

  15. Relationships Among Academic Performance, Basic Skills, Subject Matter Knowledge, and Teaching Skills of Teacher Education Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; Farokhi, Elizabeth

    1987-01-01

    In order to determine if successful academic performance assures good teaching, four measures of academic achievement of teacher education graduates of Georgia State University from 1981 through 1984 were correlated with on-the-job performance assessments. Results are presented and implications for education policies are discussed. (Author/MT)

  16. Education, Employment and Income of High School Vocational Agriculture Graduates. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada, R. M.; Seaver, S. K.

    In order to evaluate vocational agriculture education in 21 Connecticut high schools for the purposes of developing or updating curriculums, this study intended to: (1) determine employment rates of vocational agriculture graduates in agricultural areas, (2) determine post-secondary educational attainment levels, (3) determine variables affecting…

  17. Graduate Social Work Education and Cognitive Complexity: Does Prior Experience Really Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which age, education, and practice experience among social work graduate students (N = 184) predicted cognitive complexity, an essential aspect of critical thinking. In the regression analysis, education accounted for more of the variance associated with cognitive complexity than age and practice experience. When…

  18. Employers' Perceptions, Attitudes, and Policies on Hiring of Graduates of Online Dietetic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehpahlavan, Jaleh

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative explorative study explored dietetic employers' perceptions, attitudes, and policies regarding hiring of online dietetic graduates; how their perceptions were formed; and factors contributing to their development. Higher educational institutions and learners have embraced online education, evidenced by increased online program…

  19. Higher Education, the Graduate and the Labour Market: From Robbins to Dearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to offer a perspective on issues pertaining to higher education, the graduate and the labour market. It is one of several similar perspectives on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the publication of the journal "Education + Training." Design/methodology/approach: The approach adopted has been to provide…

  20. Exploring Gender through Education Abroad Programs: A Graduate Student Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Dian D.; Williams, Terry E.; Cartwright, Matthew; Jourian, T. J.; Monter, Marie; Weatherford, Amy

    2015-01-01

    This case study explores how graduate students who attended a short-term education abroad program understood gender as a result of participation in the trip. Findings reveal that students' understandings of gender are influenced by in and out of class contexts. Implications for faculty and education abroad practitioners are shared to deepen and…

  1. Higher Education, the Graduate and the Labour Market: From Robbins to Dearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to offer a perspective on issues pertaining to higher education, the graduate and the labour market. It is one of several similar perspectives on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the publication of the journal "Education + Training." Design/methodology/approach: The approach adopted has been to provide…

  2. Academic Writing for Graduate-Level English as a Second Language Students: Experiences in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidman-Taveau, Rebekah; Karathanos-Aguilar, Katya

    2015-01-01

    Graduate-level ESL students in Education are future multicultural educators and promising role models for our diverse K-12 students. However, many of these students struggle with academic English and, in particular, writing. Yet little research or program development addresses the specific writing-support needs of this group. This article shares…

  3. Developing an Organizational Leadership Graduate Program: A "CHAT" about Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Patrick J.; Panzo, Donna

    2015-01-01

    Much of recent research on leadership education focuses on the application of a particular assignment or project to develop an individual's leadership. Other research has examined leadership development from different educational levels such as graduate, undergraduate, and even K-12. The following paper is an idea brief surrounding a newly created…

  4. Moral Values Education in Terms of Graduate University Students' Perspectives: A Jordanian Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrar, Amani

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on how moral values differ and vary according to variants such as education, culture, thoughts, religion, gender and family relations. It handles the issue of moral education in Jordan, from the perspective of graduate students in Petra University. Since we are facing new challenges in this era and region of the world, we are…

  5. Supporting Intrinsic Motivation for Special Education Students to Meet Graduation Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Robert Sipplin

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examined how teachers use instructional practices and family reinforcement interventions to support intrinsic motivation for special education students as a means to meet graduation requirements. Purposeful sampling of highly qualified special education teachers certified in language arts was used in this study. The data…

  6. Professional Education in Postcolonial Democracies: Indigenous Rights, Universities, and Graduate Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma Rhea, Zane

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the nexus between Indigenous rights, the modern university, and graduate attributes and theorises the potential of the university in postcolonial democracies to address Indigenous rights in its professional education programs. It posits the postcolonial professional as one who has been educated about internationally recognised…

  7. The Rest of the Story: A Qualitative Study of Chinese and Indian Women's Graduate Education Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakaboski, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Previous migration discourse views educational migration through narrowly defined push-pull forces, which ignores overseas graduate education as a path for maneuvering through restrictive gendered and cultural experiences. The purpose of this exploratory research is to expand migration research and view women's migration decisions as employing…

  8. The Rest of the Story: A Qualitative Study of Chinese and Indian Women's Graduate Education Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakaboski, Tamara

    2013-01-01

    Previous migration discourse views educational migration through narrowly defined push-pull forces, which ignores overseas graduate education as a path for maneuvering through restrictive gendered and cultural experiences. The purpose of this exploratory research is to expand migration research and view women's migration decisions as employing…

  9. Employers' Perceptions, Attitudes, and Policies on Hiring of Graduates of Online Dietetic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehpahlavan, Jaleh

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative explorative study explored dietetic employers' perceptions, attitudes, and policies regarding hiring of online dietetic graduates; how their perceptions were formed; and factors contributing to their development. Higher educational institutions and learners have embraced online education, evidenced by increased online program…

  10. Status of Personal Health Requirement for Graduation at Institutions of Higher Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Dayna S.; Aydt Klein, Nicole; Kempland, Monica; Rose Oswalt, Sarah; Rexilius, Molly A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the proportion of higher education institutions in the United States that require a personal health course (PHC) for graduation and to describe the nature of such requirements. Participants: This study included a random sample of public and private institutions of higher education (IHE) with…

  11. Higher Education, the Graduate and the Labour Market: From Robbins to Dearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, John

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This article aims to offer a perspective on issues pertaining to higher education, the graduate and the labour market. It is one of several similar perspectives on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the publication of the journal "Education + Training." Design/methodology/approach: The approach adopted has been to provide a…

  12. Education and the Economy: Boosting South Dakota's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  13. Education and the Economy: Boosting Georgia's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  14. Education and the Economy: Boosting Vermont's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  15. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Hampshire's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  16. Education and the Economy: Boosting South Carolina's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  17. Education and the Economy: Boosting the District of Columbia's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  18. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Jersey's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  19. Education and the Economy: Boosting Oregon's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  20. Education and the Economy: Boosting Missouri's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  1. Education and the Economy: Boosting the Nation's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  2. Education and the Economy: Boosting Wyoming's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  3. Education and the Economy: Boosting California's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  4. Education and the Economy: Boosting Hawaii's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  5. Education and the Economy: Boosting Texas's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  6. Education and the Economy: Boosting Ohio's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  7. Education and the Economy: Boosting Iowa's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  8. Education and the Economy: Boosting Alaska's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  9. Education and the Economy: Boosting Washington's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  10. Education and the Economy: Boosting Rhode Island's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  11. Education and the Economy: Boosting Utah's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  12. Education and the Economy: Boosting Colorado's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  13. Education and the Economy: Boosting Nevada's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  14. Education and the Economy: Boosting Virginia's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  15. Education and the Economy: Boosting Kansas' Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  16. Education and the Economy: Boosting Tennessee's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  17. Education and the Economy: Boosting Florida's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  18. Education and the Economy: Boosting West Virginia's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  19. Education and the Economy: Boosting Pennsylvania's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  20. Education and the Economy: Boosting Indiana's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  1. Education and the Economy: Boosting New Mexico's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  2. Education and the Economy: Boosting North Dakota's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  3. Education and the Economy: Boosting Oklahoma's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  4. Education and the Economy: Boosting Delaware's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  5. Education and the Economy: Boosting New York's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  6. Education and the Economy: Boosting North Carolina's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  7. Education and the Economy: Boosting Illinois's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  8. Education and the Economy: Boosting Idaho's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  9. Education and the Economy: Boosting Wisconsin's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  10. Education and the Economy: Boosting Arkansas' Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  11. Education and the Economy: Boosting Nebraska's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  12. Education and the Economy: Boosting Arizona's Economy by Improving High School Graduation Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Building on its previous work examining education and the economy, the Alliance for Excellent Education (the Alliance), with generous support from State Farm[R], analyzed the economies of all fifty states and the District of Columbia to determine the economic benefits that states could see by improving high school graduation rates. Using a…

  13. A History of Critical Thinking as an Educational Goal in Graduate Theological Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, D. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The development of critical thinking skills among learners is a common educational goal across graduate theological schools. The purpose of this article is to provide a survey of some of the primary historical influences of the critical thinking movement in higher education in the United States and the movement's impact on graduate…

  14. Status of Personal Health Requirement for Graduation at Institutions of Higher Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Dayna S.; Aydt Klein, Nicole; Kempland, Monica; Rose Oswalt, Sarah; Rexilius, Molly A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine the proportion of higher education institutions in the United States that require a personal health course (PHC) for graduation and to describe the nature of such requirements. Participants: This study included a random sample of public and private institutions of higher education (IHE) with…

  15. Relationships Among Academic Performance, Basic Skills, Subject Matter Knowledge, and Teaching Skills of Teacher Education Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith; Farokhi, Elizabeth

    1987-01-01

    In order to determine if successful academic performance assures good teaching, four measures of academic achievement of teacher education graduates of Georgia State University from 1981 through 1984 were correlated with on-the-job performance assessments. Results are presented and implications for education policies are discussed. (Author/MT)

  16. Using Enterprise Education to Prepare Healthcare Professional Graduates for the Real World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refai, Deema; Thompson, John

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an investigation of the extent to which enterprise education (EE) is used in professional health schools at HEIs to develop graduates' "soft" and "functional" enterprise skills, and assesses the effectiveness of the process of delivering this education. A qualitative research study was carried out, using…

  17. BUILDING STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP OF TRANSNATIONAL EDUCATION USING ONLINE PROGRAM TO INCREASE ACADEMIC QUALITY OF GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardus Polla

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available International employment standard requires higher quality of graduates, which can be achieved through high-quality academic standards. As we know there are still a large number of graduates of Indonesian higher education rejected to work in global industry. Besides having low GPA, lots of graduates are considered lacking technical skills, interpersonal skills, and international experience. Indeed, the main weakness factor is the low English proficiency of graduates. We need a breakthrough that develops our academic standards of higher education to obtain international quality. Yet, there are challenges to face by the government, such as rebuilding the national system (establishing elite institutions, internationalizing higher education (globalizing the institutions or cross-border trades of education services, as well as enhancing private participation by repositioning the private sector. To overcome these challenges we need to build a strategic partnership of transnational education using online programs, which can obtain mutual benefit for the collaborating institutions. This article discusses about how to increase academic quality of graduates in Indonesia or in other Asian countries.

  18. Educational Technology Policy in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slakmon, Benzi

    2017-01-01

    The study examines Israel's educational technology policy in light of the coming-of-age of ICT. The study shows the ways it has been developing, and identifies two major shifts which have occurred in recent years: the introduction of the national educational cloud, and the enabling of the "bring your own device" (BYOD) policy. The way…

  19. Educational Technology Policy in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slakmon, Benzi

    2017-01-01

    The study examines Israel's educational technology policy in light of the coming-of-age of ICT. The study shows the ways it has been developing, and identifies two major shifts which have occurred in recent years: the introduction of the national educational cloud, and the enabling of the "bring your own device" (BYOD) policy. The way…

  20. Art Education Technology: Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2007-01-01

    The application of digital storytelling to art education is an interdisciplinary, inquiry-based, hands-on project that integrates the arts, education, local communities, technology, and storytelling. Through digital storytelling, students develop and apply multiliteracy skills, aesthetic sensitivities, and critical faculties to address greater…

  1. Scientific Training in the Era of Big Data: A New Pedagogy for Graduate Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikat, Jay; Carsey, Thomas M; Fecho, Karamarie; Jeffay, Kevin; Krishnamurthy, Ashok; Mucha, Peter J; Rajasekar, Arcot; Ahalt, Stanley C

    2017-03-01

    The era of "big data" has radically altered the way scientific research is conducted and new knowledge is discovered. Indeed, the scientific method is rapidly being complemented and even replaced in some fields by data-driven approaches to knowledge discovery. This paradigm shift is sometimes referred to as the "fourth paradigm" of data-intensive and data-enabled scientific discovery. Interdisciplinary research with a hard emphasis on translational outcomes is becoming the norm in all large-scale scientific endeavors. Yet, graduate education remains largely focused on individual achievement within a single scientific domain, with little training in team-based, interdisciplinary data-oriented approaches designed to translate scientific data into new solutions to today's critical challenges. In this article, we propose a new pedagogy for graduate education: data-centered learning for the domain-data scientist. Our approach is based on four tenets: (1) Graduate training must incorporate interdisciplinary training that couples the domain sciences with data science. (2) Graduate training must prepare students for work in data-enabled research teams. (3) Graduate training must include education in teaming and leadership skills for the data scientist. (4) Graduate training must provide experiential training through academic/industry practicums and internships. We emphasize that this approach is distinct from today's graduate training, which offers training in either data science or a domain science (e.g., biology, sociology, political science, economics, and medicine), but does not integrate the two within a single curriculum designed to prepare the next generation of domain-data scientists. We are in the process of implementing the proposed pedagogy through the development of a new graduate curriculum based on the above four tenets, and we describe herein our strategy, progress, and lessons learned. While our pedagogy was developed in the context of graduate education

  2. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...

  3. Complexity in graduate medical education: a collaborative education agenda for internal medicine and geriatric medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Anna; Fernandez, Helen; Cayea, Danelle; Chheda, Shobhina; Paniagua, Miguel; Eckstrom, Elizabeth; Day, Hollis

    2014-06-01

    Internal medicine residents today face significant challenges in caring for an increasingly complex patient population within ever-changing education and health care environments. As a result, medical educators, health care system leaders, payers, and patients are demanding change and accountability in graduate medical education (GME). A 2012 Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM) retreat identified medical education as an area for collaboration between internal medicine and geriatric medicine. The authors first determined a short-term research agenda for resident education by mapping selected internal medicine reporting milestones to geriatrics competencies, and listing available sample learner assessment tools. Next, the authors proposed a strategy for long-term collaboration in three priority areas in clinical medicine that are challenging for residents today: (1) team-based care, (2) transitions and readmissions, and (3) multi-morbidity. The short-term agenda focuses on learner assessment, while the long-term agenda allows for program evaluation and improvement. This model of collaboration in medical education combines the resources and expertise of internal medicine and geriatric medicine educators with the goal of increasing innovation and improving outcomes in GME targeting the needs of our residents and their patients.

  4. Technological transfer to the education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Melamed-Varela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most efficient strategies related to generation of differentiation factors which contribute to stability and sustainability in time as well as the  momentum of technological development in different territories is represented by the growth in scientific, technological and innovative development based on the structure of economic systems. Education is considered a fundamental element because it is the essence in the formation and fortification of the capacities, skills and competencies in human capital. This is needed for the management of research projects, development and innovation that will contribute to technology transfer and the progress of scientific knowledge that is encouraged from the inside of the organizational structures of the national economic sectors One of the most influential and conceptual tendencies of economic thinking in the countries (Gomez, Ibagón& Forero, 2014 are represented by the theories based on endogenous development in Latin America.  In addition,  the scientific development of a nation brewing from a process of internal learning and strengthening of the technical and technological capabilities that support the processes of education and research as generators of knowledge (Amar &Diazgranados, 2006, this principle is supported by Mazzucato´s (2014 theory,  who considers states as  capable of generating a platform for enabling capabilities of resources for the scientific and technological development entrepreneurs ;fact that are continuously supported by education. Starting from this series of concepts, the following question arises: do different levels of modern educational institutions use technological access? It must be taken into account that the scientific and technological progress results of the research, development and innovation (RDI is not indifferent for educational organizations, an activity that is mostly awarded to the universities and technological development centers (Ortiz, 2012

  5. Evaluating portfolio use as a tool for assessment and professional development in graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Marybeth

    2011-01-01

    The portfolio is emerging as an efficient and effective method for evaluating program outcomes and professional development in nursing education. Although there is a host of literature about the use of portfolios in undergraduate nursing programs, fewer reports exist about their use in graduate nursing education. This article presents the results of a formative evaluation process, using student and faculty focus groups, conducted at a midsized university's graduate nursing education program to determine the effectiveness of portfolio use. Content analysis of the focus group data yielded three student themes and two faculty themes with associated theme clusters that revealed similarities and unique perceptions of students and faculty regarding the portfolio process. The information gleaned will provide direction to faculty as they make decisions about the use of this evaluation method in the graduate program.

  6. COMPETENCES ACQUIRED BY GRADUATES THROUGH MARKETING HIGHER EDUCATION - FINDINGS FROM THE EMPLOYERS PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plaias Ioan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of the economic higher education in providing the graduates with marketing competences is to train them for employment. In light of the said objective, two important aspects must be taken into account by educators. First, the gap between theory and practice must be eliminated. Secondly, educators must select and provide the competences required by employers so that new graduates may obtain employment matching up to their training. The purpose of the present study is to highlight the main dimensions which define employers perception of the marketing competences developed by the graduates whom they have employed. The starting point of the present scientific endeavour is the evaluation of the variables which define the transversal competences and the marketing-specific competences.

  7. [The importance of test control for the post-graduate education in clinical rhinology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosulia, E V; Kim, I A; Kosiakov, S Ia; Piskunov, G Z; Vinnikov, A K

    2014-01-01

    This publication deals with the problems pertaining to the improvement of the system of the post-graduate education in otorhinolaryngology with special reference to one of its topical fields, clinical rhinology. The authors emphasize the importance of one of the principal components of the post-graduate education under the present-day conditions, namely organization of control and self-control of learning the new material, self-monitoring and individual correction of the level of knowledge. Special attention is given to the training tests that can be used to adequately simulate the decision-making process with respect to a concrete clinical situation. It is concluded that the systematic application of test control is one of the most important prerequisites for the enhancement of the effectiveness of the post-graduate education in clinical otorhinolaryngology.

  8. Self-Learning and Independent Study And Their Role In Learning Retention Of Physical Education Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Mousavi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available New ways of Education focus on transferring learning responsibility tothe learner rather than teacher.Self -Learning and independent study is one of the active learning ways in which sustainability learning(retention is effectively achieved in some subjects and courses. Thestudy was quasi-experimental study aimed to evaluate the effect ofindividual learning and learning retention of graduates in physicaleducation. Information was gathered through eight questions on thepackage (240 questions and the statistical population included graduates of physical education in state universities in second semester-2008-2011. The results showed that in general, independent study and self-learning would be effective in graduates` learning retention and those who had studied under individual training and education conditions had a higher retention level.

  9. Quality and safety graduate competencies in psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Mary; Delaney, Kathleen R; McCoy, Kathleen T; Snow, Diane; Scharf, Margaret Rhoads; Brackley, Margaret H

    2012-10-01

    Education of the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner (PMHNP) is undergoing massive change, partially driven by practice requirements and national certification changes, the development of new nurse practitioner competencies, and the development of the graduate quality and safety in nursing (QSEN) competencies. We are in the middle of a paradigm shift of expectations, not only just from these new competencies but also from the context of care and the impact PMHNP graduates will have on policy and health care delivery in the future. In this review article, the authors will discuss the general categories of the graduate QSEN competencies and how they relate to PMHNP education, competency development, and the application to curricular development in PMHNP programs across the United States. Importantly, these changes into PMHNP education, while remaining true to the fundamental tenants of advanced practice psychiatric nursing, prepare the PMHNP to meet the challenges of health care reform and service delivery.

  10. Occupational mobility network of the Romanian higher education graduates

    CERN Document Server

    Lungu, Eliza-Olivia; Militaru, Eva; Mocanu, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Although there is a rich literature on the rate of occupational mobility, there are important gaps in understanding patterns of movement among occupations. We employ a network based approach to explore occupational mobility of the Romanian university graduates in the first years after graduation (2003 - 2008). We use survey data on their career mobility to build an empirical occupational mobility network (OMN) that covers all their job movements in the considered period. We construct the network as directed and weighted. The nodes are represented by the occupations (post coded at 3 digits according to ISCO-88) and the links are weighted with the number of persons switching from one occupation to another. This representation of data permits us to use the novel statistical techniques developed in the framework of weighted directed networks in order to extract a set of stylized facts that highlight patterns of occupational mobility: centrality, network motifs.

  11. EXPANSION OF UNIVERSITY EDUCATION, GRADUATE UNEMPLOYMENT AND THE KNOWLEDGE HUB IN SRI LANKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamini Samaranayake

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to examine the nexus between the existing university education system and graduate unemployment, and to explore the responses of successive governments to address this issue. It also examines the viability and potential of the knowledge hub as a solution to graduate unemployment. Towards this end, it argues that the solution to graduate employment lies in implementing structural changes that are concurrent to changes that are taking place at the international level in higher education. It illustrates, with the use of relevant sources, the pressing issue of graduate un- and underemployment, and identifies the mismatch between skills and requirements as a major factor contributing to intensify the crisis. It observes that strategies such as training unemployed graduates to enable them to acquire the competencies needed for the modern work place, developing systems to link them to the world of work, re-structuring the university system such that it is more concerned with quality and relevance rather than the width of knowledge imparted, and introducing job-oriented programmes could partially address this issue. It also identifies the proposal to establish a knowledge hub in Sri Lanka as constituting a long term and sustainable strategy not only to mitigate the effects of graduate un- and underemployment, but also to facilitate a lucrative source of revenue for the country.

  12. O Ensino Superior Tecnológico em Gastronomia em São Paulo: Um Estudo sobre Formação, Perfil do Egresso e Áreas de Atuação / The Technological Higher Education in Gastronomy in São Paulo: A Study on Training, Graduates' profile and Areas of Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Moura de Abreu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false PT-BR X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Diante das necessidades do novo mercado de trabalho para a área de alimentos e bebidas, que necessita de um profissional articulado, com capacidade crítica e possibilidade de interação com o meio com o qual se relaciona, torna-se importante a reflexão sobre a formação do aluno egresso dos Cursos Tecnológicos em Gastronomia, pensando-se numa educação abrangente que valorize a experiência individual, as expectativas do mercado que se reflitam no conteúdo dos currículos. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo investigar, com base em pesquisa exploratório-descritiva, a matriz curricular de três cursos tecnológicos presenciais do Estado de São Paulo, analisando a proposta de formação contida nos seus documentos, o perfil dos egressos e a visão dos coordenadores, aos quais se aplicou roteiro de entrevista semiestruturada. Apresenta-se, ainda, a contextualização e trajetória da educação formal e do ensino tecnológico em Gastronomia, no Brasil. Como principais resultados observou-se que a pressão do mercado é bastante forte na elaboração dos currículos dos cursos, assim como a percepção dos coordenadores deixa entrever as limitações para a formação mais abrangente de um profissional oriundo dos cursos tecnológicos em Gastronomia. The Technological Higher Education in Gastronomy in São Paulo: A Study on Training, Graduates' profile and Areas of Practice - The job market for the field of foods and beverages requires a professional that is articulated, critical and with ability to interact with the environment. In that way, it is important to reflect about the formation of Food Technology Courses in terms of education, individual experience, market expectations and curriculum. The present study investigated based on an exploratory-descriptive research, the curriculum of three technology courses in the State of São Paulo, analyzing its

  13. Overseas Internship Education in Engineering Graduate Courses and Evaluation of the Educational Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Toru; Yoshikawa, Kozo; Nakamura, Masato

    Center for Engineering Education Development, CEED, Hokkaido University was established to provide new graduate course programs more practical and concordant with the needs of industry and global society. The major program is the overseas internship, where students join some project as experiment, design, analysis, production, software making, etc, in the companies or research organizations in the foreign countries. For these three years, CEED sent over 65 students to 24 countries in the world. In this report, the CEED implementation of the internship program is described and examples of students‧ activities in the overseas internship are introduced. The educational effect is also stated based on the questionnaire survey. From the data, students‧ abilities such as, international understanding, challenging spirit, attitude to learn new things, as well as language proficiency are markedly improved.

  14. Multimedia technologies in education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaskos, Joseph; Diomidus, Marianna

    2002-01-01

    In general multimedia is the combination of visual and audio representations. These representations could include elements of texts, graphic arts, sound, animation, and video. However, multimedia is restricted in such systems where information is digitalized and is processed by a computer. Interactive multimedia and hypermedia consist of multimedia applications that the user has more active role. Education is perhaps the most useful destination for multimedia and the place where multimedia has the most effective applications, as it enriches the learning process. Multimedia both in nursing education and in medical informatics education has several applications as well. A multimedia project can be developed even as a "stand alone" application (on CD-ROM), or on World Wide Web pages on Internet. However several technical constraints exist for developing multimedia applications on Internet. For developing multimedia projects we need hardware and software, talent and skill. The software requirements for multimedia development consist of one or more authoring systems and various editing applications for text, images, sounds and video. In this chapter different software tools for creating multimedia applications are presented. In the last part of this chapter, two examples of multimedia educational training programs are discussed. Both are "stand alone" applications (CD-ROMs). The first, examines several aspects of the electronic patient record by using videos, audio descriptions, lectures and glossary, while the second one presents several topics regarding epidemiology and epidemiological research by using graphics, sound and animation.

  15. MCI Regulations on Graduate Medical Education, 2012- Are we ready for paradigm shift?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj R Patel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Medical college equips medical students with the scientific background and technical skills they need for practice. But it is equally important for the new graduates to both understand and commit to high personal and professional values. Globally, there is an increasing concern among society about doctors‘ adequacy of the scientific education, clinical skills, interactions with patients and commitment to improving healthcare and providing leadership. India is no exception with frequent hue and cry expressed about proficiency of our doctors. Obviously a need has been felt since long for overhauling our medical education to make it more relevant to the role of future graduates as ―Good Doctors‖.

  16. Graduate Medical Education in Humanism and Professionalism: A Needs Assessment Survey of Pediatric Gastroenterology Fellows

    OpenAIRE

    Garvey, Katharine C.; Kesselheim, Jennifer C.; Herrick, Daniel B; WOOLF, Alan D.; Leichtner, Alan M.

    2014-01-01

    The deterioration of humanism and professionalism during graduate medical training is an acknowledged concern, and programs are required to provide professionalism education for pediatric fellows. We conducted a needs assessment survey in a national sample of 138 first- and second-year gastroenterology fellows (82% response rate). Most believed that present humanism and professionalism education met their needs, but this education was largely informal (eg, role modeling). Areas for formal edu...

  17. The Cost of Change in Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullias, Dave

    1987-01-01

    The author states that two costs will be involved in the coming change in technology education: financial and personal. He questions what group of educators will teach technology education in the future. (CH)

  18. Online teaching and learning in a graduate course In nursing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NS Gwele

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Information technology has a potential to be the answer to one of Africa’s most pressing problems- providing education to a number of geographically dispersed learners, who currently have to leave their countries for a number of years in order to pursue their studies elsewhere. The School of Nursing at the University of Natal launched an online graduate course in nursing education at the beginning of the year 2000 for the first time as part of a masters degree programme. A number of lessons have been learned from this experience. Firstly, it took too long to arrive at ‘closure’ on discussion of any one particular theme. There seemed to be a perpetual feeling of never “completing” teaching/learning tasks. Ordinarily, in a face-to-face (f2f classroom, a particular theme or topic is scheduled for a particular lecture period. More often than not, whether clarity and/or resolution has been attained, the discussion moves on to the next theme, or topic. This has not been easy to do in computer mediated communication (CMC. The students’ contributions, however, seemed more thought out and more focused than had been the case in the f2f classes. Secondly, the essentiality/importance of structure became apparent very early. After an initial tentative and slow start, once the students felt comfortable with the computer “classroom” , the bulletin board was flooded with messages, necessitating re-thinking the original structure.

  19. Examining Educators' and Employers' Perceptions on Career and Technical Education Graduates' Employability Skills for the Labor Market in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawneh, Muhammad Khaled

    2009-01-01

    Preparing skilled and knowledgeable workforce that fits the labor market requires continued collaboration between education and work. Studying educators' and employers' perspectives on technical and non-technical skills may result in improving the quality of the graduates to compete on the level of the local as well as the global labor market.…

  20. Perceptions of Liberal Education of Two Types of Nursing Graduates: The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

    2010-01-01

    The American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), which defines the expectations of a new baccalaureate-prepared nurse, includes a liberal education as a desired outcome for bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) graduates. A liberal education is thought to provide the professional nurse with the skills needed to practice nursing, including…

  1. Advances in health informatics education: educating students at the intersection of health care and information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre; Borycki, Elizabeth; Armstrong, Brian; Kuo, Mu-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the authors' work in the area of health informatics (HI) education involving emerging health information technologies. A range of information technologies promise to modernize health care. Foremost among these are electronic health records (EHRs), which are expected to significantly improve and streamline health care practice. Major national and international efforts are currently underway to increase EHR adoption. However, there have been numerous issues affecting the widespread use of such information technology, ranging from a complex array of technical problems to social issues. This paper describes work in the integration of information technologies directly into the education and training of HI students at both the undergraduate and graduate level. This has included work in (a) the development of Web-based computer tools and platforms to allow students to have hands-on access to the latest technologies and (b) development of interdisciplinary educational models that can be used to guide integrating information technologies into HI education. The paper describes approaches that allow for remote hands-on access by HI students to a range of EHRs and related technology. To date, this work has been applied in HI education in a variety of ways. Several approaches for integration of this essential technology into HI education and training are discussed, along with future directions for the integration of EHR technology into improving and informing the education of future health and HI professionals.

  2. Graduate health professions education: an interdisciplinary university - community partnership model 1996 - 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Deborah; Behringer, Bruce; Smith, Patricia; Townsend, Tom; Wachs, Joy; Stanifer, Larry; Goodrow, Bruce

    2003-07-01

    In 1996, East Tennessee State University (ETSU) reinforced its historical commitment to multidisciplinary community engagement by developing a graduate level community partnerships program in the Division of Health Sciences. While the university's earlier health partnership efforts relied primarily on curricular innovation, the approach to graduate health professions education was to seed a series of curricular enhancements and interdisciplinary, community-based learning experiences and service into traditional curricula. This paper presents the experience of one school in crafting a regional network that became the basis of a division-wide graduate level teaching and learning initiative. Carefully selected planning and implementation techniques enabled multidisciplinary practitioners and community members from across a 20-county region to participate with university faculty in training ETSU learners in community-based medical care. By year four of the project, curricular "enhancements" were institutionalized in over five departments across the Division and engaged 1160 medical residents and graduate learners in a give - get model of health education. Programme evaluation methodology was collaboratively defined and documentation of programme effort and outcomes regularly reported and strategically reviewed. Programme evaluation demonstrates mutual benefit to community and university. Faculty involvement in programme activity increased fourfold and community involvement in training of health professions graduate learners increased threefold by year four. Educational innovations were adopted into traditional curricula, thousands of hours of clinical services were provided to underserved communities and the university-community team forged by network links continues to promote multidisciplinary interests through joint public policy endeavors.

  3. "Departmental Climate and Student Experiences in Geography Graduate Programs": Research for Enhancing Departments and Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solem, Michael N.; Lee, Jenny; Schlemper, M. Beth

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the authors' research which combined quantitative and qualitative methods to analyze a rather intangible phenomenon of interest to higher education researchers and administrators, that being "departmental climate" (often referred to as "academic climate"). This investigation required the authors to develop a method by which…

  4. Creating an Intentional Web Presence: Strategies for Every Educational Technology Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowenthal, Patrick R.; Dunlap, Joanna C.; Stitson, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Educators are pushing for students, specifically graduates, to be digitally literate in order to successfully read, write, contribute, and ultimately compete in the global market place. Educational technology professionals, as a unique type of learning professional, need to be not only digitally literate--leading and assisting teachers and…

  5. Perceptions of Preservice Teachers regarding the Integration of Information and Communication Technologies in Turkish Education Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Yavuz; Odabasi, H. Ferhan; Kuzu, Abdullah

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the views of pre-service teachers regarding the indicators of information and communication technologies (ICT) at Turkish education faculties. A cross-sectional survey design was implemented with graduating students enrolled in Turkish education faculties. A combination of stratified random sampling and systematic sampling was…

  6. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per;

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction between the 3...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...... areas of expertise is to create an understanding for each other's skills and cultural differences. Futhermore enabling future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve Health Literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view on welfare technology a Student Academy was created...

  7. Correlates of Unemployed Graduates' Perceptions of the Importance of Entrepreneurial Education in Poverty Alleviation in Cross River State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuri, E. E.; Alade, F. O.; Sule, M.; Odigwe, F. N.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from the empirical research on unemployment among young graduates and the question of economic relevance of curricula of the tertiary education in Nigeria, this investigation was carried out to answer the following research question: Will unemployed graduates' perceptions of the importance of entrepreneurial education in poverty…

  8. Correlates of Unemployed Graduates' Perceptions of the Importance of Entrepreneurial Education in Poverty Alleviation in Cross River State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekuri, E. E.; Alade, F. O.; Sule, M.; Odigwe, F. N.

    2013-01-01

    Drawing from the empirical research on unemployment among young graduates and the question of economic relevance of curricula of the tertiary education in Nigeria, this investigation was carried out to answer the following research question: Will unemployed graduates' perceptions of the importance of entrepreneurial education in poverty…

  9. A Case Study of the Impact of a Sytematic Evaluation Process in a Graduate Medical Education Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromrei, Heidi T.

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has charged institutions that sponsor accredited Graduate Medical Education programs (residency and fellowship specialty programs) with overseeing implementation of mandatory annual program evaluation efforts to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements. Physicians receive scant, if…

  10. Prediction of Prospective Mathematics Teachers' Academic Success in Entering Graduate Education by Using Back-Propagation Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadir, Elif

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine a neural network based approach to predict achievement in graduate education for Elementary Mathematics prospective teachers. With the help of this study, it can be possible to make an effective prediction regarding the students' achievement in graduate education with Artificial Neural Networks (ANN). Two…

  11. The Extent of Educational Technology's Influence on Contemporary Educational Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bradford-Watts

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates how advances in educational technologies have influenced contemporary educational practices.It discusses the nature of educational technology, the limitations imposed by the digital divide and other factors of uptake, and the factors leading to successful implementation of educational technologies.The extent of influence is then discussed,together with the probable implications for educational sites for the future.

  12. Using ACRL Standards to Assess the Information Literacy of Graduate Students in an Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Jo Catalano

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective - This study investigates the information literacy of graduate education students, including those in doctoral cohorts. The Association for Research and College Libraries Information Literacy Standards were used a baseline for measurement.Methods - A survey was sent to all graduate students in the School of Education; it asked a combination of questions measuring students’ perceptions of their information literacy skills and testing their knowledge of information literacy.Results – A total of 172 surveys were returned. The results indicated that while there is a heavy reliance on internet sources, many students were able to determine which sources were reliable and which were not. After attending information instruction sessions, students were more familiar with library services and more inclined to use them.Conclusion - It was determined that a one credit course or multiple sessions of library instruction would better serve graduate students completing capstone projects.

  13. Assessment of Graduates of Master of Arts in Education (MAED in one State University in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lerma P. Buenvinida

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Higher education institution, with teacher education programs, primarily aims of producing graduates having competent, qualified and 21st century skills. Tracer studies on graduates can adequately provide essential information on their profile, future plans, reasons of enrolling at the university, extent of the use of skills provided, adequacy of skills learned, degree of satisfaction in terms of services and learning environment. Descriptive research design was used in this study to describe the characteristics, abilities, preferences and perceptions of individuals. Majority of the respondents (70.6%; 60 out of 85 in the study were females, who primarily specialized in Educational Management while others pursued English, Filipino, Mathematics, Physical Education, and Technology and Home Economics. About 60% (51 out of 85 of the total respondents were in Teacher 1 and 2 or their equivalent teaching position, and about 70.6% (60 out of 85 respondents planned to pursue doctoral program. The affordable tuition fee and the school location were the major preferred reasons for enrolling in the university. Other reasons included those skills provided by the University such as human skills, and technical, communication, leadership, research, problem solving, and ICT skills. Adequacy of skills had a positive and significant relationship to the graduates’ degree of satisfaction with services (rs = 0.603; p<.01, learning environment (rs = 0.552; p<.01, and facilities (rs = 0.527; p<.01. These results indicated that learned skills are adequate to satisfy the students concerning the general and specific services offered by the University

  14. The continuous education as a process of academic studies for graduate students at high educational levels in Sonora (Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefina Andrade Paco

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The continuous education, that the productive sector demands, is not only the accumulation of new knowledge, supported inthe education-learning process, but also a focus on the new tendencies that the labor field demands, where the universities havethe opportunity to extend their involvement, through graduations or specializations, that contribute the strength of the acquiredskills in the classroom. The objective is to know the kind of graduation interests that motivate the graduates, as a process ofcontinuous education. The study is based on the application of a questionnaire to 50 students of different degrees from publicuniversities in Sonora, whose excellent results are: 51% of those surveyed, indicate that at the end of their degree they do notobtain the tools to compete in their labor field. 92% of the students mention that universities should offer within the educativeprogram some area of financial or specialization, related to other disciplines. Another important data is that the financial areasthat graduates prefer are related to the social administrative and financial areas and in smaller proportion they prefer the engineeringdisciplines. 70% of those surveyed, indicate that universities have infrastructure, learning spaces and the skilled humanresources to offer this type of courses. The conclusion of this work, is that public universities follow training programs related tocertain areas and disciplines, centered on the student and learning, like part of their formation, but they do not have the educativeflexibility and the graduates will need to know other disciplines to complement their professional education.

  15. Foreign-Educated Graduate Nursing Students and Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Mary; Collins, Shawn Bryant

    2017-04-01

    Plagiarism is a concern related to students educated in countries other than the United States, where English is not the first language spoken. The authors' experience with plagiarism by a foreign-educated nursing student prompted an investigation into this topic. This article focuses on the occurrence of unintentional plagiarism, a common focus with foreign-educated students, addressing linguistic, as well as cultural, viewpoints. The findings from the literature on plagiarism among foreign-educated students are elicited and the article discusses strategies to help foreign-educated students learn about plagiarism and how to properly cite and reference sources. A variety of proactive strategies exist that can be used by both faculty and students to mitigate the occurrence of plagiarism by foreign-educated nursing students in higher education, starting with a clearer understanding of some of the antecedents to the problem of plagiarism. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(4):211-214.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Designing and delivering clinical risk management education for graduate nurses: an Australian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga; Currie, Tracey; Smith, Enid; McGennisken, Chris

    2007-07-01

    In order to enhance their capabilities in clinical risk management (CRM) and to be integrated into safe and effective patient safety organisational processes and systems, neophyte graduate nurses need to be provided with pertinent information on CRM at the beginning of their employment. What and how such information should be given to new graduate nurses, however, remains open to question and curiously something that has not been the subject either of critique or systematic investigation in the nursing literature. This article reports the findings of the third and final cycle of a 12 month action research (AR) project that has sought to redress this oversight by developing, implementing and evaluating a CRM education program for neophyte graduate nurses. Conducted in the cultural context of regional Victoria, Australia, the design, implementation and evaluation of the package revealed that it was a useful resource, served the intended purpose of ensuring that neophyte graduate nurses were provided with pertinent information on CRM upon the commencement and during their graduate nurse year, and enabled graduate nurses to be facilitated to translate that information into their everyday practice.

  17. The utilitarian tendency of graduate education%研究生教育功利化倾向审视

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洪剑; 刘素娟; 胡波

    2014-01-01

    Under the condition of market economy, the utilitarian tendency of postgraduate education has become increasingly obvious, trouble for the healthy development of graduate students. In this paper, we examine the graduate education utilitarianism and causes, and put forward the innovation of graduate education, to face the challenge in order to cope with the graduate education utilitarian tendency of graduate education.%市场经济条件下,研究生教育功利化倾向特征日益明显,为研究生的全面健康发展带来了困扰。本文对研究生教育功利化表现和成因进行了审视,并提出了创新研究生教育理念,以应对研究生教育功利化倾向对研究生教育的挑战。

  18. Patient safety and technology-driven medication e A qualitative study on how graduate nursing students navigate through complex medication administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Fabricius, Pia

    2014-01-01

    ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. Aim: To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. Methods: 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded...... for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient......Background: The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26e38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new...

  19. Sense of Community in Graduate Online Education: Contribution of Learner to Learner Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Jo L.; Maxwell, Marge

    2012-01-01

    Distance learning technologies offer a multitude of ways to build interaction into online courses to support learning. Based on social constructivism theory, this study explored which types of interaction are most predictive of students' sense of community in online graduate courses at a regional comprehensive university. Surveys were used to…

  20. Self-Perceptions of Value, Barriers, and Motivations for Graduate Education Among Dental Hygienists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amy N; Boyd, Linda D; Rogers, Christine Macarelli; Le Jeune, Ronald C

    2016-09-01

    Increasing the knowledge base of its practitioners through formal education is vital to advancing the dental hygiene profession, ensuring practitioners' readiness for participation in future health care workforce models, and preparing future dental hygiene educators. The aim of this study was to discover the value of, barriers to, and motivations for graduate education among dental hygienists as a first step toward establishing ways to stimulate enrollment and facilitate program change. A qualitative pilot study design was used, with focus groups used for data collection. Four virtual focus groups were conducted on a video conferencing platform with dental hygienists (N=15) of varying educational levels residing in nine states. Focus group results were examined for emerging themes. The majority of participants placed a high value on graduate education as it related to expanding employment options and satisfying personal goals, but perceived it to have little value regarding advancement in clinical practice. Top barriers to education were reported to be time management, finances, and degree program options. Motivational themes for pursuing education included increased career options, benefits, and salary; personal satisfaction; potential to advance the profession; and financial support. The participants agreed that increased education can lead to more varied career opportunities and advance the profession, but their responses suggested limited motivation to pursue graduate studies. Determining ways to increase the value, reduce barriers, and enhance motivation for a graduate degree should be a priority of academic institutions and professional organizations involved in dental hygiene to ensure a workforce that is qualified for future health care initiatives and prepared to become educators.

  1. Research Ethics Education in Post-Graduate Medical Curricula in I.R. Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikravanfard, Nazila; Khorasanizadeh, Faezeh; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2016-08-16

    Research ethics training during post-graduate education is necessary to improve ethical standards in the design and conduct of biomedical research. We studied quality and quantity of research ethics training in the curricula of post-graduate programs in the medical science in I.R. Iran. We evaluated curricula of 125 post-graduate programs in medical sciences in I.R. Iran. We qualitatively studied the curricula by education level, including the Master and PhD degrees and analyzed the contents and the amount of teaching allocated for ethics training in each curriculum. We found no research ethics training in 72 (58%) of the programs. Among the 53 (42%) programs that considered research ethics training, only 17 programs had specific courses for research ethics and eight of them had detailed topics on their courses. The research ethics training was optional in 25% and mandatory in 76% of the programs. Post-graduate studies that were approved in the more recent years had more attention to the research ethics training. Research ethics training was neglected in most of the medical post-graduate programs. We suggest including sufficient amount of mandatory research ethics training in Master and PhD programs in I.R. Iran. Further research about quality of research ethics training and implementation of curricula in the biomedical institutions is warranted.

  2. Online Graduate Teacher Education: Establishing an EKG for Student Success Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Brett E.; Hung, Jui-Long; Baughman, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Predicting which students enrolled in graduate online education are at-risk for failure is an arduous yet important task for teachers and administrators alike. This research reports on a statistical analysis technique using both static and dynamic variables to determine which students are at-risk and when an intervention could be most helpful…

  3. Women and Graduate Management Education (2012). GMAC[R] Data-to-Go Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graduate Management Admission Council, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides statistics on women and graduate management education for 2012. This paper contains two parts: (1) Women in the Business School Talent Pipeline; and (2) Women in Business. "Women in the Business School Talent Pipeline" discusses: (1) GMAT[R] Examinees; (2) B-School Demand from Younger Women; (3) MBA, Masters &…

  4. The Extent of Skills Mismatch among Childhood Education Graduates of Princess Alia University College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nashash, Hyam M.

    2015-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the extent of skill mismatch between the skills the childhood education graduates at Al-Balqa Applied University--Princess Alia University College acquired during their studies and those demanded in the labor market. The descriptive survey design was adopted and the purposive sampling technique was employed to…

  5. Structures of Community and Democratic Practices in Graduate Teacher Education, Teacher Change, and Linkages Facilitating Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Julie A.; Guyton, Edith M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined practices in a constructivist graduate teacher education program, documenting changes in teachers and their practice and analyzing connections between program practices and teacher change. Data from field notes, teacher and faculty interviews, classroom observations, faculty ratings of teachers, and artifacts helped develop a model for…

  6. Graduateness : An empirical examination of the formative function of university education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steur, Jessica; Jansen, Ellen; Hofman, W

    2012-01-01

    The formative merits of university education are at risk of being reduced from graduateness in the sense of broad academic cultivation to professional training with a strong emphasis on employability. The difficulty in opposing this trend is the absence of a clear framework for academic cultivation.

  7. Report on a Survey of Program Directors Regarding Selection Factors in Graduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Norma E.; Gray, George T.

    1979-01-01

    A national sample of 25 percent of the graduate education program directors in internal medicine, family medicine, surgery, and pediatrics were asked to judge the importance of 31 variables in the selection of house staff. A rank-ordering of variables for all respondents placed interpersonal skills demonstrated in the interview as number one.…

  8. Better Educational Website Interface Design: The Implications from Gender-Specific Preferences in Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yu-chang

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated graduate students gender-specific preferences for certain website interface design features, intending to generate useful information for instructors in choosing and for website designers in creating educational websites. The features investigated in this study included colour value, major navigation buttons placement, and…

  9. Evaluating Engagement with Graduate Outcomes across Higher Education Institutions in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronken-Smith, R.; Bond, C.; McLean, A.; Frielick, S.; Smith, N.; Jenkins, M.; Marshall, S.

    2015-01-01

    Our research addressed two aims: to develop a systematic way to evaluate institutional engagement with graduate outcomes and to explore such engagement in higher education institutions in Aotearoa/New Zealand. An online survey was completed by 14/29 institutions with nine follow-up interviews to gather information on institutional engagement with…

  10. Preparing School Counselors to Support LGBT Youth: The Roles of Graduate Education and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kull, Ryan M.; Kosciw, Joseph G.; Greytak, Emily A.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined whether school counselors' LGBT-related graduate education and professional development predicted more frequent efforts to support LGBT students, and whether their LGBT-related self-efficacy mediated the relationship between their training experiences and supportive efforts. Results from ordinary least squares (OLS) regression…

  11. Computer Science in High School Graduation Requirements. ECS Education Trends (Updated)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinth, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Allowing high school students to fulfill a math or science high school graduation requirement via a computer science credit may encourage more student to pursue computer science coursework. This Education Trends report is an update to the original report released in April 2015 and explores state policies that allow or require districts to apply…

  12. Graduate Education in Risk Analysis for Food, Agriculture, and Veterinary Medicine: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Ana-Paula; Wolt, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    The notion of risk in relation to food and food production has heightened the need to educate students to effectively deal with risk in relation to decision making from a science-based perspective. Curricula and related materials were developed and adopted to support graduate learning opportunities in risk analysis and decision making as applied…

  13. Fifteen Years of Research on Graduate Education in Economics: What Have We Learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Wendy A.; Siegfried, John J.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors summarize their 15 years of research on graduate education in economics in the United States. They examine all stages of the process, from the undergraduate origins of eventual economics PhDs to their attrition and time-to-degree outcomes. For PhD completers, the authors examine job market outcomes, research…

  14. Graduate Medical Education in the European Region. First Supplementary Report 1978.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    Data on graduate medical education in Europe are tabulated in this report from the World Health Organization. The information was collected from a short questionnaire distributed in 1976 to countries of the European region using the English language, and in 1977 to those countries using French and Russian. The countries surveyed include: Algeria,…

  15. Admission and Graduation Requirements for Special Education Doctoral Programs at 20 Top American Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Gabriela

    2009-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of the admissions and graduation requirements guidelines of the special education doctoral programs at 20 top American universities was conducted. Admission requirements typically include an application fee, previous coursework GPA, previous field experience, GRE scores, TOEFL scores, professional writing sample(s), and…

  16. Performing Art-Based Research: Innovation in Graduate Art Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.; Hoffman, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an innovation in art therapy research and education in which art-based performance is used to generate, embody, and creatively synthesize knowledge. An art therapy graduate student's art-based process of inquiry serves to demonstrate how art and performance may be used to identify the research question, to conduct a…

  17. Responsible Conduct of Research Assessment of Doctor of Education Candidates, Graduate Faculty, and Curriculum Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carla J.

    2014-01-01

    The study included an assessment of doctoral students, graduate faculty, and curriculum considerations to determine the degree of infusion of research integrity and responsible conduct of research (RCR) principles within a Doctor of Education program. Study results showed substantial increases in doctoral candidates' knowledge levels of RCR,…

  18. Performing Art-Based Research: Innovation in Graduate Art Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.; Hoffman, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an innovation in art therapy research and education in which art-based performance is used to generate, embody, and creatively synthesize knowledge. An art therapy graduate student's art-based process of inquiry serves to demonstrate how art and performance may be used to identify the research question, to conduct a process…

  19. An educational intervention to promote self-management and professional socialization in graduate nurse anesthesia students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloy, Debra A.

    Traditionally, nurse anesthesia educators have utilized prior academic achievement to predict student success. However, research has indicated that prior academic achievement offers an inadequate assessment of student success in graduate healthcare programs with extensive clinical residencies. The educational literature has identified many non-cognitive factors, such as self-efficacy and locus of control, that may provide a more holistic prediction model of student success. An experimental study with pretest-posttest design and stratified random assignment was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of an educational intervention to promote self-management, professional socialization, and academic achievement among first semester graduate nurse anesthesia students. Participants (N = 66) were demographically similar to the national graduate nurse anesthesia student body, though Hispanics and younger students were a little over-represented in the sample (56% female, 75.8% White, 15.2% Hispanic, 6% Other, 59% ≤ 30-years-old, 67% ≤ 3 years of ICU). The results showed that most graduate anesthesia students had strong self-management and professional socialization characteristics on admission. The results did not support the effectiveness of this educational intervention. Thus, ceiling effect may have accounted in part for statistically non-significant results regarding self-efficacy (p = .190, o2 = .03), locus of control (p = .137, o2 = .04), professional socialization (p = .819, o2 = .001), and academic achievement (p = .689, o2 = .003). Future researchers may need to expand the scope of the intervention, use a more powerful and sensitive instrument, and utilize a larger sample.

  20. Integrated Graduate and Continuing Education in Protein Chromatography for Bioprocess Development and Scale-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Jungbauer

    2011-01-01

    We describe an intensive course that integrates graduate and continuing education focused on the development and scale-up of chromatography processes used for the recovery and purification of proteins with special emphasis on biotherapeutics. The course includes lectures, laboratories, teamwork, and a design exercise and offers a complete view of…

  1. Responsible Conduct of Research Assessment of Doctor of Education Candidates, Graduate Faculty, and Curriculum Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carla J.

    2014-01-01

    The study included an assessment of doctoral students, graduate faculty, and curriculum considerations to determine the degree of infusion of research integrity and responsible conduct of research (RCR) principles within a Doctor of Education program. Study results showed substantial increases in doctoral candidates' knowledge levels of RCR,…

  2. Customized Content Delivery for Graduate Management Education: Application to Business Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Owen P., Jr.; Ko, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Globalization is bringing about a radical "rethink" regarding the delivery of graduate management education. Today, many students entering a residential MBA program do not possess an undergraduate degree in business. As a result, many business schools are increasingly turning to the Internet to provide "customized" instructional content to ensure…

  3. Graduate Medical Education That Meets the Nation's Health Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, Jill, Ed.; Berwick, Donald, Ed.; Wilensky, Gail, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Today's physician education system produces trained doctors with strong scientific underpinnings in biological and physical sciences as well as supervised practical experience in delivering care. Significant financial public support underlies the graduate-level training of the nation's physicians. Two federal programs--Medicare and…

  4. Professional Socialization in Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs: Attitudes and Beliefs of Faculty Members and Recent Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Kevin Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand professional socialization in nurse anesthesia educational programs through an exploration of the attitudes and beliefs of faculty members and recent graduates. Participants for this cross-sectional, quasi-experimental online study included a convenience sample of 178 nurse anesthesia faculty…

  5. Perspectives and Plans for Graduate Studies. 10. Physical Education, Kinesiology, and Related Areas 1974.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Ontario Universities, Toronto.

    This report is one of a series of disciplinary planning assessments for graduate studies in Ontario, Canada, concerning physical education, kinesiology, and related areas. Recommendations suggest: (1) There should be a limited number of discipline oriented Ph.D. programs focused on the generation of knowledge appropriate to sociology of sport,…

  6. Reflective, Ethical, and Moral Constructs in Educational Leadership Preparation: Effects on Graduates Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinski, Daisy Arredondo; Bauch, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: A 34-item Likert-type survey instrument, The Reflective, Ethical, and Moral Assessment Survey (REMAS), measuring perceptions of use of reflective, ethical and moral dispositions and leadership practices was developed. Items, component factors, and results of the self-assessment of graduates from an educational leadership preparation…

  7. The Effects of Higher Education Programme Characteristics on the Allocation and Performance of the Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijke, Hans; Meng, Christoph

    2011-01-01

    Using a unique European data-set, we investigated the significance of five higher education programme characteristics for the labour market position of the graduates: the academic versus discipline-specific character of the competencies generated; the standardization of these competencies; the combination of working and learning; the…

  8. Relationship of Job Satisfaction and Productivity to Work Values of Vocational Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, H. C.

    1978-01-01

    Relationships of job satisfaction and job productivity to work values of beginning workers who graduated from public vocational education programs were investigated. Workers with intrinsic work value orientation seem to be more satisfied with their job and are more productive than are those with extrinsic work value orientation. (Author)

  9. Project-Based Learning in Colleges of Business: Is It Enough to Develop Educated Graduates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Penny Pence; Gibson, Lindsey A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on project-based learning in colleges of business, a concept that offers the student a "hands-on" approach to knowledge by working on actual projects with business community organizations. However, it may take more than such partnerships to assure graduates become "educated people" as well as those…

  10. Comparative Study of University and Polytechnic Graduates in Finland: Implications of Higher Education on Earnings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Belle Selene; Liitiainen, Elia; Rekola, Mika

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the implications of higher education on earnings in Finland. The challenges as well as opportunities of obtaining a university degree as compared to graduating from polytechnics are evaluated using the REFLEX (The Flexible Professional in the Knowledge Society) data. As a Nordic country, Finland is known for its educated…

  11. Entrepreneurship Education: Enhancing or Discouraging Graduate Start-Up at the University of Pretoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, Melodi; Ras, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    In-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of BCom Entrepreneurship graduates, as well as a control group to determine whether the exposure to entrepreneurship education can enhance actual business start-up. Information was collected on how they experienced the learning approaches, and the value which they had derived from the degree. This…

  12. Improvement of Generic Skills Development in Study Programmes of Higher Education: The Graduates' Viewpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukelis, Kestutis; Pileicikiene, Nora

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses the concept of generic skills, underlines the importance of their development in studies of higher education, introduces methodology and results of the research on the match between generic skills of Lithuanian universities' and colleges' graduates (N=1021) and labour market needs, as well as reviews potentialities for the…

  13. The Rewards of Human Capital Competences for Young European Higher Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Aracil, Adela; Mora, Jose-Gines; Vila, Luis E.

    2004-01-01

    The labour market rewards for a number of required human capital competences are analysed using a sample of young European higher education graduates. Factor analysis is applied to classify competences by jobs into eight orthogonal groups, namely participative, methodological, specialised, organisational, applying rules, physical, generic and…

  14. Structures of Community and Democratic Practices in Graduate Teacher Education, Teacher Change, and Linkages Facilitating Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Julie A.; Guyton, Edith M.

    2001-01-01

    Examined practices in a constructivist graduate teacher education program, documenting changes in teachers and their practice and analyzing connections between program practices and teacher change. Data from field notes, teacher and faculty interviews, classroom observations, faculty ratings of teachers, and artifacts helped develop a model for…

  15. Entrepreneurship Education: Enhancing or Discouraging Graduate Start-Up at the University of Pretoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botha, Melodi; Ras, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    In-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of BCom Entrepreneurship graduates, as well as a control group to determine whether the exposure to entrepreneurship education can enhance actual business start-up. Information was collected on how they experienced the learning approaches, and the value which they had derived from the degree. This…

  16. Educating Graduate Leadership Students to Become Active Participants in Their Discourse Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getz, Cheryl; Tessema, Kedir Assefa

    2017-01-01

    Leadership Studies courses often face challenges of educating students for a focused area of specialization. We challenged this by offering an innovative leadership course whose aim was to socialize graduate students into their discourse communities. In this paper, we describe a course and the study we conducted to learn from the process and…

  17. Graduate Degree Programs in Education of the Gifted: Program Contents and Services Offered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jeanette P.; Karnes, Frances A.

    1987-01-01

    A survey of 129 institutions offering graduate programs in gifted education found: a wide variety of admission requirements; common emphases on research, psychological needs, creative studies, and curriculum development; existence of resource centers for many institutions; and concerns about teacher certification and professional and inservice…

  18. The Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research. Final Report, Part II; Methodoloqical Trilogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarsfeld, Paul F., Ed.

    Part two of a seven-section, final report on the Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research, this document contains discussions of quantification and reason analysis. Quantification is presented as a language consisting of sentences (graphs and tables), words, (classificatory instruments), and grammar (rules for constructing and…

  19. The Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research. Final Report, Part VI; Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarsfeld, Paul F., Ed.

    This document, the sixth of a final report on the Multi-Disciplinary Graduate Program in Educational Research, is a collection of three essays. The first--Notes on the History of Interdisciplinarity--by Judy Rosen, brings together and outlines the general points and findings of the literature that has been generated in an attempt to evaluate the…

  20. Integrated Graduate and Continuing Education in Protein Chromatography for Bioprocess Development and Scale-Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Jungbauer

    2011-01-01

    We describe an intensive course that integrates graduate and continuing education focused on the development and scale-up of chromatography processes used for the recovery and purification of proteins with special emphasis on biotherapeutics. The course includes lectures, laboratories, teamwork, and a design exercise and offers a complete view of…

  1. Graduate Education in Risk Analysis for Food, Agriculture, and Veterinary Medicine: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Ana-Paula; Wolt, Jeffrey D.

    2010-01-01

    The notion of risk in relation to food and food production has heightened the need to educate students to effectively deal with risk in relation to decision making from a science-based perspective. Curricula and related materials were developed and adopted to support graduate learning opportunities in risk analysis and decision making as applied…

  2. Project-Based Learning in Colleges of Business: Is It Enough to Develop Educated Graduates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Penny Pence; Gibson, Lindsey A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on project-based learning in colleges of business, a concept that offers the student a "hands-on" approach to knowledge by working on actual projects with business community organizations. However, it may take more than such partnerships to assure graduates become "educated people" as well as those…

  3. Performing Art-Based Research: Innovation in Graduate Art Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Bruce L.; Hoffman, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an innovation in art therapy research and education in which art-based performance is used to generate, embody, and creatively synthesize knowledge. An art therapy graduate student's art-based process of inquiry serves to demonstrate how art and performance may be used to identify the research question, to conduct a process…

  4. Adult Education Philosophy: The Case of Self-Directed Learning Strategies in Graduate Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines graduate students' perceptions of instruction of a professor who holds an adult education philosophy of self-directed learning (SDL). Students enrolled in three online courses (N=106) in the Fall of 2013 (n=56) and the Spring of 2014 (n=50) were asked to rank 10 of the professor's behaviors in the courses based on their level…

  5. Challenges Faced by Graduate Business Education in Southern Africa: Perceptions of MBA Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temtime, Zelealem T.; Mmereki, Rebana N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the degree of satisfaction and perceived relevance of the Graduate Business Education (GBE) programme at the University of Botswana. Design/methodology/approach: A self-administered questionnaire and face to face interviews were used to collect data from Master of Business Administration (MBA)…

  6. The Rewards of Human Capital Competences for Young European Higher Education Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Aracil, Adela; Mora, Jose-Gines; Vila, Luis E.

    2004-01-01

    The labour market rewards for a number of required human capital competences are analysed using a sample of young European higher education graduates. Factor analysis is applied to classify competences by jobs into eight orthogonal groups, namely participative, methodological, specialised, organisational, applying rules, physical, generic and…

  7. Self-Perceptions of Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers Completing a Graduate Diploma of Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hine, Gregory S. C.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative research project explored the self-perceptions of pre-service secondary mathematics teachers completing a Graduate Diploma of Secondary Education. Specifically, the researcher investigated the extent to which teachers perceived their readiness to commence a secondary mathematics teaching position. The project relied principally on…

  8. Constructivism, Education, Science, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudourides, Moses A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief review of the various streams of constructivism in studies of education, society, science and technology. It is intended to present a number of answers to the question (what really is constructivism?) in the context of various disciplines from the humanities and the sciences (both natural and…

  9. The Tribe of Educational Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Lily, Abdulrahman Essa

    2014-01-01

    This article looks into the claim that the international academic community of educational technologies seems to have functioned in a "tribal" way, having formed themselves around tribe-like patterns. It therefore addresses the research question: What are these claimed tribe-like practices that such a community exhibits? This question is…

  10. Virtual Technologies Trends in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gutiérrez, Jorge; Mora, Carlos Efrén; Añorbe-Díaz, Beatriz; González-Marrero, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality captures people's attention. This technology has been applied in many sectors such as medicine, industry, education, video games, or tourism. Perhaps its biggest area of interest has been leisure and entertainment. Regardless the sector, the introduction of virtual or augmented reality had several constraints: it was expensive, it…

  11. Technology for Education. IDRA Focus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on technology for education to benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Coca-Cola Valued Youth Program Students Meet Peers Via Video Conference" (Linda Cantu, Leticia Lopez-De La Garza) describes how at-risk…

  12. Health Educational Potentials of Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The field of health promotion technology has been in an exponential growth in recent years and smart phone applications, exer-games and self-monitoring devices has become part of fitness activities and health education. In this work-in-progress-paper theoretical perspectives for categorising...

  13. Robot Technology: Implications for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Paul E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Provides an introduction to robotic technology, and describes current robot models. Three ways of using robots in education are discussed--as exemplars of other processes, as objects of instruction, and as prosthetic aids--and selection criteria are outlined. (17 references) (CLB)

  14. Geospatial Technology in Geography Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muniz Solari, Osvaldo; Demirci, A.; van der Schee, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The book is presented as an important starting point for new research in Geography Education (GE) related to the use and application of geospatial technologies (GSTs). For this purpose, the selection of topics was based on central ideas to GE in its relationship with GSTs. The process of geospatial

  15. Geospatial Technology in Geography Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muniz Solari, Osvaldo; Demirci, A.; van der Schee, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The book is presented as an important starting point for new research in Geography Education (GE) related to the use and application of geospatial technologies (GSTs). For this purpose, the selection of topics was based on central ideas to GE in its relationship with GSTs. The process of geospatial

  16. Linking information technology in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Jaime Pérez Gutierrez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is attempted in this paper, show a clear and concise point involved the new technologies of computer science in education, and how these affect the preparation of teachers, overcoming the wide and deep stretch that separates computer specialists teachers of any subject, learners and the interaction between them.

  17. Virtual Technologies Trends in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gutiérrez, Jorge; Mora, Carlos Efrén; Añorbe-Díaz, Beatriz; González-Marrero, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality captures people's attention. This technology has been applied in many sectors such as medicine, industry, education, video games, or tourism. Perhaps its biggest area of interest has been leisure and entertainment. Regardless the sector, the introduction of virtual or augmented reality had several constraints: it was expensive, it…

  18. Mobile Technology and Liberal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author offers reflections on the impact of mobile technology for liberal education. These reflections are based on his own experience of incorporating iPads in his communication courses during the 2010-2011 academic year. As a member of an interdisciplinary faculty learning community on the use of mobile tablets, he explored…

  19. Higher education, Graduate unemployment, Poverty and Economic growth in Tunisia, 1990-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifa Mefteh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the relationship between economic growth, higher education, unemployment and poverty using properties of time series variables while applying the Ordinary Least Squares (OLS method. Our study thus contributes to the existing literature by giving the first integrated approach to examine the four way linkages in the Tunisian background over the period 1990-2013. This paper holds that higher education can impact unemployment and graduate unemployment causes poverty which would affect economic growth. Our empirical results show that there is bi-directional causal relationship between per capita gross domestic product (GDP and poverty rate (POV and also between Number of graduate students (GRA and School enrollment tertiary education (ENR besides unidirectional causal relationship which running from Number of graduate students to Unemployment with tertiary education (UNP, from Higher education expenditure (EXP to poverty rate and from Unemployment with tertiary education to poverty rate. Our empirical results also verified the existence of positive effect of ENR, GRA and POV on economic growth, while, UNP and EXP have negative determining influence on economic growth with only GRA statistically significant. These empirical insights are of particular interest for the policy makers as they help build sound economic policies to sustain economic development and improve the higher educational quality.

  20. Integrating Research and Education: Preparing Graduate Students to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullis, J.

    2003-12-01

    The link between research and teaching at all levels is increasingly recognized, and can be an attractive as well as an effective part of a graduate program in geoscience. At Brown we have a strong partnership between our department and the university's teaching center. The Sheridan Center for the Advancement of College Teaching provides resources and programs to help grad students improve their effectiveness as TAs and their qualifications for obtaining a teaching-related job, as well as to promote and facilitate improved teaching by faculty. Departments are encouraged to designate faculty and grad student liaisons to the Center and to take advantage of Center programs (including seminars on topics such as Persuasive Communication, Cognitive Diversity, Developing a Syllabus, Assessment, and Teaching Portfolios) and resources (such as books, tapes and videos and Individual Teaching Consultations), as well as to develop their own discipline-specific programs. The Geol. Sci. Dept. has been an active participant in Center activities from the start, but we have also developed our own activities and programs. Each year two geo faculty and two grad students serve as official liaisons to the Center, in addition to organizing and running a variety of programs within the department, including: orientation sessions for new graduate students and first-time TAs, `micro-teaching' practise sessions with constructive feedback for new TAs, mid-semester discussion and feedback sessions for current and more experienced TAs, as well as lunch meetings for all interested faculty and grad students to discuss aspects of teaching. These activities have increased the awareness and effectiveness of teaching and learning in our department, for example promoting faculty and TAs to implement syllabi with stated goals, in-class active learning exercises, small group projects, a greater number and variety of writing assignments, and greater diversity in assessment. The effectiveness of our