WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology dependent medically

  1. Neonates and Infants Discharged Home Dependent on Medical Technology: Characteristics and Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toly, Valerie Boebel; Musil, Carol M; Bieda, Amy; Barnett, Kimberly; Dowling, Donna A; Sattar, Abdus

    2016-10-01

    Preterm neonates and neonates with complex conditions admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) may require medical technology (eg, supplemental oxygen, feeding tubes) for their continued survival at hospital discharge. Medical technology introduces another layer of complexity for parents, including specialized education about neonatal assessment and operation of technology. The transition home presents a challenge for parents and has been linked with greater healthcare utilization. To determine incidence, characteristics, and healthcare utilization outcomes (emergency room visits, rehospitalizations) of technology-dependent neonates and infants following initial discharge from the hospital. This descriptive, correlational study used retrospective medical record review to examine technology-dependent neonates (N = 71) upon discharge home. Study variables included demographic characteristics, hospital length of stay, and type of medical technology used. Analysis of neonates (n = 22) with 1-year postdischarge data was conducted to identify relationships with healthcare utilization. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed. Approximately 40% of the technology-dependent neonates were between 23 and 26 weeks' gestation, with birth weight of less than 1000 g. Technologies used most frequently were supplemental oxygen (66%) and feeding tubes (46.5%). The mean total hospital length of stay for technology-dependent versus nontechnology-dependent neonates was 108.6 and 25.7 days, respectively. Technology-dependent neonates who were female, with a gastrostomy tube, or with longer initial hospital length of stay were at greater risk for rehospitalization. Assessment and support of families, particularly mothers of technology-dependent neonates following initial hospital discharge, are vital. Longitudinal studies to determine factors affecting long-term outcomes of technology-dependent infants are needed.

  2. Technologies for Medical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Tavares, João; Barbosa, Marcos; Slade, AP

    2012-01-01

    This book presents novel and advanced technologies for medical sciences in order to solidify knowledge in the related fields and define their key stakeholders.   The fifteen papers included in this book were written by invited experts of international stature and address important technologies for medical sciences, including: computational modeling and simulation, image processing and analysis, medical imaging, human motion and posture, tissue engineering, design and development medical devices, and mechanic biology. Different applications are treated in such diverse fields as biomechanical studies, prosthesis and orthosis, medical diagnosis, sport, and virtual reality.   This book is of interest to researchers, students and manufacturers from  a wide range of disciplines related to bioengineering, biomechanics, computational mechanics, computational vision, human motion, mathematics, medical devices, medical image, medicine and physics.

  3. Rostaporfin (Miravant Medical Technologies).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, David W C

    2002-02-01

    Pharmacia Corp, under license from Miravant Medical Technologies (formerly PDT Inc), is developing rostaporfin (SnET2, Purlytin), a light-activated cytotoxic drug developed as part of Miravant's PhotoPoint photodynamic therapy (PDT) program, for the potential treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) [180314]. In January 2002, results of phase III trials indicated that rostaporfin had not met the primary efficacy endpoint for the wet form of AMD. At this time, a full review of the data was to be undertaken, and decisions about future development of the drug were to be made after additional analyses had been completed [435577]. The original licensing agreements included the development of rostaporfin for several ophthalmology, oncology and urology indications [289078], and for dermatological applications including certain skin cancers [267521]. However, in August 1998, Miravant reported that it no longer intended to pursue cutaneous metastatic breast cancer (CMBC), in order to focus on AMD [439372], [439384]. Also in 1998, studies in basal cell carcinoma and AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma were discontinued because of business considerations [439372]. Rostaporfin is activated by red light with a wavelength of 664 nm. It is injected into the patient, where it distributes and selectively binds to plasma lipoproteins, which are produced in high concentrations by hyperproliferating cells such as cancer cells. After 24 h, the targeted cells are stimulated by red light to activate the compound. This triggers the formation of toxic free radical species that destroy the cells without affecting the surrounding normal tissue [85236]. In January 2002, Credit Suisse First Boston estimated sales for Pharmacia of 40 million US dollars in 2003 and 80 million US dollars in 2004 [436118], while in the same month, Argus Research predicted peak annual sales for Pharmacia of less than 250 million US dollars[436279].

  4. Will Medical Technology Deskill Doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the impact of medical technology on health care in light of the fact that doctors are becoming more reliant on technology for obtaining patient information, making diagnoses and in carrying out treatments. Evidence has shown that technology can negatively affect doctor-patient communications, physical examination skills, and…

  5. Educational technology in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Heeyoung; Resch, David S; Kovach, Regina A

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review the past practices of educational technology and envision future directions for medical education. The discussion starts with a historical review of definitions and perspectives of educational technology, in which the authors propose that educators adopt a broader process-oriented understanding of educational technology. Future directions of e-learning, simulation, and health information technology are discussed based on a systems view of the technological process. As new technologies continue to arise, this process-oriented understanding and outcome-based expectations of educational technology should be embraced. With this view, educational technology should be valued in terms of how well the technological process informs and facilitates learning, and the acquisition and maintenance of clinical expertise.

  6. Medical imaging technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    The book has two intentions. First, it assembles the latest research in the field of medical imaging technology in one place. Detailed descriptions of current state-of-the-art medical imaging systems (comprised of x-ray CT, MRI, ultrasound, and nuclear medicine) and data processing techniques are discussed. Information is provided that will give interested engineers and scientists a solid foundation from which to build with additional resources. Secondly, it exposes the reader to myriad applications that medical imaging technology has enabled.

  7. Commercializing medical technology

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, Kevin J.; Lieberman, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    As medicine moves into the 21st century, life saving therapies will move from inception into medical products faster if there is a better synergy between science and business. Medicine appears to have 50-year innovative cycles of education and scientific discoveries. In the 1880’s, the chemical industry in Germany was faced with the dilemma of modernization to exploit the new scientific discoveries. The solution was the spawning of novel technical colleges for training in these new chemical i...

  8. Commercializing medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, Kevin J; Lieberman, Mark A

    2007-04-01

    As medicine moves into the 21st century, life saving therapies will move from inception into medical products faster if there is a better synergy between science and business. Medicine appears to have 50-year innovative cycles of education and scientific discoveries. In the 1880's, the chemical industry in Germany was faced with the dilemma of modernization to exploit the new scientific discoveries. The solution was the spawning of novel technical colleges for training in these new chemical industries. The impact of those new employees and their groundbreaking compounds had a profound influence on medicine and medical education in Germany between 1880 and 1930. Germany dominated international science during this period and was a training center for scientists worldwide. This model of synergy between education and business was envied and admired in Europe, Asia and America. British science soon after evolved to dominate the field of science during the prewar and post World War (1930's-1970's) because the German scientists fled Hitler's government. These expatriated scientists had a profound influence on the teaching and training of British scientists, which lead to advances in medicine such as antibiotics. After the Second World War, the US government wisely funded the development of the medical infrastructure that we see today. British and German scientists in medicine moved to America because of this bountiful funding for their research. These expatriated scientists helped drive these medical advances into commercialized products by the 1980's. America has been the center of medical education and advances of biotechnology but will it continue? International scientists trained in America have started to return to Europe and Asia. These American-trained scientists and their governments are very aware of the commercial potential of biotechnology. Those governments are now more prepared to play an active role this new science. Germany, Ireland, Britain, Singapore

  9. Medical imaging technology

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    Biomedical imaging is a relatively young discipline that started with Conrad Wilhelm Roentgen’s discovery of the x-ray in 1885. X-ray imaging was rapidly adopted in hospitals around the world. However, it was the advent of computerized data and image processing that made revolutionary new imaging modalities possible. Today, cross-sections and three-dimensional reconstructions of the organs inside the human body is possible with unprecedented speed, detail and quality. This book provides an introduction into the principles of image formation of key medical imaging modalities: X-ray projection imaging, x-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound imaging, and radionuclide imaging. Recent developments in optical imaging are also covered. For each imaging modality, the introduction into the physical principles and sources of contrast is provided, followed by the methods of image formation, engineering aspects of the imaging devices, and a discussion of strengths and limitations of the modal...

  10. Exploration Medical Capability - Technology Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krihak, Michael; Watkins, Sharmila; Barr, Yael; Barsten, Kristina; Fung, Paul; Baumann, David

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of the Technology Watch process are to identify emerging, high-impact technologies that augment current ExMC development efforts, and to work with academia, industry, and other government agencies to accelerate the development of medical care and research capabilities for the mitigation of potential health issues that could occur during space exploration missions. The establishment of collaborations with these entities is beneficial to technology development, assessment and/or insertion. Such collaborations also further NASA s goal to provide a safe and healthy environment for human exploration. The Tech Watch project addresses requirements and capabilities identified by knowledge and technology gaps that are derived from a discrete set of medical conditions that are most likely to occur on exploration missions. These gaps are addressed through technology readiness level assessments, market surveys, collaborations and distributed innovation opportunities. Ultimately, these gaps need to be closed with respect to exploration missions, and may be achieved through technology development projects. Information management is a key aspect to this process where Tech Watch related meetings, research articles, collaborations and partnerships are tracked by the HRP s Exploration Medical Capabilities (ExMC) Element. In 2011, ExMC will be introducing the Tech Watch external website and evidence wiki that will provide access to ExMC technology and knowledge gaps, technology needs and requirements documents.

  11. Biological and medical sensor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Iniewski, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Biological and Medical Sensor Technologies presents contributions from top experts who explore the development and implementation of sensors for various applications used in medicine and biology. Edited by a pioneer in the area of advanced semiconductor materials, the book is divided into two sections. The first part covers sensors for biological applications. Topics include: Advanced sensing and communication in the biological world DNA-derivative architectures for long-wavelength bio-sensing Label-free silicon photonics Quartz crystal microbalance-based biosensors Lab-on-chip technologies fo

  12. MEMS for medical technology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisk, Thomas; Roxhed, Niclas; Stemme, Göran

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an in-depth description of two recent projects at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) which utilize MEMS and microsystem technology for realization of components intended for specific applications in medical technology and diagnostic instrumentation. By novel use of the DRIE fabrication technology we have developed side-opened out-of-plane silicon microneedles intended for use in transdermal drug delivery applications. The side opening reduces clogging probability during penetration into the skin and increases the up-take area of the liquid in the tissue. These microneedles offer about 200µm deep and pain-free skin penetration. We have been able to combine the microneedle chip with an electrically and heat controlled liquid actuator device where expandable microspheres are used to push doses of drug liquids into the skin. The entire unit is made of low cost materials in the form of a square one cm-sized patch. Finally, the design, fabrication and evaluation of an integrated miniaturized Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) based "electronic nose" microsystem for detection of narcotics is described. The work integrates a novel environment-to-chip sample interface with the sensor element. The choice of multifunctional materials and the geometric features of a four-component microsystem allow a functional integration of a QCM crystal, electrical contacts, fluidic contacts and a sample interface in a single system with minimal assembly effort, a potential for low-cost manufacturing, and a few orders of magnitude reduced in system size (12*12*4 mm 3) and weight compared to commercially available instruments. The sensor chip was successfully used it for the detection of 200 ng of narcotics sample.

  13. Patient safety and technology-driven medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Keinicke Fabricius, Pia

    2015-01-01

    ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. AIM: To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. METHODS: 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded...... for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient......BACKGROUND: The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26-38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new...

  14. Emergency Medical Service (EMS): Rotorcraft Technology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchspies, J. S.; Adams, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    A lead organization on the national level should be designated to establish concepts, locations, and the number of shock trauma air medical services. Medical specialists desire a vehicle which incorporates advances in medical technology trends in health care. Key technology needs for the emergency medical services helicopter of the future include the riding quality of fixed wing aircraft (reduced noise and vibration), no tail rotor, small rotor, small rotor diameter, improved visibility, crashworthy vehicle, IFR capability, more affordability high reliability, fuel efficient, and specialized cabins to hold medical/diagnostic and communications equipment. Approaches to a national emergency medical service are discussed.

  15. Medical technology in India: Tracing policy approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, Indira

    2013-01-01

    Medical devices and equipment have become an indispensable part of modern medical practice. Yet these medical technologies receive scant attention in the Indian context, both at the health policy level and as an area of study. There has been little attempt to systematically address the issue of equipment based medical technologies and how to regulate their use. There is paucity of primary data on the kind of medical equipment and techniques being introduced, on their need and relative usefulness, reliability, patterns of utilization, on their production, procurement, distribution, costs, and accessibility. This article reviews some of the policy issues relating to equipment based medical technology in India, in light of the specific choices and policies made during and after the colonial period in favour of modern medicine and a technology-based public health system, attempts at self-sufficiency and the current international environment with respect to the medical equipment and health-care industry.

  16. Medical sociology and technology: critical engagements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casper, Monica J; Morrison, Daniel R

    2010-01-01

    In this selective review of the literature on medical sociology's engagement with technology, we outline the concurrent developments of the American Sociological Association section on medicine and advances in medical treatment. We then describe theoretical and epistemological issues with scholars' treatment of technology in medicine. Using symbolic interactionist concepts, as well as work from the interdisciplinary field of science and technology studies, we review and synthesize critical connections in and across sociology's intellectual relationship with medical technology. Next, we discuss key findings in these literatures, noting a shift from a focus on the effects of technology on practice to a reconfiguration of human bodies. We also look toward the future, focusing on connections between technoscientific identities and embodied health movements. Finally, we call for greater engagement by medical sociologists in studying medical technology and the process of policy-making--two areas central to debates in health economics and public policy.

  17. Medical Technology Base Master Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    action of candidate mnedical1 countermeasures - Analysis and characterization of candidate compounds and their inetabolites - Application of molecular ...expected that research in molecular biology will lead to medical ,.vphylaes and treatments that ofter improved speclicity and potency, thus increasing...Disease Hazards Research (Inlectious Disease, Medical Biologia Defense, and Military AIDS), Conbat Casualty Care Research, Medical Chem"ca Defense Research

  18. Medical technologies: flows, frictions and new socialities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardon, A.; Moyer, E.

    2014-01-01

    While social scientists often highlight the way medical technologies mediate biomedical hegemony, this special issue focuses on the creative and often unexpected ways in which medical technologies are appropriated by diverse actors in homes, clinics and communities. The authors highlight key insight

  19. Handbook of medical and healthcare technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Furht, Borko

    2013-01-01

    This book equips readers to understand a complex range of healthcare products that are used to diagnose, monitor, and treat diseases or medical conditions affecting humans. The first part of the book presents medical technologies such as medical information retrieval, tissue engineering techniques, 3D medical imaging, nanotechnology innovations in medicine, medical wireless sensor networks, and knowledge mining techniques in medicine. The second half of the book focuses on healthcare technologies including prediction hospital readmission risk, modeling e-health framework, personal Web in healt

  20. The impact of technology dependence on children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesman, Glenn R; Kuo, Dennis Z; Carroll, John L; Ward, Wendy L

    2013-01-01

    Advances in medical care and technologies have prolonged life for many children with medical complexity. These advances and their effects reinforce the need for further research to determine how children and their families are being affected by technology dependence and their quality of life. A review of the literature suggests that children, as well as their family members, are negatively affected by technology dependence in a variety of psychosocial domains. Implications for clinical care and future research of this population are discussed. Copyright © 2013 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modelling in Medical Technology Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Michel (Bowine)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractHealth care is a rapidly developing field in which new technologies are introduced continuously. Not all new technologies have the same impact however: most represent only small changes in existing technologies, whereas only a few - like organ transplants - really are revolutionary new d

  2. Unmet needs: relevance to medical technology innovation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Avril D; Sproson, Lise; Wells, Oliver; Tindale, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the role of unmet needs in the innovation of new medical technologies using the National Institute for Health Research Devices for Dignity (D4D) Healthcare Technology Co-operative as a case study. It defines an unmet need, providing a spectrum of classification and discusses the benefits and the challenges of identifying unmet need and its influence on the innovation process. The process by which D4D has captured and utilized unmet needs to drive technology innovation is discussed and examples given. It concludes by arguing that, despite the challenges, defining and reviewing unmet need is a fundamental factor in the success of medical technology innovation.

  3. Medical Wearable Technologies: Applications, Problems and Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Bostanci, Erkan

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on wearable technologies which are increasingly being employed in the medical field. From smart watches to smart glasses, from electronic textile to data gloves; several gadgets are playing important roles in diagnosis and treatment of various medical conditions. The threats posed by these technologies are another matter of concern that must be seriously taken into account. Numerous threats ranging from data privacy to big data problems are facing us as adverse effe...

  4. Information Technology and Undergraduate Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masys, Daniel R.

    1989-01-01

    Hewlett-Packard Corporation grant enabled Harvard Medical School to begin using computer technology in medical educational applications. Hardware and software selection, integration into the curriculum, teaching the use of computers, cost, successful applications, knowledge base access, simulations, video and graphics teaching programs, and…

  5. [Health Technology Dependency: A Concept Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Miao-Yi; Chen, Ting-Yu; Kao, Chi-Wen

    2016-02-01

    Health technology dependence is a widely recognized concept that refers to the utilization of technology, including drugs, equipment, instruments, and related devices, to compensate for a physical disability or to prevent the progression of a disability. Although technology may significantly prolong the life of a patient, technology may also increase the psychological pressure of these patients and the burdens of their caregivers. There is a current dearth of related research and discussions related to the concept of "health technology dependency". Therefore, the present paper uses the strategies of concept analysis described by Walker & Avant (2010) to analyze this concept. The characteristic definition of health technology dependence addresses individuals who: (1) currently live with health technology, (2) may perceive physical or psychological burdens due to health technology, and (3) feel physical and psychological well-being when coping positively with their health technology dependency and, further, regard health technology as a part of their body. Further, the present paper uses case examples to help analyze the general concept. It is hoped that nurses may better understand the concept of "health technology dependency", consider the concerns of health-technology-dependent patients and their families, and develop relevant interventions to promote the well-being of these patients and their families.

  6. Production Situation and Technology Prospect of Medical Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Feng;LIN Li;LIU Yu-hao;MA Xing-jun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The isotope production technology was overviewed, including traditional and newest technology. The current situation of medical isotope production was introduced. The problems faced by isotope supply and demand were analyzed. The future development trend of medical isotopes and technology prospect were put forward. As the most populous country, nuclear medicine develops rapidly, however, domestic isotope mainly relies on imports. The highly productive and relatively safe MIPR is expected to be an effective way to breakthrough the bottleneck of the development of nuclear medicine. Traditional isotope production technologies with reactor can be improved. It's urgent to research and promote new isotope production technologies with reactor. Those technologies which do not depend on reactor will have a bright market prospects.

  7. Advances in medical diagnostic technology

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Khin Wee; Mohamad Salim, Maheza Irna; Ong, Sang-Bing; Utama, Nugraha Priya; Myint, Yin Mon; Mohd Noor, Norliza; Supriyanto, Eko

    2014-01-01

    This book provides the most recent findings and knowledge in advanced diagnostics technology, covering a wide spectrum including brain activity analysis, breast and lung cancer detection, echocardiography, computer aided skeletal assessment to mitochondrial biology imaging at the cellular level. The authors explored magneto acoustic approaches and tissue elasticity imaging for the purpose of breast cancer detection. Perspectives in fetal echocardiography from an image processing angle are included. Diagnostic imaging in the field of mitochondrial diseases as well as the use of Computer-Aided System (CAD) are also discussed in the book. This book will be useful for students, lecturers or professional researchers in the field of biomedical sciences and image processing.

  8. Medical application of PET technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Sang Moo; Choi, C. W.; An, S. H.; Woo, K. S.; Chung, W. S.; Yang, S. D.; Jun, G. S. and others

    1999-04-01

    We performed following studies using PET technology: 1. Clinical usefulness of [{sup 18}F]FDG whole body PET in malignant disease 2. Clinical usefulness of quantitative evaluation of F-18-FDG 3. Pilot study of C-11 methionine PET in brain tumor 4. PET study in patients with Parkinson's disease 5. A study on the clinical myocardial PET image. PET gives various metabolic information for the living human body, and is very important, new diagnostic modality. The PET study will give us the information of cancer patients such as early detection of cancer, staging, recurrence detection and characterization of cancer. The quantitative analysis using PET could be applied to evaluate the pathophysiology of various diseases and develop new drugs and develop new radiopharmaceuticals.

  9. Endogenous Technology Adoption and Medical Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiraud, Karine; Lhuillery, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Despite the claim that technology has been one of the most important drivers of healthcare spending growth over the past decades, technology variables are rarely introduced explicitly in cost equations. Furthermore, technology is often considered exogenous. Using 1996-2007 panel data on Swiss geographical areas, we assessed the impact of technology availability on per capita healthcare spending covered by basic health insurance whilst controlling for the endogeneity of health technology availability variables. Our results suggest that medical research, patent intensity and the density of employees working in the medical device industry are influential factors for the adoption of technology and can be used as instruments for technology availability variables in the cost equation. These results are similar to previous findings: CT and PET scanner adoption is associated with increased healthcare spending, whilst increased availability of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty facilities is associated with reductions in per capita spending. However, our results suggest that the magnitude of these relationships is much greater in absolute value than that suggested by previous studies that did not control for the possible endogeneity of the availability of technologies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Assessing medical technologies in development; a new paradigm of medical technology assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, J. Marjan; van Rossum, Wouter; Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Rakhorst, Gerhard

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to provide a practical contribution to the field of medical technology assessment within a new paradigm. This paradigm indicates the need for more comprehensive technology assessments in the development stage of a new technology. - Method: We introduce a method, based on

  11. Assessing medical technologies in development - A new paradigm of medical technology assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, MJM; van Rossum, W; Verkerke, GJ; Rakhorst, G

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Our study aims to provide a practical contribution to the field of medical technology assessment within a new paradigm. This paradigm indicates the need for more comprehensive technology assessments in the development stage of a new technology. Method: We introduce a method, based on Saat

  12. The ethics of an ordinary medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Some routinely applied hospital technologies may have unintended consequences for patients and their families. The neonatal cardiorespiratory monitor, a computer-like display used to show an infant's vital functions, is one such technology that may become part of a parent's day-to-day being with his or her hospitalized child. In this phenomenological study, I explored how the monitor may mediate parental sensibilities, reshaping the contact of parent and child. This exploration speaks to understanding the relational ethics of even the seemingly most ordinary of medical technologies in clinical contexts.

  13. Information Technologies (ITs) in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Pandza, Haris; Toromanovic, Selim; Masic, Fedja; Sivic, Suad; Zunic, Lejla; Masic, Zlatan

    2011-09-01

    Advances in medicine in recent decades are in significant correlation with the advances in the information technology. Modern information technologies (IT) have enabled faster, more reliable and comprehensive data collection. These technologies have started to create a large number of irrelevant information, which represents a limiting factor and a real growing gap, between the medical knowledge on one hand, and the ability of doctors to follow its growth on the other. Furthermore, in our environment, the term technology is generally reserved for its technical component. Education means, learning, teaching, or the process of acquiring skills or behavior modification through various exercises. Traditionally, medical education meant the oral, practical and more passive transferring of knowledge and skills from the educators to students and health professionals. For the clinical disciplines, of special importance are the principles, such as, "learning at bedside," aided by the medical literature. In doing so, these techniques enable students to contact with their teachers, and to refer to the appropriate literature. The disadvantage of these educational methods is in the fact, that teachers often do not have enough time. Additionally they are not very convenient to the horizontal and vertical integration of teaching, create weak or almost no self education, as well as, low skill levels and poor integration of education with a real social environment. In this paper authors describe application of modern IT in medical education - their advantages and disadvantages comparing with traditional ways of education.

  14. Mobile technology use in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luanrattana, Rattiporn; Win, Khin Than; Fulcher, John; Iverson, Don

    2012-02-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the PDA functionalities for a problem-based learning (PBL) medical curriculum at the Graduate School of Medicine (GSM), the University of Wollongong (UOW). The study determines the factors/aspects of incorporating PDAs, and the attitudes of stakeholders regarding the use of PDAs in such a PBL-based medical curriculum. In-depth interviews were designed and conducted with medical faculty, the medical education technology team and honorary medical academics. Four major PDA functionalities were identified, these being: clinical-log, reference, communication, and general functions. Two major aspects for the incorporation of PDAs into the PBL-medical curriculum at the UOW were determined from the interviews, these being technical and practical aspects. There is a potential for PDAs to be incorporated into the PBL-medical curricula at the UOW. However, a clear strategy needs to be defined as to how best to incorporate PDAs into PBL-medical curricula with minimal impact on students, as well as financial and resource implications for the GSM.

  15. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today's more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  16. A survey of medical diagnostic imaging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heese, V.; Gmuer, N.; Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    The fields of medical imaging and medical imaging instrumentation are increasingly important. The state-of-the-art continues to advance at a very rapid pace. In fact, various medical imaging modalities are under development at the National Synchrotron Light Source (such as MECT and Transvenous Angiography.) It is important to understand how these techniques compare with today`s more conventional imaging modalities. The purpose of this report is to provide some basic information about the various medical imaging technologies currently in use and their potential developments as a basis for this comparison. This report is by no means an in-depth study of the physics and instrumentation of the various imaging modalities; instead, it is an attempt to provide an explanation of the physical bases of these techniques and their principal clinical and research capabilities.

  17. [Forecasting medical technologies--a global overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Orna

    2011-02-01

    Forecasting new medical technologies is a crucial stage in the process of decision-making in health care systems on national, organizational, professional and personal levels. Knowing what is on the horizon is essential. It is a tool facilitating preparedness and planning for updating health care in the western world. The challenge is to identify new promising technologies at an early stage. This is due to the uncertainty in estimating developing trends and consequences (clinical, financial, political, legal, social and ethical). A balance must be found between the desire to adopt new emerging technologies and the necessity for accountability n basing decisions on efficient evidence. Scarce resources, pervading health systems everywhere, emphasize the need for this mechanism to justify and improve health system determinations. Planning for the future has expanded into new medical fields, thereby reinforcing the importance of national forecasting bodies. This article presents the basic terminology and principles of medical technology forecasting and reviews the agencies involved in early warning systems including Israel.

  18. Anti-thrombotic technologies for medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavery, Karen S; Rhodes, Candace; Mcgraw, Adam; Eppihimer, Michael J

    2016-08-03

    Thrombosis associated with medical devices may lead to dramatic increases in morbidity, mortality and increased health care costs. Innovative strategies are being developed to reduce this complication and provide a safe biocompatible interface between device and blood. This article aims to describe the biological phenomena underlying device-associated thrombosis, and surveys the literature describing current and developing technologies designed to overcome this challenge. To reduce thrombosis, biomaterials with varying topographical properties and incorporating anti-thrombogenic substances on their surface have demonstrated potential. Overall, there is extensive literature describing technical solutions to reduce thrombosis associated with medical devices, but clinical results are required to demonstrate significant long-term benefits.

  19. HEP technologies to address medical imaging challenges

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Developments in detector technologies aimed at solving challenges in present and future CERN experiments, particularly at the LHC, have triggered exceptional advances in the performance of medical imaging devices, allowing for a spectacular progress in in-vivo molecular imaging procedures, which are opening the way for tailored therapies of major diseases. This talk will briefly review the recent history of this prime example of technology transfer from HEP experiments to society, will describe the technical challenges being addressed by some ongoing projects, and will present a few new ideas for further developments and their foreseeable impact.

  20. Technology in postgraduate medical education: a dynamic influence on learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Alison; Webb, Katie

    2015-11-01

    The influence of technology in medical workplace learning is explored by focusing on three uses: m-learning (notably apps), simulation and social media. Smartphones with point-of-care tools (such as textbooks, drug guides and medical calculators) can support workplace learning and doctors' decision-making. Simulations can help develop technical skills and team interactions, and 'in situ' simulations improve the match between the virtual and the real. Social media (wikis, blogs, networking, YouTube) heralds a more participatory and collaborative approach to knowledge development. These uses of technology are related to Kolb's learning cycle and Eraut's intentions of informal learning. Contentions and controversies with these technologies exist. There is a problem with the terminology commonly adopted to describe the use of technology to enhance learning. Using learning technology in the workplace changes the interaction with others and raises issues of professionalism and etiquette. Lack of regulation makes assessment of app quality a challenge. Distraction and dependency are charges levelled at smartphone use in the workplace and these need further research. Unless addressed, these and other challenges will impede the benefits that technology may bring to postgraduate medical education.

  1. Medical imaging technology reviews and computational applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dewi, Dyah

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the latest research findings and reviews in the field of medical imaging technology, covering ultrasound diagnostics approaches for detecting osteoarthritis, breast carcinoma and cardiovascular conditions, image guided biopsy and segmentation techniques for detecting lung cancer, image fusion, and simulating fluid flows for cardiovascular applications. It offers a useful guide for students, lecturers and professional researchers in the fields of biomedical engineering and image processing.

  2. ['Medical technology assessment'; more than just efficacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskens, E

    2000-03-25

    'Medical technology assessment' means investigating the developments, costs and effects of medical technologies. Practising physicians increasingly are confronted with consequences of management based on such research results. In order to follow and participate in the discussion they should be aware of this and know the jargon. In policy problems, measures of effect in natural units (e.g. cardiovascular mortality) offer advantages over measures of clinical findings (e.g. decrease of the serum cholesterol levels). Survival in various health states and disorders can be compared by multiplying the number of life years gained by a factor for the quality of life in those years. Costs are usually expressed in monetary terms. These may be calculated as direct medical costs on the basis of fees or actual costs for society. The latter is the case when the balancing is based on a societal perspective. The societal perspective enables a more objective assessment of health effects than when a patient perspective is used. 'Incremental cost effectiveness' expresses where extra expenditures will have maximum effect, and bears higher relevance for policy decisions than mean costs per unit of effect. Immaterial matters are more difficult to assess, but should nevertheless be considered in selecting the policy to be implemented.

  3. Discharge planning and home care of the technology-dependent infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakewell-Sachs, S; Porth, S

    1995-01-01

    Technology-dependent infants are a medically complex, diverse group of individuals, many of whom can be cared for at home. Hospital discharge of any technology-dependent infant requires a multidisciplinary, comprehensive program of discharge planning and follow-up into the home. This article presents an overview of the technology-dependent infant population and a discussion of many of the pertinent issues for consideration during the discharge planning period and the transition from hospital to home.

  4. Technology Acceptance of Electronic Medical Records by Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocker, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Technology Acceptance Model's (TAM) relevance of the intention of nurses to use electronic medical records in acute health care settings. The basic technology acceptance research of Davis (1989) was applied to the specific technology tool of electronic medical records (EMR) in a specific setting…

  5. Inhalant Dependence and its Medical Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Hamid Boztaş

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The term of inhalants is used for matters easily vapors. Inhalants are preferred for rapid, positive reinforcement and mild high effects. Products including inhalants are cheap, accessible, legal substances and are prevalently used in community. The prevalence of inhalant use in secondary schools in Turkey is about 5.1%. Inhalant substance dependence is generally observed within 14-15 age group. Age at first use could be as low as 5 to 6 years of age. Substance dependence is more probable in adults working in substance existing places. Inhalant usage is common in disadvantaged groups, children living in street, people with history of crimes, prison, depression, suicide, antisocial attitudes and conflict of family, history of abuse, violence and any other drug dependence and isolated populations. Inhalants are absorbed from lungs, after performing their quick and short effect metabolized by cytochrom P450 enzyme system except inhalant nitrites group which has a depressing effect like alcohol. In chronic use general atrophy, ventricular dilatation and wide sulcus were shown in cerebrum, cerebellum and pons by monitoring brain. Defects are mostly in periventricular, subcortical regions and in white matter. Demyelinization, hyperintensity, callosal slimming and wearing off in white and gray matter margins was also found. Ravages of brain shown by brain monitorisation are more and serious in inhalant dependence than in other dependences. It is important to decrease use of inhalants. Different approaches should be used for subcultures and groups in prevention. Prohibiting all the matters including inhalant is not practical as there are too many substances including inhalants. Etiquettes showing harmful materials can be used but this approach can also lead the children and adolescents recognize these substances easily.. Despite determintal effects of inhalant dependence, there are not yet sufficient number of studies conducted on prevention and

  6. Role development of nurses for technology-dependent children attending mainstream schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Fumie; Suzuki, Machiko

    2015-04-01

    To describe the role development of nurses caring for medical technology-dependent children attending Japanese mainstream schools. Semi-structured interviews with 21 nurses caring for technology-dependent children were conducted and analyzed using the modified grounded theory approach. Nurses developed roles centered on maintaining technology-dependent children's physical health to support children's learning with each other, through building relationships, learning how to interact with children, understanding the children and the school community, and realizing the meaning of supporting technology-dependent children. These findings support nurses to build relationships of mutual trust with teachers and children, and learn on the job in mainstream schools. © 2015, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Gadget Dependency among Medical College Students in Delhi

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, N.; Krishnamurthy, V.; J Majhi; Gupta, S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gadget holds the great importance in everyday life. Mobile phone and internet usage have become universal practice especially among the student community. Gadgets usage has both pros and cons. Objective: To assess the magnitude of gadget utilization among medical college students in Delhi and to estimate the burden of gadget dependency. Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted in three medical colleges. The participants were 957 medical students selected by systematic ra...

  8. Gadget Dependency among Medical College Students in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Gupta

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gadget holds the great importance in everyday life. Mobile phone and internet usage have become universal practice especially among the student community. Gadgets usage has both pros and cons. Objective: To assess the magnitude of gadget utilization among medical college students in Delhi and to estimate the burden of gadget dependency. Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted in three medical colleges. The participants were 957 medical students selected by systematic random sampling, interviewed using a self-administered questionnaire. Result: The sample consisted of 485 (50.7% males and 472 (49.3% females, aged 17-25 years. Gadgets of at least one variety were uniformly used by all the students, 22.4% of the students surveyed were found to be gadget dependent. Conclusion: Our study shows high prevalence of gadget dependency among medical students. There is need to create awareness regarding the problem of gadget dependency and its social and health effects.

  9. Mineral-PET Kimberlite sorting by nuclear-medical technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ballestrero, S; Cafferty, L; Caveney, R; Connell, SH; Cook, M; Dalton, M; Gopal, H; Ives, N; Lee, C A; Mampe, W; Phoku, M; Roodt, A; Sibande, W; Sellschop, J P F; Topkin, J; Unwucholaa, D A

    2010-01-01

    A revolutionary new technology for diamond bearing rock sorting which has its roots in medical-nuclear physics has been taken through a substantial part of the R&D phase. This has led to the construction of the technology demonstrator. Experiments using the technology demonstrator and experiments at a hospital have established the scientific and technological viability of the project.

  10. The Impact of Bar Code Medication Administration Technology on Reported Medication Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holecek, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The use of bar-code medication administration technology is on the rise in acute care facilities in the United States. The technology is purported to decrease medication errors that occur at the point of administration. How significantly this technology affects actual rate and severity of error is unknown. This descriptive, longitudinal research…

  11. Mobile technologies in medical education: AMEE Guide No. 105.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Ken; Ellaway, Rachel H; Topps, David; Archibald, Douglas; Hogue, Rebecca J

    2016-06-01

    Mobile technologies (including handheld and wearable devices) have the potential to enhance learning activities from basic medical undergraduate education through residency and beyond. In order to use these technologies successfully, medical educators need to be aware of the underpinning socio-theoretical concepts that influence their usage, the pre-clinical and clinical educational environment in which the educational activities occur, and the practical possibilities and limitations of their usage. This Guide builds upon the previous AMEE Guide to e-Learning in medical education by providing medical teachers with conceptual frameworks and practical examples of using mobile technologies in medical education. The goal is to help medical teachers to use these concepts and technologies at all levels of medical education to improve the education of medical and healthcare personnel, and ultimately contribute to improved patient healthcare. This Guide begins by reviewing some of the technological changes that have occurred in recent years, and then examines the theoretical basis (both social and educational) for understanding mobile technology usage. From there, the Guide progresses through a hierarchy of institutional, teacher and learner needs, identifying issues, problems and solutions for the effective use of mobile technology in medical education. This Guide ends with a brief look to the future.

  12. Making medical treatments resilient to technological disruptions in telemedicine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larburu, Nekane; Widya, Ing; Bults, Richard G.A.; Hermens, Hermie J.

    2014-01-01

    Telemedicine depends on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to support remote treatment of patients. This dependency requires the telemedicine system design to be resilient for ICT performance degradation or subsystem failures. Nevertheless, using telemedicine systems create a dependency

  13. Making medical treatments resilient to technological disruptions in telemedicine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larburu Rubio, Nekane; Widya, I.A.; Bults, Richard G.A.; Hermens, Hermanus J.

    Telemedicine depends on Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to support remote treatment of patients. This dependency requires the telemedicine system design to be resilient for ICT performance degradation or subsystem failures. Nevertheless, using telemedicine systems create a dependency

  14. Medical Information Technology in Support of the Operational Commander.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    There are numerous factors that have driven the. need for medical information technology in the operational setting. Two of the primary driving...through retirement. The FHP strategy thrusts preventive medicine and information technology into the forefront of operational health support...paper will deal with the medical information technology portion of the Force Health Protection program. This paper will discuss the pros and cons of

  15. Medical informatics between technology, philosophy and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2004-01-01

    Medical (health) informatics occupies the central place in all the segments of modern medicine in the past thirty years--in practical work, education and scientific research. In all that, computers have taken over the most important role and are used intensively for the development of the health information systems. Following activities develop within the area of health informatics: health-documentation, health-statistics, health-informatics and biomedical scientific and professional information. The medical informatics as the separate medical discipline very quickly gets developed, both in Bosnia and Herzegovina. In our country, the medical informatics is a separate subject for the last ten years, regarding to the Medical curriculum at the biomedical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina is in accordance with the project of the education related to Bologna declaration and the project EURO MEDICINA.

  16. Application of stereo-imaging technology to medical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Park, Jeongyun; Kim, In Young; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2012-09-01

    There has been continuous development in the area of stereoscopic medical imaging devices, and many stereoscopic imaging devices have been realized and applied in the medical field. In this article, we review past and current trends pertaining to the application stereo-imaging technologies in the medical field. We describe the basic principles of stereo vision and visual issues related to it, including visual discomfort, binocular disparities, vergence-accommodation mismatch, and visual fatigue. We also present a brief history of medical applications of stereo-imaging techniques, examples of recently developed stereoscopic medical devices, and patent application trends as they pertain to stereo-imaging medical devices. Three-dimensional (3D) stereo-imaging technology can provide more realistic depth perception to the viewer than conventional two-dimensional imaging technology. Therefore, it allows for a more accurate understanding and analysis of the morphology of an object. Based on these advantages, the significance of stereoscopic imaging in the medical field increases in accordance with the increase in the number of laparoscopic surgeries, and stereo-imaging technology plays a key role in the diagnoses of the detailed morphologies of small biological specimens. The application of 3D stereo-imaging technology to the medical field will help improve surgical accuracy, reduce operation times, and enhance patient safety. Therefore, it is important to develop more enhanced stereoscopic medical devices.

  17. [Current problems of information technologies application for forces medical service].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, V V; Korneenkov, A A; Bogomolov, V D; Borisov, D N; Rezvantsev, M V

    2013-06-01

    The modern information technologies are the key factors for the upgrading of forces medical service. The aim of this article is the analysis of prospective information technologies application for the upgrading of forces medical service. The authors suggested 3 concepts of information support of Russian military health care on the basis of data about information technologies application in the foreign armed forces, analysis of the regulatory background, prospects of military-medical service and gathered experience of specialists. These three concepts are: development of united telecommunication network of the medical service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation medical service, working out and implementation of standard medical information systems for medical units and establishments, monitoring the military personnel health state and military medical service resources. It is noted that on the assumption of sufficient centralized financing and industrial implementation of the military medical service prospective information technologies, by the year 2020 the united information space of the military medical service will be created and the target information support effectiveness will be achieved.

  18. Implications of WWW technologies for exchanging medical records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice Dixon

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses some of the implications for medical record exchange of very recent developments in technology and tools that support the World Wide Web. It argues that XML (Extensible Mark-up Language is a very good enabling technology for medical record exchange. XML provides a much cheaper way of executing the exchange of medical information that circumvents the need for proprietary software. Use of XML can also simplify solutions to the problems associated with coping with the evolution of medical systems in time. However XML on its own does not resolve all the semantic heterogeneities.

  19. How children and young people construct and negotiate living with medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Susan

    2010-11-01

    Increasing numbers of children need the support of medical technology for their survival and wellbeing, yet little is known about their experiences of living technology-assisted lives. This study aimed to explore how this group of children experience and construct medical technology and its influence on their identity and social relationships. Using a Grounded Theory approach, 28 children/young people aged between 8 and 19 years old and using different types of medical devices were recruited via nursing services in England. Data were collected by in-depth interviews conducted in children's homes. The medical technology occupied an ambivalent position in children's lives being seen as having both an enabling and disabling presence. Children actively engaged in work to incorporate the technology into their lives and bodies by developing strategies to manage their condition, the technology and their identities. This body work appeared to be driven by a desire to 'normalise' their bodies and their lives. Technologies were shaped to integrate them into everyday life and children managed their self-presentation and controlled information about their condition. This work was ongoing, responding to changing social contexts and relationships. For these children the process of 'growing up' involves incorporating disability, illness and technology. This study contributes to knowledge by examining how medical technology is constructed by children whose lives are dependent on it and illuminating the resources and strategies they use to manage their identity and negotiate peer culture interactions and norms. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    to digitally augment a paper medical record. We report on two studies: a field study in which we describe the benefits and challenges of using a combination of electronic and paper-based medical records in a large university hospital and a deployment study in which we analyze how 8 clinicians used the Hy......PR in a medical simulation. Based on these empirical studies, this paper introduces and discusses the concept of collaborative affordances, which describes a set of properties of the medical record that foster collaborative collocated work....... explored the integration of paper and digital technology, there are still a wide range of open issues in the design of technologies that integrate digital and paper-based medical records. This paper studies the use of one such novel technology, called the Hybrid Patient Record (HyPR), that is designed...

  1. Medical simulation technology: educational overview, industry leaders, and what's missing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spooner, Nicholas; Hurst, Stephen; Khadra, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Modern medical simulation technology (MST) debuted in 1960 with the development of Resusci Annie (Laerdal 2007), which assisted students in the acquisition of proper ventilation and compression techniques used during basic life support. Following a steady stream of subsequent technological advances and innovations, MST manufacturers are now able to offer training aids capable of facilitating innovative learning in such diverse areas as human patient simulators, simulated clinical environments, virtual procedure stations, virtual medical environments, electronic tutors, and performance recording. The authors list a number of the most popular MSTs presently available while citing evaluative efforts undertaken to date regarding the efficacy of MST to the medical profession. They conclude by proposing a variety of simulation innovations of prospective interest to both medical and technology personnel while offering healthcare administrators a series of recommended considerations when planning to integrate MST into existing medical systems.

  2. Defining technology dependence in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratling, Regena

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to identify current terms and definitions used to identify and describe children and adolescents who require technology. A total of 400 articles published from January 2000 through May 2012 were reviewed; 26 articles met the inclusion criteria. The review included only primary research studies that focused on a child and adolescent sample (birth to 18 years old) who required technology. Current terms and definitions used to describe children and adolescents who require technology include technology and complex care. Technology is a constant in both terminology and definitions, and it differentiates this population from the general population of children with chronic illness and special health care needs. This review highlights the need for better, more detailed descriptions of the population of children and adolescents who require technology in their daily lives. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. 78 FR 39343 - SHINE Medical Technologies, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... intends to gather the information necessary to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for construction... Technologies, Inc. AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Intent to prepare environmental impact... (NRC) will be preparing an environmental impact statement (EIS) related to the review of...

  4. [Robotics and medical technology: which liability?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirot-Mazères, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    Nowadays, medical robots become more and more important to better provide care, to remote patients and help to perform surgery. Legal et ethical issues relating to health care robots are not new, but are more complicated, in particular about the assignation of liabilitiy. This article will give an overview of some of the legal issues relating the use of robotics in health care and medical and surgical procedures: first in relation to the safety of these specific devices, and then in relation to the threats to privacy and individual liberties.

  5. Globalization and the trends of medical technology trade in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semin, Semih; Güldal, Dilek; Demiral, Yücel

    2007-05-01

    Medical technology trade is one of the most affected health areas by global regulations in the developing countries. The aim of the study is to examine recent changes in medical technology import and export and their results in Turkey. Data show that the total medical technology imports (MTI) increased from $ 34.6 million to $ 3427.9 million between 1970 and 2003. While MTI constituted 3.6% of total imports in 1970 and 1.3% in 1980, this ratio raised up to 4.9% in 2003. The ratio of MTI in total health expenditures were also increased from 7.6% in 1970 to 31.5% in 2003. Medical technology exports (MTE) have been increased from $ 0.9 million in 1970 to $ 303.2 million in 2003. The ratio of MTE to MTI increased from 2.7% to 13.9% between 1970 and 1990 and decreased after 1990, to 8.8%. Our study implied that the medical technology trade in Turkey has been negatively affected and in some respects differs from some other important industries in the globalization era. Nevertheless, detailed comparative studies in different developing countries such as China, Brazil, Mexico and India, are needed to explore the real state of medical technology trade, use and the effects of globalization on these topics.

  6. Public Policy Systems Dealing with Ethically Contested Medical Technological Innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoppe, Rob

    2008-01-01

    The questions tackled in this paper are: How do we deal with ethically contested medical innovations?, and Can we do better? First, I analyse how we deal with these problems by a division of labour and competitive boundary work between the medical R&D system's research and technological imperative,

  7. Transhumanism, medical technology and slippery slopes

    OpenAIRE

    McNamee, M. J.; Edwards, S D

    2006-01-01

    In this article, transhumanism is considered to be a quasi‐medical ideology that seeks to promote a variety of therapeutic and human‐enhancing aims. Moderate conceptions are distinguished from strong conceptions of transhumanism and the strong conceptions were found to be more problematic than the moderate ones. A particular critique of Boström's defence of transhumanism is presented. Various forms of slippery slope arguments that may be used for and against transhumanism are discussed and on...

  8. Medically relevant ElectroNeedle technology development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Carrie Frances; Thomas, Michael Loren; McClain, Jaime L.; Harper, Jason C.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2008-11-01

    ElectroNeedles technology was developed as part of an earlier Grand Challenge effort on Bio-Micro Fuel Cell project. During this earlier work, the fabrication of the ElectroNeedles was accomplished along with proof-of-concept work on several electrochemically active analytes such as glucose, quinone and ferricyanide. Additionally, earlier work demonstrated technology potential in the field of immunosensors by specifically detecting Troponin, a cardiac biomarker. The current work focused upon fabrication process reproducibility of the ElectroNeedles and then using the devices to sensitively detect p-cresol, a biomarker for kidney failure or nephrotoxicity. Valuable lessons were learned regarding fabrication assurance and quality. The detection of p-cresol was accomplished by electrochemistry as well as using fluorescence to benchmark ElectroNeedles performance. Results from these studies will serve as a guide for the future fabrication processes involving ElectroNeedles as well as provide the groundwork necessary to expand technology applications. One paper has been accepted for publication acknowledging LDRD funding (K. E. Achyuthan et al, Comb. Chem. & HTS, 2008). We are exploring the scope for a second paper describing the applications potential of this technology.

  9. Medical devices in dermatology using DLP technology from Texas Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, M.; Lüllau, F.

    2012-03-01

    The market of medical devices is growing continuously worldwide. With the DLP™ technology from Texas Instruments Lüllau Engineering GmbH in Germany has realized different applications in the medical discipline of dermatology. Especially a new digital phototherapy device named skintrek™ PT5 is revolutionizing the treatment of skin diseases like psoriasis , Vitiligo and other Eczema. The functions of the new phototherapy device can only be realized through DLP™ technology which is not only be used for the selective irradiation process. In combination with other optical systems DLP™ technology undertakes also other functionalities like 3D-topology calculation und patient movement compensation.

  10. Technology-dependency among patients discharged from a children's hospital: a retrospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharp Virginia

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in medical technology may be increasing the population of children who are technology-dependent (TD. We assessed the proportion of children discharged from a children's hospital who are judged to be TD, and determined the most common devices and number of prescription medications at the time of discharge. Methods Chart review of 100 randomly selected patients from all services discharged from a children's hospital during the year 2000. Data were reviewed independently by 4 investigators who classified the cases as TD if the failure or withdrawal of the technology would likely have adverse health consequences sufficient to require hospitalization. Only those cases where 3 or 4 raters agreed were classified as TD. Results Among the 100 randomly sampled patients, the median age was 7 years (range: 1 day to 24 years old, 52% were male, 86% primarily spoke English, and 54% were privately insured. The median length of stay was 3 days (range: 1 to 103 days. No diagnosis accounted for more than 5% of cases. 41% were deemed to be technology dependent, with 20% dependent upon devices, 32% dependent upon medications, and 11% dependent upon both devices and medications. Devices at the time of discharge included gastrostomy and jejeunostomy tubes (10%, central venous catheters (7%, and tracheotomies (1%. The median number of prescription medications was 2 (range: 0–13, with 12% of cases having 5 or more medications. Home care services were planned for 7% of cases. Conclusion Technology-dependency is common among children discharged from a children's hospital.

  11. [PRIORITY TECHNOLOGIES OF THE MEDICAL WASTE DISPOSAL SYSTEM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samutin, N M; Butorina, N N; Starodubova, N Yu; Korneychuk, S S; Ustinov, A K

    2015-01-01

    The annual production of waste in health care institutions (HCI) tends to increase because of the growth of health care provision for population. Among the many criteria for selecting the optimal treatment technologies HCI is important to provide epidemiological and chemical safety of the final products. Environmentally friendly method of thermal disinfection of medical waste may be sterilizators of medical wastes intended for hospitals, medical centers, laboratories and other health care facilities that have small and medium volume of processing of all types of waste Class B and C. The most optimal method of centralized disposal of medical waste is a thermal processing method of the collected material.

  12. Transhumanism, medical technology and slippery slopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, M J; Edwards, S D

    2006-09-01

    In this article, transhumanism is considered to be a quasi-medical ideology that seeks to promote a variety of therapeutic and human-enhancing aims. Moderate conceptions are distinguished from strong conceptions of transhumanism and the strong conceptions were found to be more problematic than the moderate ones. A particular critique of Boström's defence of transhumanism is presented. Various forms of slippery slope arguments that may be used for and against transhumanism are discussed and one particular criticism, moral arbitrariness, that undermines both weak and strong transhumanism is highlighted.

  13. Democratization of medical knowledge and technology: brief commentary on implications for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colt, Henri; Quadrelli, Silvia

    2006-01-01

    Today's movement towards the democratization of knowledge and dissemination of technology creates an opportunity for health care providers to reform medical education, bridge disciplines, and contribute to the correction of social inequalities. The question is whether this generation of physicians will have the courage to bring down the barriers that have deprived the majority of humanity from the medical knowledge, technology, and healthcare that rightfully belongs to all.

  14. [A survey of medical information education in radiological technology schools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohba, Hisateru; Ogasawara, Katsuhiko; Hoshino, Shuhei; Hosoba, Minoru; Okuda, Yasuo; Konishi, Yasuhiko; Ikeda, Ryuji

    2010-08-20

    The purpose of this study was to clarify actual conditions and problems in medical information education and to propose the educational concept to be adopted in medical information. A questionnaire survey was carried out by the anonymous method in June 2008. The survey was intended for 40 radiological technology schools. The questionnaire items were as follows: (1) educational environment in medical information education, (2) content of a lecture in medical information, (3) problems in medical information education. The response rate was 55.0% (22 schools). Half of the responding schools had a laboratory on medical information. Seventeen schools had a medical information education facility, and out of them, approximately 50% had an educational medical information system. The main problems of the medical information education were as follows: (a) motivation of the students is low, (b) the educational coverage and level for medical information are uncertain, (c) there are not an appropriate textbook and educational guidance. In conclusion, these findings suggest that it is necessary to have a vision of medical information education in the education of radiological technologists.

  15. Teaching bioethics to medical technology students in pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Rubina

    2009-01-01

    Incorporating ethics education in curriculum of medical technology students and highlighting the importance of teaching the subject to this particular population in this part of world are our aims. At SIUT we have a school with name of "Zain ul Abidin" school of Biomedical Technology, which is supposed to award B.S. degree in 5 sub-specialties that is hemodialysis, radiology, laboratory sciences, operation theater technology and intensive care technology. This school is affiliated by Karachi University. The students entering in school have done fellow in science (F.Sc.)with pre-medical group, thus have background knowledge of biology, physics, chemistry, languages, religion and Pakistan studies. Here for B.S. included in their curriculum are the subjects of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, pharmacology, pathology, Islamiat and English for all and then related sub-specialty topics to each group for example student in hemodialysis group more exposed to nephrology topics etc. I planned to add ethics with subjects, which are common to all specialties and designed curriculum. Curriculum was approved (after minor changes), from Karachi University and I started teaching ethics to these students. This paper highlights methods and tools of teaching and evaluation and results observed. This will be the first examination in bioethics from medical technologists, at university level in the history of country. This is a great achievement in country to start teaching bioethics to medical technologists. Karachi University has implemented the same curriculum to other medical technology schools affiliated with University.

  16. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approache......PR in a medical simulation. Based on these empirical studies, this paper introduces and discusses the concept of collaborative affordances, which describes a set of properties of the medical record that foster collaborative collocated work.......The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approaches...... explored the integration of paper and digital technology, there are still a wide range of open issues in the design of technologies that integrate digital and paper-based medical records. This paper studies the use of one such novel technology, called the Hybrid Patient Record (HyPR), that is designed...

  17. Emerging medical technologies and emerging conceptions of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stempsey, William E

    2006-01-01

    Using ideas gleaned from the philosophy of technology of Martin Heidegger and Hans Jonas and the philosophy of health of Georges Canguilhem, I argue that one of the characteristics of emerging medical technologies is that these technologies lead to new conceptions of health. When technologies enable the body to respond to more and more challenges of disease, we thus establish new norms of health. Given the continued development of successful technologies, we come to expect more and more that our bodies should be able to respond to ever-new challenges of environment and disease by establishing ever-new norms of health. Technologies may aim at the prevention and treatment of disease, but they also bring about modifications of what we consider normal for the human being. Thus, new norms of health arise from technological innovation.

  18. NASA technology utilization applications. [transfer of medical sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The work is reported from September 1972 through August 1973 by the Technology Applications Group of the Science Communication Division (SCD), formerly the Biological Sciences Communication Project (BSCP) in the Department of Medical and Public Affairs of the George Washington University. The work was supportive of many aspects of the NASA Technology Utilization program but in particular those dealing with Biomedical and Technology Application Teams, Applications Engineering projects, new technology reporting and documentation and transfer activities. Of particular interest are detailed reports on the progress of various hardware projects, and suggestions and criteria for the evaluation of candidate hardware projects. Finally some observations about the future expansion of the TU program are offered.

  19. Is technology the best medicine? Three practice theoretical perspectives on medication administration technologies in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonen, Marcel Jmh; Vosman, Frans Jh; Niemeijer, Alistair R

    2016-06-01

    Even though it is often presumed that the use of technology like medication administration technology is both safer and more effective, the importance of nurses' know-how is not to be underestimated. In this article, we accordingly try to argue that nurses' labor, including their different forms of knowledge, must play a crucial role in the development, implementation and use of medication administration technology. Using three different theoretical perspectives ('heuristic lenses') and integrating this with our own ethnographic research, we will explore how nursing practices change through the use of medication technology. Ultimately, we will argue that ignoring (institutional) complexity and the various types of important knowledge that nurses have, will seriously complicate the implementation of medication administration technology. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Role of information communication technology in higher education: learners perspective in rural medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Tripti K; Waghmare, Lalitbhushan S; Jagzape, Arunita T; Rawekar, Alka T; Quazi, Nazli Z; Mishra, Ved Prakash

    2014-06-01

    Higher education has undergone profound transformation due to recent technological advancements. Resultantly health profession students have a strong base to utilize information technology for their professional development. Studies over recent past reflect a striking change in pattern of technology usage amongst medical students expanding prospects exponentially by e-books, science apps, readymade power-point presentations, evidence based medicine, Wikipedia, etc. Aim & Objectives: The study was undertaken with an aim to explore the general perceptions of medical students and faculties about the role of Information Communication Technology in higher education and to gauge student's dependence on the same for seeking knowledge and information. Cross-sectional, mixed research design. The study was conducted in Department of Physiology, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences (Deemed University). Study population included students (n=150) and teaching faculty (n=10) of I(st) phase of medical curriculum. The survey questionnaire (10 closed ended and 5 open ended items) and Focus group discussion (FGD) captured the perceptions and attitudes of students and faculties respectively regarding the role and relevance of technology in higher education. Quantitative analysis of closed ended responses was done by percentage distribution and Qualitative analysis of open ended responses and FGD excerpts was done by coding and observing the trends and patterns respectively. Overall the observations were in favour of increasing usability and dependability on technology as ready reference tool of subject information. Learners valued text books and technology almost equally and regarded computer training as a desirable incorporation in medical curriculum. Role of technology in education should be anticipated and appropriate measures should be undertaken for its adequate and optimum utilization by proper training of students as well as facilitators.

  1. Advanced Medical Technology Capacity Building and the Medical Mentoring Event: A Unique Application of SOF Counterinsurgency Medical Engagement Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Dan; Tate, Charmaine; Wey, Pierre-Francois; Batjom, Emmanuel; Nicholas, Thomas A; Boedeker, Ben H

    2012-01-01

    Pashto instruction manual, Dari video training program, video laryngoscope and difficult airway training mannequin to be used by indigenous medical personnel to train other indigenous medical personnel in the skill of endotracheal intubation. Utilizing Special Operations medical personnel, University of Nebraska medical personnel and local Afghan medical instructors, we coordinated with local authorities and ISAF medical authorities. We trained approximately 100 ANA physician assistant (PA) students and ten ANA intensive care unit (ICU) and Anesthesia medical staff in endotracheal intubation. The video laryngoscope was used as a training aid to guide each student?s direct intubation technique. Results We validated the Medical Mentorship (MM) concept as a means to engage an indigenous population?s medical personnel. The indigenous medical training facilities capability was augmented by use of the video laryngoscope as a training aid. This improvement was sustained over the observable period. Relationships were developed and enhanced for medical support of coalition partner forces supporting SOF operations. Introducing the video laryngoscope to the ICU increased direct care capabilities within the medical institution. Conclusions The MEDSEM is a viable option for military commanders to leverage medical assets to positively engage an indigenous population during COIN operations. MEDSEMs leave residual sustainable medical capabilities, in contrast to MEDCAP models. This report describes a modification of the MEDSEM concept?Medical Mentoring Event (MME)?a short term focused intervention designed to insert medical technology or techniques into an indigenous medical facility that creates sustainable, tangible benefits to patient care while fostering a SOF Commanders objectives. Follow up with embedded NATO trainers at National Military Hospital (NMH) shows that the video laryngoscope continues to be used successfully in airway management training and in difficult intubations

  2. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed.

  3. Utilisation of medical technology assessment in health policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, WJA; Wieringh, R; van den Heuvel, LPM

    1997-01-01

    Objective: To assess the contribution of medical technology assessment (MTA) to health policy decision making, the question has to be answered whether MTA is actually being used in decision-making processes and what factors are related to its utilisation. Design: We investigated recent Dutch policy

  4. Using Technology to Meet the Challenges of Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guze, Phyllis A

    2015-01-01

    Medical education is rapidly changing, influenced by many factors including the changing health care environment, the changing role of the physician, altered societal expectations, rapidly changing medical science, and the diversity of pedagogical techniques. Changes in societal expectations put patient safety in the forefront, and raises the ethical issues of learning interactions and procedures on live patients, with the long-standing teaching method of "see one, do one, teach one" no longer acceptable. The educational goals of using technology in medical education include facilitating basic knowledge acquisition, improving decision making, enhancement of perceptual variation, improving skill coordination, practicing for rare or critical events, learning team training, and improving psychomotor skills. Different technologies can address these goals. Technologies such as podcasts and videos with flipped classrooms, mobile devices with apps, video games, simulations (part-time trainers, integrated simulators, virtual reality), and wearable devices (google glass) are some of the techniques available to address the changing educational environment. This article presents how the use of technologies can provide the infrastructure and basis for addressing many of the challenges in providing medical education for the future.

  5. Using Technology to Meet the Challenges of Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guze, Phyllis A.

    2015-01-01

    Medical education is rapidly changing, influenced by many factors including the changing health care environment, the changing role of the physician, altered societal expectations, rapidly changing medical science, and the diversity of pedagogical techniques. Changes in societal expectations put patient safety in the forefront, and raises the ethical issues of learning interactions and procedures on live patients, with the long-standing teaching method of “see one, do one, teach one” no longer acceptable. The educational goals of using technology in medical education include facilitating basic knowledge acquisition, improving decision making, enhancement of perceptual variation, improving skill coordination, practicing for rare or critical events, learning team training, and improving psychomotor skills. Different technologies can address these goals. Technologies such as podcasts and videos with flipped classrooms, mobile devices with apps, video games, simulations (part-time trainers, integrated simulators, virtual reality), and wearable devices (google glass) are some of the techniques available to address the changing educational environment. This article presents how the use of technologies can provide the infrastructure and basis for addressing many of the challenges in providing medical education for the future. PMID:26330687

  6. 3D medical collaboration technology to enhance emergency healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Gregory F; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry

    2009-01-01

    of the dynamic reconstructions. We call this idea remote 3D medical collaboration. In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical collaboration technology; we describe the relevant computer vision, computer graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype...... these problems, we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to reconstruct dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and of events taking place within. The 3D views could be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote healthcare professionals equipped with fixed displays...... system; and we present evaluation results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical collaboration technology could offer benefits over conventional 2D videoconferencing in emergency healthcare....

  7. The changing role of economic evaluation in valuing medical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, Jason S; Foerster, Douglas; Bridges, John Fp

    2012-12-01

    Economic evaluation is established within health-technology assessment but is challenged by those wanting to use economic evaluation to inform pricing and/or incorporate nontraditional sources of value and the views of diverse stakeholders. The changing role of economic evaluation in (formally or informally) assessing prices/values in four jurisdictions (UK, Australia, Germany and USA) is detailed and the authors propose a taxonomy of factors impacting the value of medical technology spanning clinical utility (effectiveness, safety/tolerability and quality of evidence), consumer demand (consumer preferences, process utility and unmet need), economic incentives (innovation, option value and market competition) and the societal perspective (social justice, social values and national interest). The authors suggest that multicriteria decision analysis methods grounded in hedonic-pricing theory can facilitate the valuing/pricing of medical technologies. The use of such an approach is hindered by a paucity of relevant educational opportunities, vested interests and aversion to placing prices/values on health.

  8. A Study of Mathematics Needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Keith J.

    A study was conducted to determine what mathematics skills were needed for Dental Laboratory Technology, Medical Laboratory Technology, and Respiratory Therapy. Data obtained from studies, course outlines, textbooks, and reports were used to construct a 79-item mathematics skill questionnaire. This questionnaire was administered to employers,…

  9. Medical and Para-Medical Personnel’ Perspectives on Home Health Care Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Stara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available User-based research is strongly recommended in design for older adults. The aim of this paper is to focus the attention on the poorly explored role of medical and para-medical personnel’s perspective on home health care technologies using data that have been gained during the “Active Ageing At Home” (AA@H project. A focus group was organized at the National Institute of Health & Science on Ageing (INRCA in Italy. Results demonstrate that several challenges deserve a stronger effort by the whole research sector on ageing and technology: (1 a leading role of the participatory design process; (2 the assessment of the added value of health technologies through robust methods; (3 the definition of an unique identity and well established practices among disciplines; (4 the creation of favorable prerequisites and conditions to the technology uptake.

  10. [Application of advanced engineering technologies to medical and rehabilitation fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujie, Masakatsu

    2012-07-01

    The words "Japan syndrome" can now be heard increasingly through the media. Facing the approach of an elderly-dominated society, Robot Technology(RT)is expected to play an important role in Japan's medical, rehabilitation, and daily support fields. The industrial robot, which has already spread through the world with a great success in certain isolated environments by doing the work which is specialized for the thing with the hard known characteristic. By comparison, in the medical and rehabilitation fields, environments always change intricately, and individual characteristics differ from person to person. Furthermore, there are many times when a robot will be asked to directly interact with people. Moreover, the relation between a robot and a person turns into a relation which should involve contact flexibly according to a situation, and also turns into a relation which should avoid contact. In our group, we have so far developed practical rehabilitation and medical robots which can respond to difficulties such as environmental change and individual specificity. In developing rehabilitation robots, it is especially important to consider intuitive operability and individual differences. In addition, in developing medical robots, it is important to replace the experimental knowledge of surgeons to the mechanical quantitative properties. In this article, we introduce some practical examples of rehabilitation and medical robots interweaving several detailed technologies we have so far developed.

  11. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, Frederick W; Gjerde, Craig L; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2010-06-24

    Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1) demographic characteristics; 2) differences between the two universities; 3) how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4) characteristics of students who play most frequently. 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%). Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%), felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%), and believed that video games can have educational value (80%). A majority (77%) would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%), and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%). However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly favorable views about the use of video games and related new

  12. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kron Frederick W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks. However, there is no known research on medical students' game experiences or attitudes towards new media technologies in medical education. This investigation seeks to elucidate medical student experiences and attitudes, to see whether they warrant the development of new media teaching methods in medicine. Methods Medical students from two American universities participated. An anonymous, 30-item, cross-sectional survey addressed demographics, game play experience and attitudes on using new media technologies in medical education. Statistical analysis identified: 1 demographic characteristics; 2 differences between the two universities; 3 how video game play differs across gender, age, degree program and familiarity with computers; and 4 characteristics of students who play most frequently. Results 217 medical students participated. About half were female (53%. Respondents liked the idea of using technology to enhance healthcare education (98%, felt that education should make better use of new media technologies (96%, and believed that video games can have educational value (80%. A majority (77% would use a multiplayer online healthcare simulation on their own time, provided that it helped them to accomplish an important goal. Men and women agreed that they were most inclined to use multiplayer simulations if they were fun (97%, and if they helped to develop skill in patient interactions (90%. However, there was significant gender dissonance over types of favorite games, the educational value of video games, and the desire to participate in games that realistically replicated the experience of clinical practice. Conclusions Overall, medical student respondents, including many who do not play video games, held highly

  13. Living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fex, Angelika; Flensner, Gullvi; Ek, Anna-Christina; Söderhamn, Olle

    2011-12-01

    Living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home An increased number of chronically ill adults perform self-care while using different sorts of advanced medical technology at home. This hermeneutical study aimed to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning of living with an adult family member using advanced medical technology at home. Eleven next of kin to adults performing self-care at home, either using long-term oxygen from a cylinder or ventilator, or performing peritoneal or haemodialysis, were interviewed. The qualitative interviews were analysed using a Gadamerian methodology. The main interpretation explained the meaning as rhythmical patterns of connectedness versus separation, and of sorrow versus reconciliation. Dependence on others was shown in the need for support from healthcare professionals and significant others. In conclusion, next of kin took considerable responsibility for dependent-care. All next of kin were positive to the idea of bringing the technology home, even though their own needs receded into the background, while focusing on the best for the patient. The results were discussed in relation to dependent-care and transition, which may have an influence on the self-care of next of kin and patients. The study revealed a need for further nursing attention to next of kin in this context.

  14. Critical issues in medical education and the implications for telemedicine technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Mishra, Saroj Kanta; Kapoor, Lily; Singh, Indra Pratap

    2009-01-01

    Ensuring quality medical education in all the medical colleges across India based on uniform curriculum prescribed by a regulatory body and maintaining a uniform standard are dependent on availability of an excellent infrastructure. Such infrastructure includes qualified teachers, knowledge resources, learning materials, and advanced education technology, which is a challenge in developing countries due to financial and logistic constraints. Advancement in telecommunication, information science, and technology provides an opportunity to exchange knowledge and skill across geographically dispersed organizations by networking academic medical centers of excellence with medical colleges and institutes to practice distance learning using information and communication technology (ICT)-based tools. These may be as basic as commonly used Web-based tools or may be as advanced as virtual reality, simulation, and telepresence-based collaborative learning environment. The scenario in India is no different from any developing country, but there is considerable progress due to technical advancement in these sectors. Telemedicine and tele-education in health science, is gradually getting adopted into the Indian Health System after decade-long pilot studies across the country. A recent recommendation of the National Knowledge Commission, once implemented, would ensure a gigabyte network across all the educational institutions of the country including medical colleges. Availability of indigenous satellite communication technology and the government policy of free bandwidth provision for societal development sector have added strength to set up infrastructure to pilot several telemedicine educational projects across the country.

  15. Medication development of ibogaine as a pharmacotherapy for drug dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, D C; Kovera, C A; Buck, B E; Norenberg, M D; Shapshak, P; Hearn, W L; Sanchez-Ramos, J

    1998-05-30

    The potential for deriving new psychotherapeutic medications from natural sources has led to renewal interest in rain forest plants as a source of lead compounds for the development of antiaddiction medications. Ibogaine is an indole alkaloid found in the roots of Tabernanthe iboga (Apocynaceae family), a rain forest shrub that is native to equatorial Africa. Ibogaine is used by indigenous peoples in low doses to combat fatigue, hunger and in higher doses as a sacrament in religious rituals. Members of American and European addict self-help groups have claimed that ibogaine promotes long-term drug abstinence from addictive substances, including psychostimulants and cocaine. Anecdotal reports attest that a single dose of ibogaine eliminates withdrawal symptoms and reduces drug cravings for extended periods of time. The purported antiaddictive properties of ibogaine require rigorous validation in humans. We have initiated a rising tolerance study using single administration to assess the safety of ibogaine for treatment of cocaine dependency. The primary objectives of the study are to determine safety, pharmacokinetics and dose effects, and to identify relevant parameters of efficacy in cocaine-dependent patients. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of ibogaine in humans are assessed by analyzing the concentration-time data of ibogaine and its desmethyl metabolite (noribogaine) from the Phase I trial, and by conducting in vitro experiments to elucidate the specific disposition processes involved in the metabolism of both parent drug and metabolite. The development of clinical safety studies of ibogaine in humans will help to determine whether there is a rationale for conducting efficacy trials in the future.

  16. Home medical monitoring network based on embedded technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guozhong; Deng, Wenyi; Yan, Bixi; Lv, Naiguang

    2006-11-01

    Remote medical monitoring network for long-term monitoring of physiological variables would be helpful for recovery of patients as people are monitored at more comfortable conditions. Furthermore, long-term monitoring would be beneficial to investigate slowly developing deterioration in wellness status of a subject and provide medical treatment as soon as possible. The home monitor runs on an embedded microcomputer Rabbit3000 and interfaces with different medical monitoring module through serial ports. The network based on asymmetric digital subscriber line (ADSL) or local area network (LAN) is established and a client - server model, each embedded home medical monitor is client and the monitoring center is the server, is applied to the system design. The client is able to provide its information to the server when client's request of connection to the server is permitted. The monitoring center focuses on the management of the communications, the acquisition of medical data, and the visualization and analysis of the data, etc. Diagnosing model of sleep apnea syndrome is built basing on ECG, heart rate, respiration wave, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, air temperature of mouth cavity or nasal cavity, so sleep status can be analyzed by physiological data acquired as people in sleep. Remote medical monitoring network based on embedded micro Internetworking technology have advantages of lower price, convenience and feasibility, which have been tested by the prototype.

  17. Innovation under Regulatory Uncertainty: Evidence from Medical Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Ariel Dora

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores how the regulatory approval process affects innovation incentives in medical technologies. Prior studies have found early mover regulatory advantages for drugs. I find the opposite for medical devices, where pioneer entrants spend 34 percent (7.2 months) longer than follow-on entrants in regulatory approval. Back-of-the- envelope calculations suggest that the cost of a delay of this length is upwards of 7 percent of the total cost of bringing a new high-risk device to market. Considering potential explanations, I find that approval times are largely unrelated to technological novelty, but are meaningfully reduced by the publication of objective regulatory guidelines. Finally, I consider how the regulatory process affects small firms' market entry patterns and find that small firms are less likely to be pioneers in new device markets, a fact consistent with relatively higher costs of doing so for more financially constrained firms.

  18. Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards & Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    DoD SBIR projects to develop a first-responder ICE Supervisor. TATRC BAA support has been instrumental in providing “program glue” to effectively...FDA has specifically asked AAMI (Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation ) to pursue the development of interoperability...advances in mind. We also recognize that, as in all technological advances, interoperability poses safety and medico -legal challenges as well. The

  19. Medication error reduction and the use of PDA technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, Sue

    2007-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether nursing medication errors could be reduced and nursing care provided more efficiently using personal digital assistant (PDA) technology. The sample for this study consisted of junior and senior undergraduate baccalaureate nursing students. By self-selection of owning a PDA or not, students were placed in the PDA (experimental) group or the textbook (control) group, provided with a case study to read, and asked to answer six questions (i.e., three medication administration calculations and three clinical decisions based on medication administration). The analysis of collected data, calculated using a t test, revealed that the PDA group answered the six questions with greater accuracy and speed than did the textbook group.

  20. [Medical technology innovation: why get involved and how?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azagury, Dan E; Buchs, Nicolas C; Volonté, Francesco; Morel, Philippe

    2013-06-19

    Medical technologies are an intrinsic part of our daily practice. More than a simple recipient of novel medical devices, clinicians have a unique role to play in medtech innovation. They are invaluable assets for testing devices and guiding manufacturers towards the most clinically relevant solutions. More importantly, they have a direct view on patient needs and can therefore identify unmet clinical needs. As these skills are not part of medical school curricula, new centers in medtech innovation education are arising across Europe following the success of US programs. These centers offer a full curriculum in medtech innovation so that doctors can more actively participate and foster innovation in their field. This new knowledge can allow us to initiate our own innovations and potentially influence the future of our own practice.

  1. The Relationship Between Medical Imaging Technology and Medical Imaging Diagnosis%论医学影像技术与医学影像诊断的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨东奇

    2015-01-01

    Objective To discuss and analysis the relationship between medical imaging technology and medical imaging diagnosis. Methods Based on our medical institution, combined with personal experience, elaborated the connections between medical image technology and medical image diagnose. Results Medical image technology and medical image diagnosis is a dialectical unity of the whole, both independent of the role wil have a certain impact on the other side. Conclusion Medical image diagnosis need the support of imaging technology, medical image diagnosis technology and medical imaging technology mutual y integral in clinic and they depend on each other.%目的:讨论并分析医学影像技术与医学影像诊断关系之间的联系。方法以我医疗机构为研究基准,结合个人实践经验,阐述医疗发展形势下医学影像技术和医学影像诊断之间的联系。结果医学影像技术与医学影像诊断是一个辩证统一的整体,两者独立作用均会对对方产生一定的影响。结论医学影像的诊断需要影像技术的支持,医学影像的诊断技术和医学影像的技术互为整体,在临床对于患者进行诊断的过程中互相依赖、制约以及促进。

  2. Impact of Medication Dose Tracking Technology on Nursing Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Grayson; Campbell, Udobi; Kelm, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Objective: The impact of providing nursing staff access to data collected through a medication dose tracking technology (MDTT) web portal was investigated. Methods: A quasi-experimental, nonrandomized, pre-post intervention study was conducted in the Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (CTICU) at Duke University Hospital. The change in the number of medication requests per dispense routed to the pharmacy electronic health record (EHR) in-basket was analyzed pre and post web portal access. Other endpoints included the number of MDTT web portal queries per day by nursing staff, change in nursing satisfaction survey scores, and technician time associated with processing medication requests pre and post web portal access. The pre web portal access phase of the study occurred from June 1, 2014 to August 31, 2014. The post web portal access phase occurred from October 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014. Results: An 11.4% decrease in the number of medication requests per dispense was exhibited between the pre and post web portal access phases of the study (0.0579 vs 0.0513, respectively; p < .001). Pre and post surveys showed a significant improvement in nurses' satisfaction regarding access to information on the location of medications (p = .009). Additionally, CTICU nursing staff utilized the MDTT web portal for 3.21 queries per day from October 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014. Conclusion: Providing nurses access to data collected via an MDTT decreased the number of communications between nursing and pharmacy staff regarding medication availability and led to statistically significant improvements in nursing satisfaction for certain aspects of the medication distribution process.

  3. Path dependence in technologies and organizations: a concise guide

    OpenAIRE

    Castaldi, C Carolina; Dosi, G; Paraskevopoulou, E

    2011-01-01

    The note on which an entry for the Palgrave Encyclopedia of Strategic Management will draw offers a beginner's guide to path dependency in technologies and organizations. We address the very meaning of the concept and its centrality in various aspects of economic analysis. We outline the various levels of the ecomic system in which it is observable, its sources, concequences and different formal representations of path dependent processes.

  4. Near field communications technology and the potential to reduce medication errors through multidisciplinary application

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Connell, Emer

    2016-07-01

    Patient safety requires optimal management of medications. Electronic systems are encouraged to reduce medication errors. Near field communications (NFC) is an emerging technology that may be used to develop novel medication management systems.

  5. Improving patient access to novel medical technologies in Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kearney, Peter

    2012-02-03

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) organized a one-day workshop with clinicians, health economic experts, and health technology appraisal experts to discuss the equity of patient access to novel medical technologies in Europe. Two index technologies were considered: implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and drug-eluting stents (DES). The use of ICDs range from 35 implants\\/million population in Portugal to 166 implants\\/million population in Germany, whereas for implants of DES (as percentage of total stents) it is lowest in Germany at 14% and high in Portugal at 65%. These differences can in part be explained by a lack of structured implementation of guidelines, the direct cost in relation to the overall healthcare budget, and to differences in procedures and models applied by Health Technology Assessment (HTA) agencies in Europe. The workshop participants concluded that physicians need to be involved in a more structured way in HTA and need to become better acquainted with its methods and terminology. Clinical guidelines should be systematically translated, explained, disseminated, updated, and adopted by cardiologists in Europe. Clinically appropriate, consistent and transparent health economic models need to be developed and high-quality international outcome and cost data should be used. A process for funding of a technology should be developed after a positive recommendation from HTA agencies. Both the ESC and the national cardiac societies should build-up health economic expertise and engage more actively in discussions with stakeholders involved in the provision of healthcare.

  6. Patient safety and technology-driven medication - A qualitative study on how graduate nursing students navigate through complex medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Fabricius, Pia; Lefevre, Rikke S; Møller, Tom

    2015-05-01

    The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26-38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using the systematic horizontal phenomenological-hermeneutic template methodology. The interviews uncovered that understanding the technologies; professionalism and patient safety are three crucial elements in the medication process. The students expressed positivity and confidence in using technology, but were fearful of committing serious medication errors. From the nursing students' perspective, experienced nurses deviate from existing guidelines, leaving them feeling isolated in practical learning situations. Having an unclear nursing role model for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient adherence to the medication process, still remains to be studied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Perception of medical students for utility of mobile technology use in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushama Subhash Thakre

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mobile technology is changing the way we live, and it is beginning to change the way we learn. Current literature reviews have shown that research on mobile technology in medical education primarily focused on efficacy, of mobile devices as an educational tool and resource, infrastructure to support m-learning, benefits, challenges, and appropriate use. Objectives: To assess the perception of medical student for the utility of mobile technology in their learning experience and to find out different barriers in the application of mobile phone in medical education. Materials and Methods: The study was designed as a descriptive study to assess emerging patterns of mobile technology use by medical students across the academic year 2013-2014. Interview and focus group discussion was a method of data collection. Results: Mean age ± standard deviation of the current mobile was 3.45 ± 1.45 years. Mobile users were 302 (96.79% and Smartphone users were 261 (83.61%. In the present study, 176 (56.41% used for the academic purpose and 65 (20.83% of the students preferred the same for an entertainment purpose. Gender-wise significant difference was observed in regards to Smartphone availability and daily Internet use for education purpose by female was more than male. Conclusion: The lessons learned from this study are-majority of the students use Smartphone mainly for communication, learning, and entertainment purpose. With increasing use of portable devices by students, it is logical to expect the next step to incorporate these devices in the learning environment and should, therefore, be appropriately considered for curriculum.

  8. Novel medical imaging technologies for disease diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olego, Diego

    2009-03-01

    New clinical approaches for disease diagnosis, treatment and monitoring will rely on the ability of simultaneously obtaining anatomical, functional and biological information. Medical imaging technologies in combination with targeted contrast agents play a key role in delivering with ever increasing temporal and spatial resolution structural and functional information about conditions and pathologies in cardiology, oncology and neurology fields among others. This presentation will review the clinical motivations and physics challenges in on-going developments of new medical imaging techniques and the associated contrast agents. Examples to be discussed are: *The enrichment of computer tomography with spectral sensitivity for the diagnosis of vulnerable sclerotic plaque. *Time of flight positron emission tomography for improved resolution in metabolic characterization of pathologies. *Magnetic particle imaging -a novel imaging modality based on in-vivo measurement of the local concentration of iron oxide nano-particles - for blood perfusion measurement with better sensitivity, spatial resolution and 3D real time acquisition. *Focused ultrasound for therapy delivery.

  9. An Analysis of Medical Laboratory Technology Journals' Instructions for Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Martina; Mlinaric, Ana; Omazic, Jelena; Supak-Smolcic, Vesna

    2016-08-01

    Instructions for authors (IFA) need to be informative and regularly updated. We hypothesized that journals with a higher impact factor (IF) have more comprehensive IFA. The aim of the study was to examine whether IFA of journals indexed in the Journal Citation Reports 2013, "Medical Laboratory Technology" category, are written in accordance with the latest recommendations and whether the quality of instructions correlates with the journals' IF. 6 out of 31 journals indexed in "Medical Laboratory Technology" category were excluded (unsuitable or unavailable instructions). The remaining 25 journals were scored based on a set of 41 yes/no questions (score 1/0) and divided into four groups (editorial policy, research ethics, research integrity, manuscript preparation) by three authors independently (max score = 41). We tested the correlation between IF and total score and the difference between scores in separate question groups. The median total score was 26 (21-30) [portion of positive answers 0.63 (0.51-0.73)]. There was no statistically significant correlation between a journal's IF and the total score (rho = 0.291, P = 0.159). IFA included recommendations concerning research ethics and manuscript preparation more extensively than recommendations concerning editorial policy and research integrity (Ht = 15.91, P = 0.003). Some policies were poorly described (portion of positive answers), for example: procedure for author's appeal (0.04), editorial submissions (0.08), appointed body for research integrity issues (0.08). The IF of the "Medical Laboratory Technology" journals does not reflect a journals' compliance to uniform standards. There is a need for improving editorial policies and the policies on research integrity.

  10. Review of early assessment models of innovative medical technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasterholdt, Iben; Krahn, Murray D; Kidholm, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Hospitals increasingly make decisions regarding the early development of and investment in technologies, but a formal evaluation model for assisting hospitals early on in assessing the potential of innovative medical technologies is lacking. This article provides an overview of models...... for early assessment in different health organisations and discusses which models hold most promise for hospital decision makers. METHODS: A scoping review of published studies between 1996 and 2015 was performed using nine databases. The following information was collected: decision context, decision...... problem, and a description of the early assessment model. RESULTS: 2362 articles were identified and 12 studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. An additional 12 studies were identified and included in the review by searching reference lists. The majority of the 24 early assessment studies were variants...

  11. Medical Representatives' Intention to Use Information Technology in Pharmaceutical Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Eun-Seon; Chang, Hyejung

    2016-10-01

    Electronic detailing (e-detailing), the use of electronic devices to facilitate sales presentations to physicians, has been adopted and expanded in the pharmaceutical industry. To maximize the potential outcome of e-detailing, it is important to understand medical representatives (MRs)' behavior and attitude to e-detailing. This study investigates how information technology devices such as laptop computers and tablet PCs are utilized in pharmaceutical marketing, and it analyzes the factors influencing MRs' intention to use devices. This study has adopted and modified the theory of Roger's diffusion of innovation model and the technology acceptance model. To test the model empirically, a questionnaire survey was conducted with 221 MRs who were working in three multinational or eleven domestic pharmaceutical companies in Korea. Overall, 28% and 35% of MRs experienced using laptop computers and tablet PCs in pharmaceutical marketing, respectively. However, the rates were different across different groups of MRs, categorized by age, education level, position, and career. The results showed that MRs' intention to use information technology devices was significantly influenced by perceived usefulness in general. Perceived ease of use, organizational and individual innovativeness, and several MR characteristics were also found to have significant impacts. This study provides timely information about e-detailing devices to marketing managers and policy makers in the pharmaceutical industry for successful marketing strategy development by understanding the needs of MRs' intention to use information technology. Further in-depth study should be conducted to understand obstacles and limitations and to improve the strategies for better marketing tools.

  12. Review of Economic Submissions to NICE Medical Technologies Evaluation Programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshreef, Abualbishr; Jenks, Michelle; Green, William; Dixon, Simon

    2016-12-01

    The economic evaluation of medical devices is increasingly used to inform decision making on adopting new or novel technologies; however, challenges are inevitable due to the unique characteristics of devices. Cost-consequence analyses are recommended and employed by the English National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Medical Technologies Evaluation Programme (MTEP) to help address these challenges. The aim of this work was to review the critiques raised for previous MTEP submissions and explore if there were common problems across submissions. We reviewed a sample of 12 economic submissions to MTEP representing 50 % of 24 sets of guidance issued to July 2015. For each submission, we reviewed the External Assessment Centre's (EAC) report and the guidance document produced by NICE. We identified the main problems raised by the EAC's assessments and the committee's considerations for each submission, and explored strategies for improvement. We found that the identification and measurement of costs and consequences are the main shortcomings within economic submissions to MTEP. Together, these shortcomings accounted for 42 % of criticisms by the EACs among the reviewed submissions. In certain circumstances problems with these shortcomings may be unavoidable, for example, if there is a limited evidence base for the device being appraised. Nevertheless, strategies can often be adopted to improve submissions, including the use of more appropriate time horizons, whilst cost and resource use information should be taken, where possible, from nationally representative sources.

  13. ``Low Power Wireless Technologies: An Approach to Medical Applications''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido O., Francisco J.; González R., Miguel; Moreno M., Antonio; de La Cruz F, José Luis

    Wireless communication supposed a great both -quantitative and qualitative, jump in the management of the information, allowing the access and interchange of it without the need of a physical cable connection. The wireless transmission of voice and information has remained in constant evolution, arising new standards like BluetoothTM, WibreeTM or ZigbeeTM developed under the IEEE 802.15 norm. These newest wireless technologies are oriented to systems of communication of short-medium distance and optimized for a low cost and minor consume, becoming recognized as a flexible and reliable medium for data communications across a broad range of applications due to the potential that the wireless networks presents to operate in demanding environments providing clear advantages in cost, size, power, flexibility, and distributed intelligence. About the medical applications, the remote health or telecare (also called eHealth) is getting a bigger place into the manufacturers and medical companies, in order to incorporate products for assisted living and remote monitoring of health parameteres. At this point, the IEEE 1073, Personal Health Devices Working Group, stablish the framework for these kind of applications. Particularly, the 1073.3.X describes the physical and transport layers, where the new ultra low power short range wireless technologies can play a big role, providing solutions that allow the design of products which are particularly appropriate for monitor people’s health with interoperability requirements.

  14. A longitudinal study of families with technology-dependent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toly, Valerie Boebel; Musil, Carol M; Carl, John C

    2012-02-01

    Few researchers have longitudinally examined families caring for technology-dependent children at home. We tested a theoretically and empirically based conceptual model by examining family functioning and normalization in 82 mothers (female primary caregivers) twice over 12 months. Time 1 and Time 2 cross-sectional findings were consistent; the only predictor of family functioning was mothers' depressive symptoms. Contrary to the proposed model, normalization, caregiving duration, and home nursing hours were not directly related to family functioning. Baseline family functioning significantly predicted future family functioning. Also, mothers whose children were no longer technology-dependent at Time 2 reported significant improvements in family functioning and normalization. An intervention to address high levels of depressive symptoms of these mothers is essential to optimizing family functioning.

  15. Families with children who are technology dependent: normalization and family functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toly, Valerie Boebel; Musil, Carol M; Carl, John C

    2012-02-01

    This cross-sectional study examined family functioning and normalization in 103 mothers of children ≤16 years of age dependent on medical technology (mechanical ventilation, intravenous nutrition/medication, respiratory/nutritional support) following initiation of home care. Differences in outcomes (mother's depressive symptoms, normalization, family functioning), based on the type of technology used, were also examined. Participants were interviewed face-to-face using the Demographic Characteristics Questionnaire, the Functional Status II-Revised Scale, the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, a Normalization Scale subscale, and the Feetham Family Functioning Survey. Thirty-five percent of the variance in family functioning was explained primarily by the mothers' level of depressive symptoms. Several variables were significant predictors of normalization. Analysis of variance revealed no significant difference in outcomes based on the type of technology used. Mothers of technology-dependent children are at high risk for clinical depression that may affect family functioning. This article concludes with clinical practice and policy implications.

  16. Hospital discharge of respiratory-technology-dependent children: role of a dedicated respiratory care discharge coordinator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tearl, Donna K; Cox, Timothy J; Hertzog, James H

    2006-07-01

    Preparation of respiratory-technology-dependent children for hospital discharge presents many challenges. Adequate training and education of parental caregivers, discharge planning, and coordination with the durable-medical-equipment and home-nursing companies must be completed. A process using multiple respiratory therapists (RTs) to achieve this may not be efficient. We evaluated our model, in which a dedicated RT discharge coordinator provides education and coordinates discharge planning of respiratory-technology-dependent pediatric patients. This system provides a single contact for caregivers and outside agencies, a single respiratory-care educator for the caregivers, and a clinical pathway that involves the entire multidisciplinary team. Patient length of stay and customer satisfaction were evaluated before and after implementation of the discharge-coordinator program. Our dedicated-RT-discharge-coordinator model was associated with rapid initiation of frequent family-training sessions. Durable-medical-equipment-company personnel reported that they had increased satisfaction with the quality of training of the family caregivers. The members of the hospital multidisciplinary team had increased satisfaction with the discharge process. Patient length of stay nonsignificantly decreased after the implementation of the discharge-coordinator program. There are several advantages to using a dedicated RT-discharge-coordinator system for home-discharge preparation of respiratory-technology-dependent children.

  17. GEOGRAPHIC MEDICAL HISTORY: ADVANCES IN GEOSPATIAL TECHNOLOGY PRESENT NEW POTENTIALS IN MEDICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Faruque

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes, behaviour, and the environment are known to be the major risk factors for common diseases. When the patient visits a physician, typical questions include family history (genes and lifestyle of the patient (behaviour, but questions concerning environmental risk factors often remain unasked. It is ironic that 25 centuries ago Hippocrates, known as the father of medicine, noted the importance of environmental exposure in medical investigation as documented in his classic work, “Airs, Waters, Places”, yet the practice of routinely incorporating environmental risk factors is still not in place. Modern epigenetic studies have found that unhealthy lifestyle and environmental factors can cause changes to our genes that can increase disease risk factors. Therefore, attempting to solve the puzzle of diseases using heredity and lifestyle alone will be incomplete without accounting for the environmental exposures. The primary reason why environmental exposure has not yet been a routine part of the patient’s medical history is mostly due to our inability to provide clinicians useful measures of environmental exposures suitable for their clinical practices. This presentation will discuss advances in geospatial technology that show the potential to catalyse a paradigm shift in medical practice and health research by allowing environmental risk factors to be documented as the patient’s “Geographic Medical History”. In order to accomplish this we need information on: a relevant spatiotemporal environmental variables, and b location of the individual in that person’s dynamic environment. Common environmental agents that are known to interact with genetic make-up include air pollutants, mold spores, pesticides, etc. Until recently, the other component, location of an individual was limited to a static representation such as residential or workplace location. Now, with the development of mobile technology, changes in an individual’s location

  18. Geographic Medical History: Advances in Geospatial Technology Present New Potentials in Medical Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruque, F. S.; Finley, R. W.

    2016-06-01

    Genes, behaviour, and the environment are known to be the major risk factors for common diseases. When the patient visits a physician, typical questions include family history (genes) and lifestyle of the patient (behaviour), but questions concerning environmental risk factors often remain unasked. It is ironic that 25 centuries ago Hippocrates, known as the father of medicine, noted the importance of environmental exposure in medical investigation as documented in his classic work, "Airs, Waters, Places", yet the practice of routinely incorporating environmental risk factors is still not in place. Modern epigenetic studies have found that unhealthy lifestyle and environmental factors can cause changes to our genes that can increase disease risk factors. Therefore, attempting to solve the puzzle of diseases using heredity and lifestyle alone will be incomplete without accounting for the environmental exposures. The primary reason why environmental exposure has not yet been a routine part of the patient's medical history is mostly due to our inability to provide clinicians useful measures of environmental exposures suitable for their clinical practices. This presentation will discuss advances in geospatial technology that show the potential to catalyse a paradigm shift in medical practice and health research by allowing environmental risk factors to be documented as the patient's "Geographic Medical History". In order to accomplish this we need information on: a) relevant spatiotemporal environmental variables, and b) location of the individual in that person's dynamic environment. Common environmental agents that are known to interact with genetic make-up include air pollutants, mold spores, pesticides, etc. Until recently, the other component, location of an individual was limited to a static representation such as residential or workplace location. Now, with the development of mobile technology, changes in an individual's location can be tracked in real time if

  19. [Application of robotic technology to the needs in the medical service of the Armed Forces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iudin, A B; Chepur, S V; shestakov, S V

    2013-06-01

    Application of robotic technology to the needs in the medical service of the Armed Forces. Further development of the medical service is inseparably associated with the implementation of robot technology into the practice of medical support of the Armed Forces of the Russian federation. For this purpose it is necessary to create a clinical scientific research centre of robot technology and interdepartmental scientific research simulation training center on the basis of the Kirov Military Medical Academy. It is also necessary to provide development of medical robotic complexes of tactical level of the medical service.

  20. [Personalized medicine and individual healthcare : Medical and information technology aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederlag, W; Lemke, H U; Rienhoff, O

    2010-08-01

    The individualization of medicine and healthcare appears to be following a general societal trend. The terms "personalized medicine" and "personal health" are used to describe this process. Here it must be emphasized that personalized medicine is not limited to pharmacogenomics, but that the spectrum of personalized medicine is much broader. Applications range from individualized diagnostics, patient-specific pharmacological therapy, therapy with individual prostheses and implants to therapy approaches using autologous cells, and from patient model-based therapy in the operating room, electronic patient records through to the individual care of patients in their home environment with the use of technical systems and services. Although in some areas practical solutions have already been found, most applications will not be fully developed for many years to come. Medical and information technology are essential to personalized medicine and personal health, each driving the other forward.

  1. Mechanical technologies for PIGMI. [Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansborough, L.D.

    1979-01-01

    PIGMI (Pion Generator for Medical Irradiations) is a compact linear proton accelerator designed for a hospital environment. The prototype of the low energy section of PIGMI has been designed and is being fabricated at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. It is an accelerator design which makes use of several advanced or innovative technologies. The PIGMI Prototype consists of a 250 keV injector, a double harmonic buncher, a tape-wound 13 KG solenoid magnet, and four accelerator tanks with a total of 63 drift tubes of which 18 contain strong focusing quadrupoles of permanent magnets. The accelerator tanks are mild steel, copper-plated using a bright acid leveling technique. Drift tubes are stainless steel, fabricated using electron beam welding, shaped in a lathe and then copper plated. Drift tubes loaded with permanent magnets are sealed using laser welding. The samarium cobalt magnets are shaped by cutting and grinding techniques developed at Los Alamos.

  2. Authentication of digital medical images with digital signature technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J P

    1995-03-01

    To determine whether digital signature technology (DST) can authenticate digital medical images to the same level of authenticity required for interbank electronic transfer of funds. Message digests were computed for two magnetic resonance images that differed only by the value of a single bit. RSA (Rivest, Shamir, and Adleman) public key cryptography was used to encrypt each message digest to form a digital signature for each image, a process analogous to the established use of RSA DST for electronic funds transfer. The process was then reversed to authenticate the original image from its digital signature. Although the images differed by less than 0.000095%, their message digests differed at 94% of their characters. The digital signature of the original image proved that it was authentic and that the altered image was not authentic. RSA DST can establish the authenticity of images to at least the level of confidence required for interbank electronic transfer of funds.

  3. 42 CFR 412.88 - Additional payment for new medical service or technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...: (i) The full DRG payment (including adjustments for indirect medical education and disproportionate... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Additional payment for new medical service or... for new medical service or technology. (a) For discharges involving new medical services...

  4. Research on Supporting Functions of the Information Technology on Electronic medical record

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Sheng Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Promote further utilization of information technology in quality control of the electronic medical record and provide forceful technological supports for medical quality control. Method: research existing problems in quality control of electronic medical record at present, put forward that the information technology should be used sufficiently, integration with other systems should be completed, quality control rules should be built and quality control time should be set and finally point out the key construction element of information technology to provide supports. Result: the article points out that further utilization of information technology in quality control of EMR should start from the standard, structuralized and paperless electronic medical record, construction of the communication platform and application of high technology. Conclusion: it is of great significance to promote improvement of quality control level of the electronic medical record and improve continuously medical quality.

  5. A Mixed Learning Technology Approach for Continuing Medical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon R. Curran

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Distance learning technologies have been used for many years to provide CME to rural physicians. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility and acceptability of a mixed learning technology approach for providing distance CME. The approach combined audio teleconferencing instruction with a Web-based learning system enabling the live presentation and archiving of instructional material and media, asynchronous computer conferencing discussions, and access to supplemental online learning resources. Methodology: The study population was comprised of physicians and nurse practitioners who participated in audio teleconference sessions, but did not access the Web-based learning system (non-users; learners who participated in audio teleconferences and accessed the Web-based system (online users; and faculty. The evaluation focused upon faculty and learners’ experiences and perceptions of the mixed learning technology approach; the level of usage; and the effectiveness of the approach in fostering non-mandatory, computer-mediated discussions. Results and Discussion: The users of the Web-based learning system were satisfied with its features, ease of use, and the ability to access online CME instructional material. Learners who accessed the system reported a higher level of computer skill and comfort than those who did not, and the majority of these users accessed the system at times other than the live audio teleconference sessions. The greatest use of the system appeared to be for self-directed learning. The success of a mixed learning technology approach is dependent on Internet connectivity and computer access; learners and faculty having time to access and use the Web; comfort with computers; and faculty development in the area of Web-based teaching.

  6. Personality types and nicotine Dependency among medical sciences students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    H. Bakshi; A. Khodadadizadeh

    2014-01-01

    ... inclined towards smoking and related diseases. Thus, to test this hypothesis, we have studied possible correlations between psychological personality and tobacco-dependency among university students in the central part of Iran...

  7. Personality types and nicotine Dependency among medical sciences students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bakshi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Smoking has recently become a major public health threat among the youth of today in Iran. Many clinicians and researchers hypothesized that tobacco-related disorders are maintained by the ability of nicotine to regulate positive and negative mood states. Moreover, some research indicates that there is no correlation between personality type, cigarette smoking, and heart disease, while some others mention that people with personality type A are more inclined towards smoking and related diseases. Thus, to test this hypothesis, we have studied possible correlations between psychological personality and tobacco-dependency among university students in the central part of Iran. In the current study, the most prevalent personality type was B (56.8%, with A (43.2%. Regarding smoking status, 17.5% (70 of the students were smokers and 82.5% (330 non-smokers; moreover, our results showed 66.7% (47 of smokers had low dependency and 33.3% (23 were physically dependent on nicotine. Concerning the difference between smokers and non-smokers based on their personality type, the results showed that 51.4% smokers had type A personality and 59.9% non-smokers were type B. There were also statistical differences between personality type and tobacco usage in students (p<0.05. We also found statistical differences between physical dependency and personality type; that is, 67.3% of smoking students who were physically dependent on nicotine had A type personality (p<0.05. The results suggest that there are several psychological types having higher association with tobacco use than other types. It poses some additional challenges for students’ support services to address mental health problems. The personality type in our study turned out to be an important factor influencing the nicotine dependency of the students.

  8. Development process and manufacturing of modern medical implants with LENS technology

    OpenAIRE

    M. Balažic; D. Recek; D. Kramar; M. Milfelner; J. Kopač

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Research and development of modern medical implants is complex and demanding process focused on fulfilling requirements regarding materials, machining technologies and functionality. Typical example of modern medical implant is elbow nail for fixation of Caput radii fractures. It could be manufactured with classical machining technologies and with advanced Rapid Prototyping technologies such as highly targeted metal deposition technology LENS (Laser Engineered Net Shaping).Design/met...

  9. Enabling medication management through health information technology (Health IT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibbon, K Ann; Lokker, Cynthia; Handler, Steve M; Dolovich, Lisa R; Holbrook, Anne M; O'Reilly, Daria; Tamblyn, Robyn; J Hemens, Brian; Basu, Runki; Troyan, Sue; Roshanov, Pavel S; Archer, Norman P; Raina, Parminder

    2011-04-01

    The objective of the report was to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) on all phases of the medication management process (prescribing and ordering, order communication, dispensing, administration and monitoring as well as education and reconciliation), to identify the gaps in the literature and to make recommendations for future research. We searched peer-reviewed electronic databases, grey literature, and performed hand searches. Databases searched included MEDLINE®, Embase, CINAHL (Cumulated Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Compendex, Inspec (which includes IEEE Xplore), Library and Information Science Abstracts, E-Prints in Library and Information Science, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts, and Business Source Complete. Grey literature searching involved Internet searching, reviewing relevant Web sites, and searching electronic databases of grey literatures. AHRQ also provided all references in their e-Prescribing, bar coding, and CPOE knowledge libraries. Paired reviewers looked at citations to identify studies on a range of health IT used to assist in the medication management process (MMIT) during multiple levels of screening (titles and abstracts, full text and final review for assignment of questions and data abstrction). Randomized controlled trials and cohort, case-control, and case series studies were independently assessed for quality. All data were abstracted by one reviewer and examined by one of two different reviewers with content and methods expertise. 40,582 articles were retrieved. After duplicates were removed, 32,785 articles were screened at the title and abstract phase. 4,578 full text articles were assessed and 789 articles were included in the final report. Of these, 361 met only content criteria and were listed without further abstraction. The final report included data from 428 articles across the seven key

  10. Medical image digital archive: a comparison of storage technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunn, Timothy; Hutchings, Matt

    1998-07-01

    A cost effective, high capacity digital archive system is one of the remaining key factors that will enable a radiology department to eliminate film as an archive medium. The ever increasing amount of digital image data is creating the need for huge archive systems that can reliably store and retrieve millions of images and hold from a few terabytes of data to possibly hundreds of terabytes. Selecting the right archive solution depends on a number of factors: capacity requirements, write and retrieval performance requirements, scaleability in capacity and performance, conformance to open standards, archive availability and reliability, security, cost, achievable benefits and cost savings, investment protection, and more. This paper addresses many of these issues. It compares and positions optical disk and magnetic tape technologies, which are the predominant archive mediums today. New technologies will be discussed, such as DVD and high performance tape. Price and performance comparisons will be made at different archive capacities, plus the effect of file size on random and pre-fetch retrieval time will be analyzed. The concept of automated migration of images from high performance, RAID disk storage devices to high capacity, NearlineR storage devices will be introduced as a viable way to minimize overall storage costs for an archive.

  11. Managing medical technology: lessons for the United States from Quebec and France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenau, P V

    2000-01-01

    Important modifications to technology assessment, diffusion, adoption, and utilization must take place if the United States is to better employ medical technology and save resources so as to assure access for the uninsured and underinsured. The United States can learn from other health systems that are more successful in achieving these goals. The author selects for comparison the health systems of France and Quebec. The discussion focuses on the differences between the three systems in the management of medical technology on a range of policy-relevant dimensions, including health system structure, attitudes about planning versus market competition, government regulation, the balance between decentralization and centralization, the needs of the individual and those of the society, linkages between technology assessment and policy-making, and the importance of medical technology assessment for medical practice. Seven specific recommendations are made for better managing medical technology in the United States, drawing on what can be observed from the experiences of Quebec and France.

  12. [Educational system for medical sciences at the University of Tsukuba--with special reference to medical technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Toshiko

    2006-03-01

    Three-year colleges for nursing, medical technology, and so on, have all been reorganized into four-year educational institutions in national universities. Since the reform, universities are not responsible for educating medical scientists except nurses. The new College of Nursing and Medical Technology in the University of Tsukuba has been developed along these lines. Here introduce some of its attempts and provide an opportunity to a better system. The Department has the following three characteristics: 1. Medical scientists are educated in the new Department, and the Department is closely cooperating with the School of Medicine. 2. There are courses for medical researchers concerning Molecular Pathology, Pathological Engineering and Environmental Pathology. 3. The qualification to apply to a national test for medical technologists is given to the students. Unfortunately, the system is not fully understood by the faculty or the students and does not work well because the Medical Technology Department and the Nursing Department are grouped together as a single institution. Moreover, this flaw in the system prevents the Medical Technology Department from actively promoting highly advanced medical sciences, such as organ transplantation, artificial organs, gene therapy, reproductive medicines, and so forth (Fig. 1). Few specialists exist who can bridge achievements in basic or advanced sciences and clinical application. Serious social problems about food safety, care systems, post-genome medicine, the youth, and so on, have to be dealt with, too. We are thus planning to separate the Department as the College of Medical Science (Fig. 2) and link it to the educational system in the master's and doctoral programs (Fig. 3). This model will successfully educate a new type of medical specialists.

  13. 3D medical collaboration technology to enhance emergency healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Gregory F; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) videoconferencing has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years to support collaboration in healthcare. Two issues that arise in most evaluations of 2D videoconferencing in telemedicine are the difficulty obtaining optimal camera views and poor depth perception. To address...... system; and we present evaluation results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical collaboration technology could offer benefits over conventional 2D videoconferencing in emergency healthcare.......Two-dimensional (2D) videoconferencing has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years to support collaboration in healthcare. Two issues that arise in most evaluations of 2D videoconferencing in telemedicine are the difficulty obtaining optimal camera views and poor depth perception. To address...... these problems, we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to reconstruct dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and of events taking place within. The 3D views could be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote healthcare professionals equipped with fixed displays...

  14. Medical technology in Japan the politics of regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Altenstetter, Christa

    2014-01-01

    Compared to its American and European counterparts, Japan lags in adopting innovative medical devices and making new treatments and procedures available. Christa Altenstetter examines the contextual conditions of Japan's medical profession and its regulatory framework. Altenstetter looks into how physicians and device companies connect to the government and bureaucracy, the relationships connecting Japanese patients to their medical system and governmental bureaucracy, and how relationships between policymakers and the medical profession are changing.

  15. Mathematical simulation of hemodynamical processes and medical technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsitsyura, Nadiya; Novyc'kyy, Victor V.; Lushchyk, Ulyana B.

    2001-06-01

    Vascular pathologies constitute a significant part of human's diseases and their rate tends to increase. Numerous investigations of brain blood flow in a normal condition and in a pathological one has created a new branch of modern medicine -- angioneurology. It combines the information on brain angioarchitecture and on blood supply in a normal condition and in a pathological one. Investigations of a disease's development constitute an important problem of a modern medicine. Cerebrum blood supply is regulated by arterial inflow and venous outflow, but, unfortunately, in the literature available arterial and venous beds are considered separately. This causes an one-sided interpretation of atherosclerotical and discirculatory encefalopathies. As arterial inflow and venous outflow are interrelated, it seems to be expedient to perform a complex estimation of arteriovenous interactions, prove a correlation dependence connection between the beds and find a dependence in a form of mathematical function. The results will be observed clearly in the graphs. There were 139 patients aged from 2 up to 70 examined in the 'Istyna' Scientific Medical Ultrasound Center by means of a Logidop 2 apparatus manufactured by Kranzbuhler, Germany using a technique of cerebral arteries and veins ultrasound location (invented and patented by Ulyana Lushchyk, State Patent of Ukraine N10262 of 19/07/1995). A clinical interpretation of the results obtained was performed. With the help of this technique and ultrasound Dopplerography the blood flow in major head and cervical arteries was investigated. While performing a visual graphic analysis we paid attention to the changes of carotid artery (CA), internal jugular vein (IJV) and supratrochlear artery's (STA) hemodynamical parameters. Generally accepted blood flow parameters: FS -- maximal systolic frequency and FD -- minimal diastolic frequency were measured. The correlation between different combinations of parameters in the vessels mentioned

  16. Judicious Use of Simulation Technology in Continuing Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Michael T.; DiazGranados, Deborah; Feldman, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Use of simulation-based training is fast becoming a vital source of experiential learning in medical education. Although simulation is a common tool for undergraduate and graduate medical education curricula, the utilization of simulation in continuing medical education (CME) is still an area of growth. As more CME programs turn to simulation to…

  17. Impact of managed care on the development of new medical technology: ethical concerns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Pamela; Saha, Subrata

    1995-10-01

    During the last three decades, development of new medical technology has been largely responsible for the spectacular advances in the diagnosis and treatment of many human diseases. This has contributed to improved medical care of our population. However, concerns have been raised that in today's managed care environment of health care, introduction of new medical technology will be difficult. Cost-sensitive health care providers should consider various ethical issues involved before demanding that only those technologies that save money and show highly positive cost benefit ratio will be reimbursed. The impact of such considerations on the innovations of new medical devices and their developments is discussed.

  18. iMedEd: the role of mobile health technologies in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglani, Shiv M; Topol, Eric J

    2014-09-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) technologies have experienced a recent surge in attention because of their potential to transform the delivery of health care. This enthusiasm is partly due to the near ubiquity of smartphones and tablets among clinicians, as well as to the stream of mobile medical apps and devices being created. While much discussion has been devoted to how these tools will impact the practice of medicine, surprisingly little has been written on the role these technologies will play in medical education. In this commentary the authors describe the opportunities, applications, and challenges of mHealth apps and devices in medical education and argue that medical schools should make efforts to integrate these technologies into their curricula. By not doing so, medical educators risk producing a generation of clinicians underprepared for the changing realities of medical practice brought on by mHealth technologies.

  19. [Mobile phone-computer wireless interactive graphics transmission technology and its medical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuo; Liu, Jing

    2010-05-01

    Application of clinical digital medical imaging has raised many tough issues to tackle, such as data storage, management, and information sharing. Here we investigated a mobile phone based medical image management system which is capable of achieving personal medical imaging information storage, management and comprehensive health information analysis. The technologies related to the management system spanning the wireless transmission technology, the technical capabilities of phone in mobile health care and management of mobile medical database were discussed. Taking medical infrared images transmission between phone and computer as an example, the working principle of the present system was demonstrated.

  20. Purchasing medical innovation the right technology, for the right patient, at the right price

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, James C

    2015-01-01

    Innovation in medical technology generates a remarkable supply of new drugs, devices, and diagnostics that improve health, reduce risks, and extend life. But these technologies are too often used on the wrong patient, in the wrong setting, or at an unaffordable price. The only way to moderate the growth in health care costs without undermining the dynamic of medical innovation is to improve the process of assessing, pricing, prescribing, and using new technologies. Purchasing Medical Innovation analyzes the contemporary revolution in the purchasing of health care technology, with a focus on th

  1. [Undergraduate education of medical technologists to promote scientific and technological literacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroyuki; Akizawa, Hirotsugu

    2010-07-01

    It is becoming increasingly important for today's medical technologists to receive proper training on the safety of medical treatment and healthcare in order to accommodate the rapid changes and advancement in medical technology. In particular, because of the increase of hospital-acquired infections, the role of medical technologists involved in infection control has become much more important. In addition, particularly in Japan, the career options available to students graduating with a degree in medical technology have become much more diverse, ranging from research laboratories to clinical services; however, undergraduate education for medical technologists is limited. It is therefore deemed necessary for undergraduate students to be provided with adequate training from their universities by offering a wider selection of classes in this subject area. In this paper, we summarize our preliminary findings on the trial lessons that are offered to medical technology students in their microbiology class. These lessons are designed to enhance students' academic potential and to engage their interest.

  2. Preparing for the changing role of instructional technologies in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Bernard R; McNeil, Sara G; Cook, David A; Agarwal, Kathryn L; Singhal, Geeta R

    2011-04-01

    As part of an international faculty development conference in February 2010, a working group of medical educators and physicians discussed the changing role of instructional technologies and made recommendations for supporting faculty in using these technologies in medical education. The resulting discussion highlighted ways technology is transforming the entire process of medical education and identified several converging trends that have implications for how medical educators might prepare for the next decade. These trends include the explosion of new information; all information, including both health knowledge and medical records, becoming digital; a new generation of learners; the emergence of new instructional technologies; and the accelerating rate of change, especially related to technology. The working group developed five recommendations that academic health leaders and policy makers may use as a starting point for dealing with the instructional technology challenges facing medical education over the next decade. These recommendations are (1) using technology to provide/support experiences for learners that are not otherwise possible-not as a replacement for, but as a supplement to, face-to-face experiences, (2) focusing on fundamental principles of teaching and learning rather than learning specific technologies in isolation, (3) allocating a variety of resources to support the appropriate use of instructional technologies, (4) supporting faculty members as they adopt new technologies, and (5) providing funding and leadership to enhance electronic infrastructure to facilitate sharing of resources and instructional ideas.

  3. Medical visualization based on VRML technology and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Meng; Luo, Qingming; Lu, Qiang; Sheng, Rongbing; Liu, Yafeng

    2003-07-01

    Current high-performance computers and advanced image processing capabilities have made the application of three dimensional visualization objects in biomedical images facilitate the researches on biomedical engineering greatly. Trying to cooperate with the update technology using Internet, where 3-D data are typically stored and processed on powerful servers accessible by using TCP/IP, we held the results of the isosurface be applied in medical visualization generally. So in this system we use the 3-D file format VRML2.0, which is used through the Web interface for manipulating 3-D models. In this program we implemented to generate and modify triangular isosurface meshes by marching cubes algorithm, using OpenGL and MFC techniques to render the isosurface and manipulate voxel data. This software is more adequate visualization of volumetric data. The drawbacks are that 3-D image processing on personal computers is rather slow and the set of tools for 3-D visualization is limited. However, these limitations have not affected the applicability of this platform for all the tasks needed in elementary experiments in laboratory or data preprocessed. With the help of OCT and MPE scanning image system, applying these techniques to the visualization of rabbit brain, constructing data sets of hierarchical subdivisions of the cerebral information, we can establish a virtual environment on the World Wide Web for the rabbit brain research from its gross anatomy to its tissue and cellular levels of detail, providng graphical modeling and information management of both the outer and the inner space of the rabbit brain.

  4. Global Budgets and Technology-Intensive Medical Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zirui; Fendrick, A. Mark; Safran, Dana Gelb; Landon, Bruce; Chernew, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2009-2010, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts entered into global payment contracts (the Alternative Quality contract, AQC) with 11 provider organizations. We evaluated the impact of the AQC on spending and utilization of several categories of medical technologies, including one considered high value (colonoscopies) and three that include services that may be overused in some situations (cardiovascular, imaging, and orthopedic services). Methods Approximately 420,000 unique enrollees in 2009 and 180,000 in 2010 were linked to primary care physicians whose organizations joined the AQC. Using three years of pre-intervention data and a large control group, we analyzed changes in utilization and spending associated with the AQC with a propensity-weighted difference-in-differences approach adjusting for enrollee demographics, health status, secular trends, and cost-sharing. Results In the 2009 AQC cohort, total volume of colonoscopies increased 5.2 percent (p=0.04) in the first two years of the contract relative to control. The contract was associated with varied changes in volume for cardiovascular and imaging services, but total spending on cardiovascular services in the first two years decreased by 7.4% (p=0.02) while total spending on imaging services decreased by 6.1% (p<0.001) relative to control. In addition to lower utilization of higher-priced services, these decreases were also attributable to shifting care to lower-priced providers. No effect was found in orthopedics. Conclusions As one example of a large-scale global payment initiative, the AQC was associated with higher use of colonoscopies. Among several categories of services whose value may be controversial, the contract generally shifted volume to lower-priced facilities or services. PMID:24772385

  5. Aequilibrium prudentis: on the necessity for ethics and policy studies in the scientific and technological education of medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Misti Ault; Giordano, James

    2013-04-23

    The importance of strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education continues to grow as society, medicine, and the economy become increasingly focused and dependent upon bioscientific and technological innovation. New advances in frontier sciences (e.g., genetics, neuroscience, bio-engineering, nanoscience, cyberscience) generate ethical issues and questions regarding the use of novel technologies in medicine and public life. In light of current emphasis upon science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education (at the pre-collegiate, undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels), the pace and extent of advancements in science and biotechnology, the increasingly technological orientation and capabilities of medicine, and the ways that medicine - as profession and practice - can engage such scientific and technological power upon the multi-cultural world-stage to affect the human predicament, human condition, and perhaps nature of the human being, we argue that it is critical that science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education go beyond technical understanding and directly address ethical, legal, social, and public policy implications of new innovations. Toward this end, we propose a paradigm of integrative science, technology, ethics, and policy studies that meets these needs through early and continued educational exposure that expands extant curricula of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programs from the high school through collegiate, graduate, medical, and post-graduate medical education. We posit a synthetic approach that elucidates the historical, current, and potential interaction of scientific and biotechnological development in addition to the ethico-legal and social issues that are important to educate and sustain the next generation of medical and biomedical professionals who can appreciate, articulate, and address the realities of scientific and biotechnological progress given the shifting

  6. Outsourcing medical data analyses: can technology overcome legal, privacy, and confidentiality issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumen, Bostjan; Heričko, Marjan; Sevčnikar, Andrej; Završnik, Jernej; Hölbl, Marko

    2013-12-16

    Medical data are gold mines for deriving the knowledge that could change the course of a single patient's life or even the health of the entire population. A data analyst needs to have full access to relevant data, but full access may be denied by privacy and confidentiality of medical data legal regulations, especially when the data analyst is not affiliated with the data owner. Our first objective was to analyze the privacy and confidentiality issues and the associated regulations pertaining to medical data, and to identify technologies to properly address these issues. Our second objective was to develop a procedure to protect medical data in such a way that the outsourced analyst would be capable of doing analyses on protected data and the results would be comparable, if not the same, as if they had been done on the original data. Specifically, our hypothesis was there would not be a difference between the outsourced decision trees built on encrypted data and the ones built on original data. Using formal definitions, we developed an algorithm to protect medical data for outsourced analyses. The algorithm was applied to publicly available datasets (N=30) from the medical and life sciences fields. The analyses were performed on the original and the protected datasets and the results of the analyses were compared. Bootstrapped paired t tests for 2 dependent samples were used to test whether the mean differences in size, number of leaves, and the accuracy of the original and the encrypted decision trees were significantly different. The decision trees built on encrypted data were virtually the same as those built on original data. Out of 30 datasets, 100% of the trees had identical accuracy. The size of a tree and the number of leaves was different only once (1/30, 3%, P=.19). The proposed algorithm encrypts a file with plain text medical data into an encrypted file with the data protected in such a way that external data analyses are still possible. The results

  7. Virtual reality and interactive gaming technology for obese and diabetic children: is military medical technology applicable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Thomas Brett

    2011-03-01

    The Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center has pursued a number of technologies that may have application to the problems of obesity and diabetes management in children. Children are getting fatter because of increased caloric intake and less physical activity. Furthermore, technology advances have failed to significantly improve metabolic control of type 1 diabetes. Behavioral strategies should target video games, mobile phones, and other popular items used by children and seen by them as necessities. Exergaming is considerably more active than traditional video gaming and can be equivalent to moderate-intensity exercise. Diabetes equipment such as continuous glucose monitors and insulin pumps lack integration and live connectivity and suffer from a poor user interface. In contrast, mobile phones offer wireless connectivity, an excellent voice-enabled interface, and cloud connectivity that could possibly serve as a motivational and compliance tool for diabetes patients through text messaging to the patient, parents, and physician. Mobile phones have the potential to motivate and educate obese children as well. Exergaming for obese children could also be integrated into award systems of game consoles and game play time. The key to successful implementation of these strategies depends on the ability to integrate and connect the various technologies.

  8. Medical photography: current technology, evolving issues and legal perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, M T; DeWees, J M; Vela, K M; Khirallah, R T

    2015-04-01

    Medical photographic image capture and data management has undergone a rapid and compelling change in complexity over the last 20 years. This is because of multiple factors, including significant advances in ease of photograph capture, alongside an evolution of mechanisms of data portability/dissemination, combined with governmental focus on health information privacy. Literature to guide medical, legal, governmental and business professionals when dealing with issues related to medical photography is virtually nonexistent. Herein, we will address the breadth of uses of medical photography, device properties/specific devices utilised for image capture, methods of data transfer and dissemination and patient perceptions and attitudes regarding photography in a medical setting. In addition, we will address the legal implications, including legal precedent, copyright and privacy law, informed consent, protected health information and the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), as they pertain to medical photography.

  9. Advanced computer-aided intraoperative technologies for information-guided surgical management of gliomas: Tokyo Women's Medical University experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, H; Nakamura, R; Muragaki, Y; Suzuki, T; Chernov, M; Hori, T; Takakura, K

    2008-10-01

    The availability of the intraoperative MRI and real-time neuronavigation has dramatically changed the principles of surgery for gliomas. Current intraoperative computer-aided technologies permit perfect localization of the neoplasm, precise estimation of its volume, and clear definition of its interrelationships with the eloquent brain structures. This allows maximal tumor resection with minimal risk of postoperative disabilities. Under such conditions the medical treatment has become significantly dependent on the quality of the provided information and can be designated as information-guided management. Therefore, appropriate management of the wide spectrum of the intraoperative medical data and its adequate distribution between members of the surgical team for facilitation of the clinical decision-making is very important for attainment of the best possible outcome. Further progress in advanced neurovisualization, robotics, and comprehensive medical information technology has a great potential to increase the safety of the neurosurgical procedures for parenchymal brain tumors in the eloquent brain areas.

  10. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approaches...... to digitally augment a paper medical record. We report on two studies: a field study in which we describe the benefits and challenges of using a combination of electronic and paper-based medical records in a large university hospital and a deployment study in which we analyze how 8 clinicians used the Hy...

  11. Motivation as an independent and a dependent variable in medical education: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusurkar, R A; Ten Cate, Th J; van Asperen, M; Croiset, G

    2011-01-01

    Motivation in learning behaviour and education is well-researched in general education, but less in medical education. To answer two research questions, 'How has the literature studied motivation as either an independent or dependent variable? How is motivation useful in predicting and understanding processes and outcomes in medical education?' in the light of the Self-determination Theory (SDT) of motivation. A literature search performed using the PubMed, PsycINFO and ERIC databases resulted in 460 articles. The inclusion criteria were empirical research, specific measurement of motivation and qualitative research studies which had well-designed methodology. Only studies related to medical students/school were included. Findings of 56 articles were included in the review. Motivation as an independent variable appears to affect learning and study behaviour, academic performance, choice of medicine and specialty within medicine and intention to continue medical study. Motivation as a dependent variable appears to be affected by age, gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, personality, year of medical curriculum and teacher and peer support, all of which cannot be manipulated by medical educators. Motivation is also affected by factors that can be influenced, among which are, autonomy, competence and relatedness, which have been described as the basic psychological needs important for intrinsic motivation according to SDT. Motivation is an independent variable in medical education influencing important outcomes and is also a dependent variable influenced by autonomy, competence and relatedness. This review finds some evidence in support of the validity of SDT in medical education.

  12. Information technology and its role in anaesthesia training and continuing medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Larry F; Erlendson, Matthew J; Sun, John S; Clemenson, Anna M; Martin, Paul; Eng, Reuben L

    2012-03-01

    Today's educators are faced with substantial challenges in the use of information technology for anaesthesia training and continuing medical education. Millennial learners have uniquely different learning styles than previous generations of students. These preferences distinctly incorporate the use of digital information technologies and social technologies to support learning. To be effective teachers, modern educators must be familiar with these new information technologies and understand how to use them for medical education. Examples of new information technologies include learning management systems, lecture capture, social media (YouTube, Flickr), social networking (Facebook), Web 2.0, multimedia (video learning triggers and point-of-view video) and mobile computing applications. The information technology challenges for educators in the twenty-first century include: (a) understanding how technology shapes the learning preferences of today's anaesthesia residents, (b) distinguishing between the function and properties of new learning technologies and (c) properly using these learning technologies to enhance the anaesthesia curriculum.

  13. Assessing the Quality of Medical Information Technology Economic Evaluations: Room for Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Eric L.; Ortiz, Maqui; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Crosslin, David R.; Lobach, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Medical information systems are being recognized for their ability to improve patient outcomes. While standards for the economic evaluation of medical technologies were instituted in the mid-1990s, little is known about their application in medical information technology studies. In a review of medical information technology evaluation studies published between 1982 and 2002, we found that the volume and variety of economic evaluations had increased; however, investigators routinely omitted key cost or effectiveness elements in their designs, resulting in publications with incomplete, and potentially biased, economic findings. Of the studies that made economic claims, 23% did not report any economic data, 40% failed to include any effectiveness measures, and more than 50% used a case study or pre- post- test design. Thus, during a time when health economic study methods in general have experienced significant development, there is little evidence of similar progress in medical information technology economic evaluations. PMID:17238338

  14. Medication administration technologies and patient safety: a mixed-method systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Kelly; Cummings, Greta G; Marck, Patricia; Yurtseven, Ozden

    2011-10-01

    Healthcare leaders need evidence-based information on nursing medication administration technologies to guide the design of improvements to patient safety. The aim of this study was to evaluate the research evidence on relationships between the use of medication administration technologies and incidence of medication administration incidents and preventable adverse drug events to inform decision-making about existing technology options. Thirteen electronic databases and seven relevant patient safety websites were searched for the years 1980-2009. A mixed-method systematic literature review of research on medication administration technologies and associated links to patient safety, operationalized as medication administration incidents and preventable adverse drug events, was conducted. Twelve studies (two qualitative, five pre- and postinterventions and five correlational) met the inclusion criteria. All were assessed as medium quality with low generalizability of study findings. Only two studies sampled more than one hospital and none of the studies was driven by an explicit theoretical framework. The studies included in this review are generally positive towards medication administration technologies and their potential benefits, yet the level of evidence overall is equivocal. The majority of studies pointed to the development of workarounds by nurses following medication administration technology implementation that could compromise patient safety. More theoretically driven research is needed to determine which medication administration technologies should be implemented in what ways to most effectively reduce medication administration incidents and preventable adverse drug events and minimize the development of potentially unsafe workarounds. Further evidence is required to accurately assess the actual contribution of medication administration technologies for improving patient safety. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2011 Blackwell

  15. Identification of phreatophytic groundwater dependent ecosystems using geospatial technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez Hoyos, Isabel Cristina

    The protection of groundwater dependent ecosystems (GDEs) is increasingly being recognized as an essential aspect for the sustainable management and allocation of water resources. Ecosystem services are crucial for human well-being and for a variety of flora and fauna. However, the conservation of GDEs is only possible if knowledge about their location and extent is available. Several studies have focused on the identification of GDEs at specific locations using ground-based measurements. However, recent progress in technologies such as remote sensing and their integration with geographic information systems (GIS) has provided alternative ways to map GDEs at much larger spatial extents. This study is concerned with the discovery of patterns in geospatial data sets using data mining techniques for mapping phreatophytic GDEs in the United States at 1 km spatial resolution. A methodology to identify the probability of an ecosystem to be groundwater dependent is developed. Probabilities are obtained by modeling the relationship between the known locations of GDEs and main factors influencing groundwater dependency, namely water table depth (WTD) and aridity index (AI). A methodology is proposed to predict WTD at 1 km spatial resolution using relevant geospatial data sets calibrated with WTD observations. An ensemble learning algorithm called random forest (RF) is used in order to model the distribution of groundwater in three study areas: Nevada, California, and Washington, as well as in the entire United States. RF regression performance is compared with a single regression tree (RT). The comparison is based on contrasting training error, true prediction error, and variable importance estimates of both methods. Additionally, remote sensing variables are omitted from the process of fitting the RF model to the data to evaluate the deterioration in the model performance when these variables are not used as an input. Research results suggest that although the prediction

  16. Medical implants by using RP and investment casting technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Horacek

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the production technology of knee joint replacement by using rapid prototyping technology. The aim of the work is to outline the manufacturing technology intended for prototype production with the use of rapid prototyping and investment casting technology for use in orthopaedics and the surgery of knee joint replacement. The research results should make an effective contribution in the attempts to minimize the invasive surgical procedure, shorten the production of knee joint replacement as well as reduce the cost. At present, the research is focused on the preparation of STL data from CT (Computed Tomography and verification of the production technology of prototypes made using available RP technology and its evaluation.

  17. Systems in foil: opening new perspectives in medical technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, F.P.; Heck, G.T. van; Rensing, P.; Koetse, M.M.; Kalisingh, S.S.; Schoo, H.

    2008-01-01

    Organic electronic devices produced on foil open promising new perspectives for incorporation in disposable medical devices or sterile packaging materials because they are thin, lightweight and flexible. However, for economical viable applications reliable and cheap large scale production methods ar

  18. Systems in foil: opening new perspectives in medical technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, F.P.; Heck, G.T. van; Rensing, P.; Koetse, M.M.; Kalisingh, S.S.; Schoo, H.

    2008-01-01

    Organic electronic devices produced on foil open promising new perspectives for incorporation in disposable medical devices or sterile packaging materials because they are thin, lightweight and flexible. However, for economical viable applications reliable and cheap large scale production methods ar

  19. A Medical Area Network of Virtual Technology (MANVT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Zhang, Y., Hu, H., Shriver, C., Hooke, J., & Liebman, M. " Caffeine Intake, Race, and Risk of Invasive Breast Cancer, Lessons Learned from Data...illustrated in Fig. 3, the model is composed of six major modules: Medical History, Physical Exam , Diagnostic, Treatment, Outcome, and Scheduling and...article.) 1010 H. Hu et al.j]oumal of Biomedical Informatics 44 (2011) 1004-1019 IE Medical History Ill Physical Exam 13 Diagnostic EJ Biopsy IE

  20. Bridging the Technology Valley of Death in Joint Medical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    also provided the impetus to establish joint medical development portfolios. In 2010, the Joint Program Committee for Combat Casualty Care established...Resuscitation Re- search and Development Program for the Combat Casualty Care Research Program at the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command in...discontinue a program. Our experience to date includes: 2011—The Red Cell Pharming Program: This S&T program was sponsored by the Defense Advanced

  1. On Heidegger, medicine, and the modernity of modern medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassington, Iain

    2007-06-01

    This paper examines medicine's use of technology in a manner from a standpoint inspired by Heidegger's thinking on technology. In the first part of the paper, I shall suggest an interpretation of Heidegger's thinking on the topic, and attempt to show why he associates modern technology with danger. However, I shall also claim that there is little evidence that medicine's appropriation of modern technology is dangerous in Heidegger's sense, although there is no prima facie reason why it mightn't be. The explanation for this, I claim, is ethical. There is an initial attraction to the thought that Heidegger's thought echoes Kantian moral thinking, but I shall dismiss this. Instead, I shall suggest that the considerations that make modern technology dangerous for Heidegger are simply not in the character - the ethos - of medicine properly understood. This is because there is a distinction to be drawn between chronological and historical modernity, and that even up-to-date medicine, empowered by technology, retains in its ethos crucial aspects of a historically pre-modern understanding of technology. A large part of the latter half of the paper will be concerned with explaining the difference.

  2. Care for technology dependent children and their relationship with the health care systems1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okido, Aline Cristiane Cavicchioli; Zago, Márcia Maria Fontão; de Lima, Regina Aparecida Garcia

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to understand the experience of care delivery to technology dependent children based on the mothers' experience. METHOD: exploratory study with qualitative approach, based on the theoretical framework of medical anthropology and the narrative method. Twelve mothers participated and, as the technique to obtain the narratives, open interviews were held at the participants' homes. RESULTS: the narratives were organized into three thematic categories: the family system, identifying the care forms, the association between popular and scientific knowledge and the participation of the social network; the professional system, which discusses the relations between professionals and family, the hegemony of the biomedical model and the role of nursing; and the popular system, presenting popular care practices like spirituality and religiosity. CONCLUSION: the study provided support for a health care project that takes into account the families' moral and symbolic values and beliefs in view of the illness of a technology-dependent child. The results found can contribute towards changes in the health work process, so that its foundation is guided not only by the biomedical model, allowing the integration of the sociocultural dimensions into the health care movement. PMID:26039300

  3. Information and communication technology in medical education: an experience from a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyari, Asefeh Badiey; Bahadorani, Mahnaz; Tootoonchi, Mina; Gardiner, John Jacob Zucker; Peña, Roberto A; Adibi, Peyman

    2012-03-01

    This literature review was conducted using PubMed-Medline, PubMed-Central and ERIC databases, 1979- 2010, for research studies and pertinent theoretical publications including journals and texts. Key search words included general terms such as: "medical education," "information and communication technology in medical education," "medical students' computer skills" and "ICT use among medical students". Theoretical approaches were included to place the review within an educational and social context, and selected studies to demonstrate use of ICT in medical education through time and in different countries.

  4. The impact of medical technology on sense of security in the palliative home care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munck, Berit; Sandgren, Anna

    2017-03-02

    The increase in the use of medical devices in palliative home care requires that patients and next-of-kin feel secure. Therefore, the aim was to describe medical technology's impact on the sense of security for patients, next-of-kin and district nurses. Deductive content analysis was conducted on data from three previous studies, using the theoretical framework 'palliative home care as a secure base'. The use of medical technology was shown to have an impact on the sense of security for all involved. A sense of control was promoted by trust in staff and their competence in managing the technology, which was linked to continuity. Inner peace and being in comfort implied effective symptom relief facilitated by pain pumps and being relieved of responsibility. Health care professionals need to have practical knowledge about medical technology, but at the same time have an awareness of how to create and maintain a sense of security.

  5. Relationship between patient dependence and direct medical-, social-, indirect-, and informal-care costs in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darbà J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Josep Darbà,1 Lisette Kaskens2 1Department of Economics, University of Barcelona, 2BCN Health Economics and Outcomes Research SL, Barcelona, Spain Objective: The objectives of this analysis were to examine how patients' dependence on others relates to costs of care and explore the incremental effects of patient dependence measured by the Dependence Scale on costs for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD in Spain. Methods: The Co-Dependence in Alzheimer's Disease study is an 18 multicenter, cross-sectional, observational study among patients with AD according to the clinical dementia rating score and their caregivers in Spain. This study also gathered data on resource utilization for medical care, social care, caregiver productivity losses, and informal caregiver time reported in the Resource Utilization in Dementia Lite instrument and a complementary questionnaire. The data of 343 patients and their caregivers were collected through the completion of a clinical report form during one visit/assessment at an outpatient center or hospital, where all instruments were administered. The data collected (in addition to clinical measures also included sociodemographic data concerning the patients and their caregivers. Cost analysis was based on resource use for medical care, social care, caregiver productivity losses, and informal caregiver time reported in the Resource Utilization in Dementia Lite instrument and a complementary questionnaire. Resource unit costs were applied to value direct medical-, social-, and indirect-care costs. A replacement cost method was used to value informal care. Patient dependence on others was measured using the Dependence Scale, and the Cumulative Index Rating Scale was administered to the patient to assess multi-morbidity. Multivariate regression analysis was used to model the effects of dependence and other sociodemographic and clinical variables on cost of care. Results: The mean (standard deviation costs per patient

  6. #Nomoretextbooks? The impact of rapid communications technologies on medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Ameer; White, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    This paper was selected as the 2013 student essay winner by the Canadian Undergraduate Surgical Education Committee. The essay was in response to the question "How does rapid communications technology affect learning?"

  7. To the point: medical education, technology, and the millennial learner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Laura; Hampton, Brittany S; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Craig, LaTasha B; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Graziano, Scott C; McKenzie, Margaret L; Pradham, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Page-Ramsey, Sarah M

    2017-06-28

    This article, from the "To The Point" series that was prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, provides an overview of the characteristics of millennials and describes how medical educators can customize and reframe their curricula and teaching methods to maximize millennial learning. A literature search was performed to identify articles on generational learning. We summarize the importance of understanding the attitudes, ideas, and priorities of millennials to tailor educational methods to stimulate and enhance learning. Where relevant, a special focus on the obstetrics and gynecology curriculum is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Sustainable Public Procurement of Medical Technology and Green Logistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vettorato, Giovanna; Hsuan, Juliana

    This paper investigates design for remanufacture in terms of both detailed new product design and the environmental performance in which modularization and reversed production may operate. We examine the medical equipment industry and their potential contributions to the implementation of green...... supply chain in the healthcare sector. An exploratory case study of medical equipment supply chain is presented when considering the life cycle of the product can be managed through the modularization strategies. Preliminary findings indicate that design-for-disassembly of modules make equipment easier...

  9. [Key Technology and Quantity Control of Wearable Medical Devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongen; Yao, Shaowei

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, because the wearable medical devices can indicate the health monitoring index of blood sugar, blood pressure, heart rate, oxygen content, temperature, respiration of the human body anytime and anywhere, can also be used for the treatment of various diseases, accompanied by the development of large data, which will bring a subversive revolution for the medical device industry. This paper introduces the development of wearable devices, key technical index of main products, and to make a preliminary study on its quantity control.

  10. Patent Law, Antitrust Enforcement, and Public Access to Pharmaceuticals and Medical Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Sigman, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    Patent and antitrust laws impact public access to pharmaceuticals and medical technologies. Two instances—one involving Roche’s new class of HIV/AIDS drugs, the other an antitrust action brought against Boston Scientific Corporation for violations of an anticompetitive agreement pertaining to cardiac treatment technology—illustrate the salient effects that medical products can have on public welfare. This paper provides a summary of pat...

  11. Economic Evaluation in Medical Information Technology: Why the Numbers Don’t Add Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstein, Eric L.; Ortiz, Maqui; Anstrom, Kevin J.; Crosslin, David R.; Lobach, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Standards for the economic evaluation of medical technologies were instituted in the mid-1990s, yet little is known about their application in medical information technology studies. In a review of evaluation studies published between 1982 and 2002, we found that the volume and variety of economic evaluations had increased. However, investigators routinely omitted key cost or effectiveness elements in their designs, resulting in publications with incomplete, and potentially biased, economic findings. PMID:17238533

  12. A primer of economic methods of assessment of medical imaging technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, C. [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Herston, QLD (Australia). Department of Radiological Sciences

    1997-12-01

    A number of methods of economic assessment that can be applied to medical technology are described. Two, in particular Cost-Benefit Analysis and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis - are applied to medical imaging technology. An outline of a Cost-Benefit Analysis of a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and the cost effectiveness of Magnetic Resonance Imaging is given. Copyright (1997) Australian Institute of Radiography 17 refs.

  13. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Emergency Medical Technology--Basic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Emergency Medical Technology--Paramedic (Program CIP: 51.0904). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the emergency medical technology (EMT) programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline…

  14. Science, technology, autonomy, and dependence: a framework for international debate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morehouse, W.

    1979-01-01

    The role of science and technology in the international system has changed markedly in the past 30 years. Science and technology have emerged as primary instruments of power and social control, with the major industrialized countries, especially the superpowers, relying more and more on science and technology as a means of maintaining their dominance in that system. The technological gap between the North and the South has widened during this period. Development strategies, relying on importation of capital-intensive, socially inappropriate, environmentally destructive Western technologies will lead to a massive global equity crisis in the 1980s. These technologies have been at the heart of the accelerating de-industrialization of the Third World by the First and Second Worlds on a scale far beyond what occurred in historical colonialism. The critical need is to focus the debate at the forthcoming world conferences on these underlying issues, leading to the formulation of concrete action proposals at the national and international levels which will effectively promote the technological autonomy of the Third World. While we cannot be certain that greater autonomy will lad to greater equity, few Southern countries can go very far in meeting the minimum material needs of most, not to speak all, of their people without a greatly strengthened autonomous capacity for creating, acquiring, adapting, and using technology to solve their own urgent economic and social problems.

  15. The Co-Dependent Relationship of Technology and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surry, Daniel W.; Baker, Fredrick W., III

    2016-01-01

    Technology is one the defining features of humanity. It is ubiquitous in modern society and plays an important role in nearly everything that humans do. New technologies frequently spur our imagination, can evoke powerful emotions and often serve as the topic of heated debate. Many people are in awe of the power and potential of new technologies…

  16. Task analysis of information technology-mediated medication management in outpatient care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stiphout, F. van; Zwart-van Rijkom, J.E.F.; Maggio, L.A.; Aarts, J.E.C.M.; Bates, D.W.; Gelder, T. van; Jansen, P.A.F.; Schraagen, J.M.C.; Egberts, A.C.G.; Braak, E.W.M.T. ter

    2015-01-01

    Aims Educating physicians in the procedural as well as cognitive skills of information technology (IT)-mediated medication management could be one of the missing links for the improvement of patient safety. We aimed to compose a framework of tasks that need to be addressed to optimize medication man

  17. Patient safety and technology-driven medication e A qualitative study on how graduate nursing students navigate through complex medication administration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbæk, Janne; Gaard, Mette; Fabricius, Pia

    2014-01-01

    ways of educating nursing students in today's medication administration. Aim: To explore nursing students' experiences and competences with the technology-driven medication administration process. Methods: 16 pre-graduate nursing students were included in two focus group interviews which were recorded...... for the technology-driven medication process, nursing students face difficulties in identifying and adopting best practices. The impact of using technology on the frequency, type and severity of medication errors; the technologies implications on nursing professionalism and the nurses ability to secure patient......Background: The technology-driven medication process is complex, involving advanced technologies, patient participation and increased safety measures. Medication administration errors are frequently reported, with nurses implicated in 26e38% of in-hospital cases. This points to the need for new...

  18. Rethinking agency and medical adherence technology: applying Actor Network Theory to the case study of Digital Pills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, Alejandra; Cabling, Mark L; Sheppard, Vanessa B

    2015-12-01

    Much literature surrounding medical technology and adherence posits that technology is a mechanism for social control. This assumes that the medical establishment can take away patients' agency. Although power relationships and social control can play a key role, medical technology can also serve as an agentive tool to be utilized. We (1) offer the alternative framework of Actor Network Theory to view medical technology, (2) discuss the literature on medication adherence and technology, (3) delve into the ramifications of looking at adherence as a network and (4) use Digital Pills as a case study of dispersed agency.

  19. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  20. Exploring the technology readiness of nursing and medical students at a Canadian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caison, Amy L; Bulman, Donna; Pai, Shweta; Neville, Doreen

    2008-06-01

    Technology readiness is a well-established construct that refers to individuals' ability to embrace and adopt new technology. Given the increasing use of advanced technologies in the delivery of health care, this study uses the Technology Readiness Index (Parasuraman, 2000) to explore the technology readiness of nursing and medical students from the fall 2006 cohort at Memorial University of Newfoundland. The three major findings from this study are that (i) rural nursing students are more insecure with technology than their urban counterparts, (ii) male medical students score higher on innovation than their female counterparts and have a higher overall technology readiness attitude than female medical students, and (iii) medical students who are older than 25 have a negative technology readiness score whereas those under 25 had a positive score. These findings suggest health care professional schools would be well served to implement curricular changes designed to support the needs of rural students, women, and those entering school at a non-traditional age. In addition, patterns such as those observed in this study highlight areas of emphasis for current practitioners as health care organizations develop continuing education offerings for staff.

  1. Learning in Technology-Enhanced Medical Simulation: Locations and Knowings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song-ee Ahn

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study focuses on how knowings and learning take place in full-scale simulation training of medical and nursing students, by drawing upon actor-network theory (ANT. ANT situates materiality as a part of the social practices. Knowing and learning, according to ANT, are not simply cognitive or social phenomena, but are seen as emerging as effects of the relation between material assemblages and human actors being performed into being in particular locations. Data consists of observations of simulations performed by ten groups of students. The analysis focuses on the emerging knowings in the socio-material—arrangements of three locations involved in the simulation—the simulation room, the observation room and the reflection room. The findings indicate that medical knowing, affective knowing and communicative knowing are produced in different ways in the different locations and material arrangements of the simulation cycle.Keywords: simulation, locations, knowings, actor-network theory, collaborate learning, multiprofessional learning.

  2. Climate impacts of energy technologies depend on emissions timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Morgan R.; Trancik, Jessika E.

    2014-05-01

    Energy technologies emit greenhouse gases with differing radiative efficiencies and atmospheric lifetimes. Standard practice for evaluating technologies, which uses the global warming potential (GWP) to compare the integrated radiative forcing of emitted gases over a fixed time horizon, does not acknowledge the importance of a changing background climate relative to climate change mitigation targets. Here we demonstrate that the GWP misvalues the impact of CH4-emitting technologies as mid-century approaches, and we propose a new class of metrics to evaluate technologies based on their time of use. The instantaneous climate impact (ICI) compares gases in an expected radiative forcing stabilization year, and the cumulative climate impact (CCI) compares their time-integrated radiative forcing up to a stabilization year. Using these dynamic metrics, we quantify the climate impacts of technologies and show that high-CH4-emitting energy sources become less advantageous over time. The impact of natural gas for transportation, with CH4 leakage, exceeds that of gasoline within 1-2 decades for a commonly cited 3 W m-2 stabilization target. The impact of algae biodiesel overtakes that of corn ethanol within 2-3 decades, where algae co-products are used to produce biogas and corn co-products are used for animal feed. The proposed metrics capture the changing importance of CH4 emissions as a climate threshold is approached, thereby addressing a major shortcoming of the GWP for technology evaluation.

  3. Medical technology as a key driver of rising health expenditure: disentangling the relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorenson C

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Corinna Sorenson,1,2 Michael Drummond,2,3 Beena Bhuiyan Khan1 1LSE Health, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, UK; 2European Health Technology Institute for Socioeconomic Research, Brussels, Belgium; 3Centre for Health Economics, University of York, York, UK Abstract: Health care spending has risen steadily in most countries, becoming a concern for decision-makers worldwide. Commentators often point to new medical technology as the key driver for burgeoning expenditures. This paper critically appraises this conjecture, based on an analysis of the existing literature, with the aim of offering a more detailed and considered analysis of this relationship. Several databases were searched to identify relevant literature. Various categories of studies (eg, multivariate and cost-effectiveness analyses were included to cover different perspectives, methodological approaches, and issues regarding the link between medical technology and costs. Selected articles were reviewed and relevant information was extracted into a standardized template and analyzed for key cross-cutting themes, ie, impact of technology on costs, factors influencing this relationship, and methodological challenges in measuring such linkages. A total of 86 studies were reviewed. The analysis suggests that the relationship between medical technology and spending is complex and often conflicting. Findings were frequently contingent on varying factors, such as the availability of other interventions, patient population, and the methodological approach employed. Moreover, the impact of technology on costs differed across technologies, in that some (eg, cancer drugs, invasive medical devices had significant financial implications, while others were cost-neutral or cost-saving. In light of these issues, we argue that decision-makers and other commentators should extend their focus beyond costs solely to include consideration of whether medical technology results in

  4. Managing Information Technology in Academic Medical Centers: A "Multicultural" Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Charles P.; Corn, Milton; Krumrey, Arthur; Perry, David R.; Stevens, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how beliefs and concerns of academic medicine's diverse professional cultures affect management of information technology. Two scenarios, one dealing with standardization of desktop personal computers and the other with publication of syllabi on an institutional intranet, form the basis for an exercise in which four prototypical members…

  5. Nutritional care of medical inpatients: a health technology assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruse Filip

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inspiration for the present assessment of the nutritional care of medical patients is puzzlement about the divide that exists between the theoretical knowledge about the importance of the diet for ill persons, and the common failure to incorporate nutritional aspects in the treatment and care of the patients. The purpose is to clarify existing problems in the nutritional care of Danish medical inpatients, to elucidate how the nutritional care for these inpatients can be improved, and to analyse the costs of this improvement. Methods Qualitative and quantitative methods are deployed to outline how nutritional care of medical inpatients is performed at three Danish hospitals. The practices observed are compared with official recommendations for nutritional care of inpatients. Factors extraneous and counterproductive to optimal nutritional care are identified from the perspectives of patients and professional staff. A review of the literature illustrates the potential for optimal nutritional care. A health economic analysis is performed to elucidate the savings potential of improved nutritional care. Results The prospects for improvements in nutritional care are ameliorated if hospital management clearly identifies nutritional care as a priority area, and enjoys access to management tools for quality assurance. The prospects are also improved if a committed professional at the ward has the necessary time resources to perform nutritional care in practice, and if the care staff can requisition patient meals rich in nutrients 24 hours a day. At the kitchen production level prospects benefit from a facilitator contact between care and kitchen staff, and if the kitchen staff controls the whole food path from the kitchen to the patient. At the patient level, prospects are improved if patients receive information about the choice of food and drink, and have a better nutrition dialogue with the care staff. Better nutritional care of

  6. Health Technology Assessment: managing the introduction and use of medical devices in clinical practice in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Antonio; Ratti, Marco; Cerbo, Marina; Jefferson, Tom

    2009-05-01

    Technology assumes a key role in current clinical practice. A number of innovative or improved products are constantly being launched on the market and offered directly to the users (i.e., clinicians) or even to the patients. However, in most cases, the regulation for admission to commerce is slower than the innovation process and may be inadequate for assessing the real clinical effectiveness and safety of medical devices in the premarket phase. Health Technology Assessment (HTA) can be used as a tool for the evaluation of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and risk to patients of medical devices. HTA products (e.g., periodic reports) may aid healthcare payers to make informed choices regarding the appropriate use, coverage and reimbursement of medical devices. We present the strengths and limitations of the first three Italian HTA reports we coauthored and critically explore some of the aspects related to the introduction, adoption and use of medical technologies in clinical practice.

  7. Research on RFID technology in medical temperature measurement system and anti-collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenge

    2012-04-01

    RFID is a new technology developed in the nineties, using the wireless technology to achieve the non-contact data reading. It has a great advantage compared with traditional technology in reading data by wireless. And it is widely used in transportation, material management system, and medical areas etc. In this paper, it mainly introduces the RFID application in the field of medical temperature measurement system which can real-timely get and trace patient's temperature. Firstly, it introduces the structure of RFID, and then study and realizes the patient's temperature gathering and storage, lastly, realizing the RFID anti-collision algorithm.

  8. Technology complementing military behavioral health efforts at tripler army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetz, Melba C; Folen, Raymond A; Yamanuha, Bronson K

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a short narrative on the ways that behavioral health professionals and their patients are currently benefitting from the use of technology. Examples stem from applications of technology to patients/research participants at the Tripler Army Medical Center. The paper also discusses how current use of this technology has made it possible to serve individuals in their own cultural environment, providing a cost-effective means of providing mental health services.

  9. An Empirical Assessment of a Technology Acceptance Model for Apps in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briz-Ponce, Laura; García-Peñalvo, Francisco José

    2015-11-01

    The evolution and the growth of mobile applications ("apps") in our society is a reality. This general trend is still upward and the app use has also penetrated the medical education community. However, there is a lot of unawareness of the students' and professionals' point of view about introducing "apps" within Medical School curriculum. The aim of this research is to design, implement and verify that the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) can be employed to measure and explain the acceptance of mobile technology and "apps" within Medical Education. The methodology was based on a survey distributed to students and medical professionals from University of Salamanca. This model explains 46.7% of behavioral intention to use mobile devise or "apps" for learning and will help us to justify and understand the current situation of introducing "apps" into the Medical School curriculum.

  10. Implementing PDA technology in a medical library: experiences in a hospital library and an academic medical center library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgen, Evelyn Breck

    2003-01-01

    Personal digital assistants (PDAs) have grown from being a novelty in the late 1990s to an essential tool for healthcare professionals in the 2000s. This paper describes the experiences of a librarian who implemented PDA technology first in a hospital library, and then at an academic medical center library. It focuses on the role of the library in supporting PDA technology and resources. Included are programmatic issues such as training for library staff and clinicians, and technical issues such as Palm and Windows operating systems. This model could be used in either a hospital or academic health sciences library.

  11. The Design of Medical Consumable Filing System Based on RFID Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Min; ZHONG Tian-ping; TANG Li-ming; QIN Xian; HUANG Ya-ping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: With the modern information technology, much management problems in the records of medical equipment and hospital supplies have been solved to achieve a comprehensive, real-time and accurate management. Methods: The import BARCODE file archiving system, in order to borrow and return series operation of the automatic identification, set the expiration of contracts, licenses and time of alarms. Results: The efficiency and accuracy of data entry, and mobile data collection terminal data processing in real time. Conclusion: Based on RFID technology for medical equipment supplies the file system to the radio channel as a transmission media, the target for non-contact automatic identification technology, medical equipment, supplies, intelligent file management and information technology.

  12. [MEDICAL SOCIAL MODELING TECHNOLOGIES FOR ACTIVE AGING IN KAZAKHSTAN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benberin, V V; Akhetov, A A; Tanbaeva, G Z

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses a new model for active ageing in Republic of Kazakhstan with participation the state, population and medical social services. Achieving active longevity will lead to positive trends in the development of human capital of the state, because it enables to use experience and knowledge of senior generation in enhancing the effectiveness of socio-economic transformation in health care. The study was carried out on the base of the Central clinical hospital of the President's affairs administration in Republic of Kazakhstan, with the participation of 147 admitted patients of elderly and senile age.

  13. New diagnostic and information technology for mobile medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, C Gresham; Boling, Peter A

    2009-02-01

    Medicare reimbursement for home visits average around $100 without ancillaries, so making 10 home visits to prevent even a single $1,000 ambulance ride is cost-neutral for Medicare. Home medical care is only an added cost if it fails to offset acute care use. The government's demographic and financial pressure suggests a need to press ahead with the enhanced mobile care model, so the explosion in point-of-care devices should continue. The main challenge is to decide which ones provide dispositive value to patients.

  14. Microelectronics technologies for new detectors in medical imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M

    2007-01-01

    The use of silicon chips for instrumentation developments in elementary particle physics serves as an example for other applications and digital imaging detectors could find use in medical and molecular imaging. Attractive features are direct quantum conversion in a semiconductor matrix, innovative three-dimensional modular detector construction, multilayer devices, very fast signal processing, on-line data pre-processing and massive parallelism at the system level. Cost aspects of such semiconductor imager options have to be taken into account in the R&D phase. With the integrated electronics and high density interconnects in the Medipix development as an example, the ultimate aim of single photon imaging comes within reach.

  15. A new concept for medical imaging centered on cellular phone technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Granot

    Full Text Available According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a a data acquisition device (DAD at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site. The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode.

  16. A new concept for medical imaging centered on cellular phone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Yair; Ivorra, Antoni; Rubinsky, Boris

    2008-04-30

    According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a) a data acquisition device (DAD) at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b) an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site). The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode.

  17. Advances in wearable technology and its medical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    The concept of monitoring individuals in the home and community settings was introduced more than 50 years ago, when Holter monitoring was proposed (in the late 1940s) and later adopted (in the 1960s) as a clinical tool. However, technologies to fully enable such vision were lacking and only sporadic and rather obtrusive monitoring techniques were available for several decades. Over the past decade, we have witnessed a great deal of progress in the field of wearable sensors and systems. Advances in this field have finally provided the tools to implement and deploy technology with the capabilities required by researchers in the field of patients' home monitoring. These technologies provide the tools to achieve early diagnosis of diseases such as congestive heart failure, prevention of chronic conditions such as diabetes, improved clinical management of neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease, and the ability to promptly respond to emergency situations such as seizures in patients with epilepsy and cardiac arrest in subjects undergoing cardiovascular monitoring. Current research efforts are focused on the development of systems enabling clinical applications. The current focus on developing and deploying wearable systems targeting specific clinical applications has the potential of leading to clinical adoption within the next five to ten years.

  18. Scanning Micromirror Platform Based on MEMS Technology for Medical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eakkachai Pengwang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This topical review discusses recent development and trends on scanning micromirrors for biomedical applications. This also includes a biomedical micro robot for precise manipulations in a limited volume. The characteristics of medical scanning micromirror are explained in general with the fundamental of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS for fabrication processes. Along with the explanations of mechanism and design, the principle of actuation are provided for general readers. In this review, several testing methodology and examples are described based on many types of actuators, such as, electrothermal actuators, electrostatic actuators, electromagnetic actuators, pneumatic actuators, and shape memory alloy. Moreover, this review provides description of the key fabrication processes and common materials in order to be a basic guideline for selecting micro-actuators. With recent developments on scanning micromirrors, performances of biomedical application are enhanced for higher resolution, high accuracy, and high dexterity. With further developments on integrations and control schemes, MEMS-based scanning micromirrors would be able to achieve a better performance for medical applications due to small size, ease in microfabrication, mass production, high scanning speed, low power consumption, mechanical stable, and integration compatibility.

  19. The evolution of medical technology: lessons from the Burgess Shale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, S A

    2001-04-01

    Many forthcoming medical advances-growth factors, tissue engineering, gene therapy, attachable prosthetic limbs, and implantable computers--are so new that as yet there is no clinical experience with them. Each therapeutic technique will evolve in an environment containing few guideposts to help judge its efficacy and safety. Recent developments in evolution theory (based on an analysis of Cambrian fossils in Canada's Burgess Shale quarry) suggest that evolution passes, at times, through innovative cycles of progress--when diversification of design leads to perfection of form--with the concomitant production of many unsuccessful models. The evolution of the total knee replacement is a perfect example of the process, because many of the early devices have proven to be dismal failures. However, modern knee replacements would not have been developed without them. Because the risk of unforeseen complications associated with new medical products cannot be discerned in advance, each patient-consumer should have the opportunity to intelligently weigh an innovative product's risk potential against its possible benefit. The proposal made here, for a temporary New Product status for new drugs and devices after a product is cleared by the Food and Drug Administration for general marketing, provides a mechanism for making such decisions.

  20. Medical student attitudes toward video games and related new media technologies in medical education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kron, Frederick W; Gjerde, Craig L; Sen, Ananda; Fetters, Michael D

    2010-01-01

    Studies in K-12 and college students show that their learning preferences have been strongly shaped by new media technologies like video games, virtual reality environments, the Internet, and social networks...

  1. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Medical Radiologic Technology (Radiography) (CIP: 51.0907--Medical Radiologic Technology). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the radiologic technology program. Presented in the introductory section are a description of the program and suggested course sequence. Section I lists baseline competencies for the program,…

  2. Biodesign process and culture to enable pediatric medical technology innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, James; Wynne, Elizabeth; Krummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Innovation is the process through which new scientific discoveries are developed and promoted from bench to bedside. In an effort to encourage young entrepreneurs in this area, Stanford Biodesign developed a medical device innovation training program focused on need-based innovation. The program focuses on teaching systematic evaluation of healthcare needs, invention, and concept development. This process can be applied to any field of medicine, including Pediatric Surgery. Similar training programs have gained traction throughout the United States and beyond. Equally important to process in the success of these programs is an institutional culture that supports transformative thinking. Key components of this culture include risk tolerance, patience, encouragement of creativity, management of conflict, and networking effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Healthcare information technology and medical-surgical nurses: the emergence of a new care partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, An'Nita; Fisher, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Healthcare information technology in US hospitals and ambulatory care centers continues to expand, and nurses are expected to effectively and efficiently utilize this technology. Researchers suggest that clinical information systems have expanded the realm of nursing to integrate technology as an element as important in nursing practice as the patient or population being served. This study sought to explore how medical surgical nurses make use of healthcare information technology in their current clinical practice and to examine the influence of healthcare information technology on nurses' clinical decision making. A total of eight medical surgical nurses participated in the study, four novice and four experienced. A conventional content analysis was utilized that allowed for a thematic interpretation of participant data. Five themes emerged: (1) healthcare information technology as a care coordination partner, (2) healthcare information technology as a change agent in the care delivery environment, (3) healthcare information technology-unable to meet all the needs, of all the people, all the time, (4) curiosity about healthcare information technology-what other bells and whistles exist, and (5) Big Brother is watching. The results of this study indicate that a new care partnership has emerged as the provision of nursing care is no longer supplied by a single practitioner but rather by a paired team, consisting of nurses and technology, working collaboratively in an interdependent relationship to achieve established goals.

  4. Comparison of advanced cooling technologies efficiency depending on outside temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaise Hamanaka; Haihua Zhao; Phil Sharpe

    2009-09-01

    In some areas, water availability is a serious problem during the summer and could disrupt the normal operation of thermal power plants which needs large amount of water to operate. Moreover, when water quantities are sufficient, there can still be problem created by the waste heat rejected into the water which is regulated in order to limit the impact of thermal pollution on the environment. All these factors can lead to a decrease of electricity production during the summer and during peak hours, when electricity is the most needed. In order to deal with these problems, advanced cooling technologies have been developed and implemented to reduce water consumption and withdrawals but with an effect in the plant efficiency. This report aims at analyzing the efficiency of several cooling technologies with a fixed power plant design and so to produce a reference to be able to compare them.

  5. Educational Scholarship and Technology: Resources for a Changing Undergraduate Medical Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Brandon N; Corral, Irma; John, Nadyah Janine; Shelton, P G

    2017-06-01

    Returning to the original emphasis of higher education, universities have increasingly recognized the value and scholarship of teaching, and medical schools have been part of this educational scholarship movement. At the same time, the preferred learning styles of a new generation of medical students and advancements in technology have driven a need to incorporate technology into psychiatry undergraduate medical education (UGME). Educators need to understand how to find, access, and utilize such educational technology. This article provides a brief historical context for the return to education as scholarship, along with a discussion of some of the advantages to this approach, as well as several recent examples. Next, the educational needs of the current generation of medical students, particularly their preference to have technology incorporated into their education, will be discussed. Following this, we briefly review the educational scholarship of two newer approaches to psychiatry UGME that incorporate technology. We also offer the reader some resources for accessing up-to-date educational scholarship for psychiatry UGME, many of which take advantage of technology themselves. We conclude by discussing the need for promotion of educational scholarship.

  6. Classifying algorithms for SIFT-MS technology and medical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhead, K T; Lee, D; Chase, J G; Moot, A R; Ledingham, K M; Scotter, J; Allardyce, R A; Senthilmohan, S T; Endre, Z

    2008-03-01

    Selected Ion Flow Tube-Mass Spectrometry (SIFT-MS) is an analytical technique for real-time quantification of trace gases in air or breath samples. SIFT-MS system thus offers unique potential for early, rapid detection of disease states. Identification of volatile organic compound (VOC) masses that contribute strongly towards a successful classification clearly highlights potential new biomarkers. A method utilising kernel density estimates is thus presented for classifying unknown samples. It is validated in a simple known case and a clinical setting before-after dialysis. The simple case with nitrogen in Tedlar bags returned a 100% success rate, as expected. The clinical proof-of-concept with seven tests on one patient had an ROC curve area of 0.89. These results validate the method presented and illustrate the emerging clinical potential of this technology.

  7. Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-04-13

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  8. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Massaroni

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  9. Glossary of technical terms for the medical technology professionals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Felipe García Rodríguez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current work is a glossary of technical terms in English language for Medical Health Professionals, has been prepared due to the lack of technical lexicon the students have during and after their university studies, that is, the students have a deficit of technical words which limits their professional competence and accountability. This shortage limits them and makes it a great laboring challenge if they have to work overseas in English-speaking countries. The glossary comprises the main and necessary words which are needed for this type of professional in their field of action. These graduates have a solid knowledge and comprehension of biological, biochemical and biophysical fundamentals in their mother tongue but they do not have the necessary elements in the target language to operate properly. It is a need that they can work appropriately in the spheres of prevention, promotion and health recovery to support a diagnosis, a treatment and a management not only in their mother tongue but in English for their future work.

  10. Medication safety through information technology: a focus on medication prescribing and administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of hospital care is changing: the aging population results in more patients being admitted to hospitals, but are discharged sooner. As a result, hospitals invest in information technology to assure safe and effective treatment and facilitate rapid patient turnover. In this thesis we

  11. Medication safety through information technology: a focus on medication prescribing and administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of hospital care is changing: the aging population results in more patients being admitted to hospitals, but are discharged sooner. As a result, hospitals invest in information technology to assure safe and effective treatment and facilitate rapid patient turnover. In this thesis we des

  12. Medication safety through information technology: a focus on medication prescribing and administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmons, Pieter

    2014-01-01

    The delivery of hospital care is changing: the aging population results in more patients being admitted to hospitals, but are discharged sooner. As a result, hospitals invest in information technology to assure safe and effective treatment and facilitate rapid patient turnover. In this thesis we des

  13. 论医学专家的技术观%On medical experts' conception of technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜治政

    2014-01-01

    The scientific conception of technology is a critical condition for technology innova-tion for every medical expert. Technology is the main carrier of medicine, while medicine is not equal to technology. The technology, a means rather than an end, must be combined with humanity. It has double-edged characteristics. All above are the contents of the conception of technology, requiring medical experts to concern about the current appearance of SCI thermal and the tendency of the sub-jectification of technology, pay great attentions to the double roots of technology alienation, and be cautious of the unconscious results of technology. In short, it is necessary to conduct humanity and social control to technology, so that the medical technology can better benefit human health.%科学的技术观是医学专家从事技术创造能否获得成功的重要条件。医学的主要载体是技术,医学不等于技术,技术是手段而不是目的,技术具有双刃性,技术必须与人文相结合。医学技术观的这些内容,要求医学专家关注当前出现的SCI热和技术主体化倾向,重视技术异化的双重根源,审慎对待技术的无意识结果。因而需要对技术进行人文社会管控,使医学技术更好地造福于人类健康。

  14. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF PARTS OF MEDICAL PRODUCTS PRODUCED USING ADDITIVE MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Górski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of tests conducted on the elements of medical devices - slings used with medical lifts - manufactured using additive technologies. Project assumptions were: to produce 100 samples of clips with varying design, material and orientation parameter. Samples were manufactured using FDM and SLA processes and then tested for mechanical strength, load transmission and functionality, using certified equipment. Paper shows full methodology and obtained test results.

  15. Technology complementing military psychology programs and services in the Pacific Regional Medical Command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetz, Melba C; Folen, Raymond A; Van Horn, Sandra; Ruseborn, Daniel; Samuel, Kevin M

    2013-08-01

    The Tripler Army Medical Center is the only federal tertiary care hospital serving the Pacific Regional Medical Command. Due to Tripler's large area of responsibility, many behavioral health professionals are starting to employ more technology during their sessions. As explained in this article, virtual reality and telepsychology efforts are proving to benefit military service members and their families in the Pacific Rim. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  16. The effectiveness of technology-enhanced relaxation techniques for military medical warriors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetz, Melba C; Kaloi-Chen, Janalle Y; Turner, David D; Bouchard, Stéphane; Riva, Giuseppe; Wiederhold, Brenda K

    2011-09-01

    Combat zones can be very stressful for those in the area. Even in the battlefield, military medical personnel are expected to save others, while also staying alive. In this study, half of a sample of deployed military medical warriors (total n = 60) participated in technology-assisted relaxation training. Learning relaxation skills with a video clip of virtual reality relaxing scenes showed a statistically significant impact on the anxiety levels of the Experimental Group.

  17. ATTITUDES OF MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY GRADUATES TOWARDS THE INTERNSHIP TRAINING PERIOD AT KING FAISAL UNIVERSITY

    OpenAIRE

    Bashawri, Layla A.M.; Mirghani A Ahmed; Bahnassy, Ahmed A.L.; Al-Salim, Jawaher A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this present survey was to look into the attitudes of medical laboratory technology (MLT) graduates towards the internship training period of the MLT Department, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Faisal University. Material and Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and distributed for this purpose. The study period was from December 1st 2002 – 31st December 2004. Two-hundred questionnaires were distributed to recent graduates, and 115 wer...

  18. A Study on Nomophobia - Mobile Phone Dependence, Among Students of a Medical College in Bangalore

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background: Smart phones today have become an important part of our techno-culture, especially among the younger population. Discomfort, anxiety, nervousness or anguish caused by being out of contact with a mobile phone is termed as "Nomophobia"- no mobile phobia. Nomophobia is on the rise across the globe. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of Nomophobia and mobile phone dependence among the students of a medical college. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was ca...

  19. A Study on Nomophobia - Mobile Phone Dependence, Among Students of a Medical College in Bangalore

    OpenAIRE

    Pavithra MB, Suwarna Madhukumar, Mahadeva Murthy TS

    2015-01-01

    Background: Smart phones today have become an important part of our techno-culture, especially among the younger population. Discomfort, anxiety, nervousness or anguish caused by being out of contact with a mobile phone is termed as "Nomophobia"- no mobile phobia. Nomophobia is on the rise across the globe. Objectives: To assess the prevalence of Nomophobia and mobile phone dependence among the students of a medical college. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was ca...

  20. MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF STAFF IN MEDICAL ORGANIZA TIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Revskaia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the mechanisms and technology management personnel professionalization of medical organizations. The question is now becoming even more relevant within the health care sector optimization, the main purpose of which is claimed to improve the quality of health care by improving the efficiency of health care organizations and their personnel, including the availability of physicians and medical staff, their skills and professionalism. The problems of improving the technology of postgraduate education of doctors examined.

  1. The Berlin Brain-Computer Interface: Non-Medical Uses of BCI Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Blankertz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain-Computer Interfacing (BCI is a steadily growing area ofresearch. While initially BCI research was focused on applicationsfor paralyzed patients, increasingly more alternative applications inhealthy human subjects are proposed and investigated. In particular,monitoring of mental states and decoding of covert user states haveseen a strong rise of interest. Here, we present some examples ofsuch novel applications which provide evidence for the promisingpotential of BCI technology for non-medical uses. Furthermore, wediscuss distinct methodological improvements required to bringnon-medical applications of BCI technology to a diversity of laypersontarget groups, e.g., ease of use, minimal training, general usability,short control latencies.

  2. Evaluation of the suitability of emergent medical technology in earthquake relief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-rong LIU

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish the reasonable methods to evaluate the suitability of emergent medical technology in earthquake relief,the suitability evaluation system,including 3 I-grade indexes and 8 II-grade indexes,was established by consulting specialists on the basis of systemic analysis of the influential factors.The weights of the indexes were determined by analytic hierarchy process,and the mathematical model of suitability evaluation was built up by a weighted sum of the indexes.The established evaluation method has been proved effective by an empirical study consisting of 12 common emergent medical technology.

  3. The Debrisoft(®) Monofilament Debridement Pad for Use in Acute or Chronic Wounds: A NICE Medical Technology Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meads, Catherine; Lovato, Eleonora; Longworth, Louise

    2015-12-01

    As part of its Medical Technology Evaluation Programme, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited a manufacturer to provide clinical and economic evidence for the evaluation of the Debrisoft(®) monofilament debridement pad for use in acute or chronic wounds. The University of Birmingham and Brunel University, acting as a consortium, was commissioned to act as an External Assessment Centre (EAC) for NICE, independently appraising the submission. This article is an overview of the original evidence submitted, the EAC's findings and the final NICE guidance issued. The sponsor submitted a simple cost analysis to estimate the costs of using Debrisoft(®) to debride wounds compared with saline and gauze, hydrogel and larvae. Separate analyses were conducted for applications in home and applications in a clinic setting. The analysis took an UK National Health Service (NHS) perspective. It incorporated the costs of the technologies and supplementary technologies (such as dressings) and the costs of their application by a district nurse. The sponsor concluded that Debrisoft(®) was cost saving relative to the comparators. The EAC made amendments to the sponsor analysis to correct for errors and to reflect alternative assumptions. Debrisoft(®) remained cost saving in most analyses and savings ranged from £77 to £222 per patient compared with hydrogel, from £97 to £347 compared with saline and gauze, and from £180 to £484 compared with larvae depending on the assumptions included in the analysis and whether debridement took place in a home or clinic setting. All analyses were severely limited by the available data on effectiveness, in particular a lack of comparative studies and that the effectiveness data for the comparators came from studies reporting different clinical endpoints compared with Debrisoft(®). The Medical Technologies Advisory Committee made a positive recommendation for adoption of Debrisoft(®) and this has been published

  4. The application of digital medical 3D printing technology on tumor operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jimin; Jiang, Yijian; Li, Yangsheng

    2016-04-01

    Digital medical 3D printing technology is a new hi-tech which combines traditional medical and digital design, computer science, bio technology and 3D print technology. At the present time there are four levels application: The printed 3D model is the first and simple application. The surgery makes use of the model to plan the processing before operation. The second is customized operation tools such as implant guide. It helps doctor to operate with special tools rather than the normal medical tools. The third level application of 3D printing in medical area is to print artificial bones or teeth to implant into human body. The big challenge is the fourth level which is to print organs with 3D printing technology. In this paper we introduced an application of 3D printing technology in tumor operation. We use 3D printing to print guide for invasion operation. Puncture needles were guided by printed guide in face tumors operation. It is concluded that this new type guide is dominantly advantageous.

  5. Impact of information technology on the role of medical libraries in information managment: normative background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamarija Rožić-Hristovski

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Exponential growth of biomedical knowledge and information technology development is changing the infrastructure of health care systems, education and research. So medical libraries roles have shifted from managing containers of information toward influencing biomedical information resource content and education. These new tasks are formalised in modem American standards for medical libraries, stressing information management role in evolving environment.In Slovenia medical libraries also are aware of development imperative of information activities for advances in medicine. At one side they are faced with lack of specific guidelines for proactive action and on the other with inadequate assessment in legal documents and insufficient funding.

  6. Exploring the potential of video technologies for collaboration in emergency medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Söderholm, Hanna M.; Manning, James E.

    2008-01-01

    We are investigating the potential of 3D telepresence, or televideo, technology to support collaboration among geographically separated medical personnel in trauma emergency care situations. 3D telepresence technology has the potential to provide richer visual information than current 2D videocon...... and trust between the collaborating physician and paramedic show mixed results. Postinterview data help explain these results. © 2008 ASIS&T Published online 14 August 2008 in Wiley InterScience....

  7. The potential of medical device industry in technological and economical context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maresova P

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Petra Maresova,1 Marek Penhaker,1,2 Ali Selamat,1,3 Kamil Kuca1,41Faculty of Informatics and Management, University of Hradec Králové, Hradec Králové, Czech Republic; 2Department of Cybernetics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Technical University of Ostrava, Poruba, Czech Republic; 3Faculty of Computing, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia; 4Center for Biomedical Research, University Hospital Hradec Králové, Hradec Králové, Czech RepublicAbstract: The high quality of public health improves not only healthy life expectancy, but also the productivity of labor. The most important part of the health care sector is the medical technology industry. The aim of this study is to analyze the current situation in the medical device industry in Europe, its potential strengths and weaknesses in the context of topical economic and demographic development. The contribution specifies an analysis of the economic state of the medical device industry in the context of demographic development of European Union’s macroeconomic indicators and views of experts in the field of medical device development, concerning the opportunities for entities involved in the medical device market. There is fierce competition on the European market. The innovative activity is stable and well regulated by responsible authorities. Worldwide, the medical device market is expected to grow.Keywords: technology context, medical device, Europe, expenditure, review

  8. Complexities in building innovation systems : the case of radical medical technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kukk, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to facilitate a further understanding of how firms behind innovative technologies deal with different complexities in system-building strategies and the co-dependencies among different technologies, actors and system-building activities, while contributing to the

  9. Complexities in building innovation systems : the case of radical medical technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kukk, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this thesis is to facilitate a further understanding of how firms behind innovative technologies deal with different complexities in system-building strategies and the co-dependencies among different technologies, actors and system-building activities, while contributing to the buil

  10. Developing an active emergency medical service system based on WiMAX technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shing-Han; Cheng, Kai-An; Lu, Wen-Hui; Lin, Te-Chang

    2012-10-01

    The population structure has changed with the aging of population. In the present, elders account for 10.63% of the domestic population and the percentage is still gradually climbing. In other words, the demand for emergency services among elders in home environment is expected to grow in the future. In order to improve the efficiency and quality of emergency care, information technology should be effectively utilized to integrate medical systems and facilities, strengthen human-centered operation designs, and maximize the overall performance. The improvement in the quality and survival rate of emergency care is an important basis for better life and health of all people. Through integrated application of medical information systems and information communication technology, this study proposes a WiMAX-based emergency care system addressing the public demands for convenience, speed, safety, and human-centered operation of emergency care. This system consists of a healthcare service center, emergency medical service hospitals, and emergency ambulances. Using the wireless transmission capability of WiMAX, patients' physiological data can be transmitted from medical measurement facilities to the emergency room and emergency room doctors can provide immediate online instructions on emergency treatment via video and audio transmission. WiMAX technology enables the establishment of active emergency medical services.

  11. Supervising nursing students in a technology-driven medication administration process in a hospital setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaard, Mette; Orbæk, Janne

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify, describe and synthesize the experiences of nurse supervisors and the factors that influence the supervision of pre-graduate nursing students in undertaking technology-driven medication administration in hospital settings...

  12. A Needs Assessment of the Medical Laboratory Technology Students at New York City Technical College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, Ranjani

    A study examined the needs of medical laboratory technology students at New York City Technical College. The nominal group technique (which involves silent generation of ideas in writing, round-robin feedback, and individual voting on priority ideas) was used to assess the academic and personal needs of 20 students. The following seven significant…

  13. Material- and feature-dependent effects on cell adhesion to micro injection moulded medical polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Ying; Habimana, Olivier; Flood, Peter; Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Rodriguez, Brian J; Zhang, Nan; Casey, Eoin; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    Two polymers, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), containing a range of nano- to micron- roughness surfaces (Ra 0.01, 0.1, 0.4, 1.0, 2.0, 3.2 and 5.0μm) were fabricated using electrical discharge machining (EDM) and replicated using micro injection moulding (μIM). Polymer samples were characterized using optical profilometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water surface contact angle. Cell adhesion tests were carried out using bacterial Pseudomonas fluorescens and mammalian Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells to determine the effect of surface hydrophobicity, surface roughness and stiffness. It is found that there are features which gave insignificant differences (feature-dependent effect) in cell adhesion, albeit a significant difference in the physicochemical properties (material-dependent effect) of substrata. In bacterial cell adhesion, the strongest feature-dependence is found at Ra 0.4μm surfaces, with material-dependent effects strongest at Ra 0.01μm. Ra 0.1μm surfaces exhibited strongest feature-dependent effects and Ra 5.0μm has strongest material-dependent effects on mammalian cell adhesion. Bacterial cell adhesion is found to be favourable to hydrophobic surfaces (COC), with the lowest adhesion at Ra 0.4μm for both materials. Mammalian cell adhesion is lowest in Ra 0.1μm and highest in Ra 1.0μm, and generally favours hydrophilic surfaces (PMMA). These findings can be used as a basis for developing medical implants or microfluidic devices using micro injection moulding for diagnostic purposes, by tuning the cell adhesion on different areas containing different surface roughnesses on the diagnostic microfluidic devices or medical implants.

  14. Ethics of emergent information and communication technology applications in humanitarian medical assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Matthew; Pringle, John; Christen, Markus; Eckenwiler, Lisa; Schwartz, Lisa; Davé, Anushree

    2016-07-01

    New applications of information and communication technology (ICT) are shaping the way we understand and provide humanitarian medical assistance in situations of disaster, disease outbreak or conflict. Each new crisis appears to be accompanied by advancements in humanitarian technology, leading to significant improvements in the humanitarian aid sector. However, ICTs raise ethical questions that warrant attention. Focusing on the context of humanitarian medical assistance, we review key domains of ICT innovation. We then discuss ethical challenges and uncertainties associated with the development and application of new ICTs in humanitarian medical assistance, including avoiding harm, ensuring privacy and security, responding to inequalities, demonstrating respect, protecting relationships, and addressing expectations. In doing so, we emphasize the centrality of ethics in humanitarian ICT design, application and evaluation.

  15. Testing the self-medication hypothesis of depression and aggression in cannabis-dependent subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Mikkel; Rosenberg, Raben; Fjordback, Lone; Brandholdt, Jack; Foldager, Leslie; Sher, Leo; Munk-Jørgensen, Povl

    2007-07-01

    A self-medication hypothesis has been proposed to explain the association between cannabis use and psychiatric and behavioral problems. However, little is known about the reasons for use and reactions while intoxicated in cannabis users who suffer from depression or problems controlling violent behavior. We assessed 119 cannabis-dependent subjects using the Schedules of Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN), parts of the Addiction Severity Index (ASI), and questionnaires on reasons for cannabis use and reactions to cannabis use while intoxicated. Participants with lifetime depression and problems controlling violent behavior were compared to subjects without such problems. Validity of the groupings was corroborated by use of a psychiatric treatment register, previous use of psychotropic medication and convictions for violence. Subjects with lifetime depression used cannabis for the same reasons as others. While under the influence of cannabis, they more often experienced depression, sadness, anxiety and paranoia, and they were less likely to report happiness or euphoria. Participants reporting problems controlling violent behavior more often used cannabis to decrease aggression, decrease suspiciousness, and for relaxation; while intoxicated they more often reacted with aggression. Subjects with prior depression do not use cannabis as a mean of self-medication. They are more likely to experience specific increases of adverse symptoms while under the influence of cannabis, and are less likely to experience specific symptom relief. There is some evidence that cannabis is used as a means of self-medication for problems controlling aggression.

  16. U.S. Military Technology Dependence: The Hidden Vulnerability to National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    vulnerabilities.14 The introduction of technology into a complex system can create more problems than it solves . Vulnerability is defined in three environments...vulnerabilities at the strategic level, while solving technology challenges at the tactical level. The dependency on technology that is being...combination of military and private R&D allows flexibility and broadens the field of experts, which in turn facilitates creativity in design and problem

  17. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Business and Office and Related Technology Cluster. Office Systems Technology (CIP: 52.0401--Administrative Assistant/Secretarial). Accounting Technology (CIP: 52.0302). Medical Office Technology (CIP: 52.0404--Medical Admin. Asst./Secretarial). Microcomputer Technology (CIP: 52.0490). Court Reporting Technology (CIP: 52.0405). Paralegal Technology (CIP: Paralegal/Legal Assistant).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for four programs in the postsecondary-level business and office cluster (office systems, accounting, medical office, and microcomputer technologies) and two programs in the legal cluster (court reporting and paralegal…

  18. Developing technology-enhanced active learning for medical education: challenges, solutions, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Lise; Pettit, Robin K; Lewis, Joy H; Bennett, Thomas; Carrasco, Noel; Brysacz, Stanley; Makin, Inder Raj S; Hutman, Ryan; Schwartz, Frederic N

    2015-04-01

    Growing up in an era of video games and Web-based applications has primed current medical students to expect rapid, interactive feedback. To address this need, the A.T. Still University-School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona (Mesa) has developed and integrated a variety of approaches using technology-enhanced active learning for medical education (TEAL-MEd) into its curriculum. Over the course of 3 years (2010-2013), the authors facilitated more than 80 implementations of games and virtual patient simulations into the education of 550 osteopathic medical students. The authors report on 4 key aspects of the TEAL-MEd initiative, including purpose, portfolio of tools, progress to date regarding challenges and solutions, and future directions. Lessons learned may be of benefit to medical educators at academic and clinical training sites who wish to implement TEAL-MEd activities.

  19. The gastroenterologist and his endoscope: the embodiment of technology and the necessity for a medical ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M W

    1996-12-01

    The purpose of this essay is to argue for the necessity of an ethics of the practice of the specialist-technologist in medicine. In the first part I sketch three stages of medical ethics, each with a particular viewpoint regarding the technology of medicine. I focus on Brody's consideration of the "physician's power" as a example of contemporary medical ethics which explicitly excludes the specialist-technologist as a locus of development of medical ethics. Next, the philosophy of Heidegger is examined to suggest an approach to the problem, and, finally, some of Levinas' contributions regarding the "other" are introduced to suggest a preliminary approach to a medical ethics of the specialist-technologist.

  20. Organizational models of educational technology in U.S. and Canadian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Kevin H; Kamin, Carol; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Moses, Anna; Heestand, Diane

    2008-07-01

    To examine the organizational structure of educational technology units within U.S. and Canadian medical schools in order to (1) identify organization models that support educational technology, (2) describe key attributes of these models, and (3) discuss the strengths and challenges associated with these models. The authors distributed a survey to 88 schools that had previously provided information on their educational technology services and infrastructure. The authors developed the survey through a series of pilots and, then, from the data for each respondent school, created concept maps, which were used to identify organizational models. The authors conducted analyses to determine differences among models. The authors coded the comments about organizational models and identified themes. The authors received adequate data for analysis from 61 schools (69%). Four models for educational technology organizations emerged: (1) centralized units located in the school of medicine, (2) centralized units located at the health science center, (3) centralized units at the comprehensive university, and (4) no centralized unit (Dispersed Model). The majority (75%) of schools relied on some type of centralized organization. Whereas few organization attributes proved to be statistically significant, the centralized models have more resources devoted to educational technology and a closer alignment with the academic mission than the Dispersed Model. Medical schools primarily use central models. The authors recommend that schools structuring their educational technology resources consider exploration of a central model because of its focused use of resources to improve teaching and learning.

  1. SOME ASPECTS OF ORGANIZATION OF HIGH TECHNOLOGY MEDICAL AID RENDERING AT SARATOV SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF TRAUMATOLOGY AND ORTHOPEDICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Shulgina

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the peculiarities of organization of high technology medical aid rendering at Saratov Scientific Research Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics. Profiles and volumes of high technology medical aid and its order during 2006-2007 are presented.

  2. From HEP Computing to Bio—Medical Research and Vice Versa:Technology Transfer and Application Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Chauvie; G.Cosmo; 等

    2001-01-01

    We present a series of achievements associated to the transfer of simulation technologies to the bio-medical environment.We show also how the novel collaborative organization built around Geant4 has changed the traditional concept of technology transfer between the HEP domain and the bio-medical environment,configuring a two-way interaction.

  3. Fostering Entrepreneurial Investment Decision in Medical Technology Ventures in a Changing Business Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Bettina Keppler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results obtained from a survey among public and private venture capitalists from countries which attract a large amount of venture capital investment: Germany, Switzerland, Austria and Israel. The objective is to investigate venture capitalists’ investment criteria for medical technology ventures in the start-up or expansion phase. Since existing research evaluated venture capitalists’ general investment criteria, the aim of this study is to provide specific results on entrepreneurial investment decisions for the medical technology sector, which constantly attracted a significant share of European venture capital. The research used semi-structured interviews with 39 venture capitalists and experts. The results show that venture capitalists prefer to invest in companies which develop products for treating and diagnosing diseases showing a high prevalence and large market volumes, such as cardiovascular, metabolic and neurological diseases, and orthopaedic disorders. The study confirms that venture capitalists use a number of industry-specific criteria highly relevant in a changing business environment. These include a high medical need for the product, availability of clinical data, stage of European Conformity approval, high probability of receiving reimbursement from health insurances, medical key opinion leaders supporting technology, management’s regulatory experience and their communication ability with doctors and key opinion leaders.

  4. Managing perceived conflicts of interest while ensuring the continued innovation of medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haute, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    If it were not for the ongoing collaboration between vascular surgeons and the medical technology industry, many of these advanced treatments used every day in vascular interventional surgery would not exist. The flip side of this coin is that these vital relationships create multiple roles for surgeons and must be appropriately managed. The dynamic process of innovation, along with factors such as product delivery technique refinement, education, testing and clinical trials, and product support, all make it necessary for ongoing and close collaboration between surgeons and the device industry. This unique relationship sometimes leads to the perception of conflicts of interest for physicians, in part because the competing pressures from the multiple, overlapping roles as clinician/caregiver/investigator/innovator/customer are significant. To address this issue, the Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed), the nation's largest medical technology association representing medical device and diagnostics companies, developed a Code of Ethics to guide medical technology companies in their interactions with health care professionals. First introduced in 1993, the AdvaMed Code strongly encourages both industry and physicians to commit to openness and high ethical standards in the conduct of their business interactions. The AdvaMed Code addresses many of the types of interactions that can occur between companies and health care professionals, including training, consulting agreements, the provision of demonstration and evaluation units, and charitable donations. By following the Code, companies send a strong message that treatment decisions must always be based on the best interest of the patient. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  5. Nanomaterials and synergistic low-intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopedic implantable medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirwaiker, Rohan A; Samberg, Meghan E; Cohen, Paul H; Wysk, Richard A; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials play a significant role in biomedical research and applications because of their unique biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. In recent years, they have been utilized to improve the functionality and reliability of a wide range of implantable medical devices ranging from well-established orthopedic residual hardware devices (e.g., hip implants) that can repair defects in skeletal systems to emerging tissue engineering scaffolds that can repair or replace organ functions. This review summarizes the applications and efficacies of these nanomaterials that include synthetic or naturally occurring metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in orthopedic implants, the largest market segment of implantable medical devices. The importance of synergistic engineering techniques that can augment or enhance the performance of nanomaterial applications in orthopedic implants is also discussed, the focus being on a low-intensity direct electric current (LIDC) stimulation technology to promote the long-term antibacterial efficacy of oligodynamic metal-based surfaces by ionization, while potentially accelerating tissue growth and osseointegration. While many nanomaterials have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide more effective implantable medical surfaces, further decisive investigations are necessary before they can translate into medically safe and commercially viable clinical applications. The article concludes with a discussion about some of the critical impending issues with the application of nanomaterials-based technologies in implantable medical devices, and potential directions to address these.

  6. Use of mobile learning technology among final year medical students in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masika, Moses Muia; Omondi, Gregory Barnabas; Natembeya, Dennis Simiyu; Mugane, Ephraim Mwatha; Bosire, Kefa Ogonyo; Kibwage, Isaac Ongubo

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone penetration has increased exponentially over the last decade as has its application in nearly all spheres of life including health and medical education. This study aimed at assessing the use of mobile learning technology and its challenges among final year undergraduate students in the College of Health sciences, University of Nairobi. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted among final year undergraduate students at the University of Nairobi, College of Health Sciences. Self-administered, anonymous questionnaires were issued to all final year students in their lecture rooms after obtaining informed consent. Data on demographics, mobile device ownership and mobile learning technology use and its challenges was collected. Data entry and analysis was done using SPSS(®). Chi-square and t-test were used for bivariate analysis. We had 292 respondents; 62% were medical students, 16% were nursing students, 13% were pharmacy students and 9% were dental surgery students. The majority were female (59%) and the average age was 24 years. Eighty eight percent (88%) of the respondents owned a smart device and nearly all of them used it for learning. 64% of the respondents used medical mobile applications. The main challenges were lack of a smart device, lack of technical know-how in accessing or using apps, sub-optimal internet access, cost of acquiring apps and limited device memory. Mobile learning is increasingly popular among medical students and should be leveraged in promoting access and quality of medical education.

  7. Using Web 2.0 technologies to enhance evidence-based medical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Miriam J; Flanagin, Andrew J

    2011-01-01

    This article invokes research on information seeking and evaluation to address how providers of evidence-based medical information can use Web 2.0 technologies to increase access to, enliven users' experiences with, and enrich the quality of the information available. In an ideal scenario, evidence-based medical information can take appropriate advantage of community intelligence spawned by Web 2.0 technologies, resulting in the ideal combination of scientifically sound, high-quality information that is imbued with experiential insights from a multitude of individuals. To achieve this goal, the authors argue that people will engage with information that they can access easily, and that they perceive as (a) relevant to their information-seeking goals and (b) credible. The authors suggest the utility of Web 2.0 technologies for engaging stakeholders with evidence-based medical information through these mechanisms, and the degree to which the information provided can and should be trusted. Last, the authors discuss potential problems with Web 2.0 information in relation to decision making in health contexts, and they conclude with specific and practical recommendations for the dissemination of evidence-based health information via Web 2.0 technologies.

  8. Future Directions in Medical Physics: Models, Technology, and Translation to Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewerdsen, Jeffrey

    The application of physics in medicine has been integral to major advances in diagnostic and therapeutic medicine. Two primary areas represent the mainstay of medical physics research in the last century: in radiation therapy, physicists have propelled advances in conformal radiation treatment and high-precision image guidance; and in diagnostic imaging, physicists have advanced an arsenal of multi-modality imaging that includes CT, MRI, ultrasound, and PET as indispensible tools for noninvasive screening, diagnosis, and assessment of treatment response. In addition to their role in building such technologically rich fields of medicine, physicists have also become integral to daily clinical practice in these areas. The future suggests new opportunities for multi-disciplinary research bridging physics, biology, engineering, and computer science, and collaboration in medical physics carries a strong capacity for identification of significant clinical needs, access to clinical data, and translation of technologies to clinical studies. In radiation therapy, for example, the extraction of knowledge from large datasets on treatment delivery, image-based phenotypes, genomic profile, and treatment outcome will require innovation in computational modeling and connection with medical physics for the curation of large datasets. Similarly in imaging physics, the demand for new imaging technology capable of measuring physical and biological processes over orders of magnitude in scale (from molecules to whole organ systems) and exploiting new contrast mechanisms for greater sensitivity to molecular agents and subtle functional / morphological change will benefit from multi-disciplinary collaboration in physics, biology, and engineering. Also in surgery and interventional radiology, where needs for increased precision and patient safety meet constraints in cost and workflow, development of new technologies for imaging, image registration, and robotic assistance can leverage

  9. Health information technology: medical record documentation issues in the electronic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, Bill; Bholat, Michelle Anne

    2012-12-01

    This article outlines the regulatory movement propelling physicians into the electronic health record environment and the subsequent emergence of quality issues in the medical record. There are benefits and downside risks for implementing electronic health records as part of the desire of a practice or institution to build patient-centered medical homes. The intersection of how a practice or institution collects and reports quality metrics using health information technology and subsequently submits claims for services rendered has created unforeseen challenges for which leadership must be aware and address proactively.

  10. How we develop and sustain innovation in medical education technology: Keys to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, James B; Kanter, Steven L

    2011-01-01

    The use of information technology to support the educational mission of academic medical centers is nearly universal; however, the scope and methods employed vary greatly (Souza et al. 2008 ). This article reviews the methods, processes, and specific techniques needed to conceive, develop, implement, and assess technology-based educational programs across healthcare disciplines. We discuss the core concepts, structure, and techniques that enable growth, productivity, and sustainability within an academic setting. Herein are specific keys to success with examples including project selection, theory-based design, the technology development process, implementation, and evaluation that can lead to broad participation and positive learning outcomes. Most importantly, this article shares methods to involve students, faculty, and stakeholders in technology design and the development process that fosters a sustainable culture of educational innovation.

  11. Re-engineering the process of medical imaging physics and technology education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprawls, Perry

    2005-09-01

    The extensive availability of digital technology provides an opportunity for enhancing both the effectiveness and efficiency of virtually all functions in the process of medical imaging physics and technology education and training. This includes degree granting academic programs within institutions and a wide spectrum of continuing education lifelong learning activities. Full achievement of the advantages of technology-enhanced education (e-learning, etc.) requires an analysis of specific educational activities with respect to desired outcomes and learning objectives. This is followed by the development of strategies and resources that are based on established educational principles. The impact of contemporary technology comes from its ability to place learners into enriched learning environments. The full advantage of a re-engineered and implemented educational process involves changing attitudes and functions of learning facilitators (teachers) and resource allocation and sharing both within and among institutions.

  12. [Social consensus on medical technology policy: ethical issues and citizen participation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hajime

    2004-01-01

    Social consensus is considered to be a necessary condition for a policy to be introduced and implemented effectively. This is the case with the approval, regulation and prohibition of certain advanced medical research and technology, especially when they could invoke moral disputes in society. Public policies on organ transplantation, definition of death, euthanasia, genetic screening and diagnosis, and human stem cell research are recent examples. The concept of consensus, however, is elusive, along with the measures to secure it. Technocratic decision making, as a paternalistic activity frequently led by experts, sometimes poses a challenge to democratic decision making, supposedly based on a well-informed and rational public. It also remains to be proved whether public involvement in policymaking can be a solution to ethical value conflicts in society. From the perspective of policy sciences, this paper first introduces the concept of consensus, especially consensus on moral issues in pluralistic societies, and its implications to public policy, including citizen participation in decision making. Then, it briefly explains the historical background with which social consensus and public involvement have increasingly flourished in the field of technology assessments and technology policy making, including biomedical technology. Next, major institutions, governmental and nongovernmental, involved in the ethical aspects of medical research and technology, are presented along with their efforts for citizen participation. Finally, the paper discusses some of the future agendas on this issue.

  13. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT in Medical Education and Practice: The Major Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Karsenti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This literature review addresses the main effects and challenges in using information and communication technologies (ICT in medical education and practice. The first challenge is to better prepare future physicians for the changing behaviours of patients, who are increasingly Internet-savvy and who sometimes appear to know more about their diseases than their physicians. The second challenge, which is closely linked to the first, is to raise awareness among physicians in training of the many benefits of using ICT to improve not only the quality of interventions and health care delivery but, from a broader perspective, the organization of the health care system itself. The third challenge is to motivate medical students and practitioners to use ICT to find information, learn and develop. It is proposed that information literacy should be a mandatory skill for all medical students. The e-learning mode of training is also addressed. Although underemployed in most medical faculties, it represents the future of initial and continuous medical training. Virtual resources and communities, simulations and 3D animations are also discussed. The fourth and final challenge is to change medical teaching practices.

  14. The Berlin Brain–Computer Interface: Non-Medical Uses of BCI Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankertz, Benjamin; Tangermann, Michael; Vidaurre, Carmen; Fazli, Siamac; Sannelli, Claudia; Haufe, Stefan; Maeder, Cecilia; Ramsey, Lenny; Sturm, Irene; Curio, Gabriel; Müller, Klaus-Robert

    2010-01-01

    Brain–computer interfacing (BCI) is a steadily growing area of research. While initially BCI research was focused on applications for paralyzed patients, increasingly more alternative applications in healthy human subjects are proposed and investigated. In particular, monitoring of mental states and decoding of covert user states have seen a strong rise of interest. Here, we present some examples of such novel applications which provide evidence for the promising potential of BCI technology for non-medical uses. Furthermore, we discuss distinct methodological improvements required to bring non-medical applications of BCI technology to a diversity of layperson target groups, e.g., ease of use, minimal training, general usability, short control latencies. PMID:21165175

  15. Introducing RFID technology in dynamic and time-critical medical settings: requirements and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlak, Siddika; Sarcevic, Aleksandra; Marsic, Ivan; Burd, Randall S

    2012-10-01

    We describe the process of introducing RFID technology in the trauma bay of a trauma center to support fast-paced and complex teamwork during resuscitation. We analyzed trauma resuscitation tasks, photographs of medical tools, and videos of simulated resuscitations to gain insight into resuscitation tasks, work practices and procedures. Based on these data, we discuss strategies for placing RFID tags on medical tools and for placing antennas in the environment for optimal tracking and activity recognition. Results from our preliminary RFID deployment in the trauma bay show the feasibility of our approach for tracking tools and for recognizing trauma team activities. We conclude by discussing implications for and challenges to introducing RFID technology in other similar settings characterized by dynamic and collocated collaboration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Dissemination of medical applications of nuclear energy with virtual reality technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Felipe M.; Oliveira, Beatriz A.R. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Belas Artes]. E-mail: felipemurybotelho@yahoo.com.br; Jorge, Carlos A.F.; Mol, Antonio C.A.; Lapa, Celso M.F. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: lapa@ien.gov.br

    2007-07-01

    This work makes use of Virtual Reality technology to disseminate medical applications of nuclear energy, with educational purposes. Virtual Reality is an effective learning tool, since navigation and interaction in virtual worlds can improve motivation in the learning process. With this technology, learning can be achieved in a clearer, joyful and more objective way. Among the existing medical applications of nuclear energy, this work focuses on the use of radiopharmaceuticals. The goal is to simulate this application in a virtual environment, for educational purposes, and to show the absorption of a radiopharmaceutical by the human body, during a diagnostics or treatment procedure. An example has been chosen, for Iodine radiopharmaceutical, which has affinity with the thyroid, and then concentrates in this organ. During the simulation, the concentration of the radioactive Iodine in the thyroid can be emphasized, and in the sequence, the virtual patient can be shown during the imaging procedure. (author)

  17. Ite Boerema--surgeon and engineer with a double-Dutch legacy to medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopardi, Lisa N; Metcalfe, Matthew S; Forde, Allison; Maddern, Guy J

    2004-01-01

    Ite Boerema, 1902-1978: a Dutchman with a brilliant academic surgical career, and war hero, decorated for resistance to the Germans in World War II. As a man who regarded surgery as "engineering in medicine," we still feel his legacy in medical technology today, specifically with regard to his work on esophageal anastomoses and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This biography places his major contributions to medicine in context of the man himself and of contemporary medicine.

  18. Distributed network, wireless and cloud computing enabled 3-D ultrasound; a new medical technology paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arie Meir

    Full Text Available Medical technologies are indispensable to modern medicine. However, they have become exceedingly expensive and complex and are not available to the economically disadvantaged majority of the world population in underdeveloped as well as developed parts of the world. For example, according to the World Health Organization about two thirds of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In this paper we introduce a new medical technology paradigm centered on wireless technology and cloud computing that was designed to overcome the problems of increasing health technology costs. We demonstrate the value of the concept with an example; the design of a wireless, distributed network and central (cloud computing enabled three-dimensional (3-D ultrasound system. Specifically, we demonstrate the feasibility of producing a 3-D high end ultrasound scan at a central computing facility using the raw data acquired at the remote patient site with an inexpensive low end ultrasound transducer designed for 2-D, through a mobile device and wireless connection link between them. Producing high-end 3D ultrasound images with simple low-end transducers reduces the cost of imaging by orders of magnitude. It also removes the requirement of having a highly trained imaging expert at the patient site, since the need for hand-eye coordination and the ability to reconstruct a 3-D mental image from 2-D scans, which is a necessity for high quality ultrasound imaging, is eliminated. This could enable relatively untrained medical workers in developing nations to administer imaging and a more accurate diagnosis, effectively saving the lives of people.

  19. Integration of computer technology into the medical curriculum: the King's experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickie Aitken

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there have been major changes in the requirements of medical education which have set the scene for the revision of medical curricula (Towle, 1991; GMC, 1993. As part of the new curriculum at King's, the opportunity has been taken to integrate computer technology into the course through Computer-Assisted Learning (CAL, and to train graduates in core IT skills. Although the use of computers in the medical curriculum has up to now been limited, recent studies have shown encouraging steps forward (see Boelen, 1995. One area where there has been particular interest is the use of notebook computers to allow students increased access to IT facilities (Maulitz et al, 1996.

  20. A network collaboration implementing technology to improve medication dispensing and administration in critical access hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Douglas S; Ward, Marcia M; Loes, Jean L; O'Brien, John

    2010-01-01

    We report how seven independent critical access hospitals collaborated with a rural referral hospital to standardize workflow policies and procedures while jointly implementing the same health information technologies (HITs) to enhance medication care processes. The study hospitals implemented the same electronic health record, computerized provider order entry, pharmacy information systems, automated dispensing cabinets (ADC), and barcode medication administration systems. We conducted interviews and examined project documents to explore factors underlying the successful implementation of ADC and barcode medication administration across the network hospitals. These included a shared culture of collaboration; strategic sequencing of HIT component implementation; interface among HIT components; strategic placement of ADCs; disciplined use and sharing of workflow analyses linked with HIT applications; planning for workflow efficiencies; acquisition of adequate supply of HIT-related devices; and establishing metrics to monitor HIT use and outcomes.

  1. Families' concerns about the care of children with technology-dependent special health care needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce de Souza Esteves

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective.To identify concerns of family members of Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN as far as care related to using technology, and to discuss nurses' performance in the face of these concerns. Methodology. Qualitative descriptive research, developed through February and March 2014, through semi-structured interviews with six family members, caregivers of technology-dependent CSHCN who are followed at a University Hospital in Rio de Janeiro. The setting chosen was the family members' home. Data were submitted to content analysis. Results. Concerns were distributed in a timeframe, divided between those occurring the moment the family members received the information about the technological device needed, then those which arose while accompanying the child during hospitalization, and finally those that remained after the hospital discharge. Conclusion. The family needs information and support from nurses, because different concerns emerge throughout the treatment and accompaniment of a technology-dependent child.

  2. The Dependency of Engineering Technology Student’s towards the Usage of Calculator in Mathematics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussin Nor Hafizah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Calculators are one of the important technology used to solve mathematical computations. It also can be the tool for learning mathematics if it is used appropriately. However, too much depends on calculator can be harmful to students ability to solve simple mathematical problem. The purpose of this study is to examine the dependency of students in Faculty of Engineering Technology (FTK, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka, on the usage of calculator to solve the mathematical problems. A sample of 383 first year Engineering Technology (ET students’ taking mathematics subject are selected from five different course. Students were examined based on the results of Mathematic Competency Test and the survey from a questionnaire that covers questions regarding the students’ enjoyment on the usage of calculator and the usefulness of calculator in mathematic activities. The investigation yield a result showing that the students has a high dependency on using calculator to solve mathematical problem.

  3. An integrative review of communication between parents and nurses of hospitalized technology-dependent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambra, Barbara K; Stiffler, Deborah; Broome, Marion E

    2014-12-01

    With advances in health care, the population of children who are technology-dependent is increasing and, therefore, the need for nurses to understand how best to engage in communication with the parents of these children is critical. Shared communication between the parents of hospitalized technology-dependent children and their nurses is essential to provide optimal care for the child. The components and behaviors of the parent-nurse communication process that improve mutual understanding of optimal care for the child had not previously been examined. Among parents of hospitalized technology-dependent children and their nurses, what communication behaviors, components, concepts, or processes improve mutual understanding of optimal care for the child? An integrative review of both qualitative and quantitative studies was conducted. Key words including communication, hospitalized, nurse, parent, pediatric, and technology-dependent were used to search databases such as Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health and Medline for years 2000-2014. The data regarding the process of parent-nurse communication were extracted as they related to the mutual understanding of optimal care for the child. The data were grouped into themes and compared across studies, designs, populations, and settings. Six articles were identified that provided information regarding the processes of shared communication among the parents of hospitalized technology-dependent children and their nurses. Providing clear information, involving parents in care decisions, trust and respect for each other's expertise, caring attitudes, advocacy, and role negotiation were all found to be important factors in shared parent-nurse communication. The results of this integrative review inform our understanding of the parent-nurse communication process. The findings provide nurses with an understanding of strategies to better engage in respectful, engaging, and intentional communication with parents of

  4. Partnership With Parents of Technology-Dependent Children: Clarification of the Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Michele A

    2016-01-01

    A strategy based on the Hybrid Model of Concept Development was used to integrate previous concept analyses and research with data from interviews with parents and nurses caring for children dependent on technology to clarify the concept. Partnership was generally described positively in the literature, but some cautions were noted. Six characteristics of partnering were identified from the fieldwork data: respect, flexibility, caring professionalism, communication, acknowledgment of parental control, and support for parents. The concept of participation is clarified and extended to a unique area of nursing practice, the care of children dependent on technology in the home.

  5. Delivering a medical school elective with massive open online course (MOOC) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The educational technology of massive open online courses (MOOCs) has been successfully applied in a wide variety of disciplines and are an intense focus of educational research at this time. Educators are now looking to MOOC technology as a means to improve professional medical education, but very little is known about how medical MOOCs compare with traditional content delivery. A retrospective analysis of the course evaluations for the Medicine as a Business elective by fourth-year medical students at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) for the 2012-2015 academic years was conducted. This course was delivered by small group flipped classroom discussions for 2012-2014 and delivered via MOOC technology in 2015. Learner ratings were compared between the two course delivery methods using routinely collected course evaluations. Course enrollment has ranged from 6-19 students per year in the 2012-2015 academic years. Student evaluations of the course are favorable in the areas of effective teaching, accurate course objectives, meeting personal learning objectives, recommending the course to other students, and overall when rated on a 5-point Likert scale. The majority of all student ratings (76-95%) of this elective course are for the highest possible choice (Strongly agree or Excellent) for any criteria, regardless if the course was delivered via a traditional or MOOC format. Statistical analysis of these ratings suggests that the Effective Teacher and Overall Evaluations did not statistically differ between the two delivery formats. Student ratings of this elective course were highly similar when delivered in a flipped classroom format or by using MOOC technology. The primary advantage of this new course format is flexibility of time and place for learners, allowing them to complete the course objectives when convenient for them. The course evaluations suggest this is a change that is acceptable to the target audience. This study suggests that

  6. The effects of health information technology on the costs and quality of medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Leila

    2014-03-01

    Information technology has been linked to productivity growth in a wide variety of sectors, and health information technology (HIT) is a leading example of an innovation with the potential to transform industry-wide productivity. This paper analyzes the impact of health information technology (HIT) on the quality and intensity of medical care. Using Medicare claims data from 1998 to 2005, I estimate the effects of early investment in HIT by exploiting variation in hospitals' adoption statuses over time, analyzing 2.5 million inpatient admissions across 3900 hospitals. HIT is associated with a 1.3% increase in billed charges (p-value: 5.6%), and there is no evidence of cost savings even five years after adoption. Additionally, HIT adoption appears to have little impact on the quality of care, measured by patient mortality, adverse drug events, and readmission rates.

  7. [The present status and future prospects of application of digital medical technology in general surgery in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, C H; LauWan, Y Y; Cai, W

    2017-01-01

    It has been almost 10 years since digital medical technology has started to becommonly used in general surgery in China.Led by advances in three dimensional(3D) visualization technology, virtual reality, simulation surgery, and 3D printing, digital medical technology have played important roles in changing the current practice of general surgery in China to become more effective by improving diagnostic accuracy and a better choice of therapeutic procedure with a resultant increased surgical success rate and a decreased surgical risks.Furthermore, education of medical students and young doctors become better and easier.

  8. Medical student case presentation performance and perception when using mobile learning technology in the emergency department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Tews

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Hand-held mobile learning technology provides opportunities for clinically relevant self-instructional modules to augment traditional bedside teaching. Using this technology as a teaching tool has not been well studied. We sought to evaluate medical students’ case presentation performance and perception when viewing short, just-in-time mobile learning videos using the iPod touch prior to patient encounters.Twenty-two fourth-year medical students were randomized to receive or not to receive instruction by video, using the iPod Touch, prior to patient encounters. After seeing a patient, they presented the case to their faculty, who completed a standard data collection sheet. Students were surveyed on their perceived confidence and effectiveness after using these videos.Twenty-two students completed a total of 67 patient encounters. There was a statistically significant improvement in presentations when the videos were viewed for the first time (p = 0.032. There was no difference when the presentations were summed for the entire rotation (p = 0.671. The reliable (alpha = 0.97 survey indicated that the videos were a useful teaching tool and gave students more confidence in their presentations.Medical student patient presentations were improved with the use of mobile instructional videos following first time use, suggesting mobile learning videos may be useful in medical student education. If direct bedside teaching is unavailable, just-in-time iPod touch videos can be an alternative instructional strategy to improve first-time patient presentations by medical students.

  9. The MAGEC system for spinal lengthening in children with scoliosis: A NICE Medical Technology Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Michelle; Craig, Joyce; Higgins, Joanne; Willits, Iain; Barata, Teresa; Wood, Hannah; Kimpton, Christine; Sims, Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Scoliosis-structural lateral curvature of the spine-affects around four children per 1,000. The MAGEC system comprises a magnetically distractible spinal rod implant and an external remote controller, which lengthens the rod; this system avoids repeated surgical lengthening. Rod implants brace the spine internally and are lengthened as the child grows, preventing worsening of scoliosis and delaying the need for spinal fusion. The Medical Technologies Advisory Committee at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) selected the MAGEC system for evaluation in a NICE medical technologies guidance. Six studies were identified by the sponsor (Ellipse Technologies Inc.) as being relevant to the decision problem. Meta-analysis was used to compare the clinical evidence results with those of one conventional growth rod study, and equal efficacy of the two devices was concluded. The key weakness was selection of a single comparator study. The External Assessment Centre (EAC) identified 16 conventional growth rod studies and undertook meta-analyses of relevant outcomes. Its critique highlighted limitations around study heterogeneity and variations in baseline characteristics and follow-up duration, precluding the ability to draw firm conclusions. The sponsor constructed a de novo costing model showing that MAGEC rods generated cost savings of £9,946 per patient after 6 years, compared with conventional rods. The EAC critiqued and updated the model structure and inputs, calculating robust cost savings of £12,077 per patient with MAGEC rods compared with conventional rods over 6 years. The year of valuation was 2012. NICE issued a positive recommendation as supported by the evidence (Medical Technologies Guidance 18).

  10. Methods for assessment of innovative medical technologies during early stages of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelmes, Marc; Neumann, Ulrike; Lühmann, Dagmar; Schönermark, Matthias P; Hagen, Anja

    2009-11-05

    Conventional Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is usually conducted at a point in time at which the development of the respective technology may no longer be influenced. By this time developers and/or purchasers may have misinvested resources. Thus the demand for Technology Assessment (TA) which incorporates appropriate methods during early development stages of a technology becomes apparent. Against this health political background, the present report describes methods for a development-accompanying assessment of innovative medical technologies. Furthermore, international research programmes set out to identify or apply such methods will be outlined. A systematic literature search as well as an extensive manual literature search are carried out in order to obtain literature and information. The greatest units of the identified methods consist of assessment concepts, decision support methods, modelling approaches and methods focusing on users and their knowledge. Additionally, several general-purpose concepts have been identified. The identified research programmes INNO-HTA and MATCH (Multidisciplinary-Assessment-of-Technology-Centre-for-Healthcare) are to be seen as pilot projects which so far have not been able to generate final results. MATCH focuses almost entirely on the incorporation of the user-perspective regarding the development of non-pharmaceutical technologies, whereas INNO-HTA is basically concerned with the identification and possible advancement of methods for the early, socially-oriented technology assessment. Most references offer only very vague descriptions of the respective method and the application of greatly differing methods seldom exceeds the character of a pilot implementation. A standardisation much less an institutionalisation of development-accompanying assessment cannot be recognized. It must be noted that there is no singular method with which development-accompanying assessment should be carried out. Instead, a technology and

  11. Methods for assessment of innovative medical technologies during early stages of development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional Health Technology Assessment (HTA is usually conducted at a point in time at which the development of the respective technology may no longer be influenced. By this time developers and/or purchasers may have misinvested resources. Thus the demand for Technology Assessment (TA which incorporates appropriate methods during early development stages of a technology becomes apparent. Against this health political background, the present report describes methods for a development-accompanying assessment of innovative medical technologies. Furthermore, international research programmes set out to identify or apply such methods will be outlined. A systematic literature search as well as an extensive manual literature search are carried out in order to obtain literature and information. The greatest units of the identified methods consist of assessment concepts, decision support methods, modelling approaches and methods focusing on users and their knowledge. Additionally, several general-purpose concepts have been identified. The identified research programmes INNO-HTA and MATCH (Multidisciplinary-Assessment-of-Technology-Centre-for-Healthcare are to be seen as pilot projects which so far have not been able to generate final results. MATCH focuses almost entirely on the incorporation of the user-perspective regarding the development of non-pharmaceutical technologies, whereas INNO-HTA is basically concerned with the identification and possible advancement of methods for the early, socially-oriented technology assessment. Most references offer only very vague descriptions of the respective method and the application of greatly differing methods seldom exceeds the character of a pilot implementation. A standardisation much less an institutionalisation of development-accompanying assessment cannot be recognized. It must be noted that there is no singular method with which development-accompanying assessment should be carried out. Instead, a

  12. How Recommender Systems in Technology-Enhanced Learning depend on Context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drachsler, Hendrik; Manouselis, Nikos

    2009-01-01

    Drachsler, H., & Manouselis, N. (2009). How Recommender Systems in Technology-Enhanced Learning depend on Context. Presentation given at the 1st workshop on Context-aware Recommender Systems for Learning at the Alpine Rendez-Vous 2009. November, 30 - December, 3, 2009, Garmisch-Patenkirchen, Germany

  13. Building a Smooth Medical Service for Operating Room Using RFID Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-Ping Hung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the information technology advancement, the feasibility for the establishment of mobile medical environments has been strengthened. Using RFID to facilitate the tracing of patients’ mobile position in hospital has attracted more attentions from researchers due to the demand on advanced features. Traditionally, the management of surgical treatment is generally manually operated and there is no consistent operating procedure for patients transferring among wards, surgery waiting rooms, operating rooms, and recovery rooms, resulting in panicky and urgent transferring work among departments and, thus, leading to delays and errors. In this paper, we propose a new framework using radio frequency identification (RFID technology for a mobilized surgical process monitoring system. Through the active tag, an application management system used before, during, and after the surgical processes has been proposed. The concept of signal level matrix, SLM, was proposed to accurately identify patients and dynamically track patients’ location. By updating patient’s information real-time, the preprocessing time needed for various tasks and incomplete transfers among departments can be reduced, the medical resources can be effectively used, unnecessary medical disputes can be reduced, and more comprehensive health care environment can be provided. The feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed system are demonstrated with a number of experimental results.

  14. Demonstration of medical communications based on an ATM broadband network technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jerome R., Jr.; Blaine, G. James; Dubetz, Martin W.; Krieger, Kenneth; Jost, R. Gilbert; Moore, Stephen M.; Richard, William D.; Turner, Jonathan S.; Winterbauer, Albert

    1992-07-01

    The research and development efforts of several university and industry groups have brought digital imaging technologies into the practice of medicine. Radiographic images based on a digital data set can now be acquired, stored, communicated and presented for both primary interpretation and access by the referring physician. Moreover, conferences between a specialist and a primary care physician can be supported with audio and video links. A demonstration project at Washington University in collaboration with Southwestern Bell and NEC-America provides a testbed for deployment of ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) broadband network technology supporting both LAN and WAN experiments in multimedia medical communications. A network based on four geographically dispersed ATM switches supports rapid display of high-resolution medical images, patient information, digital video and digitized real-time physiological signals at channel rates of 100 Mb/s. A prototype configuration of an Inquiry station is based on the NeXT computer with auxiliary displays for the medical images. Observations and preliminary performance results will be presented.

  15. Surveying the relationship of Internet addiction with dependence on cell phone, depression, anxiety, and stress in collegians (Case study: Bam University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asra Nassehi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: A considerable increase in using the Internet and cell phone is evident especially among university students. On the other hand, the attention and concerns expressed about the psychological and social effects of long-term use of communicational technologies and the, probably negative, effects on professional future and social relationships are growing. Therefore, the present study is aimed at determining the relationship of Internet addiction with excessive dependence on cell phone, depression, anxiety, and stress in the students of Bam University of Medical Sciences. Methodology: A comparative-correlative study on 230 students in Bam University of Medical Sciences was carried out in 2014. The data was collected using Young’s Internet Addiction Test (IAT, dependence of cell phone, and Lovibond & Lovibond’s depression, anxiety and stress scale (DASS-21. (sig. = 0.05 Finding: Total scores of Internet addiction and dependence on cell phone were 49.03±20 and 42.7±11.77 respectively. There was also a significant relationship between Internet addiction and the variables dependence on cell phone, depression, anxiety, and stress. (p<0.05 Conclusion: The results showed that increase in the time spent on the Internet led to increase in depression, anxiety, stress, and dependence on cell phone. Therefore, there is a need for more efficient educational, consultation, and behavioral planning to attenuate the psychological and social damages.

  16. In-hospital medical complications associated with patient dependency after acute ischemic stroke: data from the China National Stroke Registry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Peng-lian; ZHAO Xing-quan; DU Wan-liang; WANG An-xin; JI Rui-jun; YANG Zhong-hua; WANG Chun-xue

    2013-01-01

    Background The mortality of stroke patients is strongly affected by medical complications.However,there are limited data investigating the effect of in-hospital medical complications on the dependency of stroke patients worldwide.We prospectively and systematically investigated the effect of medical complications on dependency of patients at 3,6 and 12 months after stroke using the China National Stroke Registry (CNSR).Methods This prospective cohort study collected data of patients age >18 years with acute ischemic stroke in 132 clinical centers distributed across 32 provinces and four municipalities (including Hong Kong region) of China,from September 2007 to August 2008.Data on medical complications,dependency and other information were obtained from paper-based registry forms.Medical complications associated with stroke outcomes were assessed using multivariable Logistic regression.Results Of 11 560 patients with acute ischemic stroke,1826 (15.80%) presented with in-hospital medical complications.In-hospital medical complications were independent risk factors for dependency of patients at 3 months (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.367,95% confidence interval (CI) 2.021-2.771),6 months (adjusted OR 2.257,95% CI 1.922-2.650),and 12 months (adjusted OR 1.820,95% CI 1.538-2.154) after acute ischemic stroke.Conclusion The results demonstrated that the short-term and long-term dependency of acute ischemic stroke patients is significantly associated with in-hospital medical complications in China.

  17. APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: Learning about Computers and Applying Computer Technology to Education and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M.; Hales, Deborah J.; Briscoe, Greg; Benjamin, Sheldon; Boland, Robert J.; Luo, John S.; Chan, Carlyle H.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B.; Yager, Joel; Yellowlees, Peter M.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article provides a brief overview of important issues for educators regarding medical education and technology. Methods: The literature describes key concepts, prototypical technology tools, and model programs. A work group of psychiatric educators was convened three times by phone conference to discuss the literature. Findings…

  18. APA Summit on Medical Student Education Task Force on Informatics and Technology: Steps to Enhance the Use of Technology in Education through Faculty Development, Funding and Change Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Donald M.; Benjamin, Sheldon; Briscoe, Gregory; Hales, Deborah J.; Boland, Robert J.; Luo, John S.; Chan, Carlyle H.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Karlinsky, Harry; Gordon, Daniel B.; Yellowlees, Peter M.; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This article provides an overview of how trainees, faculty, and institutions use technology for acquiring knowledge, skills, and attitudes for practicing modern medicine. Method: The authors reviewed the literature on medical education, technology, and change, and identify the key themes and make recommendations for implementing…

  19. Teachers' perceptions of the role of nurses: caring for children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Fumie; Katsuda, Hitomi

    2015-01-01

    This study explored special education teachers' perceptions of the role of nurses who specialize in providing nursing care to children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools. Semistructured interviews with 11 teachers were conducted, and data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The teachers surveyed thought that the most important role of nurses was to maintain good health and safety, as well as to support children's education as members of the educational team. Teachers desired that nurses give advice based on their professional knowledge to maintain the children's good health and safety. In supporting education, nurses were required to support the children's autonomy and education, and to act as members of the educational team. Study findings suggest that, for an optimal relationship with teachers, nurses who provide nursing care for children who are technology-dependent in mainstream schools need not only fulfill medical functions, but also support the education of children as members of the educational team. © 2014 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2014 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  20. Home discharge of technology-dependent children: evaluation of a respiratory-therapist driven family education program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tearl, Donna K; Hertzog, James H

    2007-02-01

    Initial hospital discharge to home of technology-dependent children requires extensive training and education of the family caregivers. Education of adult family members should promote positive interactions in a nonthreatening manner while facilitating the development of the knowledge and skills to competently and independently provide all aspects of the medical care. We utilize a training program for adult family members of children who have undergone tracheostomy to facilitate long-term mechanical ventilatory support and who are being prepared for their initial discharge from the hospital to home. A dedicated respiratory therapist family educator directs this program. Multiple teaching tools, activities, and training sessions, based on adult learning theory, are utilized to develop appropriate clinical skills to manage children with tracheostomies and the associated technological supports. We evaluated the effectiveness of our program by administering a written test to caregivers, at the start and the conclusion of their training. We also surveyed the caregivers about their satisfaction with the educational program and the respiratory therapist family educator's performance. We also surveyed employees of the durable medical equipment companies used by the families, regarding the caregivers' knowledge and competency in the home one month following discharge. Our program was associated with a statistically significant improvement in caregiver test performance, and the caregivers expressed a high degree of satisfaction with the program. The employees of the durable medical equipment companies perceived a high degree of knowledge and competence on the part of the home caregivers. Our training program appears to have a positive impact on the educational preparation of caregivers.

  1. Impact of technological innovation on a nursing home performance and on the medication-use process safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Chantal; Gascon, Viviane; Brouillette, Christel

    2014-03-01

    Despite the fact that since 1985 the government of Québec increased by 5.75 % on average the amount of money spent on healthcare per year, little improvement was noted. It is obvious that an optimal use of resources is essential to reduce waiting times and provide safer and faster services to patients. The use of new technology can contribute to improve the healthcare system efficiency. Our study aims to assess the impact of a medication distribution technology on 1) the performance of a health and social services center's pharmacy, 2) the performance of one care unit in a nursing home and on 3) the medication-use process safety. To measure performance we were inspired by the Lean approach. The results show that medication distribution technology is considered as an effective way to significantly detect medication errors, to allow nurses to focus more on patients and pharmacy to react more rapidly to changes in patient medications.

  2. Analysis of the technology acceptance model in examining hospital nurses' behavioral intentions toward the use of bar code medication administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lunar; Park, Byeonghwa; Oh, Kyeung Mi

    2015-04-01

    Serious medication errors continue to exist in hospitals, even though there is technology that could potentially eliminate them such as bar code medication administration. Little is known about the degree to which the culture of patient safety is associated with behavioral intention to use bar code medication administration. Based on the Technology Acceptance Model, this study evaluated the relationships among patient safety culture and perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, and behavioral intention to use bar code medication administration technology among nurses in hospitals. Cross-sectional surveys with a convenience sample of 163 nurses using bar code medication administration were conducted. Feedback and communication about errors had a positive impact in predicting perceived usefulness (β=.26, Pmodel predicting for behavioral intention, age had a negative impact (β=-.17, Pmodel explained 24% (Ptechnology.

  3. [The advanced technology of three-dimensional medical imaging in spine, bone and joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yuichi; Yonenobu, Kazuo

    2004-04-01

    The advanced technology of three-dimensional (3-D) medical imaging allows us to understand the patient specific anatomy in detail. Especially, in orthopedic surgery, treated spinal diseases or the disorders of bone and joints, the 3-D computed tomography(CT), such as multi-slice CT and helical CT is a useful tool for clinical diagnosis and surgical treatment. Since 1995, by the use of these 3-D CT image data, computer navigation system and surgical robot were developed and applied to a spinal instrumentation surgery and an artificial joint replacement. Now surgeons can perform the precise and safe surgical procedure by the computer guidance on the base of 3-D medical imaging.

  4. Retention factors in relation to organisational commitment in medical and information technology services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette van Dyk

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Retaining staff with scarce and critical skills in the medical and information technology (IT industry has become a top priority because of skills shortages.Research purpose: The objectives of the study were to investigate empirically: (1 the relationship between employees’ satisfaction with organisational retention factors (measured by the Retention Factors Scale and their organisational commitment (measured by the Organisational Commitment Questionnaire and (2 whether gender, age, race and tenure groups differ significantly in terms of these variables.Motivation for the study: Medical and information technology professionals have specialised and hard to replace skills. They also have strong tendencies to leave their organisations and countries. Understanding the retention factors that will increase their organisational commitment may benefit the organisations who want to retain their valuable talent.Research design, approach and method: The researchers used a cross-sectional survey design to collect data from a purposive sample of 206 staff members who had scarce skills in a South African medical and information technology services company. Correlational and inferential statistics were computed to achieve the objectives.Main findings: The results showed that the participants’ satisfaction with retention factors has a significant relationship with their organisational commitment and that the biographical groups differ significantly in terms of the variables.Practical/managerial implications: The measured retention factors were all associated with human resource management practices that influence employees’ intentions to leave.Contribution/value-add: The results are important to managers who are interested in retaining staff who have scarce skills and provide valuable pointers for designing effective retention strategies.

  5. Medical student case presentation performance and perception when using mobile learning technology in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tews, Matthew; Brennan, Kimberly; Begaz, Tomer; Treat, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Hand-held mobile learning technology provides opportunities for clinically relevant self-instructional modules to augment traditional bedside teaching. Using this technology as a teaching tool has not been well studied. We sought to evaluate medical students' case presentation performance and perception when viewing short, just-in-time mobile learning videos using the iPod touch prior to patient encounters. Twenty-two fourth-year medical students were randomized to receive or not to receive instruction by video, using the iPod Touch, prior to patient encounters. After seeing a patient, they presented the case to their faculty, who completed a standard data collection sheet. Students were surveyed on their perceived confidence and effectiveness after using these videos. Twenty-two students completed a total of 67 patient encounters. There was a statistically significant improvement in presentations when the videos were viewed for the first time (p=0.032). There was no difference when the presentations were summed for the entire rotation (p=0.671). The reliable (alpha=0.97) survey indicated that the videos were a useful teaching tool and gave students more confidence in their presentations. Medical student patient presentations were improved with the use of mobile instructional videos following first time use, suggesting mobile learning videos may be useful in medical student education. Clinical educators should consider whether, in an instance where live bedside or direct interactive teaching is unavailable, using just-in-time educational videos on a handheld device might be useful as a supplemental instructional strategy.

  6. Rituals in Death and Dying: Modern Medical Technologies Enter the Fray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of immortality, the human species has over the millennia developed rites and rituals to help in the passing of life to honor the person who is dying or has died or in some way demonstrate their “courage” and perseverance as well as duty even in the face of almost certain death. The centuries-old traditions of the gathering of loved ones, the chanting of prayers, the ritual religious blessings are in the process of being replaced by the “miracles” of modern medical technology.

  7. Nurses' Perceptions of the Impact of Work Systems and Technology on Patient Safety during the Medication Administration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher Gordon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines nurses' perceptions of the impacts of systems and technology utilized during the medication administration process on patient safety and the culture of medication error reporting. This exploratory research study was grounded in a model of patient safety based on Patricia Benner's Novice to Expert Skill Acquisition model,…

  8. Nurses' Perceptions of the Impact of Work Systems and Technology on Patient Safety during the Medication Administration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher Gordon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines nurses' perceptions of the impacts of systems and technology utilized during the medication administration process on patient safety and the culture of medication error reporting. This exploratory research study was grounded in a model of patient safety based on Patricia Benner's Novice to Expert Skill…

  9. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  10. Nurses' Perceptions of the Impact of Work Systems and Technology on Patient Safety during the Medication Administration Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher Gordon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines nurses' perceptions of the impacts of systems and technology utilized during the medication administration process on patient safety and the culture of medication error reporting. This exploratory research study was grounded in a model of patient safety based on Patricia Benner's Novice to Expert Skill Acquisition model,…

  11. Evaluating the Impact of Information Technology Tools to Support the Asthma Medical Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matiz, L Adriana; Robbins-Milne, Laura; Krause, M Christine; Peretz, Patricia J; Rausch, John C

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the impact of information technology tools on the outcomes of children with asthma in the medical home. A registry was established for children aged 4 to 18 years with an ICD-9 code for asthma. Changes to the electronic health record included modifications to notes, care plans, and orders. A retrospective analysis of emergency department and in-patient utilization for a cohort of patients was conducted from July 2009 through June 2013. Of the study population (n = 1217), 65% had a classification of asthma severity and 63% were risk-stratified. Seventy percent had a control assessment at least once. Care plan use increased from 5% to 22% and enrollment in care coordination increased from 0.1% to 4%. After 3 years, there was a reduction of emergency department and inpatient admissions for asthma (P information technology tools was associated with improved asthma outcomes.

  12. Analysis of the impact of medical technology assessment subjects on BME curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Licona, Fabiola; Azpiroz Leehan, Joaquín; Méndez, Miguel Cadena; Sacristán Rock, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents and analyzes the factors that have arisen on the implementation of the medical technology assessment and management courses, and the academic methodologies used to deal with them. Five courses that cover topics as Technology Management, Health Economics, Quality Assessment, Innovation and Entrepreneurship were designed as electives for BME curriculum and have been taught for the last two years. The activities carried out within the courses are described and their impact on the comprehension of the course contents are presented. Also, several elements and factors pertaining to the teaching-learning process are discussed. Future perspectives for the students that follow this sub-specialty branch of the BME curriculum are presented.

  13. Finding Biomedical Information. A Learning Module for Medical Technology Students on the Basics of the Use of Medical Literature in the Shiffman Medical Library, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Barton B.; Rizzo, Joseph F.

    This self-instructional library workbook was used in a series of workshops--sponsored by the Medical Technology Department in Wayne State University's College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions--in order to reduce attrition by increasing the probability of success for academically high-risk students in the professional medical technology…

  14. Rough-Set-Based Attribute Dependencies: Foundations and Bio-Medical Data Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dominik Slezak

    2006-01-01

    Theory of rough sets, proposed by Zdzislaw Pawlak in 1982, is a model of approximate reasoning. In applications, rough set methodology focuses on approximate representation of knowledge derivable from data. It leads to significant results in many areas including, for example, finance, industry, multimedia, medicine, and most recently bioinformatics. One of the key notions of rough sets is a reduct, an optimal subset of attributes providing enough information about pre-defined target concepts or whole data sources. Proposed originally within the framework of rough set approximations, it was extended regarding different application needs, using concepts of, for example, Boolean reasoning, Bayesian reasoning, and information theory. There have been developed efficient tools extracting reducts from data, based, for instance, on greedy heuristics and evolutionary algorithms. In this talk, we present foundations of rough sets, as well as current trends in rough-setbased attribute reduction, understood as the means for representation of multi-attribute approximate dependencies in real-world data. We pay a special attention to case studies of rough set applications to bio-medical problems, including MRI segmentation, geneexpression data analysis, as well as the cancer therapy survival analysis.

  15. Evaluating interactive computer-based scenarios designed for learning medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Johanna; Dalholm, Elisabeth Hornyánszky; Wallergård, Mattias; Johansson, Gerd

    2014-11-01

    The use of medical equipment is growing in healthcare, resulting in an increased need for resources to educate users in how to manage the various devices. Learning the practical operation of a device is one thing, but learning how to work with the device in the actual clinical context is more challenging. This paper presents a computer-based simulation prototype for learning medical technology in the context of critical care. Properties from simulation and computer games have been adopted to create a visualization-based, interactive and contextually bound tool for learning. A participatory design process, including three researchers and three practitioners from a clinic for infectious diseases, was adopted to adjust the form and content of the prototype to the needs of the clinical practice and to create a situated learning experience. An evaluation with 18 practitioners showed that practitioners were positive to this type of tool for learning and that it served as a good platform for eliciting and sharing knowledge. Our conclusion is that this type of tools can be a complement to traditional learning resources to situate the learning in a context without requiring advanced technology or being resource-demanding.

  16. Information technology leadership in academic medical centers: a tale of four cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, C P

    1999-07-01

    Persons and groups within academic medical centers bring consistent and predictable viewpoints to planning and decision making. The varied professional and academic cultures of these individuals appear to account primarily for the diversity of their viewpoints. Understanding these professional cultures can help leaders achieve some predictability in the complex environments for which they are responsible. Leaders in information technology in particular, in order to be successful, must become part-time anthropologists, immersing themselves in the varied workplaces of their constituents to understand the work they do and the cultures that have grown up around this work. Only in this way will they be able to manage the challenges that arise continuously as the technology and the needs it can address change over time. In this article, the author briefly describes the concept of culture, portrays four specific professional cultures that typically coexist in academic medical centers, and argues that understanding these cultures is absolutely critical to effective management and use of information resources.

  17. A dual use case study of space technologies for terrestrial medical applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozmuta, Ioana

    2017-05-01

    Many challenges exist in understanding the human body as a whole, its adaptability, its resilience, its immunological response, its healing and regeneration power. New knowledge is usually obtained by exploring unique conditions and environments and space is one such variable. Primarily, these attributes have been studied in space for the purpose of understanding the effect of the space environment on long duration space travel. However a myriad of lessons learned have emerged that are important for terrestrial medicine problems such as cardiovascular changes, intracranial pressure changes, vision changes, reduced immunity, etc. For medical study purposes, the changes induced by the space environment on the human body are in general fast and predictable; they persist while in the space environment but also revert to the initial pre-flight healthy state upon return to Earth. This provides a unique cycle to study wellness and disease prediction as well as to develop more effective countermeasures for the benefit of people on earth. At a scientific level, the environment of space can be used to develop new lines of investigations and new knowledge to push the terrestrial state of the art (i.e. study of phase diagrams, identification of new system's states, etc). Moreover, the specialized requirements for space medicine have driven advances in terrestrial medical technologies in areas such as monitoring, diagnostic, prevention and treatment. This talk will provide an overview of compelling examples in key areas of interest for terrestrial medical applications.

  18. e-Learning in medical education Guide 32 Part 2: Technology, management and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Ken; Ellaway, Rachel

    2008-06-01

    With e-learning now part of the medical education mainstream, both educational and practical technical and informatics skills have become an essential part of the medical teacher's portfolio. The Guide is intended to help teachers develop their skills in working in the new online educational environments, and to ensure that they appreciate the wider changes and developments that accompany this 'information revolution'. The Guide is divided into two parts, of which this is the second. The first part introduced the basic concepts of e-learning, e-teaching, and e-assessment, the day-to-day issues of e-learning, looking both at theoretical concepts and practical implementation issues. This second part covers topics such as practical knowledge of the forms of technology used in e-learning, the behaviours of teachers and learners in online environments and the design of e-learning content and activities. It also deals with broader concepts of the politics and psychology of e-learning, as well as many of its ethical, legal and economical dimensions, and it ends with a review of emerging forms and directions in e-learning in medical education.

  19. Application of RFID technology in patient tracking and medication traceability in emergency care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, María; Cabrero-Canosa, Mariano; Vizoso Hermida, José; Carrajo García, Lino; Llamas Gómez, Daniel; Vázquez González, Guillermo; Martín Herranz, Isabel

    2012-12-01

    One of the most important factors that directly affects the quality of health care is patient safety. Minimize the occurrence of adverse events is one of the main challenges for health professionals. This requires continuous tracking of the patient by different areas and services, a process known as traceability and proper patient identification and medication prescribed. This article presents an information system for patient tracking and drugs developed for the Emergency Department of Hospital A Coruña. The systems use RFID technology to perform various tasks: (1) locate patients in different areas; (2) measure patient care times and waiting times; (3) identify unitary doses of medication; and (4) ensure the correct matching between the patient and the medication prescribed by the doctor. The hardware infrastructure as well as the optimal configuration of devices interconnected via a wireless network was determined by conducting a detailed coverage study. To support all the functionality needed, specific tools were designed and integrated with proprietary software applications. The RFID system was evaluated positively by staff from different professional profiles involved in its development or subsequent implementation.

  20. Academic medical product development: an emerging alliance of technology transfer organizations and the CTSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Lynn M; Everts, Maaike; Heller, Caren; Burke, Christine; Hafer, Nathaniel; Steele, Scott

    2014-12-01

    To bring the benefits of science more quickly to patient care, the NIH National Center Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) supports programs that enhance the development, testing, and implementation of new medical products and procedures. The NCATS clinical and translational science award (CTSA) program is central to that mission; creating an academic home for clinical and translational science and supporting those involved in the discovery and development of new health-related inventions. The technology transfer Offices (TTO) of CTSA-funded universities can be important partners in the development process; facilitating the transfer of medical research to the commercial sector for further development and ultimately, distribution to patients. The Aggregating Intellectual Property (IP) Working Group (AWG) of the CTSA public private partnerships key function committee (PPP-KFC) developed a survey to explore how CTSA-funded institutions currently interface with their respective TTOs to support medical product development. The results suggest a range of relationships across institutions; approximately half have formal collaborative programs, but only a few have well-connected programs. Models of collaborations are described and provided as examples of successful CTSA/TTO partnerships that have increased the value of health-related inventions as measured by follow-on funding and industry involvement; either as a consulting partner or licensee.

  1. 医疗技术之“善”%The “Good” in the Medical Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨萍; 徐玉梅

    2011-01-01

    医疗技术作为一门科学与技术,对于维系人类生命健康有着举足轻重的作用.医疗技术既可以用来为善,也可以用来为恶.人是道德主体,对于技术的应用存在着道德取向.医学技术不应该只是冷冰冰的机械式操作,医疗诊治过程也不只是单纯的技术活动,而应体现出浓厚的人文情怀.在市场经济条件下,医疗技术如何为“善”,值得深思.%As a kind of science and technology, medical technology plays an important role in maintaining human life and health. In addition, medical technology not only can be used for good, but also can be used for (bad) evil. One who is the main body of morality determines the moral orientation of the technology. Medical technology should not just frosty machinery and the medical diagnosis and treatment process is not a simply technical activity, but should reflect a rich cultural feelings. Under the conditions of market economy, it is worth pondering how the medical technology to be for " good" .

  2. Emerging Use of Early Health Technology Assessment in Medical Product Development: A Scoping Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    IJzerman, Maarten J; Koffijberg, Hendrik; Fenwick, Elisabeth; Krahn, Murray

    2017-07-01

    Early health technology assessment is increasingly being used to support health economic evidence development during early stages of clinical research. Such early models can be used to inform research and development about the design and management of new medical technologies to mitigate the risks, perceived by industry and the public sector, associated with market access and reimbursement. Over the past 25 years it has been suggested that health economic evaluation in the early stages may benefit the development and diffusion of medical products. Early health technology assessment has been suggested in the context of iterative economic evaluation alongside phase I and II clinical research to inform clinical trial design, market access, and pricing. In addition, performing early health technology assessment was also proposed at an even earlier stage for managing technology portfolios. This scoping review suggests a generally accepted definition of early health technology assessment to be "all methods used to inform industry and other stakeholders about the potential value of new medical products in development, including methods to quantify and manage uncertainty". The present review also aimed to identify recent published empirical studies employing an early-stage assessment of a medical product. With most included studies carried out to support a market launch, the dominant methodology was early health economic modeling. Further methodological development is required, in particular, by combining systems engineering and health economics to manage uncertainty in medical product portfolios.

  3. Application of RFID Technology in Medical Management%RFID技术在医疗管理中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史今驰; 于敏; 王彦

    2012-01-01

    从实用的角度分析了RFID技术在医疗管理中的可行性,简要阐述了RFID的控制、存储以及通信电路,在此基础上分别介绍了医疗设备管理和患者信息管理的RFID技术具体应用,最后通过对上位机通信终端和医疗管理信息平台的设计,构成了以RFID技术为核心的医疗管理系统,提高了医护人员的工作效率,降低了医疗事故和医疗成本,保证了医疗系统运行的安全性.%The feasibility of RFID technology in medical management is analyzed from a practical point. The control, storage and communication circuit of RFID is described briefly. On this basis, the application of RFID technology in medical equipment management and patient's information management is introduced respectively. At last, through the design of the upper machine communication terminal and medical management information platform, the medical management system using RFID technology as the core is constructed, which improves the working efficiency of the medical staff, reduces the medical malpractice and medical costs, and ensures the running security of the health care system. [Chinese Medical Equipment Journal, 2012,33(6):120-122

  4. Video chat technology to remotely quantify dietary, supplement, and medication adherence in clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Courtney M.; Apolzan, John W.; Wright, Courtney; Martin, Corby K.

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a pair of studies to test the validity, reliability, feasibility, and acceptability of using video chat technology as a novel method to quantify dietary and pill-taking (i.e., supplement and medication) adherence. In the first study, we investigated whether video chat technology can accurately quantify adherence to dietary and pill-taking interventions. Mock study participants ate food items and swallowed pills while performing randomized scripted “cheating” behaviors design to mimic non-adherence. Monitoring was conducted in a crossover design, with two monitors watching in-person and two watching remotely by Skype on a smartphone. For the second study, a 22-question online survey was sent to an email listserv with more than 20,000 unique email addresses of past and present study participants to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the technology. For the dietary adherence tests, monitors detected 86% of non-adherent events (sensitivity) in-person versus 78% of events via video chat monitoring (p=0.12), with comparable inter-rater agreement (0.88 vs. 0.85; p=0.62). However, for pill-taking, non-adherence trended towards being more easily detected in-person than by video chat (77% vs. 60%; p=0.08), with non-significantly higher inter-rater agreement (0.85 vs. 0.69; p=0.21). Survey results from the second study (N=1,076 respondents; at least a 5% response rate) indicated that 86.4% of study participants had video chatting hardware, 73.3% were comfortable using the technology; and 79.8% were willing to use it for clinical research. Given the capability of video chat technology to reduce participant burden and to outperform other adherence monitoring methods such as dietary self-report and pill counts, video chatting is a novel and highly promising platform to quantify dietary and pill-taking adherence. PMID:27753427

  5. Video chat technology to remotely quantify dietary, supplement and medication adherence in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Courtney M; Apolzan, John W; Wright, Courtney; Martin, Corby K

    2016-11-01

    We conducted two studies to test the validity, reliability, feasibility and acceptability of using video chat technology to quantify dietary and pill-taking (i.e. supplement and medication) adherence. In study 1, we investigated whether video chat technology can accurately quantify adherence to dietary and pill-taking interventions. Mock study participants ate food items and swallowed pills, while performing randomised scripted 'cheating' behaviours to mimic non-adherence. Monitoring was conducted in a cross-over design, with two monitors watching in-person and two watching remotely by Skype on a smartphone. For study 2, a twenty-two-item online survey was sent to a listserv with more than 20 000 unique email addresses of past and present study participants to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the technology. For the dietary adherence tests, monitors detected 86 % of non-adherent events (sensitivity) in-person v. 78 % of events via video chat monitoring (P=0·12), with comparable inter-rater agreement (0·88 v. 0·85; P=0·62). However, for pill-taking, non-adherence trended towards being more easily detected in-person than by video chat (77 v. 60 %; P=0·08), with non-significantly higher inter-rater agreement (0·85 v. 0·69; P=0·21). Survey results from study 2 (n 1076 respondents; ≥5 % response rate) indicated that 86·4 % of study participants had video chatting hardware, 73·3 % were comfortable using the technology and 79·8 % were willing to use it for clinical research. Given the capability of video chat technology to reduce participant burden and outperform other adherence monitoring methods such as dietary self-report and pill counts, video chatting is a novel and promising platform to quantify dietary and pill-taking adherence.

  6. Parents' descriptions of ideal home nursing care for their technology-dependent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Michele A

    2013-01-01

    Home care for technology-dependent children is one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. health care industry, but nursing literature lacks clear directions to guide home care nurses in planning a family-centered practice. The purpose of this study was to address this gap in the literature by eliciting descriptions of ideal home nursing care for technology-dependent children from the perspective of their parents. A qualitative, descriptive design with formal, semi-structured interviews was used. Seven participants (three couples and one mother) were interviewed. Data analysis revealed four components of ideal home nursing care: 1) competence in technical, assessment, clinical decision-making, and problem-solving skills; 2) a caring manner; 3) relinquishing control of the child's care to the parents; and 4) fitting in with the family and their routines. These findings have implications for both home care nurses and the care managers who supervise the care of children who are technology dependent and their families.

  7. Evolution and acceptability of medical applications of RFID implants among early users of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alan D

    2007-01-01

    RFID as a wireless identification technology that may be combined with microchip implants have tremendous potential in today's market. Although these implants have their advantages and disadvantages, recent improvements how allowed for implants designed for humans. Focus was given to the use of RFID tags and its effects on technology and CRM through a case study on VeriChip, the only corporation to hold the rights and the patent to the implantable chip for humans, and an empirically based study on working professionals to measure perceptions by early adopters of such technology. Through hypotheses-testing procedures, it was found that although some resistance to accept microchip implants was found in several applications, especially among gender, it was totally expected that healthcare and medical record keeping activities would be universally treated in a positive light and the use of authorities (namely governmental agencies) would be equally treated in a negative light by both sexes. Future trends and recommendations are presented along with statistical results collected through personal interviews.

  8. PROJECT-BASED LEARNING AS A TECHNOLOGY OF MEDICAL PERSONNEL TRAINING FOR MODERN SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мaria Rostislavovna Karpova

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Topicality of the present work is determined by implementation of new Federal state educational standards of higher professional education aimed at forming students’ competences as the main result of education. The objective of this article is to describe implementation and prospects of project-based learning at the medical university. Several educational projects are used in the microbiology course, which are directed to practicing procedures of the future professional activity as well as use of received knowledge for practical tasks fulfilling. Interdisciplinary project-based training in the specialty “Medical cybernetics” results in students developing automated workstations for medical personnel in hospitals. Advancement of students’ competences takes place in conditions of team work and self-dependent decision-making. In the course of project realization students gain experience in solving modeled and real tasks in a health care institution, which is important for their further adaptation in the labour-market.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-7-18

  9. Medical homes: "where you stand on definitions depends on where you sit".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Joshua R; Bolin, Jane N; Miller, Thomas R; Gamm, Larry D; Siegrist, Thomas E; Martinez, Luis E

    2010-08-01

    The medical home is a potentially transformative strategy to address issues of access, quality, and efficiency in the delivery of health care in the United States. While numerous organizations support a physician-driven definition, it is by no means the universally accepted definition. Several professional groups, payers, and researchers have offered differing, or nuanced, definitions of medical homes. This lack of consensus has contributed to uncertainty among providers about the medical home. We conducted a systematic review of the literature on the medical home and identified 29 professional, government, and academic sources offering definitions. While consensus appears to exist around a core of selected features, the medical home means different things to different people. The variation in definitions can be partly explained by the obligation of organizations to their members and whether the focus is on the patient or provider. Differences in definitions have implications at both the policy and practice levels.

  10. An Examination of Safety Management Systems and Aviation Technologies in the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Steven A.

    The Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) industry has a significant role in the transportation of injured patients, but has experienced more accidents than all other segments of the aviation industry combined. With the objective of addressing this discrepancy, this study assesses the effect of safety management systems implementation and aviation technologies utilization on the reduction of HEMS accident rates. Participating were 147 pilots from Federal Aviation Regulations Part 135 HEMS operators, who completed a survey questionnaire based on the Safety Culture and Safety Management System Survey (SCSMSS). The study assessed the predictor value of SMS implementation and aviation technologies to the frequency of HEMS accident rates with correlation and multiple linear regression. The correlation analysis identified three significant positive relationships. HEMS years of experience had a high significant positive relationship with accident rate (r=.90; pNVG) (r=.38; pNVG, TAWS, and SMS, HEMS years of experience explained 81.4% of the variance in accident rate scores (p<.05), and HEMS years of experience was found to be a significant predictor of accident rates (p<.05). Additional quantitative regression analysis was recommended to replicate the results of this study and to consider the influence of these variables for continued reduction of HEMS accidents, and to induce execution of SMS and aviation technologies from a systems engineering application. Recommendations for practice included the adoption of existing regulatory guidance for a SMS program. A qualitative analysis was also recommended for future study SMS implementation and HEMS accident rate from the pilot's perspective. A quantitative longitudinal study would further explore inferential relationships between the study variables. Current strategies should include the increased utilization of available aviation technology resources as this proactive stance may be beneficial for the establishment of

  11. Preferance of computer technology for analytical support of large database of medical information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biryukov А.P.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the use of intelligent technologies for analytical support of large databases of medical information systems. Material and methods. We used the techniques of object-oriented software design and database design. Results. Based on expert review of models and algorithms for analysis of clinical and epidemiological data and principles of knowledge representation in large-scale health information systems, data mining schema were implemented in the software package of the register of Research Center n.a. A. I. Burnazyan of Russia. Identified areas for effective implementation of abstract data model of EAV and procedures Data Maning for the design of database of biomedical registers. Conclusions. Using intelligent software platform that supports different sets of APIs and object models for different operations in different software environments, allows you to build and maintain an information system through the procedures of data biomedical processing.

  12. Antimicrobial Treatment of Polymeric Medical Devices by Silver Nanomaterials and Related Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polívková, Markéta; Hubáček, Tomáš; Staszek, Marek; Švorčík, Václav; Siegel, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial biocompatible polymers form a group of highly desirable materials in medicinal technology that exhibit interesting thermal and mechanical properties, and high chemical resistance. There are numerous types of polymers with antimicrobial activity or antimicrobial properties conferred through their proper modification. In this review, we focus on the second type of polymers, especially those whose antimicrobial activity is conferred by nanotechnology. Nanotechnology processing is a developing area that exploits the antibacterial effects of broad-scale compounds, both organic and inorganic, to form value-added medical devices. This work gives an overview of nanostructured antimicrobial agents, especially silver ones, used together with biocompatible polymers as effective antimicrobial composites in healthcare. The bactericidal properties of non-conventional antimicrobial agents are compared with those of conventional ones and the advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:28212308

  13. A new model for graduate education and innovation in medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Youseph; Acharya, Soumyadipta

    2013-09-01

    We describe a new model of graduate education in bioengineering innovation and design- a year long Master's degree program that educates engineers in the process of healthcare technology innovation for both advanced and low-resource global markets. Students are trained in an iterative "Spiral Innovation" approach that ensures early, staged, and repeated examination of all key elements of a successful medical device. This includes clinical immersion based problem identification and assessment (at Johns Hopkins Medicine and abroad), team based concept and business model development, and project planning based on iterative technical and business plan de-risking. The experiential, project based learning process is closely supported by several core courses in business, design, and engineering. Students in the program work on two team based projects, one focused on addressing healthcare needs in advanced markets and a second focused on low-resource settings. The program recently completed its fourth year of existence, and has graduated 61 students, who have continued on to industry or startups (one half), additional graduate education, or medical school (one third), or our own Global Health Innovation Fellowships. Over the 4 years, the program has sponsored 10 global health teams and 14 domestic/advanced market medtech teams, and launched 5 startups, of which 4 are still active. Projects have attracted over US$2.5M in follow-on awards and grants, that are supporting the continued development of over a dozen projects.

  14. The Effect of Physician and Hospital Market Structure on Medical Technology Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca-Mandic, Pinar; Town, Robert J; Wilcock, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    To examine the influence of physician and hospital market structures on medical technology diffusion, studying the diffusion of drug-eluting stents (DESs), which became available in April 2003. Medicare claims linked to physician demographic data from the American Medical Association and to hospital characteristics from the American Hospital Association Survey. Retrospective claims data analyses. All fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who received a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a cardiac stent in 2003 or 2004. Each PCI record was joined to characteristics on the patient, the procedure, the cardiologist, and the hospital where the PCI was delivered. We accounted for the endogeneity of physician and hospital market structure using exogenous variation in the distances between patient, physician, and hospital locations. We estimated multivariate linear probability models that related the use of a DES in the PCI on market structure while controlling for patient, physician, and hospital characteristics. DESs diffused faster in markets where cardiology practices faced more competition. Conversely, we found no evidence that the structure of the hospital market mattered. Competitive pressure to maintain or expand PCI volume shares compelled cardiologists to adopt DESs more quickly. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. Evaluating the clinical teaching of medical imaging students at Curtin University of Technology, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohiy, H M; Davidson, R

    2011-01-01

    To ascertain the effectiveness of the clinical, tutorial-based component of teaching and the clinical assessment method in the Bachelor of Medical Imaging Science at Curtin University of Technology (CUT), Perth, Western Australia. In mid-2006, second- and third-year students enrolled in CUT's Medical Imaging Science degree were asked to complete a questionnaire assessing the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) evaluation program and clinical teaching. Thirty-three of 57 students answered questions about demographics and their opinions of the laboratory sessions, clinical placements and the OSCEs. Seventy-six per cent of students were satisfied with their laboratory sessions and clinical placements. Sixty-four percent of respondents indicated that the OSCE was not an objective evaluation, but 82% of students felt the OSCE was an effective test of their radiography skills and knowledge, and believed that they were able to evaluate and care for a patient during the OSCE. Overall, the surveyed students believed that the practical skills explored in laboratory sessions helped improve clinical training outcomes; however, only 33% of the students were satisfied that the OSCE was an appropriate assessment of their clinical training in hospitals.

  16. A Technology Acceptance Model for Inter-Organisational Electronic Medical Records Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Handy

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the findings of the first stage of an ongoing, longitudinal study into the implementation of an interorganisational electronic medical records (EMR system. The study adapted and expanded Davis' (1993 technology acceptance model (TAM to investigate the attitudes of primary care practitioners towards a proposed system for maternity patients. All doctors and midwives holding maternity care contracts with a large urban hospital in New Zealand were sent a questionnaire soliciting their views on a planned EMR system linking the hospital and the primary care sectors. The results showed that whilst Davis' two key factors of perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness were important to medical professionals, another key factor, perceived system acceptability, which concerns control and management of information is vitally important to the acceptance of the system. The study also showed that the two groups of professionals had differing requirements due to different levels of experience and practice computerisation. Finally, the research highlights a number of wider organisational issues particularly relevant to the use of inter organisational systems in general and healthcare systems in particular.

  17. Education of hand rubbing technique to prospective medical staff, employing UV-based digital imaging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehotsky, Ákos; Szilágyi, László; Demeter-Iclănzan, Annamária; Haidegger, Tamás; Wéber, György

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively assess the hand hygiene performance of medical students. Hand rubbing technique was evaluated by employing innovative UV-light-based imaging technology, identifying patterns and trends in missed areas after applying WHO's six-step protocol. This specially designed hand hygiene education and assessment program targeted 1,344 medical students at two distant sites in Central Europe. Students were introduced to a short video, presenting the basics of hand hygiene, and then received further demonstration from professional trainers, focusing on the correct execution of WHO's six-step technique. To verify the acquired skill, participants rubbed their hands with UV-marked alcohol-based solution. Digital images of the hands were recorded under UV light, followed by computer evaluation and assessment. Immediate objective visual feedback was given to the participants showing missed areas on their hands. The statistical analysis of missed spots was based on retrospective expert-driven manual evaluation. Significant difference in rubbing quality was found between female and male participants [35.3% (CI 95%: 33-38%) versus 29.0% (CI 95%: 27-31%), p hands [43.4% (CI 95%: 39-48%) versus 34.9% (CI 95%: 32-38%), p = 0.002], and various zones of the hands' dorsal side. Based on the participants' feedback and the evaluation of the infection control specialists, it can be stated that the identification of typically missed patterns and the instant visual feedback have a vital role in improving the hand hygiene technique of prospective medical staff.

  18. Building Irish families through surrogacy: medical and judicial issues for the advanced reproductive technologies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sills, Eric Scott

    2008-01-01

    Surrogacy involves one woman (surrogate mother) carrying a child for another person\\/s (commissioning person\\/couple), based on a mutual agreement requiring the child to be handed over to the commissioning person\\/couple following birth. Reasons for seeking surrogacy include situations where a woman has non-functional or absent reproductive organs, or as a remedy for recurrent pregnancy loss. Additionally, surrogacy may find application in any medical context where pregnancy is contraindicated, or where a couple consisting of two males seek to become parents through oocyte donation. Gestational surrogacy is one of the main issues at the forefront of bioethics and the advanced reproductive technologies, representing an important challenge to medical law. This analysis reviews the history of surrogacy and clinical and legal issues pertaining to this branch of reproductive medicine. Interestingly, the Medical Council of Ireland does not acknowledge surrogacy in its current practice guidelines, nor is there specific legislation addressing surrogacy in Ireland at present. We therefore have developed a contract-based model for surrogacy in which, courts in Ireland may consider when confronted with a surrogacy dispute, and formulated a system to resolve any potential dispute arising from a surrogacy arrangement. While the 2005 report by the Commission on Assisted Human Reproduction (CAHR) is an expert opinion guiding the Oireachtas\\' development of specific legislation governing assisted human reproduction and surrogacy, our report represents independent scholarship on the contractual elements of surrogacy with particular focus on how Irish courts might decide on surrogacy matters in a modern day Ireland. This joint medico-legal collaborative also reviews the contract for services arrangement between the commissioning person\\/s and the surrogate, and the extent to which the contract may be enforced.

  19. Quality management of medical education at the Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieter, Peter Erich

    2008-12-01

    The Carl Gustav Carus Faculty of Medicine, University of Technology Dresden, Germany, was founded in 1993 after the reunification of Germany. In 1999, a reform process of medical education was started together with Harvard Medical International. The traditional teacher and discipline-centred curriculum was replaced by a student-centred, interdisciplinary and integrative curriculum which has been named DIPOL (Dresden Integrative Patient/Problem- Oriented Learning). The reform process was accompanied and supported by a parallel-ongoing Faculty Development Program. In 2004, a Quality Management Program in medical education was implemented, and in 2005 medical education received DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification. Quality Management Program and DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 certification were/are unique for the 34 medical schools in Germany. The students played a very important strategic role in all processes. They were/are members in all committees like the Faculty Board, the Board of Study Affairs (with equal representation) and the ongoing audits in the Quality Management Program. Students are the only ones who experience all years of the curriculum and are capable of detecting, for example gaps, overlaps, inconsistencies of the curriculum and assessments. Therefore, the in-depth knowledge of students about the medical school's curriculum is a very helpful and essential tool in curriculum reform processes and Quality Management Programs of medical education. The reform in medical education, the establishment of the Quality Management program and the certification resulted in an improvement of quality and output of medical education and medical research.

  20. The role of telemedicine and information technology in the redevelopment of medical systems: The case of Kosova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifi, Rifat; Muja, Shaip; Bekteshi, Flamur; Merrell, Ronald C

    2006-06-01

    The medical system of Kosova was largely destroyed in 1999 by the departing Serbian forces, leaving behind Albanian physicians systematically excluded from advanced medical services for a decade and medical facilities severely damaged in the course of departure in a region with an infrastructure fragmented over the years. The medical system of Kosova can be analyzed for the effectiveness of the many efforts following the disruption of medical care in the 1990s. In this paper, the application of telemedicine and information is recounted. The medical system of Kosova was offered the concept of the International Virtual E-Hospital and this model was used to support, supplement, and guide a massive program development that involved essentially every physician and medical personnel in the region. Currently, the Telemedicine Center of Kosova (TCK) is providing information resources for medical education programs within the Kosova's medical system as well as regional and international consultations and collaboration. Furthermore, it is developing the human resources that will lead and implement telemedicine programs in this region and making serious strides in the redevelopment of medical systems using information technology.

  1. Investigating Pharmacovigilance Challenges by Nurses of Hospitals Dependent on Medical Sciences University of Ahvaz City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Cheraghi Seyfabad,

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present research was conducted in 2015 with purpose of determining pharmacovigilance challenges by nurses of Ahvaz hospitals. The method of research was descriptive and analytical. Research population included nurses of hospitals dependent on Medical Sciences University of Ahvaz that contained 8 hospitals. The number of research samples was estimated to be 259 persons. And data collection tool was a researcher-made questionnaire which evaluated 7 aspects of nurses’ drug safety issues; and in order to analyze questions the mean value of questions was calculated using SPSS Version 20 Software. Research findings showed that nurses were mostly women and married, had university degree of B.A and have participated in training courses in relation to drug safety issues. Most members of working shift were busy with working and employment of most of them was contractual. The main challenges were respectively as following: the field of record and report-writing with mean and standard deviation of observing drug safety standards score as equal to 17/96±17/41; the field of after drug treatment with mean and standard deviation of observing drug safety standards score as equal to18/28±2/42; the field of pharmaceutical services management with mean and standard deviation of observing drug safety standards score as equal to 24/58±2/76; field of patient preparation with mean and standard deviation of observing drug safety standards score as equal to 27/78±2/62; field drug provision with mean and standard deviation of observing drug safety standards score as equal to 35/67±2/87; field of receiving pharmaceutical orders with mean and standard deviation of observing drug safety standards score as equal to 40/12±3/19 and maintenance and preparation of drug with mean and standard deviation of observing drug safety standards score as equal to 42/21±4/22. The highest challenge was related to record and report-writing index and the lowest challenge was

  2. CYBER ADDICTION: THE ROLE OF EMOTIONS IN DEPENDENCE ON DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Cabral Azevedo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research apply concepts from different areas, aiming to provide a multicausal and dialogical perspective on the nosologic process of dependence upon digital technologies and the influences of motivational and emotional mechanisms on learning compulsive behaviors. The data is approached both qualitatively and quantitatively, since its analysis covers the conceptual factors obtained from literature review and the development of statistical results obtained from the questionnaires applied. This brief theoretical research pursues to reveal pathological behaviors in the use of digital technologies, especially in the actions of internet users in online social networks. The parameters of neuropsychology, psychology, psychiatry are combined with descriptions contained in the DSM V, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, and the ICD 10, International Compendium of Diseases.

  3. Conference Report: International Conference on Health Sciences and Medical Technologies, Tlemcen, Algeria 27-29 September 2016 ICHSMT'16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khelassi, Abdeldjalil

    2016-10-01

    The International Conference on Health Sciences and Medical Technologies (ICHSMT'16) was held in Tlemcen, Algeria from 27-29 September 2016. The conference was organized by the University Of Tlemcen, in partnership with Electronic Physician Journal, Mehr Publishing, and Mehrafarin Scientific Publishing. There were participants from 14 nations who presented their research in poster or oral presentations. There were also some keynote speakers who gave talks on topics such as community health, ethics of publishing medical research, and scientific writing.

  4. Realization of a universal patient identifier for electronic medical records through biometric technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, D C; Pons, Alexander P; Asfour, Shihab S

    2009-07-01

    The technology exists for the migration of healthcare data from its archaic paper-based system to an electronic one, and, once in digital form, to be transported anywhere in the world in a matter of seconds. The advent of universally accessible healthcare data has benefited all participants, but one of the outstanding problems that must be addressed is how the creation of a standardized nationwide electronic healthcare record system in the United States would uniquely identify and match a composite of an individual's recorded healthcare information to an identified individual patients out of approximately 300 million people to a 1:1 match. To date, a few solutions to this problem have been proposed that are limited in their effectiveness. We propose the use of biometric technology within our fingerprint, iris, retina scan, and DNA (FIRD) framework, which is a multiphase system whose primary phase is a multilayer consisting of these four types of biometric identifiers: 1) fingerprint; 2) iris; 3) retina scan; and 4) DNA. In addition, it also consists of additional phases of integration, consolidation, and data discrepancy functions to solve the unique association of a patient to their medical data distinctively. This would allow a patient to have real-time access to all of their recorded healthcare information electronically whenever it is necessary, securely with minimal effort, greater effectiveness, and ease.

  5. Advantages of genome sequencing by long-read sequencer using SMRT technology in medical area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazuma; Shiroma, Akino; Shimoji, Makiko; Tamotsu, Hinako; Ashimine, Noriko; Ohki, Shun; Shinzato, Misuzu; Minami, Maiko; Nakanishi, Tetsuhiro; Teruya, Kuniko; Satou, Kazuhito; Hirano, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    PacBio RS II is the first commercialized third-generation DNA sequencer able to sequence a single molecule DNA in real-time without amplification. PacBio RS II's sequencing technology is novel and unique, enabling the direct observation of DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase. PacBio RS II confers four major advantages compared to other sequencing technologies: long read lengths, high consensus accuracy, a low degree of bias, and simultaneous capability of epigenetic characterization. These advantages surmount the obstacle of sequencing genomic regions such as high/low G+C, tandem repeat, and interspersed repeat regions. Moreover, PacBio RS II is ideal for whole genome sequencing, targeted sequencing, complex population analysis, RNA sequencing, and epigenetics characterization. With PacBio RS II, we have sequenced and analyzed the genomes of many species, from viruses to humans. Herein, we summarize and review some of our key genome sequencing projects, including full-length viral sequencing, complete bacterial genome and almost-complete plant genome assemblies, and long amplicon sequencing of a disease-associated gene region. We believe that PacBio RS II is not only an effective tool for use in the basic biological sciences but also in the medical/clinical setting.

  6. Use of iPod™ technology in medical-surgical nursing courses: effect on grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Robert; Hepworth, Joseph; Goldsmith, Melissa; Lacasse, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    Advances in computer technology, such as the portable and affordable iPod™, allow students to view lectures anywhere at any time. iPods™ are of special interest for nurse educators who strive to meet demands posed by a critical nursing shortage. A mixed-methods pilot study was conducted to assess whether iPod™ could be an effective teaching tool for medical-surgical nursing lectures. In a randomized study with 35 participants, together with eight students having their own iPods™, grades of students given pre-recorded class lectures on iPods™ were compared with grades of those who attended lectures without iPods™. Learning styles, amount and use of students devoted to iPod™ lectures were considered as well as grades. Most results were not significant, but there was some evidence that the control groups who attended classroom lectures received better grades than iPod™ users, and individuals who used iPod™ more frequently before the final exam received lower grades. These somewhat surprising results suggest the need for further research in the use of this technology as a resource for nursing education delivery.

  7. Determination of dependence of feed intake level on functional and technological parameters of prescription mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aksenova O. I.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of the development of pet food formulations in the conditions of information uncertainty which is characteristic of an actual business enterprise engaged in production of feed has been considered in the paper. The analysis of the literature [1–4] has shown that the main works are devoted to the extrusion of plastics and cereal products, with the temperature conditions equal to 130–200 ºC. This temperature range is not suitable for the production of pet food, and researches on this issue are virtually absent. This study is devoted to defining the functional and technological parameters of prescription mixture depending on the level of feed intake by unproductive animals; this knowledge will allow manufacturers to simplify the development of new formulations of balanced feed. Identification of this relationship has been carried out on the basis of modeling methods of mathematical statistics in Excel and Mathcad packages, as well as on the basis of fuzzy logic set theory in MatLAB package, as the construction of a complete mathematical model is complicated by absence of an explicit numerical form of the result received on the basis of sensory analysis. The research has revealed the dependence of feed intake level on functional and technological parameters of prescription mix for non-productive animals, in particular, the highest level of animal feed intake will be achieved at the following values of the main parameters: pH – 6.5; the moisture – 9 %; the protein concentration – 85 %; the particle size – 0.55 mm; the energy value – 267 kcal/100 g feed. The adequacy of the dependence for the input variables – the moisture feed and concentration of the protein component – is confirmed by the experimental investigations. This paper can be used to generate the optimal prescription composition for functional and technological characteristics of the samples in order to create balanced extruded feeds.

  8. Early bedside care during preclinical medical education: can technology-enhanced patient simulation advance the Flexnerian ideal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, James A; Hayden, Emily M; Ahmed, Rami A; Pawlowski, John B; Khoury, Kimberly N; Oriol, Nancy E

    2010-02-01

    Flexner wanted medical students to study at the patient bedside-a remarkable innovation in his time-so that they could apply science to clinical care under the watchful eye of senior physicians. Ever since his report, medical schools have reserved the latter years of their curricula for such an "advanced" apprenticeship, providing clinical clerkship experiences only after an initial period of instruction in basic medical sciences. Although Flexner codified the segregation of preclinical and clinical instruction, he was committed to ensuring that both domains were integrated into a modern medical education. The aspiration to fully integrate preclinical and clinical instruction continues to drive medical education reform even to this day. In this article, the authors revisit the original justification for sequential preclinical-clinical instruction and argue that modern, technology-enhanced patient simulation platforms are uniquely powerful for fostering simultaneous integration of preclinical-clinical content in a way that Flexner would have applauded. To date, medical educators tend to focus on using technology-enhanced medical simulation in clinical and postgraduate medical education; few have devoted significant attention to using immersive clinical simulation among preclinical students. The authors present an argument for the use of dynamic robot-mannequins in teaching basic medical science, and describe their experience with simulator-based preclinical instruction at Harvard Medical School. They discuss common misconceptions and barriers to the approach, describe their curricular responses to the technique, and articulate a unifying theory of cognitive and emotional learning that broadens the view of what is possible, feasible, and desirable with simulator-based medical education.

  9. Evaluation of medication errors with implementation of electronic health record technology in the medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao TV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available T Vivian Liao,1 Marina Rabinovich,2 Prasad Abraham,2 Sebastian Perez,3 Christiana DiPlotti,4 Jenny E Han,5 Greg S Martin,5 Eric Honig5 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy, Mercer Health Sciences Center, 2Department of Pharmacy and Clinical Nutrition, Grady Health System, 3Department of Surgery, Emory University, 4Pharmacy, Ingles Markets, 5Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA Purpose: Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU are at an increased risk for medication errors (MEs and adverse drug events from multifactorial causes. ME rate ranges from 1.2 to 947 per 1,000 patient days in the medical ICU (MICU. Studies with the implementation of electronic health records (EHR have concluded that it significantly reduced overall prescribing errors and the number of errors that caused patient harm decreased. However, other types of errors, such as wrong dose and omission of required medications increased after EHR implementation. We sought to compare the number of MEs before and after EHR implementation in the MICU, with additional evaluation of error severity.Patients and methods: Prospective, observational, quality improvement study of all patients admitted to a single MICU service at an academic medical center. Patients were evaluated during four periods over 2 years: August–September 2010 (preimplementation; period I, January–February 2011 (2 months postimplementation; period II, August–September 2012 (21 months postimplementation; period III, and January–February 2013 (25 months postimplementation; period IV. All medication orders and administration records were reviewed by an ICU clinical pharmacist and ME was defined as a deviation from established standards for prescribing, dispensing, administering, or documenting medication. The frequency and classification of MEs were compared between groups by chi square; p<0.05 was considered significant.Results: There was a statistically significant increase

  10. Factors Related to Depressive Symptoms in Mothers of Technology-Dependent Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toly, Valerie Boebel; Musil, Carol M

    2015-07-01

    Mothers caring for technology-dependent children at home often suffer clinically significant and unrecognized depressive symptoms. The study aim was to determine factors related to elevated depressive symptoms and provide information to target interventions that assists mothers in self-management of their mental health. Secondary data analysis from a descriptive, correlational study of 75 mothers was performed. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis results indicate that younger, unpartnered mothers with lower normalization efforts and personal resourcefulness, and less care hours, had increased depressive symptoms. The importance of personal resourcefulness and the potential for a resourcefulness training intervention to reduce depressive symptoms are discussed.

  11. Medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Practice Guidelines Resources Continuing Education Funding Training & Career Development Division of Intramural Research Research Resources Scientific Reports Technology Transfer What are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical Studies NHLBI Trials Clinical Trial Websites Press ...

  12. USING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN «BIOCHEMISTRY» TEACHING OF MEDICAL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Teplyashina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is the description of a teaching software and the use of educational technology used in the discipline «Biochemistry», and the analysis of its effectiveness.Methods. The methods used in the work: a survey of students, observation, use of services Web 2.0: 1 Google Docs – for the development of questionnaires and statistical accumulation of responses; 2 You tube – for the development and publication of educational videos; 3 mindmeister.com – to prepare the mental maps; 4 Designerhttp://learningapps.org – to develop the game tasks. Results and scientific novelty. The possibilities of information technologies are analysed; the services to help develop a teaching support the learning process on the subject «Biochemistry» are selected. The references to scientific portals on the topic of this course are systematized. Subjects that attract the greatest interest of students are revealed and designated: «Protein metabolism», «Carbohydrate metabolism», «The enzymes and their importance in laboratory diagnosis». According to the identified themes the elements of the educational and methodical maintenance of the discipline «Biochemistry» on the basis of relevant services Web 2.0 are developed and tested. The high interest of students in mastering the discipline represented by the elements is found out. The proposed guidelines for teaching the subject «Biochemistry» based on acombination of traditional forms of learning are combined with the active use ofthe capabilities of modern information technologies.Practical significance. Developed by the authors technique can be used in planning and conducting of group and team work of medical university students while studying the fundamental disciplines of the university, as well as in the process of enhancing the skills of general practitioners.

  13. Information and communication technologies in higher education: evidence-based practices in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valcke, Martin; De Wever, Bram

    2006-02-01

    In contrast to traditional meta-analyses of research, an alternative overview and analysis of the research literature on the impact of information and communication technologies (ICT) in medical education is presented in this article. A distinction is made between studies that have been set up at the micro-level of the teaching and learning situation and studies on meso-level issues. At the micro-level, ICT is hypothesized to foster three basic information processing activities: presentation, organization, and integration of information. Next to this, ICT is expected to foster collaborative learning in the medical knowledge domain. Empirical evidence supports the potential of ICT to introduce students to advanced graphical representations but the studies also stress the importance of prior knowledge and the need for real-life tactile and practical experiences. The number of empirical studies focusing on the impact of ICT on information organization is restricted but the results suggest a positive impact on student attitudes and relevant learning gains. However, again, students need a relevant level of prior knowledge. Empirical studies focusing on the impact of ICT on information integration highlight the positive impact of ICT-based assessment and computer simulations; for the latter this is especially the case when novices are involved, and when they master the prerequisite ICT skills. Little empirical evidence is available regarding the impact of computer games. Research results support the positive impact of ICT-based collaboration but care has to be taken when skills development is pursued. At the meso-level, the available empirical evidence highlights the positive impact of ICT to promote the efficiency of learning arrangements. Research grounds the key position of ICT in a state-of-the-art medical curriculum. Recent developments focusing on repositories of learning materials for medical education have yet not been evaluated. The article concludes by

  14. [Problematic issues and prospects of development of information and telecommunication technologies in the medical service of the Armed Forces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalachev, O V; Pershin, I V; Borisov, D N; Korneenkov, A A

    2014-12-01

    Medical information systems composed of many specialized modules help in synchronous solving of diagnostic, therapeutic, administrative, financial, statistical, and other tasks. According to the authors, the creation of a single information space of the medical service, integrating it into a single information space of the Defense Ministry of the Russian Fedaration, development and widespread use of telemedicine technology will significantly accelerate the integration in the daily activities of military hospitals of the latest achievements in medical science and practices consistent with the objectives of improving the military health care and improvement of the quality and accessibility of health care.

  15. Technology Access and Smartphone App Preferences for Medication Adherence in Adolescents and Young Adults With Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M; Thompson, Alexis A; Liem, Robert I

    2016-05-01

    Hydroxyurea is the only Food and Drug Administration approved medication for sickle cell disease (SCD) with short- and long-term benefits for both morbidity and mortality. However, hydroxyurea underutilization and adherence remain challenges for patients with SCD. The objectives of this study were to determine access to technology among adolescents and young adults (AYA) with SCD and to identify their preferred technology-based strategies for improving medication adherence. A cross-sectional survey was administered in a variety of clinical settings from October 2014 through May 2015 to AYA (12-22 years) with SCD (all genotypes) followed in a Comprehensive Sickle Cell Program. Eighty of 107 eligible participants completed the survey for a 75% response rate. Participants (51% female, 94% Black) had a mean age of 15.3 ± 2.8 years. Most participants (75%) were on a daily medication with about half on hydroxyurea. Forgetfulness (67%) was the most common barrier to medication adherence. The majority of participants (85%) owned smartphones and either owned or had access to electronic tablets (83%), laptops (72%), or desktops (70%). Of the proposed smartphone app features, daily medication reminders were ranked first most frequently, followed by education about SCD, adherence text prompts, education about SCD medications, and medication log. The majority of our AYA with SCD owned smartphones and had access to other electronic devices. Our survey results provided valuable insight into the preferred app features and optimal strategies for developing technology-based interventions, such as a multicomponent app, to increase medication adherence for AYA with SCD or other chronic conditions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. New Technology Provides Urgent Medical Information and Protects Privacy: Providing Important Information in Medical Situations for the Developmentally Disabled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Fernando Viesca has a 24-year-old son who suffers from Angelman Syndrome, a little known chromosomal disorder that has left him with significant functional deficiencies. When Nando lived at home, his father took care of him full time, thus alleviating any worries about medical care. However, now that Nando lives in a group home, his father is no…

  17. Does Wearable Medical Technology With Video Recording Capability Add Value to On-Call Surgical Evaluations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sameer; Boehme, Jacqueline; Manser, Kelly; Dewar, Jannine; Miller, Amie; Siddiqui, Gina; Schwaitzberg, Steven D

    2016-10-01

    Background Google Glass has been used in a variety of medical settings with promising results. We explored the use and potential value of an asynchronous, near-real time protocol-which avoids transmission issues associated with real-time applications-for recording, uploading, and viewing of high-definition (HD) visual media in the emergency department (ED) to facilitate remote surgical consults. Study Design First-responder physician assistants captured pertinent aspects of the physical examination and diagnostic imaging using Google Glass' HD video or high-resolution photographs. This visual media were then securely uploaded to the study website. The surgical consultation then proceeded over the phone in the usual fashion and a clinical decision was made. The surgeon then accessed the study website to review the uploaded video. This was followed by a questionnaire regarding how the additional data impacted the consultation. Results The management plan changed in 24% (11) of cases after surgeons viewed the video. Five of these plans involved decision making regarding operative intervention. Although surgeons were generally confident in their initial management plan, confidence scores increased further in 44% (20) of cases. In addition, we surveyed 276 ED patients on their opinions regarding concerning the practice of health care providers wearing and using recording devices in the ED. The survey results revealed that the majority of patients are amenable to the addition of wearable technology with video functionality to their care. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential value of a medically dedicated, hands-free, HD recording device with internet connectivity in facilitating remote surgical consultation.

  18. Learning new lines. New 'playbook' advises hospitals how to win bigger reimbursement for medical procedures that use expensive advanced technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark

    2003-07-28

    If hospitals' tough negotiating tactics with managed care often seem to be taken from an instruction manual, then that perception would be correct. Profiting From Innovation is a research group's latest report to its hospital clients, telling them just how to get managed-care plans to pay for pricey medical technology.

  19. Probability Elicitation to Inform Early Health Economic Evaluations of New Medical Technologies : A Case Study in Heart Failure Disease Management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Qi; Postmus, Douwe; Hillege, Hans L.; Buskens, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Early estimates of the commercial headroom available to a new medical device can assist producers of health technology in making appropriate product investment decisions. The purpose of this study was to illustrate how this quantity can be captured probabilistically by combining probabil

  20. Cloud Engineering Principles and Technology Enablers for Medical Image Processing-as-a-Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Shunxing; Plassard, Andrew J; Landman, Bennett A; Gokhale, Aniruddha

    2017-04-01

    Traditional in-house, laboratory-based medical imaging studies use hierarchical data structures (e.g., NFS file stores) or databases (e.g., COINS, XNAT) for storage and retrieval. The resulting performance from these approaches is, however, impeded by standard network switches since they can saturate network bandwidth during transfer from storage to processing nodes for even moderate-sized studies. To that end, a cloud-based "medical image processing-as-a-service" offers promise in utilizing the ecosystem of Apache Hadoop, which is a flexible framework providing distributed, scalable, fault tolerant storage and parallel computational modules, and HBase, which is a NoSQL database built atop Hadoop's distributed file system. Despite this promise, HBase's load distribution strategy of region split and merge is detrimental to the hierarchical organization of imaging data (e.g., project, subject, session, scan, slice). This paper makes two contributions to address these concerns by describing key cloud engineering principles and technology enhancements we made to the Apache Hadoop ecosystem for medical imaging applications. First, we propose a row-key design for HBase, which is a necessary step that is driven by the hierarchical organization of imaging data. Second, we propose a novel data allocation policy within HBase to strongly enforce collocation of hierarchically related imaging data. The proposed enhancements accelerate data processing by minimizing network usage and localizing processing to machines where the data already exist. Moreover, our approach is amenable to the traditional scan, subject, and project-level analysis procedures, and is compatible with standard command line/scriptable image processing software. Experimental results for an illustrative sample of imaging data reveals that our new HBase policy results in a three-fold time improvement in conversion of classic DICOM to NiFTI file formats when compared with the default HBase region split policy

  1. The geko™ electro-stimulation device for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis: a NICE medical technology guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Jennifer A; Clinch, James; Radhakrishnan, Muralikrishnan; Healy, Andy; McMillan, Viktoria; Morris, Elizabeth; Rua, Tiago; Ofuya, Mercy; Wang, Yanzhong; Dimmock, Paul W; Lewis, Cornelius; Peacock, Janet L; Keevil, Stephen F

    2015-04-01

    The geko™ device is a single-use, battery-powered, neuromuscular electrostimulation device that aims to reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) selected the geko™ device for evaluation, and invited the manufacturer, Firstkind Ltd, to submit clinical and economic evidence. King's Technology Evaluation Centre, an External Assessment Centre (EAC) commissioned by the NICE, independently assessed the evidence submitted. The sponsor submitted evidence related to the geko™ device and, in addition, included studies of other related devices as further clinical evidence to support a link between increased blood flow and VTE prophylaxis. The EAC assessed this evidence, conducted its own systematic review and concluded that there is currently limited direct evidence that geko™ prevents VTE. The sponsor's cost model is based on the assumption that patients with an underlying VTE risk and subsequently treated with geko™ will experience a reduction in their baseline risk. The EAC assessed this cost model but questioned the validity of some model assumptions. Using the EACs revised cost model, the cost savings for geko™ prophylaxis against a 'no prophylaxis' strategy were estimated as £197 per patient. Following a second public consultation, taking into account a change in the original draft recommendations, the NICE medical technologies guidance MTG19 was issued in June 2014. This recommended the adoption of the geko™ for use in people with a high risk of VTE and when other mechanical/pharmacological methods of prophylaxis are impractical or contraindicated in selected patients within the National Health Service in England.

  2. Research on cultivating medical students' self-learning ability using teaching system integrated with learning analysis technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hong; Wu, Cheng; He, Qian; Wang, Shi-Yong; Ma, Xiu-Qiang; Wang, Ri; Li, Bing; He, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Along with the advancement of information technology and the era of big data education, using learning process data to provide strategic decision-making in cultivating and improving medical students' self-learning ability has become a trend in educational research. Educator Abuwen Toffler said once, the illiterates in the future may not be the people not able to read and write, but not capable to know how to learn. Serving as educational institutions cultivating medical students' learning ability, colleges and universities should not only instruct specific professional knowledge and skills, but also develop medical students' self-learning ability. In this research, we built a teaching system which can help to restore medical students' self-learning processes and analyze their learning outcomes and behaviors. To evaluate the effectiveness of the system in supporting medical students' self-learning, an experiment was conducted in 116 medical students from two grades. The results indicated that problems in self-learning process through this system was consistent with problems raised from traditional classroom teaching. Moreover, the experimental group (using this system) acted better than control group (using traditional classroom teaching) to some extent. Thus, this system can not only help medical students to develop their self-learning ability, but also enhances the ability of teachers to target medical students' questions quickly, improving the efficiency of answering questions in class.

  3. Understanding the interrelationship of instructional technology use and organizational culture: a case study of a veterinary medical college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, Susan L; Harris, Edward L

    2005-01-01

    Many predicted that in the latter part of the twentieth century modern technology would revolutionize higher education and "create a second Renaissance" (Sculley J. The relationship between business and higher education: A perspective on the 21st century. Commun ACM32:1056-1061, 1989 p1061). However, as the reality of the twenty-first century has set in, it is apparent that these revolutionary prophecies have fallen short. Using the lens of Douglas's Typology of Grid and Group, this case study examines (1) the organizational context of a veterinary medical college at a large Midwestern university; (2) individual faculty members' preferences toward instructional technology use; and (3) the interrelationship of culture and the decision process to implement instructional technology use in curricula. The study has several implications for instructional technology use in veterinary medical educational settings that help explain how cultural context can guide leadership decisions as well as influence faculty motivation and preference. The findings suggest that a key mitigating factor to instructional technology implementation is conflict or concord between the cultural biases of faculty members and actual cultural identity of the college (Stansberry S, Harris EL. Understanding why faculty use (or don't use) IT: Implementation of instructional technology from an organizational culture perspective. In Simonson M, Crawford M, eds. 25th Annual Proceedings: Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the 2002 National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, vol. 1. North Miami Beach, FL: Nova Southeastern University:viii, 507).

  4. An Empirical Method of Detecting Time-Dependent Confounding: An Observational Study of Next Day Delirium in a Medical ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, T E; Van Ness, P H; Araujo, K L B; Pisani, M A

    Longitudinal research on older persons in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) is often complicated by the time-dependent confounding of concurrently administered interventions such as medications and intubation. Such temporal confounding can bias the respective longitudinal associations between concurrently administered treatments and a longitudinal outcome such as delirium. Although marginal structural models address time-dependent confounding, their application is non-trivial and preferably justified by empirical evidence. Using data from a longitudinal study of older persons in the MICU, we constructed a plausibility score from 0 - 10 where higher values indicate higher plausibility of time-dependent confounding of the association between a time-varying explanatory variable and an outcome. Based on longitudinal plots, measures of correlation, and longitudinal regression, the plausibility scores were compared to the differences in estimates obtained with non-weighted and marginal structural models of next day delirium. The plausibility scores of the three possible pairings of daily doses of fentanyl, haloperidol, and intubation indicated the following: low plausibility for haloperidol and intubation, moderate plausibility for fentanyl and haloperidol, and high plausibility for fentanyl and intubation. Comparing multivariable models of next day delirium with and without adjustment for time-dependent confounding, only intubation's association changed substantively. In our observational study of older persons in the MICU, the plausibility scores were generally reflective of the observed differences between coefficients estimated from non-weighted and marginal structural models.

  5. 2010 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Emergency Medical Technician. (Program CIP: 51.0904 - Emergency Medical Technology/Technician)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Lisa; Bryant, Katrina; Galtelli, Mark; Glasson, Kristi; Hall, David; Hood, Brenda; Mahaffey, Libby; McBryde, John; Read, John; Shirley, Gary; Wright, Al

    2010-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  6. Using technology to teach technology: design and evaluation of bilingual online physician education about electronic medical records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonson, Sarah R; Esquivel, Adol; Mokkarala, Pallavi; Johnson, Craig W; Phelps, Cynthia L

    2005-01-01

    The "EMR Tutorial" is designed to be a bilingual online physician education environment about electronic medical records. After iterative assessment and redesign, the tutorial was tested in two groups: U.S. physicians and Mexican medical students. Split-plot ANOVA revealed significantly different pre-test scores in the two groups, significant cognitive gains for the two groups overall, and no significant difference in the gains made by the two groups. Users rated the module positively on a satisfaction questionnaire.

  7. Temperature dependence of the Al2O3:C response in medical luminescence dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edmund, Jens Morgenthaler; Andersen, Claus Erik

    2007-01-01

    is not varied. The RL response only depends on the irradiation temperature. We recommend that calibration should be carried out at the same irradiation temperature at which the measurement is performed (i.e. at body temperature for in vivo measurements). The overall change in the integrated OSL and RL signals...... and detection wavelengths. The reported temperature dependence seems to be a general property of Al2O3:C. (C) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  8. [Experience of Collaborative Research through Department of Medical Instrumental Research and Technology in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Both of Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine which offers high, technical and safe medical treatment and Horiba, Ltd. which has small CBC analyzers in a core product established a joint research institute for development of advanced laboratory test analyzer from January 1, 2012 in Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine as the "advanced treatment hospital" where the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare has got approved. Clinical needs about analyzer and reagent for a laboratory test are being investigated to the emergency medical care unit and the intensive care unit as well as the laboratory test part in the affiliated hospital and many medical departments of the pediatrics, the internal medicine and the surgery. Developing the new analyzer based on high technology, evaluating the performance of them and spreading them to a medical examination and treatment site is our main target.

  9. A Review of Advances in the Identification and Characterization of Groundwater Dependent Ecosystems Using Geospatial Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel C. Pérez Hoyos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater Dependent Ecosystem (GDE protection is increasingly being recognized as essential for the sustainable management and allocation of water resources. GDE services are crucial for human well-being and for a variety of flora and fauna. However, the conservation of GDEs is only possible if knowledge about their location and extent is available. Several studies have focused on the identification of GDEs at specific locations using ground-based measurements. However, recent progress in remote sensing technologies and their integration with Geographic Information Systems (GIS has provided alternative ways to map GDEs at a much larger spatial extent. This paper presents a review of the geospatial methods that have been used to map and delineate GDEs at spatial different extents. Additionally, a summary of the satellite sensors useful for identification of GDEs and the integration of remote sensing data with ground-based measurements in the process of mapping GDEs is presented.

  10. Interactions between parents of technology-dependent children and providers: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachimiec, Jennifer A; Obrecht, Jennifer; Kavanaugh, Karen

    2015-03-01

    This article is a review of the literature on the experiences of parents and their interactions with healthcare providers while caring for their technology-dependent child(ren) in their homes. Results are presented in the following themes: information needs, respect and partnership with healthcare providers, care coordination, and experiences with home healthcare nurses. Parents needed information and guidance and felt supported when providers recognized parents' expertise with the child's care, and offered reassurance and confirmation about their practices. Home healthcare clinicians provided supportive care in the home, but their presence created challenges for the family. By acknowledging and valuing the parents' expertise, healthcare providers can empower parents to confidently care for their child.

  11. Parents' experiences of negotiating care for their technology-dependent child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Elizabeth; Timmons, Stephen; Dampier, Sally

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this exploratory study was to understand the negotiation of care as experienced by the parents of technology-dependent children in a hospital context. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a group of six parents. Parents felt that their roles as parents were not considered enough by nurses and they tended to be seen as carers, not parents. Negotiation of care was not always apparent. Instead, nurses often made assumptions about parental involvement in care. Parents wanted to carry out care when in hospital, but were not always given choices. Parents also reported a desire for more confident nurses. This study highlights the need to gain insight into parents' experiences, in order that nurses can provide care in a way negotiated to suit the individual family. Suggestions for further research in this area are offered.

  12. Surface reflectance and conversion efficiency dependence of technologies for mitigating global warming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, Ian [Solartran Pty Ltd., 12 Lentara St, Kenmore, Brisbane 4069 (Australia); Smith, Geoff [Physics and Advanced Materials, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway, New South Wales 2007 (Australia)

    2011-05-15

    A means of assessing the relative impact of different renewable energy technologies on global warming has been developed. All power plants emit thermal energy to the atmosphere. Fossil fuel power plants also emit CO{sub 2} which accumulates in the atmosphere and provides an indirect increase in global warming via the greenhouse effect. A fossil fuel power plant may operate for some time before the global warming due to its CO{sub 2} emission exceeds the warming due to its direct heat emission. When a renewable energy power plant is deployed instead of a fossil fuel power plant there may be a significant time delay before the direct global warming effect is less than the combined direct and indirect global warming effect from an equivalent output coal fired plant - the ''business as usual'' case. Simple expressions are derived to calculate global temperature change as a function of ground reflectance and conversion efficiency for various types of fossil fuelled and renewable energy power plants. These expressions are used to assess the global warming mitigation potential of some proposed Australian renewable energy projects. The application of the expressions is extended to evaluate the deployment in Australia of current and new geo-engineering and carbon sequestration solutions to mitigate global warming. Principal findings are that warming mitigation depends strongly on the solar to electric conversion efficiency of renewable technologies, geo-engineering projects may offer more economic mitigation than renewable energy projects and the mitigation potential of reforestation projects depends strongly on the location of the projects. (author)

  13. Pharmacist Staffing, Technology Use, and Implementation of Medication Safety Practices in Rural Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Michelle M.; Moscovice, Ira S.; Davidson, Gestur

    2006-01-01

    Context: Medication safety is clearly an important quality issue for rural hospitals. However, rural hospitals face special challenges implementing medication safety practices in terms of their staffing and financial and technical resources. Purpose: This study assessed the capacity of small rural hospitals to implement medication safety…

  14. New frontiers in medical education: simulation technology at Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Ronald W; Schmid, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine is using a variety of medical simulation systems in the training of its medical students. The simulators allow students to learn and practice skills in a controlled environment, and they enable faculty to challenge students with a broader range of conditions than might ordinarily be encountered during medical training.

  15. Evidence-based decision on medical technologies in Asia Pacific: experiences from India, Malaysia, Philippines, and Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatte, Urmila; Hussain, Samsinah; de Rosas-Valera, Madeleine; Malik, Muhammad Ashar

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses national programs implemented in India, Pakistan, Malaysia, and Philippines to generate and apply evidence in making informed policy decisions on the approval, pricing, reimbursement and financing of medicines, diagnostics, and medical devices. In all countries, the Ministries of Health are generally responsible for approval of health technologies through various agencies like the Central Drugs Standard Control Organisation in India, Bureau of Food and Drugs for medicines and Bureau of Health Devices and Technology for medical devices in the Philippines, the National Pharmaceutical Control Bureau, Health Technology Assessment Unit and Medical Device Bureau in Malaysia, and the Drug Control Organization in Pakistan. Product dossiers are evaluated while taking decisions. India has a strong price control mechanism through the National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority. In the Philippines, the Essential Drug Price Monitoring System monitors prices of 37 essential drugs monthly from all drugstore outlets nationwide. In Malaysia and Pakistan registration pricing of new drugs is negotiated/fixed by the government with the vendor. A mix of social, voluntary private and community-based health insurance plans are available in India while the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation is responsible for reimbursement of drugs and medical devices in the Philippines. In Malaysia no formal reimbursement system is being practiced, and in Pakistan the government reimburses medical claims of its employees. In both India and the Philippines the bulk of health expenditure is out of pocket while the government pays for 20% and 28% respectively in both countries. The public health care services in Malaysia are heavily subsidized by the government with minimum fee being charged to the public. The government of Pakistan gives free medicines to its citizens at the public health facilities. In the region under discussion, one of the priority areas that the different

  16. Impact of language barrier on acute care medical professionals is dependent upon role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Andrew; Whitaker, Misty; Ray, Myrna; Rockich, Anna; Barton-Baxter, Marietta; Barnes, Stephen L; Boulanger, Bernard; Tsuei, Betty; Kearney, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Communication with patients is essential to providing quality medical care. The study was conducted to evaluate the effects of language barriers on health care professionals. It is hypothesized that these language barriers are commonly perceived by health care professionals and they are a source of workplace stress in acute care environments. We designed and distributed a survey tool of staff experiences and attitudes regarding the English-Spanish language barrier among patients in an acute care surgical environment of a tertiary medical center. Responses were anonymous, stratified by professional role and comparisons made using paired t tests. Sixty-one nurses and 36 physicians responded to the survey. Overall, 95% of nurses reported that the language barrier was an impediment to quality care, whereas 88% of physicians responded similarly (P = .0004). More nurses than physicians report experiencing stress (97% vs. 78%) and the degree of stress appears to be greater for nurses (P language barriers as an impediment to quality care delivery and as a source of workplace stress. Nurse and physician perceptions differ; therefore, strategies to address these language barriers should be specific to those professional roles. These barriers create a void in health care quality and safety that has effects on health care professionals.

  17. An investigation into the feasibility of locating portable medical devices using radio frequency identification devices and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britton, J

    2007-01-01

    Portable medical devices represent an important resource for assisting healthcare delivery. The movement of portable devices often results in them being unavailable when needed. Tracking equipment using radiofrequency identification technology/devices (RFID) may provide a promising solution to the problems encountered in locating portable equipment. An RFID technology trial was undertaken at Royal Alexandra Hospital, Paisley. This involved the temporary installation of three active readers and attaching actively transmitting radio frequency tags to different portable medical devices. The active readers and computer system were linked using a bespoke data network. Tags and readers from two separate manufacturers were tested. Reliability difficulties were encountered when testing the technology from the first manufacturer, probably due to the casing of the medical device interfering with the signal from the tag. Improved results were obtained when using equipment from the second manufacturer with an overall error rate of 12.3%. Tags from this manufacturer were specifically designed to overcome problems observed with the first system tested. Findings from this proof of concept trial suggest that RFID technology could be used to track the location of equipment in a hospital.

  18. Use of raiting assessment of students at studying of technology of medications under the credit – module system of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Litvinenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of credit-module system into educational process is a main requirement of Bolognese process. First and foremost rating estimation of student’s knowledge is a modern technology in educational field which helps teacher to estimate of student’s knowledge objectively. Aim of article. To analyze tactic of carrying out training for foreign students in technology of medications. Materials and methods. Investigation was carrying out on the basis of new working program of technology of medications with introduction of credit-module system into educational process. As material was used experience in working with foreign students, textbooks and methodical decisions of department, faculty and university. Results and their discussion. Usage of this system in educational process for foreign students will help teacher to take into account special features of each student and give a chance to teach how to enrich their knowledge of technology of medications on one's own. Conclusion. Teacher’s collaboration with each student is a guarantee of quality usage of credit-module system in higher institutes of education.

  19. From Resistance to Existence-Experiences of Medication-Assisted Treatment as Disclosed by People with Opioid Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Britt-Marie; Eklund, Margita; Melin, Ylva; Graneheim, Ulla Hällgren

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to describe the lived experiences of participating in a medication-assisted treatment as disclosed by individuals with opioid dependence. Eleven narrative interviews were conducted and subjected to qualitative content analysis. The experiences of participating in the programme were described as a process from resistance to existence. The participants seized the chance to claim a life lived with dignity, struggled with hidden challenges, and eventually were freed from their pasts and were grateful for an existence with dignity. The recovery process was a long-term commitment and participants asked for a more individual and flexible process based on personal needs and values.

  20. Hospital-based health technology assessment in France: A focus on medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Nicolas; Puc, Cyril; Szwarcensztein, Karine; Beuscart, Régis; Coulonjou, Hélène; Degrassat-Théas, Albane; Dutot, Camille; Epis de Fleurian, Anne-Aurélie; Favrel-Feuillade, Florence; Hounliasso, Iliona; Lechat, Philippe; Luigi, Emmanuel; Mairot, Laurent; Nguyen, Thao; Piazza, Laurent; Roussel, Christophe; Vienney, Cécile

    2017-02-01

    Hospital-based health technology assessment (HTA) guides decisions as to whether new healthcare products should be made available within hospital structures. Its extension to medical devices (MDs) makes it possible to analyse several relevant aspects of these healthcare products in addition to their clinical value, and such evaluations are of interest to national health authorities, other healthcare establishments and industry. The aim of this work was to formulate several recommendations for a blueprint for hospital-based HTA for MDs in France. Five themes based on the work of the European Adopting hospital-based HTA in the EU (AdHopHTA) project were defined. Each member of the roundtable was then allocated a documentation task based on their experience of the theme concerned, and a literature review was carried out. An inventory of hospital-based HTA was performed and six recommendations aiming to strengthen and improve this approach were put forward: (1) encouragement of the spread of the hospital-based HTA culture and participation in communications and the promotion of this approach to hospital decision-makers; (2) adaptation of hospital-based HTA to the needs of decision-makers, taking into account the financial timetable and strategic objectives of the healthcare establishment; (3) harmonisation of the dossiers requested from industry between healthcare establishments, based on a common core; (4) promotion of the sharing of hospital-based HTA data under certain conditions, with data dissociable from the HTA report and the use of a validated methodology for the literature review; (5) creation of a composite indicator reflecting data production effort and the sharing of HTA activities, to be taken into account in the distribution of funds allocated for teaching, research and innovation missions considered of general interest; (6) the transmission of information directly from local to national level by pioneering centres. This work highlights the major issues

  1. The Potential Use of Intrauterine Insemination as a Basic Option for Infertility: A Review for Technology-Limited Medical Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman M. Abdelkader

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. There is an asymmetric allocation of technology and other resources for infertility services. Intrauterine insemination (IUI is a process of placing washed spermatozoa transcervically into the uterine cavity for treatment of infertility. This is a review of literature for the potential use of IUI as a basic infertility treatment in technology-limited settings. Study design. Review of articles on treatment of infertility using IUI. Results. Aspects regarding the use of IUI are reviewed, including ovarian stimulation, semen parameters associated with good outcomes, methods of sperm preparation, timing of IUI, and number of inseminations. Implications of the finding in light of the needs of low-technology medical settings are summarized. Conclusion. The reviewed evidence suggests that IUI is less expensive, less invasive, and comparably effective for selected patients as a first-line treatment for couples with unexplained or male factor infertility. Those couples may be offered three to six IUI cycles in technology-limited settings.

  2. The Biplot as a diagnostic tool of local dependence in latent class models. A medical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, R; Vicente-Villardón, J L; Galindo, M P

    2008-05-20

    Latent class models (LCMs) can be used to assess diagnostic test performance when no reference test (a gold standard) is available, considering two latent classes representing disease or non-disease status. One of the basic assumptions in such models is that of local or conditional independence: all indicator variables (tests) are statistically independent within each latent class. However, in practice this assumption is often violated; hence, the two-LCM fits the data poorly. In this paper, we propose the use of Biplot methods to identify the conditional dependence between pairs of manifest variables within each latent class. Additionally, we propose incorporating such dependence in the corresponding latent class using the log-linear formulation of the model.

  3. Time-dependent ROC curve analysis in medical research: current methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, Adina Najwa; Cox, Trevor; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi

    2017-04-07

    ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve analysis is well established for assessing how well a marker is capable of discriminating between individuals who experience disease onset and individuals who do not. The classical (standard) approach of ROC curve analysis considers event (disease) status and marker value for an individual as fixed over time, however in practice, both the disease status and marker value change over time. Individuals who are disease-free earlier may develop the disease later due to longer study follow-up, and also their marker value may change from baseline during follow-up. Thus, an ROC curve as a function of time is more appropriate. However, many researchers still use the standard ROC curve approach to determine the marker capability ignoring the time dependency of the disease status or the marker. We comprehensively review currently proposed methodologies of time-dependent ROC curves which use single or longitudinal marker measurements, aiming to provide clarity in each methodology, identify software tools to carry out such analysis in practice and illustrate several applications of the methodology. We have also extended some methods to incorporate a longitudinal marker and illustrated the methodologies using a sequential dataset from the Mayo Clinic trial in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) of the liver. From our methodological review, we have identified 18 estimation methods of time-dependent ROC curve analyses for censored event times and three other methods can only deal with non-censored event times. Despite the considerable numbers of estimation methods, applications of the methodology in clinical studies are still lacking. The value of time-dependent ROC curve methods has been re-established. We have illustrated the methods in practice using currently available software and made some recommendations for future research.

  4. Mechanism-based medication development for the treatment of nicotine dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Xi, Zheng-Xiong; Spiller, Krista; Gardner, Eliot L.

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco use is a global problem with serious health consequences. Though some treatment options exist, there remains a great need for new effective pharmacotherapies to aid smokers in maintaining long-term abstinence. In the present article, we first discuss the neural mechanisms underlying nicotine reward, and then review various mechanism-based pharmacological agents for the treatment of nicotine dependence. An oversimplified hypothesis of addiction to tobacco is that nicotine is the major ...

  5. The application of additive technologies in creation a medical simulator-trainer of the human head operating field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashapov, L. N.; Kashapov, N. F.; Kashapov, R. N.; Pashaev, B. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the work was to determine the possible application of additive manufacturing technology during the manufacturing process as close as possible to reality of medical simulator-trainers. In work were used some additive manufacturing technologies: selective laser sintering (SLS), fused deposition modeling (FDM), binder Jetting. As a result, a prototype of simulator-trainer of the human head operating field, which based on the CT real patient, was manufactured and conducted its tests. It was found that structure, which is obtained with the use of 3D-printers ProJet 160, most appropriate and closest to the real properties of the bone.

  6. Optimizing technology development and adoption in medical imaging using the principles of innovation diffusion, part II: practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Bruce I

    2012-02-01

    Successful adoption of new technology development can be accentuated by learning and applying the scientific principles of innovation diffusion. This is of particular importance to areas within the medical imaging practice which have lagged in innovation; perhaps, the most notable of which is reporting which has remained relatively stagnant for over a century. While the theoretical advantages of structured reporting have been well documented throughout the medical imaging community, adoption to date has been tepid and largely relegated to the academic and breast imaging communities. Widespread adoption will likely require an alternative approach to innovation, which addresses the heterogeneity and diversity of the practicing radiologist community along with the ever-changing expectations in service delivery. The challenges and strategies for reporting innovation and adoption are discussed, with the goal of adapting and customizing new technology to the preferences and needs of individual end-users.

  7. Methods for assessment of innovative medical technologies during early stages of development.

    OpenAIRE

    Hagen, Anja; Schönermark, Matthias P.; Lühmann, Dagmar; Neumann, Ulrike; Bartelmes, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Conventional Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is usually conducted at a point in time at which the development of the respective technology may no longer be influenced. By this time developers and/or purchasers may have misinvested resources. Thus the demand for Technology Assessment (TA) which incorporates appropriate methods during early development stages of a technology becomes apparent. Against this health political background, the present report describes methods for a development-acc...

  8. Implementation of a Prolonged Infusion Guideline for Time-Dependent Antimicrobial Agents at a Tertiary Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohlfelder, Benjamin; Kubiak, David W; Degrado, Jeremy R; Reardon, David P; Szumita, Paul M

    Administration of time-dependent beta-lactam antibiotic as a prolonged infusion may maximize the pharmacodynamic target of time above the minimum inhibitory concentration. We describe the implementation of a prolonged infusion at a tertiary academic medical center, and a 1-year compliance analysis with the guideline. After performing a thorough literature search, a guideline was developed by members of the Department of Infectious Diseases and Department of Pharmacy. Approval and endorsement of the guideline was obtained by the Antimicrobial Subcommittee and Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee. Physical champions were instrumental in the implementation of the guideline institution-wide. We then performed a 1-year retrospective analysis of guideline compliance from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011. Noncompliant administrations were obtained from smart infusion pumps. The total number of doses administered was taken from pharmacy information resources. In total, nearly 85,000 time-dependent doses were administered. Compliance with the prolonged infusion guideline was 89%. Rates of compliance did not significantly differ between medications (P = 0.555). Obtaining support from key stakeholders in collateral services and institutional leadership was vital for the success of this guideline. Compliance with the guideline 1 year after implementation was high. Implementation of a prolonged infusion guideline is feasible with institutional support and motivation.

  9. Frequency and amplitude dependences of molding accuracy in ultrasonic nanoimprint technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekaru, Harutaka; Takahashi, Masaharu

    2009-12-01

    We use neither a heater nor ultraviolet lights, and are researching and developing an ultrasonic nanoimprint as a new nano-patterning technology. In our ultrasonic nanoimprint technology, ultrasonic vibration is not used as a heat generator instead of the heater. A mold is connected with an ultrasonic generator, and mold patterns are pushed down and pulled up at a high speed into a thermoplastic. Frictional heat is generated by ultrasonic vibration between mold patterns and thermoplastic patterns formed by an initial contact force. However, because frictional heat occurs locally, the whole mold is not heated. Therefore, a molding material can be comprehensively processed at room temperature. A magnetostriction actuator was built into our ultrasonic nanoimprint system as an ultrasonic generator, and the frequency and amplitude can be changed between dc-10 kHz and 0-4 µm, respectively. First, the ultrasonic nanoimprint was experimented by using this system on polyethylene terephthalate (PET, Tg = 69 °C), whose the glass transition temperature (Tg) is comparatively low in engineering plastics, and it was ascertained that the most suitable elastic material for this technique was an ethyl urethane rubber. In addition, we used a changeable frequency of the magnetostriction actuator, and nano-patterns in an electroformed-Ni mold were transferred to a 0.5 mm thick sheet of PET, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and polycarbonate (PC), which are typical engineering plastics, under variable molding conditions. The frequency and amplitude dependence of ultrasonic vibration to the molding accuracy were investigated by measuring depth and width of imprinted patterns. As a result, regardless of the molding material, the imprinted depth was changed drastically when the frequency exceeded 5 kHz. On the other hand, when the amplitude of ultrasonic vibration grew, the imprinted depth gradually deepened. Influence of the frequency and amplitude of ultrasonic vibration was not observed

  10. General Medical Practitioners Need to Be Aware of the Theories on Which Our Work Depend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Paul

    2006-01-01

    When general practitioners and family physicians listen, reflect, and diagnose, we use 3 different theories of knowledge. This essay explores these theories to highlight an approach to clinical practice, inquiry, and learning that can do justice to the complex and uncertain world we experience. The following points are made: (1) A variety of approaches to research and audit are needed to illuminate the richness of experience witnessed by general medical practitioners. (2) Evidence about the past cannot predict the future except in simple, short-term, or slowly changing situations. (3) We consciously or unconsciously weave together evidence generated through 3 fundamental theories of knowledge, termed postpositivism, critical theory, and constructivism, to make sense of everyday experience. We call it listening, reflecting, and diagnosing. (4) These 3 fundamental theories of knowledge highlight different aspects within a world that is more complex, integrated, and changing than any single theory can reveal on its own; they frame what we see and how we act in everyday situations. (5) Moving appropriately between these different theories helps us to see a fuller picture and provides a framework for improving our skills as clinicians, researchers, and learners. (6) Narrative unity offers a way to bring together different kinds of evidence to understand the overall health of patients and of communities; evidence of all kinds provides discrete snapshots of more complex stories in evolution. (7) We need to understand these issues so we can create an agenda for clinical practice, inquiry, and learning appropriate to our discipline. PMID:17003147

  11. Desktop supercomputers. Advance medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisiello, R S

    1991-02-01

    Medical imaging tools that radiologists as well as a wide range of clinicians and healthcare professionals have come to depend upon are emerging into the next phase of functionality. The strides being made in supercomputing technologies--including reduction of size and price--are pushing medical imaging to a new level of accuracy and functionality.

  12. 2009 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Nuclear Medicine Technology. (Program CIP: 51.0905 - Nuclear Medical Technology/Technologist)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boney, Linda; Lee, Joanne; Pyles, Alice; Whitfield, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  13. Does Childhood Use of Stimulant Medication as a Treatment for ADHD Affect the Likelihood of Future Drug Abuse and Dependence? A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Shawn M.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the disparate research findings regarding the effects of stimulant medication in subsequent substance abuse and dependence. A minimum of 4 to 5% of children in the United States will be diagnosed with ADHD; thus it is important for parents to be informed when making decisions about the use of stimulant medication to treat…

  14. 75 FR 1446 - Rate of Payment for Medical Records Received Through Health Information Technology (IT) Necessary...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-11

    ... experiencing a significant increase in the number of initial claims for disability insurance benefits and... disability insurance benefits and SSI payments on the basis of disability must provide medical evidence to... benefits. We rely on medical providers such as doctors, hospitals, clinics, and others in the healthcare...

  15. Supporting medication intake of the elderly with robot technology : Poster and demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Fokeltje; Sweers, Nikie; Shantia, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Medication intake can prove a complicated task for the elderly. Since roughly 50% of all prescribed medication is taken incorrectly (MacLaughlin, et al., 2005), simplification of this task might have beneficial effects on this group’s general health and society’s healthcare costs. In response,

  16. Supporting medication intake of the elderly with robot technology : Poster and demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cnossen, Fokeltje; Sweers, Nikie; Shantia, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Medication intake can prove a complicated task for the elderly. Since roughly 50% of all prescribed medication is taken incorrectly (MacLaughlin, et al., 2005), simplification of this task might have beneficial effects on this group’s general health and society’s healthcare costs. In response, Assis

  17. Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Society of Anesthesiology Newsletter 70:5, May 2006. 3. Goldman JM, “Patient-Centric Networked Medical Device Interoperability,” part of Dagalakis NG...Interoperability Movement,” Anesthesiology News 34:12, December 2008. 19. Johnson C, “Medical devices lag in iPod age,” The Boston Globe, December 29 2008. 20

  18. [Family Health Program and children palliative care: listening the relatives of technology dependent children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabello, Cláudia Azevedo Ferreira Guimarães; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique de Almeida

    2010-03-01

    This study discusses the creation of a new children palliative care program based on the Family Health Program, considering the level of care at home and yielding to family requests. The study focused on eighteen members of nine families of technology dependent children (TDC) who were hospital patients at Instituto Fernandes Figueira (IFF): four who are being assisted by its palliative care program Programa de Assistência Domiciliar Interdisciplinar (PADI); three who were inpatients waiting for inclusion in the Program, and finally two inpatients already included in PADI. PADI was chosen because it is the only child palliative care program in Brazil. The results are positive in regards to the connection established between the families and the health care team, the reception of the children, the explanation to the family concerning the disease, and the functional dynamics between the PADI and IFF. As negative points, difficulties arose as a result of the implementation of the program, from its continuity to the worsening or illness of the entire family. In conclusion, although the PADI is the IFF's way of discharging patients, the domiciliary cares taken by the Family Health Program, well articulated with the healthcare system, would be ideal for being the adequate assistance for such.

  19. [Family health and infant palliative care: listening the relatives of technology dependent children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabello, Claudia Azevedo Ferreira Guimarães; Rodrigues, Paulo Henrique de Almeida

    2010-10-01

    This study discusses the creation of a new child palliative care program based on the Family Health Program, considering the level of care at home and yielding to family requests. Eighteen members of nine families of technology dependent children (TDC) who were hospital patients in the Instituto Fernandes Figueira (IFF) participated on the study. From those four were being assisted by its palliative care program Programa de Assistência Domiciliar Interdisciplinar (PADI); three were inpatients waiting for inclusion in the program, and finally two inpatients already included in PADI. PADI was chosen because it is the only child palliative care program in Brazil. The results are positive in regards to the connection established between the families and the health care team, the reception of the children, the explanation to the family concerning the disease, and the functional dynamics between the PADI and the IFF. As negative points, difficulties arose as a result of the implementation of the program, from its continuity to the worsening or illness of the entire family. In conclusion, although the PADI is the IFF's way of discharging patients, the domiciliary care provided by the Family Health Program, well articulated with the healthcare system, would be ideal for being the adequate assistance for it.

  20. Development of pharmaceutical heroin preparations for medical co-prescription to opioid dependent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klous, Marjolein G; Van den Brink, Wim; Van Ree, Jan M; Beijnen, Jos H

    2005-12-12

    Presently, there is a considerable interest in heroin-assisted treatment: co-prescription of heroin to certain subgroups of chronic, treatment-resistant, opioid dependent patients. In 2002, nine countries had planned (Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Spain) or ongoing (Germany, The Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom) clinical trials on this subject. These trials (and the routine heroin-assisted treatment programs that might result) will need pharmaceutical heroin (diacetylmorphine) to prescribe to the patients. Research into the development of pharmaceutical forms of heroin for prescription to addicts can benefit from the large amount of knowledge that already exists regarding this substance. Therefore, in this paper we review the physicochemical and pharmaceutical properties of diacetylmorphine and the clinically investigated routes of administration, as well as routes of administration utilised on the street in the context of developing pharmaceutical heroin formulations for prescription to addicts. Patient acceptability of the formulation is essential, because heroin-assisted treatment is aimed at treatment-resistant addicts, who often have to be encouraged to participate (or to maintain participation) in a treatment program. This means that the most suitable products would have pharmacokinetic profiles mimicking that of diacetylmorphine for injection, with rapid peak concentrations of diacetylmorphine and 6-acetylmorphine, ensuring the 'rush effect' and the sustained presence of morphine(-6-glucuronide) creating the prolonged euphoria. Diacetylmorphine for inhalation after volatilisation (via 'chasing the dragon') seems to be a suitable candidate, while intranasal and oral diacetylmorphine are currently thought to be unsuitable. However, oral and intranasal delivery systems might be improved and become suitable for use by heroin dependent patients.

  1. Knowledge Attitude and Behavior of Medical Technology Vocational Training School Students About Genetically Modified Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safak Taner Gursoy

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To determine The Medical Technology Vocational Training School (MTVTS students’ the knowledge about the effects of GMO on human health and environment and to evaluate their attitude and behavior has been aimed. METHODS: All of the second class students of the year 2006-2007 of MTVTS were included (N=161 in the study, response rate was 92%. The survey questionare included questions on knowledge, the risk perception and attitute about GMOs. The legal framework in Turkey about GMOs, the rationale for GMO production, the labeling for GMO and the students’ perception of their knowledge was evaluated through 14 items with Likert scale. After the questionaire, the students received an informative brochure on GMOs. RESULTS: The open-ended question asking to define GMOs was answered by 59,2% of the students among which 35,6% defined as “additive”, 34,5% as “food with hormones”. The risk perceived for GMOs was the forth following cigarette smoking, stres, and environmental pollution in the ranking according to the risk score means. Sex has been the only determinant effecting this scoring for GMOs where girls perceived the risk greater. If family was one of the information sources about GMOs, the perceived risk was increased (p=0,000. Among the students 81,6% thought that GMO should not be grown in Turkey, 77,7% think that GMO was sold however. The leading topic of ambivalence is the state of self knowledge on GMO. The low income group are less concerned about consuming GMO for themselves or for their children (respectively p==0.003 ve p=0,012. CONCLUSION: Health workers are assigned with an important role to inform the public for healthy eating. However although the the risk perception of the study group for GMOs is high, their knowledge is low. Training activities to supply this deficiency should be implemented. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(6.000: 503-508

  2. Technology identity: the role of sociotechnical representations in the adoption of medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulucanlar, S; Faulkner, A; Peirce, S; Elwyn, G

    2013-12-01

    This study explored the sociotechnical influences shaping the naturally-occurring adoption and non-adoption of device technologies in the UK's National Health Service (NHS), amid increasing policy interest in this area. The study was informed by Science and Technology Studies and structuration and Actor Network Theory perspectives, drawing attention to the performative capacities of the technology alongside human agentic forces such as agendas and expectations, in the context of structural and macro conditions. Eight technologies were studied using a comparative ethnographic case study design and purposive and snowball sampling to identify relevant NHS, academic and industry participants. Data were collected between May 2009 and February 2012, included in-depth interviews, conference observations and printed and web-based documents and were analysed using constructivist grounded theory methods. The study suggests that while adoption decisions are made within the jurisdiction of healthcare organisations, they are shaped within a dynamic and fluid 'adoption space' that transcends organisational and geographic boundaries. Diverse influences from the industry, health care organisation and practice, health technology assessment and policy interact to produce 'technology identities.' Technology identities are composite and contested attributes that encompass different aspects of the technology (novelty, effectiveness, utility, risks, requirements) and that give a distinctive character to each. We argue that it is these socially constructed and contingent heuristic identities that shape the desirability, acceptability, feasibility and adoptability of each technology, a perspective that policy must acknowledge in seeking to intervene in health care technology adoption.

  3. Public views of mobile medical devices and services: a US national survey of consumer sentiments towards RFID healthcare technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, James E; Rice, Ronald E

    2009-02-01

    A 2007 national public opinion survey of 1404 Americans revealed variations in sentiments concerning the desirability of several mobile healthcare technologies based on RFID. The survey appears to be the first reasonably national public opinion survey of US adults concerning their attitudes towards mobile healthcare technology. The survey revealed high levels of interest in emergency intervention services, but much less so in health information and monitoring services. Interest in RFID personal medical technology was positively associated with high levels of trust in others and social support. At the same time, a small minority were negatively disposed towards such applications. In those cases, the negative sentiment appears heightened when the mobile healthcare application is offered in a modality attached to the body as opposed to a somewhat more physically remote option, i.e., attached to one's cell phone.

  4. Mechanism-based medication development for the treatment of nicotine dependence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng-xiong XI; Krista SPILLER; Eliot L GARDNER

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco use is a global problem with serious health consequences. Though some treatment options exist, there remains a great need for new effective pharmacotherapies to aid smokers in maintaining long-term abstinence. In the present article, we first discuss the neural mechanisms underlying nicotine reward, and then review various mechanism-based pharmacological agents for the treatment of nicotine dependence. An oversimplified hypothesis of addiction to tobacco is that nicotine is the major addictive component of tobacco. Nicotine binds to a4β2 and a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) located on dopaminergic, glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system, which causes an increase in extracellular DA in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). That increase in DA reinforces tobacco use, particularly during the acquisition phase. Enhanced glutamate transmission to DA neurons in the ventral tegmental area appears to play an important role in this process. In addition, chronic nicotine treatment increases endocannabinoid levels in the mesolimbic DA system, which indirectly modulates NAc DA release and nicotine reward. Accordingly, pharmacological agents that target brain acetylcholine, DA, glutamate, GABA, or endocannabonoid signaling systems have been proposed to interrupt nicotine action. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic strategies that alter plasma nicotine availability, metabolism and clearance also significantly alter nicotine's action in the brain. Progress using these pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic agents is reviewed. For drugs in each category, we discuss the mechanistic rationale for their potential anti-nicotine efficacy, major findings in preclinical and clinical studies, and future research directions.

  5. Improving medication adherence with a targeted, technology-driven disease management intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David B; Allison, Wanda; Chen, Joyce C; Demand, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Treatment adherence is critical in managing chronic disease, but achieving it remains an elusive goal across many prevalent conditions. As part of its care management strategy, BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina (BCBSSC) implemented the Longitudinal Adherence Treatment Evaluation program, a behavioral intervention to improve medication adherence among members with cardiovascular disease and/or diabetes. The objectives of this study were to 1) assess the effectiveness of telephonic intervention in influencing reinitiation of medication therapy, and 2) evaluate the rate and timing of medication reinitiation. BCBSSC applied algorithms against pharmacy claims data to identify patients prescribed targeted medications who were 60 or more days overdue for refills. This information was provided to care managers to address during their next patient contact. Care managers received focused training on techniques for medication behavior change, readiness to change, motivational interviewing, and active listening. Training also addressed common barriers to adherence and available resources, including side effect management, mail order benefits, drug assistance programs, medication organizers, and reminder systems. Overdue refills were tracked for 12 months, with medication reinitiation followed for an additional 3 months. In the intervention group, 94 patients were identified with 123 instances of late medication refills. In the age- and gender-matched comparison group, 61 patients were identified with 76 late refills. The intervention group had a significantly higher rate of medication reinitiation (59.3%) than the control group (42.1%; P management intervention promoting patient behavior change increased the number of patients who reinitiated therapy after a period of nonadherence and decreased the time from nonadherence to adherence.

  6. The state of the art of medical imaging technology: from creation to archive and back.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaohong W; Qian, Yu; Hui, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Medical imaging has learnt itself well into modern medicine and revolutionized medical industry in the last 30 years. Stemming from the discovery of X-ray by Nobel laureate Wilhelm Roentgen, radiology was born, leading to the creation of large quantities of digital images as opposed to film-based medium. While this rich supply of images provides immeasurable information that would otherwise not be possible to obtain, medical images pose great challenges in archiving them safe from corrupted, lost and misuse, retrievable from databases of huge sizes with varying forms of metadata, and reusable when new tools for data mining and new media for data storing become available. This paper provides a summative account on the creation of medical imaging tomography, the development of image archiving systems and the innovation from the existing acquired image data pools. The focus of this paper is on content-based image retrieval (CBIR), in particular, for 3D images, which is exemplified by our developed online e-learning system, MIRAGE, home to a repository of medical images with variety of domains and different dimensions. In terms of novelties, the facilities of CBIR for 3D images coupled with image annotation in a fully automatic fashion have been developed and implemented in the system, resonating with future versatile, flexible and sustainable medical image databases that can reap new innovations.

  7. RESEARCH OF RUSSIAN HIGH TECHNOLOGY MEDICAL EQUIPMENT MARKET: THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otstavnov Stanislav Sergeevich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data obtained from comprehensive study of russian hi-tech medical equipment market. The size and the structure of Russian medical equipment market in 2005-2011 were investigated and market size forecast for 2012-2015 was given. Priority segments of Russian high-tech medical equipment market were identified (products with a high degree of visualization, anesthetic and ventilation equipment, patient monitors based on the analysis of literature sources and morbidity structure. Key players in key segments of the market were identified and their financial performance such as number of employees, revenue, net profit, researches and development expenses were compared (according to actual annual reports. Research allowed to draw the following conclusion: today in the key segments of Russian high-tech medical equipment market the leadership of foreign companies (Hitachi, Philips, Siemens, Toshiba, General Electric, Dräger is indisputable, objective preconditions for the fundamental change of the situation are absent. Import substitution requires the consolidation of domestic producers, adequate funding and human resource. The results can be used in practice by medical industry companies and State authorities on purpose to upgrade the medical industry.

  8. RESEARCH OF RUSSIAN HIGH TECHNOLOGY MEDICAL EQUIPMENT MARKET: THE SOCIO-ECONOMIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Станислав Сергеевич Отставнов

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data obtained from comprehensive study of russian hi-tech medical equipment market. The size and the structure of Russian medical equipment market in 2005-2011 were investigated and market size forecast for 2012-2015 was given. Priority segments of Russian high-tech medical equipment market were identified (products with a high degree of visualization, anesthetic and ventilation equipment, patient monitors  based on the analysis of literature sources and morbidity structure. Key players in key segments of the market were identified and their financial performance such as number of employees, revenue, net profit, researches and development expenses were compared (according to actual annual reports.Research allowed to draw the following conclusion: today in the key segments of Russian high-tech medical equipment market the leadership of foreign companies  (Hitachi, Philips, Siemens, Toshiba, General Electric, Dräger is indisputable, objective preconditions for the fundamental change of the situation are absent. Import substitution requires the consolidation of domestic producers, adequate funding and human resource.The results can be used in practice by medical industry companies and State authorities on purpose to upgrade the medical industry.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-1-31

  9. Readiness of hospitals affiliated with Shiraz university of medical sciences for implementation of radio frequency identification technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Ebrahimi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Applying information technology in healthcare system is one of the most important criteria of the World Health Organization for evaluating the quality of healthcare systems of different countries. Moreover, applying this technology in different parts of health care system can create great potentials for improving the quality of healthcare services. In this regard, Radio Frequency Identification (RFID technology is one of the most practical technologies in identifying and collecting data. The present study aimed to compare the readiness of Shiraz University of medical sciences hospitals for implementation of RFID system in 2014. Method: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in 2014. The research population consisted of 110 senior and middle managers. Due to the limited research population, census method was used. The research tool was a questionnaire prepared by the researcher to investigate the hospitals’ readiness for implementation of RFID technology. Face and content validity of the questionnaire were approved by the experts. Cronbach’s alpha test was run to determine the reliability of the questionnaire (data were considered significant at p <0.05. Also, the data were analyzed in SPSS software using descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, and percentage and inferential statistics (one-way ANOVA. Results: The study showed that the readiness level of the hospitals was moderate. Comparing the mean of the total readiness level in the hospitals under the study revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between hospital M and other hospitals (P=0.003. However, the total readiness of hospital I was higher than others. Conclusion: Among 13 hospitals under the study, the hospitals I and A were moderately ready and others were not ready for implementation of RFID technology. Thus, considering various applications and advantages of RFID technology, it is suggested that the hospitals should prepare

  10. Exploring the potential of video technologies for collaboration in emergency medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Manning, James E.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted an experiment with a posttest, between-subjects design to evaluate the potential of emerging 3D telepresence technology to support collaboration in emergency health care. 3D telepresence technology has the potential to provide richer visual information than do current 2D video confer......&T Published online 14 August 2008 in Wiley InterScience....

  11. Medical Applications of Space Light-Emitting Diode Technology--Space Station and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, H.T.; Houle, J.M.; Donohoe, D.L.; Bajic, D.M.; Schmidt, M.H.; Reichert, K.W.; Weyenberg, G.T.; Larson, D.L.; Meyer, G.A.; Caviness, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Space light-emitting diode (LED) technology has provided medicine with a new tool capable of delivering light deep into tissues of the body, at wavelengths which are biologically optimal for cancer treatment and wound healing. This LED technology has already flown on Space Shuttle missions, and shows promise for wound healing applications of benefit to Space Station astronauts.

  12. Technology identity: The role of sociotechnical representations in the adoption of medical devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulucanlar, S.; Faulkner, A.; Peirce, S.; Elwyn, G.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the sociotechnical influences shaping the naturally-occurring adoption and non-adoption of device technologies in the UK's National Health Service (NHS), amid increasing policy interest in this area. The study was informed by Science and Technology Studies and structuration and A

  13. Perceived Usefulness and Use of Information Technology: the Moderating Influences of the Dependence of a Subcontractor towards His Contractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Khayati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The perceived usefulness is a concept that has been used by several authors in different fields of study. The analysis of these studies shows, as suggested by Davis (1989, that when the individual perceives the information and communication technologies (ICT to improve his performances, he uses them more frequently in his daily activities at work. However, one may think, as does this research, that the external factors can lead to relativize the significance of this hypothesis. Indeed, the mobilization of the research on the sociology of use and the organizational dispersion of the company allowed us to deduct that within the subcontractor enterprises, the use of ICT by the employees, who favourably perceive their usefulness, depends on the degree of the enterprises’ dependency towards their contractors, in the sense that when this dependency grows, the reactive and standard use of these technologies is requested to the detriment of their creative use, and vice versa. The analysis of results, based on a positivist paradigm, a deductive reasoning and a quantitative empirical investigation, enabled us to empirically validate a conceptual model indicating, in fact, that in the subcontractor companies highly depending on their contractors, employees who are convinced that ICT improves their work performance made more reactive use in their administrative activities, while the creative use of these technologies in disseminating the information permanently and in real time has not been promoted within companies which are weakly dependent on their contractors.

  14. Advanced biosensing methodologies developed for evaluating performance quality and safety of emerging biophotonics technologies and medical devices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilev, Ilko K.; Walker, Bennett; Calhoun, William; Hassan, Moinuddin

    2016-03-01

    Biophotonics is an emerging field in modern biomedical technology that has opened up new horizons for transfer of state-of-the-art techniques from the areas of lasers, fiber optics and biomedical optics to the life sciences and medicine. This field continues to vastly expand with advanced developments across the entire spectrum of biomedical applications ranging from fundamental "bench" laboratory studies to clinical patient "bedside" diagnostics and therapeutics. However, in order to translate these technologies to clinical device applications, the scientific and industrial community, and FDA are facing the requirement for a thorough evaluation and review of laser radiation safety and efficacy concerns. In many cases, however, the review process is complicated due the lack of effective means and standard test methods to precisely analyze safety and effectiveness of some of the newly developed biophotonics techniques and devices. There is, therefore, an immediate public health need for new test protocols, guidance documents and standard test methods to precisely evaluate fundamental characteristics, performance quality and safety of these technologies and devices. Here, we will overview our recent developments of novel test methodologies for safety and efficacy evaluation of some emerging biophotonics technologies and medical devices. These methodologies are based on integrating the advanced features of state-of-the-art optical sensor technologies and approaches such as high-resolution fiber-optic sensing, confocal and optical coherence tomography imaging, and infrared spectroscopy. The presentation will also illustrate some methodologies developed and implemented for testing intraocular lens implants, biochemical contaminations of medical devices, ultrahigh-resolution nanoscopy, and femtosecond laser therapeutics.

  15. New pathways to medicare coverage for innovative PET radiopharmaceuticals: report of a medical imaging & technology alliance (MITA) workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Bruce J; Frank, Richard A; Rodriguez, Gail M

    2012-02-01

    PET and PET/CT have revolutionized the diagnosis, staging, and monitoring of treatment effect or recurrence for a wide range of cancers and shown promise for improving health outcomes for patients with cardiovascular and central nervous system diseases. However, this technology is challenged by insurance coverage policies that hinder patients' access to PET and discourage technologic innovation. Recently, the Medical Imaging & Technology Alliance (MITA), a Washington-based industry association, convened a workshop to consider new pathways for making decisions on Medicare coverage of new PET radiopharmaceuticals and imaging procedures that are currently subject to a national noncoverage decision, or "exclusionary rule." Stakeholders from the government, medical professional societies, academia, patient groups, and industry gathered to brainstorm alternatives to the national noncoverage decision and evaluate their potential to improve access and enhance innovation. Ultimately, MITA, on behalf of the PET community, expects to use the outcomes of the workshop to propose that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services reconsider this current national noncoverage decision for PET and adopt a new framework for coverage.

  16. Building a medical multimedia database system to integrate clinical information: an application of high-performance computing and communications technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, H J; Buchanan, B G; Cooper, G F; Vries, J K

    1995-01-01

    The rapid growth of diagnostic-imaging technologies over the past two decades has dramatically increased the amount of nontextual data generated in clinical medicine. The architecture of traditional, text-oriented, clinical information systems has made the integration of digitized clinical images with the patient record problematic. Systems for the classification, retrieval, and integration of clinical images are in their infancy. Recent advances in high-performance computing, imaging, and networking technology now make it technologically and economically feasible to develop an integrated, multimedia, electronic patient record. As part of The National Library of Medicine's Biomedical Applications of High-Performance Computing and Communications program, we plan to develop Image Engine, a prototype microcomputer-based system for the storage, retrieval, integration, and sharing of a wide range of clinically important digital images. Images stored in the Image Engine database will be indexed and organized using the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus and will be dynamically linked to data in a text-based, clinical information system. We will evaluate Image Engine by initially implementing it in three clinical domains (oncology, gastroenterology, and clinical pathology) at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

  17. Risk of internet addiction among undergraduate medical, nursing, and lab technology students of a health institution from Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anika Sulania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess prevalence, usage pattern, and risk of internet addiction (IA among undergraduate students of a health institution from Delhi. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out during March-April 2015 using 20-item Young′s IA test, a Likert scale-based interview schedule with scores ranging from 0 to 100 points with a higher score indicating greater internet dependency. Background variables included sociodemographic details, general health practices, self-assessment of mental health status, inter-personal relation (family/friends, personality type, and global satisfaction in life. The scoring pattern was analyzed in the form of low risk (score ≤49 points and high risk (score ≥50 points for IA. The proportion, Chi-square test, adjusted, and un-adjusted odds ratio (OR (95% confidence interval were computed using regression analysis. Results: Out of 202, 40.6% were MBBS students, followed by 35.6% from nursing, and 23.8% from medical lab technology stream; 68.3% were females; the mean age was 20.3 ± 1.4 years; and 61.9% were residing in hostels. It was observed that 44 (21.8% and 22 (10.9% students had ever consumed alcohol and smoked, respectively, while only 42 (20.8% were engaged in physical activity (≥30 min during most (≥5 of the days of the week. Based on self-assessment, 33 (16.3% were globally dissatisfied and 88 (43.6% reported themselves to be introverts. The majority of students were using internet for educational purpose (98%, entertainment (95.0%, accessing social sites (92.5%, checking E-mails (76.2%, and pornographic websites (45%. With regard to IA, 171 (84.7% were at low risk (score ≤49 and 31 (15.4% were at high risk (score ≥50. Male students (P = 0.001, ever consumed alcohol (P = 0.003, ever smoker (P = 0.02, and regular physical activity (P = 0.04 were found to be significantly associated with a high risk of IA based on Chi-square test, but none were found significant

  18. Predicting medical staff intention to use an online reporting system with modified unified theory of acceptance and use of technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, I-Chiu; Hsu, Hui-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to report incident events using an online information system (IS) may be different from those of a paper-based reporting system. The nationwide online Patient-Safety Reporting System (PSRS) contains a value judgment behind use of the system, similar to the Value of Perceived Consequence (VPC), which is seldom discussed in ISs applications of other disciplines. This study developed a more adequate research framework by integrating the VPC construct into the well-known Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model as a theoretical base to explore the predictors of medical staff's intention to use online PSRS. The results showed that management support was an important factor to influence medical staff's intention of using PSRS. The effects of factors such as performance expectancy, perceived positive, and perceived negative consequence on medical staff's intention of using PSRS were moderated by gender, age, experience, and occupation. The results proved that the modified UTAUT model is significant and useful in predicting medical staff's intention of using the nationwide online PSRS.

  19. Absorption and metabolization of sex hormones and their transformation into contraceptive technologies: the paths taken by medical thought in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonan, Claudia; Teixeira, Luiz Antonio; Nakano, Andreza Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    The article analyses knowledge assimilation and the development of clinical and research practices relating to sex hormones among Brazilian gynaecologists. It discusses the paths taken by medical thought from the reception of the hormones to their transformation into contraceptives. Our objective is to comprehend styles of introducing and disseminating medical technologies in the area of reproductive health in Brazil. It uses methods of historical analysis and takes as its source the Anais Brasileiros de Ginecologia, a journal published between 1936 and 1970. From the outset, the accompaniment of scientific breakthroughs in relation to sex hormones and their use to treat diverse female illnesses played a key role in the rapid medical acceptance of hormonal contraception. Scientific and technical questions (side effects, dosages) and the demographic issue formed part of the majority of the debates. Objections from the Catholic Church were considered but did not set the agenda of medical thought on contraceptives. The quest to consolidate gynaecology as a scientific, modern and cosmopolitan area of expertise, along with sanitary and demographic motives that allowed contraceptives to be classed as ethical drugs, are identified as processes underlying the assimilation and metabolization of sex hormones as hormonal contraceptives.

  20. As technology and generations in medical education change, what remains is the intersection between educator, learners, assessment and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Amin

    2013-06-01

    The information era has begun to create major shifts in educational systems, including those in undergraduate medical and graduate psychiatric training programmes. Despite these changes, teaching and learning in formal educational settings remains predominately the product of the intersection between educator, learners, assessment and context. This article reviews intrinsic and external forces influencing each of these elements, such as intergenerational differences in teaching and learning styles, education technologies as they relate to delivery and maintenance of curricula, competency frameworks of assessment, and individual learning and teaching development plans. Maintaining a focus on the relationship between these factors and re-conceptualizing psychiatric education and formal medical education systems in general as a mutual two-way learning exchange between participants will promote careers of lifelong learning.

  1. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application.

  2. Predicting Inpatient Detoxification Outcome of Alcohol and Drug Dependent Patients: The Influence of Sociodemographic Environment, Motivation, Impulsivity, and Medical Comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Sofin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. This prospective study aims to identify patient characteristics as predictors for treatment outcome during inpatient detoxification treatment for drug and alcohol dependent patients. Methods. A mixed gender sample of 832 consecutively admitted drug and alcohol dependent patients were interviewed by an experienced physician. The impact of a variety of factors concerning social environment, therapy motivation, impulsivity related variables, medical history, and addiction severity on treatment outcome was examined. Results. 525 (63.1% of the patients completed detoxification treatment whereas 307 (36.9% dropped out prematurely. Being female, living in a partnership, having children, being employed, and having good education were predictive for a positive outcome. Family, health, the fear of losing the job, prosecution, and emergency admission were significant motivational predictors for treatment outcome. Being younger, history of imprisonment, and the number of previous drop-outs were predictive for a negative outcome. Conclusions. Variables concerning social environment and the number of previous drop-outs have been identified as best predictors for treatment outcome. Socially stable patients benefit from the current treatment setting and treatment shall be adapted for patients with negative predictors. Treatment may consequently be tailored with respect to intervention type, duration, and intensity to improve the outcome for those patients that fulfil criteria with negative impact on treatment retention.

  3. Predicting Inpatient Detoxification Outcome of Alcohol and Drug Dependent Patients: The Influence of Sociodemographic Environment, Motivation, Impulsivity, and Medical Comorbidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Gooren, Tina

    2017-01-01

    Aims. This prospective study aims to identify patient characteristics as predictors for treatment outcome during inpatient detoxification treatment for drug and alcohol dependent patients. Methods. A mixed gender sample of 832 consecutively admitted drug and alcohol dependent patients were interviewed by an experienced physician. The impact of a variety of factors concerning social environment, therapy motivation, impulsivity related variables, medical history, and addiction severity on treatment outcome was examined. Results. 525 (63.1%) of the patients completed detoxification treatment whereas 307 (36.9%) dropped out prematurely. Being female, living in a partnership, having children, being employed, and having good education were predictive for a positive outcome. Family, health, the fear of losing the job, prosecution, and emergency admission were significant motivational predictors for treatment outcome. Being younger, history of imprisonment, and the number of previous drop-outs were predictive for a negative outcome. Conclusions. Variables concerning social environment and the number of previous drop-outs have been identified as best predictors for treatment outcome. Socially stable patients benefit from the current treatment setting and treatment shall be adapted for patients with negative predictors. Treatment may consequently be tailored with respect to intervention type, duration, and intensity to improve the outcome for those patients that fulfil criteria with negative impact on treatment retention.

  4. Development of Medical Technology for Contingency Response to Marrow Toxic Substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-08

    and Development Authority IIDB Integrated Immunological Data Base BBMT Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplant IM Information Management BCP... OCR /ICR Optical Character Recognition/Intelligent Character Recognition CTA Clinical Trial Application OIT Office of Information Technology CTMS

  5. Governing Nanomedicine: lessons from within, and for, the EU Medical Technology Regulatory Framework : Guest Editors Introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorbeck-Jung, Bärbel; Bowman, Diana M.; Calster, van Geert

    2011-01-01

    Rapidly emerging technologies, such as nanotechnologies, are posing significant challenges to regulatory governance due to the uncertainties of development trajectories, product properties, and potential risk problems (Davies 2009). While nanotechnology-based products and processes fall within the s

  6. Optical coherence tomography: technology and applications (biological and medical physics, biomedical engineering)

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is the optical analog of ultrasound imaging and is emerging as a powerful imaging technique that enables non-invasive, in vivo, high resolution, cross-sectional imaging in biological tissue. This book introduces OCT technology and applications not only from an optical and technological viewpoint, but also from biomedical and clinical perspectives. The chapters are written by leading research groups, in a style comprehensible to a broad audience.

  7. Measuring Maturity of Use for Electronic Medical Records (EMRs) in British Columbia: The Physician Information Technology Office (PITO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimmer, Carol; Hagens, Simon; Baldwin, Anne; Anderson, Carol J

    2014-01-01

    This article examines British Columbia (BC)'s Physician Information Technology Office's efforts to measure and improve the use of electronic medical records (EMRs) by select practices in BC with an assessment of their progress using a maturity model, and targeted support. The follow-up assessments showed substantial increases in the physicians' scores resulting from action plans that comprised a series of tailored support activities. Specifically, there was an increase from 21% to 83% of physicians who could demonstrate that they used their EMRs as the principal method of record-keeping.

  8. Early assessment of medical technologies to inform product development and market access: a review of methods and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijzerman, Maarten J; Steuten, Lotte M G

    2011-09-01

    Worldwide, billions of dollars are invested in medical product development and there is an increasing pressure to maximize the revenues of these investments. That is, governments need to be informed about the benefits of spending public resources, companies need more information to manage their product development portfolios and even universities may need to direct their research programmes in order to maximize societal benefits. Assuming that all medical products need to be adopted by the heavily regulated healthcare market at one point in time, it is worthwhile to look at the logic behind healthcare decision making, specifically, decisions on the coverage of medical products and decisions on the use of these products under competing and uncertain conditions. With the growing tension between leveraging economic growth through R&D spending on the one hand and stricter control of healthcare budgets on the other, several attempts have been made to apply the health technology assessment (HTA) methodology to earlier stages of technology development and implementation. For instance, horizon scanning was introduced to systematically assess emerging technologies in order to inform health policy. Others have introduced iterative economic evaluation, e.g. economic evaluations in earlier stages of clinical research. However, most of these methods are primarily intended to support governments in making decisions regarding potentially expensive new medical products. They do not really inform biomedical product developers on the probability of return on investment, nor do they inform about the market needs and specific requirements of technologies in development. It is precisely this aspect that increasingly receives attention, i.e. is it possible to use HTA tools and methods to inform biomedical product development and to anticipate further development and market access. Several methods have been used in previous decades, but have never been compiled in a comprehensive review

  9. Conceptual Study of LSTAT Integration to Robotics and Other Advanced Medical Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-31

    Physiological Monitoring System (WPSM) ............................................. 26 Figure 15 MEMS pressure sensor &: membrane oscillator...in The Philippines , Cambodia and elsewhere. Military medical teams are being trained on the use of the LSTAT system at the Navy Trauma Training... accelerometers part of WPSM (Warfighter Physiological Status Monitor) sensor suite WPSM hub links to NG-LSTAT computer Note 1 Note 1 Note 1

  10. Early assessment of medical technologies to inform product development and market access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    IJzerman, Maarten J.; Steuten, Lotte M.G.

    2011-01-01

    Worldwide, billions of dollars are invested in medical product development and there is an increasing pressure to maximize the revenues of these investments. That is, governments need to be informed about the benefits of spending public resources, companies need more information to manage their prod

  11. The Use of Autonomous Systems in Emergency Medical Services: Bridging Human Intelligence and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    35 D. REMOTE OPERATION CONTROL ...................................................37 E. TELEMETRY INTEGRATION...40 Figure 11. Medical Telemetry Architecture Example .................................................41 Figure 12...intelligence that may be integrated into AS applications. Naranjo et al., and Panagao et al., describe the processing of dual mode operations and

  12. Enhancing Third-Year Medical Clerkships: Using Mobile Technology for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Janette R.; Nuss, Michelle A.; Cervero, Ronald M.; Gaines, Julie K.; Middendorf, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The third year clerkship is one of the most exciting and challenging times for medical students (Cooke, Irby, & O'Brien, 2010) when students spend significant time in clinical settings (e.g., hospitals) assisting in the care of patients on a daily basis. Getting information and resources just-in-time and at point-of-care (Author, 2009) is one…

  13. Restructuring an EHR system and the Medical Markup Language (MML) standard to improve interoperability by archetype technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shinji; Kume, Naoto; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    In 2001, we developed an EHR system for regional healthcare information inter-exchange and to provide individual patient data to patients. This system was adopted in three regions in Japan. We also developed a Medical Markup Language (MML) standard for inter- and intra-hospital communications. The system was built on a legacy platform, however, and had not been appropriately maintained or updated to meet clinical requirements. To improve future maintenance costs, we reconstructed the EHR system using archetype technology on the Ruby on Rails platform, and generated MML equivalent forms from archetypes. The system was deployed as a cloud-based system for preliminary use as a regional EHR. The system now has the capability to catch up with new requirements, maintaining semantic interoperability with archetype technology. It is also more flexible than the legacy EHR system.

  14. [Submitting to disease, controlling disease, industrialization and medical technology: the case of tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thebaud, A; Lert, F

    1985-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the research work undertaken in France and Algeria on tuberculosis and the application of tuberculosis treatments. Tuberculosis is one of the best medical pointers to social inequality. The disease is seen here as typical of the links between industrialization and health, with regard to the evolution of the epidemiological model and the influence of innovational+ treatments, based on chemotherapy, on the organization of care for tubercular patients, together with the socio-economic and cultural changes that have affected both French and Algerian society during the twentieth century. The first part of the article shows how the epidemiology of tuberculosis tends to vary in accordance with the dynamic evolution of social relationships as industrialization occurs in each country, and how world-wide epidemiological trends are one of the best medical pointers to the North-South divide. The second part of the article is given over to a study of the way in which the application of tuberculosis treatments in both France and Algeria is a function of the organization of the health system in each country, of the status and power of the medical profession within society, and of the impact of technical innovations on the changing forms of care for tubercular patients in both countries. In France, it can be seen that the structure of the system set up to combat tuberculosis in the inter-war years has tended to remain unchanged, despite the opportunities for re-organization of tuberculosis treatment and for making therapy less onerous which have arisen as the incidence of the disease has dropped and antibiotics have been introduced. This resistance to change seems due primarily to the difficulty of achieving redeployment of medical staff, and the inertia caused by the rigid structure of tuberculosis care within the French socio-medical system.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Software-Related Recalls of Health Information Technology and Other Medical Devices: Implications for FDA Regulation of Digital Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronquillo, Jay G; Zuckerman, Diana M

    2017-09-01

    Policy Points: Medical software has become an increasingly critical component of health care, yet the regulation of these devices is inconsistent and controversial. No studies of medical devices and software assess the impact on patient safety of the FDA's current regulatory safeguards and new legislative changes to those standards. Our analysis quantifies the impact of software problems in regulated medical devices and indicates that current regulations are necessary but not sufficient for ensuring patient safety by identifying and eliminating dangerous defects in software currently on the market. New legislative changes will further deregulate health IT, reducing safeguards that facilitate the reporting and timely recall of flawed medical software that could harm patients. Medical software has become an increasingly critical component of health care, yet the regulatory landscape for digital health is inconsistent and controversial. To understand which policies might best protect patients, we examined the impact of the US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) regulatory safeguards on software-related technologies in recent years and the implications for newly passed legislative changes in regulatory policy. Using FDA databases, we identified all medical devices that were recalled from 2011 through 2015 primarily because of software defects. We counted all software-related recalls for each FDA risk category and evaluated each high-risk and moderate-risk recall of electronic medical records to determine the manufacturer, device classification, submission type, number of units, and product details. A total of 627 software devices (1.4 million units) were subject to recalls, with 12 of these devices (190,596 units) subject to the highest-risk recalls. Eleven of the devices recalled as high risk had entered the market through the FDA review process that does not require evidence of safety or effectiveness, and one device was completely exempt from regulatory review

  16. On Medical Risk Emergency Disposal Technology SOP in China%论我国医疗风险应急处置技术SOP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜鑫; 霍原; 张赫楠

    2014-01-01

    医疗风险应急处置技术是现代社会医疗风险管理体系中非常重要的环节,其规范性与科学性对于医疗风险应急处置技术的效果至关重要。文章围绕医疗风险应急处置技术SOP展开阐述,界定了医疗风险及应急处置技术SOP,重点阐述医疗风险应急处置技术SOP的内容,从明确相关定义、组织体系及职责、应急处置预案、处置技术流程、责任追究等方面进行了论证,目的是构建科学的医疗风险应急处置技术SOP,以期更好地实现医疗风险的科学、有序处置。%Emergency disposal technology of medical risks is a very important part of modern social medical risk management system, its standardization and scientificity is essential to the effect of the emergency disposal technology of medical risks. The article discusses medical risk emergency disposal technology SOP, defines the concept of medical risk and emergency disposal technology SOP,focuses on the content of medical risk emergen-cy disposal technology SOP, demonstrates from the aspects of clear definition, organizational system and function, emergency response plans, disposal technology process, and accountability, with the purpose of building a scien-tific SOP for emergency disposal technology of medical risks, and better implementing scientific and orderly dis-position of medical risks.

  17. Adolescents' preference for technology-based emergency department behavioral interventions: does it depend on risky behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranney, Megan L; Choo, Esther K; Spirito, Anthony; Mello, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    This study aimed to (1) determine the prevalence of technology use and interest in technology-based interventions among adolescent emergency department patients and (2) examine the association between interest in an intervention and self-reported risky behaviors. Adolescents (age, 13-17 years) presenting to an urban pediatric emergency department completed a survey regarding baseline technology use, risky behaviors, and interest in and preferred format for behavioral health interventions. Questions were drawn from validated measures when possible. Descriptive statistics and χ2 tests were calculated to identify whether self-reported risky behaviors were differentially associated with intervention preference. Two hundred thirty-four patients (81.8% of eligible) consented to participate. Almost all used technology, including computers (98.7%), social networking (84.9%), and text messaging (95.1%). Adolescents reported high prevalence of risky behaviors as follows: unintentional injury (93.2%), peer violence exposure (29.3%), dating violence victimization (23.0%), depression or anxiety (30.0%), alcohol use (22.8%), drug use (36.1%), cigarette use (16.4%), and risky sexual behaviors (15.1%). Most were interested in receiving behavioral interventions (ranging from 93.6% interest in unintentional injury prevention, to 73.1% in smoking cessation); 45% to 93% preferred technology-based (vs in person, telephone call, or paper) interventions for each topic. Proportion interested in a specific topic and proportion preferring a technology-based intervention did not significantly differ by self-reported risky behaviors. Among this sample of adolescent emergency department patients, high rates of multiple risky behaviors are reported. Patients endorsed interest in receiving interventions for these behaviors, regardless of whether they reported the behavior. Most used multiple forms of technology, and approximately 50% preferred a technology-based intervention format.

  18. eLearning or technology enhanced learning in medical education-Hope, not hype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Poh Sun

    2016-09-01

    This Personal View elaborates on my strong conviction that the excitement and positive feelings that many of us have for eLearning or Technology enhanced learning (TeL) is well founded, and will argue why our hopes are justified, and not misplaced. In a nutshell, I believe that eLearning or TeL is a significant advance from previous generations of educational innovation, and offers benefits for students, educators and administrators; by synergistically combining the capabilities of digital content, the Internet, and mobile technology, supported by software and applications or "Apps".

  19. Feasibility of mHealth and Near Field Communication technology based medication adherence monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Juergen; Schwarz, Mark; Hayn, Dieter; Schreier, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    Poor patients' adherence to intake of prescribed medication has been identified as a serious problem in the treatment of chronically ill patients. Technical solutions are needed to measure and - if necessary - to increase the patients' adherence. A telemonitoring solution was developed to record a patient's medication intake based on smart blisters and mobile phones with NFC functionality. The components allowed recording of drug type, timestamp, and dosage of pills taken. The system's usability and technical feasibility was evaluated in the course of an application study. Over a period of 13 months 59 patients suffering from diabetes were monitored. 1,760 blisters were handed out to these patients and 14,843 takeout events were recorded and transmitted via mobile phone. Results indicate the feasibility of this concept to monitor adherence. Although the system still needs to be optimized for routine use it shows the potential for targeting the problem of poor patient adherence by NFC enabled devices.

  20. Assessment of medical technology students' perceptions of clinical site rotations and job choice criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, J Michele; Fenn, Joann P

    2004-01-01

    This study reflects an assessment conducted at the University of Utah to determine medical laboratory science students' perceptions and influence of clinical rotations on job choice criteria. A mixed method design was used, incorporating semistructured interviews and mailed questionnaires. This study identified both favorable as well as unfavorable factors that influence students' employment choices. Clinical managers should: 1) foster a positive organizational climate; 2) encourage constructive employee-student interaction and respect; 3) promote the clinical facilities' reputation of excellence in health care; and 4) continue to offer competitive wages and employee benefits. Clinical managers should avoid: 1) a lack of positive attitudes toward students; and 2) a lack of respect for the student's knowledge. This study provides crucial information for laboratory directors, managers, and supervisors who are interested in creating an ideal climate in which to recruit graduating medical laboratory science (MLS) students.

  1. The impact of social media and technology on professionalism in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essary, Alison C

    2011-01-01

    The use of social media is the norm among the digital native generation, with 75% of the Millennial Generation connected through Facebook. For students in medical education who struggle to distinguish between personal and professional boundaries, social media provides yet another challenge. Incidents of unprofessional conduct and academic dismissal have been reported. Administration, faculty, and students would benefit from clear policies and procedures, case scenarios of social media violations, and suggestions for using social media wisely.

  2. Medical Device Plug-and-Play Interoperability Standards and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Data Logger standard. In support of this project, we set up a web-based project site (see Figure 1) and Dr. Goldman chaired virtual meetings...Gaithersburg, MD  November 14-17 2015 – AMIA Conference, San Francisco, CA; Nursing Informatics HIT Maker Faire featured OpenICE  December 1 2015...Patient Safety: Making Medical Device ‘Plug-and-Play’ Interoperability a Reality ,” Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare 7:1, 26-30, Jan-Feb 2010. 25

  3. [Multi-course web-learning system for supporting students of medical technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Satoru; Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi; Kurihara, Yuriko; Yoshida, Shoko; Sakai, Nobue

    2013-05-01

    Web-Learning system was developed to support the self-learning for national qualification examination and medical engineering practice by students. The results from small tests in various situations suggest that the unit-learning systems are more effective, especially for the early stage of their self learning. In addition, the answers of some questionnaire suggest that the students' motivation has a certain relation with the number of the questions in the system. That is, the less number of the questions, the easier they are worked out with a higher learning motivation by students. Thus, the system was extended to enable students to study various subjects and/or units by themselves. The system enables them to have learning effects more easily by the exercise during lectures. The effectiveness of the system was investigated on medical associated subjects installed in the system. The concerning questions of Medical engineering and Pathological histology are adequately divided into several groups, of which sixteen Web-Learning subsystems were well composed for their practical application. Our concerning various unit-learning systems were confirmed much useful for most students comparing with the case of the overall Web-Learning system.

  4. Career choices in allied health: A study of influencing factors on students of medical technology at an Indian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammita J Jadhav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, entry level medical technology (MT students usually decide their career choice before the commencement of the graduate programs. There is no provision for assimilating the intricacies of different specializations in the field of MT. Aim: The research aims at identifying the factors that play a major role in reaching a career choice by MT students and disseminating this information to stakeholders for effective program design and delivery. Setting and Designs: An exploratory study was carried out at an Indian university on 78 students of MT programs in Cardiac care, dialysis, respiratory therapy, imaging sciences, clinical laboratory, operation theater and Anesthesia technology. Materials and Methods: Students were surveyed to ascertain the influencing factors that shape their preferences for career choice preceded by focus group interview. Statistical Analysis: Data was analyzed using SPSS Inc. Version 16.0; frequency distribution was used to obtain valid percentage. Cross tabulation was used to arrive at P value. Results: The prime factors influencing career choices emerged as Hospital infrastructure (91.3%, working environment (87%, alumni (P = 0.04 and status of specialization (P = 0.02 at 95% of the confidence interval however; profile of patient, use of equipment and career growth (78% also played an influential role. Conclusion: It is critical to understand and address the influencing factors that affect career choices; necessitating academia and the health care industry to partner in creating better adapted medical technologists.

  5. Visualizing the Future: Technology Competency Development in Clinical Medicine, and Implications for Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Keenan, Craig R.; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: In this article, the authors ask three questions. First, what will physicians need to know in order to be effective in the future? Second, what role will technology play in achieving that high level of effectiveness? Third, what specific skill sets will physicians need to master in order to become effective? Method: Through three case…

  6. Medical Radiologic Technology: A Suggested Two-Year Post High School Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint Louis Community Coll. at Forest Park, MO.

    Prepared to aid in the planning and initiation of radiologic technology programs in community colleges and vocational technical schools, this curriculum guide should be useful to school administrators, advisory committees, and faculty, and may be modified to meet local, state, and regional needs. It contains full descriptions of 22 course…

  7. Correlationally Assessing the Relationship of Information Technology Investments in Electronic Medical Records to Business Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    The lag in information exchange and assimilation adoption experienced by modern primary care physicians in the conduct of evidence based medicine may be affecting health care system productivity and patient quality of care. Further, interest in whether or not information technology (IT) investments show an increase in business value has increased…

  8. 2011 Mississippi Curriculum Framework: Postsecondary Paramedic. (Program CIP: 51.0904 - Emergency Medical Technology/Technician)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briscoe, Lisa; Bryant, Katrina; Deschamp, Clyde; Galtelli, Mark; Glasson, Kristi; Hall, David; Hood, Brenda; Mahaffey, Libby; McBryde, John; Read, John; Shirley, Gary

    2011-01-01

    As the world economy continues to evolve, businesses and industries must adopt new practices and processes in order to survive. Quality and cost control, work teams and participatory management, and an infusion of technology are transforming the way people work and do business. Employees are now expected to read, write, and communicate…

  9. Assessing Factors Affecting Physician's Intention to Adopt Biometric Authentication Technology in Electronic Medical Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazao, Cesar E.

    2014-01-01

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) regulated the privacy and security of patient information. Since HIPPA became a law, hospital operators have struggled to comply fully with its security and privacy provisions. The proximity-based biometric authentication (PBBA) technology evolved in last decade to help…

  10. Correlationally Assessing the Relationship of Information Technology Investments in Electronic Medical Records to Business Value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    The lag in information exchange and assimilation adoption experienced by modern primary care physicians in the conduct of evidence based medicine may be affecting health care system productivity and patient quality of care. Further, interest in whether or not information technology (IT) investments show an increase in business value has increased…

  11. Evolution of technology in teaching: Blackboard and beyond in Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muttappallymyalil, Jayakumary; Mendis, Susirith; John, Lisha Jenny; Shanthakumari, Nisha; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Shaikh, Rizwana B

    2016-10-01

    the passing of knowledge from one generation to another - has been in existence from the earliest times of human civilization. It began in 1801, with a large piece of slate hung on the wall in a school in Scotland to provide information to a large audience at one time. In the US by mid-19th century, every class room had a blackboard to teach students. The modern version of the blackboard is either green or brown board. This was introduced in late 1960s. The whiteboards came into use during the late 1980s. Projected aids have been used since 1420. The various devices used are the epidiascope, slide projector, overhead projector for transparencies and the micro projector. An instrument to project images from a horizontal surface onto a vertical screen was invented in the 1870s. By the 1960s, transparencies were in use in classrooms. The 'Hyalotype', a transparent image of a photograph using actual black and white photographs on a glass slide that could be projected was invented in 1851. By 1916, the German company Agfa started producing colored lantern slides. The first version of PowerPoint was released by Microsoft in the year 1990. Cell phones, palmtops, and handheld computers; tablets, laptops, and media players are included under mobile learning devices. With the evolution of technology, students achieved competence and interested in interactive learning. The education industry has moved from distance learning to e-learning and finally to m-learning as knowledge expanded exponentially and the demand escalated. While using teaching aids with advanced technology, we must not forget the lessons from the past, striking a balance between embracing new methods of teaching and learning while upholding the timeless principles of education. The newer educational technology can be part of a comprehensive system for lifelong education. Use of technology in education has come a long way since the earliest times of human civilization. While embarking on aids with advanced

  12. Evolution of technology in teaching: Blackboard and beyond in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendis, Susirith; John, Lisha Jenny; Shanthakumari, Nisha; Sreedharan, Jayadevan; Shaikh, Rizwana B

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and learning the passing of knowledge from one generation to another - has been in existence from the earliest times of human civilization. It began in 1801, with a large piece of slate hung on the wall in a school in Scotland to provide information to a large audience at one time. In the US by mid-19th century, every class room had a blackboard to teach students. The modern version of the blackboard is either green or brown board. This was introduced in late 1960s. The whiteboards came into use during the late 1980s. Projected aids have been used since 1420. The various devices used are the epidiascope, slide projector, overhead projector for transparencies and the micro projector. An instrument to project images from a horizontal surface onto a vertical screen was invented in the 1870s. By the 1960s, transparencies were in use in classrooms. The ‘Hyalotype’, a transparent image of a photograph using actual black and white photographs on a glass slide that could be projected was invented in 1851. By 1916, the German company Agfa started producing colored lantern slides. The first version of PowerPoint was released by Microsoft in the year 1990. Cell phones, palmtops, and handheld computers; tablets, laptops, and media players are included under mobile learning devices. With the evolution of technology, students achieved competence and interested in interactive learning. The education industry has moved from distance learning to e-learning and finally to m-learning as knowledge expanded exponentially and the demand escalated. While using teaching aids with advanced technology, we must not forget the lessons from the past, striking a balance between embracing new methods of teaching and learning while upholding the timeless principles of education. The newer educational technology can be part of a comprehensive system for lifelong education. Conclusion: Use of technology in education has come a long way since the earliest times of human civilization

  13. On the Value and Regulation of Medical Technology Applications%医学技术应用的价值思考与规制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜柏生; 刘虹

    2011-01-01

    As the rapid growth of medical technology, its applications not only promote the ad-vancement of medicine which brings about happiness to human beings, but also generate some negative social impact and consequences. Medical technology, as a tool, needs to be guided and regulated by value rationality. Social benefits, party autonomy, equal rights, privacy, public order and good morals are basic principles that must be adhered to in the application of medical technology. Keywords; medical technology, application of medical technology, medical jurisprudence%医学技术的发展日新月异,其应用不仅促进了医学的进步,给人类带来了福音,同时也产生了许多不良社会影响和负面后果.医学技术作为一种工具理性需要价值理性的引导和规制.社会效益、意思自治、权利平等、隐私保密、公序良俗是医学技术应用中必须坚持的基本原则.

  14. RU OK? The acceptability and feasibility of remote technologies for follow-up after early medical abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken, Hillary; Lohr, Patricia A; Taylor, Jeanette; Morroni, Chelsea; Winikoff, Beverly

    2014-07-01

    We tested the effectiveness and feasibility of remote communication technologies to increase follow-up after early medical abortion. Women (n=999) were randomized to 'remote' follow-up incorporating a low-sensitivity pregnancy test and standardized symptom questionnaire administered online, by text message or telephone by a non-clinical call center operator 2 weeks after treatment, or to 'clinic-based' follow-up with ultrasound at 1 week. Women in the clinic-based group who could not return performed a high-sensitivity pregnancy test at 3 weeks and had a telephone call with clinic staff. The primary outcome was completion of follow-up. Rates of complications, acceptability and preferences were compared. The overall follow-up rate did not differ by group {clinic-based, 73% vs. remote, 69%; risk ratio (RR) 1.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9-1.2]}. In the clinic-based group, 83% did not return for an ultrasound scan and were followed up by phone. In the remote group, follow-up by phone or text was more successful than online (text: 75.4%; phone: 73.7%; online: 46.5%, pafter medical abortion using remote communication is feasible and, for most women, preferable to a clinic visit. Medical abortion protocols typically use follow-up visits to ensure early identification of complications. This study demonstrates that follow-up can be achieved using remote communication technologies. This model may reduce the burden of multiple clinic visits on patients and providers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessment of motivation for treatment in alcohol dependent patients who sought treatment at a specialized medical service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Júnior Hercílio Pereira de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Motivation is deemed a critical component for interventions intended to change behaviors related to the use of alcohol and other drugs. The classification of patients in 'stages of change' can be a useful tool for the organization and improvement of treating programs. METHODS: This study assessed the stages of change using the scales URICA and SOCRATES in patients who attended two different treating programs for alcohol dependence in a specialized medical service. We performed an analysis of the association between stages of change and demographic aspects. After three months of treatment, patients were reassessed to evaluate their outcome. RESULTS: In the assessments using URICA, there was an association between stages of change and monthly income and age. There was no evidence that patients move across the stages of change. Using the scale SOCRATES, we found an association between stages of change and monthly income. In the reassessment, there was a significant movement across the stages of change. CONCLUSION: Patients who attend two different treating programs may have different motivation profiles. There was no movement congruent with the stage of change model, suggesting that patients may need more than 3 months to obtain significant changes in their motivation.

  16. Research trends in biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering: 3D bioprinting, surface modification, nano/micro-technology and clinical aspects in tissue engineering of cartilage and bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cen; Bang, Sumi; Cho, Younghak; Lee, Sahnghoon; Lee, Inseop; Zhang, ShengMin; Noh, Insup

    2016-01-01

    This review discusses about biomimetic medical materials for tissue engineering of bone and cartilage, after previous scientific commentary of the invitation-based, Korea-China joint symposium on biomimetic medical materials, which was held in Seoul, Korea, from October 22 to 26, 2015. The contents of this review were evolved from the presentations of that symposium. Four topics of biomimetic medical materials were discussed from different research groups here: 1) 3D bioprinting medical materials, 2) nano/micro-technology, 3) surface modification of biomaterials for their interactions with cells and 4) clinical aspects of biomaterials for cartilage focusing on cells, scaffolds and cytokines.

  17. Biomedical, ethical, and moral issues being forced by advanced medical technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satava, Richard M

    2003-09-01

    Technology is rampant, exponentially growing beyond the bounds normally comprehensible by the human mind. Many of these technologies are so fundamentally disruptive that they challenge the very practice of science. Discoveries once unimaginable except in science fiction are appearing at such a rapid rate that there is no time to evaluate their moral and ethical implications in a deliberate and measured fashion. Genetic engineering, human cloning, tissue engineering, intelligent robotics, nanotechnology, suspended animation, regeneration, and species prolongation are but a few that will revolutionize what it means to be human and what the ultimate fate of the species may be. Unless these issues are addressed at this time, we shall face the consequences of an uncontrolled and unprepared future.

  18. Managing data quality in an existing medical data warehouse using business intelligence technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Scott; Ostrander, Michael; Santangelo, Jennifer; Kamal, Jyoti

    2008-11-06

    The Ohio State University Medical Center (OSUMC) Information Warehouse (IW) is a comprehensive data warehousing facility that provides providing data integration, management, mining, training, and development services to a diversity of customers across the clinical, education, and research sectors of the OSUMC. Providing accurate and complete data is a must for these purposes. In order to monitor the data quality of targeted data sets, an online scorecard has been developed to allow visualization of the critical measures of data quality in the Information Warehouse.

  19. Just another reproductive technology? The ethics of human reproductive cloning as an experimental medical procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, D

    2006-10-01

    Human reproductive cloning (HRC) has not yet resulted in any live births. There has been widespread condemnation of the practice in both the scientific world and the public sphere, and many countries explicitly outlaw the practice. Concerns about the procedure range from uncertainties about its physical safety to questions about the psychological well-being of clones. Yet, key aspects such as the philosophical implications of harm to future entities and a comparison with established reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilisation (IVF) are often overlooked in discussions about HRC. Furthermore, there are people who are willing to use the technology. Several scientists have been outspoken in their intent to pursue HRC. The importance of concerns about the physical safety of children created by HRC and comparisons with concerns about the safety of IVF are discussed. A model to be used to determine when it is acceptable to use HRC and other new assisted reproductive technologies, balancing reproductive freedom and safety concerns, is proposed. Justifications underpinning potential applications of HRC are discussed, and it is determined that these are highly analogous to rationalisations used to justify IVF treatment. It is concluded that people wishing to conceive using HRC should have a prima facie negative right to do so.

  20. The application of imaging technologies in the detection of trace evidence in forensic medical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocks, Jeannie; du Toit-Prinsloo, Lorraine; Steffens, Francois; Saayman, Gert

    2015-04-01

    In a country notorious for violent crime, it seems that South African medico-legal laboratories make minimal application of technology in the death investigation process and little attention is given to trace evidence. Non-destructive, non-invasive, portable and cost-effective tools are required. This study was conducted at the Pretoria Medico-Legal Laboratory. The surface area of the bodies and clothing of victims of fatal interpersonal violence were examined using a torch, magnifying lamp, portable digital microscope and alternate light source to gauge their potential for trace evidence detection. Most studies apply these and similar tools to inert surfaces, with few focusing on their application to human skin. There was a statistically significant difference in the detection of many of the evidence types between the naked-eye observation of the pathologists and the technologies. The different imaging technologies were compared as to their cost, evidence detection ability and ease of use. The most common evidence types discovered on the bodies and clothing of victims of fatal interpersonal violence, as well as the propensity of each tool to detect these, was evaluated in order to devise the best option for incorporation into the Pretoria Medico-Legal Laboratory routine. The digital microscope performed best overall followed by the magnifying lamp, torch and the Polilight(®). This study aimed to justify the investment of more time, effort and funding into trace evidence recovery in the South African mortuary environment.

  1. Survey of Medical Literature Borrowed from the National Lending Library for Science and Technology *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, David N.; Bower, Cathryn A.

    1969-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a four-week questionnaire survey carried out at the National Lending Library (N.L.L.), Great Britian, to discover which types of organizations were the principal users of medical literature, what types of literature were used, and which were the main sources of references to medical publications. Industrial organizations and universities accounted for the majority (62 percent) of the loans, most of which were English-language periodicals published since 1960. For the whole sample, citation lists in periodical articles were the principal sources of references, although for literature published in the last fifteen months, abstracting and indexing journals were the main sources. Of the latter, Index Medicus proved to be the most fruitful source of references. By asking whether the item requested was really useful to their work, a measure of the reliability of the different sources of references was obtained. Appendixes include the questionnaire, a list of the most frequently borrowed journals, and a list of abstracting and indexing journals used as sources of references. PMID:5782264

  2. Security of distributed processing of medical image data using JINI technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruminski, Jacek

    2007-01-01

    Health Care Organizations (HCOs) are highly computerized using broadband networks for data communication within and outside of their departments. However their computer resources are usually task oriented, and not effectively used. Already introduced and new standards for e-Health (e.g. DICOM, TC251-standards) offer workflow management models to organize different resources towards a one, complex task. Distributed processing can be used to implement such models. Similarly, computational resources can be used for any complicated problem-solving task inside a HCO department, between HCO departments and between HCOs. In this article the security analysis of Jini-based computational grids and cost of safeguards introduction is presented. The Jini-based GRID was analyzed in two medical parametric imaging tasks: active, dynamic infrared imaging and dynamic susceptibility contrast imaging (DSC-MRI).

  3. U.S. Military Technology Dependence: The Hidden Vulnerability to National Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    18 J. Snell, “Chaos Theory and Post Modernism .” Education, 130(2), (February 2009), 274-276. http...Jennifer Daryl, and J. Macgregor Wise. "Culture and Technology." A Primer, New 2005. Snell, J., “Chaos Theory and Post Modernism ”, Education, 130(2...heated debates over the ethics of their use in war; however, today drones are no longer for military use only. Recently enthusiasts flying drones all

  4. Medication safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keohane, Carol A; Bates, David W

    2008-03-01

    Patient safety is a state of mind, not a technology. The technologies used in the medical setting represent tools that must be properly designed, used well, and assessed on an on-going basis. Moreover, in all settings, building a culture of safety is pivotal for improving safety, and many nontechnologic approaches, such as medication reconciliation and teaching patients about their medications, are also essential. This article addresses the topic of medication safety and examines specific strategies being used to decrease the incidence of medication errors across various clinical settings.

  5. Assessing the viewpoint of faculty members of medical record departments in Iran about the impact of Information Technology on health system 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza safdary

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Understanding the potential impact of information technology on health system can be used as a basis for health promotion based on information technology (IT. Undoubtedly, faculty members of medical record departments in Iranian medical universities have a significant role in knowledge gain of college students about the effectiveness of information technology on health system. Methods: In order to assess the impact of IT on health system in the viewpoint of faculty members of medical record departments in Iranian medical universities, a cross sectional survey was conducted and questionnaires were sent to 17 universities with medical records departments. The questionnaire had three sections: The effect of IT on health information management (including: quantitative and qualitative promotion of documentations, follow up and referral, demand management and income and cost system, medical research and medical education. To investigate the correlations between variables of the study, X2 and exact fisher tests were used. Result: From 64 distributed questionnaires, a total of 49 were completed. The majority of faculty members (%40.81 believed that the use of IT enhances the utilization of paper documents. %26.53 believed that the use of IT has high impact on increase of medical errors. The majority of members (%36.75 considered IT to have a medium impact on self-therapy. The impact of information technology on medical research and medical education was believed to be very high by 83.67% and 79.59% of respondents, respectively. We did not find any correlation between the impact of IT on the studied variables and demographic data of participants such as age, gender and the years of teaching. Discussion: Most of faculty members of medical record departments have a high knowledge about the impact of IT on promotion of the management of health, research and education in medical sciences, but their knowledge about effectiveness of IT on quality

  6. Green Materials Science and Engineering Reduces Biofouling: Approaches for Medical and Membrane-based Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerianne M Dobosz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous engineered and natural environments suffer deleterious effects from biofouling and/or biofilm formation. For instance, bacterial contamination on biomedical devices pose serious health concerns. In membrane-based technologies, such as desalination and wastewater reuse, biofouling decreases membrane lifetime and increases the energy required to produce clean water. Traditionally, approaches have combatted bacteria using bactericidal agents. However, due to globalization, a decline in antibiotic discovery, and the widespread resistance of microbes to many commercial antibiotics and metallic nanoparticles, new materials and approaches to reduce biofilm formation are needed. In this mini-review, we cover the recent strategies that have been explored to combat microbial contamination without exerting evolutionary pressure on microorganisms. Renewable feedstocks, relying on structure-property relationships, bioinspired/nature-derived compounds, and green processing methods are discussed. Greener strategies that mitigate biofouling hold great potential to positively impact human health and safety.

  7. Green materials science and engineering reduces biofouling: approaches for medical and membrane-based technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Kerianne M; Kolewe, Kristopher W; Schiffman, Jessica D

    2015-01-01

    Numerous engineered and natural environments suffer deleterious effects from biofouling and/or biofilm formation. For instance, bacterial contamination on biomedical devices pose serious health concerns. In membrane-based technologies, such as desalination and wastewater reuse, biofouling decreases membrane lifetime, and increases the energy required to produce clean water. Traditionally, approaches have combatted bacteria using bactericidal agents. However, due to globalization, a decline in antibiotic discovery, and the widespread resistance of microbes to many commercial antibiotics and metallic nanoparticles, new materials, and approaches to reduce biofilm formation are needed. In this mini-review, we cover the recent strategies that have been explored to combat microbial contamination without exerting evolutionary pressure on microorganisms. Renewable feedstocks, relying on structure-property relationships, bioinspired/nature-derived compounds, and green processing methods are discussed. Greener strategies that mitigate biofouling hold great potential to positively impact human health and safety.

  8. The impact of information technology and networks: new perspectives for scientific, technical and medical (STM) publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kemp, Arnoud

    This contribution is a strongly abbreviated notation of a much longer presentation at the Workshop on Strategies and Techniques of Information for Astronomy, organized by the European Science Foundation in Strasbourg on 21/22 June 1996. The process of publishing will undergo dramatic changes due to the influences of information technology and networks. The publishing business as a whole will shift from traditional print- and paper-based organisations to a fully digital workflow from author to end-user. Electronic publishing has moved from pre-print activities to digital preprints on a variety of servers, but still most scientific documentation is printed and not only for archival purposes. In this short contribution, a plea is made for new rules in scientific communication that authors, editors, publishers, societies, libraries and users can recognize. In addition, in the electronic age we need more security for copyright, transactions over networks and against misuse in general.

  9. Green materials science and engineering reduces biofouling: approaches for medical and membrane-based technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobosz, Kerianne M.; Kolewe, Kristopher W.; Schiffman, Jessica D.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous engineered and natural environments suffer deleterious effects from biofouling and/or biofilm formation. For instance, bacterial contamination on biomedical devices pose serious health concerns. In membrane-based technologies, such as desalination and wastewater reuse, biofouling decreases membrane lifetime, and increases the energy required to produce clean water. Traditionally, approaches have combatted bacteria using bactericidal agents. However, due to globalization, a decline in antibiotic discovery, and the widespread resistance of microbes to many commercial antibiotics and metallic nanoparticles, new materials, and approaches to reduce biofilm formation are needed. In this mini-review, we cover the recent strategies that have been explored to combat microbial contamination without exerting evolutionary pressure on microorganisms. Renewable feedstocks, relying on structure-property relationships, bioinspired/nature-derived compounds, and green processing methods are discussed. Greener strategies that mitigate biofouling hold great potential to positively impact human health and safety. PMID:25852659

  10. Analysis of Documentation Speed Using Web-Based Medical Speech Recognition Technology: Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Markus; Kaisers, Wolfgang; Wassmuth, Ralf; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2015-11-03

    Clinical documentation has undergone a change due to the usage of electronic health records. The core element is to capture clinical findings and document therapy electronically. Health care personnel spend a significant portion of their time on the computer. Alternatives to self-typing, such as speech recognition, are currently believed to increase documentation efficiency and quality, as well as satisfaction of health professionals while accomplishing clinical documentation, but few studies in this area have been published to date. This study describes the effects of using a Web-based medical speech recognition system for clinical documentation in a university hospital on (1) documentation speed, (2) document length, and (3) physician satisfaction. Reports of 28 physicians were randomized to be created with (intervention) or without (control) the assistance of a Web-based system of medical automatic speech recognition (ASR) in the German language. The documentation was entered into a browser's text area and the time to complete the documentation including all necessary corrections, correction effort, number of characters, and mood of participant were stored in a database. The underlying time comprised text entering, text correction, and finalization of the documentation event. Participants self-assessed their moods on a scale of 1-3 (1=good, 2=moderate, 3=bad). Statistical analysis was done using permutation tests. The number of clinical reports eligible for further analysis stood at 1455. Out of 1455 reports, 718 (49.35%) were assisted by ASR and 737 (50.65%) were not assisted by ASR. Average documentation speed without ASR was 173 (SD 101) characters per minute, while it was 217 (SD 120) characters per minute using ASR. The overall increase in documentation speed through Web-based ASR assistance was 26% (P=.04). Participants documented an average of 356 (SD 388) characters per report when not assisted by ASR and 649 (SD 561) characters per report when assisted

  11. Acceptability of Mobile Phone Technology for Medication Adherence Interventions among HIV-Positive Patients at an Urban Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W. T. Miller

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phone technology is increasingly used to overcome traditional barriers limiting access to care. The goal of this study was to evaluate access and willingness to use smart and mobile phone technology for promoting adherence among people attending an urban HIV clinic. One hundred consecutive HIV-positive patients attending an urban HIV outpatient clinic were surveyed. The questionnaire evaluated access to and utilization of mobile phones and willingness to use them to enhance adherence to HIV medication. The survey also included the CASE adherence index as a measure of adherence. The average age was 46.4 (. The majority of participants were males (63%, black (93%, and Hispanic (11.4% and reported earning less than $10,000 per year (67.3%. Most identified themselves as being current smokers (57%. The vast majority reported currently taking HAART (83.5%. Approximately half of the participants reported some difficulty with adherence (CASE < 10. Ninety-six percent reported owning a mobile phone. Among owners of mobile phones 47.4% reported currently owning more than one device. Over a quarter reported owning a smartphone. About 60% used their phones for texting and 1/3 used their phone to search the Internet. Nearly 70% reported that they would use a mobile device to help with HIV adherence. Those who reported being very likely or likely to use a mobile device to improve adherence were significantly more likely to use their phone daily ( and use their phone for text messages (. The vast majority of patients in an urban HIV clinic own mobile phones and would use them to enhance adherence interventions to HIV medication.

  12. Acceptability of Mobile Phone Technology for Medication Adherence Interventions among HIV-Positive Patients at an Urban Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher W T; Himelhoch, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phone technology is increasingly used to overcome traditional barriers limiting access to care. The goal of this study was to evaluate access and willingness to use smart and mobile phone technology for promoting adherence among people attending an urban HIV clinic. One hundred consecutive HIV-positive patients attending an urban HIV outpatient clinic were surveyed. The questionnaire evaluated access to and utilization of mobile phones and willingness to use them to enhance adherence to HIV medication. The survey also included the CASE adherence index as a measure of adherence. The average age was 46.4 (SD = 9.2). The majority of participants were males (63%), black (93%), and Hispanic (11.4%) and reported earning less than $10,000 per year (67.3%). Most identified themselves as being current smokers (57%). The vast majority reported currently taking HAART (83.5%). Approximately half of the participants reported some difficulty with adherence (CASE mobile phone. Among owners of mobile phones 47.4% reported currently owning more than one device. Over a quarter reported owning a smartphone. About 60% used their phones for texting and 1/3 used their phone to search the Internet. Nearly 70% reported that they would use a mobile device to help with HIV adherence. Those who reported being very likely or likely to use a mobile device to improve adherence were significantly more likely to use their phone daily (P = 0.03) and use their phone for text messages (P = 0.002). The vast majority of patients in an urban HIV clinic own mobile phones and would use them to enhance adherence interventions to HIV medication.

  13. OFSETH: optical technologies embedded in smart medical textile for continuous monitoring of respiratory motions under magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbonneau, F.; De Jonckheere, J.; Jeanne, M.; Kinet, D.; Witt, J.; Krebber, K.; Paquet, B.; Depré, A.; D'Angelo, L. T.; Thiel, T.; Logier, R.

    2010-04-01

    The potential impact of optical fiber sensors embedded into medical textiles for the continuous monitoring of the patient during Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is now proved. We report how two pure optical technologies can successfully sense textile elongation between, 0% and 3%, while maintaining the stretching properties of the textile substrates for a good comfort of the patient. Investigating influence of different patients' morphology as well as textile integration issues to let free all vitals organs for medical staff actions, the OFSETH harness allows a continuous measurement of respiration movements. For example, anaesthesia for MRI examination uses the same drugs as for any surgical procedure. Even if spontaneous respiration can be preserved most of the time, spontaneous respiration is constantly at risk of being impaired by anaesthetic drugs or by upper airway obstruction. Monitoring of the breathing activity is needed to assess adequate ventilation or to detect specific obstruction patterns. Moreover artefacts due to physiological motions induce a blooming effect on the MRI result. The use of synchronisation devices allows reducing these effects. Positioned at certain strategic places according to the investigated organ, the presented sensors could constitute an efficient and adapted solution for respiratory synchronisation of the MRI acquisition.

  14. Development of prostate cancer research database with the clinical data warehouse technology for direct linkage with electronic medical record system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, In Young; Park, Seungho; Park, Bumjoon; Chung, Byung Ha; Kim, Choung-Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Byun, Seok-Soo; Lee, Ji Youl

    2013-01-01

    In spite of increased prostate cancer patients, little is known about the impact of treatments for prostate cancer patients and outcome of different treatments based on nationwide data. In order to obtain more comprehensive information for Korean prostate cancer patients, many professionals urged to have national system to monitor the quality of prostate cancer care. To gain its objective, the prostate cancer database system was planned and cautiously accommodated different views from various professions. This prostate cancer research database system incorporates information about a prostate cancer research including demographics, medical history, operation information, laboratory, and quality of life surveys. And, this system includes three different ways of clinical data collection to produce a comprehensive data base; direct data extraction from electronic medical record (EMR) system, manual data entry after linking EMR documents like magnetic resonance imaging findings and paper-based data collection for survey from patients. We implemented clinical data warehouse technology to test direct EMR link method with St. Mary's Hospital system. Using this method, total number of eligible patients were 2,300 from 1997 until 2012. Among them, 538 patients conducted surgery and others have different treatments. Our database system could provide the infrastructure for collecting error free data to support various retrospective and prospective studies.

  15. Institutional and technological barriers to the use of open educational resources (OERs) in physiology and medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassall, Christopher; Lewis, David I

    2017-03-01

    Open educational resources (OERs) are becoming increasingly common as a tool in education, particularly in medical and biomedical education. However, three key barriers have been identified to their use: 1) lack of awareness of OERs, 2) lack of motivation to use OERs, and 3) lack of training in the use of OERs. Here, we explore these three barriers with teachers of medical and biomedical science to establish how best to enhance the use of OERs to improve pedagogical outcomes. An online survey was completed by 209 educators, many of whom (68.4%) reported using OERs in their teaching and almost all (99.5%) showing awareness of at least one OER. The results suggest that key problems that prevent educators from adopting OERs in their teaching include suitability for particular classes, time, and copyright. Most (81.8%) educators were somewhat, very, or extremely comfortable with OERs so there is no innate motivational barrier to adoption. A lack of training was reported by 13.9% of respondents, and 40% of respondents stated that there was little or no support from their institutions. OER users were no more comfortable with technology or better supported by departments but tended to be aware of a greater number of sources of OERs. Our study illustrates key opportunities for the expansion of OER use in physiology and medical teaching: increased breadth of awareness, increased institutional support (including time, training, and copyright support), and greater sharing of diverse OERs to suit the range of teaching challenges faced by staff in different subdisciplines.

  16. Evaluation of a Tracking System for Patients and Mixed Intravenous Medication Based on RFID Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Pérez, María; Vázquez González, Guillermo; Dafonte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    At present, one of the primary concerns of healthcare professionals is how to increase the safety and quality of the care that patients receive during their stay in hospital. This is particularly important in the administration of expensive and high-risk medicines with which it is fundamental to minimize the possibility of adverse events in the process of prescription-validation-preparation/dosage-dispensation-administration of intravenous mixes. This work is a detailed analysis of the evaluation, carried out by the health personnel involved in the Radiofrequency Identification (RFID) system developed in the Day Hospital and Pharmacy services of the Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña (CHUAC). The RFID system is evaluated by analyzing surveys completed by said health personnel, since their questions represent the key indicators of the patient care process (safety, cost, adequacy with the clinical practice). This work allows us to conclude, among other things, that the system tracks the patients satisfactorily and that its cost, though high, is justified in the context of the project context (use of dangerous and costly medication). PMID:27916915

  17. Evaluation of a Tracking System for Patients and Mixed Intravenous Medication Based on RFID Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Martínez Pérez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available At present, one of the primary concerns of healthcare professionals is how to increase the safety and quality of the care that patients receive during their stay in hospital. This is particularly important in the administration of expensive and high-risk medicines with which it is fundamental to minimize the possibility of adverse events in the process of prescription-validation-preparation/dosage-dispensation-administration of intravenous mixes. This work is a detailed analysis of the evaluation, carried out by the health personnel involved in the Radiofrequency Identification (RFID system developed in the Day Hospital and Pharmacy services of the Complejo Hospitalario Universitario A Coruña (CHUAC. The RFID system is evaluated by analyzing surveys completed by said health personnel, since their questions represent the key indicators of the patient care process (safety, cost, adequacy with the clinical practice. This work allows us to conclude, among other things, that the system tracks the patients satisfactorily and that its cost, though high, is justified in the context of the project context (use of dangerous and costly medication.

  18. The role of self-dependence in modern health improvemental technologies of physical students' education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumakov O.V.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A normative base is considered on the problems of physical education, physical culture and independent work of students. An analysis is conducted scientifically-methodical and special literature on issue of research. Basic features and modern going are selected near independent work in health technologies of physical education of students. A concept «Independent work» is examined as activity of man and as a teaching method. A teaching method plugs in itself independent employments by physical exercises. During correct organization they can substantially increase motive activity of students.

  19. Optimal Cycle Time and Preservation Technology Investment for Deteriorating Items with Price-sensitive Stock-dependent Demand Under Inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nita H.; Shah, Arpan D.

    2014-04-01

    The article analyzes economic order quantity for the retailer who has to handle imperfect quality of the product and the units are subject to deteriorate at a constant rate. To control deterioration of the units in inventory, the retailer has to deploy advanced preservation technology. Another challenge for the retailer is to have perfect quality product. This requires mandatory inspection during the production process. This model is developed with the condition of random fraction of defective items. It is assumed that after inspection, the screened defective items are sold at a discounted rate instantly. Demand is considered to be price-sensitive stock-dependent. The model is incorporating effect of inflation which is critical factor globally. The objective is to maximize profit of the retailer with respect to preservation technology investment, order quantity and cycle time. The numerical example is given to validate the proposed model. Sensitivity analysis is carried out to work out managerial issues.

  20. 疗医合编单位技术建设发展探析%Technology Construction and Development in the Unit Combining Recuperating and Medical Works

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    斯友良; 过贵元; 施文兴; 阮英轶; 宋启哲; 孙清华

    2013-01-01

    Combining with the practice in the units combining recuperating and medical works, the article introduces some considerations on the technology development from four aspects, including the medical special center, special key discipline, medical technology innovations and the building of specialized talented persons. It affords a useful lesson for the technology development in such units.%结合疗医合编单位实际,从医学专科中心、特色重点学科、疗养医疗技术创新和专业人才队伍建设四个方面探讨技术建设的思路,为疗医合编单位技术建设发展提供借鉴.

  1. Non-medical use of opioids among HIV-infected opioid dependent individuals on opioid maintenance treatment: the need for a more comprehensive approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roux Perrine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid maintenance treatment (OMT has a positive impact on substance use and health outcomes among HIV-infected opioid dependent patients. The present study investigates non-medical use of opioids by HIV-infected opioid-dependent individuals treated with buprenorphine or methadone. Methods The MANIF 2000 study is a longitudinal study that enrolled a cohort of 476 HIV-infected opioid-dependent individuals. Data were collected in outpatient hospital services delivering HIV care in France. The sample comprised all patients receiving OMT (either methadone or buprenorphine who attended at least one follow-up visit with data on adherence to OMT (N = 235 patients, 1056 visits. Non-medical use of opioids during OMT was defined as having reported use of opioids in a non-medical context, and/or the misuse of the prescribed oral OMT by an inappropriate route of administration (injection or sniffing. After adjusting for the non-random assignment of OMT type, a model based on GEE was then used to identify predictors of non-medical use of opioids. Results Among the 235 patients, 144 (61.3% and 91 (38.9% patients were receiving buprenorphine and methadone, respectively, at baseline. Non-medical use of opioids was found in 41.6% of visits for 83% of individual patients. In the multivariate analysis, predictors of non-medical use of opioids were: cocaine, daily cannabis, and benzodiazepine use, experience of opioid withdrawal symptoms, and less time since OMT initiation. Conclusions Non-medical use of opioids was found to be comparable in OMT patients receiving methadone or buprenorphine. The presence of opioid withdrawal symptoms was a determinant of non-medical use of opioids and may serve as a clinical indicator of inadequate dosage, medication, or type of follow-up. Sustainability and continuity of care with adequate monitoring of withdrawal symptoms and polydrug use may contribute to reduced harms from ongoing non-medical use of opioids.

  2. Properties Of Viscose Vortex Yarns Depending On Technological Parameters Of Spinning

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    Moučková Eva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the relationship between technological parameters of spinning of 100% CV Vortex yarns of different counts and its selected geometrical parameters (a lead of helix of wrapping fibre ribbon, yarn diameter as well as yarn properties. The number of twist of wrapping fibre layer is determined. The effect of the yarn delivery speed, hollow spindle diameter, and the main draft on the hairiness, mass irregularity, tenacity, elongation, resistance to abrasion and bending rigidity of Vortex yarn is observed. The yarn properties are compared with the properties of open-end rotor spun yarns. Slivers of the same spinning lot were used for the production of both kinds of yarn. The results showed that the delivery speed in combination with spindle diameter affects yarn diameter, hairiness and abrasion resistance. Mass irregularity and imperfections of yarn is mainly affected by the main draft of drafting unit. Technological parameters of spinning do not affect the level of bending rigidity of the Vortex yarn. Tested rotor spun yarns had a larger diameter, higher hairiness, lower tenacity and higher elongation, lower mass irregularity and number of imperfections, higher abrasion resistance and lower bending rigidity compared to tested Vortex spun yarns.

  3. The Research Progress and Ethical Reflection of the Medical Robots Technology%医疗机器人的研究进展及伦理学思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌卓; 伍敏; 郑翔; 赵珊; 黄海

    2014-01-01

    With the development of modern science and technology ,medical robots have been widely used in the health industry ,which greatly promot the development of medical science and become one of the hot directions in the field of robotics research . This article briefly elaborated the domestic and international researches progress of medical robots technology .And it pointed out that medical robots technology was facing the failure of the liability investigation mechanism ,being lack of legal protection and specification ,taking impact on the medical position and deviating humanistic care ,etc .At present ,the medical robots technology should be developed and popularized actively .At the same time , promoting people to update their concepts of robots and improving relevant legislations to regulate the medical robots technology are the keys to solve the ethical problems .%随着现代科技的日新月异,医疗机器人被广泛应用于医疗行业,大大推动了医学的发展,并成为机器人研究领域的热门方向之一。在简要介绍国内外医疗机器人研究进展及应用现状的基础上,本文指出该项技术存在的医疗责任追究机制不完善、缺少法律保障和规范、对医疗岗位冲击、无法体现对患者人文关怀等伦理问题;提出积极发展和推广医疗机器人技术的同时,推动人们对医疗机器人观念的更新,进一步制定和完善相关法律法规是解决该项技术伦理问题的关键。

  4. Information and communications technology, culture, and medical universities; organizational culture and netiquette among academic staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Iravani, Hoorsana; Abzari, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Netiquette is appropriate behavioral etiquette when communicating through computer networks or virtual space. Identification of a dominant organizational culture and its relationship with a network culture offers applied guidelines to top managers of the university to expand communications and develop and learn organization through the use of the internet. The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between netiquette and organizational culture among faculty members of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Iran. To achieve this aim, the research method in this study was correlational research, which belonged to the category of descriptive survey research. The target population comprised of 594 faculty members of the IUMS, from which a sample of 150 was randomly selected, based on a simple stratified sampling method. For collecting the required data, two researcher-made questionnaires were formulated. Even as the first questionnaire tended to measure the selected sample members' organizational culture according to Rabbin's model (1999), the latter was designed in the Health Management and Economic Research Center (HMERC), to evaluate netiquette. The reliability of the questionnaires was computed by Choronbach's alpha coefficient formula and they happened to be 0.97 and 0.89, respectively. Ultimately, SPSS Version #15 was used for the statistical analysis of the data. The findings revealed that the organizational culture and netiquette were below average level among the sample members, signifying a considerable gap in the mean. In spite of that, there was no significant relationship between netiquette and the organizational culture of the faculty members. Emphasizing the importance of cultural preparation and a network user's training, this research suggests that the expansion of network culture rules among IUMS and organizational official communications, through the use of internet networks, in order to promote university netiquette and

  5. Application of scintillating properties of liquid xenon and silicon photomultiplier technology to medical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Benlloch-Rodriguez, J. M.; Ferrario, Paola

    2016-04-01

    We describe a new positron emission time-of-flight apparatus using liquid xenon. The detector is based in a liquid xenon scintillating cell. The cell shape and dimensions can be optimized depending on the intended application. In its simplest form, the liquid xenon scintillating cell is a box in which two faces are covered by silicon photomultipliers and the others by a reflecting material such as Teflon. It is a compact, homogenous and highly efficient detector which shares many of the desirable properties of monolithic crystals, with the added advantage of high yield and fast scintillation offered by liquid xenon. Our initial studies suggest that good energy and spatial resolution comparable with that achieved by lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals can be obtained with a detector based in liquid xenon scintillating cells. In addition, the system can potentially achieve an excellent coincidence resolving time of better than 100 ps.

  6. The theory of shared communication: how parents of technology-dependent children communicate with nurses on the inpatient unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giambra, Barbara K; Sabourin, Teresa; Broome, Marion E; Buelow, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Care may be compromised for hospitalized technology-dependent children if nurses do not communicate with parents to include their knowledge in the child's plan of care. A qualitative study using grounded theory methodology was undertaken to identify parental perceptions and experiences of communication with nurses. The Theory of Shared Communication was the result of this study and includes questioning, listening, explaining, advocating, verifying understanding and negotiating roles to achieve the outcome of mutual understanding of the child's plan of care. Nurses should be aware of parent perceptions about communication when working with families to optimize the care they provide.

  7. Perspectives on Genetic and Genomic Technologies in an Academic Medical Center: The Duke Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Huston Katsanis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this age of personalized medicine, genetic and genomic testing is expected to become instrumental in health care delivery, but little is known about its actual implementation in clinical practice. Methods. We surveyed Duke faculty and healthcare providers to examine the extent of genetic and genomic testing adoption. We assessed providers’ use of genetic and genomic testing options and indications in clinical practice, providers’ awareness of pharmacogenetic applications, and providers’ opinions on returning research-generated genetic test results to participants. Most clinician respondents currently use family history routinely in their clinical practice, but only 18 percent of clinicians use pharmacogenetics. Only two respondents correctly identified the number of drug package inserts with pharmacogenetic indications. We also found strong support for the return of genetic research results to participants. Our results demonstrate that while Duke healthcare providers are enthusiastic about genomic technologies, use of genomic tools outside of research has been limited. Respondents favor return of research-based genetic results to participants, but clinicians lack knowledge about pharmacogenetic applications. We identified challenges faced by this institution when implementing genetic and genomic testing into patient care that should inform a policy and education agenda to improve provider support and clinician-researcher partnerships.

  8. Safety of parsley intended for processing depending on the cultivation technology and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pobereżny Jarosław

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The factors that affect the value of parsley for consumption include its taste, flavour and dietary utility (vitamins C and E, β-carotene, potassium, calcium, phosphorus and iron, raw fibre, proteins as well as the content of hazardous substances, especially nitrogen compounds. A study was carried out in 2013–2015 to determine the effect of the cultivation technology and storage on the safety of parsley intended for processing. The study material was taken from an experiment where the following fertilisers were applied to the ground: nitrogen (0, 40, 80, 120 kg N∙ha−1 and magnesium (0; 30 kg Mg∙ha−1. Parsley roots were stored for six months in a storage room at +1°C and RH 95%. The content of nitrates (V and (III was determined by the ion selective method immediately after the harvest and after storage in parsley roots.

  9. The medicalization of love.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earp, Brian D; Sandberg, Anders; Savulescu, Julian

    2015-07-01

    Pharmaceuticals or other emerging technologies could be used to enhance (or diminish) feelings of lust, attraction, and attachment in adult romantic partnerships. Although such interventions could conceivably be used to promote individual (and couple) well-being, their widespread development and/or adoption might lead to the 'medicalization' of human love and heartache--for some, a source of a serious concern. In this essay, we argue that the medicalization of love need not necessarily be problematic, on balance, but could plausibly be expected to have either good or bad consequences depending upon how it unfolds. By anticipating some of the specific ways in which these technologies could yield unwanted outcomes, bioethicists and others can help to direct the course of love's medicalization--should it happen to occur--more toward the 'good' side than the 'bad.'

  10. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenchick, Gary S; Solomon, David

    2013-01-01

    Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student's actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT), to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees' observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents) performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student-patient encounters and by

  11. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary S. Ferenchick

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student’s actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT, to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees’ observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student

  12. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, David

    2013-01-01

    Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student’s actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT), to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees’ observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents) performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student-patient encounters and by

  13. Dark focus of accommodation as dependent and independent variables in visual display technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sherrie; Kennedy, Robert; Harm, Deborah

    1992-01-01

    When independent stimuli are available for accommodation, as in the dark or under low contrast conditions, the lens seeks its resting position. Individual differences in resting positions are reliable, under autonomic control, and can change with visual task demands. We hypothesized that motion sickness in a flight simulator might result in dark focus changes. Method: Subjects received training flights in three different Navy flight simulators. Two were helicopter simulators entailed CRT presentation using infinity optics, one involved a dome presentation of a computer graphic visual projection system. Results: In all three experiments there were significant differences between dark focus activity before and after simulator exposure when comparisons were made between sick and not-sick pilot subjects. In two of these experiments, the average shift in dark focus for the sick subjects was toward increased myopia when each subject was compared to his own baseline. In the third experiment, the group showed an average shift outward of small amount and the subjects who were sick showed significantly less outward movement than those who were symptom free. Conclusions: Although the relationship is not a simple one, dark focus changes in simulator sickness imply parasympathetic activity. Because changes can occur in relation to endogenous and exogenous events, such measurement may have useful applications as dependent measures in studies of visually coupled systems, virtual reality systems, and space adaptation syndrome.

  14. Teaching students on the specialty “Technology of Perfume-Cosmetic Preparations” in Zaporizhzhya State Medical University the legal aspects of pharmacist-cosmetologists professional activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Alekseeva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article refl ects the experience of teaching the legal aspects of professional activities of pharmacists-cosmetologists to the students of Pharmaceutical Faculty, specialty «Technology of perfumery and cosmetics» in Zaporozhye State Medical University.

  15. Benefits and Risks of Electronic Medical Record (EMR): An Interpretive Analysis of Healthcare Consumers' Perceptions of an Evolving Health Information Systems Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chester D.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore healthcare consumers' perceptions of their Electronic Medical Records (EMRs). Although there have been numerous studies regarding EMRs, there have been minimal, if any, research that explores healthcare consumers' awareness of this technology and the social implications that result. As consumers' health…

  16. California Diploma Project Technical Report II: Alignment Study--Alignment Study of the Health Sciences and Medical Technology Draft Standards and California's Exit Level Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaughy, Charis; de Gonzalez, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The California Department of Education is in the process of revising the Career and Technical Education (CTE) Model Curriculum Standards. The Educational Policy Improvement Center (EPIC) conducted an investigation of the draft version of the Health Sciences and Medical Technology Standards (Health Science). The purpose of the study is to…

  17. ORGANIZATION OF STUDENTS’ SELF-GUIDED WORK IN BIOMEDICAL DEPARTMENTS OF MEDICAL UNIVERSITY USING DISTANT LEARNING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard F. Barinov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation to substantiate and analyze the practical implementation of using distance learning technologies (DLT for managing the formation of basic knowledge during students’ individual work in the Department of Histology, Cytology and Embryology, Human Anatomy and Biological Chemistry.Methods. The methods involve analysis of an individual students’ work.Results. Questionnaires showed that the use of distance learning technologies during preparation for the practical classes allows to achieve the same result for most students as in the traditional forms of preparing (without DLT, to reach a significant saving of time. Respondents note the increased meaningfulness of individual work; the appearance of motivation to study the practical material; an increase of educational efficiency on the stage of extracurricular study due to the operative removal of arising question during the consulting process; as well as satisfaction with this form of education. Under control of knowledge and skills during practical classes, the increasing of students’ performance quality was noted.Scientific novelty. Using a basic knowledge standard of medicine; regulated methodical support for individual work and the introduction of DLT in the medical and biological departments of the university provides the continuity of teaching and fundamental knowledge integration, the formation of professional competencies of students.Practical significance. The demand of theoretical subjects’ content for students of 4–6 courses and the possibility of distance access for appropriate educational resources of biomedical departments would achieve a real interdisciplinary integration and support the necessary level of basic knowledge of young specialists in relation to a specific professional activity.

  18. The impact of health information technology on the quality of medical and health care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Aziz; McKenzie, Kirsten; Clark, Michele

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the published evidence of the impact of health information technology (HIT) or health information systems (HIS) on the quality of healthcare, focusing on clinicians's; adherence to evidence-based guidelines and the corresponding impact this had on patient clinical outcomes. The review covered the use of health information technologies and systems in both medical care (i.e. clinical and surgical) and other areas such as allied health and preventive services. Studies were included in the review if they examined the impact of Electronic Health Record (EHR), Computerised Provider Order-Entry (CPOE), or Decision Support System (DS); and if the primary outcomes of the studies were focused on the level of compliance with evidence-based guidelines among clinicians. Measurements considered relevant to the review were either of changes in clinical processes resulting from a change of the providers' behaviour, or of specific patient outcomes that demonstrated the effectiveness of a particular treatment given by providers. Of 23 studies included in the current review, 17 assessed the impact of HIT/HIS on health care practitioners' performance. A positive improvement, in relation to their compliance with evidence-based guidelines, was seen in 14 studies. Studies that included an assessment of patient outcomes, however, showed insufficient evidence of either clinically or statistically important improvements. Although the number of studies reviewed was relatively small, the findings demonstrated consistency with similar previous reviews of this nature in that wide scale use of HIT has been shown to increase clinician's adherence to guidelines.

  19. Physicians’ use of computerized clinical decision supports to improve medication management in the elderly – the Seniors Medication Alert and Review Technology intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagiakrishnan, Kannayiram; Wilson, Patricia; Sadowski, Cheryl A; Rolfson, Darryl; Ballermann, Mark; Ausford, Allen; Vermeer, Karla; Mohindra, Kunal; Romney, Jacques; Hayward, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Background Elderly people (aged 65 years or more) are at increased risk of polypharmacy (five or more medications), inappropriate medication use, and associated increased health care costs. The use of clinical decision support (CDS) within an electronic medical record (EMR) could improve medication safety. Methods Participatory action research methods were applied to preproduction design and development and postproduction optimization of an EMR-embedded CDS implementation of the Beers’ Criteria for medication management and the Cockcroft–Gault formula for estimating glomerular filtration rates (GFR). The “Seniors Medication Alert and Review Technologies” (SMART) intervention was used in primary care and geriatrics specialty clinics. Passive (chart messages) and active (order-entry alerts) prompts exposed potentially inappropriate medications, decreased GFR, and the possible need for medication adjustments. Physician reactions were assessed using surveys, EMR simulations, focus groups, and semi-structured interviews. EMR audit data were used to identify eligible patient encounters, the frequency of CDS events, how alerts were managed, and when evidence links were followed. Results Analysis of subjective data revealed that most clinicians agreed that CDS appeared at appropriate times during patient care. Although managing alerts incurred a modest time burden, most also agreed that workflow was not disrupted. Prevalent concerns related to clinician accountability and potential liability. Approximately 36% of eligible encounters triggered at least one SMART alert, with GFR alert, and most frequent medication warnings were with hypnotics and anticholinergics. Approximately 25% of alerts were overridden and ~15% elicited an evidence check. Conclusion While most SMART alerts validated clinician choices, they were received as valuable reminders for evidence-informed care and education. Data from this study may aid other attempts to implement Beers’ Criteria in

  20. TOWARDS LEARNER-CENTRED MEDICAL CURRICULUM: QUALITATIVE FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF INDIVIDUAL PREFERENCES DEPENDING ON VERBAL ENVIRONMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukeyeva, A; Riklefs, V; Riklefs, I; Tashkenbayeva, V; Kassatova, A

    2016-05-01

    There is a strong evidence in medical education literature that the learner-centred curriculum favouring the use of metacognition and self-learning is very proficient. However, ethnocultural and verbal environment may undermine learners' ability to utilise the learning strategies, leading to inefficient learning. This study aimed to investigate the personal preferences of learners in multilingual educational environment prompting the most efficient learning. The study uses qualitative focus group methodology to understand students' opinion on how educational environment influences the efficiency of medical school curriculum.

  1. 数码技术在医学摄影中的应用与探讨%Application and Discussion of Digital Technology in Medical Photography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    步金梅; 范林华

    2009-01-01

    与传统摄影相比,数码技术在医学摄影中显示了其独特的优势.文章结合工作实践,探讨了当前数码摄影最前沿的关键技术,针对数字技术在医学摄影发展中存在的问题,提出了相应的对策.%Compared with traditional photography, digital technology in medical photography has demonstrated its unique advantages. Combined with the work practice of digital photogra-phy, the current cutting-edge key technologies for digital photographic technology were investiga-ted, the problems in develpment of digital photography in medical field were pointed out, and corresponding countermeasures were put forward.

  2. Physicians’ use of computerized clinical decision supports to improve medication management in the elderly – the Seniors Medication Alert and Review Technology intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alagiakrishnan K

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kannayiram Alagiakrishnan,1 Patricia Wilson,2 Cheryl A Sadowski,3 Darryl Rolfson,1 Mark Ballermann,4,5 Allen Ausford,6,7 Karla Vermeer,7 Kunal Mohindra,8 Jacques Romney,9 Robert S Hayward10 1Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, 2Department of Medicine, 3Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, 4Chief Medical Information Office, Alberta Health Services, 5Division of Critical Care, Department of Medicine, University of Alberta, 6Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, 7Lynwood Family Physician, 8eClinician EMR, Alberta Health Services-Information Systems, 9Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, 10Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Background: Elderly people (aged 65 years or more are at increased risk of polypharmacy (five or more medications, inappropriate medication use, and associated increased health care costs. The use of clinical decision support (CDS within an electronic medical record (EMR could improve medication safety.Methods: Participatory action research methods were applied to preproduction design and development and postproduction optimization of an EMR-embedded CDS implementation of the Beers’ Criteria for medication management and the Cockcroft–Gault formula for estimating glomerular filtration rates (GFR. The “Seniors Medication Alert and Review Technologies” (SMART intervention was used in primary care and geriatrics specialty clinics. Passive (chart messages and active (order-entry alerts prompts exposed potentially inappropriate medications, decreased GFR, and the possible need for medication adjustments. Physician reactions were assessed using surveys, EMR simulations, focus groups, and semi-structured interviews. EMR audit data were used to identify eligible patient encounters, the frequency of CDS events, how alerts were managed, and when evidence links were followed.Results: Analysis of

  3. Requirement Pattern Based on Dependencies of Plan in i* for Detecting Proactivity in Information-Technology Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Pérez Acosta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present a requirement pattern based on i*’s models that allows detecting proactivityin information-technology systems from the Requirements’ phase. The pattern obtained as a result ofthis paper allows detecting proactivity when there is a plan’s dependence established between the actorsinvolved and in addition one of the actors has intentions that denote a future proactive behavior inthe software. In order to validate the pattern a case study was performed taking as logic of analysis thedevelopment of a proactive dashboard to support the decision making in a college faculty. Based on theresults of the case study, it can be concluded that the proposed pattern allowed modeling the intentionaldependencies between the actors, detecting a proactive behavior and delegating the proactivity in thesystem of software to be developed.

  4. Changes in Mothers' Psychosocial Perceptions of Technology-dependent Children and Adolescents at Home in Japan: Acknowledgement of Children's Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Kaori; Kanamori, Yutaka; Ikeda, Mari; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Minowa, Hideko; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    2016-06-01

    This research was conducted to reveal Japanese mothers' changing perceptions towards their technology-dependent children in the home care setting. Fourteen Japanese mothers participated in semi-structured interviews, which were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. "Degree of preoccupation with the child" emerged as the category representing the mothers' perceptions towards their child. Three categories emerged that represented the progression of maternal perceptions over time: "accepting the child's conditions", "mastering the management of care in various conditions", and "considering social participation for the child". First, mothers gradually accepted the conditions of their child after his/her disease and disability were known. Second, others managed technology-required care and concurrently considered the social participation of their child through daily care at home. Third, the level of preoccupation with the child was affected by the mothers' management of care and their attitude towards the social participation of their child in home care. In this study, as is widely alleged in historical recognition of Japan, mothers provided daily care almost without help from other family members. Additionally, they thought it natural and good for their children. Above all, especially in Japan, professional support for mothers are necessary so that they can take breaks from care. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Marital satisfaction: the differential impact of social support dependent on situation and gender in medical staff in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Arian; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Richter, Jörg

    2013-05-12

    Stress is unavoidable in everyday life and it can effect on marital relationship. Social support especially from emotionally closed persons as a protective factor can help individuals to deal with stress and buffers the negative effects of life stress on marital satisfaction. In the present cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between social and spousal support and marital satisfaction in medical staff in Iran. Data collection was performed in 653 medical staff using socio-demographic questions, the ENRICH Marital Satisfaction Inventory, and the Social Support Questionnaire. Women and men did not differ in total social support satisfaction and the total number of supporting people; but, women were more often support providers for their husbands than men were for their wives. Spouse support was a more important indicator of marital satisfaction for women than for men. Also results revealed that spouse support is more important than social support from other resources to explain marital satisfaction. Job satisfaction had an explanatory effect on marital satisfaction especially in men. Furthermore, the findings showed that social support could decrease the explanatory impact of job satisfaction on scales of marital satisfaction. Therefore, focusing on social support, especially spouse support could be an effective approach in family counseling or family education programs to improve marital satisfaction in medical staff.

  6. Marital Satisfaction: The Differential Impact of Social Support Dependent on Situation and Gender in Medical Staff in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Arian; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Richter, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Stress is unavoidable in everyday life and it can effect on marital relationship. Social support especially from emotionally closed persons as a protective factor can help individuals to deal with stress and buffers the negative effects of life stress on marital satisfaction. In the present cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between social and spousal support and marital satisfaction in medical staff in Iran. Data collection was performed in 653 medical staff using socio-demographic questions, the ENRICH Marital Satisfaction Inventory, and the Social Support Questionnaire. Women and men did not differ in total social support satisfaction and the total number of supporting people; but, women were more often support providers for their husbands than men were for their wives. Spouse support was a more important indicator of marital satisfaction for women than for men. Also results revealed that spouse support is more important than social support from other resources to explain marital satisfaction. Job satisfaction had an explanatory effect on marital satisfaction especially in men. Furthermore, the findings showed that social support could decrease the explanatory impact of job satisfaction on scales of marital satisfaction. Therefore, focusing on social support, especially spouse support could be an effective approach in family counseling or family education programs to improve marital satisfaction in medical staff. PMID:23777731

  7. Medical imaging technology shock and volatility of macro economics: Analysis using a three-sector dynamical stochastic general equilibrium REC model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shurong; Huang, Yeqing

    2017-07-07

    The study analysed the medical imaging technology business cycle from 1981 to 2009 and found that the volatility of consumption in Chinese medical imaging business was higher than that of the developed countries. The volatility of gross domestic product (GDP) and the correlation between consumption and GDP is also higher than that of the developed countries. Prior to the early 1990s the volatility of consumption is even higher than GDP. This fact makes it difficult to explain the volatile market using the standard one sector real economic cycle (REC) model. Contrary to the other domestic studies, this study considers a three-sector dynamical stochastic general equilibrium REC model. In this model there are two consumption sectors, whereby one is labour intensive and another is capital intensive. The more capital intensive investment sector only introduces technology shocks in the medical imaging market. Our response functions and Monte-Carlo simulation results show that the model can explain 90% of the volatility of consummation relative to GDP, and explain the correlation between consumption and GDP. The results demonstrated the significant correlation between the technological reform in medical imaging and volatility in the labour market on Chinese macro economy development.

  8. Relationship of coping and patterns of dependent behavior in patients with chronic pancreatitis of biliary and alcoholic etiology in aspect of differentiation of its medical and psychological support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Маріанна Владиславівна Маркова

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Choric pancreatitis is an actual medical and psychological problem in Ukraine. The aim of the work was to study the features of coping in patients with chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic and biliary etiology.Methods. For detecting coping-mechanisms the standard method WCQ Р of Lazarus was used. The study of addictive tendencies was carried out with the help of questionnaire AUDIT and UDIT-tests oriented on patterns of dependent behavior.Results. The study of features of coping-mechanisms and an addiction to dependent behavior in patients with chronic pancreatitis revealed intergroup and intragroup differences. Confrontation and low levels of self-control, responsibility and positive assessment were intrinsic for respondents with alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis. Women demonstrated the high addiction to the search of social support, men – to distancing. As to an addictive behavior there was revealed that the typical common tendencies were the consumption of coffee, alcohol, internet-dependence, the specific ones for women – TV, shopping-dependencies, for men – workaholism in patients with biliary and computer-addiction in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Intergroup differences were demonstrated by an addiction to disorder of food behavior in patients with biliary and consumption of alcohol and smoking in respondents with alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis.Conclusions. The revealed differences in coping-strategies of patients with different nosological forms of chronic pancreatitis give important information for detecting the targets of medical and psychological influence and constructing of differentiated program of medical and psychological help to patients of this type

  9. Less Contact Ballistogram Recording during Sleep as a Perspective Technology for the Medical Monitoring System in a Mission to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baevsky, R. M.; Bogomolov, V. V.; Funtova, I. I.

    strong argument for success of a future Martian mission is absence of pathologies developed in cosmonauts following one-year or longer space flights that might forbid further gradual extension of piloted missions. However, functional shifts in the neurohormonal regulation revealed during the long-term Mir missions suggest that homeostasis of the vital important body systems is maintained owing to active functioning of the regulatory mechanisms (Grigoriev A.I. et al., 1998). Since overstrain of these mechanisms constitutes one of the main factors of risk of diseases, it is important to provide unfailing and systematic monitoring of the body regulation functional reserves. night ballistocardiography, made it possible to obtain data on super-slow heart rhythm fluctuations reflective of activation of the neurohormonal regulation (Baevsky R.M. et al., 1999). Analysis of the data showed that on a background of extended exposure of the human organism to various stressful factors the cardiovascular homeostasis is maintained through consecutive recruitment in adaptation of higher levels of regulation of the physiological systems (Grigoriev A.I., Baevsky R.M., 2001). This validates the hypothesis concerning the role of the higher autonomous centers in long-term adaptation to the spaceflight factors and opens up the new way to diagnosis and prediction of the human body functional reserves. It was first demonstrated in space during the Mir primary mission 9 in 1991. Sensor-accelerometer secured to cosmonaut's sleeping bag registered micromovements conditioned by the heart, respiratory and motor activities of a sleeping cosmonaut. The joint Russian-Austrian space investigations in 1992-1995 resulted in technology refinement and enhancement. Advantages of medical monitoring during sleep are obvious not only because of the time saving and opportunity to receive systematically information pertaining to the crew health. Records allow, to begin with, evaluate the functional state in

  10. Review on Emerging Technologies in Digital Medical and Health Service%数字医疗与健康服务中的新兴技术综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨吉江; 李建强; 王青; 胡建平

    2016-01-01

    现代信息技术,包括传感技术、云计算、安全技术等发展日新月异。这些技术深刻地影响着现代医疗和健康服务,也改变了医疗健康服务的理念和服务模式,即从传统的“有病医病”被动方式变为“无病防病”的主动方式。本文首先回顾了电子病历的发展,然后综述了健康检测技术、医疗大数据分析技术及云计算技术等在医疗里的应用。最后总结了新技术对医疗健康服务的影响,并提出了主动服务的理念。%Information technologies,including sensing,cloud,security,are changing quickly. These technologies are deeply impacting on medical and health service,and are also changing medical and health service perception and patterns,i.e., from passive pattern on curing disease to active pattern on prevention. In this paper,we firstly summarize the EMR history. Then three category technologies,i.e.,health sensing,medical bigdata analysis and cloud are reviewed in medical area. And then the influence of the emerging technologies on medical and health service is analysed. Active service is proposed.

  11. Popularizing the Internet of Things Technology to Construct Remote Medical Emergency System%推行物联网技术构建远程救护系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王标; 潘丽; 王卫兵; 张建东; 陈一君; 汤峥嵘; 叶光明

    2012-01-01

    物联网被称为继计算机、互联网之后,世界信息产业的第三次浪潮.在医疗行业中,借助于物联网技术可以持续改善医疗品质,提高患者的救治效率.基于物联网技术的远程救护系统的研发,通过集成融合物联网技术和医疗保障技术,有效提升基地医院的远程卫勤保障能力.%The Internet of Things(IOT)is called the third wave of the world information industry after the computer and internet. In medical industry, it can improve medical quality and treatment efficiency by using the internet of things technology. Research and development of the remote medical emergency system based on IOT can improve the ability of re-rmote medical service support of the base hospital effectively by combining IOT with medical security technology.

  12. [The Role of Psychological and Technology-related Personality Traits and Knowledge Levels as Factors Influencing Adoption of Telemonitoring by Medical Professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockweiler, C; Hornberg, C

    2015-11-09

    Objectives: Information and communication technologies are becoming increasingly important in health care. Randomized clinical trials have shown that telemonitoring in particular leads to improved quality of care as well as shortened hospital stays and reduced health care costs. For its long-term anchoring in medical care, user-oriented technology needs to be developed, taking into account the complex structures of technology acceptance Methods: Knowledge of and attitudes towards telemonitoring amongst medical professionals were investigated using an online-based approach with a random sample of n=614; the response rate was 21% (n=133). The emergence of positive attitude patterns towards telemonitoring was analyzed using the relationships between psychological and technology-related personality traits, and perceived knowledge was determined using a regression model. Results: Positive attitudes towards telemonitoring are significantly influenced by the individual's knowledge and agreeableness, which is strongly characterized by altruistic traits and interpersonal trust. There is a strong association with an improvement in the quality of care, while there are differences in attitudes towards telemonitoring between health care sectors and gender. Overall, only 57% of the physicians surveyed feel sufficiently informed about the use of telemonitoring. Conclusion: Medical evidence is crucial for the further development of telemedicine in general and telemonitoring in particular. Improvements need to be made in knowledge transfer, the exchange of best practice solutions and the anchoring of telemedicine in education and training. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Research on the Management Pattern of Clinical Application for Medical Technologies%医疗技术临床应用管理模式探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴锁薇; 潘琦; 陈彤; 徐锡武; 王勤

    2016-01-01

    Establishing a suitable and feasible management pattern for the clinical application of medical technologies under the new circumstance that the National Health and Family Planning Commission can celled the admission approval for the clinical practice of the third and second class medical technologies and that medical institutions are supposed to take major responsibilities for the application and management of the medical technologies in July, 2015. Through material research as well as expert interviews, we basically established the medical technology management model as well as operating measures that are suitable for hospitals to operate, and then the clinical implementations was evaluated and improved through practice. We eventually established a suitable and feasible management pattern for the clinical application of medical technologies under the new policy background which is of great significance to the management of medical quality of the hospital.%在国家卫生计生委取消由医疗卫生行政部门对第三类、第二类医疗技术的临床应用准入审批,由医疗机构承担医疗技术临床应用和管理承担主体责任的新政策背景下,研究建立一套科学的、操作性强的医疗技术临床应用管理模式。通过文献调研法、专家访谈法初步确定适合医疗管理部门开展的医疗技术管理模式后,采用实践验证法对开展效果进行评价和完善,最终建立了一套科学的、可行性强的医疗技术管理模式和评价标准,在新医疗管理政策形式下对于医院临床医疗技术管理具有重要意义。

  14. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard*, Kitt

    2014-01-01

    must take place in an inter-professional context. Aims: The purpose of the project was •to develop practice oriented competences related to telemedicine in an inter-professional and a cross-sectoral context among health professional students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory...... and motivation. Results: Evaluations and follow-up research showed that students developed competences equivalent to novice level through simulation training (3). The project gave rise to wide project on Occupational Therapy education and medical laboratory technology education too. Follow-up research concludes...

  15. Study of Disinfection Technologies for Medical Waste Water Treatment%医疗废水消毒技术探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈笠; 李正山; 黄正文; 史凯

    2012-01-01

    消毒是医疗废水处理的必需环节,人们对环境与安全的要求日益提高,不仅需要消毒剂能够杀灭废水中的致病微生物,也要求消毒剂本身不对水体造成二次污染.目前常用消毒技术中,传统氯消毒仍占主导地位,但其容易产生消毒副产物等弊端.以紫外消毒为代表的新技术发展迅速,大有取代传统消毒剂的趋势,而膜消毒和电化学消毒是医疗废水消毒新的研究方向,有广阔应用前景.%Disinfection is an essential link for the treatment of medical waste water. Given growing environmental safety concerns, pathogenic microorganisms need to be killed by qualified disinfectant without leaving secondary pollution during waste water treatment. Conventional chlorination plays a leading role among current disinfection techniques. However, it has some disadvantages such as easy generation of disinfection by-products. With the rapid development of new technology application represented by ultraviolet disinfection, it is more likely to replace traditional disinfectants. Membrane disinfection and electrochemical disinfection are emerging research directions that show broad prospects in the market.

  16. Improving Community Understanding of Medical Research: Audience Response Technology for Community Consultation for Exception to Informed Consent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Vohra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Department of Health and Human Services and Food and Drug Administration described guidelines for exception from informed consent (EFIC research. These guidelines require community consultation (CC events, which allow members of the community to understand the study, provide feedback and give advice. A real-time gauge of audience understanding would allow the speaker to modify the discussion. The objective of the study is to describe the use of audience response survey (ARS technology in EFIC CCs. Methods: As part of the Rapid Anticonvulsant Medication Prior to Arrival Trial (RAMPART, 13 CC events were conducted. We prepared a PowerPoint™ presentation with 4 embedded ARS questions,according to specific IRB guidelines to ensure that the pertinent information would reach our targeted audience. During 6 CCs, an ARS was used to gauge audience comprehension. Participants completed paper surveys regarding their opinion of the study following each CC. Results: The ARS was used with minimal explanation and only one ARS was lost. Greater than 80% of the participants correctly answered 3 of the 4 ARS questions with 61% correctly answering the question regarding EFIC. A total of 105 participants answered the paper survey; 80-90% of the responses to the paper survey were either strongly agree or agree. The average scores on the paper survey in the ARS sites compared to the non-ARS sites were significantly more positive. Conclusion: The use of an audience response system during the community consultation aspects of EFIC is feasible and provides a real-time assessment of audience comprehension of the study and EFIC process. It may improve the community’s opinion and support of the study.

  17. Medical Equipment Maintenance Programme Overview WHO Medical device technical series

    CERN Document Server

    Organization, World Health

    2011-01-01

    WHO and partners have been working towards devising an agenda an action plan tools and guidelines to increase access to appropriate medical devices. This document is part of a series of reference documents being developed for use at the country level. The series will include the following subject areas: . policy framework for health technology . medical device regulations . health technology assessment . health technology management . needs assessment of medical devices . medical device procurement . medical equipment donations . medical equipment inventory management . medical equipment maint

  18. Evaluation of abuse and dependence on drugs used for self-medication: a pharmacoepidemiological pilot study based on community pharmacies in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orriols, Ludivine; Gaillard, Julia; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Roussin, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Drugs that can be obtained without a medical prescription in community pharmacies are used to treat minor pathologies that can easily be diagnosed by the patient. Some of these drugs contain psychoactive substances with a potential for abuse and dependence. However, there is a lack of data concerning their problematic use in a wide population. To explore the feasibility of a pharmacoepidemiological method to investigate misuse, non-medical use, abuse and dependence on drugs used for self-medication. This cross-sectional pilot study, conducted during a 2-month period (from 15 January to 15 March 2007), was based on the participation of community pharmacies in the Midi-Pyrénées region of France to collect patient data. Patients requesting one drug from a list of available drugs used for self-medication and containing psychoactive substances (codeine in analgesics, pseudoephedrine, dextromethorphan and histamine H(1) receptor antagonists [antihistamines]) were included in the study. A control group was set up that consisted of patients requesting antacid drugs. The pharmacy staff proposed to the patients that they filled in an anonymous questionnaire. The questionnaire was designed to investigate patterns of drug use and the harmful consequences of overuse (abuse). In addition, questions on lack of control over drug use were adapted from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria for evaluation of dependence. Thirty-two percent (n = 74) of the solicited pharmacies participated in the survey. Only 4.8% of the solicited patients (n = 817) refused to complete the questionnaire distributed by the pharmacy staff. The questionnaire was completed inside the pharmacy by 53.3% of the patients. The other patients took the questionnaire away from the pharmacy and 31.7% of them returned it in a prepaid envelope. The patient participation rate was 64.9%, and was higher for the psychoactive substance groups than the control group

  19. Internet of Things Technology Application Analysis in Medical Care%物联网技术在医疗护理当中的应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈靖宇

    2011-01-01

    在当前社会,信息技术正在飞速的发展,面对中国医疗改革的现状,以信息化技术为核心的医疗,特别是物联网技术的出现,必然是推进中国医疗事业改革发展的重要利器。本文主要对物联网的关键技术及其在医疗护理系统当中的应用进行了分析,展望了物联网技术在医疗护理过程中的应用前景,希望能够让广大的医护人员更加了解物联网技术在医疗护理系统中的应用。%In the current society, information technology is the rapid development of China's medical reform in the face of the status quo,to information technology as the core of health care,especially the emergence of networking technology, must be to promote China's reform and development of an important medical tool.This article focuses on the key things in health care technology and its application of the system Were analyzed, looked to technology in the medical care of things in the process of application prospects,hoping to make health care more about the general things technology in health care system applications.

  20. The relationships of sociodemographic factors, medical, psychiatric, and substance-misuse co-morbidities to neurocognition in short-term abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durazzo, Timothy C; Rothlind, Johannes C; Gazdzinski, Stefan; Meyerhoff, Dieter J

    2008-09-01

    Co-morbidities that commonly accompany those afflicted with an alcohol use disorder (AUD) may promote variability in the pattern and magnitude of neurocognitive abnormalities demonstrated. The goal of this study was to investigate the influence of several common co-morbid medical conditions (primarily hypertension and hepatitis C), psychiatric (primarily unipolar mood and anxiety disorders), and substance use (primarily psychostimulant and cannabis) disorders, and chronic cigarette smoking on the neurocognitive functioning in short-term abstinent, treatment-seeking individuals with AUD. Seventy-five alcohol-dependent participants (ALC; 51+/-9 years of age; three females) completed comprehensive neurocognitive testing after approximately 1 month of abstinence. Multivariate multiple linear regression evaluated the relationships among neurocognitive variables and medical conditions, psychiatric, and substance-use disorders, controlling for sociodemographic factors. Sixty-four percent of ALC had at least one medical, psychiatric, or substance-abuse co-morbidity (excluding smoking). Smoking status (smoker or nonsmoker) and age were significant independent predictors of cognitive efficiency, general intelligence, postural stability, processing speed, and visuospatial memory after age-normed adjustment and control for estimated pre-morbid verbal intelligence, education, alcohol consumption, and medical, psychiatric, and substance-misuse co-morbidities. Results indicated that chronic smoking accounted for a significant portion of the variance in the neurocognitive performance of this middle-aged AUD cohort. The age-related findings for ALC suggest that alcohol dependence, per se, was associated with diminished neurocognitive functioning with increasing age. The study of participants who demonstrate common co-morbidities observed in AUD is necessary to fully understand how AUD, as a clinical syndrome, affects neurocognition, brain neurobiology, and their changes with