WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology education continues

  1. Learning Technologies for Adult Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Robin

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses three technologies used in an adult continuing education Masters programme: blogging, learning objects and e-portfolios. My reflections on their use and on the literature underpinning their use form the basis of the discussion. All three of these technologies were used to promote self-directed learning, reflection and learner…

  2. Using modern information technologies in continuing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Магомедхан Магомедович Ниматулаев

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Article opens problems of formation of system of continuous education and improvement of professional skill for effective realization of professional work of the teacher in the conditions of use of modern information technology. Possibilities and necessities of use of information-communication technologies, Web-technologies for an intensification and giving of additional dynamics to educational process are considered. In this connection new forms and methods of the organization of educational activity for development and perfection of this activity are defined.

  3. Continuing education for Physical Education teachers: Assistive Technology in inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Salzani Fiorini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at describing the development of continuing education for physical education teachers towards the incorporation of Assistive Technology and the creation of favorable conditions to an inclusive school. The methodology employed was reflective and collaborative research. Two teachers who were facing difficulties to include a physically disabled student and one student with global developmental delay took part in the study. The continuing education plan comprised three steps: 1 reflecting on their own practice after watching a video and planning one lesson, together with the researcher, seeking to incorporate Assistive Technology and favor inclusion; 2 videoing the lesson; 3 evaluating and reflecting on what was planned and what was executed and planning a new lesson. Some factors were seen to be essential to the development of continuing education: considering the teacher’s demand, developing collaborative work, promoting reflection on the practices and having Assistive Technology as a support to the human element.

  4. Storytelling: a care technology in continuing education for active ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nadia Pinheiro da; Polaro, Sandra Helena Isse; Vahl, Eloá Aparecida Caliari; Gonçalves, Lucia Hisako Takase

    2016-01-01

    assessing relevance and effectiveness of care/educational technology in the form of "storytelling" as a strategy in the cultivation of active ageing (AA) for elderly users of a Basic Health Unit (BHU), from the Amazon region. convergent care research (CCR) held in a BHU in Belém, state of Pará, with eight elderly ladies for testing this technology. An active ageing assessment questionnaire and WHOQOL-BREF - quality of life assessment were applied. After training with a view to continuing education, elderly ladies told stories for an audience that addressed the question: "What did you learn from it for your life?" tThe popular stories elicited reactions from which the following categories emerged: solidarity; respect for the other; imagination, dreams, hopes and culture of the Amazonian. This practice had a positive result, producing changes in the quality of life of the elderly, particularly in the psychological domain. "storytelling" proved to be an innovative technology, a relevant and effective resource in health education, especially for active ageing.

  5. Judicious Use of Simulation Technology in Continuing Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Michael T.; DiazGranados, Deborah; Feldman, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Use of simulation-based training is fast becoming a vital source of experiential learning in medical education. Although simulation is a common tool for undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula, the utilization of simulation in continuing medical education (CME) is still an area of growth. As more CME programs turn to simulation to…

  6. Continuous glucose monitoring technology for personal use: an educational program that educates and supports the patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evert, Alison; Trence, Dace; Catton, Sarah; Huynh, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the development and implementation of an educational program for the initiation of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) technology for personal use, not 3-day CGMS diagnostic studies. The education program was designed to meet the needs of patients managing their diabetes with either diabetes medications or insulin pump therapy in an outpatient diabetes education center using a team-based approach. Observational research, complemented by literature review, was used to develop an educational program model and teaching strategies. Diabetes educators, endocrinologists, CGM manufacturer clinical specialists, and patients with diabetes were also interviewed for their clinical observations and experience. The program follows a progressive educational model. First, patients learn in-depth about real-time CGM technology by attending a group presensor class that provides detailed information about CGM. This presensor class facilitates self-selection among patients concerning their readiness to use real-time CGM. If the patient decides to proceed with real-time CGM use, CGM initiation is scheduled, using a clinic-centered protocol for both start-up and follow-up. Successful use of real-time CGM involves more than just patient enthusiasm or interest in a new technology. Channeling patient interest into a structured educational setting that includes the benefits and limitations of real-time CGM helps to manage patient expectations.

  7. A Mixed Learning Technology Approach for Continuing Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon R. Curran

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Distance learning technologies have been used for many years to provide CME to rural physicians. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility and acceptability of a mixed learning technology approach for providing distance CME. The approach combined audio teleconferencing instruction with a Web-based learning system enabling the live presentation and archiving of instructional material and media, asynchronous computer conferencing discussions, and access to supplemental online learning resources. Methodology: The study population was comprised of physicians and nurse practitioners who participated in audio teleconference sessions, but did not access the Web-based learning system (non-users; learners who participated in audio teleconferences and accessed the Web-based system (online users; and faculty. The evaluation focused upon faculty and learners’ experiences and perceptions of the mixed learning technology approach; the level of usage; and the effectiveness of the approach in fostering non-mandatory, computer-mediated discussions. Results and Discussion: The users of the Web-based learning system were satisfied with its features, ease of use, and the ability to access online CME instructional material. Learners who accessed the system reported a higher level of computer skill and comfort than those who did not, and the majority of these users accessed the system at times other than the live audio teleconference sessions. The greatest use of the system appeared to be for self-directed learning. The success of a mixed learning technology approach is dependent on Internet connectivity and computer access; learners and faculty having time to access and use the Web; comfort with computers; and faculty development in the area of Web-based teaching.

  8. Advances in Technology in Continuing Education: Who Should Foot the Bill?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Every continuing education unit must be at the forefront of the technology boom in order to remain attractive to students and best prepare them for the work force. Unfortunately, there is a significant cost associated with technological advancement sparking the debate over who should foot the bill for innovations. This article applies the Higher…

  9. Information technology and its role in anaesthesia training and continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; Erlendson, Matthew J; Sun, John S; Clemenson, Anna M; Martin, Paul; Eng, Reuben L

    2012-03-01

    Today's educators are faced with substantial challenges in the use of information technology for anaesthesia training and continuing medical education. Millennial learners have uniquely different learning styles than previous generations of students. These preferences distinctly incorporate the use of digital information technologies and social technologies to support learning. To be effective teachers, modern educators must be familiar with these new information technologies and understand how to use them for medical education. Examples of new information technologies include learning management systems, lecture capture, social media (YouTube, Flickr), social networking (Facebook), Web 2.0, multimedia (video learning triggers and point-of-view video) and mobile computing applications. The information technology challenges for educators in the twenty-first century include: (a) understanding how technology shapes the learning preferences of today's anaesthesia residents, (b) distinguishing between the function and properties of new learning technologies and (c) properly using these learning technologies to enhance the anaesthesia curriculum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Continuous Partial Attention as a Problematic Technology Use: A Case Of Educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Mehmet Firat

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Continuous Partial Attention is a current concept open to research which, besides multitasking, intensely occupies the agenda of education, communication and cognitive psychology. The purpose of the present study was to determine educators’ continuous partial attention. In line with this purpose, the research data were collected from 109 educators in higher education from different age groups and from four different countries with the use of a questionnaire made up of two sections and seven questions. The findings obtained in the study revealed that the educators’ Continuous Partial Attention did not significantly differ with respect to their technology use efficacies, their ages or their countries. In addition, it was found out that the educators’ Continuous Partial Attention differed statistically significantly depending on the fields they worked in. Based on this, it could be stated that educators working in the field of educational technologies encounter with Continuous Partial Attention more frequently than educators working in other fields. At the end of the study, several suggestions were put forward.

  11. Communities of practice: pedagogy and internet-based technologies to support educator's continuing technology professional development in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurice Schols

    2011-01-01

    Advances in information and communication technologies (ICTs) as well as modern pedagogical perspectives have created new possibilities to facilitate and support learning in higher education (HE). Emerging technologies bring opportunities to reconsider teaching and learning. New ideas and concepts

  12. Access to Interprofessional Continuing Education in Integrated Care through Digital Instructional Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidos, Adrienne; Ruffolo, Mary

    2017-01-01

    In preparing the workforce for integrated care, continuing professional education serves a critical role. Within a rapidly changing health care landscape, matriculated students now benefit from pedagogical innovations supporting integrated care, particularly interprofessional education, and working professionals must not be excluded from this…

  13. Information and Communication Technologies and Continuing Health Professional Education in Canada. A Survey of Providers Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memorial Univ., St. John's (Newfoundland).

    The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in continuing health professional education (CHPE) was examined in a national survey of Canadian CHPE providers. Of the 3,044 surveys distributed to schools of medicine, nursing, and pharmacy, national/provincial health professional associations, nonprofit health advocacy organizations,…

  14. Defining the Continuing Education Professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, John K.

    1992-01-01

    A job description for continuing education practitioners includes 11 domains and the job responsibilities for each: client management, external marketing, internal marketing, strategic planning, administration, program development, technology management, adult learning, personal development, career management, and community and professional…

  15. Reinventing Continuing Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshok, Mary Lindenstein

    2012-01-01

    Re-inventing continuing higher education is about finding ways to be a more central player in a region's civic, cultural, and economic life as well as in the education of individuals for work and citizenship. Continuing higher education will require data gathering, analytical tools, convening authority, interpretive skills, new models of delivery,…

  16. Redefining continuing education delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, K H

    1997-01-01

    Just as technology is transforming the delivery of education, the Internet and advanced telecommunication applications are changing the "face" of CE and the connotation of "lifelong learning." As late as the mid-1980s, a discussion of computer applications in nursing CE focused on the "timely" transition to microcomputers as tools for the enhancement of managerial tasks for increased productivity. Even as recently as 1990, there seemed to be "time" for those providers who were "slower to adopt innovation" to "catch up." Now, the CE provider who does not integrate the microcomputer and advanced telecommunications as an integral component of their delivery modalities may be outsourced rapidly by an educational or commercial competitive unit that is able to utilize the communication medium, mergers and partnerships, enterprise, and individual lifestyle and learning patterns that will epitomize the CE unit of the 21st century. As with the "re-engineering" of nursing education, the "re-engineered" delivery modalities of evolving CE entity might now best be conceptualized on a continuum from the traditional mode that time and place dependent to a mode of synchronous and asynchronous data and advanced telecommunication. Delivery methods will need to be selected according to the target populations, content, and situation. The health-care educational provider may discover, as in other industries, that a combination of distance and residential offerings will be the most successful medium for the delivery of CE to the progressively more "information and technologically savvy" lifelong learner of the 21st century. In addressing the dramatic effects of the information technology era on the refocused multimedia/interactive delivery method for student education, educators amply quoted Bob Dylan's phrase of the 1960s, "The times, they are a-changing." And so, we see that the times are also changing at an astronomical rate for the health-care educational provider as well as the

  17. Educational technology in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Resch, David S; Kovach, Regina A

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review the past practices of educational technology and envision future directions for medical education. The discussion starts with a historical review of definitions and perspectives of educational technology, in which the authors propose that educators adopt a broader process-oriented understanding of educational technology. Future directions of e-learning, simulation, and health information technology are discussed based on a systems view of the technological process. As new technologies continue to arise, this process-oriented understanding and outcome-based expectations of educational technology should be embraced. With this view, educational technology should be valued in terms of how well the technological process informs and facilitates learning, and the acquisition and maintenance of clinical expertise.

  18. Lifelong Learning for Clinical Practice: How to Leverage Technology for Telebehavioral Health Care and Digital Continuing Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M; Turvey, Carolyn; Hwang, Tiffany

    2018-03-12

    Psychiatric practice continues to evolve and play an important role in patients' lives, the field of medicine, and health care delivery. Clinicians must learn a variety of clinical care systems and lifelong learning (LLL) is crucial to apply knowledge, develop skills, and adjust attitudes. Technology is rapidly becoming a key player-in delivery, lifelong learning, and education/training. The evidence base for telepsychiatry/telemental health via videoconferencing has been growing for three decades, but a greater array of technologies have emerged in the last decade (e.g., social media/networking, text, apps). Clinicians are combining telepsychiatry and these technologies frequently and they need to reflect on, learn more about, and develop skills for these technologies. The digital age has solidified the role of technology in continuing medical education and day-to-day practice. Other fields of medicine are also adapting to the digital age, as are graduate and undergraduate medical education and many allied mental health organizations. In the future, there will be more online training, simulation, and/or interactive electronic examinations, perhaps on a monthly cycle rather than a quasi-annual or 10-year cycle of recertification.

  19. Archives: Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 88 ... Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home > Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 1 - 50 of 88 ...

  20. Archives: Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 51 - 88 of 88 ... Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home > Archives: Continuing Medical Education. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives. 51 - 88 of 88 ...

  1. Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 25, No 9 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 5 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Continuing Education for Distance Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassner, Mary; Adams, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    Distance librarians as engaged professionals work in a complex environment of changes in technologies, user expectations, and institutional goals. They strive to keep current with skills and competencies to support distance learners. This article provides a selection of continuing education opportunities for distance librarians, and is relevant…

  4. Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A review article willintroduce readers to the educational subject matter, along with one-page summarises (in print) of additional articles that may be accessed in full online. We will continue to offer topical and up-to-date CME material. Readers are encouraged to register with samj.org.za to receive future notifications of new ...

  5. Continuing Education in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, Catalina

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays it is not enough to hold a degree title allowing us to exercise a profession. We all know—indeed, it is obvious—that the socioeconomic environment we operate in has evolved rapidly and dramatically. Greater competition in the job market and training needs that are increasingly more specific and dynamic are driving the demand for specialized learning and are making concepts such as continuing education or lifelong training more important. A health professional must have a calling for ...

  6. Adult education in the continuous education system

    OpenAIRE

    Verbitsky Andrey Aleksandrovich

    2015-01-01

    The article reveals problems of adults’ education as a part of lifelong learning. The article formulates the mission of continuing education, its values, purposes, contents, and principles and terms of organizing the educational process.

  7. Continuous professional development of educators: the state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuous Professional Development (CPD) for educators should form an integral part of an education system. CPD should include diverse programmes that are reflective and that promote and embrace technological development. Such programmes would make it possible to respond to challenges brought about by ...

  8. Continuing Education by Correspondence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussow, Milton

    1974-01-01

    By means of portable laboratory modules and instructional materials, it is possible to construct a home study program in most technologies, as a technical institute and a proprietary school have done, creating a career path by which students can earn an Associate Degree in Electronics, mainly through correspondence study. (AJ)

  9. Continuing education and professional development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Edwina

    2002-01-01

    The success of a profession will be determined upon its education and training. A profession is required to encompass: a core body of knowledge; a set of ethical codes of practice; and have practitioners with humanistic qualities. In order to maintain the success of a profession it is necessary to have continuing education, which enhances professional development. Continuing professional education includes a form of self-regulation, which ensures the maintenance of a minimum standard of practice in this ever-changing workplace, and by regulating this standard, the discipline becomes more accountable to the client and the profession as a whole. In Australia, the Nuclear Medicine society's continuing education programs and Universities offering postgraduate programs promote continuing education. If technologists are to successfully keep up with developments in instrumentation, protocols and changing health care requirements, we must ensure that the education of practitioners does not cease at certification of entry to the workplace (Au)

  10. Educational Technology in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meifeng, Liu; Jinjiao, Lv; Cui, Kang

    2010-01-01

    This paper elaborates the two different academic views of the identity of educational technology in China at the current time--advanced-technology-oriented cognition, known as Electrifying Education, and problem-solving-oriented cognition, known as Educational Technology. It addresses five main modes of educational technology in China: as a…

  11. Technology Education and the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    One hears quite frequently how the arts continually suffer in the academic day. Many long-time technology education champions certainly know what this is all about; but there may be some ways to use technology education to bring the arts into the classroom. This article offers a series of activities and suggestions that will help students better…

  12. Confidentiality | Benatar | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 1 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  13. REMOTE TRAINING AND CONTINUING EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander E. Petrov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider two trends in teaching methods and tools chosen on the base of continuing education concept and challenges of the information society. Indeed, the modern post-school education requires improved efficiency and activity of training as it should or can be combined with productive activity of students. Here we discuss and analyze some trends of contemporary distance learning in order to include them into solution of lifelong learning problems. 

  14. Education Technology Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Years ago, as personal computers and other technological advancements began to find their way into classrooms and other educational settings, teachers and administrators sought ways to use new technology to benefit students. The potential for improving education was clear, but the limitations of the available education technology made it difficult…

  15. Marketing Continuing Education for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This guide presents an overview of marketing and its potential value in continuing education programs for nurses. The first portion of the guide briefly discusses the concept of marketing. It contains definitions of key marketing concepts (product, place, price, and promotion), discussion of the basic tenets of marketing (consumer needs…

  16. Exploring Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Duzer, Eric

    Modular middle school technology programs, generically called Exploring Technology Education (ETE) courses, are described and analyzed to determine their strengths and weaknesses and their appropriate role in middle school curricula. Interviews were conducted with teachers, officers of the Exploring Technology Educators Association, vendors and…

  17. Technology in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, Kasi

    2011-01-01

    This paper was written to support a position on using technology in education. The purpose of this study was to support the use of technology in education by synthesizing previous research. A variety of sources including books and journal articles were studied in order to compile an overview of the benefits of using technology in elementary,…

  18. Education Technology Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Darrell M.; Bleiberg, Joshua

    2013-01-01

    Advances in technology are enabling dramatic changes in education content, delivery, and accessibility. Throughout history, new technologies have facilitated the exponential growth of human knowledge. In the early twentieth century, the focus was on the use of radios in education. But since then, innovators have seen technology as a way to improve…

  19. Technology Education in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Shoji; Stern, Sam

    1993-01-01

    Describes the history, current status, and future direction of technology education in Japan, including the process of curriculum transition, secondary and postsecondary structure, and lack of resources. (SK)

  20. Opportunities of Continuing Adult Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija Ušeckienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available After becoming the member state of the European Union, Lithuania undertook all the obligations of a member state. One of them is the implementation of The Lisbon Strategy aiming at the worlds most dynamic and competitive knowledge– based economy by 2010. Under the strategy, a stronger economy will drive job creation, sustainable development, and social inclusion. These changes demand the modernisation of education systems in the E U states, Lithuania among them. To achieve this objective, political forces came to an agreement on the future of Lithuanian education. In 2003 The Seimas of the Republic of Lithuania approved of National Education Strategy 2003–2012. This strategy is special not only because it is based on the experiences of the reform, addresses current and future world’s challenges and opportunities, maintains links with other strategic national reforms, but also emphasises efforts to ensure quality lifelong education for Lithuanian population and striving to become a partner in modern knowledge-based economy. Therefore, an extensive discussion on lifelong education strategies on individual and institution levels in all spheres of social and personal life has started in the E U and Lithuania. Nowadays lifelong learning is not just one aspect of education and training; it gradually is becoming the most important principle in the continuum of complex learning contexts. Such vision must be implemented this decade. The object of the research: the preconditions for the development of continuing adult education. The aim of the research: to examine the peculiarities of the preconditions for the development of continuing adult education in Pakruojis region. The methods of the research: analysis of references and documents on education; an anonymous survey in written form (a questionnaire; statistical analysis of data. The sample. The research was conducted in Pakruojis region in January-April, 2006. 300 respondents of different age

  1. What Is Educational Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, Henry T.

    1975-01-01

    Featured in this issue are the English translations of two speeches delivered to graduate students in educational technology at Pontificia Universidade, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Henry Ingle defines educational technology in the traditional as well as modern sense, describes its essential elements, and discusses situations in which the use of…

  2. Educational Technology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Takashi

    1987-01-01

    This overview of the current state of educational technology in Japan includes discussions of professional associations; academic and popular journals; diffusion of media and the budget in elementary and secondary schools; recent trends in government policies; educational technology research; a literature review; and suggestions of future trends.…

  3. VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT FOR CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorana D. BOLBOACA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of communication and information technologies lead to the changes in continuing medical education by offering the possibility to move up-to-date medical information through Internet to the physicians. The main goal of this study was to create a virtual space for continuing medical education. In this context, a number of computer-assisted tools for instruction, evaluation and utilization in daily activity have been developed and integrated into a unitary system. The main imposed specifications of the system were accessibility, integrity, availability, and security.This report describes the characteristics of tables design and organization, and of system integration. The security level was imposed for assuring the accessibility of each physician to medical information useful in his or her activity and the knowledge database development.

  4. Educational technology, reimagined.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Michael

    2010-01-01

    "Educational technology" is often equated in the popular imagination with "computers in the schools." But technology is much more than merely computers, and education is much more than mere schooling. The landscape of child-accessible technologies is blossoming in all sorts of directions: tools for communication, for physical construction and fabrication, and for human-computer interaction. These new systems and artifacts allow educational designers to think much more creatively about when and where learning takes place in children's lives, both within and outside the classroom.

  5. Technology based Education System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant Hiran, Kamal; Doshi, Ruchi; Henten, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded in the acad......Abstract - Education plays a very important role for the development of the country. Education has multiple dimensions from schooling to higher education and research. In all these domains, there is invariably a need for technology based teaching and learning tools are highly demanded...... and operational data that is used within a university for daily routine work. This paper presents a hybrid cloud computing model for higher education institutions to share intellectual data. Moreover, it proposes, the strategies for the implementation of the cloud computing in the academic institutions. Keywords...

  6. Technology and Educational Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boocock, Sarane S.

    2012-01-01

    Most current debate on instructional technology is characterized either by grandiose speculation on the salvation of education through automation (without specification of "what" and "how" technological innovations will actually be introduced in specific classroom situations, and how the changes will be financed), or by jargon-filled hairsplitting…

  7. The Educational Technology Myth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, David

    2012-01-01

    If one wants to teach youth to think, one has to restrain himself from doing all their thinking for them. One has to refrain from specifying in advance what they are going to think. Yet, this is just what educational technologists are consistently guilty of doing. Educational technology is committed to excluding the possibility of anything new or…

  8. Assistive Technology Instruction within a Continuously Evolving Technology Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson-Karlan, George R.

    2015-01-01

    The movement toward greater availability of online education in the university setting creates challenges for design, development, and implementation of online courses, particularly those focused on the educational use of technology as content. This article is structured around a central theme of designing and implementing hybrid online courses…

  9. Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Cast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan

    2012-03-31

    This Final Technical Report describes progress made on the sub-projects awarded in the Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42457: Continuation of Crosscutting Technology Development at Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST). The final reports for each sub-project are attached in the appendix. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: a) Solid-solid separation b) Solid-liquid separation c) Chemical/Biological Extraction d) Modeling and Control, and e) Environmental Control.

  10. Technology Revolution = Education Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLafferty, Charles L., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Outlines one attempt to infuse technology into an educational psychology course, discussing commonly available tools and techniques (e.g., online syllabus, e-mail, World Wide Web, presentation packages, and use of learning teams and electronic discussion groups). The paper examines obstacles, student responses, application in the K-12 classroom,…

  11. Marginalized Student Access to Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtcu, Wanda M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how a teacher can disrupt an established curriculum that continues the cycle of inequity of access to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum by students in alternative education. For this paper, I will focus on the technology components of the STEM curriculum. Technology in the…

  12. Female Technology Education Teachers' Experiences of Finnish Craft Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niiranen, Sonja; Hilmola, Antti

    2016-01-01

    In order to introduce a more equitable gender balance in education and consequently in the labour market, it is highly relevant to continue to expand our knowledge of technology education and to give attention to gender related issues. The ultimate purpose of this study was to contribute to efforts to get more women to study technology and pursue…

  13. Nourishing Professional Practice: Continuing Education in Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinneer, James W.

    The literature on continuing education (CE) in dietetics was reviewed. The review focused on the following: motivators and barriers for participation in continuing dietetic education, formats for CE in dietetics, and approaches to assessing learner needs. The role of professional associations, the existence of voluntary credentialing programs, the…

  14. 4-H Volunteer Continuing Education Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, Ken, III; Bullock, Leslie R.

    2017-01-01

    The 4-H Volunteer Continuing Education Academy was developed to provide 4-H club leaders a continuing education opportunity, to assist them in developing and enhancing the skills and knowledge necessary for their volunteer role, and to provide a means for 4-H livestock and horse club leaders to recertify. All participants reported satisfaction…

  15. [Medical technology and medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mallek, D; Biersack, H-J; Mull, R; Wilhelm, K; Heinz, B; Mellert, F

    2010-08-01

    The education of medical professionals is divided into medical studies, postgraduate training leading to the qualification as a specialist, and continuing professional development. During education, all scientific knowledge and practical skills are to be acquired, which enable the physician to practice responsibly in a specialized medical area. In the present article, relevant curricula are analyzed regarding the consideration of medical device-related topics, as the clinical application of medical technology has reached a central position in modern patient care. Due to the enormous scientific and technical progress, this area has become as important as pharmacotherapy. Our evaluation shows that medical device-related topics are currently underrepresented in the course of medical education and training and should be given greater consideration in all areas of medical education. Possible solutions are presented.

  16. Continuing Medical Education: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  17. An Overview of Continuing Interprofessional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Interprofessional education, continuing interprofessional education, interprofessional collaboration, and interprofessional care are moving to the forefront of approaches with the potential to reorganize the delivery of health professions education and health care practice. This article discusses 7 key trends in the scholarship and practice of…

  18. Providing Continuing Education for International Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Debra L

    2015-10-01

    In an increasingly globalized world, providing continuing education (CE) for nurses is becoming a more common opportunity for U.S. educators. It is important for educators to provide CE programs in a culturally competent and sensitive environment. The challenges involved include effective communication, appropriate teaching methodologies, contextually appropriate content, and awareness of cultural-specific needs and customs. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. A new vision for distance learning and continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Ronald M

    2005-01-01

    Increasing demands on continuing medical education (CME) are taking place at a time of significant developments in educational thinking and new learning technologies. Such developments allow today's CME providers to better meet the CRISIS criteria for effective continuing education: convenience, relevance, individualization, self-assessment, independent learning, and a systematic approach. The International Virtual Medical School (IVIMEDS) provides a case study that illustrates how rapid growth of the Internet and e-learning can alter undergraduate education and has the potential to alter the nature of CME. Key components are a bank of reusable learning objects, a virtual practice with virtual patients, a learning-outcomes framework, and self-assessment instruments. Learning is facilitated by a curriculum map, guided-learning resources, "ask-the-expert" opportunities, and collaborative or peer-to-peer learning. The educational philosophy is "just-for-you" learning (learning customized to the content, educational strategy, and distribution needs of the individual physician) and "just-in-time" learning (learning resources available to physicians when they are required). Implications of the new learning technologies are profound. E-learning provides a bridge between the cutting edge of education and training and outdated procedures embedded in institutions and professional organizations. There are important implications, too, for globalization in medical education, for multiprofessional education, and for the continuum of education from undergraduate to postgraduate and continuing education.

  20. Technological transfer to the education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Melamed-Varela

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most efficient strategies related to generation of differentiation factors which contribute to stability and sustainability in time as well as the  momentum of technological development in different territories is represented by the growth in scientific, technological and innovative development based on the structure of economic systems. Education is considered a fundamental element because it is the essence in the formation and fortification of the capacities, skills and competencies in human capital. This is needed for the management of research projects, development and innovation that will contribute to technology transfer and the progress of scientific knowledge that is encouraged from the inside of the organizational structures of the national economic sectors One of the most influential and conceptual tendencies of economic thinking in the countries (Gomez, Ibagón& Forero, 2014 are represented by the theories based on endogenous development in Latin America.  In addition,  the scientific development of a nation brewing from a process of internal learning and strengthening of the technical and technological capabilities that support the processes of education and research as generators of knowledge (Amar &Diazgranados, 2006, this principle is supported by Mazzucato´s (2014 theory,  who considers states as  capable of generating a platform for enabling capabilities of resources for the scientific and technological development entrepreneurs ;fact that are continuously supported by education. Starting from this series of concepts, the following question arises: do different levels of modern educational institutions use technological access? It must be taken into account that the scientific and technological progress results of the research, development and innovation (RDI is not indifferent for educational organizations, an activity that is mostly awarded to the universities and technological development centers (Ortiz, 2012

  1. Lateral Thinking and Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Shlomo

    1997-01-01

    Presents an analysis of technology education and its relevance to lateral thinking. Discusses prospects for utilizing technology education as a platform and a contextual domain for nurturing lateral thinking. Argues that technology education is an appropriate environment for developing complementary incorporation of vertical and lateral thinking.…

  2. President’s Message: Advancing the TIDE of Technology Education

    OpenAIRE

    Lipton, Ethan B.

    2005-01-01

    The article presents information relating to the field of technology education. Vigorous change continues in the study of technology and the delivery of technology education because of the integrating nature of technology and the need to prepare students for developing technological world to meet changing human needs. Significant strides have been made in the evolution of technology education of which we should all be very proud. In the last decade alone, the International Technology Educatio...

  3. EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGIES TO EMPOWER HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C.V. Garzón

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: The New Media Consortium (NMC Horizon Project defines educational technology in a broad sense as tools and resources that are used to improve teaching, learning, and creative inquiry. Each technology has been carefully researched and framed in the context of its potential impact on higher education. Within the Horizon Project there are currently seven categories of technologies, tools, and strategies for their use that the NMC monitors continuously. All they have the potential to foster real changes in education, particularly in the development of progressive pedagogies and learning strategies; the organization of teachers’ work; and the arrangement and delivery of content. Following the recommendations of NMC experts panel, we design an application named Augmented Reality Metabolic Pathways (ARMET in order to improve motivation and to promote student interactivity to the development of skills needed to learn the metabolic pathways. Materials and methods: The ARMET app was developed using Unity, 3D molecules obtained from Protein Data Bank and ChemSpider-chemical structure database, the usage data are stored into a database (MySQL and are analyzed using the statistical software R. Results and conclusions: ARMET mixes several technologies out of seven categories recommend in the NMC Horizon Report: Mobile app, Bring Your Own Device, Flipped Classroom, Learning Analytics and Augmented Reality. The principal criterion for the inclusion of those technologies into the app was its potential relevance to teaching and learning biochemistry. ARMET is available for iOS and Android platforms, and includes PDF files with a set of cards, the game board and classroom worksheet’s. The students and teachers can register for free. Teachers can create classes and track student performance. ARMET collects data for personalizing learning experiences addressing the challenge to build better pedagogical tools to establish effective

  4. News bites: International | Bateman | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 30, No 8 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. A Reflection on Continuing Professional Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Barrie

    2017-01-01

    Barrie Brennan's thesis entitled "Continuing Professional Education in Australia. A Tale of Missed Opportunities" offers a history of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in the Australian context. This paper arose from Brennan's research for his thesis and is focused on issues that arose from the introduction of Australia's…

  6. An Anatomy of Continuing Interprofessional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Hugh

    2009-01-01

    Continuing interprofessional education is the means by which experienced health, social care, and other practitioners learn with, from, and about each other, formally and informally, to improve their collective practice and to cultivate closer collaboration. It applies principles of interprofessional education through media commonly employed in…

  7. The SHEFC Review of Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Jean

    1996-01-01

    Critiques a Scottish proposal to convert liberal adult education into credit-bearing courses for funding purposes. Argues that this would reduce access and narrow curricular offerings for certain groups and that wholesale accreditation should not displace all other agendas and goals for adult and continuing education. (SK)

  8. Continuities, Discontinuities, Interactions: Values, Education, and Neuroethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semetsky, Inna

    2009-01-01

    This article begins by revisiting the current model of values education (moral education) which has recently been set up in Australian schools. This article problematizes the pedagogical model of teaching values in the direct transmission mode from the perspective of the continuity of experience as central to the philosophies of John Dewey and…

  9. Research Areas in Adult and Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Röbken, Heinke; Ehrenspeck-Kolasa, Yvonne; von Ossietzky, Carl

    2014-01-01

    This study builds upon a Delphi study carried out by Zawacki-Richter (2009) which posited a validated classification of research areas in the special area of distance education. We now replicate the study for the broader field of adult and continuing education (ACE). The aims of this paper are: firstly, to develop a categorisation of research…

  10. Continuing Professional Education in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiman, Ashley; Zacharakis, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The military relies on continuing professional education as a key component to the success of its organization. With decreasing budgets and increasing importance for a force that operates efficiently and thinks critically, the cognitive tension among training, education, and learning comes center stage.

  11. CLOUD TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Dukkardt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the review of main features of cloud computing that can be used in education. Particular attention is paid to those learning and supportive tasks, that can be greatly improved in the case of the using of cloud services. Several ways to implement this approach are proposed, based on widely accepted models of providing cloud services. Nevertheless, the authors have not ignored currently existing problems of cloud technologies , identifying the most dangerous risks and their impact on the core business processes of the university. 

  12. Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-01

    This document outlines activities for educating key target audiences, as suggested by workshop participants. Held December 4-5, 2002, the Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop kicked off a new education effort coordinated by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  13. The New Technology of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apter, Michael J.

    A guide to the field of educational technology in Britain is presented with reference to the increasing use of media in education due to the "explosions" of information and population. Descriptions of the major developments in educational technology at the present time (1968) include the use of television (both broadcast and closed…

  14. 78 FR 16447 - Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program (RCEP) for the Technical Assistance and Continuing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-15

    ... (RCEP) for the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Centers (TACE Centers); Proposed Extension... (RCEP) for the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Centers (TACE Centers), the Secretary... with disabilities through enhanced technical assistance (TA) and continuing education (CE) for State...

  15. Educational technology and the new technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, Pleunes Willem; Plomp, T.

    1989-01-01

    Like everywhere in our culture, new technologies gradually penetrate the field of education. This may be seen as a problem area, which asks for appropriate, actions by teachers, curriculum experts, instructional designers and others. As "technology" seems to be the main issue,one may quation whether

  16. Marginalized Student Access to Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtcu, Wanda M.

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate how a teacher can disrupt an established curriculum that continues the cycle of inequity of access to science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) curriculum by students in alternative education. For this paper, I will focus on the technology components of the STEM curriculum. Technology in the United States, if not the world economy, is developing at a rapid pace. Many areas of day to day living, from applying for a job to checking one's bank account online, involve a component of science and technology. The 'gap' in technology education is emphasized between the 'haves and have-nots', which is delineated along socio-economic lines. Marginalized students in alternative education programs use this equipment for little else than remedial programs and credit recovery. This level of inequity further widens in alternative education programs and affects the achievement of marginalized students in credit recovery or alternative education classes instead of participation technology classes. For the purposes of this paper I focus on how can I decrease the inequity of student access to 21st century technology education in an alternative education program by addressing the established curriculum of the program and modifying structural barriers of marginalized student access to a technology focused curriculum.

  17. Searching for Educational Technology Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2003-01-01

    Identifies the types of positions available at domestic four-year institutions of higher education for faculty whose specialty is educational technology. Analyzes educational job postings listed in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" from August, 2000, through July, 2001. (Author/SOE)

  18. Marketing Continuing Education: A Study of Price Strategies. Occasional Papers in Continuing Education, No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Marvin E.

    The objective of the study conducted at the Centre for Continuing Education (CCE) at the University of British Columbia was to determine that threshold pricing not only existed for continuing education courses, but also was applicable to an administrative decision-making structure. The first part of the three-part investigation analyzed consumer…

  19. VIRTUAL INTERNSHIP AS AN EFFECTIVE RESOURCE OF CONTINUOUS PEDAGOGICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М П Нечаев

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the necessity of introduction of new effective forms and technologies to support continuous professional growth of teachers. Emphasizes the role of virtual internships as an effective resource in the organization of system of continuous pedagogical education based on the development of professional reflection of the teacher. Noted that the organization of virtual internships will allow teachers to build on the scientific basis of the technology of following tasks: formation of motivation of teachers to continuously improve their professional skills; developing the ability to analyze educational experience of their colleagues; the development of the ability to analyze the pedagogical experience through the prism of analysis of the “alien” experience; develop the ability to see your “strong” and “weak” parties in a professional way, to determine the cause of professional difficulties, to identify internal resources to build individual trajectory of their professional development.

  20. Rural-Urban Partnering in Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malay, Michael E.; Moore, Jayne F.

    2002-01-01

    Interactive television was used to deliver instruction on advanced cardiac life support to rural health care providers. The partnership between rural and urban hospitals enabled the provision of high-quality, cost-effective continuing education to geographically isolated populations. (SK)

  1. Clinical pharmacology | Blockman | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 28, No 3 (2010) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Clinical pharmacology. M Blockman. Abstract. No Abstract ...

  2. More about ... Immunology | Singh | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 30, No 8 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  3. Online Continuing Medical Education in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwadie, Adnan D.

    2013-01-01

    As the largest country in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and its health care system are well positioned to embark on an online learning intervention so that health care providers in all areas of the country have the resources for updating their professional knowledge and skills. After a brief introduction, online continuing medical education is…

  4. Thriving in Partnership: Models for Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, Peter; Boeck, Deena

    2012-01-01

    This article, based on a presentation at the University Professional and Continuing Education Association Annual Conference, March 29, 2012, provides concepts, terminology, and financial models for establishing and maintaining successful institutional partnerships. The authors offer it as a contribution to developing a wider understanding of the…

  5. Lived Experience of University Continuing Education Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Janice

    2011-01-01

    This article is based on a study that explored the professional lives of eight leaders of continuing education in Canadian universities, with a focus on their administrative role, to provide a deeper understanding of how they live within their practice (lived experience). A practical listing of 56 horizons of experience was identified, useful as…

  6. The Painful Shoulder | Roche | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The painful shoulder is commonly managed by the non-specialist. Continuing Medical Education Vol. 26 (8) 2008: pp. 398-402. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners · Terms and Conditions of Use · Contact AJOL · News.

  7. Review article: Ethnomusicology and music education: Continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review article further explores the nexus between music education and African music/(ethno)musicology that continues the dialogue between the disciplines of musicology and ethnomusicology initiated by Susan Harrop-Allin in SAMUS vol. 25 109-24). Although there has been an explosion of literature over the last five ...

  8. Marketing Realities in Continuing Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Ruth F.; DuHamel, Martha B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes tenets of continuing professional education marketing: identify target audience, define mission, assess community needs, identify competition, establish credibility, develop marketing plans, provide options, evaluate, and develop high-quality programs. Offers advice for pricing, cancellations, new courses, promotion expenses, direct…

  9. Continuous Improvement through Baldridge in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri, Diane K.; Miller, Ruth

    2001-01-01

    Describes efforts of the Baldrige in Education Center and Quality Leadership Academy in Santa Cruz County, California, to support teacher and administrator efforts to improve student performance in selected schools through the use of continuous-improvement techniques adopted by many American corporations to improve product quality and increase…

  10. Google Scholar and the Continuing Education Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howland, Jared L.; Howell, Scott; Wright, Thomas C.; Dickson, Cody

    2009-01-01

    The recent introduction of Google Scholar has renewed hope that someday a powerful research tool will bring continuing education literature more quickly, freely, and completely to one's computer. The authors suggest that using Google Scholar with other traditional search methods will narrow the research gap between what is discoverable and…

  11. Satisfaction with a distance continuing education program for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Ann B; Irwin, Cathy A; Cohen, Betty

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed differences in program satisfaction among health professionals participating in a distance continuing education program by gender, ethnicity, discipline, and community size. A one-group posttest design was used with a sample of 45,996 participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Rural Hospital, Distance Continuing Medical Education Program during 1995-2007. This program provided 2,219 continuing education programs for physicians (n = 7,047), nurses (n = 21,264), allied health (n = 3,230) and dental (n = 305) professionals, pharmacists (n = 4,088), administrators (n = 1,211), and marketing/finance/human resources professionals (n = 343). These programs were provided in Arkansas hospitals, clinics, and area health education centers. Interactive video technology and the Internet were used to deliver these programs. The program satisfaction instrument demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and construct validity. Participants had high levels of satisfaction regarding knowledge and skills, use of information to enhance patient care, program quality, and convenience of the technology (mean total satisfaction score = 4.44, range: 1-5). Results from the t-test for independent samples and one-way analysis of variance indicated that men (p = 0.01), African-Americans and Hispanics (p distance continuing education programs.

  12. Determination Effective Elements of Continuing Interprofessional Education Models

    OpenAIRE

    Leila Safabakhsh; Alireza Irajpour; Nikoo Yamani

    2017-01-01

    Background: Traditional continuing education (CE) approaches have limited impact on patient management and outcomes. Continuing interprofessional education is an innovated educational approach that can improve patient care and outcomes related to health care. There is a need to provide guidance to continuing education professionals in the development, implementation, and evaluation of continuing interprofessional education activities. Objectives: This study attempted to identity effective ele...

  13. Technology Education Professional Enhancement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Thomas A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The two goals of this project are: the use of integrative field of aerospace technology to enhance the content and instruction delivered by math, science, and technology teachers through the development of a new publication entitled NASA Technology Today, and to develop a rationale and structure for the study of technology, which establishes the foundation for developing technology education standards and programs of the future.

  14. Emerging Technologies in Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusberg, Zosia A. C.

    2007-01-01

    Three emerging technologies in physics education are evaluated from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science and physics education research. The technologies--Physlet Physics, the Andes Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS), and Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) Tools--are assessed particularly in terms of their potential at promoting…

  15. Health Educational Potentials of Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The field of health promotion technology has been in an exponential growth in recent years and smart phone applications, exer-games and self-monitoring devices has become part of fitness activities and health education. In this work-in-progress-paper theoretical perspectives for categorising...... and analysing health educational potentials of technologies are presented....

  16. Health Educational Potentials of Technologies.

    OpenAIRE

    Magnussen, Rikke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The field of health promotion technology has been in an exponential growth in recent years and smart phone applications, exer-games and self-monitoring devices has become part of fitness activities and health education. In this work-in-progress-paper theoretical perspectives for categorising and analysing health educational potentials of technologies are presented.

  17. Technology for Education and Learning

    CERN Document Server

    2012 international conference on Technology for Education and Learning (ICTEL 2012)

    2012-01-01

    This volume contains 108 selected papers presented at the 2012 international conference on Technology for Education and Learning (ICTEL 2012), Macau, China, March 1-2, 2012. The conference brought together researchers working in various different areas of Technology for Education and Learning with a main emphasis on technology for business and economy in order to foster international collaborations and exchange of new ideas. This proceedings book has its focus on Technology for Economy, Finance and Education representing some of the major subareas presented at the conference.

  18. Emerging Technologies in Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krusberg, Zosia A. C.

    2007-10-01

    Three emerging technologies in physics education are evaluated from the interdisciplinary perspective of cognitive science and physics education research. The technologies—Physlet Physics, the Andes Intelligent Tutoring System (ITS), and Microcomputer-Based Laboratory (MBL) Tools—are assessed particularly in terms of their potential at promoting conceptual change, developing expert-like problem-solving skills, and achieving the goals of the traditional physics laboratory. Pedagogical methods to maximize the potential of each educational technology are suggested.

  19. Continuing Education Credits | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are pleased to be able to offer continuing education credits to Registered Dietitians. Registered Dietitians This event is pending for approval by the Commission on Dietetic Registration for 2 CPEUs.  Procedure  Immediately after the event, a link to a short questionnaire will be sent to you by email. Please complete the questionnaire online and print out your certificate of completion.  |

  20. Technological literacy and innovation education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansbøl, Mikala

    , and a heavy digitization of the health care sector. These developments have actualized the fundamental question of how new technologies change and challenge the professions and their professional relationships? As one way to deal with this question, health education programmes have begun to focus...... on innovation education and educational activities fostering technological literacy. While focus on technological literacy has often (historically) taken a functionalist direction, and mainly been related to ICT and development of non- vocational curricula, more recent developments of approaches...... education approaches. This paper inscribes itself in these latter movements, and contributes to opening up the question of how health education programmes can deal with the ways new technologies change and challenge the professions and their professional relationships. The paper presents and discusses three...

  1. Disruptive technologies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Flavin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the role of “disruptive” innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally adopted and used by students and staff. Instead, other technologies not owned or controlled by HEIs are widely used to support learning and teaching. According to Christensen's theory of Disruptive Innovation, these disruptive technologies are not designed explicitly to support learning and teaching in higher education, but have educational potential. This study uses Activity Theory and Expansive Learning to analyse data regarding the impact of disruptive technologies. The data were obtained through a questionnaire survey about awareness and use of technologies, and through observation and interviews, exploring participants’ actual practice. The survey answers tended to endorse Disruptive Innovation theory, with participants establishing meanings for technologies through their use of them, rather than in keeping with a designer's intentions. Observation revealed that learners use a narrow range of technologies to support learning, but with a tendency to use resources other than those supplied by their HEIs. Interviews showed that participants use simple and convenient technologies to support their learning and teaching. This study identifies a contradiction between learning technologies made available by HEIs, and technologies used in practice. There is no evidence to suggest that a wide range of technologies is being used to support learning and teaching. Instead, a small range of technologies is being used for a wide range of tasks. Students and lecturers are not dependent on their HEIs to support learning and teaching. Instead, they self-select technologies, with use weighted towards established brands. The

  2. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND COMMUNICATION IN NURSING EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. B. Costa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of information and communication technologies in education, transforms not only the way we communicate, but also work, decide and think, as well as allows you to create rich, complex and diversified learning situations, through sharing the tasks between teachers and students , providing an interactive, continuous and lifelong learning. The paper aims to reflect on the importance of the use of information and communication technologies in higher education and show the potential in promoting changes and challenges for teachers of undergraduate nursing course. This is a literary review concerning the issue at hand, in the period from February to March 2014. The result indicates that the resources of information and communication technologies are strategies for the education of future nurses and promote the changing process for teachers , providing quality education to students and understanding that we must seek new opportunities to build a new style of training.

  3. Motion sensor technologies in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bratitsis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to raise a discussion regarding motion sensor technologies, mainly seen as peripherals of contemporary video game consoles, by examining their exploitation within educational context. An overview of the existing literature is presented, while attempting to categorize the educational approaches which involve motion sensor technologies, in two parts. The first one concerns the education of people with special needs. The utilization of motion sensor technologies, incorporated by game consoles, in the education of such people is examined. The second one refers to various educational approaches in regular education, under which not so many research approaches, but many teaching ideas can be found. The aim of the paper is to serve as a reference point for every individual/group, willing to explore the Sensor-Based Games Based Learning (SBGBL research area, by providing a complete and structured literature review.

  4. Integrating Educational Technologies into the Culinary Classroom and Instructional Kitchen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Samuel

    2005-01-01

    The integration of educational technologies has and will continue to change the nature of education. From the advent of the printed word to the current use of computer assisted teaching and learning, the use of technology is an integral part of modern day realities and approaches to education. The purpose of this paper is to review some of the…

  5. Reasons nurses participate in continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, A B

    1979-01-01

    The study was undertaken to identify dimensions, or motivational orientations that underlie reasons nurses participate in continuing education programs and to determine relationships between these orientations and the legal status of CE and selected demographic characteristics of participants. The sample included 843 nurses who participated in CE programs sponsored by colleges and universities with accredited baccalaureate schools of nursing. Two instruments were used for data collection: a 56-item checklist consisting of reasons for participation (Education Participation Scale) and a personal data sheet. Factor analysis of responses to the EPS indicated that seven motivational orientations underlay the nurses' reasons for participation: compliance with authority, improvement in social relations, improvement in social welfare skills, professional advancement, professional knowledge, relief from routine, and acquisition of credentials. Mean scores on each orientation for the entire sample ranged from 6.55 (professional knowledge) to 1.57 (improvement in social relations) on a 10-point scale. Analysis of variance to determine the relationship between motivational orientation scores and legal status of continuing nursing education revealed no differences among the three legal conditions studied---mandatory, proposed, and voluntary CE---except on the acquisition of credentials orientation. Scores on this orientation varied significantly (p less than .001), but only for respondents employed part-time; for these nurses mean scores were ranked mandatory, proposed, then voluntary. Study findings suggest that, for these nurses, the presence or threat of a mandatory CE law had little influence in motivating participation. Rather, these nurses participated in continuing nursing education programs for reasons related to maintaining professional currency and improving their ability to serve the public.

  6. Towards Discursive Education: Philosophy, Technology, and Modern Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erneling, Christina E.

    2010-01-01

    As technology continues to advance, the use of computers and the Internet in educational environments has immensely increased. But just how effective has their use been in enhancing children's learning? In this thought-provoking book, Christina E. Erneling conducts a thorough investigation of scholarly journals articles on how computers and the…

  7. Factors Affecting Teachers' Continuation of Technology Use in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafyulilo, Ayoub; Fisser, Petra; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the continuation of technology use in science and mathematics teaching of the teachers who attended a professional development program between 2010 and 2012. Continuation of technology use was hypothesized to be affected by the professional development program and by personal, institutional, and…

  8. Factors affecting teachers’ continuation of technology use in teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kafyulilo, A.; Fisser, P.; Voogt, J.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the continuation of technology use in science and mathematics teaching of the teachers who attended a professional development program between 2010 and 2012. Continuation of technology use was hypothesized to be affected by the professional development program

  9. Computers: Educational Technology Paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Hajah Rugayah Hj.; Mustapha, Wan Narita

    2005-01-01

    As we move further into the new millennium, the need to involve and adapt learners with new technology have been the main aim of many institutions of higher learning in Malaysia. The involvement of the government in huge technology-based projects like the Multimedia Super Corridor Highway (MSC) and one of its flagships, the Smart Schools have…

  10. Educational Technology: Integration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Dean L.; Tennyson, Robert D.

    This paper presents a perspective of the current state of technology-assisted instruction integrating computer language, artificial intelligence (AI), and a review of cognitive science applied to instruction. The following topics are briefly discussed: (1) the language of instructional technology, i.e., programming languages, including authoring…

  11. Continuous aqueous tritium monitor applying membrane technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigg, R.A.

    1992-01-01

    Efforts to develop continuous, real-time tritium monitors are focusing on liquid scintillation (LS) counting because its sensitivity for tritium can be below Environmental Protection Agency guidelines (20 pCi/ml). A flow-through LS counter should have a counting efficiency = 0.48, instrumental backgrounds = 5 count/min counting cell volume = 5 ml, and sample water loading capacities = 15 wt%. The system would offer minimum quantifiable activities at the ±10% level of <18 pCi/ml in a 10-min count or <1 pCi/ml if data are averaged for 1 day. The latter value is below the tritium background of surface waters worldwide. However, good time response in a flow-through LS monitor requires flow rates of at least several milliliters per minute. Such a single-pass system would consume large volumes of expensive LS cocktail, and it would generate notable amounts of mixed organic waste

  12. Distance Education in Technological Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R .C. SHARMA

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance Education in Technological AgeRomesh Verma (Editor, New Delhi: Anmol Publications, 2005, ISBN 81-261-2210-2, pp. 419 Reviewed by R C SHARMARegional DirectorIndira Gandhi National Open University-INDIA The advancements in information and communication technologies have brought significant changes in the way the open and distance learning are provided to the learners. The impact of such changes is quite visible in both developed and developing countries. Switching over to online mode, joining hands with private initiatives and making a presence in foreign waters, are some of the hallmarks of the open and distance education (ODE institutions in developing countries. The compilation of twenty six essays on themes as applicable to ODE has resulted in the book, “Distance Education in Technological Age”. These essays follow a progressive style of narration, starting from describing conceptual framework of distance education, how the distance education was emerged on the global scene and in India, and then goes on to discuss emergence of online distance education and research aspects in ODE. The initial four chapters provide a detailed account of historical development and growth of distance education in India and State Open University and National Open University Model in India . Student support services are pivot to any distance education and much of its success depends on how well the support services are provided. These are discussed from national and international perspective. The issues of collaborative learning, learning on demand, life long learning, learning-unlearning and re-learning model and strategic alliances have also given due space by the authors. An assortment of technologies like communication technology, domestic technology, information technology, mass media and entertainment technology, media technology and educational technology give an idea of how these technologies are being adopted in the open universities. The study

  13. Las nuevas tecnologías y la formación médica continuada a distancia The new technologies and the distance continuing medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Segura Badia

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Tras analizar las ventajas e inconvenientes de las FMC a distancia, se contemplan las tres tipologías básicas: provisión de contenidos (enfoque tradicional, gestión de contenidos (enfoque tradicional con las nuevas tecnologías y "on-line" (procesos de aprendizaje y comunicación. Entre los elementos que definen la calidad de los programas formativos a distancia se destacan los tecnológicos, metodológicos y evaluativos. Entre los primeros se incluyen las plataformas, los estándares y la estructura del programa; entre los segundos, los tutores, el diseño de los contenidos , los sistemas de comunicación y las herramientas para crear actividades; y, finalmente, entre los evaluativos, destacan las tipologías destinadas a la evaluación de contenidos, de aprendizaje y de práctica.The advantages and disadvantages of the distance CME are considered, analyzing the three fundamental typologies: contents' offer (traditional approach,, contents' management (traditional approach plus new technologies and "on-line" offer (learning processes and communication. Among the elements related to the quality of the distance CME programmes one can identify the following three essentials: technology, methodology and evaluation. Technology's elements include the platforms, standards and programme's structure. The tutors, contents' design, communication systems and tools to generate activities are the fundamental elements of the methodologies. Finally, among the evaluation one can identify the different procedures aimed to assess the contents, the learning and the practice (performance.

  14. TECHNOLOGY OF EDUCATIONAL EVENTS DESIGNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Volkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to prove and disclose the essence of the author’s technology of educational events designing.Methodology and methods of research. Methodological basis of work is humanitarian approach. The method of pedagogical modeling was used for the model development of educational events influence on pedagogical activity formation. The content analysis of texts descriptions, case-study method, expert estimations of event projects were applied as the main methods of efficiency confirmation of the technology of educational events design.Results and scientific novelty. The characteristics of an educational event are emphasized by means of an empirical way: opening (what a person opens for himself; generation (a result of a personal action; and participation in creation of something "new" (new communications, relations and experience. The structure of technology of educational events design including work with concepts (an educational event, substantial and procedural components is presented. The technology of educational events designing is considered as the process of the well-grounded choice of designing technologies, mutual activity, pedagogical communication, components of educational activity: contents, methods, means, and organizational forms depending on educational aims due to age-specific peculiarities of participants of the educational event. The main conditions providing successful use of the technology are the involvement into joint cognitive activity of all its participants and importance of the events for each of them that qualitatively change the nature of a cognitive process and generate real transformations of the reality.Practical significance. The author’s experience in teaching testifies to introduction of the module «Technology of Design of Educational Events» into the basic educational subject-module «Design Competence of the Teacher» (degree program «Pedagogical Education», considering this module as

  15. Technology Education Reform in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng Steven

    Technology education in Taiwan, presently called living technology (LT), is a new area that has evolved from handicraft, industrial arts, and other areas. LT is offered mainly at the secondary school level, although it is required for all students in grades 1-11. In response to calls for curriculum reform, the present elementary and junior high…

  16. Adequate Funding for Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, Jason B.

    2010-01-01

    Public schools are currently operating in a pressure-cooker of accountability systems in which they must teach students to high standards and meet ever increasing targets for student proficiency, or face increasingly severe sanctions. Into this mix is thrown educational technology and the funding for that technology. The literature espouses the…

  17. The Growing Necessity for Continuing Education: The Short Course Option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWhorter, P.J.; Romig, A.D.

    1999-02-02

    Continuing education is a critical issue in the workplace. Rapid change, the emergence of new technology, and the lack of trained individuals make continuing education an imperative for employers. The desire for individual growth and marketability make it an imperative for the employee also. While there are many options for continuing education, an increasingly popular vehicle is the short course. Time, cost efficiency and instruction by those experienced in real industrial practice are key factors in the success of this educational format. Over the past couple of decades, short course offerings and the number and type of sponsoring organizations have grown significantly. Within the scientific community, courses in basic disciplines (e.g., materials characterization), emergent technologies (e.g., Micro-Electro- Mechanical Systems), equipment operation (e.g., electron microscopes) and even business practices (e.g., ES&H, proposal writing) have emerged and are taught by universities, technical societies and equipment manufacturers. Short course offerings and formats are evolving. Presently, it is possible to find series of courses which define specific curricula. These curricula set the stage for new developments in the future, including increased certification and licensing (e.g., technologists). Along with such certifications will come the need for accreditation. Who will offer such programs, and especially, who will accredit them are significant questions. Perhaps the most dramatic changes will occur with the integration of advanced information technology. While satellite-based remote offerings are available, the use of the web for educating a dispersed group is just beginning to emerge. In its simplest forms, this offers little advantage over a video or a real-time satellite course, but the eventual emergence of tele-operation of experimental equipment will revolutionize remote teaching.

  18. Mobile Technology in Educational Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jueming; Kinshuk

    2005-01-01

    The use of computers and the Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and staff members with various online educational services. With the recent developments in mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By…

  19. Gaming Research for Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Aaron C.; Ernst, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses the use of gaming to teach Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) in public education. The intent of the investigation was to identify attitudes about gaming and its use in education, as well as the need to utilize gaming as a platform to serve as an integrator of STEM subject matter. Participants included…

  20. Art Education Technology: Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2007-01-01

    The application of digital storytelling to art education is an interdisciplinary, inquiry-based, hands-on project that integrates the arts, education, local communities, technology, and storytelling. Through digital storytelling, students develop and apply multiliteracy skills, aesthetic sensitivities, and critical faculties to address greater…

  1. Educational Technology Policy in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slakmon, Benzi

    2017-01-01

    The study examines Israel's educational technology policy in light of the coming-of-age of ICT. The study shows the ways it has been developing, and identifies two major shifts which have occurred in recent years: the introduction of the national educational cloud, and the enabling of the "bring your own device" (BYOD) policy. The way…

  2. Next wave EM technology : Electromagnetic communication technology continues to progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwick, J.

    1998-01-01

    Alpine Oil Services Corp. and Ryan Energy Technologies Inc., have made technological advances in the use of real time electromagnetic (EM) data transmission, using low frequency radio waves to transmit well commands or geological information. The development of the telemetry activated tool was done in two steps. The first technology was real time EM data transmission from the subsurface which used the wellbore to transfer information. The second step was constructing a memory pack which involved an electronic instrument installed in the wellbore which was programmed to perform certain tasks at certain times by transmitting signals back and forth. The use of EM communication allows the geological steering information to come back faster. The EM signal is much faster compared to MWD systems for deeper directional wells. The EM technology also has immediate applications in underbalanced drilling. 1 fig

  3. TABLET (MOBILE TECHNOLOGY FOR PROFESSIONAL MUSIC EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunova Irina B.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights issues associated with the introduction of cloud-centric and tablet (mobile devices in music education, use of which confronts the teacher-musician fundamentally new challenges. So, it's a development of practical teaching skills with the assistance of modern technology, a search of approaches to the organization of educational process, a creation of conditions for the continuity between traditional music learning and information technologies in educational process. Authors give the characteristics of cloud computing and the perspective of its use in music schools (distance learning, sharing, cloud services, etc.. Also you can see in this article the overview of some mobile applications (for OS Android and iOS and their use in the educational process.

  4. Education Technology Survey, 1995.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality Education Data, Inc., Denver, CO.

    Primary research (in-depth telephone interviews) was conducted among elementary and secondary school educators in Spring 1995 to determine usage, attitudes, and barriers to usage for five electronic in-school services: Cable in the Classroom; computers, laserdisc or CD-ROM; Internet; online computer services such as America Online and Prodigy; and…

  5. Continuing education in the family health strategy: rethinking educational groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinira Magali Fortuna

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the experience of the family health team in resignifying the way to develop educational groups. METHOD: groups of discussion, with twenty-six biweekly group meetings conducted, with an average of fifteen professionals from the family health team, during the year 2009. The empirical material consisted of the transcription of the groups, on which thematic analysis was performed. RESULTS: two themes were developed and explored from the collective discussions with the team: "The experience and coordination of the groups" and "The work process and educational groups in a service-school". CONCLUSIONS: continuing Education in Health developed with the team, not only permitted learning about the educational groups that comprised the population, but also contributed to the team's analysis of its own relationships and its work process that is traversed by institutions. This study contributed to the advancement of scientific knowledge about the process of continuing health education as well as educational groups with the population. Also noteworthy is the research design used, providing reflexivity and critical analysis on the part of the team about the group process experienced in the meetings, appropriating knowledge in a meaningful and transformative manner.

  6. Continuing education in the family health strategy: rethinking educational groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Cinira Magali; Matumoto, Silvia; Pereira, Maria José Bistafa; Camargo-Borges, Celiane; Kawata, Lauren Suemi; Mishima, Silvana Martins

    2013-01-01

    to analyze the experience of the family health team in resignifying the way to develop educational groups. groups of discussion, with twenty-six biweekly group meetings conducted, with an average of fifteen professionals from the family health team, during the year 2009. The empirical material consisted of the transcription of the groups, on which thematic analysis was performed. two themes were developed and explored from the collective discussions with the team: "The experience and coordination of the groups" and "The work process and educational groups in a service-school". continuing Education in Health developed with the team, not only permitted learning about the educational groups that comprised the population, but also contributed to the team's analysis of its own relationships and its work process that is traversed by institutions. This study contributed to the advancement of scientific knowledge about the process of continuing health education as well as educational groups with the population. Also noteworthy is the research design used, providing reflexivity and critical analysis on the part of the team about the group process experienced in the meetings, appropriating knowledge in a meaningful and transformative manner.

  7. Dialysis (Part 1): Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (continuing education credit).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, J

    1997-02-19

    The first of two articles on dialysis outlines the experience of patients from chronic renal failure to end stage renal failure and offers a historical perspective of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). It relates to UKCC Professional Development categories: Care enhancement and Reducing risk.

  8. Continuing education is the key in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    An evaluation of the Jamaican Women's Center Programme by the Population Council of New York found that 55% of teenage mothers in Jamaica returned to school in Kingston and 73% in the Mandeville branch following their pregnancies and exposure to the program. Only 15% who were not exposed to the program returned to school. The Sister School Workshop Program on Teenage Pregnancy provides knowledge instead of the myth and fantasy given by parents and clergy. Continuing education is particularly important for those with low self-esteem. The Center also provided knowledge about contraception. The findings were that contraceptive use was 89% among program graduates and 81% among nonprogram persons. In addition to the higher % of usage, there were differences in methods used. Center users preferred the IUD and pills, while nonprogram persons favored pills and injections. Subsequent pregnancies were much higher among nonprogram persons at 39%, while for program participants 15% at Kingston and 8% from the Mandeville Center had subsequent pregnancies within 3 years. The creation of the Jamaican Women's Center in 1978 has also promoted continuing education during pregnancy. Assistance is also provided to those reentering the school system after giving birth. The financial cost has been reasonable at J$3500 program year/woman and nursery facility costs at J$664/child/year. Other services to former students include counseling and school visits and occasionally financial aid amounts J$176/woman/year. Rural outreach averages J$336/woman/year. The identifiable weakness was in preparation of these girls for employment. It is suggested that additional efforts be made to provide wider and more marketable skills to meet local needs. There is also a need to provide linkage with other skills training programs and small business groups in order to expand labor force opportunities for these women.

  9. Educating medical students: lessons from research in continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, K V

    1994-01-01

    Creating a true continuum of medical education from admission to medical school throughout a lifetime of professional learning is easier said than done. To do so, the various components on the continuum must be explored to determine where appropriate links might be made. The author considers selected concepts and evidence from the theory and practice underlying continuing medical education (CME) and continuing professional education (CPE) insofar as CME and CPE can inform undergraduate medical curricula, including its current innovations. Five conceptual and empirical approaches from CME and CPE are discussed in detail: social learning theory, how physicians learn and change, competence in business and the professions, how professionals learn in practice, and lifelong self-directed learning. Then the author describes the implications of these approaches for the ongoing development of undergraduate medical education. (1) The entire learning environment, and not merely discrete aspects such as curriculum content, must be examined and fully utilized to benefit learning. (2) The importance of the contexts in which learning occurs must be emphasized in several ways. (3) Learning should be centered around clinical problems. (4) The many benefits of small-group learning and other ways of learning from colleagues should be emphasized. (5) The undergraduate curriculum should emphasize the development of students' feelings of self-efficacy to ensure that students become physicians who are confident about their abilities. (6) CME research and CPE research reinforce the efforts in undergraduate medical education to emphasize the early development of students' process skills as well as content mastery.

  10. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...... between the 3 areas of expertise is to create an understanding for each other's skills and cultural differences. Futhermore enabling future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve Health Literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view on welfare technology a Student Academy was created...

  11. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction between the 3...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...... areas of expertise is to create an understanding for each other's skills and cultural differences. Futhermore enabling future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve Health Literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view on welfare technology a Student Academy was created...

  12. Toward Sustainable Practices in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshof, Leo

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the problematic relationship between technology education, consumption and environmental sustainability. The emerging global sustainability crisis demands an educational response that moves beyond mere "tinkering" with classroom practices, toward technology education which embraces life cycle thinking and…

  13. 42 CFR 136.340 - Provision of continuing education allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provision of continuing education allowances. 136... Improvement Act Programs Subdivision J-5-Continuing Education Allowances § 136.340 Provision of continuing education allowances. In order to encourage physicians, dentists and other health professionals to join or...

  14. Constructivism, Education, Science, and Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Moses A. Boudourides

    2003-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief review of the various streams of constructivism in studies of education, society, science and technology. It is intended to present a number of answers to the question (what really is constructivism?) in the context of various disciplines from the humanities and the sciences (both natural and social). In particular the discussion will focus on four varieties of constructivism: philosophical, cybernetic, educational, and sociological co...

  15. Constructivism, Education, Science, and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses A. Boudourides

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to present a brief review of the various streams of constructivism in studies of education, society, science and technology. It is intended to present a number of answers to the question (what really is constructivism? in the context of various disciplines from the humanities and the sciences (both natural and social. In particular the discussion will focus on four varieties of constructivism: philosophical, cybernetic, educational, and sociological constructivism.

  16. The Role of Motivation in Continuing Education for Pharmacists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin a Tsoi, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare professionals, including pharmacists, need to continuously update their knowledge and are, therefore, expected to participate in Continuing Education (CE) and Continuous Professional Development (CPD) activities on a regular basis. Lack of intrinsic (or autonomous) motivation appears to

  17. The Critical Role of the Continuing Education Specialist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Pamela S

    2016-11-01

    Continuing education departments are charged with the responsibility of developing, implementing, and evaluating education that improves the practice of nursing and enhances the professional development of the nurse. This article addresses the importance of the continuing education (CE) Specialist in supporting this work. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2016;47(11):482-483. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Integrating technology into radiologic science education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertz, Christopher Ira; Hobbs, Dan L; Mickelsen, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    To review the existing literature pertaining to the current learning technologies available in radiologic science education and how to implement those technologies. Only articles from peer-reviewed journals and scholarly reports were used in the research for this review. The material was further restricted to those articles that emphasized using new learning technologies in education, with a focus on radiologic science education. Teaching in higher education is shifting from a traditional classroom-based lecture format to one that incorporates new technologies that allow for more varied and diverse educational models. Radiologic technology educators must adapt traditional education delivery methods to incorporate current technologies. Doing so will help engage the modern student in education in ways in which they are already familiar. As students' learning methods change, so must the methods of educational delivery. The use of new technologies has profound implications for education. If implemented properly, these technologies can be effective tools to help educators.

  19. The Extent of Educational Technology's Influence on Contemporary Educational Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Bradford-Watts

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates how advances in educational technologies have influenced contemporary educational practices.It discusses the nature of educational technology, the limitations imposed by the digital divide and other factors of uptake, and the factors leading to successful implementation of educational technologies.The extent of influence is then discussed,together with the probable implications for educational sites for the future.

  20. Business as Usual? A Review of Continuing Professional Education and Adult Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittnebel, Leo

    2012-01-01

    The commodification of education in all forms has created a lucrative trade, particularly within the realm of continuing professional education. Mandated across a wide spectrum of industries, and particularly salient in healthcare due to rapid advances in medicine and technology, professional education is said to be the vehicle that keeps…

  1. Reforming Technical and Technological Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David N.

    1993-01-01

    Review of technical and technological educational reform in Brazil, Canada, Germany, Great Britain, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Sweden shows that reform takes time to complete effectively, long-term approaches are needed, and reform is linked to industrial development, regional cooperation, and decentralized decision making. (SK)

  2. Teaching Strategies in Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaller, Anthony E.

    Teachers of technology education need to relate their teaching strategies to learning theory, student needs, and Bloom's taxonomy. In learning, students take in information and apply it to the real world through accommodation. Teaching strategies must allow for this process of accommodation. Student needs involve sustenance (physiological needs),…

  3. Geospatial Technology in Geography Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muniz Solari, Osvaldo; Demirci, A.; van der Schee, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    The book is presented as an important starting point for new research in Geography Education (GE) related to the use and application of geospatial technologies (GSTs). For this purpose, the selection of topics was based on central ideas to GE in its relationship with GSTs. The process of geospatial

  4. Constructivism, Education, Science, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudourides, Moses A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a brief review of the various streams of constructivism in studies of education, society, science and technology. It is intended to present a number of answers to the question (what really is constructivism?) in the context of various disciplines from the humanities and the sciences (both natural and…

  5. Linking information technology in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Jaime Pérez Gutierrez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available It is attempted in this paper, show a clear and concise point involved the new technologies of computer science in education, and how these affect the preparation of teachers, overcoming the wide and deep stretch that separates computer specialists teachers of any subject, learners and the interaction between them.

  6. The Tribe of Educational Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Lily, Abdulrahman Essa

    2014-01-01

    This article looks into the claim that the international academic community of educational technologies seems to have functioned in a "tribal" way, having formed themselves around tribe-like patterns. It therefore addresses the research question: What are these claimed tribe-like practices that such a community exhibits? This question is…

  7. Virtual Technologies Trends in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Gutiérrez, Jorge; Mora, Carlos Efrén; Añorbe-Díaz, Beatriz; González-Marrero, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality captures people's attention. This technology has been applied in many sectors such as medicine, industry, education, video games, or tourism. Perhaps its biggest area of interest has been leisure and entertainment. Regardless the sector, the introduction of virtual or augmented reality had several constraints: it was expensive, it…

  8. Mobile Technology and Liberal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author offers reflections on the impact of mobile technology for liberal education. These reflections are based on his own experience of incorporating iPads in his communication courses during the 2010-2011 academic year. As a member of an interdisciplinary faculty learning community on the use of mobile tablets, he explored…

  9. Brain Activities and Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riza, Emel

    2002-01-01

    There are close relationships between brain activities and educational technology. Brain is very important and so complicated part in our bodies. From long time scientists pay attention to that part and did many experiments, but they just reached little information like a drop in the sea. However from time to time they gave us some light to…

  10. Advanced Technology for Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Ahmed K. (Compiler); Malone, John B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings of the Workshop on Advanced Technology for Engineering Education, held at the Peninsula Graduate Engineering Center, Hampton, Virginia, February 24-25, 1998. The workshop was jointly sponsored by the University of Virginia's Center for Advanced Computational Technology and NASA. Workshop attendees came from NASA, other government agencies, industry and universities. The objectives of the workshop were to assess the status of advanced technologies for engineering education and to explore the possibility of forming a consortium of interested individuals/universities for curriculum reform and development using advanced technologies. The presentations covered novel delivery systems and several implementations of new technologies for engineering education. Certain materials and products are identified in this publication in order to specify adequately the materials and products that were investigated in the research effort. In no case does such identification imply recommendation or endorsement of products by NASA, nor does it imply that the materials and products are the only ones or the best ones available for this purpose. In many cases equivalent materials and products are available and would probably produce equivalent results.

  11. Online Continuing Medical Education for the Latin American Nephrology Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Alvaro; Gonzalez-Martinez, Francisco; Noboa, Oscar; Abbud-Filho, Mario; Lorier, Leticia; Nin, Marcelo; Silvariño, Ricardo; García, Sofía; Pefaur, Jacqueline; Greloni, Gustavo C; Noronha, Irene L; Lopez, Antonio; Ribeiro-Alves, María A; Tanús, Roberto; Fernández-Cean, Juan

    2015-01-01

    A continuing medical education (CME) course was implemented for Latin American nephrologists in 2013. The topic was Immunopathology in native and transplanted kidneys. The course was given in Spanish and Portuguese. The activities included a distance education seven-week asynchronous online modality with multiple educational strategies. Thirty hours of study workload were estimated to complete the course. Four hundred and ninety-eight physicians coming from 18 countries registered for the course; 442 of them participated in it. Of those who participated, 51% received a certificate of completion and 29% a certificate of participation. Sixty-five percent of registrants participated in the case discussions. Eighty-six percent were very satisfied and 13% were satisfied. Lack of time to devote to the course was the main limitation expressed (62%), while Internet access or difficulties in the use of technology were considered by only 12 and 6% of participants, respectively. There was a significant increase in knowledge between before and after the course; the average grade increased from 64 to 83%. In conclusion, technology-enabled education demonstrated potential to become an instrument for Latin American nephrologists.

  12. Technology, Education and Copyright Harmonization Act Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaver, Marc S.

    2017-01-01

    Educational institutions continually work to balance between providing students with access to data and protecting copyright owner's exclusive rights. The Copyright Act of 1976, effective in 1978, provided exemptions for live and distance education. As digital technology grew in capability, its capabilities were incorporated in distance education,…

  13. Nurse practitioner continuing education: exploring influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne, JoEllen

    2015-07-01

    This article introduces the interrelated concepts of nurse practitioner (NP) continuing education (CE) funding patterns, regulatory guidance surrounding NP CE, and its effect on patient outcomes in the United States. A literature review was done by searching online databases: MEDLINE and CINAHL. Searches included review of NP certifying body websites, Institute of Medicine, Josiah Macy Foundation, and the National Council of State Boards of Nursing websites. The nursing literature supports no connection between required CE and improvement in provision of care to patients, nor does it support improvement in individual provider competence. The funding patterns for nursing and medicine indicate a bias toward biomedical and pharmacological interventions. This type of funding stream may contribute to practice gaps rather than improve them. Understanding factors that influence CE program availability, plus the choices NPs make regarding mandatory CE, can provide planning guidance. This guidance can help reach the goal of improved patient outcomes and decreased healthcare disparities as a result of CE interventions. NP-specific findings may potentially influence regulatory reform relevant to mandatory CE and maintenance of certification. It is important that NPs recognize existing conflicts of interest in order to make informed program choices. © 2014 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  14. Current Trends In Educational Technology: Implication On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the current trends in educational technology and the implication on educational managers in Nigeria. The current trends in the field of educational technology are centred on the influence of information and communication technology on the development of educational management. Various challenges ...

  15. Synthetic Biology and the Argument from Continuity with Established Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    ) that it ignores the distinction between what reasons we have and what we should do all things considered. I then illustrate the Continuity Argument and its problems in the case where human manipulation of organisms’ genetic makeup is a suggested reason for finding synthetic biology problematic. Finally, I suggest......Defenders of synthetic biology commonly make reference to the fact that established technologies, such as domestication or selective breeding, share some of the features of synthetic biology that critics argue make it ethically problematic. In this chapter, I reconstruct such references...... as instances of a type of argument which I dub the Continuity Argument. Roughly, the Continuity Argument seeks to show that if we are not disposed to reject the established technology, then features that this technology share with synthetic biology cannot provide reasons to find it ethically problematic. I...

  16. Development of a Virtual Technology Coach to Support Technology Integration for K-12 Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, William; van Tryon, Patricia J. Slagter

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to develop a virtual technology coach for K-12 educators, this article analyzed survey results from sixty teachers with regards to specific resources that a technology coach could provide within a virtual environment. A virtual technology coach was proposed as a possible solution to provide continual professional development for…

  17. Risk Evaluation of Business Continuity Management by Using Green Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Chen

    IT disasters can be seen as the test of the ability in communities and firms to effectively protect their information and infrastructure, to reduce both human and property loss, and to rapidly recover. In this paper, we use a literature meta-analysis method to identify potential research directions in Green Business Continuity Management (GBCM). The concept and characteristics of GBCM are discussed. We analysis the connotation and the sources of green technology risk. An assessment index system is established from the perspectives of GBCM. A fuzzy comprehensive assessment method is introduced to assess the risks of green technology in Business Continuity Management.

  18. Mapping the Terrain of Continuing Allied Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Terrie

    A number of factors make continuing education in the allied health professions a unique category of adult education. The mandatory nature of continuing allied health education violates two of the basic tenets of adult learning theory--that adults voluntarily participate in learning to satisfy personal needs and that adults are generally not…

  19. Continuity and Change in Disaster Education in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to describe post-war continuity and change in disaster education in Japan. Preparedness for natural disasters has been a continuous agenda in Japan for geographical and meteorological reasons, and disaster education has been practised in both formal and informal settings. Post-war disaster management and education have taken a…

  20. Partnership for Environmental Technology Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, Paul R.; Fosse, Richard

    1992-01-01

    The need for broad cooperative effort directed toward the enhancement of science and mathematics education, including environmental science and technology has been recognized as a national priority by government, industry, and the academic community alike. In an effort to address this need, the Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE) has been established in the five western states of Arizona, California, Hawaii, Nevada and Utah. PETE'S overall objectives are to link the technical resources of the DOE, ERA, and NASA Laboratories and private industry with participating community colleges to assist in the development and presentation of curricula for training environmental-Hazardous Materials Technicians and to encourage more transfer students to pursue studies in environmental science at four-year institutions. The program is co-sponsored by DOE and EPA. DoD participation is proposed. PETE is being evaluated by its sponsors as a regional pilot with potential for extension nationally. (author)

  1. Continuing education for primary health care nurse practitioners in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Pamela; DiCenso, Alba; Donald, Faith; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Opsteen, Joanne; Chambers, Tracey

    2013-04-01

    The Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing offers a nine-university, consortium-based primary health care nurse practitioner education program and on-line continuing education courses for primary health care nurse practitioners. Our study sought to determine the continuing education needs of primary health care nurse practitioners across Ontario, how best to meet these needs, and the barriers they face in completing continuing education. Surveys were completed by 83 (40%) of 209 learners who had participated in continuing education offered by the Council of Ontario University Programs in Nursing between 2004 and 2007. While 83% (n=50) of nurse practitioners surveyed indicated that continuing education was extremely important to them, they also identified barriers to engaging in continuing education offerings including; time intensity of the courses, difficulty taking time off work, family obligations, finances and fatigue. The most common reason for withdrawal from a continuing education offering was the difficulty of balancing work and study demands. Continuing education opportunities are important to Ontario primary health care nurse practitioners, and on-line continuing education offerings have been well received, but in order to be taken up by their target audience they must be relevant, readily accessible, flexible, affordable and offered over brief, intense periods of time using technology that is easy to use and Internet sites that are easily navigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. ICT energy efficiency in higher education. Continuous measurement and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ter Hofte, H. [Novay, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2011-11-15

    Power consumption of information and communications technology (ICT) is rising rapidly worldwide. Reducing (the growth in) energy demand helps to achieve sustainability goals in the area of energy resource depletion, energy security, economy, and ecology. Various governments and industry consortia have set out policies and agreements to reduce the (growth in) demand for energy. In the MJA3 agreements in the Netherlands, various organizations, including all 14 universities and 39 universities of applied sciences pledged to achieve 30% increase in energy efficiency in 2020 compared to 2005. In this report, we argue that using the number of kilowatt-hours of final electricity used for ICT per enrolled student per day (kWh/st/d), should be used as the primary metric for ICT energy efficiency in higher education. For other uses of electricity than ICT in higher education, we express electricity use in kilowatthours per person per day (kWh/p/d). Applying continuous monitoring and management of ICT energy is one approach one could take to increase ICT energy efficiency in education. In households, providing direct (i.e. real-time) feedback about energy use typically results in 5-15% energy savings, whereas indirect feedback (provided some time after consumption occurs), results in less energy savings, typically 0-10%. Continuous measurement of ICT electricity use can be done in a variety of ways. In this report, we distinguish and describe four major measurement approaches: (1) In-line meters, which require breaking the electrical circuit to install the meter; (2) clamp-on-meters, which can be wrapped around a wire; (3) add-ons to existing energy meters, which use analog or digital ports of existing energy meters; (4) software-only measurement, which uses existing network interfaces, protocols and APIs. A measurement approach can be used at one or more aggregation levels: at building level (to measure all electrical energy used in a building, e.g. a datacenter); at

  3. A propulsion technology challenge — An abortable. Continuous use vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czysz, Paul A.; Froning, H. David

    1996-02-01

    Propulsion is the enabling technology for an abortable, continuous use vehicle. Propulsion performance purchases margin in the other material, structural, and system requirements. But what is abortability, and continuous use? Why is it necessary? What are its characteristics? And, what specifically is required in the propulsion system to enable these characteristics? Is the cost of the launcher really trivial, or is that the incomplete cost analysis limited to expendables and rebuilt, reusables. This paper identifies what constitutes an abortable, continuous use vehicle, the propulsion characteristics required, and the technology necessary to provide those characteristics. The proposition resulting is that this is not a technology issue, it is a concept of operation and a bureaucratic issue. The required goal is not as distant as some might propose, and the technology not as unprepared for commercial application as some assumed. The conclusion is that clearly we cannot continue to base the next century's orbital operations on an expendable rebuilt for reuse concept. What is required is a rocket based combined cycle (RBCC) engine based on those now in space operation 1,2; not a combination of cycles that remains to be shown as a practical, achievable reality.

  4. Continuous-Flow Biochips: Technology, Physical Design Methods and Testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Araci, Ismail Emre; Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    2015-01-01

    This article is a tutorial on continuous-flow biochips where the basic building blocks are microchannels, and microvalves, and by combining them, more complex units such as mixers, switches, and multiplexers can be built. It also presents the state of the art in flow-based biochip technology...

  5. Peer-to-Peer JXTA Architecture for Continuing Mobile Medical Education Incorporated in Rural Public Health Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Rajasekaran, Rajkumar; Sriman Narayana Iyengar, Nallani Chackravatula

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Mobile technology helps to improve continuing medical education; this includes all aspects of public health care as well as keeping one?s knowledge up-to-date. The program of continuing medical and health education is intertwined with mobile health technology, which forms an imperative component of national strategies in health. Continuing mobile medical education (CMME) programs are designed to ensure that all medical and health-care professionals stay up-to-date with the knowled...

  6. Toward a Freedom to Learn in Continuing Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Cheryl

    1986-01-01

    A hybrid of professional continuing education and Carl Rogers's humanistic philosophy supporting freedom in learning is proposed, and the five principles of the philosophy are examined for their potential for transfer to professional education. (MSE)

  7. Thesaurus Dataset of Educational Technology in Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Linjing; Liu, Qingtang; Zhao, Gang; Huang, Huan; Huang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The thesaurus dataset of educational technology is a knowledge description of educational technology in Chinese. The aims of this thesaurus were to collect the subject terms in the domain of educational technology, facilitate the standardization of terminology and promote the communication between Chinese researchers and scholars from various…

  8. Digital Technologies as Education Innovation at Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryukov, Vladimir; Gorin, Alexey

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses the use of digital technology-based education innovations in higher education. It demonstrated that extensive implementation of digital technologies in universities is the main factor conditioning the acceleration of innovative changes in educational processes, while digital technologies themselves become one of the key…

  9. The promises of educational technology: a reassessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ely, Donald P.; Plomp, T.

    1986-01-01

    The claims made for educational technology have not always been realized. Many programmes in education based on media and technology have produced useful documentation and supportive research; others have failed. The current, comprehensive definition of educational technology is a helpful key to

  10. Effect of Health Care Professionals' Continuing Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of educational intervention by health care providers on clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients in a Yemeni health facility. Methods: A prospective, one-group and pre- and post-test design to assess the effects of health care providers' education on clinical patient outcomes was ...

  11. Continuous professional development of educators: the state ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Higher Education is one of the mechanisms that can be employed to provide and sustain reflective practice within CPD. Factors that may inhibit the capacity of Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to render a sustainable service in this regard should be identified and circumvented. A necessary partner in enhancing the ...

  12. Integration through adult and continuing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne; Geiger, Tinne

    2011-01-01

    In the Nordic countries a large proportion of immigrants and descendants are excluded from the labour market and the group is overrepresented among the unemployed. International experience shows that adult education and training can be useful tools in providing immigrant groups a foothold in the ...... countries, analysing the use of adult education and training targeted at the integration of immigrants into the labour market (employability) . This article outlines the findings and relates them to international experience....

  13. Continuing Education Workshops in Bioinformatics Positively Impact Research and Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazas, Michelle D; Ouellette, B F Francis

    2016-06-01

    Bioinformatics.ca has been hosting continuing education programs in introductory and advanced bioinformatics topics in Canada since 1999 and has trained more than 2,000 participants to date. These workshops have been adapted over the years to keep pace with advances in both science and technology as well as the changing landscape in available learning modalities and the bioinformatics training needs of our audience. Post-workshop surveys have been a mandatory component of each workshop and are used to ensure appropriate adjustments are made to workshops to maximize learning. However, neither bioinformatics.ca nor others offering similar training programs have explored the long-term impact of bioinformatics continuing education training. Bioinformatics.ca recently initiated a look back on the impact its workshops have had on the career trajectories, research outcomes, publications, and collaborations of its participants. Using an anonymous online survey, bioinformatics.ca analyzed responses from those surveyed and discovered its workshops have had a positive impact on collaborations, research, publications, and career progression.

  14. CTSA approach in education: opportunities and challenges in continuing education teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Camilo Figueiredo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to initiate the formation of critical citizens from the Basic Education, this research aimed to investigate how a group of teachers from the local public from Londrina in Parana conceives of Science-Technology-Society-Environment Approach (CTSA for the teaching of scientific content. Data were collected through questionnaires and speeches from the participating during a course entitled Science-Technology-Society, offered in the course of Specialization in Education and Technology of the Federal Technological University of Paraná, Brazil. According to the data obtained initially unaware of this entire group approach to teaching. Soon, they were not as elaborate, plan and develop scientific content prioritizing CTSA relations. Therefore, this research promoted participants the innovation pedagogical and methodological knowledge to work the CTSA relationships in the classroom, because teachers revealed in his speeches understanding of how important it is to develop the contents prioritizing CTSA relations to form citizens critical to society. Based on these data, we stress the importance of teaching continuing education that enables the study of the CTSA approach to mobilize a more qualitative basic education.

  15. KSC Education Technology Research and Development Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odell, Michael R. L.

    2003-01-01

    Educational technology is facilitating new approaches to teaching and learning science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education. Cognitive research is beginning to inform educators about how students learn providing a basis for design of more effective learning environments incorporating technology. At the same time, access to computers, the Internet and other technology tools are becoming common features in K-20 classrooms. Encouraged by these developments, STEM educators are transforming traditional STEM education into active learning environments that hold the promise of enhancing learning. This document illustrates the use of technology in STEM education today, identifies possible areas of development, links this development to the NASA Strategic Plan, and makes recommendations for the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Education Office for consideration in the research, development, and design of new educational technologies and applications.

  16. A Prescription for Reframing Continuing Pharmacy Education in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Anita M.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research indicates that adults learn best when they are motivated, self-directed and choose what and how they learn. This project focuses on continuing pharmacy education and seeks to answer the question: "How can pharmacists be motivated to participate in continuing pharmacy education programs because they want to, not because they…

  17. Continuing education for performance improvement: a creative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Patti-Ann; Hardesty, Ilana; White, Julie L; Zisblatt, Lara

    2012-10-01

    In an effort to improve patient safety and health care outcomes, continuing medical education has begun to focus on performance improvement initiatives for physician practices. Boston University School of Medicine's (BUSM) Continuing Nursing Education Accredited Provider Unit has begun a creative project to award nursing contact hours for nurses' participation in performance improvement activities. This column highlights its initial efforts. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Towards More Effective Continuing Education and Training for Australian Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billett, Stephen; Choy, Sarojni; Dymock, Darryl; Smith, Ray; Henderson, Amanda; Tyler, Mark; Kelly, Ann

    2015-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year research project that aimed to identify and evaluate the potential models and practices of learning support that might constitute a national approach to workers' continuing education and training. The identification of a national approach to continuing education and training is emerging as a priority for…

  19. Concept and Theory in Continuing Education for Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Pauline Taglialavore

    1987-01-01

    The explosion of new knowledge and increased specialization have heightened the nurse's need for continuing education. The concepts of motivation, obsolescence, competence, and lifelong learning are inherent in the continuing education process. These concepts and the theories of learning and change are presented and related to nursing practice.…

  20. Real Estate Tax Exemption for Continuing Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charters, Alexander N.

    A court case in which the issue was whether Syracuse University was entitled to tax exemption for certain real property used for administrative offices, classrooms, student housing, and parking lots by its continuing education programs, particularly the Continuing Education Center for the Public Service, is presented. The finding of the Court is…

  1. Continuing Professional Education for Teachers and University and College Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranton, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    In this chapter, the author explores a variety of aspects of continuing professional education for teachers and university and college faculty members. She discusses the kinds of knowledge that are addressed and the role of online learning in continuing professional education.

  2. Continuous nonlinear optimization for engineering applications in GAMS technology

    CERN Document Server

    Andrei, Neculai

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the theoretical details and computational performances of algorithms used for solving continuous nonlinear optimization applications imbedded in GAMS. Aimed toward scientists and graduate students who utilize optimization methods to model and solve problems in mathematical programming, operations research, business, engineering, and industry, this book enables readers with a background in nonlinear optimization and linear algebra to use GAMS technology to understand and utilize its important capabilities to optimize algorithms for modeling and solving complex, large-scale, continuous nonlinear optimization problems or applications. Beginning with an overview of constrained nonlinear optimization methods, this book moves on to illustrate key aspects of mathematical modeling through modeling technologies based on algebraically oriented modeling languages. Next, the main feature of GAMS, an algebraically oriented language that allows for high-level algebraic representation of mathematical opti...

  3. A Delphi forecast of technology in education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, B. E.

    1973-01-01

    The results are reported of a Delphi forecast of the utilization and social impacts of large-scale educational telecommunications technology. The focus is on both forecasting methodology and educational technology. The various methods of forecasting used by futurists are analyzed from the perspective of the most appropriate method for a prognosticator of educational technology, and review and critical analysis are presented of previous forecasts and studies. Graphic responses, summarized comments, and a scenario of education in 1990 are presented.

  4. Using Principles of Quality and Safety Education for Nurses in School Nurse Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Ruth K.; Sprague-McRae, Julie

    2014-01-01

    School nurses require ongoing continuing education in a number of areas. The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) framework can be utilized in considering school nurses' roles and developing continuing education. Focusing on neurology continuing education, the QSEN framework is illustrated with the example of concussion management…

  5. Current Trends in Higher Education Technology: Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damewood, Andrea M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on how technology in use changes over time, and the current trend of simulation technology as a supported classroom technology. Simulation-based training as a learning tool is discussed within the context of adult learning theories, as is the technology used and how today's higher education technology administrators support…

  6. CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION: CLOSING THE GAP ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    medical education (CME) entails in- service training necessary to update knowledge and skills and maintain an effective and relevant delivery of health task ... person working life3. This write-up attempts to re- echo the concept of CME as a key to improving medical practice with emphasis on the contending issues in the ...

  7. Multisite Assessment of Nursing Continuing Education Learning Needs Using an Electronic Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Susan; Jackson, Stephanie; Cook, Lesley; Reed, Joanne Williams; Blakeney, Keshia; Zimbro, Kathie; Parker, Cindy

    2016-02-01

    A continued education needs assessment and associated education plan are required for organizations on the journey for American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet® designation. Leveraging technology to support the assessment and analysis of continuing education needs was a new venture for a 12-hospital regional health system. The purpose of this performance improvement project was to design and conduct an enhanced process to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of gathering data on nurses' preferences and increase nurse satisfaction with the learner assessment portion of the process. Educators trialed the use of a standardized approach via an electronic survey tool to replace the highly variable processes previously used. Educators were able to view graphical summary of responses by category and setting, which substantially decreased analysis and action planning time for education implementation plans at the system, site, or setting level. Based on these findings, specific continuing education action plans were drafted for each category and classification of nurses. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Diabetes Technology-Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy and Continuous Glucose Monitoring in Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Anne L; Ahmann, Andrew J; Battelino, Tadej; Evert, Alison; Hirsch, Irl B; Murad, M Hassan; Winter, William E; Wolpert, Howard

    2016-11-01

    To formulate clinical practice guidelines for the use of continuous glucose monitoring and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in adults with diabetes. The participants include an Endocrine Society-appointed Task Force of seven experts, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology co-sponsored this guideline. The Task Force developed this evidence-based guideline using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system to describe the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. The Task Force commissioned one systematic review and used the best available evidence from other published systematic reviews and individual studies. One group meeting, several conference calls, and e-mail communications enabled consensus. Committees and members of the Endocrine Society, the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, the American Association of Diabetes Educators, and the European Society of Endocrinology reviewed and commented on preliminary drafts of these guidelines. Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and continuous glucose monitoring have an important role in the treatment of diabetes. Data from randomized controlled trials are limited on the use of medical devices, but existing studies support the use of diabetes technology for a wide variety of indications. This guideline presents a review of the literature and practice recommendations for appropriate device use.

  9. Database mirroring in fault-tolerant continuous technological process control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Danel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the implementations of mirroring technology of the selected database systems – Microsoft SQL Server, MySQL and Caché. By simulating critical failures the systems behavior and their resilience against failure were tested. The aim was to determine whether the database mirroring is suitable to use in continuous metallurgical processes for ensuring the fault-tolerant solution at affordable cost. The present day database systems are characterized by high robustness and are resistant to sudden system failure. Database mirroring technologies are reliable and even low-budget projects can be provided with a decent fault-tolerant solution. The database system technologies available for low-budget projects are not suitable for use in real-time systems.

  10. University Continuing Education for Lifelong Learning in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haejoo

    2008-01-01

    Lifelong education achieves its goals when it improves people's quality of life and when it brings social cohesion and development. University continuing education (UCE) has contributed to the expansion of higher education opportunities in terms of its quantity. However, we have to look further than sheer volume of activity. Original ideals of…

  11. Initial teacher education and continuing professional development for science teachers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens; Evans, Robert Harry

    2011-01-01

    Research into ways of improving the initial education and continuing professional development of science teachers is closely related to both common and unique strands. The field is complex since science teachers teach at different educational levels, are often educated in different science subjec...

  12. Satellite education: The national technological university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waugh, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    National Technological University (NTU) was founded to address the wide-ranging educational needs of the employed technical professional. A state-of-the-art satellite delivery system allows nationwide coverage by participating engineering colleges. Established in 1984, NTU is now a nonprofit effort of 24 engineering colleges. The NTU network grew rapidly to its present configuration, and enrollment patterns clearly demonstrate the need and acceptance of the concept. Each member school teaches its own courses (with on-campus students enrolled) over the network and awards its own grades. Receiving sites at NTU are operated by a sponsoring organization (i.e., the employer) in accordance with NTU guidelines. Masters degrees are offered in electrical engineering, computer engineering, computer science, engineering management, and manufacturing engineering. Several certificate programs are also available. Typically, NTU telecasts 80 credit courses each term. Over 50,000 attend continuing education courses, tutorials, and research teleconferences each year. Newly acquired channels will enable further expansion

  13. Educational Technologies in Health Science Libraries: Teaching Technology Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Emily J.

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many. To appeal to their users, many health sciences librarians are interested in developing technology-based classes. This column explores the question: what skills are necessary for developing and teaching technology in an academic health sciences library setting? PMID:24528269

  14. Educational technologies in health sciences libraries: teaching technology skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Emily J

    2014-01-01

    As technology rapidly changes, libraries remain go-to points for education and technology skill development. In academic health sciences libraries, trends suggest librarians provide more training on technology topics than ever before. While education and training have always been roles for librarians, providing technology training on new mobile devices and emerging systems requires class creation and training capabilities that are new to many librarians. To appeal to their users, many health sciences librarians are interested in developing technology-based classes. This column explores the question: what skills are necessary for developing and teaching technology in an academic health sciences library setting?

  15. A study on the continuing education of radiologic technologists: Focused on current status and satisfaction of continuing education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Hye Lim; Choi, In Seok; Nam, So Ra; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yoon, Yong Su; Her, Jae; Han, Seong Gyu; Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of bio-convergence engineering, graduate school, Korea university, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Duck Sun [Korea university college of medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    In this study, we surveyed the current status, satisfaction and demand of radiologic technologist continuing education for 93 radiologic technologists who participated in the continuing education. To understand the current status and general evaluation and to find out the improvement direction, survey was conducted on 3 categories: participation, satisfaction and demand of continuing education. In addition, we analyzed the continuing education implementation status and the management system by collecting related regulations. As a result, the education completion rates of radiologic technologists from 2010 to 2012 were respectively 42.6%, 43.4% and 34.2%; the rates were similar to other medical technician’s average education completion rates. According to the survey, in case of participation, the most frequent answer was ‘more than five times less than 10 times per year’ with 48.4% and in satisfaction section, the most common answer was ‘Average(3)’ with 34.4%. In demand of continuing education section, 32.8% of the respondents chose ‘Clinical skill training in major field’. In the results of this research, continuing education needs to be managed in the direction of helping radiologists improve their personal ability and self development. Furthermore, to meet the demand of radiologists, the quality of continuing education should be improved to satisfy the educatee.

  16. A study on the continuing education of radiologic technologists: Focused on current status and satisfaction of continuing education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, Hye Lim; Choi, In Seok; Nam, So Ra; Kim, Hyun Ji; Yoon, Yong Su; Her, Jae; Han, Seong Gyu; Kim, Jung Min; Ahn, Duck Sun

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we surveyed the current status, satisfaction and demand of radiologic technologist continuing education for 93 radiologic technologists who participated in the continuing education. To understand the current status and general evaluation and to find out the improvement direction, survey was conducted on 3 categories: participation, satisfaction and demand of continuing education. In addition, we analyzed the continuing education implementation status and the management system by collecting related regulations. As a result, the education completion rates of radiologic technologists from 2010 to 2012 were respectively 42.6%, 43.4% and 34.2%; the rates were similar to other medical technician’s average education completion rates. According to the survey, in case of participation, the most frequent answer was ‘more than five times less than 10 times per year’ with 48.4% and in satisfaction section, the most common answer was ‘Average(3)’ with 34.4%. In demand of continuing education section, 32.8% of the respondents chose ‘Clinical skill training in major field’. In the results of this research, continuing education needs to be managed in the direction of helping radiologists improve their personal ability and self development. Furthermore, to meet the demand of radiologists, the quality of continuing education should be improved to satisfy the educatee

  17. RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL PANORAMA OF MODERNIZATION OF TRAINING TEACHERS OF CONTINUOUS VOCATIONAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Dorozhkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Nowadays, there is no evidence-based strategy of upgrade of system of preparation of pedagogical personnel for continuous professional education in the Russian Federation. At the same time, scientists recognize that smoothly running regular high-quality replenishment of education by the skilled heads and teachers having fundamental psychology and pedagogical knowledge and being specialists in one of economic industries has crucial importance for successful development of post-industrial society. Hence, the need for creation of multichannel system of professional and pedagogical preparation has emerged.The aim of the present publication is to provide the complex overview of problems of reforming of professional pedagogical education and to show possible ways of their decision.Methods. The methodological basis of the study involves the concept of professional development of an individual; the thesis on the integration of the system-based, process and project approaches; the principles for the development of professional pedagogical education. Panoramic approach to the discussed problems of modernization of professional and pedagogical school has defined the logic of our research.Results. Psychological and pedagogical problems of professional education are analysed. Multidimensional metaprofessional qualities of teachers of vocational school are considered. The conceptual model of vocational structure of preparation of pedagogical personnel is developed for the system of continuous professional education.The debatable aspect of the research is reflected in the project of a psychological and pedagogical platform – the autonomous modular educational program including massive open online courses, management systems of educational process, supports of innovative infrastructure of education, humanitarian technologies of high education.Practical significance. The vocational structure of training of teachers of vocational

  18. New Theoretical Approach Integrated Education and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Gang

    2010-01-01

    The paper focuses on exploring new theoretical approach in education with development of online learning technology, from e-learning to u-learning and virtual reality technology, and points out possibilities such as constructing a new teaching ecological system, ubiquitous educational awareness with ubiquitous technology, and changing the…

  19. Early Learning and Educational Technology Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing the growth of technology use in early learning settings, the U.S. Department of Education and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services collaborated in the development of the "Early Learning and Educational Technology Policy Brief" to promote developmentally appropriate use of technology in homes and early learning…

  20. The Multistability of Technological Breakdowns in Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjarke Lindsø; Tafdrup, Oliver Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Everyone who is involved with modern technological artefacts such as computers, software and tablets has experienced situations where the artefacts suddenly cease to function properly. This is commonly known as a technological breakdown. Within education and the praxis of teaching...... technological breakdowns become a more and more ubiquitous phenomenon due to the rapid increase of technological artefacts utilized for educational purposes (Riis, 2012). The breakdowns impact the educational practice with consequences ranging from creating small obstacles to rendering it impossible to conduct...... successful teaching. Thus, knowing how to cope with technological breakdowns is a pivotal part of being a technological literate....

  1. Franchising Technology Education: Issues and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Dan; Newcomer, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    Describes educational technology franchises that sell services to students, either through schools or directly through retail centers, to educate them about and with technology. Topics addressed include the emphasis on personalized instruction; cooperative learning; curriculum; cost effectiveness; site-based management in public education; and…

  2. Educational Technology: Effective Leadership and Current Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courville, Keith

    2011-01-01

    (Purpose) This article describes the basis for effective educational technology leadership and a few of the current initiatives and impacts that are a result of the aforementioned effective leadership. (Findings) Topics addressed in this paper include: (1) the role of the educational technology leader in an educational setting; (2) an examination…

  3. Technology and Education: Friends or Foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Joseph N.

    The population explosion and developments in information technology have created a powerful need for technological advancement on a global scale. Such advancement must come through education, and such education, given the size and breadth of the need, is best realized through multimedia instruction and distance education. Communications…

  4. Studying Innovation Technologies in Modern Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stukalenko, Nina M.; Zhakhina, Bariya B.; Kukubaeva, Asiya K.; Smagulova, Nurgul K.; Kazhibaeva, Gulden K.

    2016-01-01

    In modern society, innovation technologies expand to almost every field of human activity, including such wide field as education. Due to integrating innovation technologies into the educational process practice, this phenomenon gained special significance within improvement and modernization of the established educational system. Currently, the…

  5. A Contemporary Preservice Technology Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Rod; Becker, Kurt; Stewardson, Gary

    2012-01-01

    In order to teach engineering education, today's engineering and technology education teachers must be equipped with lesson plans to teach engineering design, among other principles, to the 6th-12th grade levels. At Utah State University (USU), curriculum has been developed for preservice engineering and technology education teachers that…

  6. Networked Learning and Network Science: Potential Applications to Health Professionals' Continuing Education and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Alvaro; Parboosingh, John

    2015-01-01

    Prior interpersonal relationships and interactivity among members of professional associations may impact the learning process in continuing medical education (CME). On the other hand, CME programs that encourage interactivity between participants may impact structures and behaviors in these professional associations. With the advent of information and communication technologies, new communication spaces have emerged that have the potential to enhance networked learning in national and international professional associations and increase the effectiveness of CME for health professionals. In this article, network science, based on the application of network theory and other theories, is proposed as an approach to better understand the contribution networking and interactivity between health professionals in professional communities make to their learning and adoption of new practices over time. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  7. Center for Continuing Education and Community Service at Kuwait University: A Model in Leadership for Adult and Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alansari, Eissa M.; Albustan, Suad A.

    2009-01-01

    Education should not be limited only to formal school education but individuals should always find ways and means to increase their knowledge and improve their skills. The rapid flow of knowledge and social change, the discovery of new techniques and innovations, etc call for continuous learning. Individuals who missed formal education looked to…

  8. Status of nuclear technology education in Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davaa, S.; Khuukhenkhuu, G.

    2007-01-01

    The National University of Mongolia (NUM) is the country's oldest, the only comprehensive university, and a leading center of science, education and culture. The NUM has twelve schools and faculties in the capital city Ulaanbaatar and three branches in provinces. The University offers the widest range of undergraduate and graduate programs in natural and social sciences and humanities. After sixty years of dynamic growth, the University has become a place of sustained innovation, a blend of scholarship and practical realism. The last ten years have been a period of reforms in the structure, financing and governance of Mongolian educational institutions. The NUM has been continuously adjusting its operations and curriculum to deal with new economic conditions, changing labour market demands and altered social aspirations. Committed to human peace, development and welfare in the increasingly globalized world, the NUM promotes equal and mutually beneficial international cooperation. It is a member of the International Association of Universities (IAU), University Mobility in Asia and the Pacific (UMAP), and Euro-Asian University Network (EAUN) and has direct co-operation agreements with more than sixty international academic and research centers in Europe, the USA and the Asia-Pacific Rim. On the threshold of the 21st century, the NUM remains a major center for fundamental and applied research as well as a university that is distinguished by the quality of its teaching. Following its values and traditions, the University strives to be an innovative and dynamic learning community. Requirements for Program Majored in Nuclear Technology: Profession major purpose: The objective is to provide knowledge and skills to use nuclear physics' methodology and nuclear radiation for education, science, health protection, agriculture, geology, mining, nature protection, energy and etc industries. The graduates of this major will become engineer technology staff and researchers in

  9. Implementation of Mobile Pedagogy During Continuous Education of Physical Culture Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman S.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: one of the urgent problems in the field of continuous training of future teachers of physical culture is the training of students using mobile devices and innovative educational Internet technologies. The scientific literature has thoroughly studied the introduction of mobile technologies in the professional training of teachers, but the development of foundations for the formation of physical competence based on innovative approaches, such as mobile training, has not been implemented to date. Hence, the necessity of setting the research goal that is to create a methodological model for the continuing education of teachers of physical culture on the basis of the ideas of mobile pedagogy in the cluster “college - university” and the use of experimental methods to substantiate the effectiveness of its implementation in the professional training of students. Materials and Methods: to create a model of continuous education, including the integration of various clusters, components and innovative technologies, the systemic approach is applied to the study with the additional use of competency, activity, qualification, personality-orientedness, culturological and innovation-technological approaches. Systematisation, comparison, comparison and generalisation are used in modeling the continuous education of teachers of physical culture. Results: in the process of research, the integrating resources and the scientific and educational potential of secondary and higher education were revealed. These recourses allowed the systematisation and modeling of the process of continuing education of teachers of physical culture based on the ideas of mobile pedagogy in the cluster “college - university”. At the experimental stage of the study, the effectiveness of the implementation of mobile pedagogy is proved and the author’s approach to the training of future teachers of physical culture is methodologically grounded. Discussion and

  10. Health Care Improvement and Continuing Interprofessional Education: Continuing Interprofessional Development to Improve Patient Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, Peter M.; Janes, Gillian; Chambers, Alison

    2009-01-01

    Health care improvement and continuing professional education must be better understood if we are to promote continuous service improvement through interprofessional learning in the workplace. We propose that situating interprofessional working, interprofessional learning, work-based learning, and service improvement within a framework of social…

  11. Using QR codes for continuous assessment in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Jiménez Rodríguez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of information and communications technology (ICT in education has accelerated in recent years. At university level educational platforms that provide access to the contents of different subjects are used, as well as on-line communication between teachers and students. This project intended to improve teacher quality and motivation and satisfaction in 1st grade students, through the insertion of new ICT tools [forms Google and QR codes (quick response codes] that allow students the continuous assessment of their own learning, with particular emphasis on the application of metacognitive strategies for problem solving. It was conducted during the academic year 2014-2015 in the subject of Basic Psychology (practices. The subject Basic Psychology is taught in 1st Degree of Social Work at the Complutense University of Madrid. It consists of six ECTS (European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System credits and as such, students receive two hours of lecture and practical class one hour each week. It was during the weekly hour of practice which was carried out this innovation project.

  12. Utilization of Educational Technology in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Takashi

    1980-01-01

    Gives an overview of the development of educational technology in Japan evident in the increase of publications, the diffusion of technological innovations, and the organization of research pertaining to the field. (Author/MER)

  13. Using quantum principles to develop independent continuing nursing education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurlinden, Jeffrey; Pepsnik, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Innovations in health care call for fresh approaches to continuing nursing education that support lateral relationships, teamwork, and collaboration. To foster this transformation, we devised the following education principles: Everyone teaches, everyone learns; embrace probability; information is dynamic; and trust professionals to practice professionally. These principles guided the development of seven independent, practice-specific, evidence-based continuing nursing education programs totaling 21.5 contact hours for casual-status nurses who practiced as childbirth educators. The programs were popular, promoted teamwork, and increased communication about evidence-based practice.

  14. The Technological Dimension of Educational Technology in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Yannis

    2012-01-01

    This article describes some of the main technological trends and issues of the European landscape of research and innovation in educational technology. Although several innovative technologies (tools, architectures, platforms, or approaches) emerge, such as intelligent support to personalization, collaboration or adaptation in mobile, game-based,…

  15. Technological Knowledge and Reasoning in Finnish and Estonian Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, Ossi; Soobik, Mart

    2017-01-01

    The main idea of this research was to find out if there is a relationship between students' undertakings within Craft and Technology education and their ability to understand technological concepts. Study participants' technological knowledge and reasoning was measured with a questionnaire regarding mechanical systems connected with simple…

  16. Technology and Technique: An Educational Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, Aytekin

    2012-01-01

    Today, technology is developing very fast around the world. This technological development (hardware and software) affects our life. There is a relationship among technology, society, culture, organization, machines, technical operation, and technical phenomenon. Educators should know this relationship because technology begins to affect teaching…

  17. All-printed capacitors with continuous solution dispensing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yang; Plötner, Matthias; Berndt, Andreas; Kumar, Amit; Voit, Brigitte; Pospiech, Doris; Fischer, Wolf-Joachim

    2017-09-01

    Printed electronics have been introduced into the commercial markets in recent years. Various printing technologies have emerged aiming to process printed electronic devices with low cost, environmental friendliness, and compatibility with large areas and flexible substrates. The aim of this study is to propose a continuous solution dispensing technology for processing all-printed thin-film capacitors on glass substrates using a leading-edge printing instrument. Among all printing technologies, this study provides concrete proof of the following outstanding advantages of this technology: high tolerance to inks, high throughput, low cost, and precise pattern transfers. Ag nanoparticle ink based on glycol ethers was used to print the electrodes. To obtain dielectric ink, a copolymer powder of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-benzoylphenyl methacrylate) containing crosslinkable side groups was dissolved in anisole. Various layouts were designed to support multiple electronic applications. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to investigate the all-printed capacitor layers formed using the proposed process. Additionally, the printed capacitors were electrically characterized under direct current and alternating current. The measured electrical properties of the printed capacitors were consistent with the theoretical results.

  18. Higher Education Beyond Faculties: Interdisciplinary Education in Care and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponselee, Anne-Mie A G; Van Hoof, Joost

    2017-01-01

    A Centre of Healthcare and Technology of a Dutch University of Applied Sciences, is presented - and illustrated by project examples - to show how the transitions in the sectors of health care and technology can result in interdisciplinary education in care and technology by means of higher education beyond faculties.

  19. Continuing geographic education model contribution to environmental culture development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González E. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low levels of geographic culture and educations were found in schools and communities caused by formal education systems shortcomings, poor geographic educative influence aside learning institutions, and lose comprehension of individual and social needs. The main objective of the research supporting this article was to devise a continuing geographic education model for social agents at schools and communities, as a requirement to attain a sustainable development based on the practical usage of this model to favor the organization of its systematic cultural influences. This research is part of a larger project leaded by the author and is derived from his PH D studies. The findings are being appraised since 2005 in social and educative contexts of Camagüey Province making evident the validity of the model. Key words: continuing geographic education model, geographic education, geographic culture.

  20. Trends in Adult and Continuing Education in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekkehard Nuissl

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This contribution summarizes the most important trends in adult education in Germany as they were elaborated in a secondary analytic research project of the DIE (Deutsches Institut für Erwachsenenbildung – German Institute for Adult Education in 2007. According to the study, participation in continuing education in Germany is increasing after long years of decrease, even though, overall, financing of adult education has been further reduced. Cooperation as well as competition between continuing education institutions has increased. Course offers have become shorter, counselling and information have more significant roles than in the past, and those employed in adult education, especially teaching staff, have a higher level of qualifications than before. Adult education policy in Germany has varying aims as a result of the federal structure of the country. Incentives for vocational and workplace training predominate however.

  1. Physical Education Teacher's Attitudes towards Philosophy of Education and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkeli, Anil; Senel, Omer

    2016-01-01

    The current study was carried out to find out the attitudes of physical education teachers towards educational philosophy and technology, and to determine the relationship between the philosophy of education that they adopt and their attitudes toward technology. With this aim, the study was conducted on 22 female and 69 male physical education…

  2. Women Technology Leaders: Gender Issues in Higher Education Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    Women working in higher education information technology (IT) organizations and those seeking leadership positions in these organizations face a double challenge in overcoming the traditionally male-dominated environments of higher education and IT. Three women higher education chief information officers (CIOs) provided their perspectives,…

  3. THE CYBERSPACE IN THE CONTINUED CLINICAL BIOCHEMISTRY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Martins

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The cybernetic spaces simulate the real world with interactive multimedia. This work  has been applied since January, 2007 on the curricular student’s apprenticeship at high school and graduation, in the site “bioq.educacao.biz/ULAB-HC-UFPE”. It has been developed to provide continuity to the technical-scientific learning of students and professionals, and also to improve their human social relations on the  labour  environment.  It’s comprises a virtual space, destined to communication and collective building of knowledge on the clinical biochemistry.   It’s about an interactive environment which allows the users registered as coordinator professor (professional  or the scientist student (trainee,  unlimited access to  posting contents (classes, texts, presentations, animations, consultations, non-synchronic discussions (on orkut, forums, e-mail and synchronic discussions (on chats, videoconferences. After a few live tutorials  about new  input in this environment, and the use of the new learning tool,  the collective building of knowledge on cyberspace begins. As a trainee’s program task, the scientist student would have to build a space of his own, under guidance and supervision of the coordinator teachers.  The cyberspace efficiency was evaluated from reports collected in February, 2008: the adherence to this  work was satisfactory, regarding this period, with 68 registered users, 870 accesses and 52 contents available on the several sections of the virtual laboratory. Our work is still being applied, and new adhesions are  happening everyday. We intend to amplify this cyber environment in order to make it a  permanent  continued education site on the health area.  From interest contracts and common knowledge,  the technological interfaces constitute an interaction, in which everyone is a potential author.  Keywords: Cyberspace, online biochemistry education, continued education.

  4. Technological Middle Level Education in Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Cruz Prieto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Technological middle level education in Mexico trains young people between 15 to 18 years old to continue higher studies or to enter the labor market. It serves about 807,433 students through its 755 campuses with an educational model that has a focus on developing competences. High School Educational Reform, in operation since 2008, has initiated some programs to serve students, with the aim of reducing dropout rates. It also has implemented innovative management and information systems. In 2013, an educational reform was begun with an orientation to working conditions, focusing on the evaluation of school administrators and teachers. Received: 25/09/2013 / Accepted: 03/10/2013How to reference this articleCruz Prieto, S., Egido, I. (2014. La Educación Tecnológica de Nivel Medio Superior en México. Foro de Educación, 12(16, pp. 99-121. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.14516/fde.2014.012.016.004

  5. Opioid use in palliative care | Hosking | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 21, No 5 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Effects of continuing paediatric education in interpersonal communication skills.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, A.M. van; Holl, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Paediatric care places great demands on interpersonal communication skills, especially as regards the handling of psychosocial issues. Recent shifts in paediatric morbidity and increases in patient empowerment furthermore emphasize the need for continuing paediatric education in communication

  7. History of Continuing Nursing Education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Alice M.

    1998-01-01

    Nursing history since 1853 is presented to identify issues in continuing nursing education, such as the influence of feminism and professionalism, changing constituencies, and philosophies in health care. (SK)

  8. Neurosciences Continuing Education: An Adult With New-Onset Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Rimas V

    2018-04-01

    The case of a 43-year-old woman with new-onset seizures is presented within the context of a continuing education quiz. Details regarding the underlying etiology and contemporary advances in the literature are referenced.

  9. Continuing Education in Research Ethics for the Clinical Nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffers, Brenda Recchia

    2002-01-01

    Review of professional nursing statements, federal policy, and recommendations for protection of human research subjects resulted in a topic and content outline for research ethics training for nurses. Suggestions for continuing education programs on research ethics were formulated. (SK)

  10. Strategic Market Planning in Conglomerate Continuing Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, James P.

    1987-01-01

    The author tells how very large, multidivision continuing education programs can use their size as a marketing advantage. Some advantages include (1) superior service, (2) an image of high quality, (3) the bandwagon effect, and (4) stronger buying power. (CH)

  11. Learning as the Basis for Continuing Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Barbara J.; Cervero, Ronald M.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter is an update and expansion of previous work and explores how professionals construct knowledge in the context of their practice by connecting concepts from their experiences and continuing professional education activities.

  12. Mentoring and Informal Learning as Continuing Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines the role of mentoring in continuing professional education from a critical perspective, addressing informal and formal mentoring relationships while highlighting their potential to encourage critical reflection, learning, and coconstruction of knowledge.

  13. Developing User-Centered Continuous Professional Education for ATD Service Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanto-Ronkanen, Anne; Paalasmaa, Pekka; Saarni, Lea

    2015-01-01

    Finnish Assistive Technology Device Service centers raised the question about education to the full-time workers of ATD Services. They nominated a group which included representatives of universities, ATD Service centers and national authorities. This small group drew up background questionnaires concerning the education, its content and length. Three universities started the education, the aim of which was to learn new methods to develop their own work, learning by doing at work with their superiors. This continuous professional education corresponded to 30 ECTS credits and lasted 10 months. Based on the feedback from the guiding group of CPE, students and their superiors, this type of education is needed. It met its goals by giving students methods to develop their work and broaden their view on ATD service when having discussions with other experts. Continuous professional education needs to be developed further and it could also be part of joined European education with national elements.

  14. Current and Future Opportunities and Challenges in Continuing Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadelin, Jeffrey W; Travlos, Dimitra V; Janke, Kristin K; Zellmer, William A; Vlasses, Peter H

    2017-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) convened a consensus-seeking invitational conference on October 29-30, 2015, in Chicago, Ill. ACPE's desire to have stakeholder guidance on its role in the future of continuing pharmacy education and continuing professional development led to the convening of the conference. The purpose of this article is to summarize the proceedings of the conference, including the recommendations from the stakeholders.

  15. Strengthening healthcare delivery in Haiti through nursing continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, M; Julmisse, M; Marcelin, N; Merry, L; Tuck, J; Gagnon, A J

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to (1) highlight nursing continuing education as a key initiative for strengthening healthcare delivery in low-resource settings, and (2) provide an example of a nursing continuing education programme in Haiti. Haiti and other low-resource settings face extreme challenges including severe shortages of healthcare workers, high rates of nurse out-migration and variations in nurse competency at entry-to-practice. Nursing continuing education has the potential to address these challenges and improve healthcare delivery through enhanced nurse performance and retention; however, it is underutilized in low-resource settings. A case study is presented from the Hôpital Universitaire de Mirebalais in Mirebalais, Haiti of a new nursing continuing education programme called the Beyond Expert Program. The case study highlights eight key dimensions of nursing continuing education in low-resource settings: (1) involving local stakeholders in planning process, (2) targeting programme to nurse participant level and area of care, (3) basing course content on local context, (4) including diverse range of nursing topics, (5) using participatory teaching methods, (6) addressing resource constraints in time and scheduling, (7) evaluating and monitoring outcomes, and (8) establishing partnerships. The case study provides guidance for others wishing to develop programmes in similar settings. Creating a nursing continuing education programme in a low-resource setting is possible when there is commitment and engagement for nursing continuing education at all levels of the organization. Our report suggests a need for policy-makers in resource-limited settings to make greater investments in nursing continuing education as a focus of human resources for health, as it is an important strategy for promoting nurse retention, building the knowledge and skill of the existing nursing workforce, and raising the image of nursing in low-resource settings. © 2015

  16. Exploring ward nurses' perceptions of continuing education in clinical settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govranos, Melissa; Newton, Jennifer M

    2014-04-01

    Health care systems demand that nurses are flexible skilful workers who maintain currency and competency in order to deliver safe effective patient centered care. Nurses must continually build best practice into their care and acquire lifelong learning. Often this learning is acquired within the work environment and is facilitated by the clinical nurse educator. Understanding clinical nurses' values and needs of continuing education is necessary to ensure appropriate education service delivery and thus enhance patient care. To explore clinical ward-based nurses' values and perceptions towards continuing education and what factors impact on continuing education in the ward. A case study approach was utilized. A major teaching hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A range of clinical nursing staff (n=23). Four focus groups and six semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken. Focus group interviews explored participants' values and perceptions on continuing education through a values clarification tool. Thematic analysis of interviews was undertaken to identify themes and cluster data. Three central themes: 'culture and attitudes', 'what is learning?' and 'being there-being seen', emerged reflecting staffs' values and perceptions of education and learning in the workplace. Multiple factors influence ward nurses' ability and motivation to incorporate lifelong learning into their practice. Despite variance in nurses' values and perceptions of CE in clinical environments, CE was perceived as important. Nurses yearned for changes to facilitate lifelong learning and cultivate a learning culture. Clinical nurse educators need to be cognizant of adult learners' characteristics such as values, beliefs, needs and potential barriers, to effectively facilitate support in a challenging and complex learning environment. Organizational support is essential so ward managers in conjunction with educational departments can promote and sustain continuing education, lifelong

  17. Content analysis of continuing education for cervical cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter, Virginia L; Crenshaw, Jeannette T; Gilder, Richard E

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this project was to assess free and low-cost web-based continuing education activities to determine if they reflect updated national guidelines for cervical cancer screening. A qualitative design and descriptive statistics were used to conduct a content analysis. An abstraction tool was used to evaluate 15 continuing education activities. Data collection was conducted between January and February 2013 by two registered nurses. The results were recorded independently and compared for agreement between data collectors, as well as inter-rater reliability of the data collectors, and the abstraction tool was used to collect data for the analysis. The majority of the continuing education activities included the updated guidelines for screening intervals, the age to begin screening and when to discontinue screening. Most of the activities also indicated that human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing is not recommended for younger women. Very few of the continuing education activities included tips for providers to use when counselling patients. The correct information on age-appropriate screening intervals and HPV co-testing was included in the continuing education activities reviewed. The areas that were largely underrepresented in the continuing education activities were the risk factors, prevention measures for transmission of HPV, patient counselling about HPV and the appropriate screening practices. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare © 2013 The Joanna Briggs Institute.

  18. Social Work Continuing Education: Current Issues and Future Direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzman, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Continuing education is arising as an area of rapid growth and increased attention in the social work profession. Conceptually, the impetus and focus are on the promotion of the principles of lifelong learning and professional replenishment; but pragmatically, the driving force has been the virtually universal requirement of continuing education…

  19. A Report of the Center for Continuing Education, Drake University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Clarence H., Ed.

    With assistance from Title I of the Higher Education Act, a two-day workshop for counselors in Iowa was sponsored by the Center for Continuing Education at Drake University. Proceedings of the workshop, reported in this publication, include four interlocking dimensions: (1) the counselor's role in vocational decision making, (2) the counselor's…

  20. Impact of diabetes continuing education on health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The short-term impact of a continuing medical education program on providers. Diabetes Care. 1999; 22: 1929. 25. Gagliardino JJ, González C, Caporale JE. Diabetes. Education Study Group of Argentina. The diabetes- related attitudes of health care professionals and persons with diabetes in Argentina. Rev Panam Salud.

  1. Exceptional Adults Learn in Broward Community College's Continuing Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Lucia O'C.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Educational Programs for Exceptional Adults (EPEA), a continuing education project for mentally and physically handicapped adults at Broward (Florida) Community College, offers a varied curriculum in personal and vocational adjustment, home management, and leisure time skills, includes a summer camp program, and draws on the support of community…

  2. Continuous Improvement in Action: Educators' Evidence Use for School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannata, Marisa; Redding, Christopher; Rubin, Mollie

    2016-01-01

    The focus of the article is the process educators use to interpret data to turn it into usable knowledge (Honig & Coburn, 2008) while engaging in a continuous improvement process. The authors examine the types of evidence educators draw upon, its perceived relevance, and the social context in which the evidence is examined. Evidence includes…

  3. Problem Based Learning in Continuing Education--Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegeager, Nikolaj; Thomassen, Anja Overgaard; Laursen, Erik

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the PBL model applied at Aalborg University in order to discuss research findings with regard to the educational effectiveness of the PBL model in securing an efficient transfer of learning from university driven continuing education to the context of the workplace. In recent years Aalborg University has seen a progressive…

  4. Social Work Continuing Education: A Statewide Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianino, Mark; Ruth, Betty J.; Miyake Geron, Scott

    2016-01-01

    This article presents findings from a 2013 qualitative study of social work continuing education (CE) in Massachusetts. Eleven focus groups were conducted with 75 participants from key stakeholder groups: practitioners, educators, licensing board members, and agency administrators. Although positive perspectives surfaced--such as diversity of CE…

  5. Adult, Continuing, and Health Professions Education: Moving Forward Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Barbara J.; Cervero, Ronald M.

    2018-01-01

    In this final chapter, we summarize the themes of this sourcebook along with the issues and trends in health professions education (HPE) identified by the chapter authors. By comparing and contrasting HPE and adult and continuing education, we discuss ways in which the two can be integrated.

  6. Integrating Aesthetics: Transforming Continuing Education through Africentric Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Auburn E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Manuscript written for the Adult Education Research Conference based on dissertation research completed at National Louis University. Purpose: To increase knowledge base of art based learning as a mode of anti-racist pedagogy and the use of an Africentric framework for continuing and professional education. Setting: African Centered…

  7. Student Performance Requirements: Minitary Service. Continuation Education System Development Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Puente Union High School District, CA.

    Funded under Title III of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, the La Puente, California, continuation education project investigated (1) attitudes of former students concerning the success of the school in preparing them for entry into military service, (2) the minimal skills and knowledge required by each of the armed forces, (3)…

  8. Challenges of Women Participation in Continuing Higher Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Engr E. Egbochukwu

    higher education programme with particular focus on the B.Ed part-time programme of the University of Lagos ... challenges of women participants in the programme include time constraints, increasing marital demand, poor .... young girls and married women in educational pursuit and had continued to exhibit their desire or ...

  9. Public Administration Education in Europe: Continuity or Reorientation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnal, Gyorgy

    2015-01-01

    The article explores the changing patterns of disciplinary orientation in European public administration (PA) education. The study builds on an earlier research, which defined three distinct clusters of countries, based on their specific PA education tradition. It asks whether countries' movement away from the Legalist paradigm has continued since…

  10. Applications of current technology for continuous monitoring of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drayer, R.

    2013-01-01

    Advancements in technology have opened many opportunities to improve upon the current infrastructure surrounding the nuclear fuel cycle. Embedded devices, very small sensors, and wireless technology can be applied to Security, Safety, and Nonproliferation of Spent Nuclear Fuel. Security, separate of current video monitoring systems, can be improved by integrating current wireless technology with a variety of sensors including motion detection, altimeter, accelerometer, and a tagging system. By continually monitoring these sensors, thresholds can be set to sense deviations from nominal values. Then alarms or notifications can be activated as needed. Safety can be improved in several ways. First, human exposure to ionizing radiation can be reduced by using a wireless sensor package on each spent fuel cask to monitor radiation, temperature, humidity, etc. Since the sensor data is monitored remotely operator stay-time is decreased and distance from the spent fuel increased, so the overall radiation exposure is reduced as compared to visual inspections. The second improvement is the ability to monitor continuously rather than periodically. If changes occur to the material, alarm thresholds could be set and notifications made to provide advanced notice of negative data trends. These sensor packages could also record data to be used for scientific evaluation and studies to improve transportation and storage safety. Nonproliferation can be improved for spent fuel transportation and storage by designing an integrated tag that uses current infrastructure for reporting and in an event; tracking can be accomplished using the Iridium satellite system. This technology is similar to GPS but with higher signal strength and penetration power, but lower accuracy. A sensor package can integrate all or some of the above depending on the transportation and storage requirements and regulations. A sensor package can be developed using off the shelf technology and applying it to each

  11. APPLICATIONS OF CURRENT TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF SPENT FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drayer, R.

    2013-06-09

    Advancements in technology have opened many opportunities to improve upon the current infrastructure surrounding the nuclear fuel cycle. Embedded devices, very small sensors, and wireless technology can be applied to Security, Safety, and Nonproliferation of Spent Nuclear Fuel. Security, separate of current video monitoring systems, can be improved by integrating current wireless technology with a variety of sensors including motion detection, altimeter, accelerometer, and a tagging system. By continually monitoring these sensors, thresholds can be set to sense deviations from nominal values. Then alarms or notifications can be activated as needed. Safety can be improved in several ways. First, human exposure to ionizing radiation can be reduced by using a wireless sensor package on each spent fuel cask to monitor radiation, temperature, humidity, etc. Since the sensor data is monitored remotely operator stay-time is decreased and distance from the spent fuel increased, so the overall radiation exposure is reduced as compared to visual inspections. The second improvement is the ability to monitor continuously rather than periodically. If changes occur to the material, alarm thresholds could be set and notifications made to provide advanced notice of negative data trends. These sensor packages could also record data to be used for scientific evaluation and studies to improve transportation and storage safety. Nonproliferation can be improved for spent fuel transportation and storage by designing an integrated tag that uses current infrastructure for reporting and in an event; tracking can be accomplished using the Iridium satellite system. This technology is similar to GPS but with higher signal strength and penetration power, but lower accuracy. A sensor package can integrate all or some of the above depending on the transportation and storage requirements and regulations. A sensor package can be developed using off the shelf technology and applying it to each

  12. Specificity of continuous auditing approach on information technology internal controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaćanski Slobodan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary business world, can not be imagined without the use of information technology in all aspects of business. The use of information technology in manufacturing and non-production companies' activities can greatly facilitate and accelerate the process of operation and control. Because of its complexity, they possess vulnerable areas and provide space for the emergence of accidental and intentional frauds that can significantly materially affect the business decisions made by the companies' management. Implementation of internal controls can greatly reduce the level of errors that can contribute to making the wrong decisions. In order to protect the operating system, the company's management implement an internal audit to periodically examine the fundamental quality of the internal control systems. Since the internal audit, according to its character, only periodically checks quality of internal control systems and information technologies to be reported to the manager, the problem arises in the process of in wrong time reporting the management structures of the business entity. To eliminate this problem, management implements a special approach to internal audit, called continuous auditing.

  13. Panel Debate: Technics and technology in mathematics and mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten

    2015-01-01

    new technologies enter mathematics as a discipline and mathematics education as a societal practice. Our analysis suggests a focus on continuities in time and place in the sense that it is necessary to understand the history of “tool use” in mathematics and the various ways that scholastic and non...... guidelines and conclusions regarding the use of computer technology in mathematics education.......The use of computer technology for teaching and learning of mathematics has several consequences and does sometimes give rise to both controversies and misunderstandings. We address these problems by both a philosophical and a historical approach, investigating what it actually is that goes on when...

  14. Social Adjustment of At-Risk Technology Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Jeremy V.; Moye, Johnny J.

    2013-01-01

    Individual technology education students' subgroup dynamic informs progressions of research while apprising technology teacher educators and classroom technology education teachers of intricate differences between students. Recognition of these differences help educators realize that classroom structure, instruction, and activities must be…

  15. Challenges in nursing continuing education: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamian, Jalil; Moeini, Mahin; Soleimani, Marzie

    2015-01-01

    Nursing continuing education with development of knowledge, skill, and attitude results in improvement of nursing activity, and thus improves the health care in the society. If the education is not planned and implement properly, it affects the patient care. This study was designed to explore the challenges of nursing continuing education in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences hospitals. The research was conducted from April 2012 to February 2013 in Isfahan, Iran. The sampling was begun with purposeful method and continued with snowball method. Thirty-nine participants were selected among the nurses of Alzahra, Kashani, and Noor hospitals, nursing and midwifery faculty, continuing education center, and the vice-chancellery for treatment. The participants were both learners and planners of continuing education program. In this descriptive explorative qualitative research, we interviewed 39 participants in five focus group and five individual interviews, until data saturation was achieved. We used semi-structured interviews and field notes for data gathering, and members checking, triangulation (data and method), peer debriefing, and peer review to increase the strength of data. Data were analyzed with thematic analysis method that was proposed by Broun and Clarke in 2006. Data analysis produced 175 initial codes, 8 subthemes, and 5 main themes. The main themes included: Learners related factors, teachers related factors, educational process related factors, inadequate facilities, and defective evaluation. According to the results, we need to revise the educational process in nursing continuing education. To achieve this goal, we need a team for needs assessment, planning, and evaluation. In addition, we must pay attention to educators' and learners' issues.

  16. Future Ready Learning: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education. 2016 National Education Technology Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The National Education Technology Plan is the flagship educational technology policy document for the United States. The 2016 Plan, "Future Ready Learning: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education," articulates a vision of equity, active use, and collaborative leadership to make everywhere, all-the-time learning possible. While…

  17. Continuing medical education based on the needs of society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmanzadeh H

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. One of the main reasons of inefficiency in traditional medical education is the application of diseaseoriented educational system in continuing medical education, instead of a symptom-oriented approach. Purpose. To determine the most common and important symptoms and complaints among Iranian nation according to the viewpoints of general parishioners. Method. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, a self-administered questionnaire consisting of demographic data and 153 scaled-questions about body systems and organs, which were designed based on Likert style. A pilot study was performed. Of 26217 GPs all over the country, 5000 physicians were selected by stage randomized sampling method. Of this number, 1714 GPs answered and returned the questionnaire. Result. Demographic data, the relative number of male and female GPs, and relative and absolute distribution of GPs were described and analyzed using Chi square test. The difference of GPs’ opinions about the most common symptoms were analyzed according to the physicians’ gender, duration of practice and their province of practice; there were significant differences found in some systems. Conclusion. It seems that continuing medical education programs should be planned based on a modern evidencebased approach and according to the society’s and practicing physicians’ needs in order to achieve a communityoriented medical education system. Keywords: DISEASE-ORIENTED MEDICAL EDUCATION, CLINICAL PROCESS, CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION, GENERAL PRACTITIONERS, PERCEIVED NEEDS ASSESSMENT, EVIDENCE-BASED MEDICAL EDUCATION, COMMUNITY-ORIENTED MEDICAL EDUCATION

  18. Best Practices of Leadership in Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Loren

    2014-01-01

    Leadership in Educational Technology is a relatively new field that is changing as fast as technology itself. Success for an educational leader includes maintaining a firm grasp of how to diagnose the needs of a district, a school, or a classroom while aligning policies, procedures, and protocols into a format that will empower the individual…

  19. Relationships between Teacher Characteristics and Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Kurt Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Too often, teachers are using educational technology resources for administrative purposes instead of using these resources in a constructivist manner to enhance student learning. The study site was well behind the national average in overall educational technology use categories. The purpose of this explanatory correlational research was to…

  20. The Changing Nature of Educational Technology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    The many changes in educational technologies have been well documented in both the professional and popular literature. What is less well documented is the changing nature of programs that prepare individuals for careers in the broad multi-disciplinary field of educational technology. This article is a first attempt to look at how educational…

  1. Dehumanization: An Overview of Educational Technology's Critics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Geoff

    Almost since its inception, the word "dehumanization" has caused apprehension, especially as the words relate to educational technology. This paper is a brief analysis of educational technology's critics from the late 1950s through present time; it also serves as a study of how their rhetoric has affected the structure of elementary and…

  2. Online Experiential Education for Technological Entrepreneurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermolovich, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Technological Entrepreneurship is both an art and a science. As such, the education of a technological entrepreneur requires both an academic and an experiential component. One form of experiential education is creating real new ventures with student teams. When these ventures are created in an online modality, students work in virtual teams and…

  3. Historiography in Graduate Technology Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jim; Hunt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    A proposal is made suggesting the inclusion of historiography (i.e., historical research and the writing of history) into graduate technology teacher education. In particular, a strategy is forwarded to have graduate students in technology teacher education, who are working at schools in different locations, conduct historical research and write…

  4. A Model Technology Educator: Thomas A. Edison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzer, William S.; Rogers, George E.; Bush, Jeffery

    2007-01-01

    Reflecting back over a century ago to the small village of Menlo Park, New Jersey provides insight into a remarkable visionary and an exceptional role model for today's problem-solving and design-focused technology educator: Thomas A. Edison, inventor, innovator, and model technology educator. Since Edison could not simply apply existing knowledge…

  5. Aligning Technology Education Teaching with Brain Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study was designed to determine if there is a level of alignment between technology education curriculum and theories of intellectual development. The researcher compared Epstein's Brain Growth Theory and Piaget's Status of Intellectual Development with technology education curriculum from Australia, England, and the United…

  6. Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria focuses on the following areas: Agriculture, Food Science, Technology/Engineering, Science and Applied Science, Vocational/Technical Education. Vol 17, No 2 (2012). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ...

  7. Continuous Improvement in Nursing Education through Total Quality Management (TQM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Wai Mun

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management (TQM has generally been validated as a crucial revolution in the management field. Many academicians believe that the concept of TQM is applicable to academics and provides guiding principles towards improving education. Therefore, an increasing number of educational institutions such as schools, colleges and universities have started to embrace TQM philosophies to their curricula.Within the context of TQM, this paper would explore the concept of continuous improvement by using the Deming philosophy. Subsequently, this paper would elaborate on the application of TQM to bring about continuous improvement in the current education system.

  8. Continuing Science and Technology at the Proposed Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was designated in 2002 to be the site for the nation's first permanent geological repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The process of selecting a site for the repository began nearly 25 years ago with passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act in 1982. The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for submitting a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for constructing and operating the repository, and DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is charged with carrying out this action. The use of multiple natural and engineered barriers in the current repository design are considered by OCRWM to be sufficiently robust to warrant license approval; however, potential design enhancements and increased understanding of both natural and engineered barriers, especially over the long time frames during which the waste is to remain isolated from human contact continue to be examined. The Office of Science and Technology and International (OST andI) was created within OCRWM to help explore novel technologies that might lower overall costs and to develop a greater understanding of processes relevant to the long-term performance of the repository. A brief overview of Yucca Mountain, and the role that OST andI has in identifying technological or scientific advances that could make repository operations more efficient or performance more robust, will be presented. It is important to note, however, that adopting any of OST andI's technological or scientific developments will be at the discretion of OCRWM's Office of Repository Development (ORD)

  9. Potential of information technology in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattheos, N; Stefanovic, N; Apse, P; Attstrom, R; Buchanan, J; Brown, P; Camilleri, A; Care, R; Fabrikant, E; Gundersen, S; Honkala, S; Johnson, L; Jonas, I; Kavadella, A; Moreira, J; Peroz, I; Perryer, D G; Seemann, R; Tansy, M; Thomas, H F; Tsuruta, J; Uribe, S; Urtane, I; Walsh, T F; Zimmerman, J; Walmsley, A D

    2008-02-01

    The use of information technology (IT) in dentistry is far ranging. In order to produce a working document for the dental educator, this paper focuses on those methods where IT can assist in the education and competence development of dental students and dentists (e.g. e-learning, distance learning, simulations and computer-based assessment). Web pages and other information-gathering devices have become an essential part of our daily life, as they provide extensive information on all aspects of our society. This is mirrored in dental education where there are many different tools available, as listed in this report. IT offers added value to traditional teaching methods and examples are provided. In spite of the continuing debate on the learning effectiveness of e-learning applications, students request such approaches as an adjunct to the traditional delivery of learning materials. Faculty require support to enable them to effectively use the technology to the benefit of their students. This support should be provided by the institution and it is suggested that, where possible, institutions should appoint an e-learning champion with good interpersonal skills to support and encourage faculty change. From a global prospective, all students and faculty should have access to e-learning tools. This report encourages open access to e-learning material, platforms and programs. The quality of such learning materials must have well defined learning objectives and involve peer review to ensure content validity, accuracy, currency, the use of evidence-based data and the use of best practices. To ensure that the developers' intellectual rights are protected, the original content needs to be secure from unauthorized changes. Strategies and recommendations on how to improve the quality of e-learning are outlined. In the area of assessment, traditional examination schemes can be enriched by IT, whilst the Internet can provide many innovative approaches. Future trends in IT will

  10. Game-like Technology Innovation Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2011-01-01

      The aim of this paper is to discuss the first results and methodological challenges and perspectives of designing game-inspired scenarios for implementation of innovation processes into schools' science education. This paper comprises and report on a case study of a game-inspired innovation...... scenario designed for technology education in grades 7 - 9 in Danish schools. In the paper, methodological challenges of doing design-based research into technology innovation education are discussed. The preliminary results from the first studies of a game-inspired technology innovation camp are also...... presented, along with discussions of the future of development of these educational spaces....

  11. Whatever became of educational technology? the implications for teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Latchem

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the reasons for educational technology principles and practices not being more widely accepted and successfully applied in everyday teaching and learning. It argues that these are: an over-emphasis on new technology; a failure to learn from the lessons of the past; and a lack of meta-analysis and collaborative research to evidence the benefits. The paper also brings out the point that the literature fails to acknowledge the important role of educational technology in informal learning and non-formal education. It concludes with recommendations for future research into the broader aspects of educational technology and the employment of more longitudinal and collaborative action research and the nature of pre- service, in-service and postgraduate teacher education in educational technology.

  12. Technological Developments in Networking, Education and Automation

    CERN Document Server

    Elleithy, Khaled; Iskander, Magued; Kapila, Vikram; Karim, Mohammad A; Mahmood, Ausif

    2010-01-01

    "Technological Developments in Networking, Education and Automation" includes a set of rigorously reviewed world-class manuscripts addressing and detailing state-of-the-art research projects in the following areas: Computer Networks: Access Technologies, Medium Access Control, Network architectures and Equipment, Optical Networks and Switching, Telecommunication Technology, and Ultra Wideband Communications. Engineering Education and Online Learning: including development of courses and systems for engineering, technical and liberal studies programs; online laboratories; intelligent

  13. Technology in Adult Education ESOL Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Today's world is filled with technology resources such as cellphones, iPods, laptops and the internet. By using these technological resources, adult education ESOL teachers can improve instruction, boost learning and better prepare students for real world English use. This article examines advantages of technology use and offers examples of…

  14. Introducing Mobile Technology in Graduate Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gopesh; Chhajed, Dilip; Hong, Seung Won; Scagnoli, Norma

    2014-01-01

    The insertion of mobile technology in educational settings is becoming more prevalent, making it important to understand the effectiveness of such technology in enhancing students' learning and engagement. This article is based on research conducted to study the effects of the use of mobile technology--specifically iPads--by students in a graduate…

  15. Technology and Online Education: Models for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Catherine W.; Sonnenberg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    This paper contends that technology changes advance online education. A number of mobile computing and transformative technologies will be examined and incorporated into a descriptive study. The object of the study will be to design innovative mobile awareness models seeking to understand technology changes for mobile devices and how they can be…

  16. Librarian instruction-delivery modality preferences for professional continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Valerie A; Bose, Arpita; Boehmer, Susan J

    2010-01-01

    Attending professional continuing education (CE) is an important component of librarianship. This research study identified librarians' preferences in delivery modalities of instruction for professional CE. The study also identified influential factors associated with attending CE classes. Five instruction-delivery modalities and six influential factors were identified for inclusion in an online survey. The survey completed by members of the American Library Association (ALA), Special Libraries Association (SLA), and Medical Library Association (MLA) provided the data for analysis of librarian preferences and influential factors. The majority of respondents were MLA members, followed by ALA and SLA members. Librarians from all three library associations preferred the face-to-face instructional modality. The most influential factor associated with the decision to attend a professional CE class was cost. All five instruction-delivery modalities present useful structures for imparting professional CE. As librarians' experience with different modalities increases and as technology improves, preferences in instruction delivery may shift. But at present, face-to-face remains the most preferred modality. Based on the results of this study, cost was the most influential factor associated with attending a CE class. This may change as additional influential factors are identified and analyzed in future studies.

  17. Business and Technology Educators: Practices for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donne, Vicki; Hansen, Mary A.

    2013-01-01

    Business educators face the challenge of operationalizing the global converging initiatives of technology integration and inclusion of students with a disability in K-12 education. A survey of business educators was conducted to ascertain how they were implementing these initiatives in the United States. Results indicated that business educators…

  18. Preparing Marketing for the Future: Strategic Marketing Challenges for Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, James

    2013-01-01

    Today's programs and delivery methods in continuing education for the adult student are evolving due to changing needs, competition, and new markets and technologies. The marketing infrastructure, including staffing, budgeting, and processes such as customer relationship marketing and market research, must be in alignment with changing needs.

  19. Coping with Change and Fostering Innovation: An Agenda for Professional and Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Kay J.

    2010-01-01

    In an age of knowledge, the capacities of professional and continuing education to open up new networks, overcome organizational hurdles, and foster an environment for innovation have assumed great relevance. This article makes the case as to why. It discusses key forces driving change--the knowledge economy, demographics, technology, and…

  20. Continuing professional education: Status, trends, and issues related to electronic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, D.

    1975-01-01

    Four professional groups, teachers, doctors, lawyers, and engineers were examined to determine if they constitute a potential market for continuing professional education via large scale electronic technology. Data were collected in view of social and economic forces, such as mandatory periodic relicensure, additional course requirements for certification, or the economic health of supporting industries.

  1. Continuing medical education for general practitioners: a practice format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNieuwenborg, Lena; Goossens, Martine; De Lepeleire, Jan; Schoenmakers, Birgitte

    2016-04-01

    Our current knowledge-based society and the many actualisations within the medical profession require a great responsibility of physicians to continuously develop and refine their skills. In this article, we reflect on some recent findings in the field of continuing education for professional doctors (continuing medical education, CME). Second, we describe the development of a CME from the Academic Center for General Practice (ACHG) of the KU Leuven. First, we performed a literature study and we used unpublished data of a need assessment performed (2013) in a selected group of general practitioners. Second, we describe the development of a proposal to establish a CME programme for general practitioners. CME should go beyond the sheer acquisition of knowledge, and also seek changes in practice, attitudes and behaviours of physicians. The continuing education offerings are subject to the goals of the organising institution, but even more to the needs and desires of the end user. Integrated education is crucial to meet the conditions for efficient and effective continuing education. The ACHG KU Leuven decided to offer a postgraduate programme consisting of a combination of teaching methods: online courses (self-study), contact courses (traditional method) and a materials database. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. The Virtual Retina: Is Good Educational Technology Always Strategic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowie, Sandra

    Educational technology units must continually monitor their strategic plans to ensure that they are aligned with the realities of their institutions. Strategic dissonance occurs when previously successful strategies are no longer achieving the same positive outcomes. The Virtual Retina CD-ROM project is used in this paper as an example of…

  3. Use of Educational Technologies to assist Academics in their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    r.poonoosamy

    the integration of educational technologies in their curriculum can assist them in their teaching. Data was gathered through a survey where 169 students ... interaction, fosters view of learning as a continuous research process and finally highlights student learning strengths and difficulties. ACOT 2012 study confirms.

  4. Educational Technology and Distance Supervision in Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Robert Milton; Hays, Danica G.; Pribesh, Shana L.; Wood, Chris T.

    2017-01-01

    The authors used a nonexperimental descriptive design to examine the prevalence of distance supervision in counselor education programs, educational technology used in supervision, training on technology in supervision, and participants' (N = 673) perceptions of legal and ethical compliance. Program policies are recommended to guide the training…

  5. Workplace continuing education for nurses caring for hospitalised older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbusch, Jennifer; Shaw, Maureen; Leblanc, Marie-Eve; Kjorven, Mary; Kwon, Jae-Yung; Blackburn, Lorraine; Lawrie, Barb; Shamatutu, Marilyn; Wolff, Angela C

    2017-12-01

    To develop, implement and evaluate a workplace continuing education programme about nursing care of hospitalised older people. The healthcare system cannot rely solely upon nurses' prelicensure education to prepare them to meet the evolving needs of hospitalised older patients. Over the past decade, there has been a dramatic rise in the proportion of older people in hospitals, yet many nurses do not have specialised knowledge about the unique care needs of this population. A multimethod pre-to post-design was employed. Between September 2013 and April 2014, data were collected via surveys, focus groups and interviews. Thirty-two Registered Nurses initially enrolled in the programme of which 22 completed all data points. Three managers also participated in interviews. One-way repeated-measures ANOVAs were conducted to evaluate the effect of the programme and change over time. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Survey results indicated improvements in perceptions about nursing care of older people but no changes in knowledge. Themes generated from the qualitative data focused on participants' experiences of taking part in the programme and included: (i) relevance of content and delivery mode, (ii) value of participating in the programme and (iii) continuing education in the context of acute care. This study illustrated the potential role of workplace continuing education in improving care for hospitalised older people, particularly the potential to change nurses' perceptions about this population. Nurses prefer learning opportunities that are varied in delivery of educational elder-focused content and accessible at work. Organisational leaders need to consider strategies that minimise potential barriers to workplace continuing education. Workplace continuing education can play a key role in improving quality of care for hospitalized older adults and ought to be a priority for employers planning education for nurses. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Continuing education in physical education at school: principals and challenges for a critical education project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ferreira de Souza Antunes

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The theme of teacher's formation has gained a spotlight in academic research, especially in the context of the researches conducted in the perspective of the "researcher professor", and in the consolidation of the partnerships between universities and educational systems by promoting programs of continuing education. The Laboratory of Studies about School, Curriculum and Physical Education of the Faculty of Physical Education at the Federal University of Uberlândia (LECEF/FAEFI/UFU is constituted as a unifying space for teachers and students whose aim is the further study on issues related to school, teaching and curriculum planning for physical education as a curriculum component as well as providing space for continuing education to promote qualitative changes in teaching practice. This article presents a model of educational planning held on the curricular component of physical education, developed in a collective planning context, under an extension project offered by LECEF. We underline the principles and assumptions leading the planning process adopted. We emphasize that the collective work gives us dialogue, exchange of experience, inclination to listen, overcoming the difficulties of individualism and isolation presents in the organization and realization of pedagogical work routine.

  7. What Is Technology Education? A Review of the "Official Curriculum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ryan A.; Brown, Joshua W.

    2010-01-01

    Technology education, not to be confused with educational technology, has an "official curriculum." This article explores this "official curriculum" and answers the following questions; what are the goals of technology education, what should technology education look like in classrooms, and why technology education is important. This article…

  8. The role of technology and digital gaming in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Brian; Boyle, Liz; MacArthur, Ewan; Manion, Baltasar Fernandez

    2013-03-13

    There is growing evidence that using e-learning and digital gaming technology can support students in their learning. An international project, Continuing/Higher Education in Research Methods Using Games, funded by the European Commission's Lifelong Learning Programme and led by a team at the University of the West of Scotland, aims to develop interactive activities and games to support nursing and social science students. This article looks at the scope of the project in helping to deliver nurse education.

  9. 34 CFR 389.1 - What is the Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program? 389.1 Section 389.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued... CONTINUING EDUCATION PROGRAMS General § 389.1 What is the Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program? This...

  10. Combining continuing education with expert consultation via telemedicine in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, Xavier; Aird, James; Tho, Ly; Bintcliffe, Fiona; Monsell, Fergal; Gollogly, Jim; Noor, Saqib

    2014-04-01

    Telemedicine has the potential to increase access to both clinical consultation and continuing medical education in Cambodia. We present a Cambodian surgical centre's experience with a collaboration in which complicated orthopaedic cases were presented to a panel of consultants using free online videoconferencing software, providing a combined opportunity for both continuing education and the enhancement of patient care. Effects of the case conference on patient care were examined via a retrospective review and clinician perspectives were elicited via a qualitative survey. The case conference altered patient care in 69% of cases. All Cambodian staff reported learning from the conference and 78% reported changes in their care for patients not presented at the conference. Real-time videoconferencing between consultants in the developed world and physicians in a developing country may be an effective, low-cost and easily replicable means of combining direct benefits to patient care with continuing medical education.

  11. Educational Technology Classics: The Science Teacher and Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbeck, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    The science teacher is the key person who has the commitment and the responsibility for carrying out any brand of science education. All of the investments, predictions, and expressions of concern will have little effect on the accomplishment of the broad goals of science education if these are not reflected in the situations in which learning…

  12. Educational technologies in the system of managerial staff mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Gancharik

    2016-01-01

    organizations.Today, the full range of human activities entrusted to the personnel service of organizations. Educational institutions are involved only in the process of learning and, as a rule, stand apart from the rest of the personnel requirements of organizations (according to the principle: “We gave you the knowledge, and then you are by yourself…”. It is practically impossible to create a large-scale system of continuous development of managerial staff in the organizations without continuous interaction of personnel services in organizations, and educational institutions that have, both human and educational technologies.It is proposed to extend the learning process of the educational institutions in the state bodies and organizations through a system of cascading mentoring based on telecommunication technologies. The structure of the e-learning system provides means of creation, management and delivery of the content, means of organizing the learning process and interaction support of the participants. E-learning system provides system view of the educational process, when the main unit is not the academic discipline, and the formed administrative competence, around which the complex process of interaction between students, lecturers, learners and educational institutions exists. In the Academy of Management this interaction is carried out using the remote control SharePoint LMS learning system, which provides the high-quality implementation of the educational process. In the cascade mentoring system the distance learning is based on the modern telecommunication technologies and means of remote access to the distributed databases and knowledge of scientific, technical and educational information. The most promising model in this area is the open education, the dominant trend in the development of which becomes the student-centered learning model, taking into account the individual, personal qualities of each student and is based on the advanced pedagogical and

  13. Industrial Design: A Phoenix Reborn from the Ashes of Technology Education--A Case History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Martin; Feigler, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Like the "phoenix," technology education (TE) can, under the right circumstances, give life to new programs--curricula with different emphases and directions from technology education, yet sharing a common heritage: the belief that applied technology will continue to shape the world. How that shaping process takes place--and the problems that it…

  14. [Twelve years of continuing medical education in Slovakia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristúfek, P; Gajdosík, J

    2010-07-01

    Continuing medical education (CME) is an important part of the medical practice today. After the pregraduate and postgraduate education each general practitioner and specialist should follow the CME to maintain, develop or increase the knowledge and professional skills. In May of 2004 a Slovak accreditation council for continuing medical education (SACCME) was established on the base of mutual agreement among statutory representatives of Slovak Medical University, Association of Medical Schools, Slovak Medical Association, Slovak Medical Chamber, and Association of Private Physicians as non governmental non for profit organisations. During the period of 2004-2009, the number of accredited events (educational meetings, conferences and congresses) increased from 133 to 938 including the autodidactic tests in medical journals. From the beginning of 2009, SACCME credits obtained by physicians yearly are being transferred to the database of Slovak medical chamber which is responsible by law for control of CME process.

  15. Technology and Education: Theoretical Reflections Exemplified in Religious Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, John; Freathy, Rob

    2016-01-01

    How do recent technological advances impact upon the field of education? This article examines the work of the philosopher of technology Bernard Stiegler and his interpretation of technology as pharmakon (both remedy and poison). This is linked to threshold concept theory which advocates more creative ways of learning, and illustrated through a…

  16. The Utilization of Education Technology in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Angela

    2017-01-01

    With the rise of technology, many educational organizations are scrambling to find ways to incorporate technology into effective learning strategies. Although there is a significant need to equip curriculum with active learning technology objectives, the challenges that are sometimes overlooked lies within faculty perceived barriers and how they…

  17. Recent trends in continuing medical education among obstetrician-gynecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwick, Richard M; Schulkin, Jay; Cooley, Sarah W; Janakiraman, Vanitha; Norwitz, Errol R; Robinson, Julian N

    2011-05-01

    To estimate current trends in continuing medical education among obstetrician-gynecologists in relation to the Maintenance of Certification program. A validated questionnaire was mailed to 1,030 randomly selected physicians of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists in the United States, Puerto Rico, and Canada. Participants were asked about current practices and opinions regarding continuing medical education activities. Responses were compared between members mandated for Maintenance of Certification (board certification 1986 or later; time-limited certificate) or not (board certification before 1986; nontime-limited certificate). Five hundred twenty (50.4%) surveys were completed. Respondents were more often male (57.1%), generalists (87.3%), in community-based (73.8%) group practices (77.2%) with mean (±standard deviation) age 52.4±9.9 years. College physicians mandated to participate in the Maintenance of Certification program were more likely to rely on Annual Board Certification articles as a major source of continuing medical education credits compared with those not requiring Maintenance of Certification (79.9% compared with 44.6%, Pinternational meetings (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.67) and self-selected continuing medical education materials (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.14-0.60) as sources of continuing medical education credits. Despite these differences, physicians in both groups equally valued the relevance of Annual Board Certification articles (92.6% compared with 96.4%, P=.23), the importance of content at academic meetings (98.3% compared with 99.3%, P=.33), the usefulness of simulation drills (97.8% compared with 94.3%, P=.35), and the general ability of continuing medical education activities to improve skills as a physician (90.9% compared with 86.4%, P=.20). Requirement of the Maintenance of Certification program has led to significant changes in continuing medical education choices by obstetrician-gynecologists. The changes in continuing

  18. Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT to Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Woodside

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to reduce costs and increase worker satisfaction, many businesses have implemented a concept known as Bring Your Own Device (BYOD or Bring Your Own Technology (BYOT. Similarly, many school districts are beginning to implement BYOT policies and programs to improve educational learning opportunities for students who have a wide variety of technology devices. BYOT allow districts with limited budgets enable usage of technology while improving student engagement. This paper explores the technology devices, and educational implications of policies, device management, security and included components.

  19. Emerging educational technologies: Tensions and synergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Michael Spector

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of high level sources with regard to new and emerging technologies was conducted. Three technologies, according to these sources, appear especially promising: (a massive open online courses (MOOCs, (b personalized learning, and (c game-based learning. This paper will review information from the US National Science Foundation, the US Department of Education, the New Media Consortium, and two European Networks of Excellence with regard to new and emerging technologies. A critique will then be provided using established principles pertaining to learning and instruction and a recommended curriculum for advanced learning technologies. The general result is that it appears that some educational technology advocates are overstating the likelihood of these three technologies having a significant and sustained impact in the near future, although there are promising aspects to each of these technologies in the long term.

  20. The High Technology Industry and Education in Canada. New Technologies in Canadian Education Series. Paper 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Judith

    This paper reports the results of a survey of a number of high technology companies in Canada who were asked to provide information about their relationship with the educational system, the application of their products in education, and their views on the implications for education in general of the new technology in information and…

  1. Reimagining the Role of Technology in Education: 2017 National Education Technology Plan Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Educational Technology, US Department of Education, 2017

    2017-01-01

    The National Education Technology Plan (NETP) sets a national vision and plan for learning enabled by technology through building on the work of leading education researchers; district, school, and higher education leaders; classroom teachers; developers; entrepreneurs; and nonprofit organizations. The principles and examples provided in this…

  2. The role of Educational Technology in Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZAHRA SAFFARI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dear Editor Being one of the most effective tools for educational system improvement, educational Technology plays an important role in learning facilitation. In order to have a deeper, more effective and long lasting learning impact, this systematic approach designs, implements and evaluates the teaching- learning process, using specific purposes, new methods of psychology and communication sciences and also human and non-human resources (1. A fruitful and effective educational system which results in actual learning improvement cannot be achieved unless its faculty members become competent. To achieve this goal, not only they must attain and/or maintain academic qualifications, especially in their teaching area, but also be familiar with the newest communication and teaching methods and equipped with educational and professional skills. Considering the growing movement of education towards the new technologies and the Ministry of Health and Medical Education tendency for upgrading the educational technology and virtual learning, the need for experts in education technology was clear. Therefore, given its mission which focuses on scientific promotion and academic training improvement, in an cooperation with shiraz educational development center along with Center of Excellence for electronic learning`s staff and faculty members, Shiraz Educational Technology unit, established the Master of education technology courses (2. Education’s technology and E-Learning, have arises a condition in which many educational goals, such as independent learning, self-directed learning, learning regardless of time or place, collaborative learning and providing immediate feedbacks and assessment of learning, appears more achievable. Electronic medical education has become very popular in developed countries and is rapidly developing, since it has educational value and the tremendous broadening audience through educational programs. Considering the fact that

  3. 78 FR 42871 - Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver; Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... CFR Chapter III Final Extension of Project Period and Waiver; Rehabilitation Continuing Education Program for the Technical Assistance and Continuing Education Centers (TACE Centers) AGENCY...) and continuing education (CE) provided to State vocational rehabilitation (VR) agencies and their...

  4. Geospatial Technology in Geography Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMers, Michael N.

    2016-01-01

    Depending on how you determine the starting point for the technology driving geographic information systems (GIS) and remote sensing, it is well over fifty years old now. During the first years of its existence in the early 1960s, the new technology benefited relatively few students who attended the handful of college programs that were actually…

  5. Updating nurse graduate knowledge – the development of the “Evidence Based Practice In Nursing” continuing educational programme

    OpenAIRE

    Stavropoulou, Areti

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been given great importance in designing continuing education and lifelong learning programs. The development process of such programs is strongly related to successful learning outcomes. The aim of this paper is to describe the process followed to design the “Evidence Based Practice in Nursing” Continuing Educational Program which implemented at the Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Crete, TEI Athens and ΑTEI of Thessaloniki during the academic year 2014-...

  6. Educational Uses of Virtual Reality Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Youngblut, Christine

    1998-01-01

    The potential of VR technology tor supporting education is widely recognized. It has already seen practical use in an estimated 20 or more public schools and colleges, and many more have been involved in evaluation or research efforts...

  7. Photobioreactor: Biotechnology for the Technology Education Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Trey; Wells, John; White, Karissa

    2002-01-01

    Describes a problem scenario involving photobioreactors and presents materials and resources, student project activities, and teaching and evaluation methods for use in the technology education classroom. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  8. Educational Uses of Virtual Reality Technology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Youngblut, Christine

    1998-01-01

    ... addressed. Educational uses of the technology are broadly distinguished as those where students interact with pre-developed VR applications and those where students develop their own virtual worlds...

  9. Uncertain aspirations for continuing in education: antecedents and associated outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Leslie Morrison; Schoon, Ingrid; Sabates, Ricardo

    2012-11-01

    Relatively little is known about adolescents who hold uncertain aspirations, that is, those who do not know what they would like to do in the future regarding their educational or occupational plans. Drawing upon the Longitudinal Study of Young People in England born in 1989-1990, the authors tested a pathway model to investigate the antecedents of uncertain aspirations for continuing in education past compulsory schooling age (i.e., 16 years) and associated later educational outcomes. Gender differences in the pathways are also tested. Findings indicate that the relationship linking socioeconomic status to uncertain aspirations is mediated through parents' educational expectations and the relationship linking academic performance at age 11 to uncertain aspirations is mediated through parents' educational expectations and adolescents' self-perceived ability, which, in turn, predict academic performance at age 16 and educational enrollment at age 18. Gender differences in these processes are also evident: young males not only hold greater uncertainty about continuing in education, the consequences of uncertainty regarding later academic performance are worse for males than females.

  10. Technology in Help of Personalised Education

    OpenAIRE

    Terzieva, Valentina; Todorova, Katia; Kademova-Katzarova, Petia

    2017-01-01

    Report published in the Proceedings of the National Conference on "Education and Research in the Information Society", Plovdiv, June, 2017 The aim of the research is to evaluate the potential of new technologies applied in education. We assess the usage of information and communication technology (ICT) for personalisation of learning resources by examining opinion of teachers in a survey. The results show that to be used in different learning contexts and to meet the needs and pre...

  11. HIV and the eye | Visser | Continuing Medical Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 31, No 4 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  12. Continuing Medical Education - Vol 27, No 1 (2009)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education - Vol 27, No 1 (2009). Journal Home > Archives > Vol 27, No 1 (2009). Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Addiction treatment · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. R Meyer ...

  13. Impact of diabetes continuing education on health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of a continuing education (CE) program on the attitudes of health care professionals (HCPs) towards diabetes care in Yemen. Methods: A pre- and post-intervention study was carried out in Mukalla City, Hadramout, Yemen and was offered to all physicians, pharmacists, and nurses ...

  14. Improving the Relationship between Continuing Education Leadership and Marketing Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Jim

    2009-01-01

    In this economy, college and university continuing education units will not automatically reap the benefits of returning adult learners as in past recessions: this economy caused a drastic reduction of resources available to the workforce and for personal revenue. As a result of decreased personal income and workforce training funding, competition…

  15. Do Continuing Medical Education Articles Foster Shared Decision Making?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Michel; Lafortune, Valerie; Lajeunesse, Judith; Lambert-Perrault, Anne-Marie; Manrique, Hermes; Blais, Johanne; Legare, France

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Defined as reviews of clinical aspects of a specific health problem published in peer-reviewed and non-peer-reviewed medical journals, offered without charge, continuing medical education (CME) articles form a key strategy for translating knowledge into practice. This study assessed CME articles for mention of evidence-based…

  16. Streaming of Continuous Media for Distance Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Ali; Safar, Maytham

    2007-01-01

    Distance education created new challenges regarding the delivery of large size isochronous continuous streaming media (SM) objects. In this paper, we consider the design of a framework for customized SM presentations, where each presentation consists of a number of SM objects that should be retrieved and displayed to the user in a coherent…

  17. Continuing Medical Education on the Internet: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael W.

    1999-01-01

    Review of 205 continuing medical education (CME) websites found the following: most university sites offered only class schedules; far more commercial sites than university sites offered online CME content; 60-80% of content met quality control standards; only 10% of sites provided information on peer review of content. (SK)

  18. Continuing Education Modules and the Scholarship of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Economic and political trends underscore the importance of engaged scholarship as evidence that colleges and universities are serving their constituencies. Set in a background of debate about pure versus applied social science this article describes a planned approach to continuing gerontological education grounded firmly in the principles of the…

  19. Leadership in Continuing Education: Leveraging Student-Centred Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marilyn; Plessis, Judith

    2014-01-01

    For this study, we interviewed eight Canadian and American continuing education deans and directors to explore how their personal accounts or "stories" about leadership high-light the dynamic nature of their leadership roles. This article focuses on the potential impact of these stories to better integrate and serve the adult learner…

  20. Continuing education in geriatrics for rural health care providers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Population trends in developing countries show an increasing population of older adults (OAs), especially in rural areas. The purpose of this study was to explore the geriatrics continuing education needs of health care providers (HCPs) working in rural Uganda. The study employed a descriptive design to collect data from ...

  1. The Problem of Pseudoscience in Social Work Continuing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Bruce A.; Pignotti, Monica

    2016-01-01

    The National Association of Social Workers requires social workers to obtain continuing education (CE) after they receive their social work degrees. A large and profitable industry that has emerged catering to this need for CE that is particularly focused on the needs of licensed social workers. Quality control mechanisms in place to monitor the…

  2. Lessons in University Continuing Education: A 25-Year Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Andy; Rogers, Lynda M.

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the enrollment patterns of a continuing education institution over 25 years of its history. The institution is an auxiliary unit of a major state university system with the mission of providing postgraduate professional training to nonmatriculated students. Our study illustrates that both the quantity and the quality of…

  3. Evaluation of a Continuing Education Training on Client Financial Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Jodi Jacobson; Svoboda, Deborah; Sander, Rebecca L.; Osteen, Philip J.; Callahan, Christine; Elkinson, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The researchers conducted an evaluation study assessing outcomes among 37 social workers who completed a continuing education course on financial capability and working with clients. Key constructs assessed included participants' attitudes about financial capability, self-efficacy to provide services, organizational barriers, and basic financial…

  4. Continuing Education: A National Imperative for School Nursing Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vought-O'Sullivan, Victoria; Meehan, Nancy K.; Havice, Pamela A.; Pruitt, Rosanne H.

    2006-01-01

    Competency-based continuing education is critical to the professional development of school nurses to ensure the application of timely, age-appropriate clinical knowledge and leadership skills in the school setting. School nurses are responsible for a large number of students with a variety of complex and diverse health care needs. Benner's theory…

  5. A Gerontology Practitioner Continuing Education Certificate Program: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englehardt, Jacqueline; Hash, Kristina M.; Mankowski, Mariann; Harper-Dorton, Karen V.; Pilarte, Ann E.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a school of social work survey assessing the geriatric training needs of social workers and other professionals in aging and the need for a gerontology practitioner's continuing education (CE) certificate program. A total of 391 professionals, the majority of whom were social workers, participated in an online…

  6. Case Study: Online Continuing Education for New Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Beth R.; McKeal, Alyse E.

    2017-01-01

    Continuing education is vital for new librarians to gain skills and knowledge beyond library school. Professional development offered free in an online environment is often the best option for staying current on the issues and trends necessary for young librarians to grow and flourish. This paper presents a case study of an online professional…

  7. Challenges of Women Participation in Continuing Higher Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigated the challenges or constraints of women in continuing higher education programme with particular focus on the B.Ed part-time programme of the University of Lagos. A simple survey research design was employed to explore the issue. A 15 item questionnaire supplemented with oral interview ...

  8. Who Is Driving Continuing Medical Education for Family Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Douglas; Allan, G. Michael; Manca, Donna; Sargeant, Joan; Barnett, Carly

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Considerable time and money are invested in continuing medical education (CME) for family physicians (FPs) but the effectiveness is uncertain. The participation of FPs as coordinators and teachers is not well known. The goal of this project was to describe the role of FPs in organizing and teaching CME events that are accredited for…

  9. Advancing Public Health through Continuing Education of Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Addleton, Robert L.; Vitale, Frank M.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Mejicano, George C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the CS2day (Cease Smoking Today) initiative positioned continuing education (CE) in the intersection between medicine and public health. The authors suggest that most CE activities address the medical challenges that clinicians confront, often to the neglect of the public health issues that are key risk factors for the…

  10. Needed: A Voucher Plan in Support of Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, David S.

    Opportunities for career advancement, an adequate pool of trained manpower, and the growth of our economy are inextricably connected with the availability of continuing education and training opportunities to working adults. Availability is a function of access to training and successful participation in training. The federally funded voucher plan…

  11. Marketing and Market Research for Adult and Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckmaster, Annette

    Marketing is an essential part of conducting a continuing education program, but marketing consists of more than just promotion. According to Kotler, exchange is the central concept underlying marketing. Marketing involves understanding, planning, implementing, and controlling this exchange. The exchange situation contains all the elements of the…

  12. Access to Continuing Education for Critical Care Nurses in Rural or Remote Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickx, Lori; Winters, Charlene

    2017-04-01

    Caring for the critically ill does not occur solely in large medical centers or urban areas. Nurses practicing in rural or remote settings practice as nurse generalists, caring for a wide range of patients, including those needing critical care. As a nurse generalist, the need for a wide variety of skill sets challenges nurses in rural areas to maintain current practice through continuing education across many content areas. They also may not come in contact with critically ill patients or emergent situations as often as their urban counterparts, which can make remaining comfortable with more advanced skills difficult. Because nurses working in rural or remote areas may care for critically ill patients less often, the need to remain vigilant in pursuit of continuing education is increased; however, access to continuing education can be problematic because of geographic isolation, difficulty getting time off from work, limited financial resources, and perceived lack of applicable topics. With advances in technology, critical care nurses working in rural areas have more options for continuing education, which is crucial for maintaining a skilled nursing workforce in rural health care facilities. This article addresses challenges critical care nurses working in remote or rural areas face in pursuing continuing education and provides information about available educational opportunities. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  13. The Impact of Technology on Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagowski, J. J.

    1995-08-01

    Near the top of the list of critical issues in education is the appropriate use of technology in the educational process. It is clear that some type of investment in educational technology, specifically interactive computing, is essential for nearly all institutions, and indeed, many have made some purchases already. Despite that fact, the leadership of educational institutions face a complex set of problems in this regard. What portion of a (probably) shrinking budget should be allocated to this expanding area? Which options from a growing array of technological choices are the most appropriate for a particular environment? Which of these options are essentials, and which are luxuries? What sorts of technology will benefit students the most? What is needed now in order to keep from falling (even further) behind a few years hence? The pressure to do something is great, and it is often exacerbated by arguments of efficiency that have little foundation in fact. For example, suggestions are often made that an investment in educational technology will help handle more students. This point of view may ultimately prevail, but little evidence on this point is currently available. Indeed, it appears that more faculty/staff effort is required to bring interactive technology into students' hands in a meaningful way. Often ignored is the amount of training necessary for a spectrum of novice users. Another argument often made is that empowering students with interactive technology will somehow lessen pressure on the current (classical) library operation. Presumably, this effect will come about through access to the Internet resources. As currently constituted, the Internet carries information of widely varying quality, ranging from the systematic holdings of many of the fine libraries of the world to outright garbage (from an intellectual point of view). Information on the Internet (other than that from libraries) is often unedited or unorganized to the extent that potential

  14. Progression of technology education for atomic energy engineering in Tsuyama National College of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Okada, T.; Sato, M.; Sasai, Y.; Konishi, D.; Harada, K.; Taniguchi, H.; Toya, H.; Inada, T.; Sori, H.; Yagi, H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the achievements of a program in which technology education is provided to cultivate practical core engineers for low-level radiation. It was made possible by means of (1) an introductory education program starting at an early age and a continuous agenda throughout college days and (2) regional collaboration. First, with regard to the early-age introductory education program and the continuous education agenda, the subjects of study related to atomic energy or nuclear engineering were reorganized as 'Subjects related to Atomic Power Education' for all grades in all departments. These subjects were included in the syllabus and the student guide book, emphasizing a continuous and consistent policy throughout seven-year college study, including the five-year system and additional two-year advanced course. Second, to promote practical education, the contents of lectures, experiments, and internships were enriched and realigned in collaboration with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Okayama University and The Cyugoku Electric Power Co., Inc. In addition to the expansion and rearrangement of atomic power education, research on atomic power conducted for graduation thesis projects were undertaken to enhance the educational and research activities. In consequence, it has been estimated that there is now a total of fourteen subject areas in atomic energy technology, more than eight-hundred registered students in the department, and thirteen members of the teaching staff related to atomic energy technology. Furthermore, the 'Tsuyama model' is still being developed. This program was funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. (author)

  15. Community college: Two-year and continuing education programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, L.R.

    1989-01-01

    In response to educational needs in the waste management industry that were expressed by companies located in Oak Ridge and Knoxville, Tennessee, Roane State Community College has developed an associate degree program in environmental health technology as well as related noncredit programs offered by the Waste Management Training Center. The degree program contains three options: health physics, industrial hygiene, and waste management technologies. Roane State's involvement in these programs was a direct response to the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) model concept. This model brings together the resources of the DOE, regulatory agencies, private industry, higher education, and various contractors to resolve waste disposal and waste cleanup problems. Firms such as International Technology, Scientific Ecology Group, and Bechtel National enhanced Roane State's awareness of the nature of some of the environmental problems these and many other firms are working to resolve

  16. Educational Cognitive Technologies as Human Adaptation Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Nesterova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Modernity is characterized by profound changes in all spheres of human life caused by the global transformations on macro and micro levels of social reality. These changes allow us to speak about the present as the era of civilizational transition in the mode of uncertainty. Therefore, this situation demands qualitative transformations of human adaptive strategies and educational technologies accordingly. The dominant role in the dynamics of pedagogics and andragogy’s landscape belongs to transformative learning. The transformative learning theory is considered as the relevant approach to education of the individual, which is able to become an autonomous communicative actor of the social complexity. The article considers the cognitive technologies of social cohesion development and perspectives of their implementation in the educational dimension. In addition to implementing the principles of inclusion, equity in education, an important factor for improving social cohesion, stability and unity of society is the development of cognitive educational technologies. The key factors and foundations for the cognitive educational technologies are transversal competencies. They create the conditions for civil, public dialogue, non-violent type of communication. These “21st century skills” are extremely important for better human adaptation. One of the aspects and roots of social adaptation is social cohesion. Mutual determinations and connections between social cohesion development and transversal competences have been shown. The perspective direction of further researches is to find a methodological base for the further development of cognitive education technologies and platform for realization of innovative services for educational programs. New educational paradigm offers the concept of human adaptation as cognitive effectiveness and how to reach it through educational technologies. The article includes topics of creative thinking, teambuilding

  17. Group dynamics within long-term continuing education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilorio, C; Lehr, S; Keen, P D

    1989-01-01

    Nursing educators have responded to the need for continuing education by developing a variety of programs ranging in length from half-day seminars to several months of intensive study. Although books and articles have been written about nurses returning to school for baccalaureate degrees and the ensuing expectations, changes, and needs involved in this process, the literature revealed little information on how students, families, and faculty "live" a long-term continuing education (CE) experience. This article will examine the evolution of students into well-defined groups. The stages of group process, development of norms, assumption of roles within the groups, and factors related to conflicts are discussed. Methods used to reduce conflict and facilitate the movement of the groups to the resolution stage are presented in order to assist instructors involved in long-term CE programs.

  18. Integrating technology in STEM education

    OpenAIRE

    Chacko, Priya; Appelbaum, Sarah; Kim, Heejoo; Zhao, Jinhui; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2015-01-01

    Students have access to the Internet at their fingertips via e-tablets and smart phones. However, the STEM fields are struggling to remain relevant in students' lives outside the classroom. In an effort to improve high school science curricula and to keep students engaged in the classroom, we developed a technology-rich bioengineering summer program for high school students in grades 9-12. The program utilized touch screen technology in conjunction with hands-on experiments and traditional le...

  19. The Technological Enframing of Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Steve

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I seek to critique pervasive notions of what counts in mathematics education using Heidegger's notion of the technological enframing. I suggest that early childhood and schooling have become technologies in themselves, casting students and teachers as part of the standing reserve within the inexorable drive for economic advancement.…

  20. Virtual Education: Guidelines for Using Games Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Damian

    2014-01-01

    Advanced three-dimensional virtual environment technology, similar to that used by the film and computer games industry, can allow educational developers to rapidly create realistic online virtual environments. This technology has been used to generate a range of interactive Virtual Reality (VR) learning environments across a spectrum of…

  1. Trends and Research Issues in Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    If one looks back at the last 50 years or so at educational technologies, one will notice several things. First, the pace of innovation has increased dramatically with many developments in the application of digital technologies to learning and instruction, following by a few years developments in the sciences and engineering disciplines that are…

  2. Edutainment as a Modern Technology of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Anikina, Oksana Vladimirovna; Yakimenko, Elena Vladimirovna

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the methodological value and potential of modern education technology Edutainment. The author reveals the features and gives the definition of the Edutainment technology concept based on a review and analysis of the literature. ESP teaching is also taken into account.

  3. Social media, new technologies and history education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribbens, Kees; Haydn, Terry; Carretero, Mario; Berger, Stefan; Grever, Maria

    This chapter explores the implications of recent developments in technology and social media, having a significant impact on the way in which young people learn history in schools and outside schools. New technology not only has a positive influence on education, it also has unintended negative

  4. Leveraging Digital Technology in Social Studies Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Sarah Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Today's K-12 classrooms are increasingly comprised of students who accomplish much of their informal learning through digital media and technology. In response, a growing number of educators are considering how they might draw upon these informal learning experiences to support student engagement and learning in the classroom through technology.…

  5. Introducing Technology Education at the Elementary Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Many school districts are seeing a need to introduce technology education to students at the elementary level. Pennsylvania's Penn Manor School District is one of them. Pennsylvania has updated science and technology standards for grades 3-8, and after several conversations the author had with elementary principals and the assistant superintendent…

  6. Emerging Education Technologies and Research Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Two recent publications report the emerging technologies that are likely to have a significant impact on learning and instruction: (a) New Media Consortium's "2011 Horizon Report" (Johnson, Smith, Willis, Levine & Haywood, 2011), and (b) "A Roadmap for Education Technology" funded by the National Science Foundation in…

  7. Current Educational Technology Research Trends in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Minoru; Ueno, Maomi

    2009-01-01

    To examine trends in educational practice research, this article conducted a survey and analysis of factors affecting the review of research papers in the field of the educational technology in Japan. Two factors, namely, practical orientation and theoretical orientation, were extracted from 63 survey responses, and scores from members of a…

  8. Game-Like Technology Innovation Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the methodological challenges and perspectives of designing game-like scenarios for the implementation of innovation processes in school science education. This paper presents a design-based research study of a game-like innovation scenario designed for technology education for Danish public school students aged 13-15. Students…

  9. Information Technologies (ITs) in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Toromanovic, Selim; Masic, Fedja; Sivic, Suad; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Zlatan

    2011-09-01

    Advances in medicine in recent decades are in significant correlation with the advances in the information technology. Modern information technologies (IT) have enabled faster, more reliable and comprehensive data collection. These technologies have started to create a large number of irrelevant information, which represents a limiting factor and a real growing gap, between the medical knowledge on one hand, and the ability of doctors to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. Education means, learning, teaching, or the process of acquiring skills or behavior modification through various exercises. Traditionally, medical education meant the oral, practical and more passive transferring of knowledge and skills from the educators to students and health professionals. For the clinical disciplines, of special importance are the principles, such as, "learning at bedside," aided by the medical literature. In doing so, these techniques enable students to contact with their teachers, and to refer to the appropriate literature. The disadvantage of these educational methods is in the fact, that teachers often do not have enough time. Additionally they are not very convenient to the horizontal and vertical integration of teaching, create weak or almost no self education, as well as, low skill levels and poor integration of education with a real social environment. In this paper authors describe application of modern IT in medical education - their advantages and disadvantages comparing with traditional ways of education.

  10. New Technologies and Education: Challenging Disappointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Encarnacion Hidalgo

    2003-01-01

    Examines information and communication technologies and their use in education, including advantages and disadvantages. Highlights include gains made by students who were given computers to use, Internet use in Spain, new attitudes toward education; the teacher's role, necessary student characteristics, and factors influencing the success of an…

  11. Partnership for electrical generation technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasmussen, R. S.; Beaty, L.; Holman, R.

    2006-01-01

    This Engineering Technician education effort adapts an existing two-year Instrumentation and Control (I and C) education program into a model that is focused on electrical-generation technologies. It will also locally implement a program developed elsewhere with National Science Foundation funding, aimed at public schools, and adapt it to stimulate pre-college interest in pursuing energy careers in general. (authors)

  12. New Achievements in Technology Education and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Safeeullah, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Since many decades Education Science and Technology has an achieved tremendous recognition and has been applied to variety of disciplines, mainly Curriculum development, methodology to develop e-learning systems and education management. Many efforts have been taken to improve knowledge of students, researchers, educationists in the field of…

  13. Information and Communication Technology Use in Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and Communication Technology Use in Education: Emphasis on the Impact of Asynchronous Media. ... noted that the struggle to be part of the digital world is obvious in the knowledge society, therefore, government and in fact, education authorities should endeavour to provide ICT in Nigeria school system.

  14. Sustaining science, technology and mathematics teacher education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sustaining science, technology and mathematics teacher education through gender mainstreaming. C Ugwuanyi, O Bankole. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Educational Research Vol. 2(1&2) 2003: 17-22. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  15. Technological Affordances for the Music Education Researcher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, William I.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine music education researchers' perceptions of the importance of selected technologies to scholarly inquiry. Participants (N = 460), individuals who had published articles during a 5-year period between 2008 and 2012 in six prominent journals that disseminate music education research, were invited to complete…

  16. TECHcitement: Advances in Technological Education, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Community Colleges (NJ1), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This publication includes 13 articles: (1) ATE [Advanced Technological Education] Attuned to Global Competition; (2) Materials Science Center Supplies Information on Often-Overlooked Field; (3) CSEC [Cyber Security Education Consortium] Builds Corps of Cyber Technicians; (4) KCTCS [Kentucky Community and Technical College System] Is U.S. Partner…

  17. Getting Your Counselor to Support Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preble, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    Is there a disconnect between counselors and educators in technology and vocational education? What is counseling, and what is a school counselor's role in a secondary school setting? How can one work with his or her guidance staff to ensure that students better understand your course offerings? The development of relationships, knowledge, and…

  18. Application of Educational Technology Resource and Systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examined the application of educational technology resource systems approach in teaching English Language highlighting some inadequacies observed in educational system in Nigeria. Language is the most unique gift to man from God for language differentiates man from animals. This forms the basis to ...

  19. Usage of Technology Enhanced Educational Tools for Delivering Programming Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Ivanović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Methods and approaches behind technology enhanced learning (TEL in programming courses at a university level encourage continuous research in the last 20 years. Still there is no generally applicable way that would guarantee success. In this paper some experiences gathered during years of a technology-enhanced approach in teaching Object-Oriented Programming (OOP at two universities in two countries are presented and compared. Emphasis is given on the technology-enhanced educational tools that were selected or developed by the two institutions for teaching OOP. Different traditions and independent development at both institutions allow us to draw generally applicable conclusions and recommendations.

  20. Educational Potential of Case-Study Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorinova, Zoya; Vorobeva, Victoria; Malyanova, Marina

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of phenomenological and typological analysis of case-study technology educational potential. The definition “educational potential of case-study technology” is given, the main characteristics of which are changed in communication and collaborative activity quality, appearance of educational initiatives, change of participants’ position in learning process, formation of “collective subject” in collaborative activity, increase of learning (subject) results. Dep...

  1. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

  2. Punctuated continuity: The technological trajectory of advanced biomass gasifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkels, Arjan F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent interest in biofuels and bio-refineries has been building upon the technology of biomass gasification. This technology developed since the 1980s in three periods, but failed to break through. We try to explain this by studying the technological development from a quasi-evolutionary perspective, drawing upon the concepts of technological paradigms and technological trajectories. We show that the socio-economic context was most important, as it both offered windows of opportunity as well as provided direction to developments. Changes in this context resulted in paradigm shifts, characterized by a change in considered end-products and technologies, as well as a change in companies involved. Other influences on the technological trajectory were firm specific differences, like the focus on a specific feedstock, scale and more recently biofuels to be produced. These were strengthened by the national focus of supporting policies, as well as specific attention for multiple technologies in policies of the USA and European Commission. Over each period we see strong variation that likely benefitted the long term development of the technology. Despite policy efforts that included variation and institutionalization, our case shows that the large changes in socio-economic context and the technological challenges were hard to overcome. - Highlights: • Advanced biomass gasification, as important enabling technology for biofuels and the bio-based economy, has been lacking success despite decades of research and development. • We try to explain this by reconstructing its technological trajectory. • We focus on processes of variation and selection, and interaction between local demonstration projects and the upcoming technological field. • The development of the technology over each period shows strong variation. • Long RD and D times in combination with major changes in the socio-economic context have resulted in discontinuities that even affected premium

  3. Progression of Technology Education for Atomic Energy Engineering in Tsuyama National College of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Manabu; Kobayashi, Toshiro; Okada, Tadashi; Sato, Makoto; Sasai, Yuji; Konishi, Daijiro; Harada, Kanji; Taniguchi, Hironari; Toya, Hideaki; Inada, Tomomi; Sori, Hitoshi; Yagi, Hideyuki

    This paper describes the achievements of a program in which technology education is provided to cultivate practical core engineers for low-level radiation. It was made possible by means of (1) an introductory education program starting at an early age and a continuous agenda throughout college days and (2) regional collaboration. First, with regard to the early-age introductory education program and the continuous education agenda, the subjects of study related to atomic energy or nuclear engineering were reorganized as “Subjects related to Atomic Power Education” for all grades in all departments. These subjects were included in the syllabus and the student guide book, emphasizing a continuous and consistent policy throughout seven-year college study, including the five-year system and additional two-year advanced course. Second, to promote practical education, the contents of lectures, experiments, and internships were enriched and realigned in collaboration with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Okayama University and The Cyugoku Electric Power Co., Inc. In addition to the expansion and rearrangement of atomic power education, research on atomic power conducted for graduation thesis projects were undertaken to enhance the educational and research activities. In consequence, it has been estimated that there is now a total of fourteen subject areas in atomic energy technology, more than eight-hundred registered students in the department, and thirteen members of the teaching staff related to atomic energy technology. Furthermore, the “Tsuyama model” is still being developed. This program was funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology.

  4. Progression of technology education for atomic energy engineering in Tsuyama National College of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Manabu; Kobayashi, Toshiro; Okada, Tadashi

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the achievements of a program in which technology education is provided to cultivate practical core engineers for low-level radiation. It was made possible by means of (1) an introductory education program starting at an early age and a continuous agenda throughout college days and (2) regional collaboration. First, with regard to the early-age introductory education program and the continuous education agenda, the subjects of study related to atomic energy or nuclear engineering were reorganized as “Subjects related to Atomic Power Education” for all grades in all departments. These subjects were included in the syllabus and the student guide book, emphasizing a continuous and consistent policy throughout seven-year college study, including the five-year system and additional two-year advanced course. Second, to promote practical education, the contents of lectures, experiments, and internships were enriched and realigned in collaboration with the Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Okayama University and The Cyugoku Electric Power Co., Inc. In addition to the expansion and rearrangement of atomic power education, research on atomic power conducted for graduation thesis projects were undertaken to enhance the educational and research activities. In consequence, it has been estimated that there is now a total of fourteen subject areas in atomic energy technology, more than eight-hundred registered students in the department, and thirteen members of the teaching staff related to atomic energy technology. Furthermore, the “Tsuyama model” is still being developed. This program was funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. (author)

  5. Integrating Technology in STEM Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Chacko

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Students have access to the Internet at their fingertips via e-tablets and smart phones. However, the STEM fields are struggling to remain relevant in students’ lives outside the classroom. In an effort to improve high school science curricula and to keep students engaged in the classroom, we developed a technology-rich bioengineering summer program for high school students in grades 9-12. The program utilized touch screen technology in conjunction with hands-on experiments and traditional lecturing to create an entertaining, relevant, and effective classroom experience.

  6. Athletic training continuing education needs assessment: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, T G

    1994-03-01

    Continuing education for certified athletic trainers is both required and essential. The purpose of this study was to determine the need, including solutions and priorities, for continuing education for athletic trainers in various employment settings. Focus group sessions were conducted during the Spring 1992 District 4 meeting of the National Athletic Trainers Association. Representatives for each of the following employment settings were selected from the preregistration list and invited to participate: high school (7 participated), college/university (8), corporate/industrial (6), professional (3), and clinical (8). Data were compiled from written lists and audio cassette recordings of group discussions. Focus group participants across all employment settings felt that their primary continuing education needs were not being addressed at district meetings. Less traditional topics (eg, ergonomics, budgeting, public relations, and functional capacity evaluations) were identified as the more essential education needs. Focus group opinions varied somewhat regarding specific topics and methods of presentation. Recommendations included a more thematic approach to topics and presentations and ample opportunities for work or discussions in small groups. Results of the focus groups could impact the professional preparation of athletic trainers.

  7. Touch technologies in primary education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob

    This paper presents findings from a longitude project on children‘s use of interactive touchscreens in classroom-settings. By exploring and analysing interaction among pairs, children‘s collaborative activities are under study, and it is highlighted how touch technologies invites for a more...

  8. Distance Education Technologies in Asia

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    17 schools ... The use of other Asian DE experiences as basis for planning is a logical move for Mongolia because most Asian countries that are now involved in DE have a .... for distance education in the region, and the pioneering examples these provide for other Asian countries with similar physical and social conditions.

  9. Review of information technologies and their importance in the educational directory of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Андрей Викторович Иванов

    2018-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the fact that the need for education is continuous and ongoing process therefore anytime anywhere access to it is becoming a necessity. The need for information is constantly increasing phenomenon. Education should meet the needs of different groups of learners, and therefore, modern information technologies are important to meet this need. Discusses the requirements of society, which consist in the fact that all the members of this society have the necessary level of technological literacy. Thus, increasing access and reducing the cost of education with the aim of achieving the planned quality of education possible to implement cloud-based IT technologies. Sets out the specifics of cloud computing, which imposes special requirements for training in their use, including the management of educational process. Draws conclusions about what information and communication technologies, understanding the capabilities of cloud technologies and their impact on the management efficiency of the education system, are the main prerequisites for the development of professional competence of the head of the educational organization in the field of information technology.

  10. Informational technologies in modern educational structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedyanin, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    The article represents the structure of informational technologies complex that is applied in modern school education, describes the most important educational methods, shows the results of their implementation. It represents the forms and methods of educational process informative support usage, examined in respects of different aspects of their using that take into account also the psychological features of students. A range of anxious facts and dangerous trends connected with the usage and distribution of the informational technologies that are to be taken into account in the educational process of informatization is also indicated in the article. Materials of the article are based on the experience of many years in operation and development of the informational educational sphere on the basis of secondary school of the physics and mathematics specialization.

  11. Integrating Educational Technologies into Teacher Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlins, Peter; Kehrwald, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This article is a case study of an integrated, experiential approach to improving pre-service teachers' understanding and use of educational technologies in one New Zealand teacher education programme. The study examines the context, design and implementation of a learning activity which integrated student-centred approaches, experiential…

  12. Principles for Further Education in Professional Communication: Continuing Education or Postgraduate Degrees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withnall, Janice; Harris, Rebecca

    1998-01-01

    Presents preliminary findings about practitioners' attitudes to postgraduate education in journalism and public relations. Discusses implications for university education, vocational specialization and continuing professional development in light of current debates on professionalization, the tertiary education sector, and the nature of knowledge…

  13. A continuing program for technology transfer to the apparel industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingman, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    A six month program has been carried out to investigate various mechanisms for transferring technology to industry. This program has focused on transfer to the apparel industry through the Apparel Research Foundation. The procedure was to analyze the problem, obtain potentially relevant aerospace technology, and then transfer this technology to the industry organization. This was done in a specific case. Technology was identified relevant to stitchless joining, and this technology was transferred to the Apparel Research Foundation. The feasibility and ground rules for carrying out such activities on a broader scale were established. A specific objective was to transfer new technology from the industry organization to the industry itself. This required the establishment of an application engineering program. Another transfer mechanism tested was publication of solutions to industry problems in a format familiar to the industry. This is to be distinguished from circulating descriptions of new technology. Focus is on the industry problem and the manager is given a formula for solving it that he can follow. It was concluded that this mechanism can complement the problem statement approach to technology transfer. It is useful in achieving transfer when a large amount of application engineering is not necessary. A wide audience is immediately exposed to the technology. On the other hand, the major manufacturing problems which require a sophisticated technical solution integrating many innovations are less likely to be helped.

  14. Narratives of continued formation: meanings produced by Physical Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André da Silva Mello

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It discusses the meanings given by 14 physical education teachers about their experiences with the continued formation process. It is a (auto biographical narrative research, which used focal groups and interviews as tools for compiling the data. The colaborators are six male teachers and eight female teachers of municipal networks from Serra, Vitoria and Viana municipalities in the metropolitan region of Vitória, ES. The analyzes indicate that the assigned meanings are related to the collective need to reorganize institutional provided formations in dialogue with the political interests of teachers and the specificity of Physical Education as a curriculum component. In general, teachers consider the formation focused on practice and in the teaching profession as those that best reflect their expectations. The practice appears as a know-how to be appropriate from continued formetion to be experienced in school; a knowledge that, when apprehended, is reframed to produce other experiences.

  15. Online Continuing Education for Expanding Clinicians' Roles in Breastfeeding Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Roger A; Colchamiro, Rachel; Tolan, Ellen; Browne, Susan; Foley, Mary; Jenkins, Lucia; Mainello, Kristen; Vallu, Rohith; Hanley, Lauren E; Boisvert, Mary Ellen; Forgit, Julie; Ghiringhelli, Kara; Nordstrom, Christina

    2015-11-01

    Lack of health professional support is an important variable affecting mothers' achievement of breastfeeding goals. Online continuing education is a recognized pathway for disseminating content for improving clinicians' knowledge and supporting efforts to change practices. At the time we developed our project, free, accredited continuing education for physicians related to breastfeeding management that could be easily accessed using portable devices (via tablets/smartphones) was not available. Such resources were in demand, especially for facilities pursuing designation through the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. We assembled a government, academic, health care provider, and professional society partnership to create such a tutorial that would address the diverse content needed for supporting breastfeeding mothers postdischarge in the United States. Our 1.5-hour-long continuing medical and nursing education was completed by 1606 clinicians (1172 nurses [73%] and 434 physicians [27%]) within 1 year. More than 90% of nurses and over 98% of physicians said the tutorial achieved its 7 learning objectives related to breastfeeding physiology, broader factors in infant feeding decisions and practices, the American Academy of Pediatrics' policy statement, and breastfeeding management/troubleshooting. Feedback received from the tutorial led to the creation of a second tutorial consisting of another 1.5 hours of continuing medical and nursing education related to breast examination and assessment prior to delivery, provision of anticipatory guidance to pregnant women interested in breastfeeding, maternity care practices that influence breastfeeding outcomes, breastfeeding preterm infants, breastfeeding's role in helping address disparities, and dispelling common myths. The tutorials contribute to achievement of 8 Healthy People 2020 Maternal, Infant and Child Health objectives. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Continuing education mitigates the negative consequences of adolescent childbearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kate; Clark, Jamie; Castrucci, Brian; Samsel, Rachel; Fonseca, Vincent; Garcia, Imelda

    2011-04-01

    Beginning childbearing during adolescence is consistently linked with negative outcomes for both children and parents. Many have attributed this association to maternal background characteristics which are often difficult to change through policy. Though maternal educational attainment is often a side effect of adolescent childbearing, it also represents a potential avenue through which we can help young mothers overcome the obstacles associated with an early birth. The data for this study come from the 1997 Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, a nationally representative sample of mothers and their children (N = 3,193). Data are used to explore the cognitive stimulation and emotional support in the home, measured using the HOME Scale (Caldwell and Bradley in Home observation for measurement of the environment. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Little Rock, 1984). OLS regression models how maternal education moderates the association between age at first birth and quality of children's home environment. Adolescent mothers scored significantly lower on the indicator of home environment than older mothers. However, when continuing education was considered, maternal age at first birth was no longer significantly associated with the home environment. The negative consequences of early births were mediated by adolescent mothers' continuing education efforts. While interventions are needed to reduce adolescent childbearing, these results highlight the need to ensure that adolescent mothers are provided support to continue their education following delivery. The negative consequences of adolescent births are not inevitable. Encouraging school retention may help young mothers form a safe, healthy, nurturing, and developmentally appropriate home environment.

  17. REGIONAL ASPECTS OF CONTINUING EDUCATION OF THE POPULATION IN THE CONTEXT OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suleymanova F. G.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The accelerated pace of change, modernization and innovative development of society require huge resources. Human potential, and above all, the potential of youth is, in our opinion, the central of them. In the article on the material of sociological research «The Continuing Education and the Social Well-being» conducted by the Department of social problems IEIE RAS SB, studied educational behavior, value assessment and motivation of continuing education among the economically active population of the region, compares the educational and professional potential of different groups of urban and rural population in two generations «youth - non-youth». «Youth» refers to the population aged 16-30 years, «non-youth» - a population of 31 to 45 years. The research problem that directed this research, is the lack of informed knowledge about the role of continuing education in the formation of human development of young people in different socio-territorial conditions. Amid quite a mass we of equipment for both urban and rural youth, the factor of computer and digital devices plays a role in the inclusion of young adults in continuing education. It was found a direct link of dissatisfaction about continuing education with lack of access to information technology (laptop, home Internet, digital office equipment, etc. and with low material wellbeing of the family. Along with the importance of information technology in continuing education, young adults still considers the most preferred forms of supplementary professional education (hereinafter SPE activities in organized courses with qualified teachers and methods. Differences in attitudes to supplementary professional education (SPE between urban and rural youth are identified, first, by less involvement in the real educational activity (in particular, in formal education, compensated, however, by large intentions plans to engage in continuing education. Secondly, by different structure of types

  18. The nuclear technology education consortium: an innovative approach to nuclear education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, Dzh.; Klark, Eh.

    2010-01-01

    The authors report on the Nuclear Technology Education Consortium (NTEC) that includes 12 UK universities and Higher Education Institutes. It was established in 2005 to provide nuclear education and training at the Masters, Diploma, Certificate and Continuing Professional Development (CPD) levels. Module and providers of the NTEC are described (all modules are available in industry-friendly short formats). Students are allowed to select from 22 different modules, taught by experts, covering all aspects of nuclear education and training. It is the acknowledgement by each partner that they cannot deliver the range of modules individually but by cooperating. The NTEC program structure is given [ru

  19. Designing effective on-line continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimitat, Craig

    2001-03-01

    The Internet, and new information and communication technologies available through the Internet, provides medical educators with an opportunity to develop unique on-line learning environments with real potential to improve physicians' knowledge and effect change in their clinical practice. There are approximately 100 websites offering on-line CME courses in the USA alone. However, few of these CME courses appear to be based on sound educational principles or CME research and may have little chance of achieving the broader goals of CME. The majority of these courses closely resemble their traditional counterparts (e.g. paper-based books are now electronic books) and appear to be mere substitutions for old-technology CME resources. Whilst some CME providers add unique features of the Internet to enrich their websites, they do not employ strategies to optimize the learning opportunities afforded by this new technology. The adoption of adult learning principles, reflective practice and problem-based approaches can be used as a foundation for sound CME course design. In addition, knowledge of Internet technology and the learning opportunities it affords, together with strategies to maintain participation and new assessment paradigms, are all needed for developing online CME. We argue for an evidence-based and strategic approach to the development of on-line CME courses designed to enhance physician learning and facilitate change in clinical behaviour.

  20. Influencing Technology Education Teachers to Accept Teaching Positions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Luke Joseph; Putnam, Alvin Robert

    2008-01-01

    Technology education is facing a significant teacher shortage. The purpose of this study was to address the technology education teacher shortage by examining the factors that influence technology education teachers to accept teaching positions. The population for the study consisted of technology education teachers and administrators. A survey…

  1. 25 CFR 166.908 - Who can participate in continuing education and training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who can participate in continuing education and training... participate in continuing education and training? (a) The purpose of continuing education and training is to... personnel employed by approved organizations. This program will emphasize continuing education and training...

  2. Implementing Educational Technology in Higher Education: A Strategic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia C. Roberts

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the move toward implementing technology in higher education is driven by an increasing number of competitors as well as student demand, there is still considerable resistance to embracing it. Adoption of technology requires more that merely installing a product. This paper outlines a framework for a strategic change process that can be utilized by educators for the purpose of the selection as well as successful implementation of educational technologies within their setting, in particular, online course management systems. The four steps of this process include strategic analysis, strategy making, strategic plan design, and strategic plan implementation. The choice to embrace a new system and the extent and speed of its implementation depends upon internal factors such as resources, organizational culture, faculty readiness, anticipated degree of resistance, and the degree of variance from the status quo. A case from the author’s experience provides one example of how the use of distance learning technology was strategically implemented.

  3. The application of kaizen as a continuous technology innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynyuk A.V.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available this article describes the essence of technology Kaizen, which was developed in Japan to improve business processes with the aim of improving the quality of products, to improve production processes and the efficiency of management of the organization. In contrast to Western technology, Cirio, which involves the introduction of a radical innovation, technology Kaizen involves the development and implementation of small improvements on an ongoing basis, which ensures stable growth of the main processes of the company. The article presents the description and requirements of the five basic elements of the Kaizen system, and describes the activities of Kaizen teams.

  4. Educational technology infrastructure and services in North American medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamin, Carol; Souza, Kevin H; Heestand, Diane; Moses, Anna; O'Sullivan, Patricia

    2006-07-01

    To describe the current educational technology infrastructure and services provided by North American allopathic medical schools that are members of the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), to present information needed for institutional benchmarking. A Web-based survey instrument was developed and administered in the fall of 2004 by the authors, sent to representatives of 137 medical schools and completed by representatives of 88, a response rate of 64%. Schools were given scores for infrastructure and services provided. Data were analyzed with one-way analyses of variance, chi-square, and correlation coefficients. There was no difference in the number of infrastructure features or services offered based on region of the country, public versus private schools, or size of graduating class. Schools implemented 3.0 (SD = 1.5) of 6 infrastructure items and offered 11.6 (SD = 4.1) of 22 services. Over 90% of schools had wireless access (97%), used online course materials for undergraduate medical education (97%), course management system for graduate medical education (95%) and online teaching evaluations (90%). Use of services differed across the undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education continuum. Outside of e-portfolios for undergraduates, the least-offered services were for services to graduate and continuing medical education. The results of this survey provide a benchmark for the level of services and infrastructure currently supporting educational technology by AAMC-member allopathic medical schools.

  5. Technology: Its Potential Effects on Teaching in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Mubashrah; Shah, Jamil Hussain

    2011-01-01

    Background: Technology brought radical changes at each level of education. Traditional concept of education, "learning by doing" has extended by "doing and making to learn with technology". Pedagogically, technology facilitated in terms of management, communication, administration, coordination, development, collaboration and…

  6. Research on Technology and Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonham, Scott

    2010-10-01

    From Facebook to smart phones, technology is an integral part of our student's lives. For better or for worse, technology has become nearly inescapable in the classroom, enhancing instruction, distracting students, or simply complicating life. As good teachers we want to harness the power we have available to impact our students, but it is getting harder as the pace of technological change accelerates. How can we make good choices in which technologies to invest time and resources in to use effectively? Do some technologies make more of a difference in student learning? In this talk we will look at research studies looking at technology use in the physics classroom---both my work and that of others---and their impact on student learning. Examples will include computers in the laboratory, web-based homework, and different forms of electronic communication. From these examples, I will draw some general principles for effective educational technology and physics education. Technology is simply a tool; the key is how we use those tools to help our students develop their abilities and understanding.

  7. Continued SOFC cell and stack technology and improved production methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wandel, M.; Brodersen, K.; Phair, J. (and others)

    2009-05-15

    Within this project significant results are obtained on a number of very diverse areas ranging from development of cell production, metallic creep in interconnect to assembling and test of stacks with foot print larger than 500 cm2. Out of 38 milestones 28 have been fulfilled and 10 have been partly fulfilled. This project has focused on three main areas: 1) The continued cell development and optimization of manufacturing processes aiming at production of large foot-print cells, improving cell performance and development environmentally more benign production methods. 2) Stack technology - especially stacks with large foot print and improving the stack design with respect to flow geometry and gas leakages. 3) Development of stack components with emphasis on sealing (for 2G as well as 3G), interconnect (coat, architecture and creep) and test development. Production of cells with a foot print larger than 500 cm2 is very difficult due to the brittleness of the cells and great effort has been put into this topic. Eight cells were successfully produced making it possible to assemble and test a real stack thereby giving valuable results on the prospects of stacks with large foot print. However, the yield rate is very low and a significant development to increase this yield lies ahead. Several lessons were learned on the stack level regarding 'large foot print' stacks. Modelling studies showed that the width of the cell primarily is limited by production and handling of the cell whereas the length (in the flow direction) is limited by e.g. pressure drop and necessary manifolding. The optimal cell size in the flow direction was calculated to be between approx20 cm and < 30 cm. From an economical point of view the production yield is crucial and stacks with large foot print cell area are only feasible if the cell production yield is significantly enhanced. Co-casting has been pursued as a production technique due to the possibilities in large scale production

  8. Informatics and Technology in Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, William

    2017-05-01

    Biomedical or clinical informatics is the transdisciplinary field that studies and develops effective uses of biomedical data, information technology innovations, and medical knowledge for scientific inquiry, problem solving, and decision making, with an emphasis on improving human health. Given the ongoing advances in information technology, the field of informatics is becoming important to clinical practice and to residency education. This article will discuss how informatics is specifically relevant to residency education and the different ways to incorporate informatics into residency education, and will highlight applications of current technology in the context of residency education. How informatics can optimize communication for residents, promote information technology use, refine documentation techniques, reduce medical errors, and improve clinical decision making will be reviewed. It is hoped that this article will increase faculty and trainees' knowledge of the field of informatics, awareness of available technology, and will assist practitioners to maximize their ability to provide quality care to their patients. This article will also introduce the idea of incorporating informatics specialists into residency programs to help practitioners deliver more evidenced-based care and to further improve their efficiency. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Education of indoor enviromental engineering technology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kic, P.; Zajíček, Milan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 9, Spec. 1 (2011), s. 83-90 ISSN 1406-894X. [Biosystems Engineering 2011. Tartu, 12.05.2011-13.05.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : Biosystems engineering * indoor environment * study * programs Subject RIV: AM - Education http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/VS/zajicek- education of indoor enviromental engineering technology .pdf

  10. TECHNOLOGY AND DEAF EDUCATION: POSSIBILITIES OF INTERVENTION

    OpenAIRE

    Lívia Maria Ninci Martins; Heloísa Andreia de Matos Lins

    2016-01-01

    This paper is about an analysis of the potentials in the use of technology in deaf education, given the elements necessary for the realization of a bilingual education project (Libras-Portuguese), the scarce production in the field and the daily challenges of the so called inclusion process. For this, we present clippings of a case study that aimed to two distinct and parallel projects, but related: a description and analysis of the use of mobile computers (tablets), their implications for te...

  11. Technologies for Inclusive Education: Beyond Traditional Integration Approaches. Advances in Educational Technologies and Instructional Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barres, David Griol; Carrion, Zoraida Callejas; Lopez-Cozar Delgado, Ramon

    2013-01-01

    By providing students with the opportunities to receive a high quality education regardless of their social or cultural background, inclusive education is a new area that goes beyond traditional integration approaches. These approaches hope to provide the educative system with the ability to adapt to the diversity of its students. Technologies for…

  12. Creating Educational Technology Curricula for Advanced Studies in Learning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Nakayama

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Curriculum design and content are key factors in the area of human resource development. To examine the possibility of using a collaboration of Human Computer Interaction (HCI and Educational Technology (ET to develop innovative improvements to the education system, the curricula of these two areas of study were lexically analyzed and compared. As a further example, the curriculum of a joint course in HCI and ET was also lexically analyzed and the contents were examined. These analyses can be used as references in the development of human resources for use in advanced learning environments.

  13. Technology, Educator Intention, and Relationships in Virtual Learning Spaces: A Qualitative Metasynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdanetz, Lorraine M; Hamer, Mika K; Thomas, Eileen; Tarasenko, Lindsey M; Horton-Deutsch, Sara; Jones, Jacqueline

    2018-04-01

    A main concern that remains with the continued growth of online nursing education programs is the way educator and student relationships can be affected by new technologies. This interpretive study aims to gain an understanding of how technology influences the development of interpersonal relationships between the student and faculty in a virtual learning environment. Using an established structured approach to qualitative metasynthesis, a search was conducted using PubMed, EBSCO, CINAHL, Medline, ProQuest, Ovid Nursing databases, and Google Scholar, focused on caring and relational aspects of online nursing education. Technology alters communication, thereby positioning the intentionality of the educator at the heart of interpersonal relationship development in virtual learning spaces. This interpretive synthesis of prior qualitative research supports the development of a framework for online nursing courses, the need for continuing education of nursing faculty, the value of caring intentions, and enhancement of the educator's technological proficiency. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(4):197-202.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Information Literacy Education on College of Technology at Kyushu Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozono, Kazutake; Ikeda, Naomitsu; Irie, Hiroki; Fujimoto, Yoichi; Oshima, Shunsuke; Murayama, Koichi; Taguchi, Hirotsugu

    Recently, the importance of an engineering education increases by the development of the information technology (IT) . Development of the information literacy education is important to deal with new IT in the education on college of technology. Our group investigated the current state of information literacy education on college of technology at Kyushu area and the secondary education. In addition, we investigated about the talent whom the industrial world requested. From these investigation results, this paper proposed cooperation with the elementary and secondary education, enhancement of intellectual property education, introduction of information ethics education, introduction of career education and enhancement of PBL to information literacy education on college of technology.

  15. A model of e-learning uptake and continuance in Higher Educational Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Pinpathomrat, Nakarin

    2015-01-01

    To predict and explain E-learning usage in higher educational institutes (HEIs) better, this research conceptualized E-learning usage as two steps, E-learning uptake and continuance. The aim was to build a model of effective uptake and continuance of E-learning in HEIs, or ‘EUCH’.The EUCH model was constructed by applying five grounded theories: Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT); Keller’s ARCS model; Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA); Cognitive Dissonance Theory (CDT); ...

  16. Updating Nurse Graduate Knowledge – Internal Εvaluation Process of the “Evidence Based Practice in Nursing” Continuing Educational Programme

    OpenAIRE

    Stavropoulou, Areti; Kelesi, Μartha; Rovithis, Michael; Vasilopoulos, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The evaluation of continuing educational programs is essential, since through evaluation processes, the positive aspects of education are highlighted and qualitative educational procedures are established. Aim: The aim of the present article was to describe the internal evaluation process and the related outcomes of the “Evidence Based Practice in Nursing” Continuing Educational Programme, which implemented at the Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Crete, TEI of At...

  17. [Technological competencies in cardiovascular nursing education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Rika Miyahara; Leite, Maria Madalena Januário

    2015-12-01

    To identify the perception of the coordinators of the Specialization Courses in Cardiovascular Nursing about inserting content from Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and analyze them in relation to the technological competencies and regarding its applicability, relevance and importance in assisting, teaching and management. Descriptive study with 10 coordinators of the Specialization course in Cardiologic Nursing, who replied to the questionnaire for the development of technological competency adapted from the Technology Initiative Guidelines Education Reforms (TIGER), and analyzed using the Delphi technique for obtaining consensus and scored according to the relevance, pertinence and applicability using Likert scale according to degree of agreement. Six courses developed ICT content. The contents of the TIGER were considered relevant, pertinent and applicable. The coordinators recognize the need for technological competencies of the Cardiovascular Nurse for healthcare applicability.

  18. Mechanization of Continuous Production of Powdered Cellulose Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosvirnikov, D. B.; Safin, R. G.; Akhmetshin, I. R.; Taimarov, M. A.; Timerbaev, N. F.

    2017-07-01

    The article presents the mechanization of the process for obtaining powdered cellulose using the technology of steam explosion treatment of lignocellulosic material. The presented unit combines the methods of steam explosion treatment and acid hydrolysis of cellulose-containing raw materials.

  19. Using Citation Network Analysis in Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo; Park, Sunyoung

    2012-01-01

    Previous reviews in the field of Educational Technology (ET) have revealed some publication patterns according to authors, institutions, and affiliations. However, those previous reviews focused only on the rankings of individual authors and institutions, and did not provide qualitative details on relations and networks of scholars and scholarly…

  20. Educational Technology Research in a VUCA World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Thomas C.; Reeves, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    The status of educational technology research in a VUCA world is examined. The acronym, VUCA, stands for "Volatility" (rapidly changing contexts and conditions), "Uncertainty" (information missing that is critical to problem solving), "Complexity" (multiple factors difficult to categorize or control), and…

  1. Educational Technology: A Presupposition of Equality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The work of philosopher Jacques Rancière is used conceptually and methodologically to frame an exploration of the driving interests in educational technology policy and the sanctioning of particular discursive constructions of pedagogy that result. In line with Rancière's thinking, the starting point for this analysis is that of equality--that…

  2. Redesigning Technology Integration into World Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Julio C.

    2018-01-01

    This article describes how a multi-institutional, proficiency-based program engages stakeholders in design thinking to discover and explore solutions to perennial problems in technology integration into world language education (WLE). Examples of replicable activities illustrate the strategies used to fuel innovation efforts, including fostering…

  3. Information and Communication Technology (ICTs) in Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article discusses the available literature related to the contribution of communities of practice to professional development of teachers on Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) integration in education. A systematic retrieval of literature was conducted in order to identify characteristics of communities of ...

  4. Thinking about Educational Technology and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 National Educational Technology Plan mentions fostering creativity, collaboration, leadership, and critical thinking while engaging learners in complex, real-world challenges through a project-based learning approach (see http://tech.ed.gov/netp/learn ing/). The Partnership for 21st Century Learning (P21; see…

  5. Improving science, technology and mathematics education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF.MIREKU

    O. A. Sofowora1, & B. Adekomi. Abstract. The study assessed the impact of a World Bank Assisted Project “STEP-B” on teaching and learning of Science, Technology and Mathematics Education (STM) in. Nigeria. It also described the contribution of Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife to the improvement of STM through ...

  6. Contemplation as a Corrective to Technological Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Sean

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that noetic studies, contemplation, or "theoria" ought to take greater precedence in education than is currently the case. Our modern focus on and fascination with information technologies serves in many ways to thwart and to discourage the cultivation of noetic studies and the pursuit of wisdom in schools. The…

  7. Green Curriculum Analysis in Technological Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Arpita; Singh, Manvendra Pratap; Roy, Mousumi

    2018-01-01

    With rapid industrialization and technological development, India is facing adverse affects of unsustainable pattern of production and consumption. Education for sustainable development has been widely recognized to reduce the threat of environmental degradation and resource depletion. This paper used the content analysis method to explore the…

  8. Instructivist Ideology: Education Technology Embracing the Past?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amory, Alan

    2012-01-01

    It is argued that against the background of a neo-managerial and market-driven global education system, the production and use of technology to support teaching and learning perpetuates hegemonic behaviorist values. Activity theory, as a lens, is used to explore the power relations that are integral to the development and use of Reusable Learning…

  9. TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION: THE MEANS TO THE REALIZATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4. a land of bright and full opportunities, and. 5. a free and democratic society. The realization of the vision and the missions depend to a large extent on technology education. The minimum GNI per capital of the high income economies which Nigeria intends to join is at least USD 10,680 in the current rating. (Adebayo ...

  10. Increasing Impact of Technology in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah System of Higher Education, 2016

    2016-01-01

    For Fall 2016, of the 175,509 students enrolled in the Utah System of Higher Education at third week, 69,535 (39.6 %) are participating in some form of technology delivered instruction. Of that total, 54,269 (30.9%) enrolled in at least one online class. Despite availability of online courses and degrees, students prefer using online courses to…

  11. Information Technology and Undergraduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masys, Daniel R.

    1989-01-01

    Hewlett-Packard Corporation grant enabled Harvard Medical School to begin using computer technology in medical educational applications. Hardware and software selection, integration into the curriculum, teaching the use of computers, cost, successful applications, knowledge base access, simulations, video and graphics teaching programs, and…

  12. Cognitive Science Concepts and Technology Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dan

    2001-01-01

    Responses from 31 of 65 technology teacher education programs identified the extent to which they include the following cognitive theories: metacognition, schema theory, chunking, visualization/concept mapping, reflection, situated learning, and cognitive apprenticeship. Although a majority rated the top five essential, only 38-48% said the…

  13. Towards a Transformative Epistemology of Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison-Love, David

    2017-01-01

    Technology Education offers an authentic and invaluable range of skills, knowledge, capabilities, contexts and ways of thinking for learners in the 21st century. However, it is recognised that it occupies a comparatively less defined and more fragile curricular position than associated, but longer established, subjects such as Mathematics and…

  14. Information Security in Education: Are We Continually Improving?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Bialaszewski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper will shed light on the lack of the development of appropriate monitoring systems in the field of education. Test banks can be easily purchased. Smart phones can take and share pictures of exams. A video of an exam given through Blackboard can easily be made. A survey to determine the extent of cheating using technology was given to several university students. Evidence is provided that shows security is lacking as evidenced by the number of students who have made use of technological advances to cheat on exams. The findings and conclusion may serve as evidence for administrators and policy makers to re-assess efforts being made to increase security in online testing.

  15. Continuing midwifery education beyond graduation: Student midwives' awareness of continuous professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embo, M; Valcke, M

    2017-05-01

    Midwifery education plays an important role in educating graduates about engaging in continuous professional development (CPD) but there is a lack of empirical research analysing student midwives' awareness of CPD beyond graduation. We aimed to explore student midwives' awareness of the need to become lifelong learners and to map their knowledge of CPD activities available after graduation. Therefore, forty-seven reflective documents, written in the last week of student midwives' training programme, were analysed in a thematic way. Content analysis confirmed student midwives' awareness of the importance of CPD before graduation. They mentioned different reasons for future involvement in CPD and described both, formal and informal CPD-activities. Respondents were especially aware of the importance of knowledge, to a lesser degree of skills-training and still less of the potential value of the Internet for individual and collective learning. Respondents perceived a need for a mandatory preceptorship. Supporting learning guides were highly valued and the importance of reflection on CPD was well-established. This could have resulted from an integrated reflective learning strategy during education. Undergraduate midwives are aware of the importance of CPD and the interplay of formal and informal learning activities. Virtual learning requires special attention to overcome CPD challenges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of Key Performance Indicators for the Engineering Technology Education Programs in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng; Lai, Chun-Chin

    2004-01-01

    In comparison with engineering, engineering technology is more practical and purposeful. The engineering technology education programs in Taiwan have been mainly offered in 56 universities/colleges of technology (UTs/CTs) and are anticipated to continuously improve their performance to prepare quality engineering technologists. However, it is…

  17. Information Technology-Based Innovation in International Marketing Education: An Exploration of Two Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkovics, Rudolf R.; Haghirian, Parissa; Yu, Shasha

    2009-01-01

    Information technology (IT) innovations have and continue to have a significant impact on international marketing practice and customer interactions. With the marketing environment becoming increasingly dependent on technology, marketing teaching in higher education faces a challenging task of effectively leveraging technology in diverse learning…

  18. Medical education and information and communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyari, Asefeh Badiey; Bahadorani, Mahnaz; Tootoonchi, Mina; Gardiner, John Jacob Zucker; Peña, Roberto A; Adibi, Peyman

    2012-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has brought many changes in medical education and practice in the last couple of decades. Teaching and learning medicine particularly has gone under profound changes due to computer technologies, and medical schools around the world have invested heavily either in new computer technologies or in the process of adapting to this technological revolution. In order to catch up with the rest of the world, developing countries need to research their options in adapting to new computer technologies. This descriptive survey study was designed to assess medical students' computer and Internet skills and their attitude toward ICT. Research findings showed that the mean score of self-perceived computer knowledge for male students in general was greater than for female students. Also, students who had participated in various prior computer workshops, had access to computer, Internet, and e-mail, and frequently checked their e-mail had higher mean of self-perceived knowledge and skill score. Finally, students with positive attitude toward ICT scored their computer knowledge higher than those who had no opinion. The results have confirmed that the medical schools, particularly in developing countries, need to bring fundamental changes such as curriculum modification in order to integrate ICT into medical education, creating essential infrastructure for ICT use in medical education and practice, and structured computer training for faculty and students.

  19. Educational Blogging: Integrating Technology into Marketing Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Melike Demirbag; Piskin, Burak; Bol, Beste

    2010-01-01

    The major challenge of marketing education is that the discipline continually reinvents itself. Marketing approaches and practices once new rapidly become old and many texts grow outdated in a short period of time, increasing the pressure on the instructors to provide the students with the latest knowledge. The changing environment of business…

  20. Improving continuing medical education by enhancing interactivity: lessons from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Seyed Aliakbar; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Jalil; Soltani Arabshahi, Seyed Kamran; Faghih, Zahra; Parikh, Sagar V; Shirazi, Mandana

    2016-04-01

    Continuing Medical Education (CME) has been considered as a lifelong commitment for doctors to provide the optimal care for patients. Despite a long history of creating CME programs, outcomes are far from ideal. The present qualitative study aims to clarify the barriers affecting effectiveness of the CME programs in Iran based on the experiences of general practitioners. Sixteen general practitioners were recruited to participate in in-depth interviews and field observations concerning experiences with CME. The study was performed using a qualitative content analysis method. The codes, categories and themes were explored through an inductive process in which the researchers moved from specific to general. The participants' experiences identified a number of barriers, particularly insufficient interaction with the instructors; additional problems included the teachers' use of an undifferentiated approach; unreal and abstract CME; and ignorance of the diverse reasons to participate in CME. Based on the study results, there are multiple barriers to effective implementation of CME in Iran. The key barriers include insufficient interaction between the trainees and providers, which must be considered by other stakeholders and program designers. Such interactions would facilitate improved program design, invite more specific tailoring of the education to the participants, allow for more effective educational methods and set the stage for outcome evaluation from the learners actually applying their new knowledge in practice. Replication of these findings with another sample would improve confidence in these recommendations, but these findings are broadly consistent with findings in the educational literature on improving the efficacy of CME.

  1. Implications for Art Education in the Third Millennium: Art Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Sherry

    2007-01-01

    Most would agree that today's art education is far more complex than art activities such as making pumpkin paintings in October. For one, art education continually evolves in response to arts technology integration. What exactly are the implications for art education in the new millennium? In this article, the author presents and shows some of the…

  2. Persuasive Technology in Nursing Education About Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Ana Graziela; Dal Sasso, Grace T M; Iyengar, Sriram

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices, as persuasive technologies, represent an important platform to promote changes in attitudes and behaviors. They are not only understood as tools, but as a learning process that provides different opportunities to learn how to learn. The objectives of the study were to measure the quality of a virtual mobile learning object, to measure the mental workload of the educational intervention, and to evaluate the learning results. This is a technological production study with a mixed method, quasi-experimental approach. Three simulated clinical scenarios comprise the m-OVADor@, allowing for a simulated evaluation of acute pain through interactive tools. The technology met the quality criteria for educational software, with low mental workload, demonstrating a significant strategy for learning about pain among nursing students.

  3. Municipal boards and educational management: the continuing education distance and its movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalla Corte, Marilene Gabriel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Through scientific research in development, this article is based on distance extension actions of continuing education of a specific public program, the National Program of Training Municipal Counselors of Education (Pro-Council. This program targets a policy of democratization of education management and qualification on work of municipal counselors of education as well as education technicians in relation to educational practices, legislation, financing mechanisms, transfer and control of the use of funds of education in order to enable a good performance of the Municipal Boards of Education (MCE in their socio-educational institutions. In this context, the objective is recognizing and analyzing the continuing education impacts developed under Pro-Council/Federal University of Santa Maria about aspects as competence and commitment of ex-attendants at the Municipal Councils of Education as a democratic collective bodies. The study is developed under a quantitative and qualitative approach, using the production of semi-open questionnaires data applied to counselors and technicians. From this, we stress the growing interest of the Boards of Education and the Departments of Education to capacitate their counselors and technicians; the establishment and implementation of new Municipal Boards of Education in Rio Grande do Sul State/Brazil; the relationship between the professional exercise and political and theoretical reflection; and so on. Whereas the Municipal Boards of Education are required to consolidate the democratic management, it is very important the training of individuals involved and especially establishing dialogic processes with social demands of each municipality, mainly, the educational ones, in the sense of [re] building the public policies for basic education in a responsible and participatory way.

  4. What dental educators need to understand about emerging technologies to incorporate them effectively into the educational process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Corey D; Eisenberg, Elise S; O'Donnell, Jean A; Spallek, Heiko

    2014-04-01

    Many dental schools are currently struggling with the adoption of emerging technologies and the incorporation of these technologies into the educational process. Dental students exhibit an increasing degree of digital comfort when using social networking, mobile devices, search engines, or e-textbooks. Although the majority of students might consider themselves to be very skilled at using information technology, many faculty members would claim the opposite when evaluating their own knowledge and skills in the use of technology. As the use of technology, both formally and informally, continues to increase, dental educators are faced with many questions, such as: Does students' digital comfort disguise a lack of information literacy? What is the appropriate path of implementing technology into teaching and learning, and how can institutions support such an implementation? This article surveys a series of myths that exist about the use of technology in education and raises questions about their validity and how dental educators can avoid being misled by them.

  5. Bridge continuous deformation measurement technology based on fiber optic gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Weibing; Hu, Wenbin; Liu, Fang; Tang, Jianguang; Li, Sheng; Yang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Bridge is an important part of modern transportation systems and deformation is a key index for bridge's safety evaluation. To achieve the long span bridge curve measurement rapidly and timely and accurately locate the bridge maximum deformation, the continuous deformation measurement system (CDMS) based on inertial platform is presented and validated in this paper. Firstly, based on various bridge deformation measurement methods, the method of deformation measurement based on the fiber optic gyro (FOG) is introduced. Secondly, the basic measurement principle based on FOG is presented and the continuous curve trajectory is derived by the formula. Then the measurement accuracy is analyzed in theory and the relevant factors are presented to ensure the measurement accuracy. Finally, the deformation measurement experiments are conducted on a bridge across the Yangtze River. Experimental results show that the presented deformation measurement method is feasible, practical, and reliable; the system can accurately and quickly locate the maximum deformation and has extensive and broad application prospects.

  6. Gender-Based Motivational Differences in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Sonja; Räikkönen, Eija; Ikonen, Pasi

    2015-01-01

    Because of a deeply gendered history of craft education in Finland, technology education has a strong gender-related dependence. In order to motivate girls into pursuing technological studies and to enable them to see their own potential in technology, gender sensitive approaches should be developed in technology education. This study explores…

  7. Technology Education Teacher Supply and Demand--A Critical Situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moye, Johnny J.

    2009-01-01

    Technology education is an excellent format to integrate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) studies by employing problem-based learning activities. However, the benefits of technology education are still generally "misunderstood by the public." The effects of technology education on increased student mathematics…

  8. A Virtual Childhood Obesity Collaborative: Satisfaction With Online Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gance-Cleveland, Bonnie; Aldrich, Heather; Dandreaux, Danielle; Oetzel, Keri Bolton; Schmiege, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive study evaluated school-based health center (SBHC) providers' satisfaction with Web-based continuing education as part of a virtual childhood obesity intervention. Thirty-six participants from 24 SBHCs in six states participated in the training modules. Modules were divided into four learning sessions, with a total of 17 training modules. Participants completed satisfaction surveys after each module, as well as an overall survey at the end of the training. Questions were rated on a 4-point Likert scale (4 = strongly agree, 3 = agree, 2 = disagree, 1 = strongly disagree). Participation in the first two learning sessions was higher than the last two. Provider satisfaction of training modules by question type and content area was quite high (μ = 3.66-3.33). Overall satisfaction means ranged from 3.76 to 3.24. Many providers also reported plans to make changes in their practice after completing the training. This study demonstrated that a virtual childhood obesity collaborative is an acceptable delivery method for continuing education. Copyright © 2015 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Inclusive Educative Technologies, for people with disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echenique, AM; Graffigna, JP; Pérez, E.; López, N.; Piccinini, D.; Fernández, H.; Garcés, A.

    2016-04-01

    The conventional educational environment imposes barriers to education for people with disabilities, limiting their rights, which is a non-discriminative education. In turn, hampers their access to other rights and creates huge obstacles to realize their potential and participate effectively in their communities. In this sense Assistive Technology provides alternative solutions, in order to compensate for a lost or diminished ability. Thus the necessary assistance is provided to perform tasks, including those related to education, improving the inclusion. In this paper some researches had been made in the Gabinete de TecnologiaMedica, in the Facultad de Ingenieria of the Universidad Nacional de San Juan in order to solve this problem. The researchers are classified by type of disability; sensory (visual and auditory) or motor. They have been designed, developed and experienced through various prototypes that have given satisfactory results. It had been published in national and international congresses of high relevance.

  10. SOME ASPECTS OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE COMPETENCE DEVELOPMENT IN THE SYSTEM OF CONTINUED PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Gorbunov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The system of continued professional education in modern Russia is aimed at raising the level of professional workers’ ability for competition at the global vocational market. Among the most required competences we put an emphasis on the ability for efficient communication in the native and foreign languages pursuing social, cultural and professional interaction. The practical experience proves that students of various courses of study within the system of continued professional education have difficulties while communicating in a foreign language because of a low level of their foreign language communication competence that is based on ability for decoding and producing a discourse. Aim. The article considers the factors to develop students’ ability for decoding and producing a discourse in the format of reflexive positional discussion. Methodology and research methods. Development of the advanced and high level of foreign language competence is possible via introduction of institutional discursive practices into the educational process. Development of foreign language competence in the system of continued professional education is being discussed from the point of synergy of pedagogical science and applied linguistics. System-synergetic, communicative-activity, discursive and technological approaches have been chosen as the methodological base to develop the system of criteria of students’ preparedness and ability to communicate in a foreign language. Methods of analysis and synthesis have been used during the work as well. Results and scientific novelty. The materials presented in the publication make a contribution to the theory and methodology of continued professional education regarding effective experts’ foreign language mastering, and skills acquisition for the most productive interpersonal and professional-oriented communication. Methodologically-based definition and description of the components of subject and

  11. [Technology is changing: is the continuing professional development also changing?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fiore, Luca

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the impact of the new information environment on the scientific communication. Reading behavior changes: today, we browse, scan, watch, receive an impression of something. The new reading habits are not simply determined by the new tools; they are rather influenced by the need to produce and share data and information, using personalized and mobile devices. Also the content formats change: researchers, clinicians, and nurses produce texts, figures, tables, photos, videos, tweets, blog posts and they share them to readers that have to collect, appraise, recombine and - most importantly - contextualize the information. This "continuous partial production" is consistent with a "continuous partial utilization" of data; this is a risk, but it is also an opportunity. On the one side, we risk a self-referential, individualized learning process; on the other side, we can enjoy the extraordinary chance to build a "shared learning environment", able to give a comprehensive solution to the challenges experienced by the health systems. Medical journals survive as valuable media to organize data and information; the new social web tools should support the traditional publishing patterns, to enhance the sharing of information, to help the appraisal of data, and to move forward new communities of learners.

  12. An online survey of chiropractors' opinions of continuing education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Dean L

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuing Education (CE for chiropractors is mandatory for licensure in most North American jurisdictions. Numerous chiropractic colleges have begun collaborating with universities to offer master's degree programs. Distance education master's degree programs may be desirable to allow full-time practicing doctors to further their post-graduate education. The present survey sought to answer three questions. First, what is the level of satisfaction of chiropractors with their continuing education? Second, what is the level of interest of chiropractors in online master's degree programs? Lastly, what is the response rate of chiropractors to an online survey? Methods An online survey consisting of 22 multiple choice questions was e-mailed to 1000 chiropractors randomly selected from the mailing list of an online chiropractic newsletter. Upon completion of the questionnaire, participants' answers were saved on a secure site. Data analysis included evaluation of the demographic characteristics of the respondents, their opinions of and patterns of taking CE including online education, preferred learning formats, and their interest in proposed online master's degree programs. A survey response rate was determined. Results Nearly 86% of respondents felt their previously completed CE courses were either somewhat or extremely satisfactory. Over ninety percent of respondents who had completed online or distance CE coursesfound them to be somewhat or extremelysatisfactory. Almost half the respondents indicated that they most preferred online distance learning, while 34.08% most preferred face-to-face interaction. Fifty-three percent of respondents indicated an interest in starting a master's degree program; however 70.46% of respondents were interested in an online master's degree program that would offer CE credit. A response rate of 35.8% was obtained. Conclusion Satisfaction among chiropractors with CE programs is high. The notion of

  13. International Conference on Computers and Advanced Technology in Education

    CERN Document Server

    Advanced Information Technology in Education

    2012-01-01

    The volume includes a set of selected papers extended and revised from the 2011 International Conference on Computers and Advanced Technology in Education. With the development of computers and advanced technology, the human social activities are changing basically. Education, especially the education reforms in different countries, has been experiencing the great help from the computers and advanced technology. Generally speaking, education is a field which needs more information, while the computers, advanced technology and internet are a good information provider. Also, with the aid of the computer and advanced technology, persons can make the education an effective combination. Therefore, computers and advanced technology should be regarded as an important media in the modern education. Volume Advanced Information Technology in Education is to provide a forum for researchers, educators, engineers, and government officials involved in the general areas of computers and advanced technology in education to d...

  14. Evaluation of an online continuing education program from the perspective of new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Selcuk; Kucuk, Sevda; Aydemir, Melike

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the online continuing education program from the perspectives of new graduate nurses. An evaluation framework includes five factors (program and course structure, course materials, technology, support services and assessment). In this study, descriptive research methods were used. Participants of the study included 2.365 registered nurses enrolled in the first online nursing bachelor completion degree program in the country. Data were collected by survey. The findings indicated that students were mostly satisfied with this program. The results of this study suggest that well designed asynchronous online education methods can be effective and appropriate for registered nurses. However, the provision of effective support and technological infrastructure is as vital as the quality of teaching for online learners. © 2013.

  15. Teaching performance improvement: an opportunity for continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staker, Larry V

    2003-01-01

    Practicing physicians generally are not engaged in either the methods of performance improvement for health care or the measurement and reporting of clinical outcomes. The principal reasons are lack of compensation for such work, the perception that the work of performance improvement adds no value and is a waste of time, the lack of knowledge and skill in the use of basic tools for outcomes measurement and performance improvement, the failure of medical educators to teach these skills, and the inability of mentors to model their use in practice. In this article, an overview of the history of quality improvement or performance improvement in general and the adoption of two methods of improvement (Plan-Do-Study-Act and SIX SIGMA) by health care is given. Six simple tools that are easy to understand and use and could be used in every continuing medical education (CME) program are then explained and illustrated. Postgraduate medical educators and CME program directors must step up to the challenge of teaching these skills. By learning to include them in planning, evaluation, policy making, and needs assessments of CME programs, the skills of every physician could be improved. Additional goals of every CME program could be accountability for outcomes, reduction of errors, alignment of incentives, and advocacy for the very best in evidence-based health care. To develop activities that affect physician practice and population health, CME professionals must partner with performance improvement experts for needs assessment and evaluation of outcomes data. An understanding of performance improvement principles helps those in performance improvement and those in CME to determine which educational activities might be expected to influence physician competency and performance.

  16. Improving continuing medical education by enhancing interactivity: lessons from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SEYED ALIAKBAR FAGHIHI

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Continuing Medical Education (CME has been considered as a lifelong commitment for doctors to provide the optimal care for patients. Despite a long history of creating CME programs, outcomes are far from ideal. The present qualitative study aims to clarify the barriers affecting effectiveness of the CME programs in Iran based on the experiences of general practitioners. Methods: Sixteen general practitioners were recruited to participate in in-depth interviews and field observations concerning experiences with CME. The study was performed using a qualitative content analysis method. The codes, categories and themes were explored through an inductive process in which the researchers moved from specific to general. Results: The participants’ experiences identified a number of barriers, particularly insufficient interaction with the instructors; additional problems included the teachers’ use of an undifferentiated approach; unreal and abstract CME; and ignorance of the diverse reasons to participate in CME. Conclusion: Based on the study results, there are multiple barriers to effective implementation of CME in Iran. The key barriers include insufficient interaction between the trainees and providers, which must be considered by other stakeholders and program designers. Such interactions would facilitate improved program design, invite more specific tailoring of the education to the participants, allow for more effective educational methods and set the stage for outcome evaluation from the learners actually applying their new knowledge in practice. Replication of these findings with another sample would improve confidence in these recommendations, but these findings are broadly consistent with findings in the educational literature on improving the efficacy of CME.

  17. 2009 Continued Testing of the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Amy B.; Swerterlitsch, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    An amine-based carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor sorbent in pressure-swing regenerable beds has been developed by Hamilton Sundstrand and baselined for the Orion Atmosphere Revitalization System (ARS). In three previous years at this conference, reports were presented on extensive Johnson Space Center (JSC) testing of this technology in a sea-level pressure environment, with simulated and real human metabolic loads, in both open and closed-loop configurations. The test article design was iterated a third time before the latest series of such tests, which was performed in the first half of 2009. The new design incorporates a canister configuration modification for overall unit compactness and reduced pressure drop, as well as a new process flow control valve that incorporates both compressed gas purge and dual-end vacuum desorption capabilities. This newest test article is very similar to the flight article designs. Baseline tests of the new unit were performed to compare its performance to that of the previous test articles. Testing of compressed gas purge operations helped refine launchpad operating condition recommendations developed in earlier testing. Operating conditions used in flight program computer models were tested to validate the model projections. Specific operating conditions that were recommended by the JSC test team based on past test results were also tested for validation. The effects of vacuum regeneration line pressure on resulting cabin conditions was studied for high metabolic load periods, and a maximum pressure is recommended

  18. Devices for continuous monitoring of glucose: update in technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez AM

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ana María Gómez,1 Diana Cristina Henao Carrillo,1 Oscar Mauricio Muñoz Velandia2,3 1Endocrinology Unit, Hospital Universitario San Ignacio, Bogotá, Colombia; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Universitario San Ignacio, Bogotá, Colombia; 3Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Faculty of Medicine, Bogotá, Colombia Abstract: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM is a tool that allows constant evaluation of glycemic control, providing data such as the trend and fluctuation of interstitial glucose levels over time. In clinical practice, there are two modalities: the professional or retrospective and the personal or real-time CGM (RT-CGM. The latest-generation sensors are more accurate and sensitive for hypoglycemia, improving adherence to self-monitoring, which has allowed optimizing glycemic control. The development of algorithms that allow the suspension of the infusion of insulin during hypoglycemia gave rise to the integrated therapy or sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy with low glucose suspend, which has proven to be an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of diabetic patients with high risk of hypoglycemia. The objective of this review is to present the evidence of the advantages of RT-CGM, the clinical impact of integrated therapy, and cost-effectiveness of its implementation in the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus. Keywords: CMG, devices, hypoglycemia, SAPT, SAPT+LGS

  19. Emerging Technologies Landscape on Education. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis de la Fuente Valentin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a desk research that analysed available recent studies in the field of Technology Enhanced Learning. The desk research is focused on work produced in the frame of FP6 and FP7 European programs, in the area of Information and Communication Technologies. It concentrates in technologies that support existing forms of learning, and also in technologies that enhance new learning paradigms. This approach includes already adopted and successfully piloted technologies. The elaboration of the desk research had three main parts: firstly, the collection of documents from CORDIS and other institutions related to TEL research; secondly, the identification of relevant terms appearing in those documents and the elaboration of a thesaurus; and thirdly, a quantitative analysis of each term occurrences. Many of the identified technologies belong to the fields of interactive multimedia, Human-computer Interaction and-or related to recommendation and learning analytics. This study becomes a thorough review of the current state of these fields through the actual development of R&D European projects. This research, will be used as a basis to better understand the evolution of the sector, and to focus future research efforts on these sectors and their application to education.

  20. Can Technology Help Promote Equality of Educational Opportunities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Brian; Berger, Dan; Hart, Cassandra; Loeb, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    This chapter assesses the potential for several prominent technological innovations to promote equality of educational opportunities. We review the history of technological innovations in education and describe several prominent innovations, including intelligent tutoring, blended learning, and virtual schooling.

  1. Southern Africa Journal of Education, Science and Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern Africa Journal of Education, Science and Technology: About this journal. Journal Home > Southern Africa Journal of Education, Science and Technology: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. Multicultural awareness and technology in higher education: global perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, Tomayess; Isaias, Pedro; Kommers, Petrus A.M.

    2014-01-01

    This book encompasses information on the effects of international students' exchanges in higher education through e-learning technologies, providing the latest teaching and learning methods, technologies, and approaches in the higher education sector worldwide

  3. Southern Africa Journal of Education, Science and Technology: Site ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern Africa Journal of Education, Science and Technology: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > Southern Africa Journal of Education, Science and Technology: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Southern Africa Journal of Education, Science and Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern Africa Journal of Education, Science and Technology: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > Southern Africa Journal of Education, Science and Technology: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria: About this journal. Journal Home > Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  6. Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Archives: Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 18 of 18 ... Archives: Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria. Journal Home > Archives: Journal of Technology and Education in Nigeria. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. [Continuing Medical Education in Germany - mandatory and voluntary obligations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böthin, Elke

    2013-01-01

    After 1945 the common medical training infrastructure was broken up into two different political systems. While in the Federal Republic of Germany the structure was based on physicians' self-governance, in the German Democratic Republic medical professional structures were organised by the government. After the unification of the two German states, which took place on October 3, 1990, the centralistic structure was replaced by the system of physician self-governance. Before January 1, 2004, continuing medical education (CME) in West Germany relied on a system of voluntary obligations. In East Germany, though, professional CMEs were compulsory; they were called "obligatorische periphere Fortbildung." Based on 15 expert interviews on the topic of "CME in Germany", the different circumstances and conditions were analysed taking account of the historical background. Only selected professionals with experience in both German states (one with a federal, the other with a centralistic system), were chosen for the survey. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Comprehensive Training of Engineering Students through Continuing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Reynoso Flores

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a priority for student training in general and particularly for future engineers. Although this issue has been frequently addressed in recent years, proposals are still insufficient for engineering students. This paper is aimed at theoretically and empirically demonstrating the potential of continuing education as one of the key areas that engineering schools have for the comprehensive training of students. Preliminary results of a research project commissioned by the School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering (Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Electrica-FIME of Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Mexico, are presented to respond to the need to improve the learning process of students with a comprehensive approach. The research justification and some of the results obtained in the exploratory phase are also described.

  10. Continuing medical education and burnout among Danish GPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndt, Anders; Sokolowski, Ineta; Olesen, Frede

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been minimal research into continuing medical education (CME) and its association with burnout among GPs. AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between participating in CME and experiencing burnout in a sample of Danish GPs. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross......-sectional questionnaire study. SETTING: All 458 active GPs in 2004, in the County of Aarhus, Denmark were invited to participate. METHOD: Data on CME activities were obtained for all GPs and linked to burnout which was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human Services Survey. The relationship between CME...... activity and burnout was calculated as prevalence ratios (PR) in a generalised linear model. RESULTS: In total, 379 (83.5%) GPs returned the questionnaire. The prevalence of burnout was about 25%, and almost 3% suffered from 'high burnout'. A total of 344 (92.0%) GPs were members of a CME group...

  11. Continuous Evaluation in Ethics Education: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Tristan; Higgs, Cory; Mumford, Michael; Connelly, Shane; DuBois, James

    2017-06-14

    A great need for systematic evaluation of ethics training programs exists. Those tasked with developing an ethics training program may be quick to dismiss the value of training evaluation in continuous process improvement. In the present effort, we use a case study approach to delineate how to leverage formative and summative evaluation measures to create a high-quality ethics education program. With regard to formative evaluation, information bearing on trainee reactions, qualitative data from the comments of trainees, in addition to empirical findings, can ensure that the training program operates smoothly. Regarding summative evaluation, measures examining trainee cognition, behavior, and organization-level results provide information about how much trainees have changed as a result of taking the ethics training. The implications of effective training program evaluation are discussed.

  12. Staying connected: online education engagement and retention using educational technology tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Jose

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article is to inform educators about the use of currently available educational technology tools to promote student retention, engagement and interaction in online courses. Educational technology tools include content management systems, podcasts, video lecture capture technology and electronic discussion boards. Successful use of educational technology tools requires planning, organization and use of effective learning strategies.

  13. [Innovations in continuing/permanent education methods for the intensive care nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Guillamet, B; Guillamet Lloveras, A; Martínez Estalella, G; Pérez Ramírez, F

    2014-01-01

    Intensive care nursing is carried out in a dynamic environment characterized by the continuous incorporation of new technologies, approaches to care and a request for safety, participation and transparency by the public. Continuing/permanent intensive care nursing training in the acquisition of new competencies is key in this setting. In order to achieve this goal, simulation and problem based learning should be incorporated as essential methodologies to teach these skills. At the same time research should be done on which attitudes, competences, and knowledge are necessary to increase their intellectual knowledge. The core characteristics of ICU and its nursing should allow a deep change in their approach to continuing/permanent nursing education. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEEIUC. All rights reserved.

  14. Time for TIGER to ROAR! Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Hubner, Ursula; Shaw, Toria; Blake, Rachelle; Ball, Marion

    2017-11-01

    Information Technology (IT) continues to evolve and develop with electronic devices and systems becoming integral to healthcare in every country. This has led to an urgent need for all professions working in healthcare to be knowledgeable and skilled in informatics. The Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER) Initiative was established in 2006 in the United States to develop key areas of informatics in nursing. One of these was to integrate informatics competencies into nursing curricula and life-long learning. In 2009, TIGER developed an informatics competency framework which outlines numerous IT competencies required for professional practice and this work helped increase the emphasis of informatics in nursing education standards in the United States. In 2012, TIGER expanded to the international community to help synthesise informatics competencies for nurses and pool educational resources in health IT. This transition led to a new interprofessional, interdisciplinary approach, as health informatics education needs to expand to other clinical fields and beyond. In tandem, a European Union (EU) - United States (US) Collaboration on eHealth began a strand of work which focuses on developing the IT skills of the health workforce to ensure technology can be adopted and applied in healthcare. One initiative within this is the EU*US eHealth Work Project, which started in 2016 and is mapping the current structure and gaps in health IT skills and training needs globally. It aims to increase educational opportunities by developing a model for open and scalable access to eHealth training programmes. With this renewed initiative to incorporate informatics into the education and training of nurses and other health professionals globally, it is time for educators, researchers, practitioners and policy makers to join in and ROAR with TIGER. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Distance Education at Silesian University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Klosowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Distance Learning Platform used by Silesian University of Technology. Distance Learning Platform is based on modular object-oriented dynamic learning environment, represents LMS (Learning Management Systems technology, a software package designed to help educators create quality online courses. Currently on Distance Learning Platform at Silesian University of Technology are available over 520 online courses created for students of twelve University's faculties. Number of Distance Learning Platform users exceeds 12000. Distance Learning Platform works as typically asynchronous e-learning service, but in the future more synchronous e-learning services will be added. Distance Learning Platform has great potential to create a successful elearning experience by providing a plethora of excellent tools that can be used to enhance conventional classroom instruction, in hybrid courses, or any distance learning arrangements.

  16. Effective learning environments – the process of creating and maintaining an online continuing education tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sharon Davies,1 Gianni Roberto Lorello,2 Kristi Downey,1 Zeev Friedman1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sinai Health System, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Continuing medical education (CME is an indispensable part of maintaining physicians’ competency. Since attending conferences requires clinical absenteeism and is not universally available, online learning has become popular. The purpose of this study is to conduct a retrospective analysis examining the creation process of an anesthesia website for adherence to the published guidelines and, in turn, provide an illustration of developing accredited online CME. Using Kern’s guide to curriculum development, our website analysis confirmed each of the six steps was met. As well, the technical design features are consistent with the published literature on efficient online educational courses. Analysis of the database from 3937 modules and 1628 site evaluations reveals the site is being used extensively and is effective as demonstrated by the participants’ examination results, content evaluations and reports of improvements in patient management. Utilizing technology to enable distant learning has become a priority for many educators. When creating accredited online CME programs, course developers should understand the educational principles and technical design characteristics that foster effective online programs. This study provides an illustration of incorporating these features. It also demonstrates significant participation in online CME by anesthesiologists and highlights the need for more accredited programs. Keywords: anesthesia, online, continuing medical education

  17. A Review of Technology Education in Ireland; a Changing Technological Environment Promoting Design Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Keelin; Phelan, Pat

    2014-01-01

    In Ireland, Technology Education's structure and organisation across the levels of education is not delivered or governed in a coherent manner. Technology Education in primary level education, for students between 5 and 12 years of age, does not explicitly exist as a separate subject. In primary level education, Social, Environmental and…

  18. The Pacific Century. Opportunities and Challenges for Continuing Education, NUCEA Region VI Conference Proceedings (Turtle Bay, Hawaii, October 12-15, 1986).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Univ. Continuing Education Association, Los Angeles, CA. Region VI.

    These 15 presentations are from a conference held to draw attention to the importance of countries bordering the Pacific Ocean and their contributions to continuing education. They provide perspectives on continuing education opportunities from the standpoint of programming, marketing, technology, and intercultural relations. Presentations include…

  19. Mandatory continuing professional education in pharmacy: the Singapore experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Hui-Gek; Pua, Yong-Hao; Subari, Nur Azah

    2013-08-01

    Mandatory Continuing Professional Education (CPE) for the renewal of pharmacists' practising certificate was implemented in Singapore in 2008 OBJECTIVE: To study pharmacists' perceptions and attitudes about the impact of mandatory CPE in Singapore. Singapore. Internet-based questionnaire survey, conducted between May and June 2011. Pharmacists' perceptions and attitudes toward mandatory CPE and the perceived difficulty in fulfilling the CPE requirements. The overall survey response rate was 52 % (840/1,609). Of the respondents, 32 % were non-practising, 49 % were practising in patient care areas, and 19 % were practising in non-patient care areas. More than half the pharmacists agreed that mandatory CPE (1) enhanced or increased their knowledge base and skills (70 %; 95 % CI 67-73 %), (2) motivated them to continually learn (64 %; 95 % CI, 60-67 %), and (3) motivated them to reflect on their professional practice or work (58 %; 95 % CI, 54-61 %). Mandatory CPE was not perceived to enhance or increase employability. Non-practising pharmacists appeared to have the greatest difficulty meeting the CPE requirements. In general, pharmacists value mandatory CPE more for positive professional reasons than for employability reasons. The survey results may serve as useful baseline data for future studies of pharmacists' perceptions and attitudes toward CPE in Singapore.

  20. Reflections on Preparing Educators to Evaluate the Efficacy of Educational Technology: An Interview with Joseph South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Glen; Spector, J. Michael; Persichitte, Kay; Meiers, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    Joseph South, an educational researcher, technology consultant, and former director of the U.S. Office of Educational Technology participated in a research initiative on Educational Technology Efficacy Research organized by the Jefferson Education Accelerator, Digital Promise, and the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia. The…

  1. Innovative Outcome Assessment in Graduate Business Education and Continuous Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Satya P.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The changed environment of global economy with painful austerity and restructuring measures causing severe economic dislocations in many diverse parts of the world have brought into focus the usefulness and value of management education in general and graduate management education in particular. The various accrediting bodies in America, Europe and Asia in recent years have shifted their emphasis to ensuring that learning outcomes of students in the program are tied to the goals and missions of the academic institution and meet the needs of the external partners of the academic enterprise that the students go on to serve. This has resulted in rapid advances in the field of innovative outcome assessment, and measurement of competency in performing higher order tasks as well as demonstration of traits related to successful transition into the business world and contribution to the success of the enterprise where the students are employed. The mere assessment/measurement of traits is not the end, but rather the first step in the cycle of continuous improvement in the tradition of the Plan-Do-Study-Act tradition of TQM. The goal is to identify shortcomings or opportunities for improvement via the assessment process and then to “close the loop” by introducing planned changes to improve system performance.

  2. A continuing education preference survey of public health graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, S J; Perkocha, V A; Novotny, T E

    1995-01-01

    Continuing education (CE) is a vital component in strengthening the public health work force, and its importance has been emphasized by the Institute of Medicine and the Council for Education in Public Health. A CE preference survey was undertaken of alumni of the University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health (UCB-SPH). Questionnaires were mailed to a one-third random sample of 1,500 graduates from 1981-1992 who currently reside in U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Region IX. A response rate of 57% was achieved. Results of the survey show that CE activities are highly desired among respondents. Overall, 58% of respondents prefer a half-day to one-day seminar format during regular business hours, as opposed to night classes. They prefer a traditional didactic classroom presentation that is within one hour's automobile travel. The optimal setting for CE courses would be at the University of California, Berkeley, or in-house at their institution. Subject areas of interest noted by respondents are health policy development, communication in public health, community involvement, and research. Schools of public health may respond to the CE needs of their alumni through a variety of channels, including the mainstreaming of CE as part of a school's teaching responsibility, special seminars or institutes, extension courses through the larger university system, distance-based learning, and through a separately funded for-profit CE activity.

  3. Community hospital and medical school cooperation in continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jay, S J; Casebeer, L; Woods, J R; Nyhuis, A W; O'Toole, J B

    1995-02-01

    To determine the extent and trends of cooperation in continuing medical education (CME) between community teaching hospitals and medical schools in the United States. A questionnaire was sent in September 1992 to the directors of CME at 276 teaching hospital members of the Association for Hospital Medical Education (AHME). The survey was designed to answer two questions: (1) What is the extent of cooperation between hospital CME providers and medical schools? (2) In the next three years will community hospitals seek competitive or collaborative relationships in CME with medical schools? By late April 1993, 216 (78%) of the questionnaires had been returned. Of these, 177 (64% of the sample) were analyzed. Of the responding hospitals, 91 (52%) cooperated with 92 medical schools in CME; 75 (45%) of the hospitals planned to increase cooperation. Only ten (11%) of the hospitals described their current CME relationship with a medical school as "competitive in most areas"; 23 (14%) expected to increase competition in the next three years. Forty-one (24%) of the respondents were part of a community hospital CME consortium; only 20 (16%) of the other institutions expected to participate in a consortium in the next three years. Hospital size and membership in the Association of American Medical Colleges' Council of Teaching Hospitals were generally correlated with current and future competition in CME with a medical school and likely participation in a community CME consortium. The majority of teaching hospital members of the AHME perceived that they would have cooperative relationships in CME with affiliated medical schools in the three years following the survey. These collaborative relationships should provide an important basis for the further planning and development of medical education consortia.

  4. Nurses' attitudes toward continuing formal education: a comparison by level of education and geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Tanya K

    2012-01-01

    The education of nurses has an influence on patient safety and outcomes, the nursing shortage, the faculty shortage, and nurses' attitudes and actions. This article reports on a dissertation study designed to examine the attitudes of nurses, initially registered with an associate degree or diploma in nursing, toward continuing formal education. Actively licensed registered nurses in the eastern and western United States (n=535) participated. The main finding of this study was that, although nurses held positive attitudes overall, attitudes ranked barely above neutral. The findings suggest that work needs to be done to improve nurses' attitudes toward continuing formal education and research needs to be undertaken to understand what would entice nurses back to school. Implications for nursing practice and education are discussed along with suggestions for future research.

  5. Programmes of Educational Technology in China: Looking Backward, Thinking Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuyin, Xu; Jianli, Jiao

    2010-01-01

    There is a history of programmes in educational technology in colleges and universities in China going back about 70 years. This paper briefly reviews the developmental history of the educational technology programme in China, elaborates the status-quo of the programme and looks ahead into the future trends of educational technology development in…

  6. A Systems Definition of Educational Technology in Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luppicini, Rocci

    2005-01-01

    Conceptual development in the field of Educational Technology provides crucial theoretical grounding for ongoing research and practice. This essay draws from theoretical developments both within and external to the field of Educational Technology to articulate a systems definition of Educational Technology in Society. A systems definition of…

  7. Quality and Characteristics of Recent Research in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Scott D.; Daugherty, Jenny

    2008-01-01

    The focus of research in technology education has evolved throughout its history as the field changed from industrial arts to technology education (Spencer & Rogers, 2006). With the move to technology education, the field has begun to broaden its focus to better understand the teaching, learning, curriculum, and policy implications of preparing…

  8. Applying Sustainable Systems Development Approach to Educational Technology Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Information technology (IT) is an essential part of modern education. The roles and contributions of technology to education have been thoroughly documented in academic and professional literature. Despite the benefits, the use of educational technology systems (ETS) also creates a significant impact on the environment, primarily due to energy…

  9. Organization and Management of Continuing Education in German and Finnish Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawacki-Richter, Olaf; Knust, Michaela; Hanft, Anke

    2009-01-01

    In 2006, an international comparison study investigated the organization and management of university continuing education (UCE). The Finnish continuing education system proved to be especially advanced in this study. On the other hand, it became clear that Germany was still lagging behind in continuing education. In this article, German and…

  10. Continuing education requirements among State Occupational Therapy Regulatory Boards in the United States of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the contents of each state’s occupational therapy (OT) regulatory board requirements regarding licensees’ acquisition of continuing education units in the United States of America. Methods Data related to continuing education requirements from each OT regulatory board of all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the United States were reviewed and categorized by two reviewers. Analysis was conducted based on the categorization of the continuing education requirements and activities required, allowed, and not allowed/not mentioned for continuing education units. Results Findings revealed non-uniformity and inconsistency of continuing education requirements for licensure renewal between OT regulatory boards and was coupled with lack of specific criteria for various continuing education activities. Continuing education requirements were not tailored to meet the needs of individual licensee’s current and anticipated professional role and job responsibilities, with a negative bias towards presentation and publication allowed for continuing education units. Few boards mandated continuing education topics on ethics related to OT practice within each renewal cycle. Conclusion OT regulatory boards should move towards unifying the reporting format of continuing education requirements across all states to reduce ambiguity and to ensure licensees are equipped to provide ethical and competent practice. Efforts could be made to enact continuing education requirements specific to the primary role of a particular licensee. Finally, assigning the amount of continuing education credits to be awarded for different activities should be based on research evidence rather than arbitrary determination. PMID:27780351

  11. Continuing Education Needs and the Professional Reading of School Library Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrobe, Kathy

    1992-01-01

    Reports results of a survey of school library media specialists in Oklahoma regarding continuing education activities and topics. Data are presented on the relative importance of several continuing education activities, percentage of respondents regularly reading specific journals, and continuing education topics ranked by respondents' prioritized…

  12. 24 CFR 206.308 - Continuing education requirements of counselors listed on the HECM Counselor Roster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuing education requirements... MORTGAGE INSURANCE HECM Counselor Roster § 206.308 Continuing education requirements of counselors listed... successful completion of such continuing education, and such evidence must be made available to HUD upon...

  13. Continuing education requirements among State Occupational Therapy Regulatory Boards in the United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Savannah R; Crifasi, Kristen A; Marinelli, Christina M; Yuen, Hon K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the contents of each state's occupational therapy (OT) regulatory board requirements regarding licensees' acquisition of continuing education units in the United States of America. Data related to continuing education requirements from each OT regulatory board of all 50 states and the District of Columbia in the United States were reviewed and categorized by two reviewers. Analysis was conducted based on the categorization of the continuing education requirements and activities required, allowed, and not allowed/not mentioned for continuing education units. Findings revealed non-uniformity and inconsistency of continuing education requirements for licensure renewal between OT regulatory boards and was coupled with lack of specific criteria for various continuing education activities. Continuing education requirements were not tailored to meet the needs of individual licensee's current and anticipated professional role and job responsibilities, with a negative bias towards presentation and publication allowed for continuing education units. Few boards mandated continuing education topics on ethics related to OT practice within each renewal cycle. OT regulatory boards should move towards unifying the reporting format of continuing education requirements across all states to reduce ambiguity and to ensure licensees are equipped to provide ethical and competent practice. Efforts could be made to enact continuing education requirements specific to the primary role of a particular licensee. Finally, assigning the amount of continuing education credits to be awarded for different activities should be based on research evidence rather than arbitrary determination.

  14. 25 CFR 163.41 - Postgraduation recruitment, continuing education and training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Postgraduation recruitment, continuing education and... Training § 163.41 Postgraduation recruitment, continuing education and training programs. (a... agency's performance standards, during the internship period. (c) Continuing education and training. (1...

  15. A survey of interprofessional education in chiropractic continuing education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Edward M; Lisi, Anthony J

    2014-10-01

    Objective : The purpose of this study is to describe the state of chiropractic continuing education vis-à-vis interprofessional education (IPE) with medical doctors (MD) in a survey of a sample of US doctors of chiropractic (DC) and through a review of policies. Methods : Forty-five chiropractors with experience in interprofessional settings completed an electronic survey of their experiences and perceptions regarding DC-MD IPE in chiropractic continuing education (CE). The licensing bodies of the 50 US states and the District of Columbia were queried to assess the applicability of continuing medical education (CME) to chiropractic relicensure. Results : The majority (89.1%) of survey respondents who attend CE-only events reported that they rarely to never experienced MD-IPE at these activities. Survey respondents commonly attended CME-only events, and 84.5% stated that they commonly to very commonly experienced MD-IPE at these activities. More than half (26 of 51) of the licensing bodies did not provide sufficient information to determine if CME was applicable to DC relicensure. Thirteen jurisdictions (25.5%) do not, and 12 jurisdictions (23.5%) do accept CME credits for chiropractic relicensure. Conclusion : The majority of integrated practice DCs we surveyed reported little to no IPE occurring at CE-only events, yet significant IPE occurring at CME events. However, we found only 23.5% of chiropractic licensing bodies allow CME credit to apply to chiropractic relicensure. These factors may hinder DC-MD IPE in continuing education.

  16. Combining Evidence-Based Practice, Learner-Guided Education, and Continuing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew, Tahnee J; Theiss, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    Personal interest and investment in a topic can bring learning to life and affect real change in nursing practice. This article explains an innovative approach to combining learner-guided education and continuing education credit through a three-part approach to implementing evidence-based practice. This method can be used for nurses in any practice setting to generate learner interest and participation, while improving patient care. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Discursive Constructions of "Teacher" in an Educational Technology Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jenny; Loke, Swee-Kin

    2016-01-01

    The integration of technology with teaching and learning is a significant area of research in the educational technology field. Teachers play an instrumental role in technology integration, and many teacher-related factors have been identified that predict technology use and integration in educational settings. How teachers are represented in the…

  18. Revolution in Communication Technologies: Impact on Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, M.

    2015-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies have transformed the way the world lives and thinks. Education, especially, Distance Education is no different. While the technologies per se are an important factor, the social milieus in which these technologies are implemented are equally important. Technological convergence in the Indian context…

  19. Analysis of Engineering Content within Technology Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, Todd D.; Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2011-01-01

    In order to effectively teach engineering, technology teachers need to be taught engineering content, concepts, and related pedagogy. Some researchers posit that technology education programs may not have enough content to prepare technology teachers to teach engineering design. Certain technology teacher education programs have responded by…

  20. Mobile Learning and Integration of Mobile Technologies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Bhargava, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Mobile technologies have a huge potential to transform education provided these technologies are designed and implemented in such a way that they are relevant to the social and cultural context of learning. Clearly, the application, implementation, and design of mobile technology in the global educational context pose technological and…

  1. Conceptions of Environment in a Continuing Education Course for Science Teachers in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Matos, Mauricio; Barbosa, Paulo; Coelho-Matos, Myrna Elisa Chagas

    2012-01-01

    Studies focusing on environmental education and continuing education of science teachers play an important role in the science education area. This research analyzed conceptions of environment in a continuing education course for science teachers developed at the University of Sao Paulo, Brazil. The analysis of the material was made using a…

  2. Humanistic Model in Adult Education and Science and Technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Humanistic Model in Adult Education and Science and Technology: Challenges of the 21 st Century Developing Nation. ... Annals of Modern Education ... is the result of the scientific and technological advancement, this paper considers humanistic model in adult education as liberal education appropriate for adult age.

  3. Beyond Change Blindness: Embracing the Technology Revolution in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Kimberly Kode; DeSantis, Josh

    2017-01-01

    The pace of education technology innovation outpaces many professors' abilities to thoughtfully integrate new tools in their teaching practice. This poses challenges for higher education faculty as well as those responsible for planning professional development in higher education. This article explores recent trends in education technology and…

  4. Pesticide Applicator Profiling: Using Polycom[R] Distance Delivery for Continuing Education and Characterizing Florida's Licensed Applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishel, Fred; Langeland, Ken

    2011-01-01

    The University of Florida offers continuing education units (CEUs) via distance technology using Polycom[R] to meet requirements for applicators of pesticides to renew their licenses. A large statewide event conducted in 2010 also included a needs assessment of this group concerning CEUs. Results indicate that these applicators strongly prefer…

  5. Wilberforce Power Technology in Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Edward M.; Buffinger, D. R.; Hehemann, D. G.; Breen, M. L.; Raffaelle, R. P.

    1999-01-01

    The Wilberforce Power Technology in Education Program is a multipart program. Three key parts of this program will be described. They are: (1) WISE-The Wilberforce Summer Intensive Experience. This annual offering is an educational program which is designed to provide both background reinforcement and a focus on study skills to give the participants a boost in their academic performance throughout their academic careers. It is offered to entering Wilberforce students. Those students who take advantage of WISE learn to improve important skills which enable them to work at higher levels in mathematics, science and engineering courses throughout their college careers, but most notably in the first year of college study. (2) Apply technology to reaming. This is being done in several ways including creating an electronic chemistry text with hypertext links to a glossary to help the students deal with the large new vocabulary required to describe and understand chemistry. It is also being done by converting lecture materials for the Biochemistry class to PowerPoint format. Technology is also being applied to learning by exploring simulation software of scientific instrumentation. (3) Wilberforce participation in collaborative research with NASA's John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. This research has focused on two areas in the past year. The first of these is the deposition of solar cell materials. A second area involves the development of polymeric materials for incorporation into thin film batteries.

  6. Emerging Communication Technology and Examination Malpractices in Nigerian Educational Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olufemi Sunday Adeoye

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The breakthrough in communication technology, especially that of GSM phones, in Nigeria is one of the best things that has happened to the nation in terms of its technological advancement. In Nigeria, GSM means Telecom Explosion. The GSM revolution began in August 2001 and changed the face of Information and Communications Technology in Nigeria. It is much easier to reach anybody that you have his / her number, whether they are in the village or in their closet unless in a place where there is no network of the service provider. As revolutionary as GSM may seem to be, its negative effect on our educational sector is of great concern. The ongoing war against examination malpractice is yet to take its toll on perpetrators as they have devised a new method to continue their game through the cell phone technology. Described as e-cheating, the cell phone technology is providing students a smart way to beat the best effort of stakeholders to stamp out the menace. This paper examines GSM technology, the various ways in which cell phones are employed to cheat and suggestions on how to stop e-cheating through cell phones.

  7. [Continuous medical education of general practitioners/family doctors in chronic wound care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinozić, Tamara; Kovacević, Jadranka

    2014-10-01

    A number of healthcare professionals, specialists in different fields and with different levels of education, as well as non-healthcare professionals, are involved in the care of chronic wound patients, thus forming a multidisciplinary team that is not only responsible for the course and outcome of treatment, but also for the patient quality of life. Family doctor is also member of the team the task of which is to prevent, diagnose, monitor and anticipate complications and relapses, as well as complete recovery of chronic wound patients, with the overall care continuing even after the wound has healed, or is involved in palliative care. A family medicine practitioner with specialized education and their team of associates in the primary health care, along with material conditions and equipment improvement, can provide quality care for patients with peripheral cardiovascular diseases and chronic wounds, organized according to the holistic approach. It is essential that all professional associations of family medicine as well as professional associations of other specialties - fields that are involved in wound prevention and treatment - be included in developing the continuous medical education program. The benefits of modern information technology should be used to good advantage. The education should be adapted to the needs of family practitioners in terms of the form, place, time, volume, financial affordability and choice of topic. The interest shown in team education should be transformed into specialized programs in the creation of which it is essential to include both physicians and nurses and their respective professional associations. Special attention should be paid to education and training of young doctors/nurses, those with less work experience, those that have not yet been part of such education, those that lack experience in working with wound patients, those whose teams deal mostly with elderly patients, and also residents in family medicine and

  8. Students' Perceptions of and Experiences With Educational Technology: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Hedgpeth, Mari-Wells; McWhorter, Dan

    2016-05-18

    It is generally assumed that incoming students in medical education programs will be better equipped for the "digital age" given their younger age and an educational upbringing in which technology was seemingly omnipresent. In particular, many assume that today's medical students are more likely to hold positive attitudes and increased comfortability with technology and possess greater information technology (IT) skills. The purpose of this study was to compare responses of incoming veterinary medical students to a series of IT-related questions contained in a common questionnaire over the course of a 10-year period (2005-2015) to discern whether students' attitudes have improved and uses and comfortability with technology have increased as anticipated. A survey measuring attitudes and preferences, computing experience, and technology ownership was administered each year for the past 10 years to incoming veterinary medical students at a large veterinary school in the United States. Students' responses to survey items were compared at 3 data points (2005, 2010, and 2015). Today's incoming veterinary medical students tend to indicate the same desire to improve skills using spreadsheets and web page design as incoming students from 10 years ago. It seems that despite technological advances and increased exposure to such applications and skills, there remains a challenge for students to "keep up" with the ever evolving technology. Moreover, although students continue to report they are very comfortable with using a computer (and related devices), many use their computers as typewriters or word processors, as opposed to a means for performing more advanced computing functions. In general, today's medical students are not expert computer users as many assume. Despite an upbringing in a digitized world, many students still lack many basic computing skills.

  9. To Move Forward, We Must Be Mobile: Practical Uses of Mobile Technology in Literacy Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbye, Nicholas E.; Elsener, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to shift the definition of what it means to be literate. As literacy educators in teacher preparation programs, we must consider how emerging and mobile technology may be used within coursework to not only create multiple ways to conceptualize teaching 21st century literacy, but also as a professional imperative. This article…

  10. Nordic science and technology entrepreneurship education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warhuus, Jan P.; Basaiawmoit, Rajiv Vaid

    As a university discipline, entrepreneurship education (EEd) has moved from whether it can be taught, to what and how it should be taught (Kuratko 2005) and beyond the walls of the business school (Hindle 2007), where a need for a tailored, disciplinary approach is becoming apparent. Within science......, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) EEd, tacit knowledge of what works and why is growing, while reflections to activate this knowledge are often kept local or reported to the EEd community as single cases, which are difficult compare and contrast for the purpose of deriving cross-case patterns......, findings, and knowledge. The objective of this paper is to decode this tacit knowledge within Nordic science and technology institutions, and use it to provide guidance for future EEd program designs and improvements....

  11. Pursuit of nuclear science and technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangacharyulu, C.

    2009-01-01

    While it is quite encouraging to note that there is a nuclear renaissance underway around the world, there is a growing concern that the knowledge-base of nuclear technologies will be lost. Several international organizations are making concerted efforts to avert this situation by establishing collaborative workshops etc. In Western Canada, our challenges and opportunities are many-fold. As a uranium mining region, we can engage our economy in the full life-cycle of the nuclear energy industry. It is also important that we maintain and augment nuclear technologies. We need to develop the infrastructure to jump-start the education and training of the youth. We are taking a multi-prong approach to this end. We are initiating specializations in undergraduate programs which emphasize nuclear radiation physics and technology. We are collaborating with Canadian organizations such as University Network of Excellence in Nuclear Engineering (UNENE) and University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT). We are organizing collaborations with our colleagues at foreign institutions in Europe and Asia to provide an international component. We are also working with local industry and health organizations to provide a wide-range of learning opportunities to students by engaging them in research projects of immediate interest to professionals. My presentation will focus on these developments and we will also seek thoughts and suggestions for future collaborations.

  12. Uptake of Space Technologies - An Educational Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacai, Hina; Zolotikova, Svetlana; Young, Mandy; Cowsill, Rhys; Wells, Alan; Monks, Paul; Archibald, Alexandra; Smith, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    Earth Observation data and remote sensing technologies have been maturing into useful tools that can be utilised by local authorities and businesses to aid in activates such as monitoring climate change trends and managing agricultural land and water uses. The European Earth observation programme Copernicus, previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security), provides the means to collect and process multi-source EO and environmental data that supports policy developments at the European level. At the regional and local level, the Copernicus programme has been initiated through Regional Contact Office (RCO), which provide knowledge, training, and access to expertise both locally and at a European level through the network of RCOs established across Europe in the DORIS_Net (Downstream Observatory organised by Regions active In Space - Network) project (Grant Agreement No. 262789 Coordination and support action (Coordinating) FP7 SPA.2010.1.1-07 "Fostering downstream activities and links with regions"). In the East Midlands UK RCO, educational and training workshops and modules have been organised to highlight the wider range of tools and application available to businesses and local authorities in the region. Engagement with businesses and LRA highlighted the need to have a tiered system of training to build awareness prior to investigating innovative solutions and space technology uses for societal benefits. In this paper we outline education and training programmes which have been developed at G-STEP (GMES - Science and Technology Education Partnership), University of Leicester, UK to open up the Copernicus programme through the Regional Contact Office to downstream users such as local businesses and LRAs. Innovative methods to introduce the operational uses of Space technologies in real cases through e-learning modules and web-based tools will be described and examples of good practice for educational training in these sectors will be

  13. Re-engineering the process of medical imaging physics and technology education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprawls, Perry

    2005-09-01

    The extensive availability of digital technology provides an opportunity for enhancing both the effectiveness and efficiency of virtually all functions in the process of medical imaging physics and technology education and training. This includes degree granting academic programs within institutions and a wide spectrum of continuing education lifelong learning activities. Full achievement of the advantages of technology-enhanced education (e-learning, etc.) requires an analysis of specific educational activities with respect to desired outcomes and learning objectives. This is followed by the development of strategies and resources that are based on established educational principles. The impact of contemporary technology comes from its ability to place learners into enriched learning environments. The full advantage of a re-engineered and implemented educational process involves changing attitudes and functions of learning facilitators (teachers) and resource allocation and sharing both within and among institutions.

  14. Development and evaluation of continuing education course in renal nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavetian, Mirey; Rizk, Rana

    2016-02-01

    Competent renal dietitians are crucial for better patient compliance and clinical outcomes, specifically in critical settings. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate an evidence-based course in renal dietetics for dietitians working in health care systems where dietetic specialization is absent. Fifteen licensed dietitians working with hemodialysis patients in Lebanon were randomly recruited to participate in the course. The latter was developed by the study's primary investigator, according to evidence-based practice guidelines, and focused on all aspects of renal nutrition. Total course duration was 28 hours spread over a 2 month period. Dietitians' knowledge in renal nutrition was tested pre- and post-training through a 23-item questionnaire; the total score was expressed in percentage (insufficient knowledge). Paired-samples t test was used for statistical analysis. Overall knowledge of the dietitians significantly improved post-training and reached satisfactory levels (pre: 38.75 ± 17.20%, post: 62.08 ± 21.85%). Sub-analysis of the change in the knowledge showed significant and satisfactory improvement only in 3 topics: 1) correct body weight use in calculations, 2) energy estimation method and 3) phosphorus management. Knowledge in the fluid management significantly improved but did not achieve a satisfactory level. The course significantly improved dietitians' knowledge in renal nutrition. If adopted as part of the continuing education of dietitians in countries that lack dietetic specializations, it may serve the first step towards improving health care practice.

  15. Recruitment of rural healthcare professionals for live continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holuby, Ronnie Scott; Pellegrin, Karen L; Barbato, Anna; Ciarleglio, Anita

    2015-01-01

    The availability of rural healthcare is a growing concern in the United States as fewer healthcare providers choose to work in rural areas. Accessing quality continuing education (CE) for rural healthcare practitioners (HCPs) remains a challenge and may pose a barrier to quality care. To maximize attendance at a live, in-person, free CE program focusing on geriatric medication and issues specifically targeted to HCPs in rural areas, two methods were implemented sequentially. The first method used formal advertising implemented by a professional marketing service to promote CE events. The second method enlisted local healthcare organizations and physician groups to promote the CE event to their employees. Cost per attendee was calculated for comparison. Professional marketing services recruited 31 HCPs (March 2011) and resulted in a per-participant recruitment cost of US$428.62. Local healthcare organizations and physician groups' marketing recruited 48 HCPs (July-August 2011) and resulted in a per-participant recruitment cost of US$55.19. Providing free CE coordinated through local healthcare organizations and physician groups was the most cost-effective method of recruiting rural HCPs for CE. Formal advertising added cost without increasing the number of participants per event. Although this is the first study of the cost-effectiveness of recruitment methods targeting HCPs in rural areas, results are consistent with research on cost-effectiveness of outreach to rural lay community members.

  16. Distance Learning Course for Healthcare Professionals: Continuing Education in Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Vagner Kunz; Valentini, Dirceu Felipe; Rocha, Marcos Vinícius Vieira; de Almeida, Carlos Podalírio Borges; Cazella, Sílvio Cesar; Silva, Denise Rossato

    2017-12-01

    Continuing education of healthcare workers (HCWs) is an essential strategy for the control of tuberculosis (TB) transmission, enabling HCWs in early detection and appropriate treatment of TB cases. We developed a distance learning (DL) course on TB for nurses. We conducted a quasi-experimental before and after study to evaluate the DL community at the participant's learning level. In addition, to evaluate the DL community at the level of participant satisfaction, a cross-sectional study was carried out after the course. Nurses involved in active inpatient or outpatient care of patients were recruited to participate in the study. Sixty-six participants started and completed the course and they were included in the analysis. The overall mean pretest and post-test scores were 10.3 ± 2.2 and 11.4 ± 2.7, respectively. Participants increased their knowledge to a statistically significant degree (p world (10.6%); number of TB cases in Brazil (36.4%); contagiousness of latent TB infection (LTBI) (28.8%); and definition of active case finding (45.5%). Course feedback was mostly positive, with majority of users saying they were satisfied or totally satisfied. A brief DL course on TB was associated with some improvement in knowledge among nurses. The baseline knowledge was low regarding TB epidemiologic data, concepts on LTBI, and active case finding. This finding emphasizes the need to further improve the competencies and knowledge of nurses.

  17. Technology and Early Childhood Education: A Technology Integration Professional Development Model for Practicing Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace

    2009-01-01

    Despite the promise of technology in education, many practicing teachers are faced with multiple challenges of effectively integrating technology into their classroom instruction. Additionally, teachers who are successful incorporating educational technology into their instruction recognize that although technology tools have the potential to help…

  18. What Is Educational Technology? An Inquiry into the Meaning, Use, and Reciprocity of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhana, Arun

    2014-01-01

    This position paper explores the ambiguity of technology, toward refined understanding of Educational Technology. The purpose of education is described by John Dewey as growing, or habitual learning. Two philosophical conceptions of technology are reviewed. Dewey positions inquiry as a technology that creates knowledge. Val Dusek offers a…

  19. New Perspectives: Technology Teacher Education and Engineering Design

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Roger B.

    2006-01-01

    Initiatives to integrate engineering design within the field of technology education are increasingly evident (Lewis, 2005; Wicklein, 2006). Alliances between technology education and engineering were prominent in the development of the Standards for Technological Literacy (International Technology Education Association, 2000), and leaders from both disciplines have expressed support for the outcomes described in the Standards (Bybee, 2000; Council of the National Academy of Engineering, 2000...

  20. Predicting the Continued Use of Internet-Based Learning Technologies: The Role of Habit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limayem, Moez; Cheung, Christy M. K.

    2011-01-01

    The proliferation and advance of Internet-based technologies create expanded opportunities for educators to provide students with better learning experiences. Although current studies focus mostly on the learning processes and learning outcomes, this article examines the students' usage behaviour with Internet-based learning technologies across…