WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology directors association

  1. Leadership Qualities of Assistant/Associate Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Martha J.

    1992-01-01

    Describes job responsibilities of assistant/associate library directors. Changes affecting libraries as a result of automation and their impact on management are discussed, and two studies of public and academic libraries that examined ratings of managerial skills and competencies by directors and assistant directors are reviewed. (nine…

  2. Director, Information Management and Technology Division (IMTD ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Director, Information Management and Technology promotes and leads a professional and integrated corporate approach to information management and ... Special projects are designed to provide managers and employees with appropriate working tools, and to improve the overall effectiveness of general work and ...

  3. 2015 Science Mission Directorate Technology Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seablom, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The role of the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) is to enable NASA to achieve its science goals in the context of the Nation's science agenda. SMD's strategic decisions regarding future missions and scientific pursuits are guided by Agency goals, input from the science community including the recommendations set forth in the National Research Council (NRC) decadal surveys and a commitment to preserve a balanced program across the major science disciplines. Toward this end, each of the four SMD science divisions -- Heliophysics, Earth Science, Planetary Science, and Astrophysics -- develops fundamental science questions upon which to base future research and mission programs. Often the breakthrough science required to answer these questions requires significant technological innovation, e.g., instruments or platforms with capabilities beyond the current state of the art. SMD's targeted technology investments fill technology gaps, enabling NASA to build the challenging and complex missions that accomplish groundbreaking science.

  4. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into NASA Programs Associated With the Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  5. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Aeronautics and Mission Directorate (ARMD) programs. Other Government and commercial program managers can also find this information useful.

  6. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Science Mission Directorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) programs. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this information useful.

  7. Space Technology Mission Directorate: Game Changing Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddis, Stephen W.

    2015-01-01

    NASA and the aerospace community have deep roots in manufacturing technology and innovation. Through it's Game Changing Development Program and the Advanced Manufacturing Technology Project NASA develops and matures innovative, low-cost manufacturing processes and products. Launch vehicle propulsion systems are a particular area of interest since they typically comprise a large percentage of the total vehicle cost and development schedule. NASA is currently working to develop and utilize emerging technologies such as additive manufacturing (i.e. 3D printing) and computational materials and processing tools that could dramatically improve affordability, capability, and reduce schedule for rocket propulsion hardware.

  8. 27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  9. Assistant director of intramural sports and technology recognized for innovative contributions

    OpenAIRE

    Kropff, Catherine L.

    2009-01-01

    Jennifer Rezac, assistant director of intramural sports and technology at Virginia Tech, was recognized at the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association (NIRSA) Annual Conference in Charlotte, N.C., in April for her contributions to the Virginia Tech Recreational Sports department.

  10. 75 FR 16491 - Science and Technology Directorate; Submission for Review; Information Collection Request for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0026] Science and Technology Directorate; Submission for Review; Information Collection Request for the Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate First Responders Community of Practice AGENCY: Science and Technology Directorate, DHS...

  11. Results of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs (ADROP) Survey of Radiation Oncology Residency Program Directors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, Eleanor; Abdel-Wahab, May; Spangler, Ann E.; Lawton, Colleen A.; Amdur, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To survey the radiation oncology residency program directors on the topics of departmental and institutional support systems, residency program structure, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requirements, and challenges as program director. Methods: A survey was developed and distributed by the leadership of the Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs to all radiation oncology program directors. Summary statistics, medians, and ranges were collated from responses. Results: Radiation oncology program directors had implemented all current required aspects of the ACGME Outcome Project into their training curriculum. Didactic curricula were similar across programs nationally, but research requirements and resources varied widely. Program directors responded that implementation of the ACGME Outcome Project and the external review process were among their greatest challenges. Protected time was the top priority for program directors. Conclusions: The Association of Directors of Radiation Oncology Programs recommends that all radiation oncology program directors have protected time and an administrative stipend to support their important administrative and educational role. Departments and institutions should provide adequate and equitable resources to the program directors and residents to meet increasingly demanding training program requirements.

  12. Gerald L. Epstein, PhD: director, center for science, technology, and security policy, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Interview by Madeline Drexler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Gerald L

    2009-12-01

    Over his entire career, Gerald Epstein has toiled at the nexus of science, technology, and security. From 2003 to 2009, he was Senior Fellow for Science and Security at the Center for Strategic and International Studies Homeland Security Program, where he worked on reducing biological weapons threats, improving national preparedness, and easing potential tensions between the scientific research and national security communities. Epstein came to CSIS from the Institute for Defense Analyses. From 1996 to 2001, he served in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. And from 1983 to 1989, and again from 1991 until its demise in 1995, Epstein worked at the Congressional Office of Technology Assessment, where he directed a study on the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, alongside research on other global security topics. A recognized expert in biological risk reduction, Epstein was actually trained as a physicist, having received SB degrees in physics and electrical engineering from MIT, and a PhD in physics from the University of California at Berkeley. How, then, did he come to study the evolving threat from bioterrorism? "What compelled me about bioterrorism was that it was a stellar example of a topic that would lead to a train wreck between the scientific community and the security community unless they figured out how to work together," he said. "The distance between a laboratory and a very large consequence event is a lot shorter in biology than in any other field. I got into bioterrorism to help make sure that the security community doesn't get so scared of the science that it shuts it down, and that the science community isn't so oblivious of security concerns that it pays no attention to them." Epstein spoke on November 6, 2009, with contributing writer Madeline Drexler, author of Emerging Epidemics: The Menace of New Infections (Penguin, 2009), an updated version of an earlier volume. Drexler holds a visiting appointment at the

  13. Nuclear Technology Review 2013. Report by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    In response to requests by Member States, the Secretariat produces a comprehensive Nuclear Technology Review each year. Attached is this year's report, which highlights notable developments principally in 2012. The Nuclear Technology Review 2013 covers the following areas: power applications, atomic and nuclear data, accelerators and research reactors, and nuclear sciences and applications. Additional documentation associated with the Nuclear Technology Review 2013 is available on the Agency's website1 in English on nuclear hydrogen production technology and preliminary lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident for advanced nuclear power plant technology development. Information on the IAEA's activities related to nuclear science and technology can also be found in the IAEA's Annual Report 2012 (GC(57)/3), in particular the Technology section, and the Technical Cooperation Report for 2012 (GC(57)/INF/4). The document has been modified to take account, to the extent possible, of specific comments by the Board of Governors and other comments received from Member States. (author)

  14. 19 July 2013 - Chairman of the Policy Committee, European Cancer Organisation, President, European Association for Cancer Research E. Celis visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, B. Heinemann and signing the Guest Book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers. Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    19 July 2013 - Chairman of the Policy Committee, European Cancer Organisation, President, European Association for Cancer Research E. Celis visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, B. Heinemann and signing the Guest Book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers. Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

  15. The Staff Association (SA) in the Enlarged Directorate (ED) meeting!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Vice-President and the President presented the plan of activities of the Staff Association for 2017 and expressed the Staff Association’s concerns at the meeting of the Enlarged Directorate (Directors and Heads of Departments and Units) on 3 April. Five topics were presented, starting with the implementation of the decisions made during the 2015 Five-Yearly Review. Five-Yearly Review – Follow-up (see Echo No. 257) 2016 – Key points of implementation Several changes were already implemented in 2016: review of the Staff Rules and Regulations in January 2016 for the diversity aspects, and in September 2016 to incorporate the new career structure and the new salary grid with grades; review of the Administrative Circular No. 26 (Rev. 11) on the “Recognition of Merit”; placement in grades and provisional placement in benchmark jobs of all staff members; definition of guidelines for the 2017 MERIT exercise. The Staff Association was extensively involved in the...

  16. 78 FR 3019 - Privacy Act of 1974; Science & Technology Directorate-001 Research, Development, Test, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    ... 1974; Science & Technology Directorate-001 Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Records System.../Science and Technology Directorate-001 Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation System of Records... biomedical and life sciences research; and subject matter experts who voluntarily consent to be included in a...

  17. Sleep technologists educational needs assessment: a survey of polysomnography, electroneurodiagnostic technology, and respiratory therapy education program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Mary Ellen; Vaughn, Bradley V

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we assessed the community and educational needs for sleep technologists by surveying program directors of nationally accredited polysomnography, electroneurodiagnostic technology, and respiratory care educational programs. Currently, little is known about our educational capacity and the need for advanced degrees for sleep medicine technical support. A questionnaire was developed about current and future community and educational needs for sleep technologists. The questionnaire was sent to directors of CAAHEP-accredited polysomnography and electroneurodiagnostic technology programs (associate degree and certificate programs), and directors of CoARC-accredited respiratory therapy associate degree and bachelor degree programs (n = 358). Qualitative and quantitative data were collected via an internet survey tool. Data analysis was conducted with the IBM SPSS statistical package and included calculating means and standard deviations of the frequency of responses. Qualitative data was analyzed and classified based on emerging themes. One hundred seven of 408 program directors completed the survey. Seventy-four percent agreed that demand for qualified sleep technologists will increase, yet 50% of those surveyed believe there are not enough educational programs to meet the demand. Seventy-eight percent of those surveyed agreed that the educational requirements for sleep technologists will soon increase; 79% of those surveyed believe sleep centers have a need for technologists with advanced training or specialization. Our study shows educators of associate and certificate degree programs believe there is a need for a bachelor's degree in sleep science and technology.

  18. Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program FY2015 Annual Program Review: Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John; Fikes, John

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of the Initiative is the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO), which includes participation from all federal agencies involved in U.S. manufacturing. In support of the AMNPO the AMT Project supports building and Growing the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation through a public-private partnership designed to help the industrial community accelerate manufacturing innovation. Integration with other projects/programs and partnerships: STMD (Space Technology Mission Directorate), HEOMD, other Centers; Industry, Academia; OGA's (e.g., DOD, DOE, DOC, USDA, NASA, NSF); Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Advanced Manufacturing Program Office; Generate insight within NASA and cross-agency for technology development priorities and investments. Technology Infusion Plan: PC; Potential customer infusion (TDM, HEOMD, SMD, OGA, Industry); Leverage; Collaborate with other Agencies, Industry and Academia; NASA roadmap. Initiatives include: Advanced Near Net Shape Technology Integrally Stiffened Cylinder Process Development (launch vehicles, sounding rockets); Materials Genome; Low Cost Upper Stage-Class Propulsion; Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME); National Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

  19. 75 FR 33631 - Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY [Docket No. DHS-2010-0040] Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission for Review; Information Collection Request for the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology TechSolutions Program AGENCY...

  20. Associate Residency Training Directors in Psychiatry: Demographics, Professional Activities, and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Melissa R.; DeGolia, Sallie G.; Esposito, Karin; Miller, Deborah A.; Weinberg, Michael; Brenner, Adam M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to characterize associate training director (ATD) positions in psychiatry. Method: An on-line survey was e-mailed in 2009 to all ATDs identified through the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT). Survey questions elicited information regarding demographics,…

  1. Space-based Networking Technology Developments in the Interplanetary Network Directorate Information Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Loren; Clement, B.; Gao, J.; Hutcherson, J.; Jennings, E.

    2006-01-01

    Described recent development of communications protocols, services, and associated tools targeted to reduce risk, reduce cost and increase efficiency of IND infrastructure and supported mission operations. Space-based networking technologies developed were: a) Provide differentiated quality of service (QoS) that will give precedence to traffic that users have selected as having the greatest importance and/or time-criticality; b) Improve the total value of information to users through the use of QoS prioritization techniques; c) Increase operational flexibility and improve command-response turnaround; d) Enable new class of networked and collaborative science missions; e) Simplify applications interfaces to communications services; and f) Reduce risk and cost from a common object model and automated scheduling and communications protocols. Technologies are described in three general areas: communications scheduling, middleware, and protocols. Additionally developed simulation environment, which provides comprehensive, quantitative understanding of the technologies performance within overall, evolving architecture, as well as ability to refine & optimize specific components.

  2. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges (standing, center) poses with members of the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG), which is holding the 1999 Technology Fair Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  3. 30 CFR 201.100 - Responsibilities of the Associate Director for Minerals Revenue Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities of the Associate Director for Minerals Revenue Management. 201.100 Section 201.100 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT GENERAL Oil and Gas, Onshore § 201.100...

  4. 17 CFR 200.30-13 - Delegation of authority to Associate Executive Director of the Office of Financial Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Associate Executive Director of the Office of Financial Management. 200.30-13 Section 200.30-13 Commodity... authority to Associate Executive Director of the Office of Financial Management. Pursuant to the provisions... Financial Management, to be performed by him or her, or under his or her direction by such person or persons...

  5. Associate Program Directors in Surgery: A Select Group of Surgical Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amersi, Farin; Choi, Jennifer; Molkara, Afshin; Takanishi, Danny; Deveney, Karen; Tillou, Areti

    2017-09-26

    The role of the Associate Program Director (APD) within surgical education is not clearly defined or regulated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, often leading to variations in the responsibilities among institutions. Required credentials are not specified and compensation and protected time are not regulated resulting in large discrepancies among institutions. APDs are brought into the fold of surgical education to parcel out the escalating responsibilities of program director (PD). The Association of Program Directors in Surgery, Associate Program Directors Committee sent a survey to all APDs to better understand the role of the APDs within the hierarchy of surgical education. A survey was sent to all 235 general surgery residency programs through the Association of Program Directors in Surgery list serve. The survey collected information on APD demographics, characteristics, and program information, qualifications of the APD, time commitment and compensation, administrative duties, and projected career track. General surgery residency programs within the United States. 108 Associate Program Directors in general surgery RESULTS: A total of 108 (46%) APDs responded to the survey. Seventy-three (70.2%) of the APD's were males. Most (77.8%) were in practice for more than 5 years, and 69% were at a university-based program. Most of the respondents felt that the administrative and curricular tasks were appropriately distributed between the APD and PD and many shared tasks with the PD. A total of 44.6% were on the path to become a future PD at their institution. An equal number of APDs (42.6%) were compensated above their base salary for being an APD vs no compensation at all; however, 16 (14.8%) had a reduced clinical load as part of their compensation for being an APD. This is the first study to describe the characteristics of APDs within the hierarchy of surgical education. Our data demonstrate that APDs have a substantial role in the

  6. Associate residency training directors in psychiatry: demographics, professional activities, and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Melissa R; Degolia, Sallie G; Esposito, Karin; Miller, Deborah A; Weinberg, Michael; Brenner, Adam M

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize associate training director (ATD) positions in psychiatry. An on-line survey was e-mailed in 2009 to all ATDs identified through the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training (AADPRT). Survey questions elicited information regarding demographics, professional activities, job satisfaction, and goals. Of 170 ATDs surveyed, 73 (42.9%) completed the survey. Most respondents (71.3%) had been in their positions for 3 years or less. Many ATDs indicated that they were involved in virtually all aspects of residency training; 75% of respondents agreed that they were happy with their experience. However, specific concerns included inadequate time and compensation for the ATD role in addition to a lack of mentorship and unclear job expectations. Thoughtful attention to the construction of the ATD role may improve job satisfaction.

  7. Observatory director

    CERN Document Server

    Yomtov, Nel

    2015-01-01

    "Readers will learn what it takes to succeed as a space observatory director. The book also explains the necessary educational steps, useful character traits, and daily job tasks related to this career, in the framework of the STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math) movement. Photos, a glossary, and additional resources are included."-- Provided by publisher.

  8. Association of General Surgery Resident Remediation and Program Director Attitudes With Resident Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwed, Alexander C; Lee, Steven L; Salcedo, Edgardo S; Reeves, Mark E; Inaba, Kenji; Sidwell, Richard A; Amersi, Farin; Are, Chandrakanth; Arnell, Tracey D; Damewood, Richard B; Dent, Daniel L; Donahue, Timothy; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Hartranft, Thomas; Jacobsen, Garth R; Jarman, Benjamin T; Melcher, Marc L; Mellinger, John D; Morris, Jon B; Nehler, Mark; Smith, Brian R; Wolfe, Mary; Kaji, Amy H; de Virgilio, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies of resident attrition have variably included preliminary residents and likely overestimated categorical resident attrition. Whether program director attitudes affect attrition has been unclear. To determine whether program director attitudes are associated with resident attrition and to measure the categorical resident attrition rate. This multicenter study surveyed 21 US program directors in general surgery about their opinions regarding resident education and attrition. Data on total resident complement, demographic information, and annual attrition were collected from the program directors for the study period of July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2015. The general surgery programs were chosen on the basis of their geographic location, previous collaboration with some coauthors, prior work in surgical education and research, or a program director willing to participate. Only categorical surgical residents were included in the study; thus, program directors were specifically instructed to exclude any preliminary residents in their responses. Five-year attrition rates (2010-2011 to 2014-2015 academic years) as well as first-time pass rates on the General Surgery Qualifying Examination and General Surgery Certifying Examination of the American Board of Surgery (ABS) were collected. High- and low-attrition programs were compared. The 21 programs represented different geographic locations and 12 university-based, 3 university-affiliated, and 6 independent program types. Programs had a median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of 30 (20-48) categorical residents, and few of those residents were women (median [IQR], 12 [5-17]). Overall, 85 of 966 residents (8.8%) left training during the study period: 15 (17.6%) left after postgraduate year 1, 34 (40.0%) after postgraduate year 2, and 36 (42.4%) after postgraduate year 3 or later. Forty-four residents (51.8%) left general surgery for another surgical discipline, 21 (24.7%) transferred to a different surgery

  9. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Projects for 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2017-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) technologies into NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) projects. Other Government and commercial project managers interested in ARMD funding opportunities through NASA's SBIR program will find this report useful as well.

  10. Exploring social support and job satisfaction among associate degree program directors in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz-Binder, Ronda D; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2009-01-01

    A troubling trend noted in California has been an increase in the number of open positions for program directors of associate degree registered nursing (ADRN) programs. Positions remain open for extended periods of time, and the number of qualified applicants for such positions is insufficient. The loss of and ensuing slow replacement of ADRN program directors can put these programs in jeopardy of student admission suspension, or, worse yet, closure by the state nursing board. In this exploratory study, variables of social support and job satisfaction were studied. Variables were found to be limited opportunities for peer interaction, expressed discontent, and retention concerns. A significant positive relationship between job satisfaction and social support was noted. Recommendations for future research are offered.

  11. Mr. Pat McDonald, Director of "Key Business Technologies", Department of Trade and Industry, United Kingdom

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photos 01,02: Mr Pat McDonald, Director of "Key Business Technologies", Department of Trade and Industry, UK (third from left, front) in front of the ATLAS End-Cap Toroid vacuum vessel in the ATLAS assembly hall with, from left to right, Fred Wickens, Chris Jones, Peter Fletcher, Ray Browne, Neil Geddes, Jim Fleming, Anne Trefethen, Jim Wilson, Edwin Towndrow, Sharon Bonfield, Guy Rickett, Ken Smith, Peter Jenni. Photo 03: Mr Pat McDonald, Director of "Key Business Technologies", Department of Trade and Industry, UK (fifth from left) visiting ATLAS assembly hall with, from left to right, Jim Wilson, Peter Jenni, Ken Smith, Edwin Towndrow, Ray Brown, Chris Jones, Neil Geddes, Sharon Bonfield, Anne Trefethen, Jim Fleming, Fred Wickens. Photo 04: Mr Pat McDonald, Director of "Key Business Technologies", Department of Trade and Industry, UK (fourth from right) in front of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid coil casing in the ATLAS assembly hall with, from left to right, Peter Jenni, Jim Wilson, Guy Rickett, Anne Trefethen, ...

  12. Technology transfer from havana hospitals to primary care: yamila de armas, MD. Deputy director, provincial health department, havana city province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Gloria

    2009-01-01

    Dr Yamila de Armas has occupied an array of posts since finishing her residency in family medicine in her home province of Cienfuegos in 1992. She has served as a family doctor; polyclinic, municipal and provincial health director; medical school dean; and twice vice minister of public health. But few would doubt her toughest job is the one she has now: deputy director of the Havana City Provincial Health Department, in charge of medical services for the 2.2 million people living in Cuba's complex, sprawling capital. It was here in 2002-2003 that the program was launched to repair, refurbish and expand the country's nearly 500 community polyclinics. Key to the effort was equipping these facilities with a broader range of new and upgraded medical technology. Dr de Armas offers MEDICC Review her reflections on the results five years later.

  13. Visit of H.E. Mr. Attila Chikan, Minister of Economic Affairs, Prof. Adam Török, President, National Committee for Technological Development, Mr. Pal Koncz, Deputy Director General, National Committee for Technological Development, Hungary

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    Visit of H.E. Mr. Attila Chikan, Minister of Economic Affairs, Prof. Adam Török, President, National Committee for Technological Development, Mr. Pal Koncz, Deputy Director General, National Committee for Technological Development, Hungary

  14. Dr Phil Mjwara Director General, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Ministry of Science and Technology Republic of South Africa visit the Alice experiment introduce by Prof. Jurgen Schukraft, spokeperson for Alice.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Dr Phil Mjwara Director General, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Ministry of Science and Technology Republic of South Africa visit the Alice experiment introduce by Prof. Jurgen Schukraft, spokeperson for Alice.

  15. Dr Hiroshi Ikukawa Director Planning and Evaluation Division Science and Technology Policy Bureau Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan and Mr Robert Aymar signed an accord for the CERN.

    CERN Document Server

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    Dr Hiroshi Ikukawa Director Planning and Evaluation Division Science and Technology Policy Bureau Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan and Mr Robert Aymar signed an accord for the CERN.

  16. 16 October 2012 - Norwegian University of Science and Technology Rector Digernes in the ATLAS visitor centre with Senior Norwegian S. Stapnes and J. Vigen; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jacques Fichet

    2012-01-01

    16 October 2012 - Norwegian University of Science and Technology Rector Digernes in the ATLAS visitor centre with Senior Norwegian S. Stapnes and J. Vigen; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  17. Individual factors associated with intentions to leave among directors of nursing in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kash, Bita A; Naufal, George S; Dagher, Rada K; Johnson, Christopher E

    2010-01-01

    Although the importance of nurse leadership stability and participation in decision making in nursing homes is well established, scarce literature exists on determinants of intent to leave among directors of nursing (DONs) in nursing homes. : The purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with DON intent to leave in nursing homes. We examined potential factors associated with DON intent to leave at three levels: individual DON characteristics, facility, and county-level market factors. A survey of nurse supervisors in Texas nursing homes, the 2003 Texas Nursing Facility Medicaid Cost Report, and the Area Resource File were merged. We only included respondents who identified themselves as DONs in this study (572 observations). We examined bivariate differences in individual DON characteristics on the basis of facility ownership (for-profit versus not-for-profit homes) and geographic location (urban versus rural location). We constructed three alternative logit models to explore the relationships between DON intent to leave and DON, facility, and market characteristics. DONs working in for-profit homes were more inclined to leave, less satisfied with their job, and had lower levels of perceived empowerment in terms of autonomy. Educational level and intention to leave were significantly higher for DONs working in urban areas. Job satisfaction was significantly and inversely associated with intent to leave in all three models. Higher perceived salary competitiveness and level of empowerment were associated with reduced odds of intending to leave. Higher educational levels were associated with higher odds of intentions to leave. Nursing homes should focus on improving DON job satisfaction, empowerment in decision making, and salary competitiveness when designing retention strategies for DONs.

  18. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Science Mission Directorate Projects at Glenn Research Center for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Glenn ResearchCenter Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR)/(STTR)technologies into NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) programs/projects. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this useful.

  19. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Programs and Projects for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR)/(STTR) technologies into NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) projects. Other Government and commercial projects managers can also find this useful.

  20. Opinion of Teachers and Directors About Implementation and Using of Information and Communication Technologies in Schools of Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porozovs Juris

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern education is closely connected with implementation and use of information and communication technologies (ICT in the teaching process. ICT is recommended to be used in schools in Europe to develop competences of students to become high-quality professionals and active citizens in the society. A questionnaire survey of teachers and directors of Latvian schools was carried out in order to evaluate the use of ICT in Latvian schools and attitude of teaching staff towards this process. The results of the questionnaire survey showed that Latvian schools are not supplied with ICT to a satisfactory level. It is necessary to raise the competence of many teachers in the field of ICT. The attitude of teachers to the use of ICT in the study process is more positive in comparison with school directors. Important factors for improvement of ICT use in schools are ICT training for teachers, computer accessibility for teaching staff, sufficient supply of qualitative ICT teaching materials and computers in schools and encouragement of teachers to use ICT.

  1. 3 October 2013 - Ukrainian Vice Prime Minister Ukraine K. I. Gryschenko welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer who introduces Head of International Relations R. Voss; Head of Technology Department F. Bordry; Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis; Deputy Legal Counsel M. Wilbers; Adviser for Ukraine T. Kurtyka; Signing of the Agreement between Ukraine and CERN concerning the granting of the status of Associate Member at CERN; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and visiting CMS experimental area with CERN Team Leader A. Petrilli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    3 October 2013 - Ukrainian Vice Prime Minister Ukraine K. I. Gryschenko welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer who introduces Head of International Relations R. Voss; Head of Technology Department F. Bordry; Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis; Deputy Legal Counsel M. Wilbers; Adviser for Ukraine T. Kurtyka; Signing of the Agreement between Ukraine and CERN concerning the granting of the status of Associate Member at CERN; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and visiting CMS experimental area with CERN Team Leader A. Petrilli.

  2. 75 FR 53705 - Science and Technology (S&T) Directorate; Agency Information Collection Activities: Submission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ... more comprehensive real-world data. The PREDICT Web site http://www.predict.org/contains an overview... community in its efforts to build products and technologies that will better protect America's computing..., Business or other for-profit, Not-for-profit institutions, Federal government, and State, local, or tribal...

  3. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate Projects for 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2017-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) projects. Other Government and commercial projects managers can also find this useful. Space Transportation; Life Support and Habitation Systems; Extra-Vehicular Activity; High EfficiencySpace Power; Human Exploration and Operations Mission,

  4. 5th October 2011 - Vienna Science and Technology Fund Board of Directors ((WWTF) led by Its President, Lord Mayor and Governor of Vienna M. Häupl, signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss and Director for Administration and General Infrastructure S. Lettow.

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    5th October 2011 - Vienna Science and Technology Fund Board of Directors ((WWTF) led by Its President, Lord Mayor and Governor of Vienna M. Häupl, signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss and Director for Administration and General Infrastructure S. Lettow.

  5. Chairman of the DELL Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and in front of the ATLAS detector (centre) with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford (left) and Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer on 26th January 2010.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    Chairman of the DELL Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and in front of the ATLAS detector (centre) with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford (left) and Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer on 26th January 2010.

  6. Signature of the Agreement between the University of Liverpool, acting on behalf of the Cockcroft Institute, represented by Inaugural Director of Cockcroft Institute S. Chattopadhyay and the European Organization for Nuclear Research represented by Director-General R. Aymar,concerning collaboration between the Cockcroft Institute and CERN in Accelerator Physics and Technologies.

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2008-01-01

    Signature of the Agreement between the University of Liverpool, acting on behalf of the Cockcroft Institute, represented by Inaugural Director of Cockcroft Institute S. Chattopadhyay and the European Organization for Nuclear Research represented by Director-General R. Aymar,concerning collaboration between the Cockcroft Institute and CERN in Accelerator Physics and Technologies.

  7. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Projects at NASA Glenn Research Center for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    This document is intended to enable the more effective transition of NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) SBIR technologies funded by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program as well as its companion, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program into NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) projects. Primarily, it is intended to help NASA program and project managers find useful technologies that have undergone extensive research and development (RRD), through Phase II of the SBIR program; however, it can also assist non-NASA agencies and commercial companies in this process. aviation safety, unmanned aircraft, ground and flight test technique, low emissions, quiet performance, rotorcraft

  8. Resolution s/n it approves the proposal by the National Directorate of Energy and Nuclear Technology in the terms set out in the working groups mentioned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The following Resolution has been stated because of the results of the workshops Elaboration of proposals for strategic guidelines held from 2 to May 5, 2006, elaboration of proposals for the Strategic Lines instruments held from 24 to July 28, 2006, as well as documents Proposal of politic energetic Uruguayan Energy Sector development and proposal of Energy Policy Instruments developed by the National Directorate of Nuclear Energy and Technology and the Energy Strategy Guidelines Uruguay 2006.

  9. The effect of Organizational Commitment and Job Pressure to Job Performance through the Job Satisfaction in Employees Directorate transformation Technology Communication and Information Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Winarja, Waluya; Sodikin, Akhmad; Widodo, Djoko Setyo

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effect of organizational commitment and the Job Pressure of the Job Performance partially determine the effect of organizational commitment the performance of employees through job satisfaction variables and determine the effect of work stress on job performance through job satisfaction. The study was conducted on the employees of the Directorate of transport and communications and information technology. The sampling technique using saturated samples involvin...

  10. 1984 Science and Technology posture hearing with the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Hearing before the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, February 1, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    George A. Keyworth II, Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, testified at a hearing held on the occasion of the Committee on Science and Technology's 25th anniversary and the submission of the 1985 budget proposal of $53 billion, a 14% increase over 1984 spending. Keyworth reviewed the administration's policy of strengthening support for basic research in order to develop scientific talent and to expand the partnership between government, industry, and the universities. To meet these goals, the policy has reduced energy-related demonstration projects and has increased research funding for universities in order to focus on advanced technologies and to keep American science in the forefront. Specific questions from the Committee dealt with national laboratories lack of mission and a new emphasis on the proposed space station, among other items.

  11. 4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  12. Dr Kathryn Beers, Assistant Director Physical Sciences and Engineering, Office of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of the President United States of America visit the CMS experiment at point 5.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Dr Kathryn Beers, Assistant Director Physical Sciences and Engineering, Office of Science and Technology Policy Executive Office of the President United States of America visit the CMS experiment at point 5.

  13. Signature of the CERN – EGO (European Gravitational Observatory) Agreement concerning Collaboration in Scientific, Technological, Educational and other Domains of Mutual Interest, by R. Heuer, Director-General and Prof. F. Ferrini.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    Signature of the CERN – EGO (European Gravitational Observatory) Agreement concerning Collaboration in Scientific, Technological, Educational and other Domains of Mutual Interest, by R. Heuer, Director-General and Prof. F. Ferrini.

  14. Wolfsberg Executive Director P. Guptara at ATLAS experiment with ATLAS Resources Coordinator M. Nordberg, LHC machine Technical Coordination and Planning P. Proudlock and Information Technology Department Head W. von Rüden on 21 September 2006.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Wolfsberg Executive Director P. Guptara at ATLAS experiment with ATLAS Resources Coordinator M. Nordberg, LHC machine Technical Coordination and Planning P. Proudlock and Information Technology Department Head W. von Rüden on 21 September 2006.

  15. 7 March 2013 -Stanford University Professor N. McKeown FREng, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and B. Leslie, Creative Labs visiting CERN Control Centre and the LHC tunnel with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    7 March 2013 -Stanford University Professor N. McKeown FREng, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and B. Leslie, Creative Labs visiting CERN Control Centre and the LHC tunnel with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  16. 28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

  17. 25 November 2008 - State Councilor in charge of Science, Technology and Education Y. Liu, People's Repblic of China, visiting AMS experiment with CERN Director-General R. Aymar and AMS Collaborator Y. Yang.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    25 November 2008 - State Councilor in charge of Science, Technology and Education Y. Liu, People's Repblic of China, visiting AMS experiment with CERN Director-General R. Aymar and AMS Collaborator Y. Yang.

  18. Chinese Commission of Science Technology and Industry for National Defense Senior Vice Minister CHEN Qiufa exchanging gifts at luncheon and signing the Guest Book on 1st November 2007 with CERN Director-General R. Aymar.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Chinese Commission of Science Technology and Industry for National Defense Senior Vice Minister CHEN Qiufa exchanging gifts at luncheon and signing the Guest Book on 1st November 2007 with CERN Director-General R. Aymar.

  19. 18 MArch 2008 - Director, Basic and Generic Research Division, Research Promotion Bureau, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Prof.Ohtake visiting ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    18 MArch 2008 - Director, Basic and Generic Research Division, Research Promotion Bureau, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Prof.Ohtake visiting ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  20. 24th May 2011 - ITER Organization Director-General O.Motojima visiting SM18 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Deputy L. Rossi, accompanied by Adviser for Relations with ITER J.-P. Koutchouk.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    24th May 2011 - ITER Organization Director-General O.Motojima visiting SM18 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Deputy L. Rossi, accompanied by Adviser for Relations with ITER J.-P. Koutchouk.

  1. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate Projects at Glenn Research Center for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Glenn Research Center Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR)/(STTR) technologies into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) programs and projects. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this useful. Introduction Incorporating Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-developed technology into NASA projects is important, especially given the Agency's limited resources for technology development. The SBIR program's original intention was for technologies that had completed Phase II to be ready for integration into NASA programs, however, in many cases there is a gap between Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) 5 and 6 that needs to be closed. After SBIR Phase II projects are completed, the technology is evaluated against various parameters and a TRL rating is assigned. Most programs tend to adopt more mature technologies-at least TRL 6 to reduce the risk to the mission rather than adopt TRLs between 3 and 5 because those technologies are perceived as too risky. The gap between TRLs 5 and 6 is often called the "Valley of Death" (Figure 1), and historically it has been difficult to close because of a lack of funding support from programs. Several papers have already suggested remedies on how to close the gap (Refs. 1 to 4).

  2. 28 August 2013 - Director of Technical Quality Management Head of ESTEC Establishment European Space Agency F. Ongaro visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Technology Department J.-P. Tock; visiting the ATLAS experimental area with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Accompanied throughout by F. Bordry and V. Parma.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    28 August 2013 - Director of Technical Quality Management Head of ESTEC Establishment European Space Agency F. Ongaro visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Technology Department J.-P. Tock; visiting the ATLAS experimental area with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Accompanied throughout by F. Bordry and V. Parma.

  3. The role of the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate in the development of vaccines and diagnostics for Transboundary Animal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colby, M; Coats, M; Brake, D; Fine, J

    2013-01-01

    The development of countermeasures to support an effective response to Transboundary Animal Diseases (TAD) poses a challenge on a global scale and necessitates the coordinated involvement of scientists from government, industry and academia, as well as regulatory entities. The Agricultural Defense Branch under the Chemical and Biological Defense Division (CBD) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) supports this important mission within the United States. This article provides an overview of the Agricultural Defense Branch's vaccine and diagnostic TAD project.

  4. Associate Directorate Environmental Management Infrastructure Plan for Area G and Area L Domes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, Patrice Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baumer, Andrew Ronald [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-26

    Technical Area 54, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is situated in the east-central portion of the Laboratory on the Mesita del Buey between Pajarito Canyon to the south and Cañada del Buey to the north. TA-54 includes four MDAs designated as G, H, J, and L; a waste characterization, container storage, and transfer facility; active TRU waste and MLLW waste storage and low-level waste (LLW) disposal operations at Area G; active hazardous and mixed low-level (MLLW) waste storage operations at Area L; and administrative and support areas. MDA J has previously under-gone closure. Area G is a waste management and disposal area, used for the disposal and storage of radioactive wastes since 1957. Since August 2015, Area G has been in warm standby and provides minimal operations to support safety, compliance, and nitrate salt remediation. Located within Area G, MDA G covers 63-acres. MDA G contains 334 active and inactive waste management units, which include 36 pits, 294 shafts, and 4 trenches. In 1971, Area G began use for the retrievable storage of TRU waste. There are two pits, four trenches and 60 shafts that contain retrievable TRU waste. Thirty-three of the shafts contain TRU waste that may present unique problems for retrieval. In 1986, segregation of MLLW was initiated at Area G for treatment and temporary storage or for off-site disposal. Area G is the only active LLW disposal facility at the Laboratory. Current operations at Area G include storage and characterization of TRU and mixed TRU waste destined for off-site disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico and the storage of MLLW destined for off-site treatment and/or disposal. Several above-ground container storage units (CSUs) are currently used for storage of containerized MLLW and/or mixed TRU wastes. These consist of asphalt pads and associated fabric domes or other structures. As defined by the Consent Order, MDA G contains 229 of the 334 subsurface waste

  5. Associate Directorate Environmental Management Infrastructure Plan for Area G and Area L Domes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, Patrice Ann; Baumer, Andrew Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Technical Area 54, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is situated in the east-central portion of the Laboratory on the Mesita del Buey between Pajarito Canyon to the south and Canada del Buey to the north. TA-54 includes four MDAs designated as G, H, J, and L; a waste characterization, container storage, and transfer facility; active TRU waste and MLLW waste storage and low-level waste (LLW) disposal operations at Area G; active hazardous and mixed low-level (MLLW) waste storage operations at Area L; and administrative and support areas. MDA J has previously under-gone closure. Area G is a waste management and disposal area, used for the disposal and storage of radioactive wastes since 1957. Since August 2015, Area G has been in warm standby and provides minimal operations to support safety, compliance, and nitrate salt remediation. Located within Area G, MDA G covers 63-acres. MDA G contains 334 active and inactive waste management units, which include 36 pits, 294 shafts, and 4 trenches. In 1971, Area G began use for the retrievable storage of TRU waste. There are two pits, four trenches and 60 shafts that contain retrievable TRU waste. Thirty-three of the shafts contain TRU waste that may present unique problems for retrieval. In 1986, segregation of MLLW was initiated at Area G for treatment and temporary storage or for off-site disposal. Area G is the only active LLW disposal facility at the Laboratory. Current operations at Area G include storage and characterization of TRU and mixed TRU waste destined for off-site disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico and the storage of MLLW destined for off-site treatment and/or disposal. Several above-ground container storage units (CSUs) are currently used for storage of containerized MLLW and/or mixed TRU wastes. These consist of asphalt pads and associated fabric domes or other structures. As defined by the Consent Order, MDA G contains 229 of the 334 subsurface waste

  6. 1985 science and technology posture hearing with the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy. Hearing before the Committee on Science and Technology, 99th Congress, First Session, No. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Presidential Science Adviser Dr. George Keyworth, Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, gave his annual (1985) report on US Science and Technology posture at a hearing of the Committee on Science and Technology of the US House of Representatives (99th Congress) on 5 Feb. 1985. He spoke of critical choices in three areas, i.e., how to reduce nuclear weapons, thereby to enhance the national security, how to ensure US technological superiority in the face of rapidly growing international competition, and how to accomplish the foregoing while reducing government deficits. US government support for Research and Development will total $60 billion this year, $20 billion of which are for non-defense programs, and $8 billion for basic research. He emphasized the importance of the latter to the nation's economic wellbeing, and the need to make every research dollar count in the face of rising costs and soaring deficits. Dr. Keyworth urges aggressive US efforts to maintain its world leadership in science and technology.

  7. Technology Opens Doors to Scientific Discovery, Portrait Unveiled of Former NLM Director Lindberg | NIH MedlinePlus the ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version of this page please turn JavaScript on. Technology Opens Doors to Scientific Discovery Past Issues / Spring 2016 Table of Contents Susannah Fox, chief technology officer of the U.S. Department of Health and ...

  8. 15 February 2012 - Geneva United Nations Office Director-General K.-J. Tokayev in the LHC tunnel with Adviser for Relations with international organisations M. Bona and Technology Department Head F. Bordry.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    Kassym-Jomart Tokayev, director-general of the United Nations Office at Geneva, (centre picture 02), visited CERN on 15 February. He toured the LHC tunnel with Maurizio Bona, CERN’s adviser to the director-general, relations with international organizations, left, and Frédérick Bordry, CERN’s technology department head. He also visited the ATLAS underground experimental area, as well as the exhibition at the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  9. Faculty and organizational characteristics associated with informatics/health information technology adoption in DNP programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Cathy R; Meek, Julie A; Walker, Patricia Hinton

    2014-01-01

    Nursing informatics/health information technology are key components of graduate nursing education and an accreditation requirement, yet little is known about the extent to which doctor of nursing practice (DNP) curricula include these content domains. The purpose of this descriptive study was to elicit perceptions of DNP program directors relative to (a) whether and how the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's (AACN's) Essential IV standard has been met in their DNP programs; (b) whether the Technology Informatics Guiding Educational Reform Initiative Foundation's Phase II competencies have been integrated in their programs; and (c) the faculty and organizational characteristics associated with the adoption of the AACN's Essential IV. In 2011, an electronic survey was sent to all 138 DNP program directors identified on the AACN Web site with an 81.2% response rate. Findings include variation in whether and how programs have integrated informatics/health information technology content, a lack of informatics-certified and/or master's-prepared faculty, and a perceived lack of faculty awareness of informatics curricular guidelines. DNP program director and dean awareness and support of faculty informatics education, use of informatics competency guidelines, and national policy and stimulus funding support are recommended to promote curricular inclusion and the engagement of nurses in strong informatics practices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease: 1. Diagnosis, comprehensive care and assessment. Association of Hemophilia Clinic Directors of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-07-01

    be enrolled in a home self-infusion program. Patients with hemophilia and von Willebrand's disease should wear or carry Medic Alert identification. They should be vaccinated against hepatitis B and attend for routine follow-up examinations. Laboratory testing should be carried out as required, and dental and surgical care should be undertaken in consultation with a hematologist. These recommendations were reviewed and approved by the Association of Hemophilia Clinic Directors of Canada (AHCDC) and the Medical and Scientific Advisory Committee of the Canadian Hemophilia Society. No similar consensus statements or practice guidelines are available for comparison. These recommendations were developed at the request of the Canadian Blood Agency, which funds the provision of all coagulation-factor concentrates for people with congenital bleeding disorders, and were developed and endorsed by the AHCDC and the Medical and Scientific Advisory Committee of the Canadian Hemophilia Society.

  11. Professor C.H. Llewellyn-Smith, CERN's Director General, with Professor J. Mariano Gago, Portuguese Minister of Science and Technology, and Prof. J. Routti, Director General of the European Commission Directorate General XII with H. Wenninger, Research-Technical Director

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1997-01-01

    On 28-29 November, CERN is hosting a Workshop on technology transfer, to see what can be learned from the examples of the past, and how the mechanisms for getting new ideas from laboratory to marketplace can be refined.

  12. Leadership Development for Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing-You, Robert; Wiltshire, Whitney; Skolfield, Jenny

    2010-01-01

    Background Residency program directors have increasingly challenging roles, but they may not be receiving adequate leadership development. Objective To assess and facilitate program directors' leadership self-awareness and development at a workshop retreat. Methods At our annual program director retreat, program directors and associate program directors from a variety of specialties completed the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument (TKI), which evaluates an individual's behavior in conflict situations, and the Hersey-Blanchard Situational Leadership (HBSL) model, which measures individuals' preferred leadership style in working with followers. Participants received their results during the retreat and discussed their leadership style results in the context of conflict situations experienced in the past. An online survey was distributed 3 weeks after the retreat to assess participant satisfaction and to determine whether participants would make changes to their leadership styles. Results Seventeen program directors attended the retreat and completed the tools. On the TKI, 47% preferred the Compromising mode for handling conflict, while 18% preferred either the Avoiding or Accommodating modes. On the HBSL, 71% of program directors preferred a Coaching leadership style. Ninety-one percent of postretreat-survey respondents found the leadership tools helpful and also thought they had a better awareness of their conflict mode and leadership style preferences. Eighty-two percent committed to a change in their leadership behaviors in the 6 months following the retreat. Conclusions Leadership tools may be beneficial for promoting the professional development of program directors. The TKI and HBSL can be used within a local retreat or workshop as we describe to facilitate positive leadership-behavior changes. PMID:22132267

  13. 16th September 2011 - Permanent Representative of Israel to the United Nations Office Ambassador A.Leshno-Yaar signing the Agreement concerning the Granting of the Status of Associate Membership as the Pre-stage to Membership at CERN with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Standing from left to right: ATLAS Collaboration G. Mikenberg, Israel Delegate to CERN Council E. Rabinovici, CERN Director-General R. Heuer, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure S. Lettow, Ambassador to the UN A. Leshno-Yaar, CERN Legal COunsel E. Groniger-Voss, CERN Council President M. Spiro, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci, Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers and Head of International Relations, F. Pauss.

  14. 16 CFR 1000.30 - Directorate for Laboratory Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. 1000.30... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.30 Directorate for Laboratory Sciences. The Directorate for Laboratory Sciences, which is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Laboratory Sciences, is responsible for...

  15. 16 CFR 1000.27 - Directorate for Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Directorate for Health Sciences. 1000.27... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.27 Directorate for Health Sciences. The Directorate for Health Sciences is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Health Sciences and is responsible for reviewing and...

  16. 16 CFR 1000.29 - Directorate for Engineering Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Directorate for Engineering Sciences. 1000... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.29 Directorate for Engineering Sciences. The Directorate for Engineering Sciences, which is managed by the Associate Executive Director for Engineering Sciences, is responsible for...

  17. 16 CFR 1000.26 - Directorate for Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Directorate for Epidemiology. 1000.26... AND FUNCTIONS § 1000.26 Directorate for Epidemiology. The Directorate for Epidemiology, managed by the Associate Executive Director for Epidemiology, is responsible for the collection and analysis of data on...

  18. The Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A presentation of the Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies (DASTS). Organization, experiences, challenges and future developments.......A presentation of the Danish Association for Science and Technology Studies (DASTS). Organization, experiences, challenges and future developments....

  19. 10 September 2013 - Italian Minister for Economic Development F. Zanonato visiting the ATLAS cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and Italian scientists F. Gianotti and A. Di Ciaccio; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; in the LHC tunnel with S. Bertolucci, Technology Deputy Department Head L. Rossi and Engineering Department Head R. Saban; visiting CMS cavern with Scientists G. Rolandi and P. Checchia.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    10 September 2013 - Italian Minister for Economic Development F. Zanonato visiting the ATLAS cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and Italian scientists F. Gianotti and A. Di Ciaccio; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; in the LHC tunnel with S. Bertolucci, Technology Deputy Department Head L. Rossi and Engineering Department Head R. Saban; visiting CMS cavern with Scientists G. Rolandi and P. Checchia.

  20. 3 February 2011 - British Members of the Science and Technology Committee (Commons)led by A. Miller MP signing the guest book with CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; in the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1 with Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Deputy D. Charlton.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    3 February 2011 - British Members of the Science and Technology Committee (Commons)led by A. Miller MP signing the guest book with CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; in the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1 with Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Deputy D. Charlton.

  1. 14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

  2. 16 December 2013 - P. Lavie President of the Technion Institute of Technology in Israel visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. G. Mikenberg, E. Rabinovici, Y. Rozen and S. Tarem present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    16 December 2013 - P. Lavie President of the Technion Institute of Technology in Israel visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. G. Mikenberg, E. Rabinovici, Y. Rozen and S. Tarem present throughout.

  3. 13 September 2013 - Chairman of the Board of Directors of the von Karman Institute Kingdom of Belgium J.-P. Contzen visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department N. Delruelle and signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli (visit)

    2013-01-01

    13 September 2013 - Chairman of the Board of Directors of the von Karman Institute Kingdom of Belgium J.-P. Contzen visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department N. Delruelle and signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka present.

  4. 17 January 2014 - Y. Sakurada Japanese Senior Vice Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez. Head of International Relations R. Voss present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    17 January 2014 - Y. Sakurada Japanese Senior Vice Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez. Head of International Relations R. Voss present throughout.

  5. 1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    1 November 2012 - Signature of the Co-operation Agreement between the Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation (COLCIENCIAS) of Colombia and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning Scientific and Technical Co-operation in High-Energy Physics and related technologies by CERN Director-General R. Heuer, witnessed by Ambassador of Colombia to Switzerland C. Turbay Quintero.

  6. Complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor volume is associated with improved survival in recurrent glioblastoma—results from the DIRECTOR trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchorska, Bogdana; Weller, Michael; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Senft, Christian; Hau, Peter; Sabel, Michael C.; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Ketter, Ralf; Schlegel, Uwe; Marosi, Christine; Reifenberger, Guido; Wick, Wolfgang; Tonn, Jörg C.; Wirsching, Hans-Georg

    2016-01-01

    Background The role of reoperation for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) remains unclear. Prospective studies are lacking. Here, we studied the association of clinical outcome with extent of resection upon surgery for recurrent GBM in the patient cohort of DIRECTOR, a prospective randomized multicenter trial comparing 2 dose-intensified temozolomide regimens at recurrence of GBM. Methods We analyzed prospectively collected clinical and imaging data from the DIRECTOR cohort (N = 105). Volumetric analysis was performed on gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI as well as fluid attenuated inversion recovery/T2 MRI and correlated with PFS after initial progression (PFS2) and post-recurrence survival (PRS). Quality of life was monitored by the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BN20 questionnaires at 8-week intervals. Results Seventy-one patients received surgery at first recurrence. Prognostic factors, including age, MGMT promoter methylation, and Karnofsky performance score, were balanced between patients with and without reoperation. Outcome in patients with versus without surgery at recurrence was similar for PFS2 (2.0 mo vs 1.9 mo, P = .360) and PRS (11.4 mo vs 9.8 mo, P = .633). Among reoperated patients, post-surgery imaging was available in 59 cases. In these patients, complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor (N = 40) versus residual detection of contrast enhancement (N = 19) was associated with improved PRS (12.9 mo [95% CI: 11.5–18.2] vs 6.5 mo [95% CI: 3.6–9.9], P < .001) and better quality of life. Incomplete tumor resection was associated with inferior PRS compared with patients who did not undergo surgery (6.5 vs 9.8 mo, P = .052). Quality of life was similar in these 2 groups. Conclusion Surgery at first recurrence of GBM improves outcome if complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor is achieved. PMID:26823503

  7. Tracing technology in the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guard, J Roger; Peay, Wayne J

    2003-04-01

    From the beginning of the association, technology and the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries (AAHSL) have been intertwined. Technology was the focus of one of the first committees. Innovative applications of technology have been employed in the operations of the association. Early applications of mini-computers were used in preparing the Annual Statistics. The association's use of network communications was among the first in the country and later applications of the Web have enhanced association services. For its members, technology has transformed libraries. The association's support of the early development of Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems (IAIMS) and of its recent reconceptualization has contributed to the intellectual foundation for this revolution.

  8. 78 FR 14101 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-04

    ... the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Science and Technology Directorate, 1120 Vermont Avenue NW... Director, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane, Bldg. 410... Hanson, HSSTAC Executive Director, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security...

  9. Director`s series on proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, K.C.; Price, M.E. [eds.

    1994-12-27

    The Director`s Series on Proliferation is an occasional publication of essays on the topics of nuclear, chemical, biological, and missile proliferation. The seven papers presented in this issue cover the following topics: Should the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) be amended?; NPT extension - Legal and procedural issues; An Indonesian view of NPT review conference issues; The treaty of Tlatelolco and the NPT - Tools for peace and development; Perspectives on cut-off, weapons dismantlement, and security assurances; Belarus and NPT challenges; A perspective on the chemical weapons convention - Lessons learned from the preparatory commission.

  10. 27 November 2014 - Warsaw University of Technology (PL) Vice-Rector for Research R. Bacewicz visitng the ALICE control room and undergorund experimental area with WUT students, accompanied by A. Charkiewicz and A. Siemko; joint signature ceremony with HNINP Director-General M. Jezabek

    CERN Multimedia

    Guillaume, Jeanneret

    2014-01-01

    CERN-PHOTO-201411-245-95: from left to right: Professor D.Sc.Ph.D. Rajmund Bacewicz, Vice-Rector for Research, Warsaw University of Technology, CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Prof. Marek Jeżabek, Director-General, Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Republic of Poland

  11. Management and Use of Director, Operational Test and Evaluation Funds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2000-01-01

    .... The reorganization disestablished the functions of the Director, Test, Systems Engineering, and Evaluation, within the Office of Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics...

  12. Complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor volume is associated with improved survival in recurrent glioblastoma-results from the DIRECTOR trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchorska, Bogdana; Weller, Michael; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh; Senft, Christian; Hau, Peter; Sabel, Michael C; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Ketter, Ralf; Schlegel, Uwe; Marosi, Christine; Reifenberger, Guido; Wick, Wolfgang; Tonn, Jörg C; Wirsching, Hans-Georg

    2016-04-01

    The role of reoperation for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) remains unclear. Prospective studies are lacking. Here, we studied the association of clinical outcome with extent of resection upon surgery for recurrent GBM in the patient cohort of DIRECTOR, a prospective randomized multicenter trial comparing 2 dose-intensified temozolomide regimens at recurrence of GBM. We analyzed prospectively collected clinical and imaging data from the DIRECTOR cohort (N = 105). Volumetric analysis was performed on gadolinium contrast-enhanced MRI as well as fluid attenuated inversion recovery/T2 MRI and correlated with PFS after initial progression (PFS2) and post-recurrence survival (PRS). Quality of life was monitored by the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-BN20 questionnaires at 8-week intervals. Seventy-one patients received surgery at first recurrence. Prognostic factors, including age, MGMT promoter methylation, and Karnofsky performance score, were balanced between patients with and without reoperation. Outcome in patients with versus without surgery at recurrence was similar for PFS2 (2.0 mo vs 1.9 mo, P = .360) and PRS (11.4 mo vs 9.8 mo, P = .633). Among reoperated patients, post-surgery imaging was available in 59 cases. In these patients, complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor (N = 40) versus residual detection of contrast enhancement (N = 19) was associated with improved PRS (12.9 mo [95% CI: 11.5-18.2] vs 6.5 mo [95% CI: 3.6-9.9], P < .001) and better quality of life. Incomplete tumor resection was associated with inferior PRS compared with patients who did not undergo surgery (6.5 vs 9.8 mo, P = .052). Quality of life was similar in these 2 groups. Surgery at first recurrence of GBM improves outcome if complete resection of contrast-enhancing tumor is achieved. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Investigation of Springback Associated with Composite Material Component Fabrication (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Project 94-09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzie, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research project was to examine processing and design parameters in the fabrication of composite components to obtain a better understanding and attempt to minimize springback associated with composite materials. To accomplish this, both processing and design parameters were included in a Taguchi-designed experiment. Composite angled panels were fabricated, by hand layup techniques, and the fabricated panels were inspected for springback effects. This experiment yielded several significant results. The confirmation experiment validated the reproducibility of the factorial effects, error recognized, and experiment as reliable. The material used in the design of tooling needs to be a major consideration when fabricating composite components, as expected. The factors dealing with resin flow, however, raise several potentially serious material and design questions. These questions must be dealt with up front in order to minimize springback: viscosity of the resin, vacuum bagging of the part for cure, and the curing method selected. These factors directly affect design, material selection, and processing methods.

  14. National Defense Industrial Association Disruptive Technologies Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-14

    Algorithms, MEMS • Nano ; Meta; & New Materials • Cognitive Computing • Bio-Revolution NDIA Disruptive Technologies 10/16/2009 Page-8 Forces of Change...DISTRIBUTE 2 1 st Cen t u r y St r a t eg ic Tec h n o l o g y Vec t o r s Defense Science Board 2006 Summer Study August 18, 2006 (Final) NDIA

  15. Program Orientation for High School Sport Coaches. Coaches Council and the National Council for Secondary School Athletic Directors, 2005. A Position Paper from the National Association for Sport and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (NJ1), 2005

    2005-01-01

    The National Association for Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) believes that prior to the start of each season, all high school head coaches, assistant coaches, and volunteer coaches should be required to participate in a comprehensive orientation to the sport program. This orientation should be planned and conducted by the athletic director or…

  16. Proceedings of the American Psychological Association for the Legislative Year 2009: Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Representatives and Minutes of the Meetings of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Barry S.

    2010-01-01

    These minutes are the official record of the actions of the American Psychological Association taken during the year by both the Board of Directors (the Board) and the Council of Representatives (Council). The roll of representatives was called at each Council meeting, and more than a quorum answered to their names. Reference is made in these…

  17. Non-executive directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    A new professional networking site has been created for the NHS Alliance's non-executive director network (NEDNET). The website uses OnMedica's professional networking platform to provide a secure online environment in which NEDNET members can share information and best practice. The network aims to help non-executive directors find theirpeers, learn from each other and learn about the latest developments. The website can be found at www.medefero.com/nednet.

  18. 27th April 2009 - President of the Government of the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia N. Gruevski welcomed by CERN Director General R. Heuer, Research and Comnputing Director S. Bertolucci, Accelerators and Technology Director S. Myers, Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss, Non-Member States Relations Advisers J. Ellis and T. Kurtyka, and VIP and Protocol Office S. Molinari (HI-090405701-09)

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    HI-0904057 10-11: General introduction to CERN by the Director General R. Heuer HI-0904057 12-25: signature of a co-operation agreeement between the Former Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia and CERN; signature of the guest book by the President of the Government; Exchange of gifts HI-0904057 26-32: The President of the Government welcomed by Former IT Department Head W. Rüden and Computing Centre visit; HI-0904057 33-38: Visit the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Senior Adviser to the President of the Government Z. Dimcovski; HI-0904057 37:left: Vice Prime Minister of the Government I. Bocevski; HI-0904057 39-52: Visit CMS experimental area with Non-Member States Relations Adviser J. Ellis, UN Ambassador G. Avramchev, Senior Adviser to the President of the Government Z. Dimcovski and Collaboration Spokesperson T. Virdee. HI-0904057 53-54: Visit CMS counting room.

  19. ICTP appoints new director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, James

    2009-11-01

    Fernando Quevedo of the University of Cambridge in the UK has been appointed as the new director of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) in Trieste, Italy. Quevedo will officially begin his new role this month and replaces Katepalli Sreenivasan, the India-born physicist who has led the institute since 2003.

  20. REGIONAL CUSTOMS DIRECTORATES MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CABA STEFAN

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The management of a regional customs directorate is analyzed. A new approach of the managerial system, in the European integration context, is presented. The customs system is one of the first “doors” to a new economic, social and cultural community. For

  1. 8 February 2017 - Sri Lanka Hon. Minister of Science, Technology and Research A. D. S. Premajayantha signing the International Cooperation Agreement concerning Scientific and Technical Cooperation in High-Energy Physics 2017 with CERN Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle.

    CERN Document Server

    Brice, Maximilien

    2017-01-01

    Were present: Hon. A. D. Susil Premajayantha, Minister of Science, Technology and Research, Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka; H.E. Mr Ravinatha Aryasinha, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Sri Lanka to the UN in Geneva; Mrs Samantha Jayasuriya, Deputy Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Sri Lanka to the UN in Geneva; Ms Shashika Somaratne, Counsellor, Permanent Mission of Sri Lanka to the UN in Geneva; Mr Gihan Indragupta, Member of Sri Lanka Foreign service and Head of the G15 Secretariat; Ms Dilini Gunasekera, Second Secretary, Permanent Mission of Sri Lanka to the UN in Geneva; Mr Prageeth Herath , Supporting staff, Permanent Mission of Sri Lanka. CERN: Mr Andrzej Charkiewicz, CMS Ressources Manager; Ms Sofia Intoudi, Legal Officer; Dr Rüdiger Voss, Senior Adviser, International Relations; Ms Charlotte Warakaulle, Director for International Relations

  2. Beam director design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30 0 beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project

  3. Beam director design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younger, F.C.

    1986-08-01

    A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

  4. Message from Fermilab Director

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    With this issue’s message, Fermilab Director Pier Oddone opens a new series of occasional exchanges between CERN and other laboratories world-wide. As part of this exchange, CERN Director-General Rolf Heuer, wrote a message in Tuesday’s edition of Fermilab TodayPerspectivesNothing is more important for our worldwide particle physics community than successfully turning on the LHC later this year. The promise for great discoveries is huge, and many of the plans for our future depend on LHC results. Those of us planning national programmes in anticipation of data from the LHC face formidable challenges to develop future facilities that are complementary to the LHC, whatever the physics discoveries may be. At Fermilab, this has led us to move forcefully with a programme at the intensity frontier, where experiments with neutrinos and rare decays open a complementary window into nature. Our ultimate goal for a unified picture of nat...

  5. Discussion with CERN Directorate

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Please note that the Discussion with CERN Directorate will be transmitted also in the following rooms: Council Chamber - 503-1-001 IT Amphitheatre - 31-3-004 Prevessin 774-R-013 Simultaneous interpreting into French and English will be available in the Main Auditorium. Une interprétation simultanée en français et en anglais sera disponible dans l'amphithéâtre principal.

  6. Directors General appointed

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    At a special session on 21 March, presided over by P. Levaux, the Council of the European Organization for Nuclear Research appointed J . B. Adams and L . Van Hove as Directors General of the Organization for a period of five years beginning 1 January 1976. Dr. Adams will be responsible for the administration of CERN, for the operation of the equipment and services and for the construction of buildings and major equipment. Professor Van Hove will be responsible for the research activities of the Organization.

  7. ITER technology R and D progress report. Report by the Director. ITER technical advisory committee meeting, 25-27 June 2000, St. Petersburg

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The overall philosophy for the ITER design has been to use established approaches through detailed analysis and to validate their application to ITER through technology R and D, including fabrication of full scale or scalable models of key components. All this R and D work has been done for ITER under collaboration among the Home Teams, with a total resource of about 660 KIUA. R and D issues for ITER-FEAT are almost the same as for the 1998 ITER design. Major developments and fabrication have been completed and tests have significantly progressed. The technical output from the R and D validates the technologies and confirms the manufacturing techniques and quality assurance incorporated in the ITER design, and supports the manufacturing cost estimates for important key cost drivers. The testing of models is continuing to demonstrate their performance margin and/or to optimize their operational use. Their realisation offers insights useful for a possible future collaborative construction activity. Valuable and relevant experience has already been gained in the management of industrial scale, cross-party ventures. The successful progress of these projects increases confidence in the possibility of jointly constructing ITER in an international project framework. The R and D present status is summarized in the following: details are given in Chapters 2 and 3. Significant efforts and resources have been devoted to the Seven Large R and D Projects which cover all the major key components of the basic machine of ITER and their maintenance tools

  8. Predictors of Associate's Degree Completion in Engineering and Engineering Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reys-Nickel, Lynsey L.

    The purpose of this ex post facto study was to describe completers and non-completers of associate's degree programs in engineering and engineering technologies and determine whether and to what extent completion in these programs is a function of selected student-related variables and institutional variables. Data from the 2004/2009 Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS: 04/09) of associate's degree completers and non-completers in engineering and engineering technologies were accessed and analyzed through PowerStats, a web-based data analysis tool from National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). Descriptive data indicated that, proportionally, engineering and engineering technologies completers were mostly White, married, middle income, employed part-time, enrolled full-time, did not hold a high school diploma or certificate, completed Trigonometry/Algebra II, had a father who's highest education level was an associate's degree, but did not know their mother's highest level of education, completed remedial coursework, and started college with the goal of earning an associate's degree. While more males enrolled in the programs, males and females demonstrated similar completion rates, proportionally--with females showing a slightly higher percentage of completion. Results from the logistic regression further indicated that the variables significant to completion in associate's degree programs in engineering and engineering technologies were gender and enrollment size. Findings suggested that female students were more likely to earn the degree, and that the larger the institution, the more likely the student would become a completer. However, since a major limitation of the study was the small weighted sample size, the results of the study are inconclusive in terms of the extent to which the findings can be generalized to the population of students in associate's degree programs in engineering and engineering technologies. This study fills a

  9. 17 January 2011 - British (Cambridge) Trustee of the London Science Museum Chair of the Management Committee of the Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences H. Covington in the LHCB underground experimental area with A. Schopper; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; throughout accompanied by R. Veness.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    17 January 2011 - British (Cambridge) Trustee of the London Science Museum Chair of the Management Committee of the Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences H. Covington in the LHCB underground experimental area with A. Schopper; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; throughout accompanied by R. Veness.

  10. 21 May 2013 - Slovakian State Secretary, Ministry of Health V. Čislák signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 with V. Senaj (Technology Department); in the ALICE experimental cavern with P. Chochula (Physics Department). M. Cirilli (Knowledge Transfer Group) present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    21 May 2013 - Slovakian State Secretary, Ministry of Health V. Čislák signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 with V. Senaj (Technology Department); in the ALICE experimental cavern with P. Chochula (Physics Department). M. Cirilli (Knowledge Transfer Group) present.

  11. 26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

  12. 1 April 2014 - President of the Parliament of the Principality of Liechtenstein A. Frick and his delegation visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    1 April 2014 - President of the Parliament of the Principality of Liechtenstein A. Frick and his delegation visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis present throughout.

  13. 9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

  14. 17 October 2013 - C. Ashton High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Vice-President of the European Commission visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    17 October 2013 - C. Ashton High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Vice-President of the European Commission visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  15. 6 March 2013 - Committee for Employment and Learning, Northern Ireland Legislative Assembly, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in the LHC tunnel and visiting the LHCb experiment at LHC Point 8. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers with Vice-Chair T. Buchanan.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    6 March 2013 - Committee for Employment and Learning, Northern Ireland Legislative Assembly, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland in the LHC tunnel and visiting the LHCb experiment at LHC Point 8. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers with Vice-Chair T. Buchanan.

  16. 19 April 2013 - The University of Chicago Vice President for Research and for National Laboratories D. H. Levy signing the guest book with CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; in the LHC tunnel with L. Bottura; throughout accompanied by US CMS J. Butler. Mrs Levy and Mrs Butler took part.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    19 April 2013 - The University of Chicago Vice President for Research and for National Laboratories D. H. Levy signing the guest book with CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; in the LHC tunnel with L. Bottura; throughout accompanied by US CMS J. Butler. Mrs Levy and Mrs Butler took part.

  17. 25 June 2010 - Founder Chairman of the Japanese Science and Technology in Society Forum K. Omi signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Adviser J. Ellis and Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    25 June 2010 - Founder Chairman of the Japanese Science and Technology in Society Forum K. Omi signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Adviser J. Ellis and Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  18. 22nd September 2010 - Korean Minister of Education, Science and Technology J.-H. Lee signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting ALICE exhibition with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Schukraft; accompanied throughout by Adviser R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Teams : M. Brice ; JC Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    22nd September 2010 - Korean Minister of Education, Science and Technology J.-H. Lee signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting ALICE exhibition with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Schukraft; accompanied throughout by Adviser R. Voss.

  19. Professor Bakytzhan Abdiraiym Rector of the L. Gumilov Eurasian National University, Astana, Kazakhstan accompanied by Prof. Kairat Kuterbekov, Dr Bekzat Prmantayeva, Dr Kuralay Maksut with the Director-General, Dr Tadeusz Kurtyka, Adviser for Non-Member States, Mrs Julia Andreeva, Department of Information Technologies and Dr Nikolai Zimine, ATLAS Collaboration, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Professor Bakytzhan Abdiraiym Rector of the L. Gumilov Eurasian National University, Astana, Kazakhstan accompanied by Prof. Kairat Kuterbekov, Dr Bekzat Prmantayeva, Dr Kuralay Maksut with the Director-General, Dr Tadeusz Kurtyka, Adviser for Non-Member States, Mrs Julia Andreeva, Department of Information Technologies and Dr Nikolai Zimine, ATLAS Collaboration, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna

  20. 23rd June 2010 - Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization Chief Executive Officer A. Paterson signing a Joint Statement of Intent and the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre and control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    23rd June 2010 - Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization Chief Executive Officer A. Paterson signing a Joint Statement of Intent and the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre and control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  1. 18 December 2013 - P. Kron Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of ALSTOM signing the Guest Book with the Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. Accompanied by P. Fassnacht throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    18 December 2013 - P. Kron Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of ALSTOM signing the Guest Book with the Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. Accompanied by P. Fassnacht throughout.

  2. 8 April 2011 - Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology A. Mercadante Oliva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with J.M. Jimenez.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    8 April 2011 - Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology A. Mercadante Oliva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with J.M. Jimenez.

  3. 18 February 2013 - Foundation for Polish Science President M. Zylicz signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting the ALICE experimental cavern with K. Safarik and L. Graczykowskind LHC tunnel with Technology Department A. Siemko.

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2013-01-01

    18 February 2013 - Foundation for Polish Science President M. Zylicz signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting the ALICE experimental cavern with K. Safarik and L. Graczykowskind LHC tunnel with Technology Department A. Siemko.

  4. William Brinkman (centre), Director of the Department of Energy, U.S.A. at the superconducting magnet test hall SM18 with (from left to right) Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss, Advisor for Non-Member States J. Ellis, J. Strait from Fermilab and Deputy Head of Technology Department L. Rossi on 13 November 2009.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice; SM18

    2009-01-01

    William Brinkman (centre), Director of the Department of Energy, U.S.A. at the superconducting magnet test hall SM18 with (from left to right) Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss, Advisor for Non-Member States J. Ellis, J. Strait from Fermilab and Deputy Head of Technology Department L. Rossi on 13 November 2009.

  5. 30th November 2010 - Norwegian Ministry of Government Administration, Reform and Church Affairs State Secretary R. Valle signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting CERN Computer Centre with Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    30th November 2010 - Norwegian Ministry of Government Administration, Reform and Church Affairs State Secretary R. Valle signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting CERN Computer Centre with Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer.

  6. 5 June 2013 - European Union Ambassador to Switzerland and the Principality of Liechtenstein R. Jones in the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Head of the EU Projects Office S. Stavrev present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    5 June 2013 - European Union Ambassador to Switzerland and the Principality of Liechtenstein R. Jones in the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Head of the EU Projects Office S. Stavrev present.

  7. Chinese Commission of Science Technology and Industry for National Defense Senior Vice Minister CHEN Qiufa visiting ALICE experiment on 1st November 2007 with CERN Director-General R. Aymar and Adviser J.-P. Revol. Thursday, 1st and Friday, 2nd November 2007

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Chinese Commission of Science Technology and Industry for National Defense Senior Vice Minister CHEN Qiufa visiting ALICE experiment on 1st November 2007 with CERN Director-General R. Aymar and Adviser J.-P. Revol. Thursday, 1st and Friday, 2nd November 2007

  8. 24 May 2013 - Rector of the Polish Stanislaw Staszic AGH University of Science and Technology T. Slomka in the LHC tunnel at Point 8 with Senior Polish Staff Member A. Siemko, in LHCb experimental cavern with LHCb Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Adviser for Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    24 May 2013 - Rector of the Polish Stanislaw Staszic AGH University of Science and Technology T. Slomka in the LHC tunnel at Point 8 with Senior Polish Staff Member A. Siemko, in LHCb experimental cavern with LHCb Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Adviser for Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka present.

  9. 8 April 2013 - Indian Hon'ble Minister for Ministry of Science & Technology and Ministry of Earth Sciences Shri Sudini Jaipal Reddy in the LHC tunnel with K. Foraz, visiting the CMS cavern with Technical Coordinator A. Ball and Former Spokesperson T. Virdee, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2013-01-01

    8 April 2013 - Indian Hon'ble Minister for Ministry of Science & Technology and Ministry of Earth Sciences Shri Sudini Jaipal Reddy in the LHC tunnel with K. Foraz, visiting the CMS cavern with Technical Coordinator A. Ball and Former Spokesperson T. Virdee, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer.

  10. VMware vCloud Director essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Lipika

    2014-01-01

    If you are a technical professional with system administration knowledge, then this book is for you. The book also covers areas of importance if you are a virtualization engineer, consultant, architect, senior system engineer, or senior system analyst. You should possess core vSphere platform knowledge necessary to serve as a base to learn vCloud Director and its associated components.

  11. Defining and Selecting Independent Directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Pichet

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Drawing from the Enlightened Shareholder Theory that the author first developed in 2011, this theoretical paper with practical and normative ambitions achieves a better definition of independent director, while improving the understanding of the roles he fulfils on boards of directors. The first part defines constructs like firms, Governance system and Corporate governance, offering a clear distinction between the latter two concepts before explaining the four main missions of a board. The second part defines the ideal independent director by outlining the objective qualities that are necessary and adding those subjective aspects that have turned this into a veritable profession. The third part defines the ideal process for selecting independent directors, based on nominating committees that should themselves be independent. It also includes ways of assessing directors who are currently in function, as well as modalities for renewing their mandates. The paper’s conclusion presents the Paradox of the Independent Director.

  12. Veterinary Technician Program Director Leadership Style and Program Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renda-Francis, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    Program directors of American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) accredited veterinary technician programs may have little or no training in leadership. The need for program directors of AVMA-accredited veterinary technician programs to understand how leadership traits may have an impact on student success is often overlooked. The purpose of…

  13. Fusion technology. Annual report of the. Association Cea/EURATOM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magaud, P.; Le Vagueres, F.

    1996-01-01

    In 1996, the French EURATOM-CEA Association made significant contributions to the European technology programme. This work is compiled in this report as follows: the ITER CEA activities and related developments are described in the first section; blankets and material developments for DEMO, long term safety studies are summarised in the second part; the Underlying Technology activities are compiled in the third part of this report. In each section, the tasks are sorted out to respect the European presentation. For an easy reading, appendix 4 gives the list of tasks in alphabetical order with a page reference list. The CEA is in charge of the French Technology programme. Three specific organizational directions of the CEA, located on four sites (see appendix 5) are involves in this programme: Advanced Technologies Direction (DTA), for Material task; Nuclear Reactors Direction (DRN), for Blanket design, Neutronic problems, Safety tasks; Physical Sciences Direction (DSM) uses the competence of the Tore Supra team in the Magnet design and plasma Facing Component field. The CEA programme is completed by collaborations with Technicatome, COMEX-Nucleaire and Ecole Polytechnique. The breakdown of the programme by Directions is presented in figure 1. The allocation of tasks is given in appendix 2 and in appendix 3, the related publications. (author)

  14. Climatic shocks associate with innovation in science and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Dreu, Carsten K W; van Dijk, Mathijs A

    2018-01-01

    Human history is shaped by landmark discoveries in science and technology. However, across both time and space the rate of innovation is erratic: Periods of relative inertia alternate with bursts of creative science and rapid cascades of technological innovations. While the origins of the rise and fall in rates of discovery and innovation remain poorly understood, they may reflect adaptive responses to exogenously emerging threats and pressures. Here we examined this possibility by fitting annual rates of scientific discovery and technological innovation to climatic variability and its associated economic pressures and resource scarcity. In time-series data from Europe (1500-1900CE), we indeed found that rates of innovation are higher during prolonged periods of cold (versus warm) surface temperature and during the presence (versus absence) of volcanic dust veils. This negative temperature-innovation link was confirmed in annual time-series for France, Germany, and the United Kingdom (1901-1965CE). Combined, across almost 500 years and over 5,000 documented innovations and discoveries, a 0.5°C increase in temperature associates with a sizable 0.30-0.60 standard deviation decrease in innovation. Results were robust to controlling for fluctuations in population size. Furthermore, and consistent with economic theory and micro-level data on group innovation, path analyses revealed that the relation between harsher climatic conditions between 1500-1900CE and more innovation is mediated by climate-induced economic pressures and resource scarcity.

  15. Climatic shocks associate with innovation in science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Mathijs A.

    2018-01-01

    Human history is shaped by landmark discoveries in science and technology. However, across both time and space the rate of innovation is erratic: Periods of relative inertia alternate with bursts of creative science and rapid cascades of technological innovations. While the origins of the rise and fall in rates of discovery and innovation remain poorly understood, they may reflect adaptive responses to exogenously emerging threats and pressures. Here we examined this possibility by fitting annual rates of scientific discovery and technological innovation to climatic variability and its associated economic pressures and resource scarcity. In time-series data from Europe (1500–1900CE), we indeed found that rates of innovation are higher during prolonged periods of cold (versus warm) surface temperature and during the presence (versus absence) of volcanic dust veils. This negative temperature–innovation link was confirmed in annual time-series for France, Germany, and the United Kingdom (1901–1965CE). Combined, across almost 500 years and over 5,000 documented innovations and discoveries, a 0.5°C increase in temperature associates with a sizable 0.30–0.60 standard deviation decrease in innovation. Results were robust to controlling for fluctuations in population size. Furthermore, and consistent with economic theory and micro-level data on group innovation, path analyses revealed that the relation between harsher climatic conditions between 1500–1900CE and more innovation is mediated by climate-induced economic pressures and resource scarcity. PMID:29364910

  16. Survey of directors of emergency departments in California on overcrowding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, John R; Navarro, Misty L; Derlet, Robert W

    2000-01-01

    Objective To survey the directors of emergency departments in California on their opinions of the extent and factors associated with overcrowding in emergency departments. Methods Surveys were mailed to a random sample of emergency department directors. Questions included estimated magnitude, frequency, causes, and effects of overcrowding. Results Of 160 directors surveyed, 113 (71%) responded, and 109 (96%) reported overcrowding as a problem. All (n = 21) university or county hospital directors and most (n = 88 [96%]) private or community hospital directors reported overcrowding. The 4 private or community hospital directors reporting no overcrowding serve smaller communities with populations less than 250,000. Thirty-two directors (28%) reported daily overcrowding. The most cited causes were increasing patient acuity and volume, hospital bed shortage, laboratory delays, and nursing shortage. These putative causes were similar between university or county and private or community hospital directors, except for consultant delays, which were more prevalent in university or county hospital emergency departments. Conclusions Overcrowding is perceived to be a serious problem by emergency department directors. Many factors may contribute to overcrowding, and most are beyond the control of emergency departments. PMID:10854386

  17. IT governance guidelines for directors

    CERN Document Server

    Calder, Alan

    2005-01-01

    This important new book – 'IT Governance: Guidelines for Directors' provides directors, executives, managers and professional advisers with clear, pragmatic guidelines for ensuring that IT and the business work together for the same strategic objectives. 

  18. Object Oriented Programming in Director

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian DARDALA

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Director is one of the most popular authoring software. As software for developing multimedia applications, Director is an object oriented programming environment. A very important issue to develop multimedia applications is the designing of their own classes. This paper presents the particular aspects concerning the available facilities offered by Lingo to design classes and to generate objects.

  19. The Director's Work on Himself

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Annelis

    2008-01-01

    A reading of Stanislavsky's major works about the actor's work on himself from the viewpoint of the director's work on himself.......A reading of Stanislavsky's major works about the actor's work on himself from the viewpoint of the director's work on himself....

  20. 28 November 2013 - N. N. Kudryavtsev, Russian Rector of the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology signing an Agreement and the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson B. Heinemann and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with AGH University of Science and Technology A. Erokhin. M. Savino, Physics Department, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research also present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    28 November 2013 - N. N. Kudryavtsev, Russian Rector of the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology signing an Agreement and the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson B. Heinemann and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with AGH University of Science and Technology A. Erokhin. M. Savino, Physics Department, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research also present.

  1. 21 March 2011 - South African Ministry of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Director General P. Mjwara signing the guest with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser J. Ellis and ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and J. Cleymans; in the CERN control centre with R. Steerenberg; visiting ALICE surface exhibition with P. Giubellino and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    21 March 2011 - South African Ministry of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Director General P. Mjwara signing the guest with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser J. Ellis and ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and J. Cleymans; in the CERN control centre with R. Steerenberg; visiting ALICE surface exhibition with P. Giubellino and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura.

  2. ICU Director Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbu, Ogbonna C.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2015-01-01

    Improving value within critical care remains a priority because it represents a significant portion of health-care spending, faces high rates of adverse events, and inconsistently delivers evidence-based practices. ICU directors are increasingly required to understand all aspects of the value provided by their units to inform local improvement efforts and relate effectively to external parties. A clear understanding of the overall process of measuring quality and value as well as the strengths, limitations, and potential application of individual metrics is critical to supporting this charge. In this review, we provide a conceptual framework for understanding value metrics, describe an approach to developing a value measurement program, and summarize common metrics to characterize ICU value. We first summarize how ICU value can be represented as a function of outcomes and costs. We expand this equation and relate it to both the classic structure-process-outcome framework for quality assessment and the Institute of Medicine’s six aims of health care. We then describe how ICU leaders can develop their own value measurement process by identifying target areas, selecting appropriate measures, acquiring the necessary data, analyzing the data, and disseminating the findings. Within this measurement process, we summarize common metrics that can be used to characterize ICU value. As health care, in general, and critical care, in particular, changes and data become more available, it is increasingly important for ICU leaders to understand how to effectively acquire, evaluate, and apply data to improve the value of care provided to patients. PMID:25846533

  3. The medical director and quality requirements in the dialysis facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Brigitte

    2015-03-06

    Four decades after the successful implementation of the ESRD program currently providing life-saving dialysis therapy to >430,000 patients, the definitions of and demands for a high-quality program have evolved and increased at the same time. Through substantial technological advances ESRD care improved, with a predominant focus on the technical aspects of care and the introduction of medications such as erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and active vitamin D for anemia and bone disease management. Despite many advances, the size of the program and the increasingly older and multimorbid patient population have contributed to continuing challenges for providing consistently high-quality care. Medicare's Final Rule of the Conditions for Coverage (April 2008) define the medical director of the dialysis center as the leader of the interdisciplinary team and the person ultimately accountable for quality, safety, and care provided in the center. Knowledge and active leadership with a hands-on approach in the quality assessment and performance improvement process (QAPI) is essential for the achievement of high-quality outcomes in dialysis centers. A collaborative approach between the dialysis provider and medical director is required to optimize outcomes and deliver evidence-based quality care. In 2011 the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services introduced a pay-for-performance program-the ESRD quality incentive program (QIP)- with yearly varying quality metrics that result in payment reductions in subsequent years when targets are not achieved during the performance period. Success with the QIP requires a clear understanding of the structure, metrics, and scoring methods. Information on achievement and nonachievement is publicly available, both in facilities (through the facility performance score card) and on public websites (including Medicare's Dialysis Facility Compare). By assuming the leadership role in the quality program of dialysis facilities, the medical

  4. Technology issues associated with using densified hydrogen for space vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1992-01-01

    Slush hydrogen and triple-point hydrogen offer the potential for reducing the size and weight of future space vehicles because these fluids have greater densities than normal-boiling-point liquid hydrogen. In addition, these fluids have greater heat capacities, which make them attractive fuels for such applications as the National Aerospace Plane and cryogenic depots. Some of the benefits of using slush hydrogen and triple-point hydrogen for space missions are quantified. Some of the major issues associated with using these densified cryogenic fuels for space applications are examined, and the technology efforts that have been made to address many of these issues are summarized.

  5. Catherine Cesarsky - ESO's Next Director General

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The ESO Council has appointed Dr. Catherine Cesarsky as Director General for a five year period, succeeding Professor Riccardo Giacconi, whose term ends this year. Dr. Cesarsky will take up her duties on September 1, 1999, at the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Germany). Dr. Cesarsky was born in France in 1943. She received a degree in Physical Sciences at the University of Buenos Aires and graduated with a PhD in Astronomy in 1971 from Harvard University (Cambridge, Mass., USA). Afterwards she worked at the California Institute of Technology (CALTECH). In 1974, she became a staff member of the Service d'Astrophysique (SAp) , Direction des Sciences de la Matière (DSM), Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique (CEA) (France). She headed the theoretical group of the SAp (1978-1985), was Head of SAp (1985-1993) and has been Director of DSM since 1994. The DSM encompasses, at the CEA, activities of basic research in physics, chemistry, astrophysics and earth sciences and comprises about 3000 scientists, engineers, technicians, etc. Dr. Cesarsky is known for her successful research activities in several central areas of modern astrophysics. The first part of her career was devoted to the high-energy domain. This has involved studies of the propagation and composition of galactic cosmic rays, of matter and fields in the diffuse interstellar medium, as well as the acceleration of particles in astrophysical shocks, e.g. in connection with supernovae. She then turned to infrared astronomy. She is the Principal Investigator of the ISOCAM camera onboard the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) of the European Space Agency (ESA) and, as such, she leads the ISOCAM central programme. It studies, in a coordinated way, the infrared emission from a variety of galactic and extragalactic sources and is yielding new and exciting results on star formation and galactic evolution. Dr. Cesarsky received the COSPAR (Committee on Space Research) Space Science Award in 1998. She is a member of many

  6. Juan Antonio Rubio appointed as Director-General of CIEMAT

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Juan Antonio Rubio, Head of CERN's ETT unit (Education and Technology Transfer) has been appointed by the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science as the Director General of the Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology, CIEMAT. Dr Rubio's career began at the Spanish Nuclear Energy Commission where he held the posts of Investigator, Head of the High Energy Group and Head of Nuclear Physics and High Energy Division. Later, he was named Director of the Department of Basic Investigation and Scientific Director of the CIEMAT. In 1987 he joined CERN as Scientific Adviser to the Director General and Group Leader of the Scientific Assessment Group. Up to now, Dr Rubio has been the Head of the ETT unit, as well as Coordinator for Latin America and Commissioner for the 50th Anniversary of the Organization. He was born on 4 June 1944 in Madrid, and holds a Doctorate in Physical Sciences from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid.

  7. Association between assisted reproductive technology and advanced retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RV Paul Chan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available RV Paul Chan1, Yoshihiro Yonekawa1, Margaux A Morrison2,3, Grace Sun1, Ryan K Wong1, Jeffrey M Perlman4, Michael F Chiang5,6, Thomas C Lee7, M Elizabeth Hartnett3, Margaret M DeAngelis2,31Department of Ophthalmology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York; 2Ocular Molecular Genetics Institute, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; 3University of Utah School of Medicine, Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah; 4Department of Pediatrics, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York; Departments of 5Ophthalmology and 6Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York; 7The Vision Center, Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, California, USAPurpose: To investigate the associations between assisted reproductive technology (ART and severe retinopathy of prematurity (ROP requiring treatment. Methods: Retrospective analyses of inborn preterm infants screened for severe ROP at the Weill Cornell Medical Center Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the New York-Presbyterian Hospital by single factor logistic regression and multifactor models.Results: Of 399 ethnically diverse infants, 253 were conceived naturally and 146 by ART. Eight (3.16% patients conceived naturally, and 11 (7.53% with ART required laser treatment. In multifactor analyses, significant risks for severe ROP requiring treatment included both gestational age (odds ratio [OR] 0.34; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.23–0.52; P< 0.001 and ART ([OR] 4.70; [CI], 1.52–4.57; P = 0.007.Conclusions: ART is associated with severe ROP requiring treatment in this cohort. This is the first report that demonstrates a statistically significant association between ART and severe ROP requiring treatment in infants in the US.Keywords: retinopathy of prematurity, low birth rate, blindness, assisted reproductive technology

  8. 7 CFR 29.17 - Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.17 Director. Director or Acting Director, Tobacco Division, Agricultural Marketing Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. ...

  9. UNC Cancer Center Director to Lead NCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    President Donald Trump has selected Norman "Ned" Sharpless, MD, director of the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, to lead the NCI. The news was met with widespread approval among cancer researchers, who view Sharpless as a strong communicator who can ably represent the needs of the cancer community in the face of proposed funding cuts. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Boards: Independent and Committed Directors?

    OpenAIRE

    Christophe Volonté

    2011-01-01

    Regulators, proxy advisors and shareholders are regularly calling for independent directors. However, at the same time, independent directors commonly engage in numerous outside activities potentially reducing their time and commitment with the particular firm. Using Tobin's Q as an approximation of market valuation and controlling for endogeneity, our empirical analysis reveals that neither is independence positively related to firm performance nor are outside activities negatively related t...

  11. Child Welfare Training in Child Psychiatry Residency: A Program Director Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Terry G.; Cox, Julia R.; Walker, Sarah C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study surveys child psychiatry residency program directors in order to 1) characterize child welfare training experiences for child psychiatry residents; 2) evaluate factors associated with the likelihood of program directors' endorsing the adequacy of their child welfare training; and 3) assess program directors'…

  12. 3rd August 2010 - CEO Siemens Healthcare Sector, Chief Technology Officer, Head of Corporate Technology, Member of Siemens AG Managing Board, Germany, H. Requardt, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1008148 11: H. von Dewitz in the ATLAS Visitor centre with Collaboration member M. Hauschild (left) and Former IT Department Head W. von Rüden (right) CERN-HI-1008148 18 : Head of Innovation and Systems Projects, Siemens Healthcare Sector O. Heid (left) in the ATLAS Visitor centre with Collaboration member M. Hauschild. CERN-HI-1008148: in the ATLAS visitor centre, from left to right: Former IT Department Head W. von Rüden; ATLAS Collaboration P. Mättig; CEO Siemens Healthcare Sector, Chief Technology Officer, Head of Corporate Technology, Member of Siemens AG Managing Board, Germany, H. Requardt; Head of Innovation and Systems Projects, Siemens Healthcare Sector O. Heid; H. von Dewitz; ATLAS Collaboration member M. Hauschild.

  13. Association between Health Information Technology and Case Mix Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young-Taek; Lee, Junsang; Lee, Jinhyung

    2017-10-01

    Health information technology (IT) can assist healthcare providers in ordering medication and adhering to guidelines while improving communication among providers and the quality of care. However, the relationship between health IT and Case Mix Index (CMI) has not been thoroughly investigated; therefore, this study aimed to clarify this relationship. To examine the effect of health IT on CMI, a generalized estimation equation (GEE) was applied to two years of California hospital data. We found that IT was positively associated with CMI, indicating that increased IT adoption could lead to a higher CMI or billing though DRG up-coding. This implies that hospitals' revenue could increase around $40,000 by increasing IT investment by 10%. The positive association between IT and CMI implies that IT adoption itself could lead to higher patient billings. Generally, a higher CMI in a hospital indicates that the hospital provides expensive services with higher coding and therefore receives more money from patients. Therefore, measures to prevent upcoding through IT systems should be implemented.

  14. National Educational Technology Trends: 2012. State Leadership Empowers Educators, Transforms Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, Delia, R.; Fox, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA) is the principal association representing the technology leadership in all fifty states, the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. This is SETDA's ninth annual report on select educational technology activities. This year's report includes…

  15. Factors associated with access of rural women to technology in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A descriptive, correlational study was conducted to: describe the channels through which rural women obtain information regarding technology, and factors promoting access of women to technology; determine the contribution of technology to socio-economic development; and describe the relationships among factors ...

  16. 12 CFR 918.4 - Directors' expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Directors' expenses. 918.4 Section 918.4 Banks... BANK DIRECTOR COMPENSATION AND EXPENSES § 918.4 Directors' expenses. Each Bank may pay its directors for such necessary and reasonable travel, subsistence and other related expenses incurred in...

  17. The emergency department medical director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, T A

    1987-02-01

    This article has presented an overview of the duties, responsibilities, and management roles of the emergency department Medical Director, a position that can be among the most challenging, stimulating, and exciting in medicine. However, prior to accepting a position as an Emergency Department medical director, one should have a clear understanding of what the job entails. Careful discussions with the hospital administration, medical staff, nursing personnel, and staff emergency physicians should be undertaken to learn the perceptions of these people and expectations of the position. Once the job has been accepted, using the roles, responsibilities, and duties detailed herein may be of benefit--but should always be applied with good judgment, tactful cooperation, and common sense. Finally, it should not be surprising to a medical director to find, as Spinoza did many years ago, that the excellent thing he aspires to are as difficult as they are rare.

  18. Cost and logistics of implementing a tissue-based American College of Surgeons/Association of Program Directors in Surgery surgical skills curriculum for general surgery residents of all clinical years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Brandon; Clark, Philip; Sudan, Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    The cost and logistics of deploying the American College of Surgeons (ACS)/Association of Program Directors in Surgery (APDS) National Technical Skills Curriculum across all training years are not known. This information is essential for residency programs choosing to adopt similar curricula. A task force evaluated the authors' institution's existing simulation curriculum and enhanced it by implementing the ACS/APDS modules. A 35-module curriculum was administered to 35 general surgery residents across all 5 clinical years. The costs and logistics were noted, and resident satisfaction was assessed. The annual operational cost was $110,300 ($3,150 per resident). Cost per module, per resident was $940 for the cadaveric module compared with $220 and $240 for dry simulation and animal tissue-based modules, respectively. Resident satisfaction improved from 2.45 to 4.78 on a 5-point, Likert-type scale after implementing the ACS/APDS modules. The ACS/APDS skills curriculum was implemented successfully across all clinical years. Cadaveric modules were the most expensive. Animal and dry simulation modules were equivalent in cost. The addition of tissue-based modules was associated with high satisfaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The Playwrights-Directors Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Edward

    The playwrights-directors workshop at the University of Wisconsin (Madison) allows students of directing and playwriting to meet jointly to explore and solve problems in the creation and production of original one-act scripts. At the heart of the program is the belief that both playwriting and directing students profit from producing their efforts…

  20. 29 September 2015 - Vice-President of the Government of Spain S. Sáenz de Santamaría in the ATLAS visitor centre, the Synchrocyclotron, the Data Centre visit point and the LHC magnet facility with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez.

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Were also present from Spain: Sra. Carmen Vela, Secretaria de Estado de Investigación, Desarrollo e Innovación, Sr. D. Bernardo de Sicart Escoda Embajador de España en Berna, Sra. Da Ana Menéndez Pérez, Embajadora Representante Permanente de España ante Naciones Unidas y OOII con sede en Ginebra, Sra. Da María Pico Directora del Gabinete de la Vicepresidenta and Sr. D. Miguel Temboury Redondo Subsecretario de Economía y Competitividad. And from CERN: Dr Maria Alandes Pradillo, Information Technology Department, Dr Maria Barroso-Lopez Deputy Group Leader, IT-PES, Dr Frédérick Bordry, Director of Accelerators and Technology, Dr Borja Fernandez Adiego Engineering Department, Prof. Maria Jose Garcia Borge ISOLDE Collaboration Spokesperson, Dr Fabiola Gianotti Director-General elect 2016-2020, Mr Frédéric Hemmer Information Technology Department Head, Prof. Mario Martinez, Spanish Scientific Delegate to CERN Council Mr Guillermo Merino Fernandez, Technology Department Mr Lluis Miralles, General Infrast...

  1. Proceedings of the American Psychological Association, Incorporated, for the legislative year 2015: Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Representatives February 20-22, 2015, Washington, DC, and August 5 and August 7, 2015, Washington, DC, and minutes of the February, June, August, and December 2015 meetings of the Board of Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jennifer F

    2016-01-01

    This article provides the minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Representatives February 20-22, 2015, Washington, DC, and August 5 and August 7, 2015, Washington, DC, and minutes of the February, June, August, and December 2015 meetings of the Board of Directors. These minutes are the official record of the actions of the Association taken during the year by both the Board of Directors (the Board) and the Council of Representatives (Council). They are arranged in topical rather than chronological order, and subheadings are used when appropriate. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Proceedings of the American Psychological Association for the Legislative Year 2011: Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Representatives, February 18-20, 2011, Washington, DC, and August 3 and 5, 2011, Washington, DC, and Minutes of the February, June, August, and December 2011 Meetings of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Barry S.

    2012-01-01

    These minutes are the official record of the actions of the Association taken during the year by both the Board of Directors (the Board) and the Council of Representatives (Council). The roll of representatives was called at each Council meeting, and more than a quorum answered to their names. Reference is made in these minutes to various reports,…

  3. Proceedings of the American Psychological Association for the Legislative Year 2010: Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Representatives, February 19-21, 2010, Washington, DC, and August 11 and 15, 2010, San Diego, California, and Minutes of the February, June, August, September, and December 2010 Meetings of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Barry S.

    2011-01-01

    These minutes are the official record of the actions of the Association taken during the year by both the Board of Directors (the Board) and the Council of Representatives (Council). The roll of representatives was called at each Council meeting, and more than a quorum answered to their names. Reference is made in these minutes to various reports,…

  4. 21 September 2010 - Chairman of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission A. Parvez, CERN Director-General R. Heuer, Staff Association President G. Deroma, Ambassador to the UN Z. Akram (showing a symbol of the funds raised by CERN Staff for Pakistan)and Adviser for Non-Member States R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    21 September 2010 - Chairman of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission A. Parvez, CERN Director-General R. Heuer, Staff Association President G. Deroma, Ambassador to the UN Z. Akram (showing a symbol of the funds raised by CERN Staff for Pakistan)and Adviser for Non-Member States R. Voss.

  5. 2011 Computation Directorate Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D L

    2012-04-11

    From its founding in 1952 until today, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made significant strategic investments to develop high performance computing (HPC) and its application to national security and basic science. Now, 60 years later, the Computation Directorate and its myriad resources and capabilities have become a key enabler for LLNL programs and an integral part of the effort to support our nation's nuclear deterrent and, more broadly, national security. In addition, the technological innovation HPC makes possible is seen as vital to the nation's economic vitality. LLNL, along with other national laboratories, is working to make supercomputing capabilities and expertise available to industry to boost the nation's global competitiveness. LLNL is on the brink of an exciting milestone with the 2012 deployment of Sequoia, the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) 20-petaFLOP/s resource that will apply uncertainty quantification to weapons science. Sequoia will bring LLNL's total computing power to more than 23 petaFLOP/s-all brought to bear on basic science and national security needs. The computing systems at LLNL provide game-changing capabilities. Sequoia and other next-generation platforms will enable predictive simulation in the coming decade and leverage industry trends, such as massively parallel and multicore processors, to run petascale applications. Efficient petascale computing necessitates refining accuracy in materials property data, improving models for known physical processes, identifying and then modeling for missing physics, quantifying uncertainty, and enhancing the performance of complex models and algorithms in macroscale simulation codes. Nearly 15 years ago, NNSA's Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), now called the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program, was the critical element needed to shift from test-based confidence to science-based confidence

  6. Associate Director | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... Interacts regularly with colleagues in IDRC to contribute to IDRC's overall programming and learning;; Contributes to Centre-wide learning by distilling and imparting lessons from individual projects through the Rolling PCR interviews and process; and; Contributes as appropriate to IDRC policy and program development, ...

  7. Computation Directorate 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, V E; Guse, J A

    2008-03-06

    If there is a single word that both characterized 2007 and dominated the thoughts and actions of many Laboratory employees throughout the year, it is transition. Transition refers to the major shift that took place on October 1, when the University of California relinquished management responsibility for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), became the new Laboratory management contractor for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). In the 55 years under the University of California, LLNL amassed an extraordinary record of significant accomplishments, clever inventions, and momentous contributions in the service of protecting the nation. This legacy provides the new organization with a built-in history, a tradition of excellence, and a solid set of core competencies from which to build the future. I am proud to note that in the nearly seven years I have had the privilege of leading the Computation Directorate, our talented and dedicated staff has made far-reaching contributions to the legacy and tradition we passed on to LLNS. Our place among the world's leaders in high-performance computing, algorithmic research and development, applications, and information technology (IT) services and support is solid. I am especially gratified to report that through all the transition turmoil, and it has been considerable, the Computation Directorate continues to produce remarkable achievements. Our most important asset--the talented, skilled, and creative people who work in Computation--has continued a long-standing Laboratory tradition of delivering cutting-edge science even in the face of adversity. The scope of those achievements is breathtaking, and in 2007, our accomplishments span an amazing range of topics. From making an important contribution to a Nobel Prize-winning effort to creating tools that can detect malicious codes embedded in commercial

  8. 32 CFR 2400.19 - Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Declassification and Downgrading § 2400.19 Declassification by the Director of the Information Security Oversight Office. If the Director of the Information... Information Security Oversight Office. 2400.19 Section 2400.19 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to...

  9. First AGU Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2010-08-01

    On 1 July 2010, the first AGU Board of Directors took office. The board is composed of the president, president-elect, immediate past president, general secretary, international secretary, development board chair, six members elected by the Union membership, vice chair of the AGU Council, and the executive director. Two additional members may be nominated by the AGU president and approved by the board. The creation of the board is a result of the new governance structure approved by the AGU membership in November 2009. The board is responsible for the business aspects of the Union, while an expanded AGU Council will focus on science issues. Council members will be introduced in a future issue of Eos.

  10. 22 August 2014 - Members of the International Business Council of the World Economic Forum led by Managing Director and Member of the Managing Board P. Rösler

    CERN Multimedia

    Gadmer, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    Visiting the LHC tunnel at point 5 with Director-General R. Heuer, Director of Accelerators and Technology F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss and Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis

  11. 3rd May 2009 - Japanese Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy, Food Safety, Minister of Consumer Affairs, Minister of Space Policy S. Noda, visiting ATLAS experimental area, LHC tunnel and CERN Control Centre with CERN Director-General R. Heuer, Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Beams Department Head P. Collier.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    090506101-08: signature of the guest book and exchange of gifts; 090506109 + 46-64: Japanese Ambassador to the United Nations Office S. Kitajima, Japanese Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy, Food Safety, Minister of Consumer Affairs, Minister of Space Policy S. Noda, CERN Director-General R. Heuer, Non Member-State relations Adviser J. Ellis and ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1; 090506110-11 + 28-45: Japanese Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy, Food Safety, Minister of Consumer Affairs, Minister of Space Policy S. Noda and his delegation visiting ATLAS experimental area with CERN Japanese users and Management; 090506112 + 86-94: Japanese Minister of State for Science and Technology Policy, Food Safety, Minister of Consumer Affairs, Minister of Space Policy S. Noda, CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Japanese users in front of an LHC superconducting magnet; sLHC Project Leader also present. 090506113-19: Arrival of Japanese Min...

  12. Nematic director fields and topographies of solid shells of revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Mark; Mostajeran, Cyrus

    2018-02-01

    We solve the forward and inverse problems associated with the transformation of flat sheets with circularly symmetric director fields to surfaces of revolution with non-trivial topography, including Gaussian curvature, without a stretch elastic cost. We deal with systems slender enough to have a small bend energy cost. Shape change is induced by light or heat causing contraction along a non-uniform director field in the plane of an initially flat nematic sheet. The forward problem is, given a director distribution, what shape is induced? Along the way, we determine the Gaussian curvature and the evolution with induced mechanical deformation of the director field and of material curves in the surface (proto-radii) that will become radii in the final surface. The inverse problem is, given a target shape, what director field does one need to specify? Analytic examples of director fields are fully calculated that will, for specific deformations, yield catenoids and paraboloids of revolution. The general prescription is given in terms of an integral equation and yields a method that is generally applicable to surfaces of revolution.

  13. Towards a Framework for Managing Risk Associated with Technology-Induced Error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borycki, Elizabeth M; Kushniruk, Andre W

    2017-01-01

    Health information technologies (HIT) promised to streamline and modernize healthcare processes. However, a growing body of research has indicated that if such technologies are not designed, implemented or maintained properly this may lead to an increased incidence of new types of errors which the authors have referred to as "technology-induced errors". In this paper, framework is presented that can be used to manage HIT risk. The framework considers the reduction of technology-induced errors at different stages by managing risks associated with the implementation of HIT. Frameworks that allow health information technology managers to employ proactive and preventative approaches that can be used to manage the risks associated with technology-induced errors are critical to improving HIT safety and managing risk associated with implementing new technologies.

  14. Classification of medication incidents associated with information technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, Ka-Chun; van der Veen, Willem; Bouvy, Marcel L.; Wensing, Michel; van den Bemt, Patricia M. L. A.; de Smet, Peter A. G. M.

    Introduction Information technology (IT) plays a pivotal role in improving patient safety, but can also cause new problems for patient safety. This study analyzed the nature and consequences of a large sample of IT-related medication incidents, as reported by healthcare professionals in community

  15. Integration of Leadership Styles of School Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlovic, Nebojsa; Oljaca, Milka; Kostovic, Svetlana

    2012-01-01

    Management style can be defined as a special behavior of directors in the work process that affects the performance in an organization, in this case-school. Management style has two related meanings: first is behavior of directors to employees, second is directors' approach in school regarding management, participation of employees in decision…

  16. 45 CFR 1700.5 - Executive Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Executive Director. 1700.5 Section 1700.5 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS § 1700.5 Executive Director. (a) The Executive Director serves...

  17. International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL: Promoting Science and Technology Librarianship in the Changing Library Landscape International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL: Promoting Science and Technology Librarianship in the Changing Library Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitrayee Ghosh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL has been in the forefront of providing leadership to information professionals and promoting science and Technology librarianship in today's changing library landscape. The present article is an attempt to comprehend the present status of IATUL and analyze the activities and contribution it has made to overcome the range of challenges facing by tertiary level Technological libraries throughout the world. The SWOT analysis method is used to assess the achievements of IATUL, failures and ascertain constraints being faced in this internet age. The author relied on web sites as well as ephemeral material such as minutes, annual reports, newsletters, and memoranda to construct this article. Meeting and Interview with IATUL present and past presidents and other office bearers of the associations provided useful sources of information. It is also attempted to provide relevant information for those interested to join IATUL for professional development.

  18. Fuel cycle integration issues associated with P/T technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaels, G.E.; Ludwig, S.B.

    1992-01-01

    The three primary interfaces between a generic partitioning and transmutation (P/T) technology and the existing United States fuel cycle are the light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel inventory, the reprocessed uranium (RU) stream, and the high-level waste stream. The features and implications of these three interfaces are reviewed and their implications for P/T system design and for waste management are assessed. The variability of transuranic nuclide composition in the LWR spent fuel is calculated and its potential implications for transmutation system core design are discussed. The radiological characteristics of the RU stream are presented, and options for disposition of the stream are reviewed. Most P/T scenarios assume that RU will be recycled to LWRs. This study demonstrates, however, that LWR recycle cannot totally consume the reprocessed stream, and disposal of a waste uranium steam with high levels of radiologically-significant isotopes will still be necessary. The radioactivity of the tails stream for enrichment plants resulting from a dedicated RU campaign is calculated. The tendency of gaseous diffusion plant enrichment technology to deplete the tails stream of minor uranium isotopes is seen as a benefit and an advantage over Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation-type technology. Finally, the implications of P/T on LWR-origin wastes reporting to the repository is discussed, and several significant differences between LWR-origin waste originating from transmutation systems are assessed

  19. The Current State of Early Childhood Education Programs: How Early Childhood Center Directors Manage Their Human Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arend, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Research in the field of early childhood education (ECE) demonstrated the association between skilled directors and high quality programs. Still, most state licensing requirements do not delineate the requisite knowledge or experience necessary to be an effective director. Many ECE directors advance to their position directly from the…

  20. International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL: Promoting Science and Technology Librarianship in the Changing Library Landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitrayee Ghosh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available International Association of Technological University Libraries (IATUL has been in the forefront of providing leadership to information professionals and promoting science and Technology librarianship in today's changing library landscape. The present article is an attempt to comprehend the present status of IATUL and analyze the activities and contribution it has made to overcome the range of challenges facing by tertiary level Technological libraries throughout the world. The SWOT analysis method is used to assess the achievements of IATUL, failures and ascertain constraints being faced in this internet age. The author relied on web sites as well as ephemeral material such as minutes, annu- al reports, newsletters, and memoranda to construct this article. Meeting and Interview with IATUL present and past presidents and other office bearers of the associations provided useful sources of information. It is also attempted to pro- vide relevant information for those interested to join IATUL for professional development.

  1. Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate 2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz De La Rubia, T; Fluss, M J; Rath, K; Rennie, G; Shang, S; Kitrinos, G

    2006-08-08

    In 1952, we began laboratory operations in the barracks building of the Naval Air Station with approximately 50 employees. Today, the Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS) Directorate is a major organization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with more than 500 employees who continue to contribute to our evolving national security mission. For more than half a century, the mission of the Laboratory revolved primarily around nuclear deterrence and associated defense technologies. Today, Livermore supports a broad-based national security mission, and our specialized capabilities increasingly support emerging missions in human health and energy security. In the future, CMS will play a significantly expanded role in science and technology at the intersection of national security, energy and environment, and health. Our world-class workforce will provide the science and technology base for radically innovative materials to our programs and sponsors. Our 2005 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Organized into two major sections-research themes and dynamic teams, this report focuses on achievements arising from earlier investments that address future challenges. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national security mission. Research Themes: (1) Materials Properties and Performance under Extreme Conditions--We are developing ultrahard nanocrystalline metals, exploring the properties of nanotubes when exposed to very high temperatures, and engineering stronger materials to meet future needs for materials that can withstand extreme conditions. (2) Chemistry under Extreme Conditions and Chemical Engineering to Support National-Security Programs--Our recent

  2. Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate 2005 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz De La Rubia, T; Fluss, M J; Rath, K; Rennie, G; Shang, S; Kitrinos, G

    2006-01-01

    In 1952, we began laboratory operations in the barracks building of the Naval Air Station with approximately 50 employees. Today, the Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS) Directorate is a major organization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with more than 500 employees who continue to contribute to our evolving national security mission. For more than half a century, the mission of the Laboratory revolved primarily around nuclear deterrence and associated defense technologies. Today, Livermore supports a broad-based national security mission, and our specialized capabilities increasingly support emerging missions in human health and energy security. In the future, CMS will play a significantly expanded role in science and technology at the intersection of national security, energy and environment, and health. Our world-class workforce will provide the science and technology base for radically innovative materials to our programs and sponsors. Our 2005 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Organized into two major sections-research themes and dynamic teams, this report focuses on achievements arising from earlier investments that address future challenges. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national security mission. Research Themes: (1) Materials Properties and Performance under Extreme Conditions--We are developing ultrahard nanocrystalline metals, exploring the properties of nanotubes when exposed to very high temperatures, and engineering stronger materials to meet future needs for materials that can withstand extreme conditions. (2) Chemistry under Extreme Conditions and Chemical Engineering to Support National-Security Programs--Our recent

  3. Regulatory uncertainty and the associated business risk for emerging technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerr, Robert A.

    2011-04-01

    An oversight system specifically concerned with nanomaterials should be flexible enough to take into account the unique aspects of individual novel materials and the settings in which they might be used, while recognizing that heretofore unrecognized safety issues may require future modifications. This article considers a question not explicitly considered by the project team: what is the risk that uncertainty over how regulatory oversight will be applied to nanomaterials will delay or block the development of this emerging technology, thereby depriving human health of potential and substantial benefits? An ambiguous regulatory environment could delay the availability of valuable new technology and therapeutics for human health by reducing access to investment capital. Venture capitalists list regulatory uncertainty as a major reason not to invest at all in certain areas. Uncertainty is far more difficult to evaluate than risk, which lends itself to quantitative models and can be factored into projections of return on possible investments. Loss of time has a large impact on investment return. An examination of regulatory case histories suggests that an increase in regulatory resting requirement, where the path is well-defined, is far less costly than a delay of a year or more in achieving product approval and market launch.

  4. Francisco Miranda, Director de Colciencias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efraím Otero Ruiz

    2006-09-01

    De su desempeño en Sussex (universidad distinguida mundialmente por sus estudios sobre desarrollo tecnológico, transferencia de tecnología y administración de proyectos se recibieron siempre los mejores informes, que lo colocaron en el alto nivel de los latinoamericanos ilustres que han pasado larga o brevemente por dicho claustro, como Máximo Halty-Carrere del Uruguay, Francisco Sagasti del Perú o Fernando Chaparro de Colombia. Con ese bagaje regresó al país donde fue designado como Director Administrativo del Centro Internacional de Entrenamiento e Investigación Médica (CIDEIM de Cali, cargo que ocupó de 1992 a 2002; y al terminar ese decenio fue nombrado por la Junta Directiva como Director Ejecutivo, cargo que ocupó hasta su designación en COLCIENCIAS. En Cali ha ocupado también distinguidas posiciones, tales como Miembro del Consejo Directivo de la Fundación Planeta Valle y del Consejo de Internacionalización de la Universidad Javeriana en esa ciudad...

  5. Examining the Self-Reported Health Behaviors and the Importance of Role Modeling among Resident Directors Affiliated with the Association of College and University Housing Officers-International (ACUHO-I) Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, Maylen Lizeth

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine self-reported health behaviors (health responsibility, physical activity, nutrition, spiritual growth, interpersonal relations and stress management) of Resident Directors who self-reported being affiliated with ACUHO-I. The second purpose of the study was to examine which areas of health behaviors, do…

  6. Arms Control and nonproliferation technologies: Technology options and associated measures for monitoring a Comprehensive Test Ban, Second quarter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casey, Leslie A.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter contains reprinted papers discussing technology options and associated measures for monitoring a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). These papers were presented to the Conference on Disarmament (CD) in May and June 1994. An interagency Verification Monitoring Task Force developed the papers. The task force included participants from the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, the Intelligence Community, the Department of Interior, and the Department of State. The purpose of this edition of Arms Control and Nonproliferation Technologies is to share these papers with the broad base of stakeholders in a CTBT and to facilitate future technology discussions. The papers in the first group discuss possible technology options for monitoring a CTBT in all environments (underground, underwater, atmosphere, and space). These technologies, along with on-site inspections, would facilitate CTBT monitoring by treaty participants. The papers in the second group present possible associated measures, e.g., information exchanges and transparency measures, that would build confidence among states participating in a CTBT.

  7. The role of the psychiatrist: job satisfaction of medical directors and staff psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranz, J; Stueve, A; McQuistion, H L

    2001-12-01

    In a previous survey of Columbia University Public Psychiatry Fellowship alumni, medical directors reported experiencing higher job satisfaction compared to staff psychiatrists. To further this inquiry, the authors conducted an expanded survey among the membership of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists (AACP). We mailed a questionnaire to all AACP members. Respondents categorized their positions as staff psychiatrist, program medical director or agency medical director, and rated their overall job satisfaction. The form also included a number of demographic and job characteristic items. Of 479 questionnaires mailed, a total of 286 individuals returned questionnaires (61%-12 forms were undeliverable). As in our previous survey, medical directors experience significantly higher job satisfaction compared to staff psychiatrists. Program and agency medical directors do not differ significantly. In addition, job satisfaction is strongly and negatively correlated with age for staff psychiatrists but not for medical directors. This survey strengthens the previously reported advantage medical directors have over staff psychiatrists regarding job satisfaction. The finding that job satisfaction decreases with increasing age of staff psychiatrists but not medical directors is particularly interesting, suggesting that staff psychiatrist positions may come to be regarded as "dead-end" over time. Psychiatrists are advised to seek promotions to program medical director positions early in their careers, since these positions are far more available, and provide equal job satisfaction, compared to agency medical director positions.

  8. Association between Thrombophilia and Repeated Assisted Reproductive Technology Failures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kobra Hamdi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was performed to investigate the incidence of thrombophilic gene mutations in repeated assisted reproductive technology (ART failures. Methods: The prevalence of mutated genes in the patients with a history of three or more previous ART failures was compared with the patients with a history of successful pregnancy following ARTs. The study group included 70 patients, 34 with three or more previously failed ARTs (A and control group consisted of 36 patients with successful pregnancy following ARTs (B. All patients were tested for the presence of mutated thrombophilic genes including factor V Leiden (FVL, Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR and Prothrombin (G20210A using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR. Results: Mutation of FVL gene was detected in 5.9% women of group A (2 of 34 compared with 2.8% women (1 of 36 of control group (P = 0.6. Mutation of MTHFR gene was found in 35.3% (12 cases as compared with 50% (18 cases of control (35.3% versus 50%; P = 0.23. Regarding Prothrombin, only control group had 5.6% mutation (P = 0.49. No significant differences were detected in the incidences of FVL, Prothrombin and MTHFR in the study group A compared with the control group B. Conclusion: The obtained results suggest that thrombophilia does not have a significant effect in ART failures.

  9. Research leadership: should clinical directors be distinguished researchers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Stephen; Goodall, Amanda H; Bastiampillai, Tarun

    2016-06-01

    Clinical directors established research-led healthcare by combining research, teaching and clinical excellence within the teaching hospitals. This research culture created high clinical standards, which benefited patients, the workforce and healthcare organisations. The current paper explores this research leadership role for clinical directors. It reviews studies arising from the theory of expert leadership, which focuses on the relationship between a leader's core knowledge and organisational performance. More specifically, we examine the expert leader's research track record, the associations with their organisation's performance, and the influence of research activity on clinical excellence. Distinguished researchers still lead the most prestigious teaching hospitals and the most trusted departments of psychiatry in the United States where the clinical directorate structure originated. It is also known that good scholars can improve research output when appointed to leadership positions. This suggests that the clinical director's research track record should be a consideration at a time when research is being embedded in Australia's local health networks. A clinical director's leadership may influence the research performance of their department and contribute to the quality of mental healthcare. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  10. Croser to retire as Executive Director of AAIDD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    Washington, DC-Doreen Croser retired as Executive Director of the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) in June, 2010, following a distinguished 22-year tenure in the position. Past presidents of AAIDD have issued statements in Doreen's honor.

  11. Job Satisfaction and Motivational Strategies among Library Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pors, Niels Ole; Johannsen, Carl Gustav

    2002-01-01

    Discusses a survey of Danish library directors and highlights findings associated with job satisfaction and motivational strategies. Highlights include leadership; the relation between leadership position and job satisfaction; relationship between selected variables and job satisfaction; management tools used; and time spent on leadership tasks.…

  12. Complexities of Social Capital in Boards of Directors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulinska, Iwona Magdalena

    The aim of the dissertation is to disentangle complexities of social capital in boards of directors through proposing new theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches. Although extant previous research has discussed various aspects of social capital and its association with numerous org...

  13. Analysis of Secondary School Students' Perceptions about Information Technologies through a Word Association Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Fetah; Sahin, Ismail; Celik, Ismail; Akturk, Ahmet Oguz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to discover secondary school students' perceptions related to information technologies and the connections between concepts in their cognitive structures. A word association test consisting of six concepts related to information technologies is used to collect data from 244 secondary school students. Concept maps that…

  14. Female directors and real activities manipulation: Evidence from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-hui Luo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Unlike previous studies that focus on accrual-based earnings management, this study analyzes real activities manipulation and investigates whether female directors on boards of directors (BoDs affect managers’ real activities manipulation. Using a large sample of 11,831 firm-year observations from Chinese listed companies from the 2000 to 2011 period, we find that higher female participation on BoDs is associated with lower levels of real activities manipulation, and that this negative relationship is stronger when female directors have higher ownership. These results hold for a battery of robustness checks. Overall, our findings indicate that board gender diversity may serve as a substitute mechanism for corporate governance to curb real activities manipulation and thus provide interested stakeholders with higher quality earnings reports.

  15. Complexities of Social Capital in Boards of Directors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulinska, Iwona Magdalena

    The aim of the dissertation is to disentangle complexities of social capital in boards of directors through proposing new theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches. Although extant previous research has discussed various aspects of social capital and its association with numerous...... of directors is more complex than it has been assumed in previous studies and its understanding requires a novel approach to conceptualization and empirical research. The first chapter explains the topic and motivation for the dissertation. The following chapter (Chapter 2) synthetizes the previous approaches...... combined social capital of board chair, CEO, and directors. Further, the dissertation discusses dynamics of board social capital (Chapter 4) in the context of firm expansion. It emphasizes that evolution process of board social capital is driven by multidimensional changes occurring within internal...

  16. Institutional directors and board compensation: Spanish evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix López-Iturriaga

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We address the influence of directors who represent institutional investors in three aspects of board compensation policies: level of compensation, composition, and performance sensitivity. We differentiate pressure-sensitive directors (i.e., with business links and pressure-resistant directors (i.e., without business links. Our results show that pressure-resistant directors decrease total board compensation and its fixed proportion, whereas they increase the variable proportion of total remuneration and the pay-for-performance sensitivity. By contrast, pressure-sensitive directors offer the opposite results. These findings are consistent with the view that institutional investors are not a homogeneous group and that pressure-resistant directors fulfill a more thorough monitoring role.

  17. TechPort Featured at Glenn Research Center's Technology Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Jeannette P.; Diem, Priscilla S.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Technology Portfolio (TechPort) System was featured at NASA Glenn Research Center's Technology Day on May 24, 2016. This event, which coincided with GRC's 75th Anniversary celebration, drew nearly 250 registered guests including aerospace and technology representatives, local business leaders, state and local government officials, and members of academia. GRC's Director of the Office of Technology Incubation and Innovation and Center Chief Technologist, John Sankovic, presented the opening remarks. Several technical and business-focused panel sessions were convened. NASA's Associate Administrator for the Space Technology Mission Directorate, Steve Jurczyk, GRC's Director of Space Flight Systems, Bryan Smith, and NASA astronaut and U.S. Navy Captain, Sunita Williams, were engaged as a panel for a discussion about "NASA's Journey to Mars: Science Fiction Meets Reality." Another panel moderated by the Executive Director of the Cleveland Water Alliance, Bryan Stubbs, involved a discussion with four GRC technologists on the subject of global water scarcity and water treatment concerns. The GRC panelists shared information on the development of snow-sensing, hyperspectral imaging, and non-equilibrium plasma technologies. Technology Day attendees received overviews of GRC's technologies and partnership objectives, and were introduced to areas for potential collaboration. They were also informed about opportunities to license technologies and how to do business with NASA.

  18. Director general presentation to personnel

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, Many important discussions are scheduled for the upcoming Council Week (13-17 June) on topics including the Medium-Term Plan, the Pension Fund and other matters of great relevance to us.   I would therefore like to share the main outcome of the week with you and I invite you to join me and the Directors in the Main Auditorium at 10 a.m. on Thursday 23 June. The meeting will last about one hour and a webcast will also be available. Best regards, Fabiola Gianotti DG presentation to personnel Thursday 23 June at 10 am Main Auditorium Retransmission in Council Chamber, IT Auditorium, Kjell Jonhsen Auditorium, Prevessin 864-1-C02 Webcast on cern.ch/webcast More information on the event page.

  19. What's Ahead for the NCAA? Schultz, New Executive Director, Gives His Views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Charles S.

    1987-01-01

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association's new executive director responds to questions about leadership style, the tightening academic standards, effects of cost containment, women's athletics, blacks in coaching and sports administration, institutional autonomy, and competition with the College Football Association. (MSE)

  20. 29 October 2013 - Former Director-General of IAEA H. Blix on the occasion of the Thorium Energy Conference at CERN with Chair of the ThEC13 Organization Committee E. Lillestol and Author of the book “Atome Vert” (Green Atom) J.-C. de Mestral; in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Machine Protection & Electrical Integrity Group, Performance Evaluation Section Member A. Verweij.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    29 October 2013 - Former Director-General of IAEA H. Blix on the occasion of the Thorium Energy Conference at CERN with Chair of the ThEC13 Organization Committee E. Lillestol and Author of the book “Atome Vert” (Green Atom) J.-C. de Mestral; in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Machine Protection & Electrical Integrity Group, Performance Evaluation Section Member A. Verweij.

  1. 10 October 2013 - D. Braun First Deputy Minister for Regional Development, Czech Republic, P. Styczeń Deputy Minister of Transport, Construction and Maritime Economy, Republic of Poland and F. Palko State Secretary, Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development, Slovak Republic visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings Group Leader J. M. Jimenez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    10 October 2013 - D. Braun First Deputy Minister for Regional Development, Czech Republic, P. Styczeń Deputy Minister of Transport, Construction and Maritime Economy, Republic of Poland and F. Palko State Secretary, Ministry of Transport, Construction and Regional Development, Slovak Republic visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department, Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings Group Leader J. M. Jimenez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer

  2. Associations among occupational roles, independence, assistive technology, and purchasing power of individuals with physical disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz, Daniel Marinho Cezar; Emmel, Maria Luisa Guillaumon

    2013-01-01

    to verify whether there are associations among occupational roles, independence to perform Activities of Daily Living, purchasing power, and assistive technology for individuals with physical disabilities. 91 individuals with physical disabilities participated in the study. The instruments used were: Role Checklist, Brazilian Economic Classification Criterion, Barthel Index, and a Questionnaire to characterize the subjects. an association with a greater number of roles was found among more independent individuals using a lower number of technological devices. Higher purchasing power was associated with a lower functional status of dependence. even though technology was not directly associated with independence, the latter was associated with a greater number of occupational roles, which requires reflection upon independence issues when considering the participation in occupational roles. These findings support interdisciplinary actions designed to promote occupational roles in individuals with physical disabilities.

  3. Incorporation of genetic technologies associated with applied reproductive technologies to enhance world food production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, Robert A; McDaneld, Tara G; Kuehn, Larry A; Snelling, Warren M; Nonneman, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Animal breeding and reproductive physiology have been closely related throughout the history of animal production science. Artificial insemination provides the best method of increasing the influence of sires with superior genetics to improve production traits. Multiple ovulation embryo transfer (MOET) provides some ability to increase the genetic influence of the maternal line as well. The addition of genetic technologies to this paradigm allows for improved methods of selecting sires and dams carrying the best genes for production and yield of edible products and resistance to diseases and parasites. However, decreasing the number of influential parents within a population also increases the risk of propagating a recessive gene that could negatively impact the species (Reprod Domest Anim 44:792-796, 2009; BMC Genomics 11:337, 2010). Furthermore, antagonistic genotypic relationships between production traits and fertility (Anim Prod Sci 49:399-412, 2009; Anim Genet 43:442-446, 2012) suggest that care must be taken to ensure that increasing the frequency of genes with a positive influence on production does not negatively impact the fertility of the replacement females entering the herd.

  4. 78 FR 66949 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... Executive Director, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane... Director, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane, Bldg. 410... Technology, such as new developments in systems engineering, cyber-security, knowledge management and how...

  5. Predictors of Choral Directors' Voice Handicap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Vocal demands of teaching are considerable and these challenges are greater for choral directors who depend on the voice as a musical and instructive instrument. The purpose of this study was to (1) examine choral directors' vocal condition using a modified Voice Handicap Index (VHI), and (2) determine the extent to which the major variables…

  6. 40 CFR 160.33 - Study director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Study director. 160.33 Section 160.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Organization and Personnel § 160.33 Study director. For each study, a scientist or other...

  7. 40 CFR 792.33 - Study director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Study director. 792.33 Section 792.33 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) GOOD LABORATORY PRACTICE STANDARDS Organization and Personnel § 792.33 Study director. For each study...

  8. J. B. Adams Acting Director-General

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    After the tragic death of Prof. C. J. Bakker, the Council of CERN held an emergency meeting on May 3, 1960. Following this session, Mr. F. de Rose, President of the Council of the European Organization for Nuclear Research, announced the appointment of Mr. J. B. Adams, Director of the PS division to the post of acting Director-General.

  9. CERN loses two former Directors-General

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Victor Weisskopf, a giant of modern physics and Director General of CERN from 1961-65, died on 21 April. The previous month, Willibald Jentschke, Director General from 1971-75 and founder of the DESY Laboratory in Hamburg, passed away.

  10. PLAY DIRECTING AND DIRECTORS: AN EVOLUTIONARY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While the theatre director can be seen as the `god of the theatre', he/she can also be seen as a priest and a carrier who must coordinate human and material resources a master and a messenger. Drawing from the above, this paper traces the evolution of play directing and the theatre director in different theatres of the world ...

  11. Robert Aymar, Director-General of CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    Robert Aymar, photographed in 2003 before taking his position as Director-General at CERN, succeeding Luciano Maiani in 2004. At this time, Aymar was director of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) although he had already been involved with developments at CERN, chairing the External Review Committee, set up in 2001 in response to the increased cost of the LHC.

  12. Associations between specific technologies and adolescent sleep quantity, sleep quality, and parasomnias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Teresa; Broglia, Emma; Thomas, G Neil; Taheri, Shahrad

    2014-02-01

    We tested the hypothesis that weekday bedtime use of six technologies would be significantly associated with eight sleep parameters studied relating to sleep quantity, sleep quality, and parasomnias. In our cross-sectional study, we previously administered validated age-appropriate questionnaires (School Sleep Habits Survey, Technology Use Questionnaire). Participating adolescents (n=738; 54.5% boys) were aged 11-13 years and were from the Midlands region of the United Kingdom in 2010. Frequent use of all technology types was significantly inversely associated with weekday sleep duration (hours). Frequent music listeners and video gamers had significantly prolonged sleep onset (β=7.03 [standard error {SE}, 2.66]; Pvideo gaming, and social networking, with music listeners demonstrating the greatest effect (OR, 2.85 [95%CI, 1.58-5.13]). Music listeners were at increased risk for frequent nightmares (OR, 2.02 [95% CI, 1.22-3.45]). Frequent use of all technologies except for music and mobile telephones was significantly associated with greater cognitive difficulty in shutting off. Frequent television viewers were almost four times more likely to report higher sleepwalking frequency (OR, 3.70 [95% CI, 1.89-7.27]). Frequent weekday technology use at bedtime was associated with significant adverse effects on multiple sleep parameters. If confirmed in other samples and longitudinally, improving sleep hygiene through better management of technology could enhance the health and well-being of adolescent populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. New project director for Honduras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Miguel Machuca has been installed as project director for the Honduras Contraceptive Social Marketing Program (HCSMP). he was selected from a field of candidates with public and private sector experience in marketing, business management and program development. Machuca will direct the development of the social marketing program and work to establish a marketing function within ASHONPLAFA, the sponsoring organization for HCSMP. A major goal is to correct misinformation or lack of information about family planning methods among consumers and reatilers; for example, consumers worry about the side-effects of oral contraceptives (OCs) and many perceive subsidized products to be either experimental or discards. Easily understandable graphic package naterials are being prepared for OCs distributed through the program. Another goal is sales training. The project is scheduled to be launched in March 1984 with distribution of Perla, a standard dose OC. Radio spots and newspaper ads are being prepared to inform consumers that Perla can be purchased through pharmacies and small rural shops at the cost of US$.75/cycle. A low-dose OC, a condom and a vaginal tablet are scheduled to be added to the product line by December 1984. Market research on brand names, packaging and pricing of these products is currently being conducted. According the Machuca, his biggest challenge will be to maintain a balance between the need to comply with the policies and regulations of the various organizations involved with the HCSMP and the simultaneous need to promote and implement the entrepreneurial activities necessary to project goals.

  14. CEA nuclear energy Directorate - Activity report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    After an overview of the activities of the Directorate at the international level, of its scientific activities, and of the consideration given to quality, and a presentation of the transverse program on advanced materials, this report proposes presentations of activities in different domains: future nuclear industrial systems (reactors of 4. generation, back-end of the future cycle, sustainable management of nuclear materials, fundamental scientific and technological research), optimization of the present industrial nuclear activity (reactors of 2. and 3. generation, front-end and back-end of the fuel cycle), the main tools for nuclear development (numerical simulation, the Jules Horowitz reactor), valorisation, economic support of Haute-Marne and Meuse territories (the Syndiese project), nuclear dismantling and decontamination (dismantling projects, projects and works in Fontenay-aux-Roses, Grenoble and Saclay, waste and material flow management, nuclear service facilities, transports). It also presents the activities of some specific CEA centres like Marcoule (R and D in fuel cycle), Cadarache (future energies) and Saclay (nuclear sciences and simulation of reactors and fuel cycle)

  15. 29 March 2011 - Ninth President of Israel S.Peres welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer who introduces Council President M. Spiro, Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Physics Department Head P. Bloch, Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Human Resources Department Head A.-S. Catherin, Beams Department Head P. Collier, Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer, Adviser for Israel J. Ellis, Legal Counsel E. Gröniger-Voss, ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, Former ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, Weizmann Institute G. Mikenberg, CERN VIP and Protocol Officer W. Korda.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    During his visit he toured the ATLAS underground experimental area with Giora Mikenberg of the ATLAS collaboration, Weizmann Institute of Sciences and Israeli industrial liaison office, Rolf Heuer, CERN’s director-general, and Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The president also visited the CERN computing centre and met Israeli scientists working at CERN.

  16. 2 February 2010-Bristol University Vice-Chancellor E. Thomas visiting SM18 hall with Beams Department Head P. Collier and Technology Department Senior Engineer R. Veness; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    Caption for photograph 1239013 from left to right: University of Bristol and CMS Collaboration D. Newbold; University of Bristol Team Leader and LHCb Collaboration N. Brook; Bristol University Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research G. Orpen; Beams Department Head P. Collier; Bristol University Vice-Chancellor E. Thomas;Technology Department Senior Engineer R. Veness in the SM18 hall.

  17. SPECIFICS OF IMPLEMENTING TECHNOLOGY OF ASSOCIATIVE TEACHING ENGLISH AT PRIMARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Lobachova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of the application of the associative teaching technology at primary school and the peculiarities of its implementation in teaching English to primary schoolchildren. It is found out that the modern primary school student should be able to think creatively, to solve given tasks, find associative links between objects, and be able to intercultural communication. So, a teacher has to master the innovative teaching technologies that optimize and intensify the educational process to forming primary schoolchildren’s abilities of this kind. It is determined that the technology of associative teaching English to primary schoolchildren is one of the most effective technologies because it meets quite new goals and tasks of teaching foreign languages at primary school, age and individual characteristics, needs, and interests of primary schoolchildren. It is shown that the associative teaching technology is based on the principle of harmony with nature and it creates conditions that are close to life situations, makes learning the foreign language accessible and relaxed. Associative teaching a foreign language and its various aspects are performed in accordance with the primary schoolchildren’s individual characteristics. The psychological mechanism is very important in the organization of associative teaching; it is taken into account in teaching children of primary school because human beings think with images and words are sound images that allow you to express what a person sees, feels, and thinks. Associative teaching combines both verbal and non-verbal means of communication. Associative teaching contributes to learning a foreign language based on the child’s real actions in the form of the active actions with items in accordance with the human linguistic programme that defines phased sequence of the language development. An effective method of teaching a foreign language is a method of Mind Mapping, which

  18. Program Director Participation in a Leadership and Management Skills Fellowship and Characteristics of Program Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carek, Peter J; Mims, Lisa D; Conry, Colleen M; Maxwell, Lisa; Greenwood, Vicki; Pugno, Perry A

    2015-01-01

    The association between a residency program director completing a leadership and management skills fellowship and characteristics of quality and innovation of his/her residency program has not been studied. Therefore, the aim of this study is to examine the association between a residency program director's completion of a specific fellowship addressing these skills (National Institute for Program Director Development or NIPDD) and characteristics of quality and innovation of the program they direct. Using information from the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), National Resident Matching Program (NRMP) and FREIDA® program characteristics were obtained. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. The relationship between programs with a NIPDD graduate as director and program quality measures and indicators of innovation was analyzed using both chi square and logistic regression. Initial analyses showed significant associations between the NIPDD graduate status of a program director and regional location, mean years of program director tenure, and the program's 5-year aggregate ABFM board pass rate from 2007--2011. After grouping the programs into tertiles, the regression model showed significant positive associations with programs offering international experiences and being a NIPDD graduate. Program director participation in a fellowship addressing leadership and management skills (ie, NIPDD) was found to be associated with higher pass rates of new graduates on a Board certification examination and predictive of programs being in the upper tertile of programs in terms of Board pass rates.

  19. An associative model with technological base for the competitiveness of pymes: case colombian florist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Herrera

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Globalization has opened markets where technology plays a key role in the search and achievement of competitiveness. This study, based on the cluster approach, first analyzes competitiveness of Colombian PyMes using diamond of Porter point of view, centered in florist sector; second it studies areas where information technologies would have higher impact; and third proposes associative solutions, based on the pattern of ASP, in order to provide PyMes access to world class technology managerial solutions at reasonable cost, increasing theirefficiency, productivity and quality.

  20. Technology use and its association with health and depressive symptoms in older cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Yun; Kim, Jeehoon; Sharratt, Monica

    2018-02-01

    Acknowledging the expanding influence of technology in the promotion of health and wellness, this study assessed the role of information and communication technology (ICT) use in the lives of older cancer survivors. A community sample of cancer survivors aged 65 and older (N = 1411) was extracted from a 2011 U.S. National Health and Aging Trends Study dataset. Weighted multiple regression and multinomial logistic regression analyses were performed to explore the relationships between survey respondents' ICT use and their self-rated health status and depressive symptoms. The majority of respondents reported rarely or never engaging in ICT use. Greater use of communication technology such as emailing or texting was associated with decreased risk for severe depressive symptoms and higher self-rated health status. Information technology use was not associated with depressive symptoms and self-rated health status. Investigation into reasons behind older cancer survivors' apparent low rates of engagement with ICT is warranted, particularly the examination of access as a potential barrier. Findings indicated that frequent use of communication technology was positively linked with mental and physical wellness. The nature of the relationships between communication technology use and physical and mental health merits further research, helping to determine whether community-based educational efforts to improve technology access and skills may benefit the growing population of older cancer survivors.

  1. Senior expert group for the review of the Agency's programme of activities. Opening remarks by the Director General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the opening remarks made by the Director General of the IAEA on 23 March 1998 at the first meeting of the Senior Expert Group for the review of the Agency's programme and activities. The Director General explains his considerations in establishing the group, and the major challenges facing the safe use of nuclear energy and technologies

  2. Making the Right Connections: Perceptions of Human Resource/Personnel Directors Concerning Electronic Job-Search Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Joan C.; North, Alexa B.; Arjomand, H. Lari

    1997-01-01

    Examines methods used to search for entry-level managerial positions and assesses how human resource and personnel directors in Georgia perceive these methods. Findings indicate that few of the directors use electronic technology to fill such positions, but they view positively those applicants who use electronic job searching methods. (RJM)

  3. What every library director should know

    CERN Document Server

    Curzon, Susan Carol

    2014-01-01

    What Every Library Director Should Know is the insider's view of vital actions, behaviors and strategies to succeed in every type of library. The content is based both on the author's direct experience after a long career in several types of libraries but also on the direct observation of other managers. Inset into the book are pearls of wisdom from other directors, managers and observers who are answering the question, "what is the one piece of management wisdom that you would give to anyone who wishes to become a library director?" This book will help to get you there by explaining and illus

  4. Statement of Ambassador Richard M. Russell, Associate Director and Deputy Director for Technology Office of Science and Technology Policy, Executive Office of the President, Before the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Innovation Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation United States Senate

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Russell, Richard M

    2008-01-01

    ... reauthorization of the program, in the context of the NNI's newly updated strategic plan. I also want to go into particular detail on nanotechnology-related environmental, health, and safety (EHS) issues...

  5. Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) in pediatric dentistry residency programs: a survey of program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kateeb, Elham; Warren, John; Damiano, Peter; Momany, Elizabeth; Kanellis, Michael; Weber-Gasparoni, Karin; Ansley, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent of clinical training on atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) among pediatric dentistry residency programs and assess program directors' attitudes toward ART. All U.S. Pediatric Dentistry residency programs' directors were asked to complete a web-based survey. Sixty-one of the 76 directors (80 percent) completed the survey, with no significant response bias. Eighty-nine percent of the responding programs provided clinical instruction on ART. Of these, 30 percent provided ART training often/very often. ART was used mostly in single-surface cavities (43 percent) and as an interim treatment in primary teeth (57 percent). Factors associated with ART clinical training included not placing amalgams in primary teeth (Ppediatric dentistry residency programs in the United States. Residency directors' attitudes were highly predictive of the amount of clinical training provided, suggesting that directors need to be better informed about the use of ART.

  6. Proceedings of the American Psychological Association for the legislative year 2012: minutes of the annual meeting of the Council of Representatives, February 24-26, 2012, Washington, DC, and August 2 and 5, 2012, Orlando, Florida, and minutes of the February, June, August, October, and December 2012 meetings of the Board of Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Barry S

    2013-01-01

    These minutes are the official record of the actions of the Association taken during the year by both the Board of Directors (the Board) and the Council of Representatives (Council). The roll of representatives was called at each Council meeting, and more than a quorum answered to their names. Reference is made in these minutes to various reports, some of which will be published elsewhere. Copies of these reports were distributed to Council and are on file in the Central Office. As long as the supply lasts, extra copies of many of the reports are available from the Central Office. These minutes are arranged in topical rather than chronological order, and subheadings are used when appropriate. The main topical headings are I. Minutes of Meetings; II. Elections, Awards, Membership, and Human Resources; III. Ethics; IV. Board of Directors; V. Divisions and State, Provincial, and Territorial Associations; VI. Organization of the APA; VII. Publications and Communications; VIII. Convention Affairs; IX. Educational Affairs; X. Professional Affairs; XI. Scientific Affairs; XII. Public Interest; XIII. Ethnic Minority Affairs; XIV. International Affairs; XV. Central Office; and XVI. Financial Affairs. Changes to the language of the American Psychological Association (APA) Bylaws, Association Rules, or motions of the items are noted as follows throughout these proceedings: Bracketed material is to be deleted; underlined material is to be added.

  7. Shareholders in the boardroom: Wealth effects of the SEC's proposal to facilitate director nominations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyol, A.; Lim, W.F.; Verwijmeren, P.

    2012-01-01

    Current attempts to reform financial markets presume that shareholder empowerment benefits shareholders. We investigate the wealth effects associated with the Securities and Exchange Commission's rule to facilitate director nominations by shareholders. Our results are not in line with shareholder

  8. Directors' report and accounts 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report for Scottish Hydro-Electric PLC contains details of key financial statistics, the financial calendar, the Directors' Report, the Auditors' Report, accounting policies, a Group Profit and Loss Account, balance sheets and a Group Cash Flow Statement. (UK)

  9. Director of National Intelligence: Statutory Authorities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Best, Jr., Richard A; Cumming, Alfred; Masse, Todd

    2005-01-01

    ... of the U.S. Intelligence Community since its establishment over 50 years ago. Principal among enacted changes was the establishment of a new position of the Director of National Intelligence (DNI...

  10. Wanted: Fermilab director who can build consensus

    CERN Multimedia

    Pierce, G M

    2004-01-01

    "With current Fermilab Director Michael Witherell stepping down in July 2005, an appointed committee has vowed to find a new leader who will keep the Batavia lab at the forefront of the high-energy physics field" (1 page).

  11. VMware vCloud director cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Langenhan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    VMware vCloud Director Cookbook will adopt a Cookbook-based approach. Packed with illustrations and programming examples, this book explains the simple as well as the complex recipes in an easy-to-understand language.""VMware vCloud Director Cookbook"" is aimed at system administrators and technical architects moving from a virtualized environment to cloud environments. Familiarity with cloud computing platforms and some knowledge of virtualization and managing cloud environments is expected.

  12. Alternative Perspectives on Independence of Directors

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Niamh; McDermott, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the issue of independence of boards of directors and non-executive directors of companies listed on the Irish Stock Exchange. Based on information published in annual reports, the study found that most Irish listed companies were complying with the Combined Code’s recommendations for a balanced board structure, albeit with only 60 per cent having majority-independent boards. The study found a lack of consistency in interpreting the definition of “independence”, a lack of d...

  13. XXXVIII Annual meeting of the Argentine Association of Nuclear Technology (AATN 2011)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The 38th Annual meeting of the Argentine Association of Nuclear Technology was organized by the AATN (Asociacion Argentina de Tecnologia Nuclear) in Buenos Aires, Argentine, between the 14 and 18 November of 2011. In this event 146 papers in 16 Sessions, with 13 Plenary Conferences and 3 Roundtables were presented. [es

  14. CERN, an Invaluable Asset for Humanity – Interview with the Director-General, Fabiola Gianotti

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Fabiola Gianotti is an Italian physicist and the first woman appointed by the CERN Council as the Director-General of the Laboratory. She took office on January 1st, 2016. The two Vice-Presidents of the Staff Association (SA) met with her to discuss the current affairs of the Organization. Appointment as D-G and ambitions for CERN As a former member of the personnel in the Physics department of CERN, Fabiola Gianotti has a long history with the Organization, and her vast in-house experience was likely a key factor in her appointment as the Director-General. Indeed, her in-depth knowledge of CERN and its functioning, as well as the current and future challenges of the Organization, are indispensable assets in guiding her ambitions for the Laboratory. Among her greatest aspirations for CERN, she names the increase of scientific excellence in the field of experimental research, development of cutting-edge technologies, education of younger generations, and collaborations with scientists from all over the wor...

  15. Eos Interviews Robert Van Hook, Former AGU Interim Executive Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2010-08-01

    Robert Van Hook, who served as AGU's interim executive director since January 2009, led the organization during a transition period that began with the retirement of long-serving executive director A. F. (“Fred”) Spilhaus Jr. Van Hook's tenure concluded on 30 August when Christine McEntee assumed her position as AGU's new executive director (see Eos, 91(17), 153, 156, 2010). During his tenure at AGU, which overlapped with a global economic recession, Van Hook helped to guide the organization through key structural governance changes, strategic planning, and upgrades in technology, human resources, and accounting. He also helped to revitalize public outreach and member services, among many other efforts. Van Hook, president of Transition Management Consulting, recently reflected upon his tenure, the transition period, and the future of AGU. Van Hook credits AGU's strong volunteer leadership—including past presidents Tim Killeen and Tim Grove, current president Mike McPhaden, and president-elect Carol Finn—for courage in moving the organization through a successful transition. “They were the ones who shoved the boat off from the shore. I was lucky enough to be invited into the boat,” he said. He also credits the staff for their resiliency and commitment to supporting AGU's science.

  16. Digital technologies for population health and health equity gains: the perspective of public health associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, James; Perera, Yoshith; Clarke, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Digital technology (DT) plays an increasingly important role in the health sector. This study explores how national public health associations (PHAs) use DT to achieve their mandate. The World Federation of Public Health Associations canvassed and conducted a semi-structured interview with its national public health association members about their use of DT, the challenges they encounter in using it, and their experiences and thoughts as to how to assess its impact, both organizationally as well as on population health and health equity. The study found that digital technology plays an important role in some PHAs, principally those in higher income countries. PHAs want to broaden their use within PHAs and to assess how DT enables PHAs to achieve their organizational mandates and goals, including improved public health and health equity.

  17. E-learning in graduate medical education: survey of residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, Christopher M; Agrawal, Anoop; Cook, David A; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Chaudhry, Saima; Dupras, Denise M; Oxentenko, Amy S; Beckman, Thomas J

    2017-07-11

    E-learning-the use of Internet technologies to enhance knowledge and performance-has become a widely accepted instructional approach. Little is known about the current use of e-learning in postgraduate medical education. To determine utilization of e-learning by United States internal medicine residency programs, program director (PD) perceptions of e-learning, and associations between e-learning use and residency program characteristics. We conducted a national survey in collaboration with the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine of all United States internal medicine residency programs. Of the 368 PDs, 214 (58.2%) completed the e-learning survey. Use of synchronous e-learning at least sometimes, somewhat often, or very often was reported by 85 (39.7%); 153 programs (71.5%) use asynchronous e-learning at least sometimes, somewhat often, or very often. Most programs (168; 79%) do not have a budget to integrate e-learning. Mean (SD) scores for the PD perceptions of e-learning ranged from 3.01 (0.94) to 3.86 (0.72) on a 5-point scale. The odds of synchronous e-learning use were higher in programs with a budget for its implementation (odds ratio, 3.0 [95% CI, 1.04-8.7]; P = .04). Residency programs could be better resourced to integrate e-learning technologies. Asynchronous e-learning was used more than synchronous, which may be to accommodate busy resident schedules and duty-hour restrictions. PD perceptions of e-learning are relatively moderate and future research should determine whether PD reluctance to adopt e-learning is based on unawareness of the evidence, perceptions that e-learning is expensive, or judgments about value versus effectiveness.

  18. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives.

  19. Burnout and distress among internal medicine program directors: results of a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Colin P; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Swenson, Sara L; McDonald, Furman S

    2013-08-01

    Physician burnout and distress has been described in national studies of practicing physicians, internal medicine (IM) residents, IM clerkship directors, and medical school deans. However, no comparable national data exist for IM residency program directors. To assess burnout and distress among IM residency program directors, and to evaluate relationships of distress with personal and program characteristics and perceptions regarding implementation and consequences of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) regulations. The 2010 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) Annual Survey, developed by the APDIM Survey Committee, was sent in August 2010 to the 377 program directors with APDIM membership, representing 99.0 % of the 381 United States categorical IM residency programs. The 2010 APDIM Annual Survey included validated items on well-being and distress, including questions addressing quality of life, satisfaction with work-life balance, and burnout. Questions addressing personal and program characteristics and perceptions regarding implementation and consequences of ACGME regulations were also included. Of 377 eligible program directors, 282 (74.8 %) completed surveys. Among respondents, 12.4 % and 28.8 % rated their quality of life and satisfaction with work-life balance negatively, respectively. Also, 27.0 % reported emotional exhaustion, 10.4 % reported depersonalization, and 28.7 % reported overall burnout. These rates were lower than those reported previously in national studies of medical students, IM residents, practicing physicians, IM clerkship directors, and medical school deans. Aspects of distress were more common among younger program directors, women, and those reporting greater weekly work hours. Work-home conflicts were common and associated with all domains of distress, especially if not resolved in a manner effectively balancing work and home responsibilities. Associations with program characteristics

  20. Faculty and Technology: Implications for Faculty Training and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Kidd, Terry; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors affecting ICT adoption process and the implications for faculty training and technology leadership. Respondents represented a wide range of academic and professional positions. They identified themselves as Assistant, Associate, and Professor as well as Instructional Designer, Director of Technology, Information Manager, eLearning Manager, Assistant Department Chair, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs and Consultant. The respondents identified Organizational Support, Leadership, Training and Development, and Resources as the predominate themes affecting Information and Communication Technology (ICT) adoption process in higher education. Evidence from this study offers insights on how higher education administrators and technology leaders could help their faculty and staff to implement appropriate ICT tools and practices to improve student learning.

  1. School directors and management in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srdić Vesna M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main features of school management and organization comprise planning, decision making, management, leadership and communication. Research suggests that successful school management requires not only advanced managerial but also leadership skills, with highly developed social skills as the main competence. In a complex social system, good leadership becomes a fundamental component of a successful organization or institution. Although leadership has for a long time been of interest for theoreticians and practitioners alike, there are still numerous questions waiting to be answered in the area of management and leadership in education. According to the Law on the Basis of Educational System, the person who can be named a school director must posses appropriate education, competences, license and experience in education. Legal requirements allow the provision of effective training, but the fact that personal disposition can be both an advantage and an obstacle for acquiring necessary items of knowledge and skills, points to the necessity of including selection into the standard procedure for the election of a director. Democratization and decentralization of the educational system presupposes a series of structural, systemic and functional changes which reflect on school management and the role played by the director. This paper considers responsibilities and competences of directors, both in legislation and in school practice and addresses the question whether a school director is a manager or a leader, and what are the possibilities for the provision of professional resources for school management.

  2. [Factors associated with involuntary hospital admissions in technology-dependent children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okido, Aline Cristiane Cavicchioli; Pina, Juliana Coelho; Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia

    2016-02-01

    To identify the factors associated with involuntary hospital admissions of technology-dependent children, in the municipality of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo State, Brazil. A cross-sectional study, with a quantitative approach. After an active search, 124 children who qualified under the inclusion criteria, that is to say, children from birth to age 12, were identified. Data was collected in home visits to mothers or the people responsible for the children, through the application of a questionnaire. Analysis of the data followed the assumptions of the Generalized Linear Models technique. 102 technology-dependent children aged between 6 months and 12 years participated in the study, of whom 57% were male. The average number of involuntary hospital admissions in the previous year among the children studied was 0.71 (±1.29). In the final model the following variables were significantly associated with the outcome: age (OR=0.991; CI95%=0.985-0.997), and the number of devices (OR=0.387; CI95%=0.219-0.684), which were characterized as factors of protection and quantity of medications (OR=1.532; CI95%=1.297-1.810), representing a risk factor for involuntary hospital admissions in technology-dependent children. The results constitute input data for consideration of the process of care for technology-dependent children by supplying an explanatory model for involuntary hospital admissions for this client group.

  3. 30 CFR 282.10 - Jurisdiction and responsibilities of Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jurisdiction and responsibilities of Director... Jurisdiction and Responsibilities of Director § 282.10 Jurisdiction and responsibilities of Director. Subject... part and are under the jurisdiction of the Director: Exploration, testing, and mining operations...

  4. A proto-code of ethics and conduct for European nurse directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stievano, Alessandro; De Marinis, Maria Grazia; Kelly, Denise; Filkins, Jacqueline; Meyenburg-Altwarg, Iris; Petrangeli, Mauro; Tschudin, Verena

    2012-03-01

    The proto-code of ethics and conduct for European nurse directors was developed as a strategic and dynamic document for nurse managers in Europe. It invites critical dialogue, reflective thinking about different situations, and the development of specific codes of ethics and conduct by nursing associations in different countries. The term proto-code is used for this document so that specifically country-orientated or organization-based and practical codes can be developed from it to guide professionals in more particular or situation-explicit reflection and values. The proto-code of ethics and conduct for European nurse directors was designed and developed by the European Nurse Directors Association's (ENDA) advisory team. This article gives short explanations of the code' s preamble and two main parts: Nurse directors' ethical basis, and Principles of professional practice, which is divided into six specific points: competence, care, safety, staff, life-long learning and multi-sectorial working.

  5. Determining student teachers' perceptions on using technology via Likert scale, visual association test and metaphors: A mixed study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mevhibe Kobak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine senior student teachers’ perceptions on using technology by approaching various points of view. In this study, researchers collected data through Technology Perceptions Scale, Visual Association Activity and Technology Metaphors. The participants of the study were 104 senior student teachers who were enrolled in Balıkesir University Necatibey Faculty of Education. In this descriptive study, researchers interpreted qualitative data in conjunction with quantitative data. Based on the data obtained, even though student teachers’ perceptions on using technology were found positive in the light of Likert scale, there was no significant relation in terms of gender and enrolled undergraduate program. According to the results of visual association test, student teachers ranked smartboard, Internet and computer in the first three, and portable media player, mobile phone and video/camera in the last three. Besides, researchers analyzed and classified student teachers’ metaphors about technology under 9 categories: 1developing-changing technology, 2rapidly progressing technology, 3 limitless-endless technology, 4beneficial technology, 5harmful technology, 6both beneficial and harmful technology, 7indispensible technology, 8technology as a necessity, 9 all-inclusive technology. At the end of the study, those nine categories which were acquired using the content analysis technique are presented in a table which shows the interaction between categories in a holistic view.

  6. Factors associated with involuntary hospital admissions in technology-dependent children

    OpenAIRE

    Okido,Aline Cristiane Cavicchioli; Pina,Juliana Coelho; Lima,Regina Aparecida Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify the factors associated with involuntary hospital admissions of technology-dependent children, in the municipality of Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo State, Brazil. METHOD A cross-sectional study, with a quantitative approach. After an active search, 124 children who qualified under the inclusion criteria, that is to say, children from birth to age 12, were identified. Data was collected in home visits to mothers or the people responsible for the children, through th...

  7. Attitudes Toward Acupuncture Among Pain Fellowship Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Britton; Burch, Elizabeth; Shakeshaft, Charol

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this survey was to evaluate attitudes toward acupuncture among pain medicine fellowship directors. Additional goals were to assess the availability of acupuncture at academic medical centers and ascertain the inclusion of this modality in fellowship curricula. Electronic and paper surveys were distributed to the 97 American College of Graduate Medical Education pain medicine fellowship directors during January and February, 2014. Directors were queried about their referral patterns to acupuncture, as well as their perceptions of the utility of acupuncture for common pain conditions. They were asked about the availability of acupuncture at their institution, and whether acupuncture was included in the fellowship curriculum. Sixty-seven percent of fellowship directors (65/97) completed the questionnaire. A majority of directors (83%) reported acupuncture is available to patients at their institution, and reported that acupuncture is a modality that they discuss with patients when creating a treatment plan for chronic pain (72%). The majority of programs include acupuncture as part of didactic (63%) and clinical (52%) education. Time constraints, lack of qualified teaching personnel, and cost to patients were cited as barriers to inclusion. The majority of fellowship directors considered acupuncture a safe and worthwhile option for common pain conditions. Results from this survey indicate that acupuncture is widely available to patients at academic medical centers, integrated into many pain fellowship curricula, and considered a useful modality by physician leaders in the field of pain medicine. This sentiment, paired with the flexibility of national guidelines for pain fellowship curricula, suggests a trend toward greater inclusion of this modality in academic medicine. © 2015 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Computation Directorate 2008 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D L

    2009-03-25

    Whether a computer is simulating the aging and performance of a nuclear weapon, the folding of a protein, or the probability of rainfall over a particular mountain range, the necessary calculations can be enormous. Our computers help researchers answer these and other complex problems, and each new generation of system hardware and software widens the realm of possibilities. Building on Livermore's historical excellence and leadership in high-performance computing, Computation added more than 331 trillion floating-point operations per second (teraFLOPS) of power to LLNL's computer room floors in 2008. In addition, Livermore's next big supercomputer, Sequoia, advanced ever closer to its 2011-2012 delivery date, as architecture plans and the procurement contract were finalized. Hyperion, an advanced technology cluster test bed that teams Livermore with 10 industry leaders, made a big splash when it was announced during Michael Dell's keynote speech at the 2008 Supercomputing Conference. The Wall Street Journal touted Hyperion as a 'bright spot amid turmoil' in the computer industry. Computation continues to measure and improve the costs of operating LLNL's high-performance computing systems by moving hardware support in-house, by measuring causes of outages to apply resources asymmetrically, and by automating most of the account and access authorization and management processes. These improvements enable more dollars to go toward fielding the best supercomputers for science, while operating them at less cost and greater responsiveness to the customers.

  9. Pension benefits of executive directors : A comparative study of general retailers between 2006-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Condric, Tomislav; Tomic, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Several recent corporate governance scandals relate to non-disclosure or high amounts of pension benefits given to executive directors. The lack of disclosure and transparency has gained pensions benefits greater attention as a significant part of the total remuneration received by executive directors. Due to the associated problems there is a greater need for better disclosure and in turn heightened transparency towards shareholders.   This qualitative case study focuses on general retailers...

  10. A DUAL NETWORK MODEL OF INTERLOCKING DIRECTORATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humphry Hung

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The article proposes an integrative framework for the study of interlocking directorates by using an approach that encompasses the concepts of multiple networks and resource endowment. This serves to integrate the traditional views of interorganizational linkages and intra-class cohesion. Through appropriate strategic analysis of relevant resource endowment of internal environment and external networks of organizations and corporate elites, this article argues that the selection of directors, if used effectively, can be adopted as a strategic device to enhance the corporation's overall performance.

  11. Board of directors' characteristics and conditional accounting conservatism : Spanish evidence

    OpenAIRE

    García Lara, Juan Manuel; García Osma, Beatriz; Penalva, Fernando

    2007-01-01

    Using a sample of Spanish listed firms for the period 1997-2002 we find that firms where the CEO has low influence over the functioning of the board of directors show a greater degree of accounting conservatism. We measure the influence of the CEO over the board of directors using two aggregate indexes combining 6 (8) characteristics of the functioning of the board of directors and its monitoring committees: board size, proportion of non-executive directors, proportion of independent director...

  12. 78 FR 59159 - Designation of Officers of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence To Act as Director...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-25

    ... Designation of Officers of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence To Act as Director of National Intelligence Memorandum for the Director of National Intelligence By the authority vested in me as President by... Intelligence, in the order listed, shall act as and perform the functions and duties of the Director of...

  13. 76 FR 13499 - Designation of Officers of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence To Act as Director...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-11

    ... Officers of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence To Act as Director of National Intelligence Memorandum for the Director of National Intelligence By the authority vested in me as President by the... and 4 of this memorandum, the officers of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence named in...

  14. Mechanisms of change associated with technology-based interventions for substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallery, Jesse; Jarvis, Brantley; Marsch, Lisa; Xie, Haiyi

    2015-05-01

    Technology-based interventions (TBIs) for substance use disorders have been increasing steadily. The mechanisms by which TBIs produce change in substance use outcomes have not been reviewed. This article is the first review of the conceptual and empirical underpinnings of the mechanisms associated with TBIs for substance use disorders. We review the literature on potential mechanisms associated with TBIs targeting tobacco, alcohol, and poly-substance use. We did not identify TBIs targeting other drug classes and that assessed mechanisms. Research suggests that TBIs impact outcomes via similar potential mechanisms as in non-TBIs (e.g., in-person treatment), with the exception of substance use outcomes being associated with changes in the quality of coping skills. The most frequent potential mechanisms detected were self-efficacy for tobacco abstinence and perceived peer drinking for alcohol abstinence. Research on mechanisms associated with TBIs is still in a nascent stage. We provide several recommendations for future work, including broadening the range of mechanisms assessed and increasing the frequency of assessment to detect temporal relations between mechanisms and outcomes. We also discuss unique challenges and opportunities afforded by technology that can advance theory, method, and clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of sperm sorting and associated reproductive technology for wildlife management and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, J K; Steinman, K J; Robeck, T R

    2009-01-01

    Efforts toward the conservation and captive breeding of wildlife can be enhanced by sperm sorting and associated reproductive technologies such as sperm cryopreservation and artificial insemination (AI). Sex ratio management is of particular significance to species which naturally exist in female-dominated social groups. A bias of the sex ratio towards females of these species will greatly assist in maintaining socially cohesive groups and minimizing male-male aggression. Another application of this technology potentially exists for endangered species, as the preferential production of females can enable propagation of those species at a faster rate. The particular assisted reproductive technology (ART) used in conjunction with sperm sorting for the production of offspring is largely determined by the quality and quantity of spermatozoa following sorting and preservation processes. Regardless of the ART selected, breeding decisions involving sex-sorted spermatozoa should be made in conjunction with appropriate genetic management. Zoological-based research on reproductive physiology and assisted reproduction, including sperm sorting, is being conducted on numerous terrestrial and marine mammals. The wildlife species for which the technology has undergone the most advance is the bottlenose dolphin. AI using sex-sorted fresh or frozen-thawed spermatozoa has become a valuable tool for the genetic and reproductive management of captive bottlenose dolphins with six pre-sexed calves, all of the predetermined sex born to date.

  16. Participation after acquired brain injury: Associations with everyday technology and activities in daily life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahpour, Mandana; Kottorp, Anders; Nygård, Louise; Lund, Maria Larsson

    2015-01-01

    The development of the information society has led to increased use of everyday technology and changed the conditions for participation. Enabling participation in everyday life situations is an important rehabilitation goal after acquired brain injury (ABI). Identifying factors associated with individuals' experienced participation and problems therein is therefore essential. This study aimed at exploring the relationship between perceived difficulty in everyday technology use, perceived ability in the activities of daily living (ADL), and perceived participation, and participation problems in persons with ABI. Eighty-one persons with ABI participated in the study and were assessed by the Impact on Participation and Autonomy questionnaire, the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire, and the ADL taxonomy. Findings showed that the combined model of difficulty in everyday technology (ET) use, ADL ability, and the interaction between them explained both participation in various domains of everyday life, and also overall level of perceived participation and the perceived problems. The findings underscore the importance of evaluating individuals' ability in both ET use and ADL after ABI to increase the probability of explaining these persons' participation in desired everyday life situations and, also, for rehabilitation design.

  17. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  18. 30 CFR 282.11 - Director's authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... leases or portions of leases as a single mining unit is in the interest of conservation of the natural... conservation practices and are conducted in a manner which is consistent with the following: (1) Make such OCS...) The Director is to be provided ready access to all OCS mineral resource data and all environmental...

  19. Summer Principals'/Directors' Orientation Training Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Robert L.; Garcia, Richard L.

    Intended to provide current or potential project principals/directors with the basic knowledge, skills, abilities, and sensitivities needed to manage a summer migrant school project in the local educational setting, this module provides instruction in the project management areas of planning, preparation, control, and termination. The module…

  20. Annual review and directors' report and accounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    This annual report of Midlands Electricity PLC (MEB) presents a financial review of the Group and the directors' and auditors reports. Historical and current cost profit and loss accounts, balance sheets and cash flow statements are tabulated. The Group's financial history and regulatory accounts are also presented. (UK)

  1. Gender Quotas on Board of Directors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Nina

    2013-01-01

    on the grounds of economic efficiency. Furthermore, in most countries a limited number of women are qualified to join boards of directors, and it is not clear from the evidence to date on the operation of quotas whether they will lead to a better pool of female candidates in the medium and long term....

  2. Board of directors and risk management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elst, C.F.; Birkmose, H.; Neville, M.; Sorensen, K.

    2013-01-01

    The board of directors is responsible for an appropriate business risk management environment. The paper studies in a comparative way how legislators and courts fill this duty. We question whether the legislative and regulatory framework will improve the equilibrium between entrepreneurship and risk

  3. IAEA Director General to Visit Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Full text: The Director General of the IAEA, Yukiya Amano, will visit Iran for meetings on 17 August 2014 with Iranian leaders and senior officials. The visit is part of the efforts to advance dialogue and cooperation between the Agency and Iran. (IAEA)

  4. Where Is the Next Rose Director?

    OpenAIRE

    John Blundell

    2013-01-01

    Rose Friedman (née Director), the Chicago-trained economist, was a very important contributor to Milton Friedman’s scholarly output, popular writings, and television series. His remarkable role in society was to a significant extent a joint role from which she cannot be separated.

  5. George Hampton, new Director of Administration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1963-01-01

    He succeeded Sam Dakin. George Hampton, (1920-2004), was CERN's director of administration in the 1960s and an important member of the team who managed the growth of CERN as it left the construction period and became a world-class physics laboratory.

  6. Directors' report and accounts 1990-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Director's Report and accounts for Scottish Hydro-Electric PLC are presented for the period 1990-91. Details are given of the accounting policies, profit and loss account, balance sheet, source and application of funds and abridged current cost information. (UK)

  7. Director of Program Area | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Job Summary The Director of a Program Area is accountable to the Vice President of the Program and Partnership Branch for providing strategic intelligence, ... Area; and; Contributes to policy development, planning, management and evaluation of program and administrative activities at the corporate and regional levels.

  8. Foreword by the director of Bohunice NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    In this foreword the director briefly describes activities of the NPP Bohunice in 1997. Main activities were: electric and heat production , the V-1 NPP Gradual Reconstruction Programme, nuclear safety programmes, environment protection, international co-operation as well as national and international public information

  9. IAEA Director General to Visit Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: IAEA Director General Yukiya Amano will travel to Tehran on 10 November 2013 to meet senior Iranian leaders on Monday, 11 November 2013, with the aim of strengthening dialogue and cooperation. Separately, as previously announced, IAEA and Iranian experts will meet in Tehran on Monday to discuss technical issues. IAEA)

  10. Hats for Sale: A Salute to Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Sue

    Experiences related to pursuing excellence and a positive attitude as a campus childcare director are presented. The paper describes the emotional quotient (EQ) as a complex, multifaceted quality incorporating self- and social-awareness, empathy, optimism, and persistence that may predict one's success in certain kinds of work. Optimism may be…

  11. Derivatives and the non-executive director

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Nat, M.; Buckley, A.A.

    2003-01-01

    Do non-executive directors have the wherewithal to overview a corporation's integrity, quality of performance and management in the area of derivatives policy? In a survey of the understanding and monitoring of derivatives in a small sample of quoted companies, we found disturbing levels of

  12. Michel Spiro is appointed director of the IN2P3 and the Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics of the CNRS

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Michel Spiro was appointed director of the IN2P3, by order of the Minister of Youth, National Education and Research and the Minister of Research and New Technologies on February 17, 2003. He was also appointed director of the Department of Nuclear and Particle Physics of the CNRS by decision of the CNRS Director General on February 21, 2003" (1/2 page).

  13. Statement of Aaron Cohen, Director, Research and Engineering, Johnson Space Center and Chairman, Space Station Advanced Technology Advisory Committee, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, before the Subcommittee on Science, Technology, and Space, Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, United States Senate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A.

    1985-01-01

    The activities of NASA's Space Station Advanced Technology Advisory Committee is discussed. Advanced Technology Advisory Committee (ATAC) activities over the last year are reviewed in preparation of the report to Congress on the potential for advancing automation and robotics technology for the space station and for the U.S. economy.

  14. Fusion technology. Annual report of the Association CEA/EURATOM 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magaud, P.; Le Vagueres, F.

    1998-01-01

    The research and development work performed by the French EURATOM-CEA Association for fusion technology is part of the Fusion Programme of the European Community. This report compiles the work carried out during the year 1997 as follows: The ITER CEA activities and related developments are described in the first section (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); The second part is dedicated to the Long Term activities as Blankets and material developments, long term safety, socio-economic problem; The Underlying Technology activities are compiled in the third part of this report (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); And the fourth part describes the inertial confinement studies. (K.A.)

  15. Fusion technology. Annual report of the Association CEA/EURATOM 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaud, P.; Le Vagueres, F

    1998-12-31

    The research and development work performed by the French EURATOM-CEA Association for fusion technology is part of the Fusion Programme of the European Community. This report compiles the work carried out during the year 1997 as follows: The ITER CEA activities and related developments are described in the first section (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); The second part is dedicated to the Long Term activities as Blankets and material developments, long term safety, socio-economic problem; The Underlying Technology activities are compiled in the third part of this report (plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety); And the fourth part describes the inertial confinement studies. (K.A.)

  16. Drawing a Transductive Ecosophy in Process: Technological Arts, Residual Matter, Associated Milieus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisèle Trudel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Drawing a Transductive Ecosophy in Process: Technological Arts, Residual Matter, Associated Milieus by Gisèle Trudel. NANO: New American Notes Online, Issue 7: The Aesthetics of Trash - nanocrit.com. This text examines the tetralogy of media artworks about residual matter produced by Ælab between 2008 and 2014. Taking its own title as a diagram (Deleuze and Guattari Mille Plateaux, it charts and builds on the processes of these artworks, elucidating their relations to materiality, philosophy and technicity. Technological research-creation becomes in these instances a transdisciplinary aesthetic act, emerging from an ecology of practices that combine humans, non-humans and waste matter in an effort to increase attentiveness in actions.

  17. Factors associated with patterns of mobile technology use among persons who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kelly M; Armenta, Richard F; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Liu, Lin; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Garfein, Richard S

    2016-01-01

    New and innovative methods of delivering interventions are needed to further reduce risky behaviors and increase overall health among persons who inject drugs (PWID). Mobile health (mHealth) interventions have potential for reaching PWID; however, little is known about mobile technology use (MTU) in this population. In this study, the authors identify patterns of MTU and identified factors associated with MTU among a cohort of PWID. Data were collected through a longitudinal cohort study examining drug use, risk behaviors, and health status among PWID in San Diego, California. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to define patterns of MTU (i.e., making voice calls, text messaging, and mobile Internet access). Multinomial logistic regression was then used to identify demographic characteristics, risk behaviors, and health indicators associated with mobile technology use class. In LCA, a 4-class solution fit the data best. Class 1 was defined by low MTU (22%, n = 100); class 2, by PWID who accessed the Internet using a mobile device but did not use voice or text messaging (20%, n = 95); class 3, by primarily voice, text, and connected Internet use (17%, n = 91); and class 4, by high MTU (41%, n = 175). Compared with low MTU, high MTU class members were more likely to be younger, have higher socioeconomic status, sell drugs, and inject methamphetamine daily. The majority of PWID in San Diego use mobile technology for voice, text, and/or Internet access, indicating that rapid uptake of mHealth interventions may be possible in this population. However, low ownership and use of mobile technology among older and/or homeless individuals will need to be considered when implementing mHealth interventions among PWID.

  18. 17 CFR 200.30-5 - Delegation of authority to Director of Division of Investment Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... that are principally engaged in the development or exploitation of inventions, technological... of the Commission pursuant to sections 5318A(a)(4), 5318A(e)(2) and 5318(h)(2) of the Bank Secrecy....263, and §§ 230.651-230.703(T) of this chapter as that delegated to each Regional Director in § 200.30...

  19. 22 May 2009 - HRH the Duke of Kent, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, visiting CMS underground area and CERN Control Center with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers and Senior Physicist and STFC Board Member J. Ellis.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    Tirage 1 to 11:Signature of the guest book with the Director-General, R. Heuer Tirage 12 to 25:CMS underground experimental area with Spokesperson, T. Virdee Tirage 26 to 35:CCC with P. Collier and D. Nisbet

  20. Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Among Child Care Center Directors in 2008 and 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shope, Timothy R; Walker, Benjamin H; Aird, Laura D; Southward, Linda; McCown, John S; Martin, Judith M

    2017-06-01

    Children in child care centers represent an important population to consider in attempts to mitigate the spread of an influenza pandemic. This national survey, conducted in 2008 and 2016, assessed directors' reports of their child care centers' pandemic influenza preparation before and after the 2009 H1N1 novel influenza pandemic. This was a telephone-based survey of child care center directors randomly selected from a national database of licensed US child care centers who were queried about their preparedness for pandemic influenza. We grouped conceptually related items in 6 domains into indexes: general infection control, communication, seasonal influenza control, use of health consultants, quality of child care, and perceived barriers. These indexes, along with other center and director characteristics, were used to predict pandemic influenza preparedness. Among 1500 and 518 child care center directors surveyed in 2008 and 2016, respectively, preparation for pandemic influenza was low and did not improve. Only 7% of directors had taken concrete actions to prepare their centers. Having served as a center director during the 2009 influenza pandemic did not influence preparedness. After adjusting for covariates, child care health consultation and years of director's experience were positively associated with pandemic influenza preparation, whereas experiencing perceived barriers such as lack of knowing what to do in the event of pandemic influenza, was negatively associated with pandemic influenza preparedness. Pandemic influenza preparedness of child care center's directors needs to improve. Child care health consultants are likely to be important collaborators in addressing this problem. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Alison Gregory Named Director of Library Services at Lycoming College

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison S. Gregory

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Alison S. Gregory has been named Lycoming College’s Associate Dean and Director of Library Services at the John G. Snowden Memorial Library, according to an announcement by Dr. Phil Sprunger, Provost and Dean of the college. She began her duties July 1, having served the college since 2005 as Assistant Professor and Instructional Services Librarian and Coordinator of Information Literacy and Outreach. She is replacing Janet McNeil Hurlbert, who retired at the conclusion of the 2012-13 academic year.

  2. Drivers for precision livestock technology adoption: A study of factors associated with adoption of electronic identification technology by commercial sheep farmers in England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Eliana; Hopkins, Thomas; Gurney, Emma; Shortall, Orla; Lovatt, Fiona; Davies, Peers; Williamson, George; Kaler, Jasmeet

    2018-01-01

    The UK is the largest lamb meat producer in Europe. However, the low profitability of sheep farming sector suggests production efficiency could be improved. Although the use of technologies such as Electronic Identification (EID) tools could allow a better use of flock resources, anecdotal evidence suggests they are not widely used. The aim of this study was to assess uptake of EID technology, and explore drivers and barriers of adoption of related tools among English and Welsh farmers. Farm beliefs and management practices associated with adoption of this technology were investigated. A total of 2000 questionnaires were sent, with a response rate of 22%. Among the respondents, 87 had adopted EID tools for recording flock information, 97 intended to adopt it in the future, and 222 neither had adopted it, neither intended to adopt it. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and multivariable logistic regression modelling were used to identify farmer beliefs and management practices significantly associated with adoption of EID technology. EFA identified three factors expressing farmer's beliefs-external pressure and negative feelings, usefulness and practicality. Our results suggest farmer's beliefs play a significant role in technology uptake. Non-adopters were more likely than adopters to believe that 'government pressurise farmers to adopt technology'. In contrast, adopters were significantly more likely than non-adopters to see EID as practical and useful (p≤0.05). Farmers with higher information technologies literacy and intending to intensify production in the future were significantly more likely to adopt EID technology (p≤0.05). Importantly, flocks managed with EID tools had significantly lower farmer- reported flock lameness levels (p≤0.05). These findings bring insights on the dynamics of adoption of EID tools. Communicating evidence of the positive effects EID tools on flock performance and strengthening farmer's capability in use of technology are likely

  3. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  4. Identifying influential directors in the United States corporate governance network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xuqing; Vodenska, Irena; Wang, Fengzhong; Havlin, Shlomo; Stanley, H Eugene

    2011-10-01

    The influence of directors has been one of the most engaging topics recently, but surprisingly little research has been done to quantitatively evaluate the influence and power of directors. We analyze the structure of the US corporate governance network for the 11-year period 1996-2006 based on director data from the Investor Responsibility Research Center director database, and we develop a centrality measure named the influence factor to estimate the influence of directors quantitatively. The US corporate governance network is a network of directors with nodes representing directors and links between two directors representing their service on common company boards. We assume that information flows in the network through information-sharing processes among linked directors. The influence factor assigned to a director is based on the level of information that a director obtains from the entire network. We find that, contrary to commonly accepted belief that directors of large companies, measured by market capitalization, are the most powerful, in some instances, the directors who are influential do not necessarily serve on boards of large companies. By applying our influence factor method to identify the influential people contained in the lists created by popular magazines such as Fortune, Networking World, and Treasury and Risk Management, we find that the influence factor method is consistently either the best or one of the two best methods in identifying powerful people compared to other general centrality measures that are used to denote the significance of a node in complex network theory.

  5. Factors associated with adoption of health information technology: a conceptual model based on a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Clemens Scott; DeShazo, Jonathan; Kim, Forest; Fulton, Lawrence

    2014-05-23

    The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (HITECH) allocated $19.2 billion to incentivize adoption of the electronic health record (EHR). Since 2009, Meaningful Use Criteria have dominated information technology (IT) strategy. Health care organizations have struggled to meet expectations and avoid penalties to reimbursements from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS). Organizational theories attempt to explain factors that influence organizational change, and many theories address changes in organizational strategy. However, due to the complexities of the health care industry, existing organizational theories fall short of demonstrating association with significant health care IT implementations. There is no organizational theory for health care that identifies, groups, and analyzes both internal and external factors of influence for large health care IT implementations like adoption of the EHR. The purpose of this systematic review is to identify a full-spectrum of both internal organizational and external environmental factors associated with the adoption of health information technology (HIT), specifically the EHR. The result is a conceptual model that is commensurate with the complexity of with the health care sector. We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed (restricted to English), EBSCO Host, and Google Scholar for both empirical studies and theory-based writing from 1993-2013 that demonstrated association between influential factors and three modes of HIT: EHR, electronic medical record (EMR), and computerized provider order entry (CPOE). We also looked at published books on organizational theories. We made notes and noted trends on adoption factors. These factors were grouped as adoption factors associated with various versions of EHR adoption. The resulting conceptual model summarizes the diversity of independent variables (IVs) and dependent variables (DVs) used in articles, editorials, books, as

  6. 77 FR 59407 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-27

    ... Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) would meet on September 27-28, 2012 in... of Homeland Security (DHS), Science and Technology Directorate, 1120 Vermont Avenue NW., (Room 5-212... Hanson, HSSTAC Executive Director, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security...

  7. 77 FR 56662 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... after Sept. 12: http://www.dhs.gov/homeland-security-science-and-technology-advisory-committee-hsstac... Director, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane, Bldg. 410..., Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane, Bldg. 410...

  8. Drivers for precision livestock technology adoption: A study of factors associated with adoption of electronic identification technology by commercial sheep farmers in England and Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Thomas; Gurney, Emma; Shortall, Orla; Lovatt, Fiona; Davies, Peers; Williamson, George; Kaler, Jasmeet

    2018-01-01

    The UK is the largest lamb meat producer in Europe. However, the low profitability of sheep farming sector suggests production efficiency could be improved. Although the use of technologies such as Electronic Identification (EID) tools could allow a better use of flock resources, anecdotal evidence suggests they are not widely used. The aim of this study was to assess uptake of EID technology, and explore drivers and barriers of adoption of related tools among English and Welsh farmers. Farm beliefs and management practices associated with adoption of this technology were investigated. A total of 2000 questionnaires were sent, with a response rate of 22%. Among the respondents, 87 had adopted EID tools for recording flock information, 97 intended to adopt it in the future, and 222 neither had adopted it, neither intended to adopt it. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and multivariable logistic regression modelling were used to identify farmer beliefs and management practices significantly associated with adoption of EID technology. EFA identified three factors expressing farmer’s beliefs–external pressure and negative feelings, usefulness and practicality. Our results suggest farmer’s beliefs play a significant role in technology uptake. Non-adopters were more likely than adopters to believe that ‘government pressurise farmers to adopt technology’. In contrast, adopters were significantly more likely than non-adopters to see EID as practical and useful (p≤0.05). Farmers with higher information technologies literacy and intending to intensify production in the future were significantly more likely to adopt EID technology (p≤0.05). Importantly, flocks managed with EID tools had significantly lower farmer- reported flock lameness levels (p≤0.05). These findings bring insights on the dynamics of adoption of EID tools. Communicating evidence of the positive effects EID tools on flock performance and strengthening farmer’s capability in use of

  9. OSG Director reports on grid progress

    CERN Multimedia

    Pordes, Ruth

    2006-01-01

    "In this Q&A from the Open Science Grid (OSG), executive director Ruth Prodes provides a brief history of the OSG, an overview of current projects and partners, and a glimpse at future plans, including how the recent $30 million award from the ODE's office of Science and the NSF will be employed. She also shares her thoughts of SC, saying the personal contacts are the best part."(4,5 pages)

  10. Developing future nursing home medical directors: a curriculum for geriatric medicine fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Wen, Aida; Masaki, Kamal

    2013-03-01

    Long term care facilities are important sites of care for elderly adults. Despite a growing need and interest in medical direction in nursing homes, there have been limited educational opportunities in this area for geriatric medicine fellows. This article describes a novel medical director's curriculum for first-year geriatric medicine fellows to prepare them for the role of nursing home medical director. This novel curriculum has been integrated into the Department of Geriatric Medicine's Fellowship training program at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii. The curriculum consists of seven seminars that have been integrated into the didactic sessions during the first year of fellowship. Core content areas include: (1) roles and responsibilities of the medical director, (2) infection control, (3) physician documentation, (4) federal regulations and state surveys, (5) quality improvement, (6) culture change in nursing homes, and (7) transitions in care. All topics were discussed using the framework described by the American Medical Directors Association's position statement on the roles and responsibilities of the nursing home medical director. To our knowledge, this is the first curriculum in the medical literature that is designed to prepare geriatric medicine fellows for roles as medical directors in nursing homes. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Concurrent and Subsequent Associations between Daily Digital Technology Use and High-Risk Adolescents' Mental Health Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Madeleine J.; Russell, Michael A.; Piontak, Joy R.; Odgers, Candice L.

    2018-01-01

    Adolescents are spending an unprecedented amount of time using digital technologies (especially mobile technologies), and there are concerns that adolescents' constant connectivity is associated with poor mental health, particularly among at-risk adolescents. Participants included 151 adolescents at risk for mental health problems (M[subscript…

  12. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  13. Emotional intelligence model for directors of research centers in mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Maricela Trujillo Flores

    2008-01-01

    H5 Social skills exhibited by directors, that are also part of interpersonal intelligence, allow a director to exert a greater influence on the working group, facilitating communication, conflict management, leadership, collaboration, cooperation and development of team skills.

  14. Dr. William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland (left) with R. Cashmore. Photos 02, 03: Dr William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland signing the CERN guest book with R. Cashmore.

  15. Social work, technology, and ethical practices: a review and evaluation of the national association of social workers' technology standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Amy

    2014-10-01

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are becoming essential to social work practice by providing increased treatment possibilities and reducing barriers to service. While recognizing the importance of ICTs in practice, social work practitioners have had concerns about ethical use. In response, NASW compiled the Standards for Technology and Social Work Practice. While the guidelines set the groundwork, they were not embedded in a process that would allow them to adapt to the swift pace of ICT changes. This article reviews the current Standards, evaluates how these have been implemented by practitioners, and offers suggestions for updates.

  16. DeLucca named project director in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Mike Delucca, a social marketing specialist since 1978, has been named director of a new contraceptive social marketing effort in Guatemala. The project is sponsored by Importadora de Productos Farmaceuticos (IPROFA), S.A., a group of private-sector community leaders who came together specifically to set up the project. IPROFA plan to being marketing 1 brand of oral contraceptive, condom, and foaming tablet in early 1985. Efforts will first be targeted at economically and socially disadvantaged fertile couples between the ages of 18-44 in large urban areas. By the end of 1985 marketing will begin in rural and small urban areas. DeLucca is on assignment IPROFA from Juarez and Associates, a marketing and research firm in Los Angeles. He was formerly with Development Associates of Arlington, Virginia, and served as project director for the social marketing project in El Salvador. He joined the Guatemala project in May 1984, overseeing prelaunch activities that included development of the marketing plan. After the product launch he will coordinate sales and follow-up marketing studies. The project is the result of a cooperative agreement between IPROFA and US Agency for International Development (USAID) signed in April 1982. full text

  17. 22 CFR 120.12 - Directorate of Defense Trade Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Directorate of Defense Trade Controls. 120.12 Section 120.12 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS PURPOSE AND DEFINITIONS § 120.12 Directorate of Defense Trade Controls. Directorate of Defense Trade Controls, Bureau of...

  18. Retention Initiatives Used by Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Program Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Retaining athletic training students has been identified as problematic by approximately half of athletic training program (ATP) directors. It is unknown what ATP directors do to improve athletic training student retention. Objective: To identify initiatives that ATP directors use to improve the retention rates of athletic training…

  19. Administrative behavior of directors in hospitals: the Israeli case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Z; Schmid, H; Nirel, N

    1994-01-01

    This article presents research findings on the behavior of directors in hospitals in Israel. According to the findings, hospital directors devote most of their time to internal organization processes and less time to the management of the external organizational environment. The findings also reveal that the orientation of these directors is toward centralization of authority and concentration of the decision-making process.

  20. On with the Show! A Guide for Directors and Actors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestor, Sheri

    2005-01-01

    Divided into two parts, the Director's Handbook and the Actor's Handbook, On With the Show! enables directors and actors to get the most out of rehearsal time at home and on the stage. Providing essential time-saving techniques, worksheets, and samples, this guide allows performers and directors to work more effectively and efficiently toward the…

  1. 7 CFR 2.95 - Director, Office of Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Director, Office of Ethics. 2.95 Section 2.95... Administration § 2.95 Director, Office of Ethics. The Director, Office of Ethics, shall be the USDA Alternate Agency Ethics Official, pursuant to 5 CFR 2638.202, and shall exercise the authority reserved to the...

  2. 47 CFR 54.703 - The Administrator's Board of Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) The Chief Executive Officer of the Administrator. (c) Selection process for board of directors. (1) Sixty (60) days prior to the expiration of a director's term, the industry or non-industry group that is... section, shall nominate by consensus a new director. The industry or non-industry group shall submit the...

  3. Mentors or Directors of Thesis, is he author?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María das Graças TARGINO

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Over time, with the profound changes in the learning and in research provided by technological advances, and especially because of the extreme value of higher education and scientific research, there is an intense discussion around the old and worn slogan "publish or perish". Increasingly, mentors or directors of thesis and university papers, en general, put themselves as first author or coauthor of work performed by their students, by the argument that the author, as activity and process, suffers herself social, cultural, economic and political mutations. This is a topic that arouses controversy and leads to conceptual changes, which require the deconstruction of its foundations, which, however, must respect the ethic behaviour

  4. A Panel Analysis of the Strategic Association Between Information and Communication Technology and Public Health Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sarah Jinhui

    2012-01-01

    Background In this exploratory research, we use panel data analysis to examine the correlation between Information and Communication Technology (ICTs) and public health delivery at the country level. Objective The goal of this exploratory research is to examine the strategic association over time between ICTs and country-level public health. Methods Using data from the World Development Indicators, we construct a panel data set of countries of five different income levels and look closely at the period from 2000 to 2008. The panel data analysis allows us to explore this dynamic relationship under the control for unobserved country-specific effects by using a fixed-effects estimation method. In particular,, we examine the association of five ICT factors with five public health indicators: adolescent fertility rate, child immunization coverage, tuberculosis case detected, life expectancy, and adult mortality rate. Results First, overall ICTs’ factors substantially improve a country’s public health delivery on the top of wealth effect. Second, among all the ICTs’ factors, accessibility is the only one that is associated with improvements in all aspects of public health delivery, while the contributions from the usage, quality, and applications are negligible. ICTs’ accessibility factor is associated with a considerable extension to life expectancy and reduced adult mortality rate. Third, all entity-specific factors are significant in each model, indicating that countries’ economic development level does influence their public health delivery. Conclusions Our results indicate that ICT accessibility has a strong association with effective delivery of public health. There are others, but the key strategic applications are eHealth and mHealth. The findings of this study will help government officials and public health policy makers to formulate strategic decisions regarding the best ICT investments and deployment. For example, the study shows that providing

  5. A panel analysis of the strategic association between information and communication technology and public health delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sarah Jinhui; Raghupathi, Wullianallur

    2012-10-22

    In this exploratory research, we use panel data analysis to examine the correlation between Information and Communication Technology (ICTs) and public health delivery at the country level. The goal of this exploratory research is to examine the strategic association over time between ICTs and country-level public health. Using data from the World Development Indicators, we construct a panel data set of countries of five different income levels and look closely at the period from 2000 to 2008. The panel data analysis allows us to explore this dynamic relationship under the control for unobserved country-specific effects by using a fixed-effects estimation method. In particular,, we examine the association of five ICT factors with five public health indicators: adolescent fertility rate, child immunization coverage, tuberculosis case detected, life expectancy, and adult mortality rate. First, overall ICTs' factors substantially improve a country's public health delivery on the top of wealth effect. Second, among all the ICTs' factors, accessibility is the only one that is associated with improvements in all aspects of public health delivery, while the contributions from the usage, quality, and applications are negligible. ICTs' accessibility factor is associated with a considerable extension to life expectancy and reduced adult mortality rate. Third, all entity-specific factors are significant in each model, indicating that countries' economic development level does influence their public health delivery. Our results indicate that ICT accessibility has a strong association with effective delivery of public health. There are others, but the key strategic applications are eHealth and mHealth. The findings of this study will help government officials and public health policy makers to formulate strategic decisions regarding the best ICT investments and deployment. For example, the study shows that providing accessibility should be a critical focus.

  6. Calorie counting and fitness tracking technology: Associations with eating disorder symptomatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Courtney C; Mazzeo, Suzanne E

    2017-08-01

    The use of online calorie tracking applications and activity monitors is increasing exponentially. Anecdotal reports document the potential for these trackers to trigger, maintain, or exacerbate eating disorder symptomatology. Yet, research has not examined the relation between use of these devices and eating disorder-related attitudes and behaviors. This study explored associations between the use of calorie counting and fitness tracking devices and eating disorder symptomatology. Participants (N=493) were college students who reported their use of tracking technology and completed measures of eating disorder symptomatology. Individuals who reported using calorie trackers manifested higher levels of eating concern and dietary restraint, controlling for BMI. Additionally, fitness tracking was uniquely associated with ED symptomatology after adjusting for gender and bingeing and purging behavior within the past month. Findings highlight associations between use of calorie and fitness trackers and eating disorder symptomatology. Although preliminary, overall results suggest that for some individuals, these devices might do more harm than good. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Associations between exposure to information and communication technology (ICT) and reported discomfort among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Kristy; Ciccarelli, Marina; Falkmer, Torbjorn; Parsons, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are common among adolescents in their daily activities.Exposure to ICT has been associated with discomfort and musculoskeletal disorders in adults, with growing concern about the potential risks to children and adolescents' physical health. The objectives of this study were to (i) quantify self-reported discomfort and exposure to ICT among adolescents; and (ii) determine if associations exist between discomfort and levels of exposure. The participant group comprised 33 Australian adolescents aged 12-15 years. The study used self-reports by participants for a one week period. Intensity and location of discomfort was reported via a written discomfort log. ICT exposure and physical activity were reported through an electronic time-use diary. The most common ICT types reported by participants were television, mobile phones and desktop and laptop computers. Discomfort was reported by 86% of participants. The most frequently reported areas were the legs, head/neck, back and shoulders. There was no statistical association found between ICT exposure and discomfort. The majority of participants exceeded the recommended 60 minutes per day of moderate to vigorous physical activity. High exposure to ICT and high prevalence of low level discomfort was reported by the participants. Participating in regular physical activity may have some protective effect against ICT-related discomfort.

  8. Genome-wide association study of rust traits in orchardgrass using SLAF-seq technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Bing; Yan, Haidong; Liu, Xinchun; Zang, Wenjing; Zhang, Ailing; Zhou, Sifan; Huang, Linkai; Liu, Jinping

    2017-01-01

    While orchardgrass ( Dactylis glomerata L.) is a well-known perennial forage species, rust diseases cause serious reductions in the yield and quality of orchardgrass; however, genetic mechanisms of rust resistance are not well understood in orchardgrass. In this study, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) technology in orchardgrass. A total of 2,334,889 SLAF tags were generated to produce 2,309,777 SNPs. ADMIXTURE analysis revealed unstructured subpopulations for 33 accessions, indicating that this orchardgrass population could be used for association analysis. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis revealed an average r 2 of 0.4 across all SNP pairs, indicating a high extent of LD in these samples. Through GWAS, a total of 4,604 SNPs were found to be significantly ( P  rust trait. The bulk analysis discovered a number of 5,211 SNPs related to rust trait. Two candidate genes, including cytochrome P450, and prolamin were implicated in disease resistance through prediction of functional genes surrounding each high-quality SNP ( P  rust traits based on GWAS analysis and bulk analysis. The large number of SNPs associated with rust traits and these two candidate genes may provide the basis for further research on rust resistance mechanisms and marker-assisted selection (MAS) for rust-resistant lineages.

  9. Benefits associated with advanced technologies applied to a high-speed civil transport concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozoroski, L. P.; Shields, E. W.; Fenbert, J. W.; Mcelroy, M. O.

    1993-01-01

    Results of a first-order assessment of the mission performance benefits associated with the technology improvements and goals of the Phase II High-Speed Research (HSR) Program are presented. A breakdown of the four major disciplines resulted in the following estimated TOGW savings from the 1990 vehicle: propulsion at 14.3 percent, structures at 11.7 percent, flight-deck systems at 4.0 percent, and aerodynamics at 15.0 percent. Based on 100 percent success of the HSR Phase II proposed technology advancements, the overall combined impact is estimated to result in a 45 percent reduction in TOGW from a 1990 entry-into-service (EIS) date, which could result in a viable 2005 EIS vehicle with an acceptable TOGW that meets Stage III community noise restrictions. Through supersonic laminar flow control and the possible reduction in reserve fuel requirements resulting from synthetic vision capability, the potential exists for an additional 9.6 percent reduction in TOGW.

  10. Microarray technology and applications in the arena of genome-wide association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Struan F A; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2008-07-01

    there is a revolution occurring in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping technology, with high-throughput methods now allowing large numbers of SNPs (10(5)-10(6)) to be genotyped in large cohort studies. This has enabled large-scale genome-wide association (GWA) studies in complex diseases, such as diabetes, asthma, and inflammatory bowel disease, to be undertaken for the first time. the GWA approach serves the critical need for a comprehensive and unbiased strategy to identify causal genes related to complex disease, and is rapidly replacing the more traditional candidate gene studies and microsatellite-based linkage mapping approaches that have dominated gene discovery attempts for common diseases. As a consequence of employing array-based technologies, over the last 3 years dramatic discoveries of key variants involved in multiple complex diseases and related traits have been reported in the top scientific literature and, most importantly, have been largely replicated by independent investigator groups. As a consequence, several novel genes have been identified, most notably in the metabolic, cardiovascular, autoimmune, and oncology disease areas, that are clearly rooted in the biology of these disorders. These discoveries have opened up new avenues for investigators to address novel molecular pathways that were not previously linked to or thought of in relation with these diseases. this review provides a synopsis of recent advances and what we may expect to still emerge from this field.

  11. Radiative forcing associated with particulate carbon emissions resulting from the use of mercury control technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Guangxing; Penner, Joyce E; Clack, Herek L

    2014-09-02

    Injection of powdered activated carbon (PAC) adsorbents into the flue gas of coal fired power plants with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) is the most mature technology to control mercury emissions for coal combustion. However, the PAC itself can penetrate ESPs to emit into the atmosphere. These emitted PACs have similar size and optical properties to submicron black carbon (BC) and thus could increase BC radiative forcing unintentionally. The present paper estimates, for the first time, the potential emission of PAC together with their climate forcing. The global average maximum potential emissions of PAC is 98.4 Gg/yr for the year 2030, arising from the assumed adoption of the maximum potential PAC injection technology, the minimum collection efficiency, and the maximum PAC injection rate. These emissions cause a global warming of 2.10 mW m(-2) at the top of atmosphere and a cooling of -2.96 mW m(-2) at the surface. This warming represents about 2% of the warming that is caused by BC from direct fossil fuel burning and 0.86% of the warming associated with CO2 emissions from coal burning in power plants. Its warming is 8 times more efficient than the emitted CO2 as measured by the 20-year-integrated radiative forcing per unit of carbon input (the 20-year Global Warming Potential).

  12. Concurrent and Subsequent Associations Between Daily Digital Technology Use and High-Risk Adolescents' Mental Health Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Madeleine J; Russell, Michael A; Piontak, Joy R; Odgers, Candice L

    2018-01-01

    Adolescents are spending an unprecedented amount of time using digital technologies (especially mobile technologies), and there are concerns that adolescents' constant connectivity is associated with poor mental health, particularly among at-risk adolescents. Participants included 151 adolescents at risk for mental health problems (M age  = 13.1) who completed a baseline assessment, 30-day ecological momentary assessment, and 18 month follow-up assessment. Results from multilevel regression models showed that daily reports of both time spent using digital technologies and the number of text messages sent were associated with increased same-day attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder (CD) symptoms. Adolescents' reported digital technology usage and text messaging across the ecological momentary assessment (EMA) period was also associated with poorer self-regulation and increases in conduct problem symptoms between the baseline and follow-up assessments. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  13. New technologies in the prevention and control of healthcare-associated infection.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Humphreys, H

    2010-06-01

    The increased interest in healthcare-associated infection (HCAI) among the public, patients and politicians has led to the development of potential new approaches to its prevention by industrial concerns and others. Such developments include better methods of assessing hospital hygiene, enhanced decontamination of the healthcare environment, biosynthetic tissue alternatives, antibiotic-impregnated medical devices and information technology that can help improve professional practice. Although promising, many of these have not been adequately evaluated in the clinical setting, highlighting the need for greater collaboration between industry and infection prevention and control practitioners to maximise the benefit of new products and to complement conventional approaches to HCAI prevention such as education, professional practice and the provision of better facilities.

  14. Technology issues associated with fueling the national aerospace plane with slush hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, Ned P.

    1988-01-01

    The National Aerospace Plane is a horizontal takeoff and landing, single stage-to-orbit vehicle using hydrogen fuel. The first flights are planned for the mid 1990's. The success of this important national program requires advances in virtually every discipline associated with both airbreathing and space flight. The high heating value, cooling capacity, and combustion properties make hydrogen the fuel of choice, but low density results in a large vehicle. Both fuel cooling capacity and density are increased with the use of slush hydrogen and result in significant reductions in vehicle size. A national program to advance this technology and to find engineering solutions to the many design issues is now under way. The program uses the expertise of the cryogenics production and services industry, the instrumentation industry, universities and governments. The program will be discussed to highlight the major issues and display progress to date.

  15. Risk of ectopic pregnancy associated with assisted reproductive technology in the United States, 2001-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kiran M; Boulet, Sheree L; Kissin, Dmitry M; Jamieson, Denise J

    2015-01-01

    To assess national trends in ectopic pregnancy incidence among assisted reproductive technology users and identify risk factors associated with ectopic pregnancy. We identified 553,577 pregnancies reported to the National ART Surveillance System between 2001 and 2011. Of those, 9,480 were ectopic, of which 485 were heterotopic. As a result of small numbers, ectopic and heterotopic pregnancies were combined for analysis. We assessed temporal trends in annual ectopic pregnancy rates using Poisson regression. We used log-binomial regression models with generalized estimating equations for correlated outcomes within clinics to calculate unadjusted and adjusted risk ratios for the association between ectopic pregnancy and selected patient characteristics and treatment factors. The rate of ectopic pregnancy declined from 2.0% (n=735, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9-2.2) in 2001 to 1.6% (n=968, 95% CI 1.5-1.7) in 2011 (P for trend ectopic pregnancy rate ranged from 2.0% (n=7,469, 95% CI 1.9-2.0) for fresh, nondonor cycles to 1.0% (n=641, 95% CI 0.9-1.1) for fresh, donor cycles. Among fresh, nondonor cycles, the rate of ectopic pregnancy was 1.6% (95% CI 1.4-1.7) when one embryo was transferred compared with 1.7% (95% CI 1.7-1.8), 2.2% (95% CI 2.1-2.3), and 2.5% (95% CI 2.4-2.6) when two, three, or four or more embryos were transferred, respectively (adjusted risk ratios 1.11, 95% CI 0.94-0.30; 1.33, 95% CI 1.12-1.56; and 1.49, 95% CI 1.25-1.78). Ectopic pregnancy incidence after assisted reproductive technology has decreased over time, but factors such as multiple embryo transfer increase the risk of ectopic pregnancy. II.

  16. Nursing home director of nursing leadership style and director of nursing-sensitive survey deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Selina H; Corazzini, Kirsten; Anderson, Ruth A; Sloane, Richard; Castle, Nicholas G

    2016-01-01

    Nursing homes are becoming increasingly complex clinical environments because of rising resident acuity and expansion of postacute services within a context of historically poor quality performance. Discrete quality markers have been linked to director of nursing (DON) leadership behaviors. However, the impact of DON leadership across all measured areas of DON jurisdiction has not been tested using comprehensive domains of quality deficiencies. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of DON leadership style including behaviors that facilitate the exchange of information between diverse people on care quality domains through the lens of complexity science. Three thousand six hundred nine DONs completed leadership and intent-to-quit surveys. Quality markers that were deemed DON sensitive included all facility survey deficiencies in the domains of resident behaviors/facility practices, quality of life, nursing services, and quality of care. Logistic regression procedures estimated associations between variables. The odds of deficiencies for all DON sensitive survey domains were lower in facilities where DONs practiced complexity leadership including more staff input and shared decisional authority. DON quit intentions were aligned with higher odds of facility deficiencies across all domains. Results supported the hypotheses that DONs using complexity leadership approaches by interacting more freely with staff, discussing resident issues, and sharing decision making produced better care outcomes from every DON sensitive metric assessed by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. The mechanism linking poor quality with high DON quit intentions is an area for future research. Encouraging DON use of complexity leadership approaches has the potential to improve a broad swath of quality outcomes.

  17. Federal role in science will grow, NSF Director predicts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simarski, Lynn Teo

    1992-01-01

    Walter Massey, director of the National Science Foundation, recently called for a fundamental reassessment of the relationship between the federal government and research institutions. On January 15, Massey, now in his ninth month at NSF, described great changes in the government-university “partnership” since the “golden age” of the 1960s. Speaking in Washington, D.C. at a seminar of George Washington University's Center for International Science and Technology Policy, he predicted that his own term at the foundation would not be “business as usual.”Science and technology have shifted from being a peripheral concern of the government to a central policy issue, Massey said. The United States now sees science as too important to leave its agenda for scientists to set themselves. In response, the federal government is launching the initiatives of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering, and Technology. Some of last year's FCCSET budget initiatives, spanning a number of federal agencies, dealt with math and science education, global change, and high-performance computing. Such programs “are research agenda put forth from the federal side—they are not things put forth from the [research] community,” Massey pointed out.

  18. Association between ovarian stimulators with or without intrauterine insemination, and assisted reproductive technologies on multiple births.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabane, Sonia; Sheehy, Odile; Monnier, Patricia; Bissonnette, François; Trasler, Jacquetta M; Fraser, William; Bérard, Anick

    2015-10-01

    We sought to quantify the risk of multiple births associated with the use of different modalities of medically assisted reproduction. We conducted a case-control study using a birth cohort from 2006 through 2009. This cohort was built with the linkage of data obtained by a self-administered questionnaire and medical, hospital, pharmaceutical, birth, and death databases in Quebec. Cases were pregnancies resulting in multiple live births (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision/International Statistical Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes). Each case was matched, on maternal age and year of delivery, with 3 singleton pregnancies (controls) randomly selected among all Quebec singleton pregnancies. Data on the use of different fertility treatments were collected by a self-administered questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression models, adjusted for body mass index, number of previous live births, ethnicity, family income, place of residence, marital status, subfertility, reduction of embryos, diabetes, metformin treatment, folic acid supplementation, and lifestyle factors, were used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs). We evaluated the associations between each type of fertility treatment (ovarian stimulators used alone, intrauterine insemination [IUI] used with ovarian stimulation, and assisted reproductive technologies [ART]) and the risk of multiple births. A total of 1407 cases of multiple births and 3580 controls were analyzed. More than half of multiple births following medically assisted reproduction (53.6%) occurred among women having used ovarian stimulation with or without IUI. The use of ovarian stimulators alone and IUI with ovarian stimulation increase the risk of multiple births (adjusted OR, 4.5; 95% CI, 3.2-6.4; and adjusted OR, 9.32; 95% CI, 5.60-15.50, respectively) compared to spontaneous conception. The use of invasive ART was associated with a greatly increased risk of multiple births

  19. Directors' report and accounts 1992/1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This item is the Directors' Report and Accounts for the financial year 1992/1993 for Scottish Hydro-Electric plc, a United Kingdom utility which generates, distributes and sells electricity to its customers in that country. While generation is based in Scotland, the company is seeking to penetrate the energy market in England and Wales, and increase earnings in Scotland through improved performance. Increased customer and shareholder satisfaction is identified as a continuing goal. Turnover, profits and dividends to shareholders have all increased during the year. (UK)

  20. Physics and Advanced Technologies 2001 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, R

    2002-01-01

    The Physics and Advanced Technologies (PAT) Directorate was created in July 2000 by Bruce Tarter, Director of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Director called for the new organization to execute and support programs that apply cutting-edge physics and advanced technology to develop integrated solutions to problems in national security, fusion energy, information science, health care, and other national grand challenges. When I was appointed a year later as the PAT Directorate's first Associate Director, I initiated a strategic planning project to develop a vision, mission, and long-term goals for the Directorate. We adopted the goal of becoming a leader in frontier physics and technology for twenty-first-century national security missions: Stockpile Stewardship, homeland security, energy independence, and the exploration of space. Our mission is to: (1) Help ensure the scientific excellence and vitality of the major LLNL programs through its leadership role in performing basic and applied multidisciplinary research and development with programmatic impact, and by recruiting and retaining science and technology leaders; (2) Create future opportunities and directions for LLNL and its major programs by growing new program areas and cutting-edge capabilities that are synergistic with, and supportive of, its national security mission; (3) Provide a direct conduit to the academic and high-tech industrial sectors for LLNL and its national security programs, through which the Laboratory gains access to frontier science and technology, and can impact the science and technology communities; (4) Leverage unique Laboratory capabilities, to advance the state universe. This inaugural PAT Annual Report begins a series that will chronicle our progress towards fulfilling this mission. I believe the report demonstrates that the PAT Directorate has a strong base of capabilities and accomplishments on which to build in meeting its goals. Some of the highlights

  1. Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors' selection criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Justin D; Hoffmann, Jeffrey D; Arrington, Edward D; Gerlinger, Tad L; Devine, John G; Belmont, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    Factors associated with successful selection in U.S. Army orthopaedic surgical programs are unreported. The current analysis includes survey data from all Army orthopaedic surgery residency program directors (PDs) to determine these factors. PDs at all Army orthopaedic surgery residency programs were provided 17 factors historically considered critical to successful selection and asked to rank order the factors as well as assign a level of importance to each. Results were collated and overall mean rankings are provided. PDs unanimously expressed that performance during the on-site orthopaedic surgery rotation at the individual program director's institution was most important. Respondents overwhelmingly reported that Steps 1 and 2 licensing exam scores were next most important, respectively. Survey data demonstrated that little importance was placed on letters of recommendation and personal statements. PDs made no discriminations based on allopathic or osteopathic degrees. The most important factors for Army orthopaedic surgery residency selection were clerkship performance at the individual PD's institution and licensing examination score performance. Army PDs consider both USMLE and COMLEX results, because Army programs have a higher percentage of successful osteopathic applicants.

  2. Developing Information on Energy Savings and Associated Costs and Benefits of Energy Efficient Emerging Technologies Applicable in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tengfang; Slaa, Jan Willem; Sathaye, Jayant

    2010-12-15

    Implementation and adoption of efficient end-use technologies have proven to be one of the key measures for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions throughout the industries. In many cases, implementing energy efficiency measures is among one of the most cost effective investments that the industry could make in improving efficiency and productivity while reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Over the years, there have been incentives to use resources and energy in a cleaner and more efficient way to create industries that are sustainable and more productive. With the working of energy programs and policies on GHG inventory and regulation, understanding and managing the costs associated with mitigation measures for GHG reductions is very important for the industry and policy makers around the world and in California. Successful implementation of applicable emerging technologies not only may help advance productivities, improve environmental impacts, or enhance industrial competitiveness, but also can play a significant role in climate-mitigation efforts by saving energy and reducing the associated GHG emissions. Developing new information on costs and savings benefits of energy efficient emerging technologies applicable in California market is important for policy makers as well as the industries. Therefore, provision of timely evaluation and estimation of the costs and energy savings potential of emerging technologies applicable to California is the focus of this report. The overall goal of the project is to identify and select a set of emerging and under-utilized energy-efficient technologies and practices as they are important to reduce energy consumption in industry while maintaining economic growth. Specifically, this report contains the results from performing Task 3 Technology Characterization for California Industries for the project titled Research Opportunities in Emerging and Under-Utilized Energy-Efficient Industrial Technologies, sponsored by

  3. Associations between male reproductive characteristics and the outcome of assisted reproductive technology (ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhangshun; Shi, Xiaohong; Wang, Lihong; Yang, Yan; Fu, Qiang; Tao, Minfang

    2017-06-30

    The present study was designed to investigate the relationships between indicators of male body mass index (BMI), age, reproductive hormone levels, semen parameters, and the outcomes of assisted reproductive technology (ART). The clinical data were collected from 636 couples who underwent ART between January, 2013 and December, 2015 at the reproductive center involved in our study. Pearson's correlation or Spearman rank correlation was applied to establish the relevant correlation coefficients. The correlation between influence factors' and pregnancy outcomes was analyzed using the Logistic regression model. Analyses were conducted using SPSS software. Male BMI was found to be negatively correlated with testosterone (T) ( P ART outcome. A higher male age was also negatively connected with the outcome of clinical pregnancy. Reproductive hormones were not associated with ART outcome. Sperm concentration and female age were important factors influencing ART clinical pregnancy, while the only significant factor influencing live birth was female age. Levels of obesity-related inflammatory indicators (i.e. free fatty acid (FFA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), human inhibin-B (IHNB), interleukin-1 (IL-1), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and reactive oxygen species (ROS)) also varied with degrees of BMI. The present study provides information on the associations between male reproductive characteristics and the outcome of ART, which may contribute to improved strategies to help couples achieve better pregnancy outcomes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. A new director for Arts@CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2015-01-01

    On 2 March 2015, Mónica Bello will take the reins of the Arts@CERN programme. A few days before taking over the new job, the curator and art critic talked to the CERN Bulletin about her interest in arts and science, her motivations for the job, and her plans for the future of the programme.   Mónica Bello. “The exciting nature of CERN almost demands an artistic programme like Arts@CERN,” says Mónica, former artistic director of VIDA (one of the most important competitions in digital and new media arts worldwide), who has recently been appointed as the new director of the Arts@CERN programme. “The programme is unique as it provides the artist not only with resources, but also with interesting scientific topics and a natural way for the artists to become involved. Thanks to this programme, artists can come to CERN, bring their individuality, and really benefit from the sharing experience with scientists.” Mónica,...

  5. An interview with the Director-General

    CERN Multimedia

    James Gillies

    2012-01-01

    At its March meeting, the Council took the step of extending Rolf Heuer’s mandate until the end of 2015. What can we expect from the extra two years?   Extensions to Director-General’s mandates are few and far between, with the last being for Herwig Schopper, who served an eight-year term in the 1980s. For Rolf Heuer, the proposal was raised by the Belgian delegation, so we asked delegate Walter Van Doninck why the Council felt that circumstances warranted an extension now. “We felt that the LHC's first long shutdown needed management continuity, given the important nature of the work to be carried out,” he explained. “That’s why we proposed extending the mandate of the current Director-General.” James Gillies spoke to Professor Heuer to find out what he plans to achieve with the extra time. James Gillies: First of all, how do you feel about your time in office so far? Rolf Heuer: I feel I’m about midwa...

  6. 24 February 2012 - Portuguese Minister for Education and Science N. Crato visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. The Minister is accompanied by Secretary of State for Science L. Parreira and LIP Director J.M. Gago. A. Henriques(ATLAS), C. Lourenço (CMS) and Adviser R. Voss accompany the delegation throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    On 24 February Nuno Crato, the Portuguese minister for education and science, left, toured the LHC superconducting-magnet test hall accompanied by Frédérick Bordry, CERN’s technology department head. He also took the opportunity to visit the underground experimental areas of ATLAS and CMS, and heard about the LHC Computing Grid Project before meeting Portuguese scientists working at CERN.

  7. Nuclear Systems (NS): Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nuclear Systems Project demonstrates nuclear power technology readiness to support the goals of NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate. To this end, the...

  8. Association between serum folate and vitamin B-12 and outcomes of assisted reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskins, Audrey J; Chiu, Yu-Han; Williams, Paige L; Ford, Jennifer B; Toth, Thomas L; Hauser, Russ; Chavarro, Jorge E

    2015-10-01

    Preconceptional folate and vitamin B-12 have been linked to beneficial reproductive outcomes in both natural pregnancies and those after assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment. The objective of the study was to evaluate the associations of serum folate and vitamin B-12 with ART outcomes. This analysis included a random sample of 100 women (154 ART cycles) participating in a prospective cohort study [Environment and Reproductive Health (EARTH)] at the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Center (2007-2013). Serum folate and vitamin B-12 were measured in blood samples collected between days 3 and 9 of treatment. Generalized estimating equations with adjustment for age, BMI, and race were used to evaluate the association of serum folate and vitamin B-12 with ART outcomes. Women in the highest quartile of serum folate (>26.3 ng/mL) had 1.62 (95% CI: 0.99, 2.65) times the probability of live birth compared with women in the lowest quartile (Women in the highest quartile of serum vitamin B-12 (>701 pg/mL) had 2.04 (95% CI: 1.14, 3.62) times the probability of live birth compared with women in the lowest quartile (women with serum folate and vitamin B-12 concentrations greater than the median had 1.92 (95% CI: 1.12, 3.29) times the probability of live birth compared with women with folate and vitamin B-12 concentrations less than or equal to the median. This translated into an adjusted difference in live birth rates of 26% (95% CI: 10%, 48%; P = 0.02). Higher serum concentrations of folate and vitamin B-12 before ART treatment were associated with higher live birth rates among a population exposed to folic acid fortification. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00011713. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. NASA Astrophysics Technology Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip

    2012-01-01

    July 2010, NASA Office of Chief Technologist (OCT) initiated an activity to create and maintain a NASA integrated roadmap for 15 key technology areas which recommend an overall technology investment strategy and prioritize NASA?s technology programs to meet NASA?s strategic goals. Science Instruments, Observatories and Sensor Systems(SIOSS) roadmap addresses technology needs to achieve NASA?s highest priority objectives -- not only for the Science Mission Directorate (SMD), but for all of NASA.

  10. Lander Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavers, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Since 2006 NASA has been formulating robotic missions to the lunar surface through programs and projects like the Robotic Lunar Exploration Program, Lunar Precursor Robotic Program, and International Lunar Network. All of these were led by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Due to funding shortfalls, the lunar missions associated with these efforts, the designs, were not completed. From 2010 to 2013, the Robotic Lunar Lander Development Activity was funded by the Science Mission Directorate (SMD) to develop technologies that would enable and enhance robotic lunar surface missions at lower costs. In 2013, a requirements-driven, low-cost robotic lunar lander concept was developed for the Resource Prospector Mission. Beginning in 2014, The Advanced Exploration Systems funded the lander team and established the MSFC, Johnson Space Center, Applied Physics Laboratory, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory team with MSFC leading the project. The lander concept to place a 300-kg rover on the lunar surface has been described in the New Technology Report Case Number MFS-33238-1. A low-cost lander concept for placing a robotic payload on the lunar surface is shown in figures 1 and 2. The NASA lander team has developed several lander concepts using common hardware and software to allow the lander to be configured for a specific mission need. In addition, the team began to transition lander expertise to United States (U.S.) industry to encourage the commercialization of space, specifically the lunar surface. The Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (CATALYST) initiative was started and the NASA lander team listed above is partnering with three competitively selected U.S. companies (Astrobotic, Masten Space Systems, and Moon Express) to develop, test, and operate their lunar landers.

  11. Medical directors' perspectives on strengthening hospital quality and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaway, Rachel; Bismark, Marie; Dunt, David; Kelaher, Margaret

    2017-10-09

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to understand the concerns and factors that impact on hospital quality and safety, particularly related to use of performance data, within a setting of devolved governance. Design/methodology/approach This qualitative study used thematic analysis of interviews with public hospital medical directors. For additional context, findings were framed by themes from a review of hospital safety and quality in the same jurisdiction. Findings Varying approaches and levels of complexity were described about what and how performance data are reviewed, prioritised, and quality improvements implemented. Although no consistent narrative emerged, facilitators of improvement were suggested relating to organisational culture, governance, resources, education, and technologies. These hospital-level perspectives articulate with and expand on the system-level themes in a state-wide review of hospital safety and quality. Research limitations/implications The findings are not generalisable, but point to an underlying absence of system-wide agreement on how to perceive, retrieve, analyse, prioritise and action hospital performance data. Practical implications Lack of electronic medical records and an inefficient incident reporting system limits the extent to which performance and incident data can be analysed, linked and shared, thus limiting hospital performance improvement, oversight and learning. Social implications Variable approaches to quality and safety, standards of care, and hospital record keeping and reporting, mean that healthcare consumers might expect inconsistency across Victorian hospitals. Originality/value The views of medical directors have been little researched. This work uses their voice to better understand contextual factors that situate and impact on hospital quality and safety towards understanding the mixed effectiveness of hospital quality improvement strategies.

  12. Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-31

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

  13. Evaluating Patient Empowerment in Association With eHealth Technology: Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risling, Tracie; Martinez, Juan; Young, Jeremy; Thorp-Froslie, Nancy

    2017-09-29

    The prioritization of sustainable patient-centered care in contemporary health care has resulted in an increased focus on patient empowerment, which in turn is considered to facilitate patient independence, self-management, and self-efficacy. However, a definitional consensus of empowerment remains elusive, impeding efforts to translate the conceptual ideals of empowerment into a measurable entity associated with changes in health care behavior or outcomes. The rapid integration of technology in health care serves to add another layer of complexity in the measurability and operationalization of empowerment and helps to create a specific context in which this conceptual entity should be further examined. The primary objective of this scoping review was to explore the concept of patient empowerment within the electronic health (eHealth) context. A further focus on the association or measurement of this concept in conjunction with tethered patient portal use was also employed. In this scoping review, a six-step framework was used to guide the search and paper selection process. The review was initiated with two broad research questions, which are as follows: (1) What is the relationship between empowerment and the use of eHealth technologies from a patient perspective? (2) How is patient empowerment (and/or engagement or activation) influenced by accessing personal health information through a tethered patient portal? Multiple databases were employed in a comprehensive search strategy, and papers were primarily evaluated and selected for inclusion by 2 review authors, and a third author was consulted to resolve any issues in reaching consensus. From an initial count of 1387 publications, this review returned nine systematic or literature review papers and 19 empirical studies that pertained to patient empowerment (and/or engagement and activation) in relation to the use of tethered patient portals providing access to electronic health records (EHRs). Of the 19

  14. Risk of Ectopic Pregnancy Associated With Assisted Reproductive Technology in the United States, 2001–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Kiran M.; Boulet, Sheree L.; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess national trends in ectopic pregnancy incidence among assisted reproductive technology users and identify risk factors associated with ectopic pregnancy. METHODS We identified 553,577 pregnancies reported to the National ART Surveillance System between 2001 and 2011. Of those, 9,480 were ectopic, of which 485 were heterotopic. As a result of small numbers, ectopic and heterotopic pregnancies were combined for analysis. We assessed temporal trends in annual ectopic pregnancy rates using Poisson regression. We used log-binomial regression models with generalized estimating equations for correlated outcomes within clinics to calculate unadjusted and adjusted risk ratios for the association between ectopic pregnancy and selected patient characteristics and treatment factors. RESULTS The rate of ectopic pregnancy declined from 2.0% (n5735, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9–2.2) in 2001 to 1.6% (n=968, 95% CI 1.5–1.7) in 2011 (P for trend ,.001). The ectopic pregnancy rate ranged from 2.0% (n=7,469, 95% CI 1.9–2.0) for fresh, nondonor cycles to 1.0% (n=641, 95% CI 0.9–1.1) for fresh, donor cycles. Among fresh, nondonor cycles, the rate of ectopic pregnancy was 1.6% (95% CI 1.4–1.7) when one embryo was transferred compared with 1.7% (95% CI 1.7–1.8), 2.2% (95% CI 2.1–2.3), and 2.5% (95% CI 2.4–2.6) when two, three, or four or more embryos were transferred, respectively (adjusted risk ratios 1.11, 95% CI 0.94–0.30; 1.33, 95% CI 1.12–1.56; and 1.49, 95% CI 1.25–1.78). CONCLUSION Ectopic pregnancy incidence after assisted reproductive technology has decreased over time, but factors such as multiple embryo transfer increase the risk of ectopic pregnancy. PMID:25560107

  15. 4th July 2011 - Russian Deputy Director-General Director of Directorate for Scientific and Technical Complex ROSATOM V. Pershukov in the ATLAS underground experimental area with Adviser T. Kurtyka, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Russian users.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    4th July 2011 - Russian Deputy Director-General Director of Directorate for Scientific and Technical Complex ROSATOM V. Pershukov in the ATLAS underground experimental area with Adviser T. Kurtyka, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Russian users.

  16. Relationship between gender in the board of directors and the audit committee with the audit delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Antonio Lay

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study verified the relationship between the gender in the composition of the board of directors and the audit committee with the audit delay. The survey sample consisted of 75 companies belonging to the IBrX 100 index. The variables surveyed were the presence of women on the board of directors and on the audit committee, size of the audit committee, independence of the board of directors, expertise, company size, debt, size of the audit firm and audit fees. Data collection took place in the Reference Form and the Economática® database. Data analysis was performed using descriptive statistics and multiple linear regression using SPSS® software. It was found that the presence of women is greater on the board than on the audit committee, with a small number of experienced members. The results showed that the presence of women on the audit committee has a negative and significant association with the audit delay, that is, the presence of women in this organism of corporate governance contributes to the reduction of the period of disclosure of the auditor's report. In addition, the size of the company and the independence of the board of directors were also important in the final model in relation to the audit delay. The presence of women on the board of directors was not significant with the delay in the audit.

  17. A Study of Self-Perceived Transformational Leadership Behaviors of Special Education Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristen E.

    2014-01-01

    The special education director is responsible for a myriad of responsibilities related to the education of students with disabilities. Little is known about the leadership behaviors associated with this position. Considerable research has been done to document the many benefits of transformational leadership behaviors on organizational climate and…

  18. Factors other than environmental issues influence resource allocation decisions of school foodservice directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackes, B L; Shanklin, C W

    1999-08-01

    To identify resource allocation decisions and policies and procedures used by school foodservice directors that were based on the concepts of pollution prevention, product stewardship, and sustainable development. A questionnaire about operational characteristics (including equipment and production systems, menu selection and service style) and environmental issues was mailed to school foodservice directors. Subjects were school foodservice directors in major cities who were members of the American School Food Service Association. Of the 389 questionnaires mailed, 168 (45.5%) were returned and used for data analysis. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, and correlation were used to analyze data. Cost factors were rated more important (P pollution prevention, product stewardship, and sustainable development practices. Recycling and energy conservation programs and use of locally grown food products would minimize the environmental impact of school foodservice operations while reducing operational costs.

  19. 23rd October 2010 - UNESCO Director-General I. Bokova signing the Guest Book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1010244 37: in the SM18 hall: Ms Jasmina Sopova, Communication Officer J. Sopova; Director, Division of Basic & Engineering Sciences M. Nalecz, Assistant Director-General for the Natural Sciences G. Kalonji; Former CERN Director-General H. Schopper, CERN Head of Education R. Landua; UNESCO Director-General I. Bokova; CERN Adviser M. Bona; CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and UNESCO Office in Geneva Director Luis M. Tiburcio.

  20. Assisted reproductive technologies are associated with cardiovascular remodeling in utero that persists postnatally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela-Alcaraz, Brenda; Crispi, Fàtima; Bijnens, Bart; Cruz-Lemini, Monica; Creus, Montserrat; Sitges, Marta; Bartrons, Joaquim; Civico, Salvadora; Balasch, Juan; Gratacós, Eduard

    2013-09-24

    Assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) have been shown to be associated with general vascular dysfunction in late childhood. However, it is unknown whether cardiac remodeling is also present and if these changes already manifest in prenatal life. Our aim was to assess fetal and infant (6 months of age) cardiovascular function in ART pregnancies. This prospective cohort study included 100 fetuses conceived by ART and 100 control pregnancies. ART fetuses showed signs of cardiovascular remodeling, including a more globular heart with thicker myocardial walls, decreased longitudinal function (tricuspid ring displacement in controls: median, 6.5 mm [interquartile range, 6.1-7.1 mm]; tricuspid ring displacement in ART: 5.5 mm [interquartile range, 5.1-6.1]; Pinterquartile range, 1.2-1.5 cm(2)]; atrial area in ART, 1.6 cm(2) [interquartile range, 1.3-1.8 cm(2)]; Pinterquartile range, 67-83 mm Hg]; systolic blood pressure in ART, 83 mm Hg [interquartile range, 75-94 mm Hg]; Pinterquartile range, 0.45-0.56 mm]; aortic intima-media thickness in ART, 0.64 mm [interquartile range, 0.62-0.67]; P<0.001). We could not demonstrate that our findings were directly caused by ART because of their association with various confounding factors, including intrauterine growth restriction or factors related to the cause of infertility. Children conceived by ART manifest cardiac and vascular remodeling that is present in fetal life and persists in postnatal life, suggesting opportunities for early detection and potential intervention. The underlying mechanisms and the effect of potential confounders such as growth restriction or prematurity remain to be elucidated.

  1. Identifying patient safety problems associated with information technology in general practice: an analysis of incident reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrabi, Farah; Liaw, Siaw Teng; Arachi, Diana; Runciman, William; Coiera, Enrico; Kidd, Michael R

    2016-11-01

    To identify the categories of problems with information technology (IT), which affect patient safety in general practice. General practitioners (GPs) reported incidents online or by telephone between May 2012 and November 2013. Incidents were reviewed against an existing classification for problems associated with IT and the clinical process impacted. 87 GPs across Australia. Types of problems, consequences and clinical processes. GPs reported 90 incidents involving IT which had an observable impact on the delivery of care, including actual patient harm as well as near miss events. Practice systems and medications were the most affected clinical processes. Problems with IT disrupted clinical workflow, wasted time and caused frustration. Issues with user interfaces, routine updates to software packages and drug databases, and the migration of records from one package to another generated clinical errors that were unique to IT; some could affect many patients at once. Human factors issues gave rise to some errors that have always existed with paper records but are more likely to occur and cause harm with IT. Such errors were linked to slips in concentration, multitasking, distractions and interruptions. Problems with patient identification and hybrid records generated errors that were in principle no different to paper records. Problems associated with IT include perennial risks with paper records, but additional disruptions in workflow and hazards for patients unique to IT, occasionally affecting multiple patients. Surveillance for such hazards may have general utility, but particularly in the context of migrating historical records to new systems and software updates to existing systems. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  2. INTERFIRM COOPERATION AND INFORMATION SHARING THROUGH INTERLOCKING DIRECTORATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Belal UDDIN

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available When firms engage in cooperative efforts, interfirm relations get particular interest to be studied. A direct interlock occurs when an executive or director of one firm sits on the board of another firm, and an indirect interlock occurs when two firms have directors or executives who sit on the board of a third firm. The three commonly used theoretical models such as social network theory, learning theory, and theory of strategic choice are more relevant for the formation and management of interlocking directorates. Uncertainty, resource scarcity, mutual trust, dependency, etc. influence the formation of interlocking directorates. Consequently, interlocking directorates allow sharing of information and overall cooperation between partners through learning, collaboration, networking, and effective relationship, etc. Proper management of interlocking directorates requires communication and collaboration among partners that enhance exchange of knowledge and cooperation.

  3. Association between feeling upon awakening and use of information technology devices in Japanese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yusuke; Tanabe, Tsuyoshi; Kobayashi-Miura, Mikiko; Amano, Hiroki; Yamaguchi, Natsu; Kamura, Masanori; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the relationship between feeling upon awakening (FA) and time spent using information technology (IT) devices by children in kindergartens, elementary schools, and junior high schools in Shimane, Japan. In October 2008, a self-report survey was distributed to 2075 children in kindergartens (n = 261), elementary schools (n = 1162), and junior high schools (n = 652) in Shimane, Japan. The questionnaire gathered data on sex, school year, feeling upon awakening, and time spent using IT devices after school (television, videos on television, video games, personal computers, and cellular phones). After adjusting for sex and school year, data were analyzed by multivariate logistic regression analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 2030 children completed this survey (response rate, 97.8%). Negative FA was associated with watching television more than 2 hours/day (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.23-1.85), playing video games more than 30 minutes/day (1.50, 1.20-1.87), and using personal computers more than 30 minutes/day (1.35, 1.04-1.75). Time spent using IT devices affected the FA of children in kindergarten through junior high school. We propose the development of guidelines regarding the appropriate amount of time this population should spend using IT devices.

  4. The use of CRISPR/Cas associated technologies for cell transplant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Peter J

    2016-10-01

    In this review, I will summarize recent developments in the use of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) genome editing system for cell transplant applications, ranging from transplantation of corrected autologous patient stem cells to treat inherited diseases, to the tailoring of donor pigs for cell xenotransplantation. Rational engineering of the Cas9 nuclease to improve its specificity will also be discussed. Over the past year, CRISPR/Cas9 has been used in preclinical studies to correct mutations in a rapidly increasing spectrum of diseases including hematological, neuromuscular, and respiratory disorders. The growing popularity of CRISPR/Cas9 over earlier genome editing platforms is partly due to its ease of use and flexibility, which is evident from the success of complex manipulations such as specific deletion of up to 725 kb in patient-derived stem cells, and simultaneous disruption of up to 62 endogenous retrovirus loci in pig cells. In addition, high-fidelity variants of Cas9 with greatly increased specificity are now available. CRISPR/Cas9 is a fast-evolving technology that is likely to have a significant impact on autologous, allogeneic, and xenogeneic cell transplantation.

  5. 75 FR 2555 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Technology Advisory Committee will meet January 26-28, 2010, at the Department of Homeland Security, 1120..., Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane, Bldg. 410... Burse, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane, Bldg. 410...

  6. Postdramatic Theatre of Director Christoph Marthaler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arina R. Shevchenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the main tendencies of modern European theatre represented in the creativity of a famous Swiss director Christoph Marthaler. Drama and theatre of the end of the 20th – the beginning of the 21st century were exposed to radical transformation. This change has been reflected in the theory of postdramatic theatre. A contemporary theatre is becoming more visual. Nowadays natural theatrical synthesis of various arts – visual, plastic, verbal, musical becomes an intersection of all kinds of artistic and medial practices as it has never been before. The new drama and theatre decline mimesis as the main principle of attitude to reality, they do not depict and do not reflect life, but strive to create a magic and/or ritual space of performative living and a special type of communication with audience. These peculiarities of modern theatre get a vivid evocation in the works of Christoph Marthaler. Having entered into theatre from music, the director creates his own unique language of art. The article proves that Marthaler’s works are an individual model of postdramatic theatre. The author concludes that its main distinctive feature is to blur the border between musical and dramatic performance. Marthaler does not stage the play – the images appear from musical phrases, fleeting impressions, observations and dramatic improvisations. The analysis enables to claim that the theatre in a real process of performance replaces the mimetic acting today. The applied principles of drama analysis can be used in studying of the other contemporary postdramatic theatre’s models.

  7. Directors in British and Irish cinema 

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, R. P.

    2006-01-01

    Directors in British and Irish Cinema is an assessment of the careers and achievements of over a thousand directors, most of whom have received little scholarly attention. It draws upon the expertise of over sixty contributors. Each of the 1028 entries has been provided with a comprehensive filmography (which for some of the silent film directors includes over a hundred films). Comprehensive coverage have made it a standard reference work. Collaboration with the BFI-based website Screenonli...

  8. Council appoints CERN’s next Director General

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    On 14 December 2007, CERN Council appointed Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer to succeed Dr Robert Aymar as CERN Director General. Professor Heuer will serve a five-year term, taking office on 1 January 2009. From Left to right: Dr Robert Aymar, current CERN Director General, Professor Torsten Åkesson, President of CERN Council, and Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN's next Director General.

  9. Technology Access and Use, and Their Associations With Social Engagement Among Older Adults: Do Women and Men Differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeehoon; Lee, Hee Yun; Christensen, M Candace; Merighi, Joseph R

    2017-09-01

    To examine how information and communication technology (ICT) access and use are conceptually incorporated in the Successful Aging 2.0 framework. Using data from the 2011 National Health and Aging Trends Study (N = 6,476), we examined how ICT access and use for different purposes are associated with social engagement (i.e., informal and formal social participation) by gender. Weighted logistic regression analyses were performed. Findings revealed that men were more likely to access and use ICT than women. ICT access was positively associated with all types of women's social engagement, but only with men's informal social participation. Information technology (IT) use for health matters was positively associated with formal social participation for women and with informal social participation for men. IT use for personal tasks was negatively associated with formal social participation for older adults. Communication technology use was positively associated with formal and informal social participation for women and men. This study supports the expansion of the successful aging model by incorporating ICT access and use. Further, it assists in the identification of specific technologies that promote active engagement in later life for women and men. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes associated with underlying diagnosis with and without assisted reproductive technology treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Judy E; Luke, Barbara; Tobias, Michael; Gopal, Daksha; Hornstein, Mark D; Diop, Hafsatou

    2015-06-01

    To compare the risks for adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes by diagnoses with and without assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatment to non-ART pregnancies in fertile women. Historical cohort of Massachusetts vital records linked to ART clinic data from Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology Clinic Outcome Reporting System. Not applicable. Diagnoses included male factor (ART only), endometriosis, ovulation disorders, tubal (ART only), and reproductive inflammatory disorders (non-ART only). Pregnancies resulting in singleton and twin live births from 2004 to 2008 were linked to hospital discharges in women who had ART treatment (n = 3,689), women with no ART treatment in the current pregnancy (n = 4,098), and non-ART pregnancies in fertile women (n = 297,987). None. Risks of gestational diabetes, prenatal hospitalizations, prematurity, low birth weight, and small for gestational age were modeled using multivariate logistic regression with fertile deliveries as the reference group adjusted for maternal age, race/ethnicity, education, chronic hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and plurality (adjusted odds ratios [AORs] and 95% confidence intervals [CIs]). Risk of prenatal hospital admissions was increased for endometriosis (ART: 1.97, 1.38-2.80; non-ART: 3.34, 2.59-4.31), ovulation disorders (ART: 2.31, 1.81-2.96; non-ART: 2.56, 2.05-3.21), tubal factor (ART: 1.51, 1.14-2.01), and reproductive inflammation (non-ART: 2.79, 2.47-3.15). Gestational diabetes was increased for women with ovulation disorders (ART: 2.17, 1.72-2.73; non-ART: 1.94, 1.52-2.48). Preterm delivery (AORs, 1.24-1.93) and low birth weight (AORs, 1.27-1.60) were increased in all groups except in endometriosis with ART. The findings indicate substantial excess perinatal morbidities associated with underlying infertility-related diagnoses in both ART-treated and non-ART-treated women. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Impacts of electromagnetic fields associated with marine and hydrokinetic surrogate technologies on fish movements and behaviors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claisse, Jeremy T. [Vantuna Research Group, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Pondella, Daniel J. [Vantuna Research Group, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Williams, Chelsea M. [Vantuna Research Group, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zahn, Laurel A. [Vantuna Research Group, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Williams, Jonathan P. [Vantuna Research Group, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) and offshore wind devices are being developed and deployed in U.S. and international waters. Electric current flowing through subsea transmission cables associated with these devices will generate electromagnetic fields (EMF), which may interact with, and potentially impact, marine fishes. Some marine fishes can detect electric and/or magnetic fields and use them to navigate, orientate, and sense prey, mates and predators. Over the past five years there have been multiple comprehensive reviews and studies evaluating the potential vulnerability of marine fishes to EMF produced by MHK devices. Most documented effects involve sub-lethal behavioral responses of individual fish when in close proximity to EMF (e.g., fish being repelled by or attracted to fields). These reviews reach conclusions that the current state of research on this topic is still in its infancy and evaluations of potential impacts are associated with great uncertainty. A variety of MHK technologies are likely to be considered for deployment offshore of the Hawaiian Islands, and there is a need to be able to better predict and assess potential associated environmental impacts. The goal of this study was to provide a complementary piece to these previous reviews (e.g., Normandeau et al. 2011) by focusing on marine fish species in the Hawaii region. We compiled the relevant available information, then prioritized fish species as candidates for various paths of future research. To address this, we first developed a list of Hawaii Region Focal Species, which included fishes that are more likely to be sensitive to EMF. We then compiled species-specific information available in the literature on their sensitivity to EMF, as well as life history, movement and habitat use information that could inform an analysis of their likelihood of encountering EMF from subsea cables associated with MHK devices. Studies have only documented EMF sensitivity in 11 of the marine fish

  12. Floating nuclear power plants and associated technologies in the Northern areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdall, M.; Standring, W.J.F.

    2008-12-01

    etc. varies considerably. The design currently of most relevance, that of the KLT-40S based Academician Lomonosov, is a non-propelled barge like vessel featuring facilities for onboard waste storage, fresh fuel and SNF storage. Areas of concern regarding the development, use and export of FNPP technologies as well as the advent of a nuclear industry based upon them are numerous. The presence of new nuclear power generation facilities in the northern regions will affect the risk of accidents and incidents that may impact upon human health, environmental quality and the socio-economic aspects of the region that have proved and continue to be vulnerable to actual and potential radioactive contamination. The transport of nuclear materials in and out of the region as part of an export based FNPP industry as well as the situation regarding land based industrial nuclear facilities required to support such an industry and the associated risks are also a matter of obvious concern. (Author)

  13. Professor Andrzej Budzanowski, Director General, Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics (HNINP) Poland. Dr. Grzegorz Polok, Deputy Director

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    Andrzej Budzanowski, Director-General of the Cracow Institute of Nuclear Physics (HNINP) and Lyn Evans, LHC Project Leader, signing the collaboration agreement. In the background, from leftto right : Grzegorz Polok, Deputy Director-General of the Cracow Institute of Nuclear Physics, Blazej Skoczen, in charge of the LHC cryomagnet interconnections, Claude Détraz, Director for Fixed Target and Future Programmes, Alain Poncet, AT/CRI Group Leader.

  14. Assessing the Economic and Environmental Impacts Associated with Current Street Lighting Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    lamps are a relatively new lighting technology for street lighting, the principles behind the technology date to the 1890s when Nikolas Tesla ...demonstrated the transfer of power to electrodeless incandescent and fluorescent bulbs (Roberts, 2009). Tesla was granted patent 454,622 to cover an early

  15. Ethical Issues Associated with Information and Communication Technology in Counseling and Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, James P., Jr.; Makela, Julia Panke

    2014-01-01

    For more than 50 years, literature on the use of information and communication technology in counseling and guidance has presented ethical issues related to the development and use of technologies in practice. This paper reviews the ethical issues raised, organizing them into three categories: Social equity, resources, and services. Career…

  16. Institutions, technology and water control; water users associations and irrigation management reform in two large-scale systems in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narain, V.

    2003-01-01

    Few studies of resource management have paid as much attention or intelligently surveyed the operational aspects of Water User Associations (WUAs) as Institutions, Technology and Water Control. The implementation of WUAs policies, argues this pioneering study, is shaped by the aspirations of its

  17. POLICY ANALYSIS OF PRODUCED WATER ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH IN-SITU THERMAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Keiter; John Ruple; Heather Tanana

    2011-02-01

    Commercial scale oil shale and oil sands development will require water, the amount of which will depend on the technologies adopted and the scale of development that occurs. Water in oil shale and oil sands country is already in scarce supply, and because of the arid nature of the region and limitations on water consumption imposed by interstate compacts and the Endangered Species Act, the State of Utah normally does not issue new water rights in oil shale or oil sands rich areas. Prospective oil shale and oil sands developers that do not already hold adequate water rights can acquire water rights from willing sellers, but large and secure water supplies may be difficult and expensive to acquire, driving oil shale and oil sands developers to seek alternative sources of supply. Produced water is one such potential source of supply. When oil and gas are developed, operators often encounter ground water that must be removed and disposed of to facilitate hydrocarbon extraction. Water produced through mineral extraction was traditionally poor in quality and treated as a waste product rather than a valuable resource. However, the increase in produced water volume and the often-higher quality water associated with coalbed methane development have drawn attention to potential uses of produced water and its treatment under appropriations law. This growing interest in produced water has led to litigation and statutory changes that must be understood and evaluated if produced water is to be harnessed in the oil shale and oil sands development process. Conversely, if water is generated as a byproduct of oil shale and oil sands production, consideration must be given to how this water will be disposed of or utilized in the shale oil production process. This report explores the role produced water could play in commercial oil shale and oil sands production, explaining the evolving regulatory framework associated with produced water, Utah water law and produced water regulation

  18. Los directores aprendiendo de sus maestros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Ortega Muñoz

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo de investigación está enmarcado dentro de la línea de indagación Aprendizaje para la Gestión y versa sobre los principales aprendizajes que han adquirido los directivos de educación básica del estado de Durango, México, para el mejor ejercicio de su función. Desde un estudio de narrativa, se recopilaron historias de 16 directores de educación primaria estatal pertenecientes a la zona escolar 24 del sector educativo no. 1 de la Secretaría de Educación Pública. El análisis de los datos se llevó a cabo mediante la herramienta de análisis de información cualitativa Atlas ti versión 7.5. Los hallazgos de la investigación muestran que los principales aprendizajes que los directivos de educación básica del estado de Durango, México han adquirido de sus maestros para el mejor ejercicio de su función son dos: a el trabajo en equipo, del cual se desprenden componentes como una eficaz y eficiente organización del trabajo, el trabajar siempre en colaboración y tener la mejor de las actitudes para trabajar; y b el liderazgo compartido, aspecto en que se perciben elementos como el óptimo manejo y resolución de conflictos, el liderazgo y la toma de decisiones en conjunto por parte del colectivo escolar. Abstract This research paper, framed within the line of inquiry Learning Management, deals with the main lessons that have acquired the management of basic education in the state of Durango, Mexico, for the best performance of their duties, from a study of narrative histories of 16 directors of state primary education outside the school zone 24 the education sector 1 of the Ministry of Education. The data analysis was performed using the computer statistical package you Atlas ti version 7.5. The research findings show that there are two main lessons that have acquired the management of basic education in the state of Durango, Mexico from their teachers for the better performance of their function: a teamwork

  19. Teaching and assessment of ethics and professionalism: a survey of pediatric program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Alyssa F; Sobotka, Sarah A; Ross, Lainie F

    2013-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires residency programs to provide instruction in and evaluation of competency in ethics and professionalism. We examined current practices and policies in ethics and professionalism in pediatric training programs, utilization of newly available resources on these topics, and recent concerns about professional behavior raised by social media. From May to August 2012, members of the Association of Pediatric Program Directors identified as categorical program directors in the APPD database were surveyed regarding ethics and professionalism practices in their programs, including structure of their curricula, methods of trainee assessment, use of nationally available resources, and policies regarding social media. The response rate was 61% (122 of 200). Most pediatric programs continue to teach ethics and professionalism in an unstructured manner. Many pediatric program directors are unaware of available ethics and professionalism resources. Although most programs lack rigorous evaluation of trainee competency in ethics and professionalism, 30% (35 of 116) of program directors stated they had not allowed a trainee to graduate or sit for an examination because of unethical or unprofessional conduct. Most programs do not have formal policies regarding social media use by trainees, and expectations vary widely. Pediatric training programs are slowly adopting the educational mandates for ethics and professionalism instruction. Resources now exist that can facilitate curriculum development in both traditional content areas such as informed consent and privacy as well as newer content areas such as social media use. Copyright © 2013 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Role of Program Directors in Treatment Practices: The Case of Methadone Dose Patterns in U.S. Outpatient Opioid Agonist Treatment Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Jemima A; Shiu-Yee, Karen; D'Aunno, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    To describe changes in characteristics of directors of outpatient opioid agonist treatment (OAT) programs, and to examine the association between directors' characteristics and low methadone dosage. Repeated cross-sectional surveys of OAT programs in the United States from 1995 to 2011. We used generalized linear regression models to examine associations between directors' characteristics and methadone dose, adjusting for program and patient factors. Data were collected through telephone surveys of program directors. The proportion of OAT programs with an African American director declined over time, from 29 percent in 1995 to 16 percent in 2011. The median percentage of patients in each program receiving methadone doses than other programs. This association was even stronger in programs with an African American director who served populations with higher percentages of African American patients. Demographic characteristics of OAT program directors (e.g., their race) may play a key role in explaining variations in methadone dosage across programs and patients. Further research should investigate the causal pathways through which directors' characteristics affect treatment practices. This may lead to new, multifaceted managerial interventions to improve patient outcomes. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  1. 12 CFR 7.2002 - Director or attorney as proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Director or attorney as proxy. 7.2002 Section 7... OPERATIONS Corporate Practices § 7.2002 Director or attorney as proxy. Any person or group of persons, except the bank's officers, clerks, tellers, or bookkeepers, may be designated to act as proxy. The bank's...

  2. The effect of remuneration committees, directors' shareholding and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research on which this article is based investigated whether executive directors' remuneration of the Top 100 companies listed on the Johannesburg Securities Exchange (JSE) is infl uenced by the implementation of certain corrective corporate governance measures. The remuneration of executive directors was ...

  3. 76 FR 58303 - Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ..., Washington, DC 20005. STATUS: Open. CONTACT PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate... Directors Minutes III. Approval of the Special Board of Directors Minutes IV. Approval of the Corporate Administration Committee Minutes V. Approval of the Finance, Budget and Program Committee Minutes VI. Approval of...

  4. 78 FR 69927 - SJI Board of Directors Meeting, Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-21

    ... STATE JUSTICE INSTITUTE SJI Board of Directors Meeting, Notice AGENCY: State Justice Institute. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The SJI Board of Directors will be meeting on Monday, December 9, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at the 9th Judicial Circuit of Florida in Orlando, Florida...

  5. Enhancing Child Care Quality by Director Training and Collegial Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Gillian; Ferguson, Tammy McCormick; Ressler, Glory; Lomotey, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable evidence confirms that a director with good leadership and administrative skills is vital for developing and sustaining a high quality child care program, many directors assume the role with little management experience or training. This paper reports on a training program in Canada that combined a formal curriculum to…

  6. The Role of Programme Directors as Academic Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milburn, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study investigates the academic leadership roles and responsibilities performed by programme directors in higher education (also known as programme leaders or course leaders). It will be argued there has been a lack of recognition and research into the leadership role for programme directors, attention instead focusing on…

  7. Plan director de seguridad de la información

    OpenAIRE

    Larrahondo Nuñez, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Elaboración de un plan director de seguridad de la información para una empresa del sector financiero. Elaboració d'un pla director de seguretat de la informació per a una empresa del sector financer. Master thesis for the Computer science program on Computer security.

  8. 19 CFR 146.2 - Port director as Board representative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FOREIGN TRADE ZONES General Provisions § 146.2 Port director as Board representative. The appropriate port director shall be in charge of the zone as the representative of the Board. [T.D. 86-16, 51 FR 5049, Feb. 11, 1986, as amended by T.D. 99-27, 64 FR 13676, Mar. 22, 1999] ...

  9. 36 CFR 901.3 - Board of directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Board of directors. 901.3 Section 901.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION BYLAWS OF THE CORPORATION § 901.3 Board of directors. (a) Powers and responsibilities. The business, property...

  10. Food Recall Attitudes and Behaviors of School Nutrition Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisamore, Amber; Roberts, Kevin R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore school nutrition directors' attitudes and behaviors about food recalls. Specific objectives included: 1) Determine current food recall attitudes and the relationship between demographics and these attitudes; 2) Determine current practices of school nutrition directors related to…

  11. Director and Officer Liability in the Zone of Insolvency; A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is the duty of the directors of a company to run the business of the company in the best interests of the company and its shareholders. In principle, the company, alone, is responsible for the debts incurred in the running of the company and the creditors are, in principle, precluded from looking to the directors or ...

  12. A systematic review of the technology-based assessment of visual perception and exploration behaviour in association football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuckian, Thomas B; Cole, Michael H; Pepping, Gert-Jan

    2018-04-01

    To visually perceive opportunities for action, athletes rely on the movements of their eyes, head and body to explore their surrounding environment. To date, the specific types of technology and their efficacy for assessing the exploration behaviours of association footballers have not been systematically reviewed. This review aimed to synthesise the visual perception and exploration behaviours of footballers according to the task constraints, action requirements of the experimental task, and level of expertise of the athlete, in the context of the technology used to quantify the visual perception and exploration behaviours of footballers. A systematic search for papers that included keywords related to football, technology, and visual perception was conducted. All 38 included articles utilised eye-movement registration technology to quantify visual perception and exploration behaviour. The experimental domain appears to influence the visual perception behaviour of footballers, however no studies investigated exploration behaviours of footballers in open-play situations. Studies rarely utilised representative stimulus presentation or action requirements. To fully understand the visual perception requirements of athletes, it is recommended that future research seek to validate alternate technologies that are capable of investigating the eye, head and body movements associated with the exploration behaviours of footballers during representative open-play situations.

  13. 40 CFR 125.98 - As the Director, what must I do to comply with the requirements of this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... reservoirs release water from deeper bottom layers). As the Director, you must coordinate with appropriate... materials and monitoring data to determine whether new or revised requirements for design and construction... evaluate the performance of the design and construction technologies, operational measures, and/or...

  14. A Multilevel Association Model for IT Employees’ Life Stress and Job Satisfaction: An Information Technology (IT Industry Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmood Khalid

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the association among IT employees’ life stress and job satisfaction in information technology (IT firms. Data on 250 IT employees’ in 30 working groups was obtained from 10 Information Technology (IT Chinese firms from Beijing, and analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling (HLM. Results found momentous association among life stress of IT employees’ and their job satisfaction at an individual-level and group-level in IT firms. Furthermore, life stress in Beijing at group-level moderates the association among job satisfaction and IT employees’ life stress at an individual-level. Finally, limitations and implications of the present study are also discussed.

  15. ABOUT APPLICATION OF TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT OF ASSOCIATIVE AND CREATIVE THINKING ON MATHEMATICSLESSONS USING ICT AND MODERN GADGETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А П Кухтинова

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research deals with the use of technology of associative - visual thinking development on Maths lessons with using ICT and modern gadgets. The various approaches defining the notion “the associative visual thinking” have been outlined and considerable features of the notion have been described. The work also gives a valuable information on the practical results of the use of this technology on Maths lessons confirming the facts of increasing positive dynamics of learning the material and the high rise of the quality of students’ learning.By results of questioning a tendency to digestion of new material at mathematics lessons by means of associative and figurative thinking, and application of ICT and modern gadgets come to light. It allows to create at school students skills of independent mastering knowledge, search, data collection and processing on the Internet.

  16. JSC Director's Discretionary Fund 1992 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Lyle (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    Annual report of the Johnson Space Center Director's Discretionary Fund documenting effective use of resources. The $1,694,000 funding for FY92 was distributed among 27 projects. The projects are an overall aid to the NASA mission, as well as providing development opportunities for the science and engineering staff with eventual spinoff to commercial uses. Projects described include space-based medical research such as the use of stable isotopes of deuterium and oxygen to measure crew energy use and techniques for noninvasive motion sickness medication. Recycling essentials for space crew support is conducted in the Regenerative Life Support and the Hybrid Regenerative Water Recovery test beds. Two-phase fluid flow simulated under low-gravity conditions, hypervelocity particle impact on open mesh bumpers, and microcalorimetry to measure the long-term hydrazine/material compatibility were investigated. A patent application was made on a shape-memory-alloy release nut. Computer estimate of crew accommodations for advanced concepts was demonstrated. Training techniques were evaluated using multimedia and virtual environment. Upgrades of an electronic still camera provide high resolution images from orbit are presented.

  17. Marketing perspectives of hospital pharmacy directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauer, D W; Pathak, D S

    1983-06-01

    The familiarity of hospital pharmacy directors (HPDs) with various marketing concepts for the development of pharmaceutical services was assessed. A questionnaire was designed to assess whether (1) HPDs seek input from relevant publics when evaluating or designing pharmaceutical services; (2) HPDs use marketing concepts in the development and implementation of pharmaceutical programs; and (3) marketing perspectives of HPDs differ depending on their institutional affiliations and personal characteristics. The questionnaire was sent to 320 HPDs in seven states. A total of 158 unable questionnaires were received. In response to the questions concerning input from relevant publics, HPDs agreed that they should seek input from all relevant publics with the exception of third-party agencies and patients. HPDs put more emphasis on obtaining information for evaluating existing programs and designing long-term plans from physicians, nurses, patients, and hospital administrators and less emphasis on understanding the needs of third-party agencies. HPDs seem to use marketing concepts in the development and implementation of pharmaceutical programs. HPDs indicated a clear perception of pharmacy goals, target segments among relevant publics, and a dynamic orientation toward changes in the health-care marketplace. Hospital size, level of pharmaceutical education, and years of administrative experience were found to influence the marketing perspectives of HPDs. HPDs were familiar with marketing concepts, and a favorable climate seems to exist for transferring marketing approaches to the hospital pharmacy setting.

  18. Mobile technology dominates school children's IT use in an advantaged school community and is associated with musculoskeletal and visual symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straker, Leon; Harris, Courtenay; Joosten, John; Howie, Erin K

    2018-05-01

    This paper describes the contemporary use of information technology devices by children in a socio-educationally advantaged school. A sample of 924 children (50% girls) from grades 5 to 12 (ages 10-19 years) completed an online survey in class. Total daily technology use was high and similar for girls (mean 219 (SD 148) mins/day) and boys (207 (142), p=.186). Tablet computer was the dominant device used in grades 5-9, with laptop computer the dominant device in grades 10-12. Patterns of exposure were influenced by gender, device, grade and purpose of use interactions. For example, girls used mobile phones more than boys for social purposes for grades 10 and 11, but not grade 12. Whilst children's attitudes to technology use were positive, musculoskeletal and visual symptoms were commonly reported. Hours/day tablet and phone use was related to neck/shoulder discomfort (OR = 1.07; 1.13) and visual symptoms (OR = 1.10; 1.07). Practitioner Summary: Technology use by children appears to be quite different now to a decade ago. This paper describes contemporary school children's use of various devices for various purposes. The survey of >900 children found high technology use, dominated by new mobile technologies, and associations with musculoskeletal and visual symptoms.

  19. Auditor’s Risk Assessment of Independent Directors in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salau Abdulmalik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the external auditor’s risk assessment of independent directors in Nigeria. The study utilized data from 94 non-financial listed companies on the Nigerian Stock Exchange for the periods 2008-2013. The study used cross-sectional time-series feasible generalized least square regression, which account for heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation to test the influence independent non-executive director on auditor pricing decision in Nigeria. Our result indicates that the proportion of independent non-executive director has a positive relationship with audit fees, suggesting that this class of directors is priced high by the Nigerian auditors. These findings have both policy and practical implication on corporate governance. For instance, future regulatory reforms could consider collaborative board model instead of the insistence on more independent director presence in the boardroom.

  20. Physical Characterization of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir Larionov, Ph D

    2007-06-05

    A special interest in the organization of human centromeric DNA was stimulated a few years ago when two independent groups succeeded in reconstituting a functional human centromere, using constructs carrying centromere-specific alphoid DNA arrays. This work demonstrated the importance of DNA components in mammalian centromeres and opened a way for studying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation and for construction of human artificial chromosomes (HACs) with therapeutic potential. To elucidate the structural requirements for formation of HACs with a functional kinetochore, we developed a new method for cloning of large DNA fragments for human centromeric regions that can be used as a substrate for HAC formation. This method exploits in vivo recombination in yeast (TAR cloning). In addition, a new strategy for the construction of alphoid DNA arrays was developed in our lab. The strategy involves the construction of uniform or hybrid synthetic alphoid DNA arrays by the RCA-TAR technique. This technique comprises two steps: rolling circle amplification of an alphoid DNA dimer and subsequent assembling of the amplified fragments by in vivo homologous recombination in yeast (Figure 1). Using this system, we constructed a set of different synthetic alphoid DNA arrays with a predetermined sequence varying in size from 30 to 140 kb and demonstrated that some of the arrays are competent in HAC formation. Because any nucleotide can be changed in a dimer before its amplification, this new technique is optimal for identifying the structural requirements for de novo kinetochore formation in HACs. Moreover, the technique makes possible to introduce into alphoid DNA arrays recognition sites for DNA-binding proteins. We have made the following progress on the studying of human centromeric regions using transformation-associated recombination cloning technology: i) minimal size of alphoid DNA array required for de novo kinetochore formation was estimated; ii

  1. Technology Transition a Model for Infusion and Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Vernotto C.

    2006-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has as part of its charter the mission of transferring technologies developed for the space program into the private sector for the purpose of affording back to the American people the economical and improved quality of life benefits associated with the technologies developed. In recent years considerable effort has been made to use this program for not only transitioning technologies out of the NASA Mission Directorate Programs, but also to transfer technologies into the Mission Directorate Programs and leverage the impact of government and private sector innovation. The objective of this paper is to outline an approach and the creation of a model that brings together industry, government, and commercialization strategies. When these elements are integrated, the probability of successful technology development, technology infusion into the Mission Programs, and commercialization into the private sector is increased. This model primarily addresses technology readiness levels between TRL 3 and TRL 6. This is typically a gap area known as the valley of death. This gap area is too low for commercial entities to invest heavily and not developed enough for major programs to actively pursue. This model has shown promise for increasing the probably of TRL advancement to an acceptable level for NASA programs and/or commercial entities to afford large investments toward either commercialization or infusion.

  2. She stands alone: Pakistani woman film director, Shireen Pasha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, A

    1995-01-01

    This article describes the activities of film director Shireen Pasha in promoting truth in the mass media in Pakistan. Pasha is described as one who finds it inexcusable in a state-subsidized system that national problems of poverty are not aired openly. Pasha has pursued the goal of exposing the real lives of Pakistanis on film in contrast to the publicly aired segments of "pretty girls in nice drawing rooms." Foreign channels available through satellite communications technology are viewed by Pasha as inappropriate with regard to people's needs and uncreative. Pakistan began with one channel, PTV, which recently refused to air her documentary on living conditions in Pakistan's rural areas "The Travelogue Pakistan." "The Walled City of Lahore" was her film about life in the old city. Both films poetically depicted the honor of humans and their struggle to stay alive. Some of her documentaries are made to show the value of indigenous skills, centuries old know-how, and traditions, regardless of the poverty. Pasha is described as fighting with PTV management over use of resources. Pasha desires to invest in training people to do documentaries or be more field-oriented rather than investing in equipment. Pasha joined PTV in 1975 and left in 1990. Pasha is recognized for her isolation as a woman in the business world, her commitment to exposing remote cultures and truth, and the odds she must confront in attaining her goals. Pasha is committed to doing extensive research, usually conducted during the summer months, in order to construct a credible story line that is produced usually during the winter months. One model of film story line is defined as one where women are portrayed as starting from an indigenous skill or knowledge and shifting to a greater position of power and control over their lives. Pasha believes that people who make films have the responsibility to evoke a reaction in people and to offer solutions. Two acclaimed films, which were supported by

  3. 37 CFR 11.2 - Director of the Office of Enrollment and Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Enrollment and Discipline. 11.2 Section 11.2 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND... Discipline. (a) Appointment. The USPTO Director shall appoint a Director of the Office of Enrollment and Discipline (OED Director). In the event of a vacancy in the office of the OED Director, the USPTO Director...

  4. 76 FR 78716 - Delegation of Duties, Functions, and Responsibilities Vested in the Director General of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... Responsibilities Vested in the Director General of the Foreign Service and Director of Human Resources By virtue of the authority vested in me as Director General of the Foreign Service and Director of Human Resources... in me as Director General of the Foreign Service and Human Resources, to my Principal Deputy Steven A...

  5. What skills should new internal medicine interns have in july? A national survey of internal medicine residency program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven; Vu, T Robert; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Aiyer, Meenakshy; McKown, Kevin; Chmielewski, Amy F; McDonald, Furman S

    2014-03-01

    The transition from medical student to intern may cause stress and burnout in new interns and the delivery of suboptimal patient care. Despite a formal set of subinternship curriculum guidelines, program directors have expressed concern regarding the skill set of new interns and the lack of standardization in that skill set among interns from different medical schools. To address these issues, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Next Accreditation System focuses on the development of a competency-based education continuum spanning undergraduate, graduate, and continuing medical education. In 2010, the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine subinternship task force, in collaboration with the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey committee, surveyed internal medicine residency program directors to determine which competencies or skills they expected from new medical school graduates. The authors summarized the results using categories of interest. In both an item rank list and free-text responses, program directors were nearly uniform in ranking the skills they deemed most important for new interns-organization and time management and prioritization skills; effective communication skills; basic clinical skills; and knowing when to ask for assistance. Stakeholders should use the results of this survey as they develop a milestone-based curriculum for the fourth year of medical school and for the internal medicine subinternship. By doing so, they should develop a standardized set of skills that meet program directors' expectations, reduce the stress of transitions across the educational continuum, and improve the quality of patient care.

  6. SOME CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE REVOCATION OF THE COMPANY DIRECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Cojocaru

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In principle, in Romania, according to current regulations, the director of a company can not address the court against the decision of the general meeting of shareholders through which he/she was revoked from his/her position, regardless of the reasons for the revocation. However, if the director is also the shareholder of that company, he/she may appeal the decision of the general meeting of shareholders, for other reasons than the revocation itself. This is the case even if, by that decision of the general meeting of shareholders it has been decided, inter alia, the revocation of the director. Also, the laws of Romania stipulate that the revoked director has the possibility to claim in court damages if he/she fulfilled correctly the duties as director of the company. At the same time, the article looks at the concept of director, his/her relations with the company and the revocation of the director as general concept.

  7. BOARD OF DIRECTORS STRUCTURE AND EARNINGS MANAGEMENT: BIST MANUFACTURING CASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin TEMİZ

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate association between firms’ board structure (independent members, audit comittee, female membership and board of directors size and earnings management. For the purpose of investigating associations four different earnings management models were used. In addition, four hypotheses were tested in the context of the study.  Within the scope of the study, data covering the years 2012 - 2016 belonging to the firms operating in the BIST Manufacturing Sector were used. According to results there is a relationship between the proportion of independent members in the board and earnings management practices based on accrual and sales manipulation. Obtained results confirm that the increase in the proportion of female members on the board reduces earnings management practices based on cash flow and sales manipulation. There is also evidence that an increase in the size of the board reduces earnings management practices based on cash flow and income manipulation. There is no supporting evidence that the proportion of audit comittee members reduces earnings management practices.

  8. Proceedings of the American Psychological Association for the Legislative Year 2006: Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Representatives, February 17-19, 2006, Washington, DC; and August 17 and 21, 2006, New Orleans, LA; and Minutes of the February, June, August, and December 2006 Meetings of the Board of Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paige, Ruth Ullmann

    2007-01-01

    Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Council of Representatives (February 17-19, 2006, Washington, DC; and August 17 and 21, 2006, New Orleans, LA) and of the 2006 meetings of the Board of Directors (February, June, August, and December) are provided. These minutes are the official record of the actions of the American Psychological Association…

  9. Energy and Technology: The Emergence of a New Agenda for Professional Association Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Paul W.

    Current and approaching crises in man's inhabitation of the Earth are discussed and enumerated. Education is proposed as a method of alleviating the social, ecological, psychological, and eventual biological pressures created by man's increasing subjugation to technology. The emerging pattern of disaster for man as a species is delineated, and a…

  10. Factors associated with use of yam mini sett technology in Egbeda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed yam mini–sett technology adoption performance and determinants among yam farmers in Egbeda LGA of Oyo state, Nigeria. Data were collected from 136 yam producers and analysed using descriptive and logistic regression statistics. Results show that all respondents were aware of the yam mini–sett ...

  11. Vaccine for BK Polyomavirus-associated Infections in Transplant Recipients | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI researches identified a BK polyomavirus (BKV) virulent strain that causes chronic urinary tract infections, and the development of vaccine and therapeutic methods that would block BKV pathogenesis. The NCI Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, seek parties to license or co-develop this technology.

  12. Fusion technology. Annual report of the. Association Cea/EURATOM; Technologie de fusion.Rapport annuel de l`association CEA/Euratom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magaud, P.; Le Vagueres, F.

    1996-12-31

    In 1996, the French EURATOM-CEA Association made significant contributions to the European technology programme. This work is compiled in this report as follows: the ITER CEA activities and related developments are described in the first section; blankets and material developments for DEMO, long term safety studies are summarised in the second part; the Underlying Technology activities are compiled in the third part of this report. In each section, the tasks are sorted out to respect the European presentation. For an easy reading, appendix 4 gives the list of tasks in alphabetical order with a page reference list. The CEA is in charge of the French Technology programme. Three specific organizational directions of the CEA, located on four sites (see appendix 5) are involves in this programme: Advanced Technologies Direction (DTA), for Material task; Nuclear Reactors Direction (DRN), for Blanket design, Neutronic problems, Safety tasks; Physical Sciences Direction (DSM) uses the competence of the Tore Supra team in the Magnet design and plasma Facing Component field. The CEA programme is completed by collaborations with Technicatome, COMEX-Nucleaire and Ecole Polytechnique. The breakdown of the programme by Directions is presented in figure 1. The allocation of tasks is given in appendix 2 and in appendix 3, the related publications. (author).

  13. A Study of Oceans and Atmospheric Interactions Associated with Tropical Cyclone Activity using Earth Observing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Warith; Reddy, Remata

    From October 22nd to 30th, 2012 Hurricane Sandy was a huge storm of many abnormalities causing an estimated 50 billion dollars in damage. Tropical storm development states systems’ energy as product of warm sea surface temperatures (SST’s) and tropical cyclone heat potential (TCHP). Advances in Earth Observing (EO) technology, remote sensing and proxy remote sensing have allowed for accurate measurements of SST and TCHP information. In this study, we investigated rapid intensification of Sandy through EO applications for precipitable water vapor (PWAT), SST’s and TCHP during the period of October 27th. These data were obtained from NASA and NOAA satellites and NOAA National Buoy data center (NDBC). The Sensible Heat (Qs) fluxes were computed to determine available energy resulting from ocean-atmosphere interface. Buoy 41010, 120 NM east of Cape Canaveral at 0850 UTC measured 22.3 °C atmospheric temperatures and 27 °C SST, an interface of 4.7 °C. Sensible heat equation computed fluxes of 43.7 W/m2 at 982.0 mb central pressure. Sandy formed as late-season storm and near-surface air temperatures averaged > 21 °C according to NOAA/ESRL NCEP/NCAR reanalysis at 1000 mb and GOES 13 (EAST) geostationary water vapor imagery shows approaching cold front during October 27th. Sandy encountered massive dry air intrusion to S, SE and E quadrants of storm while travelling up U.S east coast but experienced no weakening. Cool, dry air intrusion was considered for PWAT investigation from closest sounding station during Oct. 27th 0900 - 2100 UTC at Charleston, SC station 72208. Measured PWAT totaled 42.97 mm, indicating large energy potential supply to the storm. The Gulf Stream was observed using NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition Center (SPoRT) MODIS SST analysis. The results show 5 °C warmer above average than surrounding cooler water, with > 25 °C water extent approximately 400 NM east of Chesapeake Bay and eddies > 26 °C. Results from sensible heat

  14. Is the Use of Information and Communication Technology Associated With Aspects of Women's Primary Health Care in Brazil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta-Machado, Antônio Thomaz Gonzaga; de Lima, Ângela Maria L Dayrell; de Abreu, Daisy Maria Xavier; Araújo, Lucas Lobato; Sobrinho, Délcio Fonseca; Silva Lopes, Érica Araújo; Teixeira, Gabriel Henrique Silva; Dos Santos, Alaneir de Fátima

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) is on the increase in the health systems, representing a means of improving the quality of health care. This study analyzed the ICT incorporation in primary care in Brazil and identified the different aspects that may be associated with better quality in the care provided, in relation to certain aspects of women's care. We noted an unevenness regarding ICT incorporation in Brazil. However, the findings indicate an association between ICT and certain aspects of the quality provided in women's health care, which reinforces the need for further studies on this type of evaluation.

  15. Leader in Digital Transformation: Director, Information Management ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Informs the managers and other direct reports of matters decided (or under consideration) by other parts of the Centre that will have an impact on the provision of information management and information technology services. Monitors progress made against established work plans and introduces corrective action as ...

  16. Regional Director | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    With the active assistance of the Regional Controller, manages the operations of the regional office in accordance with Centre-wide resource management policies established at Headquarters on matters such as human resources, finance and administration, grant administration, information management and technology ...

  17. Policy Document Department: Science and Technology | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Policy Document Department: Science and Technology. DST South Africa. Abstract. Foreword: Mr Mosibudi Mangena, Minister of Science and Technology Mr D Hanekom, Deputy Minister of Science and Technology Dr Rob Adam, Director-General of the Department of Science and Technology Preamble The Government ...

  18. Olap and data mining technologies' integration in the construction of interdimensional associative rules in multidimensional data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Микола Тихонович Фісун

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The features of associative rules in multidimensional data searching are presented in the article, specifically theoretical basis of association searching between different dimensions in OLAP cubes and formulas of their significance characteristics (support, confidence, lift, leverage calculation are shown. The method of interdimensional association rules generation is proposed. The implementation of this method as a component of operative and intellectual data analysis information system on database management system Caché platform is described.

  19. Abstracts and electronic proceedings of the Canadian Dam Association's 2008 annual conference : emerging technologies for dams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    This conference provided a national forum to explore and discuss emerging technologies which can be used to enhance dam safety and construction practices on both new and existing projects. Advancements in the fields of dam design, construction, and remedial works were reviewed as well as new techniques for dam monitoring programs. Engineers, geoscientists, dam owners and operators and other stakeholders exchanged ideas and information regarding the operation, maintenance and management of water and tailings dams. The conference sessions dealt with a variety of topics, including dam foundations; mining dams; dams and the environment; embankment dams; dams and seismicity; hydrotechnics; assessment and investigative technologies; dam instrumentation and monitoring; computational hydraulics; and dam safety. The conference featured 46 presentations, of which 37 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs

  20. The association of technology in a workplace wellness program with health risk factor reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeppke, Ron; Edington, Dee; Bender, Joel; Reynolds, Ashley

    2013-03-01

    Determine whether there is a relationship between level of engagement in workplace wellness programs and population/individual health risk reductions. A total of 7804 employees from 15 employers completed health risk appraisal and laboratory testing at baseline and again after 2 years of participating in their personalized prevention plan. Population and individual health risk transitions were analyzed across the population, as well as by stage of engagement. Of those individuals who started in a high risk category at baseline, 46% moved down to medium risk and 19% moved down to low risk category after 2 years on their prevention plan. In the group that only engaged through the Web-based technology, 24% reduced their health risks (P technology and interactive Web-based tools can empower individuals to be more proactive about their health and reduce their health risks.

  1. ["TECHNIKA I NAUKA" ["SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY"] (1958-)--MAGAZINE OF THE ASSOCIATION OF POLISH ENGINEERS IN GREAT BRITAIN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwastyk-Kowalczyk, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the history of establishment, functioning and the role of "Science and Technology"--quarterly of the Association of Polish Engineers in Great Britain--in shaping Polish technical thought in the environment of Polish engineers and technicians living in exile. The analysis of the content of the journal published in London in the years 1958-2008 made it evident that this official scientific organ of Polish technical intelligentsia edited in 500 copies reaches members of engineering, technical and scientific milieu across many continents. Despite the fact that Polish language dominates in the articles and thanks to the interdisciplinary character of their content - science and technology, biology, the humanities, sociology and others--the journal makes it possible for the reader to participate in an intellectual adventure. "Science and Technology" was created in 1958 on the initiative of Eng. Prof. Roman Wajda in Great Britain, with support of other Polish technical associations abroad, and embraced the achievements and organisational life of the Polish technical milieu dispersed around the world. On the basis of the London Society's archive materials and old annual volumes of the journal, the author listed editors-in-chief, composition of editorial committees, collaborators, determined editing costs, changeable periodicity, successive print shops, seats of editorial office that always followed the Association in Great Britain. She also showed the effort of a handful of members of editorial committees, working on a voluntary basis to obtain materials for the journal; the role of the journal linking Polish engineers and technicians in exile and its function as a link with the Country, as well as its role in the sphere of information and propaganda. Finally, the author made an analysis of the journal's content, focusing on categories of articles published in "Science and Technology" in the years 1958-2008. Methods used by the author in the article

  2. CERN stop-over for KEK and Fermilab Directors

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    En route for a meeting of the International Committee for Future Accelerators, ICFA, held at Germany's DESY laboratory, the Directors of Japan's KEK laboratory and Fermilab in the United States had a stop-over at CERN last Wednesday 7 February. Dr Hirotaka Sugawara, Director General of Japan's high energy physics laboratory, KEK, visited the Antiproton Decelerator, AD. From left to right, Masaki Hori, member of the ASACUSA collaboration, John Eades, contact person for ASACUSA, Dr Hirotaka Sugawara, Werner Pirkl, the PS Division engineer responsible for the Radio Frequency Quadrupole decelerator in the foreground, and Kurt Hübner, CERN's Director of Accelerators. Dr Michael S. Witherell, Director of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Fermilab, visited construction sites for the LHC, ATLAS, and CMS. He is seen here with a module of the CMS hadronic calorimeter in building 186.

  3. Llewellyn Smith, Director-General designate of CERN, discusses LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Sweet, William N

    1992-01-01

    Christopher Llewellyn Smith was nominated by the Committee of Council to be Director General of CERN. He aims to pave the way for the Large Hadron Collider and utilize to the full the Large Electron-Positron machine.

  4. Dr. William C. Harris, Director-General, Science Foundation Ireland

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Pictured with Robert Eisenstein, former assistant director for mathematical and physical sciences (MPS) at the US National Science Foundation (NSF), who is spending a year at CERN as a member of the ATLAS collaboration.

  5. 22 CFR 67.2 - Board of Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., Washington, DC 20005-5000. (b) All major policy and funding decisions are made by the Board of Directors. The primary statement of NED's operating philosophy, general principles and priorities is contained in the...

  6. A Case for Graduate Programs for Television News Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, James W.

    1994-01-01

    Surveys 308 television news directors. Finds that 83.4% of respondents would like some formal management training if they could afford the time. Discusses three fundamental elements that should be included in such graduate programs for midcareer professionals. (SR)

  7. Thomas Sinks, Director, Office of the Science Advisor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biography of the Director of the Office of the Science Advisor which is responsible for is responsible for EPA’s human subject research ethics, scientific integrity, and developing cross-agency science policy guidance.

  8. Institute for Advanced Learning and Research names new executive director

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Tech News

    2008-01-01

    Virginia Tech's Institute for Advanced Learning and Research has named Liam E. Leightley as executive director, effective Oct. 6, 2008, according to Mike Henderson, chair of the institute's board of trustees.

  9. Spallation-based science and technology and associated nuclear data requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, C.D.; Lisowski, P.W.; Arthur, E.D.

    1990-01-01

    Rapid advances in accelerator technology in recent years promise average proton beam currents as high as 250 mA with energies greater than one GeV. Such an accelerator could produce very high intensities of neutrons and other nuclear particles thus opening up new areas of science and technology. An example is the efficient burning of transuranic and fission product waste. With such a spallation-burner it appears that high-level waste might be converted to low-level waste on a time scale comparable to the human lifespan at a reasonable additional cost for electric power generation. The emphasis of this paper is on the design of a high power proton target for neutron production, on the nuclear data needed to operate this target safely and effectively, and on data requirements for transmutation. It is suggested that a pilot facility consisting of a 1.6 GeV accelerator and target operating at 25 ma is the next major step in developing this technology. Bursts of protons near the terawatt level might also be generated using such an accelerator with a proton accumulator ring. Research prospects based on such proton bursts are briefly described. The status of established nuclear data needs and of accelerator-based sources for nuclear data measurements is reviewed. (author)

  10. The King Reports, Independent Non-Executive Directors and Firm Valuation on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Ntim, Collins G.

    2011-01-01

    South Africa (SA) has pursued corporate governance reforms in the form of the 1994 and 2002 King Reports. This paper examines the association between the presence of independent non-executive directors (INEDs) and market valuation of a sample of 169 firms listed on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) in SA from 2002 to 2007. Our results suggest a statistically significant and positive relationship between the presence of INEDs and firm valuation. By contrast, we find no statistically signif...

  11. HOT AEROSOL FIRE EXTINGUISHING AGENTS AND THE ASSOCIATED TECHNOLOGIES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotian Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstractSince the phase out of Halon extinguishers in the 1980s, hot aerosol fire suppression technology has gained much attention. Unlike traditional inert gas, foam, water mist and Halon fire suppression agents, hot aerosol fire extinguishing agents do not need to be driven out by pressurized gases and can extinguish class A, B, C, D and K fires at 30 to 200 g/m3. Generally, hot aerosol fire extinguishing technology has developed from a generation I oil tank suppression system to a generation III strontium salt based S-type system. S-type hot aerosol fire extinguishing technology greatly solves the corrosion problem of electrical devices and electronics compared to potassium salt based generation I & II hot aerosol fire extinguishing technology. As substitutes for Halon agents, the ODP and GWP values of hot fire extinguishing aerosols are nearly zero, but those fine aerosol particles can cause adverse health effects once inhaled by human. As for configurations of hot aerosol fire extinguishing devices, fixed or portable cylindrical canisters are the most common among generation II & III hot aerosol fire extinguishers across the world, while generation I hot aerosol fire suppression systems are integrated with the oil tank as a whole. Some countries like the U.S., Australia, Russia and China, etc. have already developed standards for manufacturing and quality control of hot aerosol fire extinguishing agents and norms for hot aerosol fire extinguishing system design under different fire protection scenarios. Coolants in hot aerosol fire suppression systems, which are responsible for reducing hot aerosol temperature to avoid secondary fire risk are reviewed for the first time. Cooling effects are generally achieved through vaporization and endothermic chemical decomposition of coolants. Finally, this review discussed areas applying generation I, II or III hot aerosol fire suppression technologies. The generation III hot aerosol fire extinguishing

  12. Independent Directors and Stakeholders Protection: A Case of Sime Darby

    OpenAIRE

    Prashanth Beleya; Gopalan Raman; Charles Ramendren; Suresh Nodeson

    2012-01-01

    In today’s ever challenging corporate environment, the unfortunate events of decision making by top management has led major companies to suffer huge losses. This results and mistakes made have given a significant impact to the stake holder’s perception and raise a serious questions on the role of board of directors especially the role of independent directors. In today’s fast evolving business pace with stiff economic conditions, unethical and misjudgment in business decisions are driving th...

  13. Center Director's Discretionary Fund 2005 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurge, Mark; Griffin, Timothy; Arens, Ellen; Calle, Carlos; Quinn, Jacqueline; Wheeler, Raymond; Metzger, Phillip T.; Calle, Luz Marina; Beaver, Justin M.; Williams, Martha; hide

    2007-01-01

    The FY 2005 CDDF projects were selected from the following spaceport and range technology and science areas: fluid system technologies; spaceport structures and materials; command, control, and monitoring technologies; and biological sciences (including support for environmental stewardship). The FY 2005 CDDF research projects involved development of the following: a) Capacitance-based moisture sensors to optimize plant growth in reduced gravity; b) Commodity-free calibration methods; c) Application of atmospheric plasma glow discharge to alter the surface properties of polymers for improved electrostatic dissipation characteristics; d) A wipe-on, wipe-off chemical process to remove lead oxides found in paint; e) A robust metabolite profiling platform for better understanding the "law" of biological regulation; f) An explanation of the excavation processes that occur when a jet of gas impinges on a bed of sand; g) "Smart coatings" to detect and control corrosion at an early stage to prevent further corrosion h) A model that can produce a reliable diagnosis of the quality of a software product; i) The formulation of advanced materials to meet system safety needs to minimize electrostatic charges, flammability, and radiation exposure; j) A lab-based instrument that uses the electro-optic Pockels effect to make static electric fields visible; k) A passive volatile organic compound (VOC) cartridge to filter, identify, and quantify VOCs flowing into or emanating from plant flight experiments.

  14. Nuclear Systems (NS): Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nuclear Systems Project demonstrates nuclear power technology readiness to support the goals of NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate. To this end,...

  15. Return to work in people with acquired brain injury: association with observed ability to use everyday technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson-Lund, Maria; Kottorp, Anders; Malinowsky, Camilla

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how the observed ability to use everyday technology (ET), intrapersonal capacities and environmental characteristics related to ET use contributes to the likelihood of return to work in people with ABI. The aim was also to explore whether these variables added to the likelihood of return to work to earlier defined significant variables in the group: age, perceived ADL ability and perceived ability in ET use. A cross-sectional study. The Management of Everyday Technology Assessment (META), the short version of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (S-ETUQ) and a revised version of the ADL taxonomy were used to evaluate 74 people with ABI. Individual ability measures from all assessments were generated by Rasch analyses and used for additional statistical analysis. The univariate analyses showed that the observed ability to use ET, as well as intrapersonal capacities and environmental characteristics related to ET use were all significantly associated with returning to work. In the multivariate analyses, none of these associations remained. The explanatory precision of return to work in people with ABI increased minimally by adding the observed ability to use ET and the variables related to ET use when age, perceived ability in ET use and ADL had been taken in account.

  16. Factors associated with adoption of robotic surgical technology in US hospitals and relationship to radical prostatectomy procedure volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbash, Gabriel I; Friedman, Bernard; Glied, Sherry A; Steiner, Claudia A

    2014-01-01

    Robotic technology has diffused rapidly despite high costs and limited additive reimbursement by major payers. We aimed to identify the factors associated with hospitals' decisions to adopt robotic technology and the consequences of these decisions. This observational study used data on hospitals and market areas from 2005 to 2009. Included were hospitals in census-based statistical areas within states in the State Inpatient Database that participated in the American Hospital Association annual surveys and performed radical prostatectomies. The likelihood that a hospital would acquire a robotic facility and the rates of radical prostatectomy relative to the prevalence of robots in geographic market areas were assessed using multivariable analysis. Hospitals in areas where a higher proportion of other hospitals had already acquired a robot were more likely to acquire one (P=0.012), as were those with more than 300 beds (Phospitals (Ptechnology in the United States. Significantly more radical prostatectomies were performed in hospitals with robots and in market areas of hospitals with robotic technology.

  17. Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies Program Funding Opportunities | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI is very pleased to announce that the Innovative Molecular Analysis Technologies (IMAT) program funding opportunity announcements have been posted for calendar year (CY) 2013. Please visit this website for more information on these announcements. For your convenience, a link to each solicitation is provided below with associated submission deadlines for new applications and resubmissions. Please contact the NCI IMAT program director, Dr.

  18. Accepting the challenge: what academic health sciences library directors do to become effective leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fought, Rick L; Misawa, Mitsunori

    2018-04-01

    This study sought to better understand effective leadership through the lived experiences of academic health sciences library directors. Phenomenological interviews were conducted with eight academic health sciences library directors to capture the essence of their shared leadership experiences. The research question that guided the study was: How do academic health sciences library directors understand their leadership effectiveness? The interviews were transcribed and coded, and the data were analyzed thematically. Three main themes emerged from data after analysis: assessment of the environment, strategies and decisions, and critical skills. Assessment of the environment includes awareness not only of trends in libraries and technology, but also the trends in health information, higher education, and current events and politics of their institutions and states. The strategies and decisions theme is about the ability to think both in the long-term and short-term when leading the library. Finally, critical skills are those leadership skills that the research participants identified as most important to their leadership effectiveness. The study identified three main themes capturing the essence of the research participants' leadership experiences. The three themes constitute a wide array of leadership skills that are important to learn, understand, and develop to increase leadership effectiveness. Effective leadership is fundamental to obtaining long-term strategic goals and is critical to the long-term future of the libraries.

  19. Assessment and perceptions of intensive care data quality, reporting and use: a survey of ICU directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson-Conroy, K M; Tierney, L T; Burrell, A R

    2012-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly common for government bodies, healthcare providers, funders and consumers to seek measures of the quality of critical care. It is important to ensure the quality of intensive care unit (ICU) data is high so these stakeholders can confidently use quality of care measures in decision-making. This paper aims to evaluate the quality of data collected for and submitted to the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database, and to investigate the perceptions of NSW ICU directors in relation to ICU data quality, reporting and usage. A survey tool was developed based on an existing framework that consisted of procedures for assessing data quality in medical registries. The survey was distributed to the directors of all NSW ICUs that submitted data in the 2007/2008 financial year. Overall, completeness of the data and its quality was perceived to be good. Participants were less likely to engage in activities involving the detection and correction of data errors, feedback of data or use of data for local purposes. A number of barriers and enablers to good quality ICU data as well as strategies to improve data quality were identified. Inadequate staff, training and resources for data collection were widespread concerns. NSW ICU directors believe more work is required to achieve high quality data and appropriate use of the data collected. Strategies targeting increased resources including updated technology and improved staffing and training, as well as low-cost solutions such as audit, feedback and clinician engagement, have been highlighted.

  20. Biological Environmental Sampling Technologies Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    assay performance for the detection of target pathogens or protein biomarkers in liquid matrices. The nanomanipulation technology provides a dramatic...personal protective equipment qPCR quantitative polymerase chain reaction RAID Rapid Assessment Initial Detection kit RFI request for information RT...Carrie Poore Robert Dorsey RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY DIRECTORATE Aaron Chonko David Grieco JOINT BIOLOGICAL TACTICAL DETECTION SYSTEM

  1. The Martin Marietta Energy Systems Associated Laboratories for Excellence in Radiation Technology (ALERT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogard, J.S.; Casson, W.H. Sr.; Bauer, M.L.; Gregory, D.C.

    1993-01-01

    The excellence and uniqueness of radiation technology expertise at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was recognized during a review by the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office prior to a 1990 Tiger Team review, and the Laboratory was encouraged at that time to explore ways of sharing this expertise with other DOE facilities. The subsequent evolution of DOE Laboratory Accreditation Programs, with their challenging performance requirements, and of program guidance such as that contained in the DOE Radiation Control Manual, which requires improved radiological instrument services and encourages standardization, reemphasizes the importance of sharing ORNL's extensive capabilities for supporting improved radiological safety and health programs

  2. Fusion technology annual report of the association EURATOM/CEA 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magaud, P.; Le vagueres, F.

    1998-01-01

    In this book are found technical and scientific papers on the main works carried out in the frame of the european program of fusion technology, during 1998. The presented activities are: plasma facing components, vacuum vessel and shield, magnets, remote handling, safety (short and long term), european blanket project (long term) with water cooled lithium lead and helium cooled pebble bed blanket, materials for fusion power plant, socio-economic research on fusion, plasma facing components, fuel cycle, inertial confinement. (A.L.B.)

  3. PRODUCTIVE PROGRESS IN A GOAT PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION, "CAPRINOCULTORES UNIDOS DE GUANAJUATO AC", THROUGH A TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER SYSTEM GGAVATT (LIVESTOCK VALIDATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER GROUP (2001-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Oliveros-Oliveros

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of technology adoption on milk goat producers in central México. The association has 13 producers, with an average age 41.5 years old, the average schooling reaches junior high school (3rd year, and  a mean of 6 dependants per family. This association has an average number of 246 female goats per herd, a total of 3447 females, and 2190 females in production control. The income in relation to investment is 36%. Technological practices implemented to date and the percentage of use are: Weighing milk (100%, Animal Nutrition consulting (71%, Estrus synchronization and reproductive management techniques (40%, Gestation Diagnosis (93%, Brucellosis control herd program (100%, Artificial kids raising in slat (46%, Disease diagnosis and management (61%, Certification of good milking practice (53%, Linear and genetics evaluation (87% Evaluation of genetic records ( 61%, Forage  conservation by silage (93%, Milk components analysis (100%, dispersion of genetic material (71%, Analysis and data processing for replacement selection and animal sale (Sire and females(100%, Bacteriological analysis of milk (93%, Cryoscopic point of milk (100%, and Diagnosis of subclinical mastitis (cytometryc flow (100%. An 80% of the producers have adopted different practices, and the association has promoted and implemented different programs such as: control milk production, milk quality, genealogical records, disease control, marketing in group, sales of fluid milk and dehydration of milk for conservation and sale. Accordingly to such practices, results are as follows: 11,180 kids born, from which 52% were females and 48% males, with 56.9%, 24.3%, 15.7% and 2.9% of double, triple, simple and quadruple births, respectively. The mean birth weight was 3.32 kg and 15.7 kg weaning at 60 days, with a daily gain weight (DGW of 206.33 g. For milk production, 3534 lactations were analyzed from 1999 to 2007 in a 90.4% of animals

  4. A comparison of regional and global catastrophic hazards associated with energy technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, C.D.; Inhaber, H.

    1984-01-01

    The paper reviews some of what is known about the relative catastrophic hazards, on both a regional and global level, of energy technologies, and proposes a logical framework for their comparison. A review of the Inhaber study results is made indicating the relative position of overall nuclear power related risks. Then, concentration is placed on describing the catastrophic and global hazards of energy technologies. Regionally catastrophic hazards include sabotage and other malicious human activities, in addition to severe accidents caused inadvertently by man, such as fires, reactor core damage events, chemical and poisonous gas releases, fuel storage fires and explosions. Global risks include such hazards as nuclear proliferation, CO 2 buildup, oil shortages and possible national conflicts over dwindling energy fuels. The conclusion is drawn that both regional and global catastrophic risks must be taken into consideration in making energy decisions, and that further study is necessary to better quantify and compare these risks. A simple decision analytic framework for making energy decisions inclusive of catastrophic risks is proposed. (author)

  5. RISK ASSESSMENT OF SURFACE WATERS ASSOCIATED WITH WATER CIRCULATION TECHNOLOGIES ON TROUT FARMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Sidoruk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic development of aquaculture has led to an increasing impact on the status of surface waters. Fish production generates wastes that, at high concentrations, may present a serious risk to the aquatic environment. Studies on the assessment of the impact of water management technologies in trout production on the quality of surface waters were conducted in 2011. Six farms were selected for the studies and were divided into two groups based on water management solutions (n = 3: farms with a flow through system (FTS and farms with a recirculation aquaculture system (RAS. On all farms, water measurement points were set and they depicted the quality of inflow water, the quality of water in ponds and the quality of outflow water. The studies did not demonstrate any impact of applied technology on electrolyte conductivity or calcium and magnesium concentrations in outflow water from a trout operation. In addition, it was found that the use of water for production purposes resulted in a slight increase in phosphorus and total nitrogen concentrations in waste waters.

  6. Members of national delegations with the Director General Luciano Maiani before the LEP Celebration

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    : front row: Mr. L. Fogas, Deputy Prime Minister, Slovak Republic; Mr. R.G. Schwartzenberg, Minister of Research, France; Mrs. A. Birules, Minister of Science & Technology, Spain; Lord Sainsbury of Turville, Minister of Science, United Kingdom; Mrs. E. Bulmahn, Minister of Education & Research, Germany; Mr. A. Ogi, President of the Confederation, Switzerland; Prof. L. Maiani, CERN Director General; Mrs. Maiani; Mr. Ph. Busquin, Commissioner for Research, European Council; Mrs. A. Bladh, State Secretary of Education & Science, Sweden; Prof. M. Gago, Minister of Science & Technology, Portugal; Prof. A. Wiszniewski, Minister of Science, Poland back row Mr. H. Eschelbacher President of Council; Mr. P. Levaux, Former Council President, Belgium; Prof. D. Dimitrov, Minister of Education & Science, Bulgaria; Dr. J. O'Fallon, Department of Energy, USA; Mr. M. Kirpichnikov, First Vice-Minister for Science, Russia; Prof. D. Deniozos, Secretary General for Research & Technology, Greece; Mr. E.S....

  7. Emerging applications of genome-editing technology to examine functionality of GWAS-associated variants for complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew J P; Deloukas, Panos; Munroe, Patricia B

    2018-04-13

    Over the last decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have propelled the discovery of thousands of loci associated with complex diseases. The focus is now turning towards the function of these association signals, determining the causal variant(s) amongst those in strong linkage disequilibrium, and identifying their underlying mechanisms, such as long-range gene regulation. Genome-editing techniques utilising zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats with Cas9 nuclease (CRISPR-Cas9), are becoming the tools of choice to establish functionality for these variants, due to the ability to assess effects of single variants in vivo. This review will discuss examples of how these technologies have begun to aid functional analysis of GWAS loci for complex traits such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, obesity and autoimmune disease. We focus on analysis of variants occurring within non-coding genomic regions, as these comprise the majority of GWAS variants, providing the greatest challenges to determining functionality, and compare editing strategies that provide different levels of evidence for variant functionality. The review describes molecular insights into some of these potentially causal variants, and how these may relate to the pathology of the trait, and look towards future directions for these technologies in post-GWAS analysis, such as base-editing.

  8. Silver Diamine Fluoride in Pediatric Dentistry Training Programs: Survey of Graduate Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Travis; Scott, Joanna M; Crystal, Yasmi O; Berg, Joel H; Milgrom, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate practice, teaching, and perceived barriers to the use of silver diamine fluoride and other caries control agents in U.S. pediatric dentistry residency programs. A 14-question survey regarding use and teaching of caries control agents was sent via email to residency program directors in 2015. Survey participants responded, using a web-based survey tool, by completing a paper and pencil survey instrument, or by interview. Surveys were completed by 74 directors or associate directors (87 percent adjusted response rate). More than a quarter (25.7 percent) reported use of silver diamine fluoride, with 68.9 percent expecting to increase use. The use of silver diamine fluoride was not associated with region or program type. Programs reported commonly used caries control agents of fluoride varnish (100 percent), acidulated phosphate fluoride foam (48.6 percent), silver nitrate (9.5 percent), and povidone iodine (1.3 percent). Most felt silver diamine fluoride should be used only with high-risk patients (89.2 percent), and the majority agreed it could be used in primary and permanent teeth. The most frequently reported barrier to use of silver diamine fluoride was parental acceptance (91.8 percent). Silver diamine fluoride is being rapidly adopted in graduate pediatric dentistry training programs, with the majority expecting to incorporate it into their teaching clinics and curricula.

  9. Attributes of Candidates Passing the ABS Certifying Examination on the First Attempt-Program Directors׳ Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Mohd Raashid; Hulme, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The American Board of Surgery Certifying Examination (CE) is a pivotal event in a surgeon's career development, as it is the last challenge before achieving Board certification. First-time pass rate on the CE is one of the key metrics of surgery residency programs. The overall pass rate on the CE has declined significantly in recent years. The goal of this study was the identification of attributes of general surgery residents that are associated with passing the CE at the first attempt. The modified Delphi process was used to survey general surgery program directors. The study was conducted in 2 rounds in the interest of time available for surgical education research fellowship project. All 259 program directors were contacted in each round of surveys. In all, 49 (19%) responded to the first round and 54 (21%) responded to the second round of survey. The characteristics of a successful resident on CE include confidence, self-motivation, sound knowledge base, strong performance on the Board's training examination (American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination), and mock orals, and good communication skills. Postgraduate years 4 and 5 are the most likely resident levels at which failure could be predicted. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetic and Technological Characterisation of Vineyard- and Winery-Associated Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aspasia A. Nisiotou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vineyard- and winery-associated lactic acid bacteria (LAB from two major PDO regions in Greece, Peza and Nemea, were surveyed. LAB were isolated from grapes, fermenting musts, and winery tanks performing spontaneous malolactic fermentations (MLF. Higher population density and species richness were detected in Nemea than in Peza vineyards and on grapes than in fermenting musts. Pediococcus pentosaceus and Lactobacillus graminis were the most abundant LAB on grapes, while Lactobacillus plantarum dominated in fermenting musts from both regions. No particular structure of Lactobacillus plantarum populations according to the region of origin was observed, and strain distribution seems random. LAB species diversity in winery tanks differed significantly from that in vineyard samples, consisting principally of Oenococcus oeni. Different strains were analysed as per their enological characteristics and the ability to produce biogenic amines (BAs. Winery-associated species showed higher resistance to low pH, ethanol, SO2, and CuSO4 than vineyard-associated isolates. The frequency of BA-producing strains was relatively low but not negligible, considering that certain winery-associated Lactobacillus hilgardii strains were able to produce BAs. Present results show the necessity of controlling the MLF by selected starters in order to avoid BA accumulation in wine.

  11. 76 FR 41274 - Committee Name: Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... renewal of the charter of the Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) is... Director, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane, Bldg. 410..., cyber-security, knowledge management and how best to leverage related technologies funded by other...

  12. 78 FR 45255 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) is necessary and in the public interest in connection with the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate's performance of its... Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security, 245 Murray Lane, Bldg. 410, Washington, DC 20528...

  13. Information Literacy for the Skeptical Library Director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Patricia S.

    This paper begins by providing background on the information literacy movement, including the educational reform efforts of the 1980s, a higher education summit conference, and the 1989 American Library Association (ALA) Presidential Committee on Information Literacy Final Report. Other highlights include: the information literacy triangle;…

  14. Evaluation of a nursing home medical director's curriculum for geriatric medicine fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Masaya; Wen, Aida; Masaki, Kamal

    2013-08-01

    To describe the evaluation of a nursing home medical directorship curriculum for geriatric medicine fellows. Six first-year geriatric medicine fellows from the University of Hawaii program participated in this educational intervention. A medical directorship curriculum based on the American Medical Directors Association's description of the roles and responsibilities of the medical director. Seven 1-hour sessions covering core topics were delivered in case-based format, with the opportunity to practice application. The curriculum's impact on learner's knowledge, attitudes, skills, and abilities was evaluated using pretests and posttests. The curriculum was evaluated using a structured individual feedback interview after the completion of this curriculum. Pre-post mean scores for attitudes and skills/ability items were compared using paired t tests. A summary of comments from fellows' interviews was tabulated. Fellows showed a significant improvement in knowledge scores after the intervention (63.33% correct before the intervention and 76.67% correct after the intervention, mean change = 13.33%, P = .03). The mean overall scores for attitudes and skills/ability items increased from 4.72 to 5.33 (change = 0.61, P = .11), and 2.67 to 3.83 (change = 1.17, P = .009), respectively. Comments from the interviews were positive and fell into 3 categories. First, fellows felt that they achieved a good knowledge base. Second, they gained a better understanding of the roles and responsibilities. Last, all participants felt the curriculum was very practical and helped them feel more prepared to become medical directors. An innovative curriculum for nursing home medical direction provided for first-year geriatric medicine fellows had a significantly positive impact on their knowledge, ability, and skills. The curriculum was effective in helping fellows better understand and apply what they learned regarding the roles and responsibilities in medical direction. Copyright © 2013

  15. Farm, household, and farmer characteristics associated with changes in management practices and technology adoption among dairy smallholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Carlos Galdino; Ugoretz, Sarah Janes; Arriaga-Jordán, Carlos Manuel; Wattiaux, Michel André

    2015-02-01

    This study explored whether technology adoption and changes in management practices were associated with farm structure, household, and farmer characteristics and to identify processes that may foster productivity and sustainability of small-scale dairy farming in the central highlands of Mexico. Factor analysis of survey data from 44 smallholders identified three factors-related to farm size, farmer's engagement, and household structure-that explained 70 % of cumulative variance. The subsequent hierarchical cluster analysis yielded three clusters. Cluster 1 included the most senior farmers with fewest years of education but greatest years of experience. Cluster 2 included farmers who reported access to extension, cooperative services, and more management changes. Cluster 2 obtained 25 and 35 % more milk than farmers in clusters 1 and 3, respectively. Cluster 3 included the youngest farmers, with most years of education and greatest availability of family labor. Access to a network and membership in a community of peers appeared as important contributors to success. Smallholders gravitated towards easy to implement technologies that have immediate benefits. Nonusers of high investment technologies found them unaffordable because of cost, insufficient farm size, and lack of knowledge or reliable electricity. Multivariate analysis may be a useful tool in planning extension activities and organizing channels of communication to effectively target farmers with varying needs, constraints, and motivations for change and in identifying farmers who may exemplify models of change for others who manage farms that are structurally similar but performing at a lower level.

  16. Critical Care Pharmacist Market Perceptions: Comparison of Critical Care Program Directors and Directors of Pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, David R; Persaud, Rosemary A; Naseman, Ryan W; Choudhary, Kavish; Carter, Kristen E; Hansen, Amanda

    2017-05-01

    Background: While hospital beds continue to decline as patients previously treated as inpatients are stabilized in ambulatory settings, the number of critical care beds available in the United States continues to rise. Growth in pharmacy student graduation, postgraduate year 2 critical care (PGY2 CC) residency programs, and positions has also increased. There is a perception that the critical care trained pharmacist market is saturated, yet this has not been evaluated since the rise in pharmacy graduates and residency programs. Purpose: To describe the current perception of critical care residency program directors (CC RPDs) and directors of pharmacy (DOPs) on the critical care pharmacist job market and to evaluate critical care postresidency placement and anticipated changes in PGY2 CC programs. Methods: Two electronic surveys were distributed from October 2015 to November 2015 through Vizient/University HealthSystem Consortium, American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP), Society of Critical Care Medicine, and American College of Clinical Pharmacy listservs to target 2 groups of respondents: CC RPDs and DOPs. Questions were based on the ASHP Pharmacy Forecast and the Pharmacy Workforce Center's Aggregate Demand Index and were intended to identify perceptions of the critical care market of the 2 groups. Results: Of 116 CC RPDs, there were 66 respondents (56.9% response rate). Respondents have observed an increase in applicants; however, they do not anticipate increasing the number of positions in the next 5 years. The overall perception is that there is a balance in supply and demand in the critical care trained pharmacist market. A total of 82 DOPs responded to the survey. Turnover of critical care pharmacists within respondent organizations is expected to be low. Although a majority of DOPs plan to expand residency training positions, only 9% expect to increase positions in critical care PGY2 training. Overall, DOP respondents indicated a balance of

  17. EURATOM-CEA association contributions to the 21st symposium on fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garin, P.; Grosman, A.; Beaumont, B. [and others

    2000-11-01

    The 27 contributions of EURATOM-Cea association have been gathered with 6 additional papers and 1 invited paper in this document. Most papers concern Tore-Supra and deal with the ergodic divertor, particle injection, impedance concept for ICRF antennas, low hybrid current drive, RF systems, the 118 GHz ECRH experiment, the inner first wall, improved vacuum vessel protection, pellet injection, material activation, and the CIEL project. 3 of the additional papers concern the model coil of ITER.

  18. EURATOM-CEA association contributions to the 21st symposium on fusion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garin, P.; Grosman, A.; Beaumont, B.

    2000-11-01

    The 27 contributions of EURATOM-Cea association have been gathered with 6 additional papers and 1 invited paper in this document. Most papers concern Tore-Supra and deal with the ergodic divertor, particle injection, impedance concept for ICRF antennas, low hybrid current drive, RF systems, the 118 GHz ECRH experiment, the inner first wall, improved vacuum vessel protection, pellet injection, material activation, and the CIEL project. 3 of the additional papers concern the model coil of ITER

  19. Exploring the association between social capital and depressive symptoms: results of a survey in German information and communication technology companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Julia; Ernstmann, Nicole; Nitzsche, Anika; Driller, Elke; Kowalski, Christoph; Lehner, Birgit; Stieler-Lorenz, Brigitte; Friepörtner, Katharina; Schmidt, Anna; Pfaff, Holger

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the association between social capital at work and depressive symptoms in employees. Data for this cross-sectional study were collected through an online survey with the full population of employees from six companies in the German information and communication technology sector (response rate: 58.4%). A multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed. Results of data from a total of 328 employees suggest that, after controlling for sociodemographic factors, health awareness, and job strain, lower levels of perceived social capital at work are associated with the experience of depressive symptoms (OR = 0.76; 95% CI: 0.64-0.90). Our findings suggest that characteristics of high social capital at work, such as an established environment of trust and a sense of common values and convictions, could be an essential resource for preventing depressive disorders.

  20. Current Technologies and Recent Developments for Screening of HPV-Associated Cervical and Oropharyngeal Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunny S. Shah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mucosal infection by the human papillomavirus (HPV is responsible for a growing number of malignancies, predominantly represented by cervical cancer and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Because of the prevalence of the virus, persistence of infection, and long latency period, novel and low-cost methods are needed for effective population level screening and monitoring. We review established methods for screening of cervical and oral cancer as well as commercially-available techniques for detection of HPV DNA. We then describe the ongoing development of microfluidic nucleic acid-based biosensors to evaluate circulating host microRNAs that are produced in response to an oncogenic HPV infection. The goal is to develop an ideal screening platform that is low-cost, portable, and easy to use, with appropriate signal stability, sensitivity and specificity. Advances in technologies for sample lysis, pre-treatment and concentration, and multiplexed nucleic acid detection are provided. Continued development of these devices provides opportunities for cancer screening in low resource settings, for point-of-care diagnostics and self-screening, and for monitoring response to vaccination or surgical treatment.

  1. The impact of institutional ethics on academic health sciences library leadership: a survey of academic health sciences library directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooey, Mary Joan M J; Arnold, Gretchen N

    2014-10-01

    Ethical behavior in libraries goes beyond service to users. Academic health sciences library directors may need to adhere to the ethical guidelines and rules of their institutions. Does the unique environment of an academic health center imply different ethical considerations? Do the ethical policies of institutions affect these library leaders? Do their personal ethical considerations have an impact as well? In December 2013, a survey regarding the impact of institutional ethics was sent to the director members of the Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries. The objective was to determine the impact of institutional ethics on these leaders, whether through personal conviction or institutional imperative.

  2. "Why is it art?" : a talk by Christian Bernard, current director of the Geneva contemporary art gallery Mamco

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    2000-01-01

    Christian Bernard (right) being welcomed to CERN by Claude Detraz, Director for Fixed Target and Future Programmes, Michel Benot, Vice-President of the Staff Association, who is organising the talk on 21 March, and Jean-Pierre Merlo, physicist and member of the Friends of Mamco committee.

  3. Faculty Status for Library Professionals: Its Effect on Job Turnover and Job Satisfaction among University Research Library Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Michael; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigates the relationships between job turnover, job satisfaction, and faculty status of ARL (Association of Research Libraries) university library directors. Finds a positive relationship between job satisfaction and faculty status; and job satisfaction and staff release time to pursue scholarly endeavors; and a negative relationship between…

  4. 27 CFR 26.261 - Action by district director of customs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... director of customs. 26.261 Section 26.261 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... customs. The district director of customs will direct the proper customs gauger to determine the taxable... the district director of customs. Upon receipt of such report the district director of customs will...

  5. [Analysis of bacterial colonization associated with Gigaspora margarita spores by green fluorescence protein (GFP) marked technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Liangkun; Yao, Qing; Ai, Yuncan; Zhu, Honghui

    2009-05-01

    We analyzed bacterial colonization associated with spores of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) Gigaspora margarita, to indicate their ecological niche, and to provide information for further researches on their populations or functions. Six bacteria strains (Peanibacillus sp. M060106-1, Peanibacillus sp. M061122-2, Peanibacillus sp. M061122-6, Bacillus sp. M061122-4, Bacillus sp. M061122-10 and Brevibacillus sp. M061122-12) isolated from G. margarita spores were tagged with green fluorescence protein (GFP) using the carrier plasmid pNF8 (gfp-mut1). We analyzed the ecological niche and population dynamics of tagged strains on G. margarita under different conditions by using fluorescent microscope and/or plate counts. Four strains (M060106-1, M061122-6, M061122-10 and M061122-12) were tagged with GFP, showing high plasmid stability. These tagged strains possessed the basic characteristics identical to their original strains and, hence, were fit for short-term study of environmental colonization. All four GFP-tagged strains colonized the spore wall of G. margarita, and M061122-6 and M061122-12 further colonized the fungal hyphae. Under different pH conditions,the population dynamic of each GFP-tagged strain on the spores showed the same trend, i.e. first increased and then decreased, and the effects on the population size varied with different pH value. GFP-tagged strains colonized the spores of low viability more easily than those of high viability, and the population dynamic on the spores of high viability was different for each tagged strain. The isolated bacteria associated with G. margarita spores can re-colonize the fungal spores, whereas their colonizing ability depends on their characteristics and environmental factors. These data contributes to the further understanding of populations and functions of AMF-associated bacteria.

  6. Dampak Struktur Kepemilikan, Financial Leverage, Board Director terhadap Nilai Perusahaan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Dwi Ari Ambarwati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study tried to analyze the effect of ownership structure, financial leverage, size of board directors and sales Growth on the performance of companies with lower growth opportunities , whether there is a proxy growth opportunities with low PER. This research was conducted at the manufacturing company with the selection criteria for purposive sampling method 2010-2012 period, based on the criteria  the obtained sample of 32companies  with  low growth opportunities. Thus obtained 96 obervasi for each group. The results showed that: 1. simultaneously the ownership structure, financial leverage, size of board directors and sales Growth affect the performance of  companies with low growth opportunities. 2. Partially, it was found empirical evidence that financial leverage and variable size of board directors significantly affect the company’s performance with lower growth opportunities. For institutional ownership structure revealed a significant effect on performance, but at a rate of 10% alpha tolerated.

  7. Athletic Directors' Barriers to Hiring Athletic Trainers in High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Raso, Samantha R.; Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Stearns, Rebecca L.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    Context In its best-practices recommendation, the Inter-Association Task Force for Preventing Sudden Death in Secondary School Athletics Programs urged all high schools to have a certified athletic trainer (AT) on staff. Despite the recommendation, many high schools lack the medical services of an AT. Objective To examine the barriers that athletic directors (ADs) face in hiring ATs in public high schools and in providing medical coverage for their student-athletes. Design Qualitative study. Setting Semistructured telephone interviews. Patients or Other Participants Twenty full-time public high school ADs (17 men, 3 women) from various geographical regions of the United States (6 North, 4 South, 4 Midwest, 6 West) participated. Data saturation guided the total number of participants. Data Collection and Analysis We completed telephone interviews guided by a semistructured questionnaire with all participants. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were included as steps to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data using the principles of the general inductive approach. Results We identified 3 themes. Lack of power represented the inability of an AD to hire an AT, which was perceived to be a responsibility of the superintendent and school board. Budget concerns pertained to the funding allocated to specific resources within a school, which often did not include an AT. Nonbudget concerns represented rural locations without clinics or hospitals nearby; misconceptions about the role of an AT, which led to the belief that first-aid–trained coaches are appropriate medical providers; and community support from local clinics, hospitals, and volunteers. Conclusions Many ADs would prefer to employ ATs in their schools; however, they perceive that they are bound by the hiring and budgeting decisions of superintendents and school boards. Public school systems are experiencing the consequences of national budget

  8. NASA Mission Operations Directorate Preparations for the COTS Visiting Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, Sarah A.; Peek, Kenneth E.

    2011-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle looming, a series of new spacecraft is under development to assist in providing for the growing logistical needs of the International Space Station (ISS). Two of these vehicles are being built under a NASA initiative known as the Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) program. These visiting vehicles ; Space X s Dragon and Orbital Science Corporation s Cygnus , are to be domestically produced in the United States and designed to add to the capabilities of the Russian Progress and Soyuz workhorses, the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) and the Japanese H-2 Transfer Vehicle (HTV). Most of what is known about the COTS program has focused on the work of Orbital and SpaceX in designing, building, and testing their respective launch and cargo vehicles. However, there is also a team within the Mission Operations Directorate (MOD) at NASA s Johnson Space Center working with their operational counterparts in these companies to provide operational safety oversight and mission assurance via the development of operational scenarios and products needed for these missions. Ensuring that the operational aspect is addressed for the initial demonstration flights of these vehicles is the topic of this paper. Integrating Dragon and Cygnus into the ISS operational environment has posed a unique challenge to NASA and their partner companies. This is due in part to the short time span of the COTS program, as measured from initial contract award until first launch, as well as other factors that will be explored in the text. Operational scenarios and products developed for each COTS vehicle will be discussed based on the following categories: timelines, on-orbit checkout, ground documentation, crew procedures, software updates and training materials. Also addressed is an outline of the commonalities associated with the operations for each vehicle. It is the intent of the authors to provide their audience with a better

  9. Athletic Directors' Barriers to Hiring Athletic Trainers in High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Raso, Samantha R; Pagnotta, Kelly D; Stearns, Rebecca L; Casa, Douglas J

    2015-10-01

    In its best-practices recommendation, the Inter-Association Task Force for Preventing Sudden Death in Secondary School Athletics Programs urged all high schools to have a certified athletic trainer (AT) on staff. Despite the recommendation, many high schools lack the medical services of an AT. To examine the barriers that athletic directors (ADs) face in hiring ATs in public high schools and in providing medical coverage for their student-athletes. Qualitative study. Semistructured telephone interviews. Twenty full-time public high school ADs (17 men, 3 women) from various geographical regions of the United States (6 North, 4 South, 4 Midwest, 6 West) participated. Data saturation guided the total number of participants. We completed telephone interviews guided by a semistructured questionnaire with all participants. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Multiple-analyst triangulation and peer review were included as steps to establish data credibility. We analyzed the data using the principles of the general inductive approach. We identified 3 themes. Lack of power represented the inability of an AD to hire an AT, which was perceived to be a responsibility of the superintendent and school board. Budget concerns pertained to the funding allocated to specific resources within a school, which often did not include an AT. Nonbudget concerns represented rural locations without clinics or hospitals nearby; misconceptions about the role of an AT, which led to the belief that first-aid-trained coaches are appropriate medical providers; and community support from local clinics, hospitals, and volunteers. Many ADs would prefer to employ ATs in their schools; however, they perceive that they are bound by the hiring and budgeting decisions of superintendents and school boards. Public school systems are experiencing the consequences of national budget cuts and often do not have the freedom to hire ATs when other school staff are being laid off.

  10. Pathology Course Director Perspectives of a Recent LCME Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E. C. Knollmann-Ritschel MD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Preparation for a Liaison Committee of Medical Education (LCME accreditation site visit is a daunting task for any medical school, particularly for medical schools that have adopted integrated curricula. The LCME accreditation is the standard that all US and Canadian allopathic medical schools must meet in order for the school to award the degree of medical doctor. The Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU recently underwent a full-scale LCME accreditation visit that was conducted under the newly revised LCME standards and elements. The site visit occurred just 5 years after our school began implementing a totally revised, organ system-based curriculum. Preparing for a critical, high-stakes site visit shortly after transitioning to a totally revised, integrated module-based preclerkship curriculum presented an array of new challenges that required a major modification to the type of preparation, communication, and collaboration that traditionally occurs between course directors and departmental chairs. These included the need to ensure accurate, timely communication of curricular details to different levels of the academic administration, particularly as it related to the execution of self-directed learning (SDL. Preparation for our site visit, did, however, provide a novel opportunity to highlight the unique educational experiences associated with the study of pathology, as pathology traverses both clinical and basic sciences. Sharing these experiences may be useful to other programs that are either undergoing or who are preparing to undergo an accreditation visit and may also aid in a broader communication of the highlights or initiatives of educational activities.

  11. Women's career priority is associated with attitudes towards family planning and ethical acceptance of reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Michael K; Mu, Lin; Collins, Stephen C

    2017-10-01

    of the career priority questions has not been assessed. Additionally, respondents' value statements were not matched to subsequent actions, so it remains possible that these values do not directly impact reproductive behaviors. Our results suggest that reproductive counseling for career-focused women should focus on effective contraception when attempting to delay pregnancy, improved knowledge about age-related fertility decline, and the scope and limitations of current reproductive technologies. In addition, the unique reproductive views of career-focused women suggest that they may benefit from increased employer/insurer support for strategies to enable delayed childbearing, such as fertility preservation and third-party reproduction. None. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  12. Fabiola Gianotti signs her contract as CERN's new Director- General

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    Today, 12 December 2014, Fabiola Gianotti signed her five-year contract as the new CERN Director-General. Her mandate will begin on 1 January 2016.   Fabiola Gianotti (left) and President of CERN Council Agnieszka Zalewska (right) after the signature of the contract.   The Italian physicist, Fabiola Gianotti was appointed as the Organization’s next Director-General at the 173rd Closed Session of the CERN Council on 4 November. The appointment was formalised this week at the December session of Council. More news from this week Council meetings can be found here.

  13. Emotional inteligence model for directors of research centers in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Mara Maricela Trujillo Flores; Luis Arturo Rivas Tovar

    2008-01-01

    El objetivo de este trabajo es mostrar resultados del modelo IE-Martruj, concebido para la medición de la inteligencia emocional de directores de centros de investigación; fue aplicado a cuarenta y tres directores de centros de investigación en México. El proceso de validación y confiabilidad del modelo es descrito en detalle, así como su formulación matemática. Como resultado de esta investigación, se muestra como conclusión general que: El modelo estudiado es un instrumento apropiado para l...

  14. Emotional intelligence model for directors of research centers in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas Tovar, Luis Arturo; Trujillo Flores, Mara Maricela

    2008-01-01

    El objetivo de este trabajo es mostrar resultados del modelo IE-Martruj, concebido para la medición de la inteligencia emocional de directores de centros de investigación; fue aplicado a cuarenta y tres directores de centros de investigación en México. El proceso de validación y confiabilidad del modelo es descrito en detalle, así como su formulación matemática. Como resultado de esta investigación, se muestra como conclusión general que: El modelo estudiado es un ins...

  15. Performance Effects of Appointing Other Firms' Executive Directors to Corporate Boards: An Analysis of UK Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Muravyev, Alexander; Talavera, Oleksandr; Weir, Charlie

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the effect on company performance of appointing non-executive directors that are also executive directors in other firms. The analysis is based on a new panel dataset of UK companies over 2002-2008. Our findings suggest a positive relationship between the presence of these non-executive directors and the accounting performance of the appointing companies. The effect is stronger if these directors are executive directors in firms that are performing well. We also find a posi...

  16. Annual report of Fusion Research and Development Directorate of JAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubo, Hirotaka; Hoshino, Katsumichi; Isei, Nobuaki; Nakamura, Hiroo; Sato, Satoshi; Shimada, Katsuhiro; Sugie, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    This annual report provides an overview of major results and progress on research and development (R and D) activities at Fusion Research and Development Directorate of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) from April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2008, including those performed in collaboration with other directorates of JAEA, research institutes, and universities. The JT-60U operation regime was extended toward the long sustainment of high normalized beta (β N ) with good confinement (β N =2.6 x 28 s). Effectiveness of real-time control of current profile was demonstrated in high β plasmas. Toroidal momentum diffusivity and the convection velocity were systematically clarified for the first time, and intrinsic rotation due to pressure gradient was discovered. Effects of toroidal rotation and magnetic field ripple on type 1 ELM size and pedestal performance were clarified, and type I ELM control was demonstrated by toroidal rotation control. Variety of inter-machine experiments, such as JT-60U and JET, and domestic collaborations were performed. In theoretical and analytical researches, for the NEXT (Numerical Experiment of Tokamak) project, numerical simulations of a tokamak plasma turbulence progressed and a zonal field generation was investigated. Also, nonlinear MHD simulations found the Alfven resonance effects on the evolution of magnetic islands driven by externally applied perturbations. Integrations of several kinds of element codes progressed in the integrated transport/MHD model, the integrated edge/pedestal model and the integrated SOL/divertor model. In fusion reactor technologies, R and Ds for ITER and fusion DEMO plants have been carried out. For ITER, a steady state operation of the 170GHz gyrotron up to 800 s with 1 MW was demonstrated. Also extracted beam current of the neutral beam injector has been extended to 320 mA at 796 keV. In the ITER Test Blanket Module (TBM), designs and R and Ds on Water and Helium Cooled Solid Breeder TBMs were progressed. For

  17. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-21

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water

  18. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear

  19. Air Quality Management Using Modern Remote Sensing and Spatial Technologies and Associated Societal Costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waheed Uddin

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of societal costs related to public health due to the degradation of air quality and the lack of physical activity, both affected by our built environment. The paper further shows road safety as another public health concern. Traffic fatalities are the number one cause of death in the world. Traffic accidents result in huge financial loss to the people involved and the related public health cost is a significant part of the total societal cost. Motor vehicle exhausts and industrial emissions, gasoline vapors, and chemical solvents as well as natural sources emit nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds, which are precursors to the formation of ground-level Ozone. High concentration values of ground-level Ozone in hot summer days produce smog and lead to respiratory problems and loss in worker’s productivity. These factors and associated economic costs to society are important in establishing public policy and decision-making for sustainable transportation and development of communities in both industrialized and developing countries. This paper presents new science models for predicting ground-level Ozone and related air quality degradation. The models include predictor variables of daily climatological data, traffic volume and mix, speed, aviation data, and emission inventory of point sources. These models have been implemented in the user friendly AQMAN computer program and used for a case study in Northern Mississippi. Lifecycle benefits from reduced societal costs can be used to implement sustainable transportation policies, enhance investment decision-making, and protect public health and the environment.

  20. Air Quality Management Using Modern Remote Sensing and Spatial Technologies and Associated Societal Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Waheed

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study of societal costs related to public health due to the degradation of air quality and the lack of physical activity, both affected by our built environment. The paper further shows road safety as another public health concern. Traffic fatalities are the number one cause of death in the world. Traffic accidents result in huge financial loss to the people involved and the related public health cost is a significant part of the total societal cost. Motor vehicle exhausts and industrial emissions, gasoline vapors, and chemical solvents as well as natural sources emit nitrogen oxides and volatile organic compounds, which are precursors to the formation of ground-level Ozone. High concentration values of ground-level Ozone in hot summer days produce smog and lead to respiratory problems and loss in worker’s productivity. These factors and associated economic costs to society are important in establishing public policy and decision-making for sustainable transportation and development of communities in both industrialized and developing countries. This paper presents new science models for predicting ground-level Ozone and related air quality degradation. The models include predictor variables of daily climatological data, traffic volume and mix, speed, aviation data, and emission inventory of point sources. These models have been implemented in the user friendly AQMAN computer program and used for a case study in Northern Mississippi. Life-cycle benefits from reduced societal costs can be used to implement sustainable transportation policies, enhance investment decision-making, and protect public health and the environment. PMID:16968969

  1. Sean Michaletz Directors Post Doc Fellow Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Cathy Jean [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-30

    Predicting climate change effects on plant function is a central challenge of global change biology and a primary mission of DOE. Although increasing temperatures and drought have been associated with reduced growth and increased mortality of plants, accurate prediction of such responses is limited by a lack of process-based theory linking climate and whole-plant physiology. This inability to predict forest mortality can cause significant biases in climate forecasts. One way forward is metabolic scaling theory (MST), which proposes that physiologic rates – from cells to the globe – are governed by the rates of resource distribution through vascular networks and the kinetics of resource utilization by metabolic reactions. MST has traditionally not considered rates of resource acquisition from organism-environment interactions, but it has an ideal mechanistic basis for doing so. As a first step towards integrating these processes, Sean has extended MST to characterize effects of temperature and precipitation on plant growth and ecosystem production. Sean’s post doc fellowship aimed to address a remaining shortcoming in that the new theory does not yet consider the physical processes of resource acquisition, and thus cannot mechanistically predict plant performance in a changing climate.

  2. Association of cardiac development with assisted reproductive technology in childhood: a prospective single-blind pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Liu, Hong; Gu, Hai-tao; Cui, Yu-gui; Zhao, Nan-nan; Chen, Juan; Gao, Li; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Jia-yin

    2014-01-01

    To examine the pattern and extent of cardiovascular developmental alterations among children conceived by assisted reproductive technology (ART) and its association with potential confounders. The present study was a prospective single-blind pilot design lasting 15 months. The ART group was recruited by a non-random, consecutive sample on the basis of the unique personal identification number assigned to ART children, whereas spontaneous conception controls were recruited by a population-based random sample from the same hospital by age. Echocardiography was available for the measurement of 128 ART children and 100 controls with respect to cardiovascular geometric morphology and cardiac function. The majority of cardiac geometric morphology parameters were comparable among the study groups (P>0.05), except for significant increases in left ventricular (LV) relative wall thickness (P=0.038), LV mass index (P=0.005) and LV remodeling index (P=0.005) in ART children after adjustment for age, gender, body surface area and heart rate. The results showed similarity in LV systolic function characterized by ejection fraction (P=0.140) and shortening fraction (P=0.167) between the groups. However, ART children had a significant tendency toward a decrease in mitral A (P=0.008) and mitral E' (P=0.012) compared with controls after adjusting for confounders. Additionally, Cox analysis suggested an independent association (Pchildren compared with controls, which may be independently associated with the anthropometrics and perinatal outcomes in addition to the ART procedure. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Early Childhood Directors as Socializers of Emotional Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinsser, Katherine M.; Denham, Susanne A.; Curby, Timothy W.; Chazan-Cohen, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Early childhood centres are vibrant social communities where child and adult emotions are integral to learning. Previous research has focused on teaching practices that support children's social-emotional learning; fewer studies have attended to relevant centre-level factors, such as the emotional leadership practices of the centre director. The…

  4. Designated Medical Directors for Emergency Medical Services: Recruitment and Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slifkin, Rebecca T.; Freeman, Victoria A.; Patterson, P. Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Context: Emergency medical services (EMS) agencies rely on medical oversight to support Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs) in the provision of prehospital care. Most states require EMS agencies to have a designated medical director (DMD), who typically is responsible for the many activities of medical oversight. Purpose: To assess rural-urban…

  5. 76 FR 74831 - Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    ..., DC 20005. STATUS: Open. CONTACT PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate... the Regular Board of Directors Meeting Minutes IV. Approval of the Finance, Budget and Program Committee Meeting Minutes V. Approval of the Corporate Administrative Committee Meeting Minutes VI. Approval...

  6. 77 FR 76078 - Regular Board of Directors Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-26

    ..., DC 20005. STATUS: Open. CONTACT PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate... Regular Board of Directors Meeting Minutes IV. Approval of the Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting... Corporate Secretary. [FR Doc. 2012-31163 Filed 12-21-12; 4:15 pm] BILLING CODE 7570-02-P ...

  7. 77 FR 58416 - Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-20

    ..., DC 20005. STATUS: Open. CONTACT PERSON FOR MORE INFORMATION: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate... Annual Board of Directors Meeting Minutes IV. Approval of the Corporate Administration Committee Meeting Minutes V. Approval of the Finance, Budget & Program Committee Meeting Minutes VI. Approval of the Audit...

  8. 77 FR 15142 - Regular Board of Directors Meeting; Sunshine Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ... 20005. STATUS: Open. CONTACT PERSON: Erica Hall, Assistant Corporate Secretary, (202) 220- 2376; ehall... Directors Meeting Minutes IV. Approval of the Audit Committee Meeting Minutes V. Approval of the Finance, Budget and Program Committee Meeting Minutes VI. Approval of the Corporate Administration Committee...

  9. London: Wakeup ity Press xpression. 1990. 145 THE DIRECTOR AS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    critical as they indeed “highlight Professor Dapo Adelugba's contribution to the emergence and development of Nigerian. Theatre…as a teacher of theatre, a foremost director and a cultural nationalist,'' as well as a robust theatre critic. Adelugba has further achieved the oral demonstration through talk shows that he featured.

  10. Quality Improvement in Otolaryngology Residency: Survey of Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowe, Sarah N

    2016-02-01

    The Clinical Learning Environment Review focuses on the responsibility of the sponsoring institution for quality and patient safety. Very little information is known regarding the status of quality improvement (QI) education during otolaryngology training. The purpose of this survey is to evaluate the extent of resident and faculty participation in QI and identify opportunities for both resident curriculum and faculty development. Cross-sectional survey A 15-item survey was distributed to all 106 otolaryngology program directors. The survey was developed after an informal review of the literature regarding education in QI and patient safety. Questions were directed at the format and content of the QI curriculum, as well as barriers to implementation. There was a 39% response rate. Ninety percent of responding program directors considered education in QI important or very important to a resident's future success. Only 23% of responding programs contained an educational curriculum in QI, and only 33% monitored residents' individual outcome measures. Barriers to implementation of a QI program included inadequate number of faculty with expertise in QI (75%) and competing resident educational demands (90%). Every program director considered morbidity and mortality conferences as an integral component in QI education. Program directors recognize the importance of QI in otolaryngology practice. Unfortunately, this survey identifies a distinct lack of resources in support of these educational goals. The results highlight the need to generate a comprehensive and stepwise approach to QI for faculty development and resident instruction. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  11. Learning to Manage: A Program Just for Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Megan E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the Head Start-Johnson & Johnson Management Fellows program, whose mission is strengthening management skills of Head Start directors by providing training in human resources management, organizational design and development, financial management, computers and information systems, operations, marketing, and development of strategic…

  12. An Afterschool Director's Educational Leadership Strategies: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Afterschool programs linked to schools provide opportunities to keep children safe and engage them in enrichment activities that can support their growth and development. Often, these programs are led by afterschool directors with a background in youth development and no experience or education in leading in educational environments. These…

  13. Prime Time Power: Women Producers, Writers and Directors on TV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenland, Sally

    This report analyzes the number of women working in the following six decision making jobs in prime time television: (1) executive producer; (2) supervising producer; (3) producer; (4) co-producer; (5) writer; and (6) director. The women who hold these positions are able to influence the portrayal of women on television as well as to improve the…

  14. Evaluation of the Library School Director: A First Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleaves, Edwin S.

    1974-01-01

    A questionnaire was administered to faculty and students at George Peabody College for Teachers to determine the effectiveness of the Director of the School of Library Science in the areas of administration, supervision, relationships, personal qualities, and professional attitudes. Sample questionnaire is appended. (LS)

  15. From medical doctor to medical director: leadership style matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Geraint; Wood, Edward V; Ibram, Ferda

    2015-07-01

    Leadership is a skill to be developed by all doctors from the foundation trainee to the director of the board. This article explores the impact of leadership style on performance and considers techniques to develop doctors' leadership skills and personal effectiveness.

  16. Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN’s next Director General

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    Currently Research Director for particle and astroparticle physics at Germany’s DESY laboratory in Hamburg, Professor Heuer will serve a five-year term, taking office on 1 January 2009.The CERN Council has appointed Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer to succeed Dr Robert Aymar as CERN’s Director-General. Professor Heuer will serve a five-year term, taking office on 1 January 2009. Currently Research Director for particle and astroparticle physics at Germany’s DESY laboratory in Hamburg, a post that he took up in 2004, Rolf-Dieter Heuer is no stranger to CERN. From 1984 to 1998, he was a staff member at the Laboratory, working for the OPAL collaboration at the Large Electron Positron collider. From 1994 to 1998, he was the collaboration’s spokesman. "This is a very exciting time for particle physics," said Heuer. "To become CERN’s Director-General for the early years of LHC operation is a great honour, a great challenge, and probably the best job in physics research tod...

  17. 12 CFR 1710.11 - Board of directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Board of directors. 1710.11 Section 1710.11 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.11 Board of...

  18. School Nutrition Directors' Perspectives on Flavored Milk in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yon, Bethany A.; Johnson, Rachel K.; Berlin, Linda

    2013-01-01

    The offering of flavored milk in schools is a controversial topic. U.S. Department of Agriculture regulations now require that flavored milk in schools is fat-free. The perceptions, beliefs, and attitudes of 21 school nutrition directors (SNDs) about the offering and student acceptance of lower-calorie, flavored milk were explored using a focus…

  19. Auteur Description: From the Director's Creative Vision to Audio Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szarkowska, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    In this report, the author follows the suggestion that a film director's creative vision should be incorporated into Audio description (AD), a major technique for making films, theater performances, operas, and other events accessible to people who are blind or have low vision. The author presents a new type of AD for auteur and artistic films:…

  20. Why so few Women on Boards of Directors?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Nina; Parrotta, Pierpaolo

    2015-01-01

    nonemployee-elected female board members. We also find clear evidence of a tokenism behavior in Danish companies. The likelihood of enlarging the share of non-employee-elected female board members is significantly smaller if one, two, or more women have sat on the board of directors. Finally, the pipeline...

  1. 42 CFR 493.1405 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... performance of moderate complexity tests and must be eligible to be an operator of a laboratory within the...; and (b) The laboratory director must— (1) (i) Be a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathy licensed to practice medicine or osteopathy in the State in which the laboratory is located; and (ii) Be...

  2. 42 CFR 493.1443 - Standard; Laboratory director qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... performance of high complexity tests and must be eligible to be an operator of a laboratory within the... laboratory director must— (1)(i) Be a doctor of medicine or doctor of osteopathy licensed to practice medicine or osteopathy in the State in which the laboratory is located; and (ii) Be certified in anatomic...

  3. 48 CFR 837.7002 - List of qualified funeral directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... which the business operates. If there has been no prior experience with the funeral director that would... contract negotiation to inspect the premises and the casket to be provided, as well as to check with the local business bureau and/or Chamber of Commerce. (38 U.S.C. 2302) ...

  4. DOD's Comptroller Recognizes NPS DRMI Director With Prestigious Award [video

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    NPS Professor Natalie Webb, Executive Director for the university’s Defense Resources Management Institute (DRMI), has been recognized by Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) The Honorable Mike McCord with the Office of the Secretary of Defense Award for Outstanding Achievement.

  5. The Special Education Director's Role in Inservice Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donatell, Henry

    1978-01-01

    Reviewed in the article on the special education director's role in inservice training programs are planning procedures (including evaluation of the present program by all staff), types of programs offered (such as summer curriculum writing and teacher orientation week), and evaluation methods. (CL)

  6. A Conversation with AATE's Executive Director, Barbara Salisbury Wills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldana, Johnny

    1997-01-01

    Presents an interview with the American Alliance for Theatre and Education's executive director Barbara Salisbury Wills. Discusses her interaction with the Goals 2000 Commission, development of the "National Standards for Arts Education," getting parents involved in theater education programs, working with state representatives, and…

  7. 20 CFR 702.272 - Informal recommendation by district director.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... LONGSHOREMEN'S AND HARBOR WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Claims... any wage loss suffered as the result of the discharge or discrimination. The district director may... of the Chief Administrative Law Judge for hearing pursuant to § 702.317. [42 FR 45302, Sept. 9, 1977] ...

  8. Cultural Contexts of Exclusion: Women College Band Directors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Elizabeth S.

    2003-01-01

    Despite gender affirmative employment practices, women constitute little more than 5% of all U.S. college band directors. Researchers have investigated this situation in terms of historical precedent, traditional socialization, discrimination, segregation, professional identity, and lack of role models. They have not, however, addressed the…

  9. Assessing Women in the Creative Department: What Creative Directors Think.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, John K.

    A study examined the status of women in the creative departments of advertising agencies. In November 1987, questionnaires were sent to the creative directors of the 196 member agencies of the Adcraft Club of Detroit (the largest advertising club in the nation). Sixty-four questionnaires were returned. Answers and comments from the directors…

  10. FAPE and LRE in Online Learning: Special Education Directors' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Diana; Harvey, Danna; Burdette, Paula; Basham, James

    2015-01-01

    While the provision of a "free appropriate public education" (FAPE) has contributed significantly to the educational experiences of students with disabilities, little is known about how services are actually provided in an online learning setting. Thus, telephone and face-to-face interviews were conducted with state directors of special…

  11. Boards of Directors' and Management's Liability in Law in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2011-01-01

    emphasizes in various places that this or that is "the responsibility of the board of directors or management", and by emphasizing such legally defined focal points, the companies act is thus nevertheless instrumental in clarifying - and in the longer term perhaps to some degree increasing the stringency...

  12. APEX (Air Pollution Exercise) Volume 1: Game Director's Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC. Office of Manpower Development.

    The Game Director's Manual is the first in a set of 21 manuals (AA 001 009-001 029) used in APEX (Air Pollution Exercise), a computerized college and professional level "real world" simulation of a community with urban and rural problems, industrial activities, and air pollution difficulties. The participants, which may range in number from 18 to…

  13. Nematic liquid crystal director structures in rectangular regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, J.; Mottram, N. J.; McKay, G.

    2018-02-01

    We consider a shallow rectangular well of nematic liquid crystal subject to weak anchoring on the sides of the well. By considering weak anchoring instead of infinitely strong anchoring, we are able to analyze nematic equilibria in the well without the need to exclude point defects at the corners, as done in previous work in the area. For relatively weak anchoring, we are able to derive analytic expressions for the director alignment angle in terms of an infinite series of modes, involving roots of a transcendental equation. The analytic forms of the director configuration are then used to calculate critical anchoring strengths at which uniform and distorted director structures exchange stability. We also consider the asymptotic behavior of the director structure and energy for very strong anchoring. We show that in both cases—for the transitions from uniform to distorted states and the limit of infinitely strong anchoring—the approximate analytic expansions agree very well with corresponding numerical calculations of the full model.

  14. Attracting non-executive directors to the board

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. de Jong (Abe); R.B.H. Hooghiemstra (Reggy); M. van Rinsum (Marcel)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractCompanies that are performing poorly from a commercial perspective and are struggling to tap into the advice and guidance of well-qualified non-executive directors need to consider new board members’ intrinsic motivations and the potential for enhancing their reputation if they are

  15. SME Non-Executive Directors: Having One and Being One

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study reported here was to ascertain the impact on small and medium-sized enterprise (SME) owner-managers of simulating having and being a non-executive director (NED) within the GOLD programme at Lancaster University, the purpose of which is to help owner-managers of SMEs to become better strategic leaders of their companies.…

  16. Digital security technology simplified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaglione, Bernard J

    2007-01-01

    Digital security technology is making great strides in replacing analog and other traditional security systems including CCTV card access, personal identification and alarm monitoring applications. Like any new technology, the author says, it is important to understand its benefits and limitations before purchasing and installing, to ensure its proper operation and effectiveness. This article is a primer for security directors on how digital technology works. It provides an understanding of the key components which make up the foundation for digital security systems, focusing on three key aspects of the digital security world: the security network, IP cameras and IP recorders.

  17. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children with sickle cell disease: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Anupama Rao; Norris, Chelita Kaye; Minniti, Caterina P

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate the current clinical practice regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring dental treatment; and (2) evaluate the perceived relative risk of bacteremia following specific dental procedures, as defined by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists. A written survey depicting various clinical scenarios of SCD children requiring common dental procedures was mailed to directors of pediatric dental advanced education programs and distributed to pediatric hematologists attending the 2003 Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America conference in Washington, DC. Surveys were returned by 60% (N=34/57) of the pediatric dentistry residency program directors. The surveys were obtained from 51% of pediatric hematologists at the meeting (N=72/140). At least 50% of all respondents recommended prophylaxis for the following clinical situations: dental extractions, treatment under general anesthesia, and status post splenectomy. The perceived risk of infectious complication was highest for extractions, followed by restorative treatment and tooth polishing. Dental residency program directors were more likely (71%, N=24/34) to recommend additional antibiotic therapy for patients taking penicillin prophylaxis if they required an invasive oral surgical procedure. Conversely, only 38% (N=25/66) of pediatric hematologists recommended additional antibiotic therapy (P=.001). Eighty-six percent of dental residency program directors (N=25/29) chose amoxicillin for prophylaxis whereas only 62% of pediatric hematologists (N=36/58) recommended amoxicillin. (P<.05). There is a lack of consensus on the appropriate use of antibiotic prophylaxis in SCD children undergoing dental treatments. Further research and risk/benefit assessment is needed to create a unified approach.

  18. 19 January 2011 - Korean Vice Minister II of Education, Science and Technology K.Chang-Kyung with Adviser R. Voss, Director-General R. Heuer and head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    Korean vice-minister II of education, science and technology, Kim Chang-Kyung, visiting the CMS experimental area at CERN on 19 January. He also had the opportunity to view part of the LHC tunnel, as well as to visit the CERN Control Centre.

  19. Program Director Survey: Attitudes Regarding Child Neurology Training and Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Ignacio; Feist, Terri B; Gilbert, Donald L

    2016-04-01

    As a result of major clinical and scientific advances and changes in clinical practice, the role of adult neurology training for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability (NDD) certification has become controversial. The most recently approved requirements for board eligibility for child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents still include 12 months in adult neurology rotations. The objective of this study was to assess United States child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residency program directors' opinions regarding optimal residency training. The authors developed an 18-item questionnaire and contacted all 80 child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors via e-mail, using SurveyMonkey. A total of 44 program directors responded (55%), representing programs that train 78 categorical and 94 total resident positions, approximately 70% of those filled in the match. Respondents identified multiple areas where child neurology residents need more training, including genetics and neuromuscular disease. A substantial majority (73%) believed child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability residents need less than 12 adult neurology training months; however, most (75%) also believed adult hospital service and man-power needs (55%) and finances (34%) would pose barriers to reducing adult neurology. Most (70%) believed reductions in adult neurology training should be program flexible. A majority believed the written initial certification examination should be modified with more child neurology and fewer basic neuroscience questions. Nearly all (91%) felt the views of child neurology and neurodevelopmental disability program directors are under-represented within the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Residency Review Committee. The requirement for 12 adult neurology months for Child Neurology and Neurodevelopmental Disability certification is not consistent with the views of the majority of program

  20. Program director`s report for the Office of Health and Environmental Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    LBNL performs basic and applied research and develops technologies in support of the Department of Energy Office of Health and Environmental Research`s mission to explore and mitigate the long-term health and environmental consequences of energy use and to advance solutions to major medical challenges. The ability of the Laboratory to engage in this mission depends upon the strength of its core competencies. In addition, there are several key capabilities that are crosscutting, or underlie, many of the core competencies. They are: bioscience and biotechnology; environmental assessment and remediation; advanced detector systems; materials characterization and synthesis; chemical dynamics, catalysis, and surface science; advanced technologies for energy supply and energy efficiency; particle and photon beams; national research facilities; computation and information management; engineering design and fabrication technologies; and education of future scientists and engineers. Research in progress and major accomplishments are summarized for projects in analytical technology; environmental research; health effects; molecular carcinogenesis; general life sciences; human genome project; medical applications; and imaging of E-binding proteins.