WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology courses grouped

  1. Teaching Reform of Course Group Regarding Theory and Design of Mechanisms Based on MATLAB Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yi; Yuan, Mingxin; Wang, Mingqiang

    2013-01-01

    Considering that the course group regarding theory and design of mechanisms is characterized by strong engineering application background and the students generally feel very boring and tedious during the learning process, some teaching reforms for the theory and design of mechanisms are carried out to improve the teaching effectiveness in this…

  2. Group technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  3. A Course on Topological Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 8. A Course on Topological Groups - A Pellucid Little Book on Topological Groups. K Parthasarathy. Book Review Volume 2 Issue 8 August 1997 pp 82-83. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  4. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  5. Poster session in instructional technology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniaty, Artina; Fauzi'ah, Lina; Wulan Febriana, Beta; Arlianty, Widinda Normalia

    2017-12-01

    Instructional technology course must be studied by students in order to 1) understand the role of technology in learning, 2) capable of analyzing advantages and disadvantages of using technology in teaching, 3) capable of performing technology in teaching. A poster session in instructional technology course was performed to 1) enhance students' interest in this course and develop students' creativity. The step of this research includes: planning, implementation, and evaluation. The result showed that students' responses towards poster session in instructional technology course were good.

  6. Distance technology transfer course content development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Illinois Department of Transportation (IDOT) offers multiple technology transfer courses for engineering, : project design, and safety training for state and local agency personnel. These courses are often essential to the : agency mission. Becau...

  7. Laboratory Grouping Based on Previous Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doemling, Donald B.; Bowman, Douglas C.

    1981-01-01

    In a five-year study, second-year human physiology students were grouped for laboratory according to previous physiology and laboratory experience. No significant differences in course or board examination performance were found, though correlations were found between predental grade-point averages and grouping. (MSE)

  8. Blogging in the Communication Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Carrie Anne

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an assignment that was developed for an undergraduate course on communication technologies taught at a public university in the Upper Midwest. The course focuses on the impact of new media technologies on traditional media industries and contemporary culture, and is taken by students majoring in journalism, public relations,…

  9. Small Group Teaching in Epidemiology Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azita Goshtasebi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: small group teaching(SGT in is a known method for developing intellectual skills, changing attitudes and encouraging the taking of responsibilities for learning. This study was an attempt to compare students’ attitudes and knowledge scores on SGT and lecture -based teaching (LBT.Methods: 22 first year medical students were enrolled in a course using two methods (lecture- based and small group discussion for teaching basic epidemiology. Data about attitudes and knowledge scores of the two methods were collected at the end of the course and analyzed using a two-sided Wilcoxon test.Results: The students were satisfied and preferred SGT in terms of Evaluation method for the course, Participatory learning and team working, effectiveness and developing self learning skills (p<0.001,and scored higher on topics of SGT(p<0.01, but believed that they needed longer discussion of the topics.Conclusion: Better question design and course organization and creating a safe, comfortable environment is essential for good performance. Integrating this teaching strategy in medical education curricula with appropriate professional and organizational development is suggested.Key words: MEDICAL EDUCATION, SMALL GROUP TEACHING, COURSE EVALUATION

  10. Electronics Technology. Performance Objectives. Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Guy

    Several intermediate performance objectives and corresponding criterion measures are listed for each of 20 terminal objectives for a basic electronics technology course. The materials were developed for a two-semester course (2 hours daily) designed to include instruction in basic electricity and electronic fundamentals, and to develop skills and…

  11. Computational technologies a first course

    CERN Document Server

    Borisov, Victor S; Grigoriev, Aleksander V 1; Kolesov, Alexandr E 1; Popov, Petr A 1; Sirditov, Ivan K 1; Vabishchevich, Petr N 1; Vasilieva, Maria V 1; Zakharov, Petr E 1; Vabishchevich, Petr N 0

    2015-01-01

    In this book we describe the basic elements of present computational technologies that use the algorithmic languages C/C++. The emphasis is on GNU compilers and libraries, FOSS for the solution of computational mathematics problems and visualization of the obtained data. Many examples illustrate the basic features of computational technologies.

  12. Gamma gamma technology group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The gamma gamma community are concerned that in the rush to prepare for the e+e− machine, allowance is not being made for a future upgrade of the photon linear collider. References. [1] ECFA/DESY Photon Collider Working Group: B Badelek et al, TESLA Technical. Design Report, Part VI, Chapter 1: Photon collider at ...

  13. A course in finite group representation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Webb, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This graduate-level text provides a thorough grounding in the representation theory of finite groups over fields and rings. The book provides a balanced and comprehensive account of the subject, detailing the methods needed to analyze representations that arise in many areas of mathematics. Key topics include the construction and use of character tables, the role of induction and restriction, projective and simple modules for group algebras, indecomposable representations, Brauer characters, and block theory. This classroom-tested text provides motivation through a large number of worked examples, with exercises at the end of each chapter that test the reader's knowledge, provide further examples and practice, and include results not proven in the text. Prerequisites include a graduate course in abstract algebra, and familiarity with the properties of groups, rings, field extensions, and linear algebra.

  14. A Laboratory Course in Technological Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, P.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a laboratory course taught at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (United Kingdom) which focuses on the preparation, properties, and applications of end-use products of the chemical industry. Outlines laboratory experiments on dyes, fibers, herbicides, performance testing, antioxidants, and surface active…

  15. Creating and Diffusing a Technology Champion Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitz, Neil; Hugstad, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Excitement has been generated for using Internet technology as a vehicle to further numerous educational objectives, including enhanced student learning, greater integration of business school functional areas, and increased job market relevance. This article discusses how the Introductory Internet Marketing course can be positioned as a…

  16. Facilitating Group Cohesion among Adolescents through Challenge Course Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, J. Scott; Benshoff, James M.

    2002-01-01

    A study examined the effects of participation in a low-element challenge course on younger adolescents' perceptions of group cohesion. Pre- and post-tests of group cohesion were administered to 167 North Carolina adolescents aged 11-14. Participants perceived an increase in group cohesion after the daylong program, regardless of their age, race,…

  17. Course Design and Technology for Synchronous Interaction in an Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreie, Jennifer; Johnson, Sandra; Lebsock, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Online course offerings in higher education continue to grow because of the strong demand. Though many online courses are based on an asynchronous model, there are courses that require real-time interaction between students themselves and between students and the instructor, which means synchronous interaction is necessary. The technology exists…

  18. Nuclear Technology Series. Course l: Radiation Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  19. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 19: Radiation Shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  20. EMC Corporation Provides Colleges with a Course in Storage Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sickle, Ed

    2008-05-01

    EMC Corporation, the world leader in data storage, created the EMC Academic Alliance Program to educate students on storage and close the education gap that exists. EMC developed a Storage Technology course to teach students about the design of storage technologies and the "big picture" of an information infrastructure. The course is "open" and focused on storage technologies, not products. College and universities use the course to teach students about a very important topic in IT: Storage. EMC collaborates with colleges and universities by providing the course, knowledge transfer sessions to faculty and program support. There is no cost to join and no cost to obtain the courses. EMC requires partners to sign an agreement for course use. Several colleges are using the course as an upper level elective and the course is taught by faculty. The alliance program has reduced faculty time to develop a storage course and time to learn the topic. Faculty is responsible for credentialing students and they supplement the course with additional materials. Students are being recruited for jobs by EMC and others, including internships. The Alliance program provides academic institutions with a way to differentiate. This paper will explain the program and the Storage Technology course.

  1. Using Leadered Groups in Organizational Behavior and Management Survey Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Rae

    2011-01-01

    In organizational behavior and management survey courses, students are likely to maximize certain career-appropriate knowledge when their classroom groups are leadered rather than leaderless. Using leadered groups facilitates the learning of the professional and managerial skills associated with formal leadership while reducing some problematic…

  2. Managing parental groups: personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the experience and personal impact of a group leadership course for child healthcare nurses. During their child's first year, all parents in Sweden are invited to participate in parental groups within the child health service; however, only 49% choose to participate. Despite extensive experience, child healthcare nurses find managing parental groups challenging and express a need for training in group dynamics and group leadership. The study was designed as a controlled study with a pretest/post-test design where the participants form their own control group. A group leadership course was given to 56 child healthcare nurses and evaluated in a pre- and postintervention questionnaire, a course evaluation and an interview with the course leaders. The child healthcare nurses felt their group leadership skills were strengthened and the majority (96%) felt that the course had changed their way of leading parental groups. They felt that the group leader role had been clarified and that they had obtained several new tools to use in their groups. Clarifying the role of group leader and adding knowledge about group leadership and dynamics seems to have increased the self-confidence for child healthcare nurses in group leadership. Improved confidence in group management might motivate the child healthcare nurses to further develop parental groups to attract the parents who currently choose not to participate. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Tree Seed Technology Training Course - Instructor's Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    F.T. Bonner; John A. Vozzo; W.W. Elam; S.B. Land

    1994-01-01

    This manual is intended primarily to train seed collectors, seed-plant managers, seed analysts, and nursery managers, but it can serve as a resource for any training course in forest regeneration. It includes both temperate and tropical tree species of all intended uses. The manual covers the following topics: seed biology, seed collection, seed handling, seed-quality...

  4. Bridging the gap between the technological singularity and mainstream medicine: highlighting a course on technology and the future of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solez, Kim; Bernier, Ashlyn; Crichton, Joel; Graves, Heather; Kuttikat, Preeti; Lockwood, Ross; Marovitz, William F; Monroe, Damon; Pallen, Mark; Pandya, Shawna; Pearce, David; Saleh, Abdullah; Sandhu, Neelam; Sergi, Consolato; Tuszynski, Jack; Waugh, Earle; White, Jonathan; Woodside, Michael; Wyndham, Roger; Zaiane, Osmar; Zakus, David

    2013-09-09

    The "technological singularity" is defined as that putative point in time forecasted to occur in the mid twenty-first century when machines will become smarter than humans, leading humans and machines to merge. It is hypothesized that this event will have a profound influence on medicine and population health. This work describes a new course on Technology and the Future of Medicine developed by a diverse, multi-disciplinary group of faculty members at a Canadian university. The course began as a continuous professional learning course and was later established as a recognized graduate course. We describe the philosophy of the course, the barriers encountered in course development, and some of the idiosyncratic solutions that were developed to overcome these, including the use of YouTube audience retention analytics. We hope that this report might provide a useful template for other institutions attempting to set up similar programs.

  5. Developing Course Materials for Technology-Mediated Chinese Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubler, Cornelius C.

    2018-01-01

    This article discusses principles involved in developing course materials for technology-mediated Chinese language learning, with examples from a new course designed to take into account the needs of distance and independent learners. Which learning environment is most efficient for a given learning activity needs to be carefully considered. It…

  6. The Effect of Instructional Technology and Material Design Course to Teacher Candidates' Gaining of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozkoparam, Süleyman Burak; Kiliç, Muhammet Emre; Usta, Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies of teacher candidates in Turkish Teaching department of Mevlana (Rumi) University and the effect of Instructional Technology and Material Design (ITMD) Course on TPACK. The study is a study of quantitative type and single-group pretest-posttest…

  7. Mathematical modeling courses for Media technology students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timcenko, Olga

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses curriculum development for Mathematical Modeling course at Medialogy education. Medialogy as a study line was established in 2002 at Faculty for Engineering and Natural Sciences at Aalborg University, and mathematics curriculum has already been revised three times, Mathematic...... Modeling on 6th semester being the latest addition. Some of the reasoning behind curriculum development, lessons learned and remaining issues are presented and discussed.  ...

  8. Hybrid Spaces and Hyphenated Musicians: Secondary Students' Musical Engagement in a Songwriting and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Evan S.

    2012-01-01

    This case study investigates how secondary students (three individuals and three groups) engaged with music and acted as musicians in a Songwriting and Technology Class (STC), a course involving the creation, performance, recording and production of original music with instruments and music technology. The following research question guided the…

  9. Teaching Creativity in a Master's Level Educational Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, Susan; Thompson, Penny; Kymes, Angel

    2015-01-01

    An online course was created for the purposes of engaging in-service teachers in pedagogies and technologies associated with creativity, innovation, and invention; using a variety of technologies in a safe, open, and playful atmosphere to help practicing teachers develop their own creativity; and providing tools for the development of creativity…

  10. Evaluating a blended-learning course taught to different groups of learners in a dental school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahinis, Kimon; Stokes, Christopher W; Walsh, Trevor F; Cannavina, Giuseppe

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to present and evaluate a blended-learning course developed for undergraduate (B.D.S.), postgraduate, and diploma (hygiene and therapy) students at the University of Sheffield School of Clinical Dentistry. Blended learning is the integration of classroom face-to-face learning with online learning. The overall methodology used for this study was action research. The data were collected using three processes: questionnaires to collect contextual data from the students taking the course; a student-led, nominal group technique to collect group data from the participants; and a non-participant observer technique to record the context in which certain group and individual behaviors occurred. The online component of the course was accepted as a valuable resource by 65 percent of those responding. While online information-sharing occurred (31 percent of the students posted in forums), there was no evidence of online collaboration, with only 8 percent replying to forum postings. Accessibility of the online environment was one of the main concerns of the students at the nominal group sessions. Differences regarding overall engagement with the course between the student groups (years) were observed during the sessions. The majority of the students were satisfied with the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) course. No statistically significant differences between males and females were found, but there were differences between different student cohorts (year groups).

  11. Delivering a medical school elective with massive open online course (MOOC) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The educational technology of massive open online courses (MOOCs) has been successfully applied in a wide variety of disciplines and are an intense focus of educational research at this time. Educators are now looking to MOOC technology as a means to improve professional medical education, but very little is known about how medical MOOCs compare with traditional content delivery. A retrospective analysis of the course evaluations for the Medicine as a Business elective by fourth-year medical students at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine (SIU-SOM) for the 2012-2015 academic years was conducted. This course was delivered by small group flipped classroom discussions for 2012-2014 and delivered via MOOC technology in 2015. Learner ratings were compared between the two course delivery methods using routinely collected course evaluations. Course enrollment has ranged from 6-19 students per year in the 2012-2015 academic years. Student evaluations of the course are favorable in the areas of effective teaching, accurate course objectives, meeting personal learning objectives, recommending the course to other students, and overall when rated on a 5-point Likert scale. The majority of all student ratings (76-95%) of this elective course are for the highest possible choice (Strongly agree or Excellent) for any criteria, regardless if the course was delivered via a traditional or MOOC format. Statistical analysis of these ratings suggests that the Effective Teacher and Overall Evaluations did not statistically differ between the two delivery formats. Student ratings of this elective course were highly similar when delivered in a flipped classroom format or by using MOOC technology. The primary advantage of this new course format is flexibility of time and place for learners, allowing them to complete the course objectives when convenient for them. The course evaluations suggest this is a change that is acceptable to the target audience. This study suggests that

  12. Incorporating Wiki Technology in a Traditional Biostatistics Course: Effects on University Students’ Collaborative Learning, Approaches to Learning and Course Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S.M. Fong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of incorporating wiki technology in an under-graduate biostatistics course for improving university students’ collaborative learning, approaches to learning, and course performance. Methodology: During a three year longitudinal study, twenty-one and twenty-four undergraduate students were recruited by convenience sampling and assigned to a wiki group (2014-2015 and a control group (2013-2014 and 2015-2016, respectively. The students in the wiki group attended face-to-face lectures and used a wiki (PBworks weekly for online- group discussion, and the students in the control group had no access to the wiki and interacted face-to-face only. The students’ collaborative learning, approaches to learning, and course performance were evaluated using the Group Process Questionnaire (GPQ, Revised Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F and course results, respectively, after testing. Findings: Multivariate analysis of variance results revealed that the R-SPQ-2F surface approach score, surface motive and strategy subscores were lower in the wiki group than in the control group (p < 0.05. The GPQ individual accountability and equal opportunity scores (components of collaboration were higher in the wiki group than in the control group (p < 0.001. No significant between-groups differences were found in any of the other outcome variables (i.e., overall course result, R-SPQ-2F deep approach score and subscores, GPQ positive interdependence score, social skills score, and composite score. Looking at the Wiki Questionnaire results, the subscale and composite scores we obtained were 31.5% to 37.7% lower than the norm. The wiki was used at a frequency of about 0.7 times per week per student. Recommendations for Practitioners: Using wiki technology in conjunction with the traditional face-to-face teaching method in a biostatistics course can enhance some aspects of undergraduate students’ collaborative learning

  13. Acceptance of technology-enhanced learning for a theoretical radiological science course: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkenke, Emeka; Vairaktaris, Elefterios; Bauersachs, Anne; Eitner, Stephan; Budach, Alexander; Knipfer, Christoph; Stelzle, Florian

    2012-03-30

    Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) gives a view to improved education. However, there is a need to clarify how TEL can be used effectively. The study compared students' attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face course on theoretical radiological science and a TEL course where students could combine face-to-face lectures and e-learning modules at their best convenience. 42 third-year dental students were randomly assigned to the traditional face-to-face group and the TEL group. Both groups completed questionnaires before the beginning and after completion of the course on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning. After completion of the course both groups also filled in the validated German-language TRIL (Trierer Inventar zur Lehrevaluation) questionnaire for the evaluation of courses given at universities. Both groups had a positive attitude towards e-learning that did not change over time. The TEL group attended significantly less face-to-face lectures than the traditional group. However, both groups stated that face-to-face lectures were the basis for education in a theoretical radiological science course. The members of the TEL group rated e-mail reminders significantly more important when they filled in the questionnaire on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning for the second time after completion of the course. The members of the technology-enhanced learning group were significantly less confident in passing the exam compared to the members of the traditional group. However, examination results did not differ significantly for traditional and the TEL group. It seems that technology-enhanced learning in a theoretical radiological science course has the potential to reduce the need for face-to-face lectures. At the same time examination results are not impaired. However, technology-enhanced learning cannot completely replace

  14. Acceptance of technology-enhanced learning for a theoretical radiological science course: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Technology-enhanced learning (TEL) gives a view to improved education. However, there is a need to clarify how TEL can be used effectively. The study compared students' attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face course on theoretical radiological science and a TEL course where students could combine face-to-face lectures and e-learning modules at their best convenience. Methods 42 third-year dental students were randomly assigned to the traditional face-to-face group and the TEL group. Both groups completed questionnaires before the beginning and after completion of the course on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning. After completion of the course both groups also filled in the validated German-language TRIL (Trierer Inventar zur Lehrevaluation) questionnaire for the evaluation of courses given at universities. Results Both groups had a positive attitude towards e-learning that did not change over time. The TEL group attended significantly less face-to-face lectures than the traditional group. However, both groups stated that face-to-face lectures were the basis for education in a theoretical radiological science course. The members of the TEL group rated e-mail reminders significantly more important when they filled in the questionnaire on attitudes and opinions towards a traditional face-to-face lectures and technology-enhanced learning for the second time after completion of the course. The members of the technology-enhanced learning group were significantly less confident in passing the exam compared to the members of the traditional group. However, examination results did not differ significantly for traditional and the TEL group. Conclusions It seems that technology-enhanced learning in a theoretical radiological science course has the potential to reduce the need for face-to-face lectures. At the same time examination results are not impaired. However, technology

  15. Teaching practice of Internet information technology in College English Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dandan

    2018-03-01

    The rapid development of “Internet+ Education” enables College English teachers to use the vast network platform with modern educational technology in teaching. The article put forward the practical mode of Micro-lecture in College English Teaching in this context to present a feasible approach to College English course.

  16. Usage of Technology Enhanced Educational Tools for Delivering Programming Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Ivanović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Methods and approaches behind technology enhanced learning (TEL in programming courses at a university level encourage continuous research in the last 20 years. Still there is no generally applicable way that would guarantee success. In this paper some experiences gathered during years of a technology-enhanced approach in teaching Object-Oriented Programming (OOP at two universities in two countries are presented and compared. Emphasis is given on the technology-enhanced educational tools that were selected or developed by the two institutions for teaching OOP. Different traditions and independent development at both institutions allow us to draw generally applicable conclusions and recommendations.

  17. Best practices for team-based assistive technology design courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Mary R; Pearlman, Jonathan L

    2013-09-01

    Team-based design courses focused on products for people with disabilities have become relatively common, in part because of training grants such as the NSF Research to Aid Persons with Disabilities course grants. An output from these courses is an annual description of courses and projects but has yet to be complied into a "best practices guide," though it could be helpful for instructors. To meet this need, we conducted a study to generate best practices for assistive technology product development courses and how to use these courses to teach students the fundamentals of innovation. A full list of recommendations is comprised in the manuscript and include identifying a client through a reliable clinical partner; allowing for transparency between the instructors, the client, and the team(s); establishing multi-disciplinary teams; using a process-oriented vs. solution-oriented product development model; using a project management software to facilitate and archive communication and outputs; facilitating client interaction through frequent communication; seeking to develop professional role confidence to inspire students' commitment to engineering and (where applicable) rehabilitation field; publishing student designs on repositories; incorporating both formal and informal education opportunities related to design; and encouraging students to submit their designs to local or national entrepreneurship competitions.

  18. Student-Identified Strengths and Challenges of Using Blackboard for Group Projects in a Social Work Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa B. Littlefield

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Blackboard (TM provides social work educators integrated online communication tools that they can employ to facilitate student learning through features such as e-mail, discussion forums, file exchange, virtual classroom, and links to online resources. This study describes students’ experiences using Blackboard (TM to support a group project assignment. The majority of students found it easy to use and useful for the project, and indicated that they would like to use it in other courses. In addition, students gained technical skills as a result of the group project. Students’ group project grades and final course grades were comparable to those in other sections of the same course taught by this investigator. The findings of this study suggest that online technology can be used to facilitate group assignments for MSW students. The benefits include increased efficiency of group functioning and increased accountability of group members. The challenges include technical problems and student resistance to using the technology.

  19. Algebra in action a course in groups, rings, and fields

    CERN Document Server

    Shahriari, Shahriar

    2017-01-01

    This text-based on the author's popular courses at Pomona College-provides a readable, student-friendly, and somewhat sophisticated introduction to abstract algebra. It is aimed at sophomore or junior undergraduates who are seeing the material for the first time. In addition to the usual definitions and theorems, there is ample discussion to help students build intuition and learn how to think about the abstract concepts. The book has over 1300 exercises and mini-projects of varying degrees of difficulty, and, to facilitate active learning and self-study, hints and short answers for many of the problems are provided. There are full solutions to over 100 problems in order to augment the text and to model the writing of solutions. Lattice diagrams are used throughout to visually demonstrate results and proof techniques. The book covers groups, rings, and fields. In group theory, group actions are the unifying theme and are introduced early. Ring theory is motivated by what is needed for solving Diophantine equa...

  20. Information Technology Students’ Language Needs for their ESP Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Balaei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find the needs of Iranian undergraduate Information Technology (IT engineering students for their ESP course. To this end, a needs analysis questionnaire was administered to 30 undergraduate IT students to elicit information about their needs in English language at Islamic Azad University, Tabriz Branch. The results of data analysis revealed that among four skills reading was the highly needed skill followed by writing. It was also found that a majority of participants were dissatisfied with the current ESP courses for undergraduate students. This, in fact, indicated that ESP curricula have not yet been successfully developed in satisfying the students’ professional needs in target situations. Findings point to the fact that ESP and its teaching in Iran has to undergo serious rethinking not only in the content of the course but also the whole process of teaching the language. The findings can help course designers to both put much more credit for ESP courses, and consider appropriate and suitable materials which can give useful information to the students. It can also help ESP teachers to meet the language needs of their students.

  1. Technology Sharing in Manufacturing Business Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sköld, Martin; Karlsson, Christer

    2012-01-01

    , consultants, partners, and others. However, the distinction between the focal firm, on the one hand, and networks, on the other, is in this paper argued to be too extensive without intermediating nuances. Less focus is given to an in-between perspective configured by business groups or concerns here defined......, internal documents and protocols, and workshops. Following the clinical field-study approach, findings are theoretically validated in relation to literature. The analysis identifies and depicts four different types of technology-sharing scenarios in manufacturing business groups. Each type has particular...

  2. 75 FR 47631 - Swets Information Services, Operations Department, Information Technology Group, Marketing Group...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-06

    ... Services, Operations Department, Information Technology Group, Marketing Group, Finance Group, Runnemede..., Information Technology (IT) Group, Marketing Group and the Finance Group into one entity instead of... Technology Group, Marketing Group, and Finance Group, Runnemede, New Jersey, who became totally or partially...

  3. Can't You Just Talk to Them? Small Group Work in a Senior Thesis Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Teresa; Mackey-Kallis, Susan

    At Villanova University, the Senior Projects Course is designed to serve as a capstone course. Students are required to integrate the pieces of the discipline acquired from previous course work into a comprehensive, fully developed research project. This paper looks critically at one aspect of effectively managing a group project course: conflict…

  4. Development and Evaluation of Senior High School Courses on Emerging Technology: A Case Study of a Course on Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Tung

    2012-01-01

    In Taiwan, the National Science Council has implemented the High Scope Program (HSP) since 2006. The purpose of this study was to analyze the development and effectiveness of senior high school HSP courses on emerging technology. This study used a course on virtual reality as an example, to investigate the influence of emerging technology courses…

  5. Emerging Technology Design: A new master course at bringing emerging technologies its break through applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eger, Arthur O.; de Boer, Andries; Rodgers, Paul; Brodhurst, Libby; Hepburn, Duncan

    2005-01-01

    In 2001 the University of Twente started a course on Industrial Design Engineering. In 2004 the first group of students obtained their bachelor degree and started with one of the two then available subsequent master courses: • Design & Styling • Management of Product Development This paper describes

  6. Achieving generic competences through a cross-disciplinary research based course in Arctic Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Hansen, Claus Thorp; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2014-01-01

    successful in achieving both the scientific and generic competences than the students who did not. The students evaluate the course as being highly motivating for further learning and they get confident by successfully having executed a research based project in a new context. The project and field work...... engineering competences, so they are more aware of this, instead of just focussing on improving their scientific competences.......In a research based course in Arctic Technology, different teaching activities were used to support learning of both technical and generic competences. The active learning was based around a 3-weeks field work period in Greenland in combination with lectures, assignments, project and peer group...

  7. Innovative technologies in course Electrical engineering and electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, E. V.; Kiselev, V. I.; Kulikova, E. A.

    2017-11-01

    Department of Electrical Engineering and Nondestructive Testing, NRU “MPEI”, has been working on development Electronic Learning Resources (ELRs) in course Electrical Engineering and Electronics for several years. This work have been focused on education intensification and effectiveness while training bachelors in nonelectrical specializations including students from Thermal and Atomic Power Engineering Institute. The developed ELRs are united in a tutorial module consisting of three parts (Electrical Circuits, Electrical Machines, Basics of Electronics): electronic textbook and workbook (ETW); virtual laboratory sessions (VLS); training sessions (ETS); personal tasks (PT); testing system that contains electronic tests in all course subjects and built-in verification of a student’s work results in ETW, VLS, ETS, PT. The report presents samples of different ELRs in html format and MathCAD, MatLAB Simulink applications, copyrighted programs in Java2, Delphi, VB6, C++. The report also contains the experience description, advantages and disadvantages of the new technologies. It is mentioned that ELRs provide new opportunities in course studying.

  8. A TELL English Course to Meet the Needs of a Multilevel BA in ELT Group: What Was Wrong?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes Fierro, María del Carmen; Delgado Alvarado, Natanael

    2015-01-01

    A Technology Enhanced Language Learning (TELL) course was designed to meet the needs of a multilevel first-semester group of students of the BA in English Language Teaching (ELT) taught at the School of Languages of the Juarez University of the State of Durango (ELE-UJED), Mexico. Amongst the relevant needs, students were to reach a CEFR B1.1…

  9. TECHNOLOGY SUPPORTED LEARNING PLATFORM: Moodle Integrated Academic Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saziye YAMAN

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available It is substantially accepted that constructivism proposes knowledge as “not a fixed object”; constructed by an individual through her own experiences. As a learning theory, constructivism in education emphasizes collaborative learning, such as authentic challenging projects involving in students, teachers and experts in the learning community. Its goal is to create learning communities that are more closely related to the collaborative practice of the real world as strongly reflected in social constructivist idea. The technologies used in the filed of education will support learning through collaborative practices, using learners’ experiences for “meaning making”. The challenge now is to extend the educational networks so that it offers access to learning resources, online storage and tools for communication and management not just within the limitation of school and time. Through learning platforms, such as Moodle, teachers and administrators may bring hardware, software and supporting services together to enable more effective conditions among teachers and students. In this study, Moodle was used to support the 4th grade pre-service language teachers’ (student teachers one of the academic courses, named as “Field Experience”. The student teachers were expected to prepare graduation theses in the field of English language teaching. Moodle was integrated as a technological learning aid and used as online support throughout a semester course. So, we will discuss how Moodle was integrated as a learning platform, while discussing, the use of Moodle as a “course supporter” process, steps and the sample activities will be presented as well.

  10. TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY EDUCATION: JOINT PROPOSALS IN THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz França Batista

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Through a brief literature review we situate the information technology, especially mobile devices (smartphones and tablets in our society highlighting the importance of teaching and education in this field. The IT education rarely deals with contemporary social issues dealing only with the technical aspect of the training. We highlight the merit of addressing social issues in the modern educational environment especially in courses of technical and technological training in IT. On the one hand the IT education, and other contemporary social issues. This paper presents proposals to connect and articulate these two distinctly opposite points. Considering the importance of a mobile programming course, we present some suggestions that seem timely and relevant on how to perform this connection and at the same time bring out an orientation, a window to discuss with the students about the humanitarian and social problems that are all around us today. Keywords: Teaching resources, Teaching Information technology, Contemporary social issues, Technological education.

  11. Teaching with technology: learning outcomes for a combined dental and dental hygiene online hybrid oral histology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Singh, Amul H; Overman, Pamela R

    2013-06-01

    Among the challenges leaders in dental and allied dental education have faced in recent years is a shortage of well-qualified faculty members, especially in some specialty areas of dentistry. One proposed solution has been the use of technology. At the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry, the departure of a faculty member who taught the highly specialized content in oral histology and embryology provided the opportunity to implement distance delivery of that course. The course is taught once a year to a combined group of dental and dental hygiene students. Previous to spring semester of 2009, the course was taught using traditional face-to-face, in-class lectures and multiple-choice examinations. During the spring semesters of 2009, 2010, and 2011, the course was taught using synchronous and asynchronous distance delivery technology. Outcomes for these courses (including course grades and performance on the National Board Dental Examination Part I) were compared to those from the 2006, 2007, and 2008 courses. Students participating in the online hybrid course were also given an author-designed survey, and the perceptions of the faculty member who made the transition from teaching the course in a traditional face-to-face format to teaching in an online hybrid format were solicited. Overall, student and faculty perceptions and student outcomes and course reviews have been positive. The results of this study can provide guidance to those seeking to use technology as one method of curricular delivery.

  12. Applied Technology Proficiency of High School Students in Applied and Traditional Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Dennis W.

    2003-01-01

    This investigation compares applied technology skill levels of high school students enrolled in various applied and comparable traditional courses, particularly Principles of Technology and physics courses respectively. Outcomes from ACT's Applied Technology Work Keys[R] assessment test were used as a measure of applied technology skill levels.…

  13. Development of a Knowledge Base for Incorporating Technology into Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Logan

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a project resulting from the request of a group of faculty at The College at Brockport to create a website for best practices in teaching and technology. The project evolved into a knowledge base powered by WordPress. Installation and configuration of WordPress resulted in the creation of custom taxonomies and post types,…

  14. Impact of clicker technology in a mathematics course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibongile Simelane

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the implementation of clickers to improve the success rate of first-year mathematics students. There were 105 students registered in this course, in a university of technology in South Africa. In order to do this, an orientation test in the form of a paper-based assessment was first conducted to determine what students already knew. About 21.9% of the students did not take the test and 20% did not pass it. These results raised concerned. Thereafter students were taught. After four weeks they were evaluated on their understanding of the concept taught in class. Results did not improve much, as 48.6% of the students did not pass the test. Therefore, a technology-engagement teaching strategy (TETS using clicker technology was developed and implemented in order to improve the pass rate. Weekly continuous assessments or diagnostic tests were conducted in order to establish the changes in students’ academic performance. A survey questionnaire was administered after the teaching and learning of incorporating clickers. This questionnaire also examined students’ perspective on the usefulness of clickers in teaching and learning. The results showed that the effective implementation of clickers with the integration of a TETS improved students’ success rate.

  15. A Course in Information Technology in Secondary Schools--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    Part 1 (SE 532 887) focused on the need for a secondary school information technology course. This part provides and describes content appropriate for the course, focusing on the three main themes of the course. Among the topics considered are technology/change, information in post-industrial society, population explosion, automated office, and…

  16. Criteria for Using Technology To Teach the Basic Course in Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eadie, William F.; Andersen, Peter A.; Armas-Matsumoto, Catherine M.; Block, Evan; Martin, Patricia Geist; Goehring, Charles; Good, Jeffrey; Hellweg, Susan A.; Knight, Laura L.; Lubic, Bryan; Spitzberg, Brian H.

    This paper describes the beginnings of a project to remake the oral communication general education course--part of the vision for the course is to use technology to help students learn course content. According to the paper, currently the basic course is taught mostly in traditional format (relatively small sections with set assignments), with…

  17. Examining Educational Climate Change Technology: How Group Inquiry Work with Realistic Scientific Technology Alters Classroom Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2018-04-01

    This study with 79 students in Montreal, Quebec, compared the educational use of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) global climate model (GCM) to climate education technologies developed for classroom use that included simpler interfaces and processes. The goal was to show how differing climate education technologies succeed and fail at getting students to evolve in their understanding of anthropogenic global climate change (AGCC). Many available climate education technologies aim to convey key AGCC concepts or Earth systems processes; the educational GCM used here aims to teach students the methods and processes of global climate modeling. We hypothesized that challenges to learning about AGCC make authentic technology-enabled inquiry important in developing accurate understandings of not just the issue but how scientists research it. The goal was to determine if student learning trajectories differed between the comparison and treatment groups based on whether each climate education technology allowed authentic scientific research. We trace learning trajectories using pre/post exams, practice quizzes, and written student reflections. To examine the reasons for differing learning trajectories, we discuss student pre/post questionnaires, student exit interviews, and 535 min of recorded classroom video. Students who worked with a GCM demonstrated learning trajectories with larger gains, higher levels of engagement, and a better idea of how climate scientists conduct research. Students who worked with simpler climate education technologies scored lower in the course because of lower levels of engagement with inquiry processes that were perceived to not actually resemble the work of climate scientists.

  18. Examining Educational Climate Change Technology: How Group Inquiry Work with Realistic Scientific Technology Alters Classroom Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2017-10-01

    This study with 79 students in Montreal, Quebec, compared the educational use of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) global climate model (GCM) to climate education technologies developed for classroom use that included simpler interfaces and processes. The goal was to show how differing climate education technologies succeed and fail at getting students to evolve in their understanding of anthropogenic global climate change (AGCC). Many available climate education technologies aim to convey key AGCC concepts or Earth systems processes; the educational GCM used here aims to teach students the methods and processes of global climate modeling. We hypothesized that challenges to learning about AGCC make authentic technology-enabled inquiry important in developing accurate understandings of not just the issue but how scientists research it. The goal was to determine if student learning trajectories differed between the comparison and treatment groups based on whether each climate education technology allowed authentic scientific research. We trace learning trajectories using pre/post exams, practice quizzes, and written student reflections. To examine the reasons for differing learning trajectories, we discuss student pre/post questionnaires, student exit interviews, and 535 min of recorded classroom video. Students who worked with a GCM demonstrated learning trajectories with larger gains, higher levels of engagement, and a better idea of how climate scientists conduct research. Students who worked with simpler climate education technologies scored lower in the course because of lower levels of engagement with inquiry processes that were perceived to not actually resemble the work of climate scientists.

  19. Fusion Teaching: Utilizing Course Management Technology to Deliver an Effective Multimodal Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Bradley D.; Cochran, Howard H.; Velikova, Marieta

    2013-01-01

    Fusion teaching merges several pedagogies into a coherent whole. Course management technology allows for the digitization and delivery of pedagogies in an effective and exciting manner. Online course management options more easily enable outcome assessment and monitoring for continuous improvement.

  20. A Wiki-Based Group Project in an Inorganic Chemistry Foundation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    A semester-long group project that utilizes wiki sites to enhance collaboration was developed for a foundation course in inorganic chemistry. Through structured assignments, student groups use metal-based or metal-combating therapeutic agents as a model for applying and understanding course concepts; they also gain proficiency with scientific- and…

  1. Can We Use Facebook Groups to Establish Social Presence in Online Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmirli, Serkan

    2017-01-01

    In this research, the potential of Facebook groups used in an online course in order to establish social presence was examined. Qualitative research methodology was used in this study. The participants of the study were 12 senior undergraduate students taking the School Experience course online over a period of 12 weeks. A Facebook group where…

  2. The Effect of Creative Drama on Student Achievement in the Course of Information Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özek, Müzeyyen Bulut

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of creative drama on student achievement in the Information Technologies course. The study was carried out for the unit "Tomorrow's Technology" which is the first unit of Information Technologies course. For this study, 89 sixth grade students were selected from primary school in…

  3. Technology Acceptance and Course Completion Rates in Online Education: A Non-experimental, Mixed Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Colelia

    As the need for quality online courses increase in demand, the acceptance of technology and completion rates become the focus of higher education. The purpose of this non-experimental, mixed method study was to examine the relationship between the university students' perceptions and acceptance of technology and learner completion rates with respect to the development of online courses. This study involved 61 participants from two universities regarding their perceived usefulness (PU) of technology, intent to use technology, and intent to complete a course. Two research questions were examined regarding student perceptions regarding technology employed in an online course and the relationship, if any, between technology acceptance and completion of an online university course. The technology acceptance model (TAM) was used to collect data on the usefulness of course activities and student intent to complete the course. An open-ended questionnaire was administered to collect information concerning student perceptions of course activities. Quantitative data was analyzed using SPSS and Qualtrics, which indicated there was not a significant relationship between technology acceptance and course completion (p = .154). Qualitative data were examined by pattern matching to create a concept map of the theoretical patterns between constructs. Pattern matching revealed many students favored the use of the Internet over Canvas. Furthermore, data showed students enrolled in online courses because of the flexibility and found the multimedia used in the courses as helpful in course completion. Insight was investigated to offer reasons and decisions concerning choice that were made by the students. Future recommendations are to expand mixed methods studies of technology acceptance in various disciplines to gain a better understanding of student perceptions of technology uses, intent to use, and course completion.

  4. Developing a Technology Enhanced CS0 Course for Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokkila, Erno; Kaila, Erkki; Lindén, Rolf; Laakso, Mikko-Jussi; Sutinen, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    The CS0 course in the curriculum typically has the role of introducing students into basic concepts and terminology of computer science. Hence, it is used to form a base on which the subsequent programming courses can build on. However, much of the effort to build better methodologies for courses is spent on introductory programming courses…

  5. Integration of e-learning technologies in an interprofessional health science course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaro, Mike; King, Sharla; Taylor, Elizabeth; Satzinger, Franziska; Snart, Fern; Drummond, Jane

    2008-02-01

    Advances in information and communication technology are influencing instructional formats and delivery modes for post secondary teaching and learning. The purpose of this study was to determine whether interprofessional team process skills traditionally taught in a small group face-to-face classroom setting could be taught in a blended learning environment; without compromising the pedagogical approach and collaborative Group Investigation Model (Sharan & Sharan 1992) used in the course. A required interprofessional team development course designed to teach health science students (Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Dentistry, Dental Hygiene, Medical Laboratory Science, and Nutrition) team process skills was redesigned from a 100% face-to-face delivery format to a blended learning format where 70% of the instruction was delivered using a new synchronous virtual classroom technology (Elluminate www.elluminate.com) in conjunction with asynchronous technology (WebCT). It was hypothesized there would be no significant difference between the blended learning format and the traditional face-to-face format in the development of interprofessional team knowledge, skills and attitudes. The two formats were evaluated on demographic information, computer experience, and interprofessional team attitudes, knowledge and skills. The three main findings are: (a) no significant differences between student groups on achieving team process skills, (b) an observation of differences between the groups on team dynamics, and (c) a more positive achievement of course learning objectives perceived by students in the blended learning class. The results provide evidence to support our blended learning format without compromising pedagogy. They also suggest that this format enhances students' perceptions of their learning.

  6. Managed Group Formation: An Approach to Team Formation in Policy Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Reed E.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Managed group formation uses student personal value data and sociometric nomination to optimize the influence of work group formation on student learning. Resulting work group formations are used to enhance the effectiveness of traditional course content and to increase students' sensitization to important group process issues in business policy.…

  7. Using Technology-Enhanced, Cooperative, Group-Project Learning for Student Comprehension and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlhoaele, Malefyane; Suhre, Cor; Hofman, Adriaan

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative learning may improve students' motivation, understanding of course concepts, and academic performance. This study therefore enhanced a cooperative, group-project learning technique with technology resources to determine whether doing so improved students' deep learning and performance. A sample of 118 engineering students, randomly…

  8. Applying XML-Based Technologies to Developing Online Courses: The Case of a Prototype Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedrzejowicz, Joanna; Neumann, Jakub

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to describe XML technologies and to show how they can be applied for developing web-based courses and supporting authors who do not have much experience with the preparation of web-based courses. Design/methodology/approach: When developing online courses the academic staff has to address the following problem--how to…

  9. Applying the Multisim Technology to Teach the Course of High Frequency Power Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Gang; Xue, Yuan-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    As one important professional base course in the electric information specialty, the course of "high frequency electronic circuit" has strong theoretical characteristic and abstract content. To enhance the teaching quality of this course, the computer simulation technology based on Multisim is introduced into the teaching of "high…

  10. Final Report of the Advanced Coal Technology Work Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Advanced Coal Technology workgroup reported to the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee. This page includes the final report of the Advanced Coal Technology Work Group to the Clean Air Act Advisory Committee.

  11. Has Group Work Education Lost Its Social Group Work Essence? A Content Analysis of MSW Course Syllabi in Search of Mutual Aid and Group Conflict Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweifach, Jay Stephen

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the results of a content analysis of MSW group work course syllabi in an effort to better understand the extent to which mutual aid and group conflict, two important dimensions of social group work, are included and featured as prominent elements in MSW-level group work instruction.

  12. Integration of Technology in Elementary Pre-Service Teacher Education: An Examination of Mathematics Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Laski, Elida

    2013-01-01

    Instructors (N = 204) of elementary mathematics methods courses completed a survey assessing the extent to which they stay informed about research related to effective uses of educational technology and the kinds and numbers of educational technologies they include in their courses. Findings indicate that, while they view educational technology…

  13. The Effect of Technology on Students' Opinions about Authentic Learning Activities in Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Hilal; Dogan, Alev; Uluay, Gulsah

    2017-01-01

    Today, most of the researchers have agreed on the importance of classroom environment where students responsible of their own learning. It is important to use modern learning methods with technology to reach this aim in courses. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of using Technology in science courses to investigate 7th…

  14. Instructors' Growth in TPACK: Teaching Technology-Infused Methods Courses to Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, Teresa S.; Buss, Ray R.; Wetzel, Keith; Lindsey, LeeAnn

    2015-01-01

    We were concerned about teaching a stand-alone technology integration course while advocating that teachers employ full integration. Our college moved to a tech-infusion model whereby our educational technology curriculum would be incorporated in methods courses. Using a qualitative approach, we documented experiences of teacher educators who were…

  15. A Comparison of Delivery Formats to Encourage Student-Centered Learning in a Power Engineering Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mathew J.; Webster, Rustin D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a student-centered approach to a power engineering technology course using the flipped or inverted classroom as well as active learning in the form of group discussions and team problem solving. The study compares student performance and perceptions of a traditional, teaching-centered classroom to two different flipped…

  16. Teaching In Online Courses:
Experiences Of Instructional Technology Faculty Members

    OpenAIRE

    AKDEMIR, Omur

    2015-01-01

    The Internet and computer technology have altered the education landscape. Online courses are offered throughout the world. Learning about the experiences of faculty members is important to guide practitioners and administrators. Using qualitative research methodology, this study investigated the experiences of faculty members teaching online courses. A convenience sampling was used to select the instructional technology faculty members to investigate their experiences in online courses. Semi...

  17. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 4: Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  18. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 25: Radioactive Material Handling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  19. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 10: Power Plant Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  20. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 2: Radiation Protection I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  1. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 20: Radiation Monitoring Techniques (Radiochemical).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  2. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 11: Radiation Detection and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  3. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 17: Radiation Protection II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  4. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 21: Radioactive Materials Disposal and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Occupational Research and Development, Inc., Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  5. Nuclear Technology Series. Course 15: Metallurgy and Metals Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Education Research Center, Waco, TX.

    This technical specialty course is one of thirty-five courses designed for use by two-year postsecondary institutions in five nuclear technician curriculum areas: (1) radiation protection technician, (2) nuclear instrumentation and control technician, (3) nuclear materials processing technician, (4) nuclear quality-assurance/quality-control…

  6. Effects of a Low-Element Challenge Course on Abstinence Self-Efficacy and Group Cohesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Jamie M.; Smith, Thomas E.; Richards, Kristin V.

    2012-01-01

    Substance abuse researchers identify self-efficacy and group cohesion as important components in alcohol and other drug-dependency treatment. Objectives: The purpose of this single-group, pretest-posttest study is to explore the therapeutic value of a challenge course intervention on the self-efficacy and group cohesion of nine chemically…

  7. Academic Procrastination and the Performance of Graduate-Level Cooperative Groups in Research Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qun G.; DaRos-Voseles, Denise A.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which academic procrastination predicted the performance of cooperative groups in graduate-level research methods courses. A total of 28 groups was examined (n = 83 students), ranging in size from 2 to 5 (M = 2.96, SD = 1.10). Multiple regression analyses revealed that neither within-group mean nor within-group…

  8. The Technological Dimension of a Massive Open Online Course: The Case of the CCK08 Course Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fini, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, a new term emerged in the already crowded e-learning landscape: MOOC, or massive open online course. Lifelong learners can now use various tools to build and manage their own learning networks, and MOOCs may provide opportunities to test such networks. This paper focuses on the technological aspects of one MOOC, the Connectivism and…

  9. An Approach for Group, Undergraduate Research Experiences in Courses Across the Geology Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, M.; Kinner, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    At Western Carolina University, a past NSF CCLI grant helped embed project-based learning throughout the geology curriculum, including a senior capstone seminar in which groups of students conduct authentic undergraduate research (UR). These curricular changes showed many high-level educational benefits to the group senior capstone research and the benefits of complex, technical projects at all levels of the curriculum if project goals and guidance for students is appropriate for their level, skills, and experiences. A current NSF TUES grant, now in its 3rd year, is formally assessing the impact of students participating in group UR experiences embedded in traditional courses at all curricular levels to determine if they have similar benefits to students conducting individually-mentored research. An ancillary goal is to develop a transferable, sustainable model for this approach, so UR experiences can formally broaden to more students at more levels. At this time, we have taught about 100 students in five research-based courses at all levels of the curriculum. Student's perceived strong benefits of their UR experience, and have been evaluated with quantitative (URSSA) and qualitative (focus groups) data. Benefits of their experiences are high related to personal growth and the scientific process and relatively low in research skills. Qualitative data shows students value 1) the open-ended nature of the authentic research questions, 2) group collaboration, and 3) hands-on learning. Similarity of student results across different courses reflect a now stable approach we have developed for courses with group UR experiences. Key elements to our approach are 1) an ongoing, broad research program (in our case, an on-campus hydrologic research station), 2) strategically assigned student groups (no. 3-6), group responsibilities that include a mix of individual and group assignments, and peer assessments, 3) student research fellows that help run the research station and

  10. Academic performance in a pharmacotherapeutics course sequence taught synchronously on two campuses using distance education technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Michael; Morin, Anna K

    2011-10-10

    To compare the academic performance of campus-based students in a pharmacotherapeutics course with that of students at a distant campus taught via synchronous teleconferencing. Examination scores and final course grades for campus-based and distant students completing the case-based pharmacotherapeutics course sequence over a 5-year period were collected and analyzed. The mean examination scores and final course grades were not significantly different between students on the 2 campuses. The use of synchronous distance education technology to teach students does not affect students' academic performance when used in an active-learning, case-based pharmacotherapeutics course.

  11. Clinical course teaching in transport of critically ill patients: Small group methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Beigmohammadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Critically ill patient transfer is potentially risky and may be lead to morbidity and mortality. Physicians' skill is very important for safe transport. We want to evaluate the effect of clinical course teaching on the promotion of physicians' abilities in the transport of critically ill patients. In an interventional study, 320 interns, male and female, were taught about patient transfer in two groups include in one day clinical course as the small group system (n=160 and other group the lecture base learning (n=160. In the clinical course, each participant under observation of an anesthesiologist in the operation room and ICU was acquainted with mask ventilation, intubation and learned to work with a defibrillator, infusion pump, portable ventilator and pulse oximeter. In lecture group, the anesthesiologist explained the topics by video and dummy. At the end of education course, the interns’ abilities were evaluated based on checklist method and scored by the project colleague in all educational items. Three hundred twenty interns, 122 males, and 198 females; were enrolled, two groups. The clinical course training caused improvements in the interns’ knowledge and abilities in intubation and use of the defibrillator and portable ventilator vs.lecture group significantly (P<0.005. The males were better than females in laryngoscopy, but the progress of the females was significantly better than males (P=0.003. The rate of adverse events was reduced significantly after clinical course teaching (P=0.041 Clinical course teaching could promote interns' clinical competencies in the transport of critically ill patients.

  12. On Study of Teaching Reform of Organic Chemistry Course in Applied Chemical Industry Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunshen

    2017-11-01

    with the implementation of new curriculum reform, the education sees great changes in teaching methods. Teaching reform is profound in organic chemistry course in applied chemical industry technology. However, many problems which have never been noticed before occur when reform programs are implemented which harm students’ ability for learning and enthusiasm in side face. This paper proposes reform measures like combining theory and practice, improving professional quality, supplementing professional needs and integrating teaching into life after analyzing organic chemistry course teaching in applied chemical industry technology currently, hoping to play a role of reference for organic chemistry course teaching reform in applied chemical industry technology.

  13. Rise and course of an elusive technology: metal gilding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perea, Alicia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Research on mercury or fire gilding technology during Prehistory and Antiquity is at its beginnings due to the fact that its identification and characterization is completely dependent on analytical techniques, mainly non destructive Archaeometry techniques allowing an easy characterization of the archaeological objects. Actually we rely on a small number of analytical data, much more limited if we place ourselves within the Iberian peninsula or if we are concerned with the early stages of the use of this technology because... nobody finds what it is not looked for.
    We submit a summary of data anlyisis by XRF and PIXE in order to characterize two groups of items: on the one hand a special type of iberian brooch with animals and hunting scenes, made up of gilded silver, and on the other the visigothic treasure of Torredonjimeno, Jaén. From the debate on these results the hypothesis of a local origin for fire gilding technology during the iberian period, about 4th century B.C., has come out regardless other centers of possible inception in Europe or the Mediterranean. A final stage would be represented by visigothic jewellery that closes the late Antiquity technological domain system up.

    La investigación sobre la técnica del dorado al fuego con amalgama de mercurio durante la Prehistoria y Antigüedad no ha hecho más que comenzar debido a que su identificación y caracterización es totalmente dependiente de las técnicas analíticas, fundamentalmente las no destructivas, puestas a punto desde la Arqueometría para facilitar el estudio del material arqueológico. Actualmente contamos con escasos datos analíticos, que se reducen drásticamente si nos situamos en la Península ibérica y concentramos nuestro interés en las primeras etapas de su utilización, porque... nadie encuentra lo que no se busca.
    Presentamos una recopilación de este tipo de datos mediante las técnicas analíticas XRF y PIXE para caracterizar dos grupos

  14. Preparing Students for 21st Century Teamwork: Effective Collaboration in the Online Group Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messersmith, Amber S.

    2015-01-01

    Facilitating meaningful interaction among students is a significant challenge of teaching in the online environment. This paper presents a semester-long approach that enables quality interaction among group members within undergraduate online group communication courses while experiencing the challenges of working with geographically dispersed…

  15. Pros and Cons of a Group Webpage Design Project in a Freshman Anatomy and Physiology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Kevin M.; Jensen, Murray; Moore, Randy

    2007-01-01

    To generate motivation and promote the development of written communication skills, students in a freshman-level anatomy and physiology course for nonmajors created group webpages describing historically important diseases. After the groups had been formed, each individual was assigned specific components of the disease (e.g., causes or…

  16. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan Lammel et al. email = crathbun@fnal.gov

    2002-01-01

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large

  17. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Lammel et al.

    2002-12-10

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large.

  18. PhD Year 1 Students' Experience with the Educational Technology and Innovation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamoah, Moses Kumi; Mackin, Eva Esi

    2016-01-01

    The advent of information, communication and new technologies, globalisation and rising costs has prompted rethinking what we teach, how we teach and even where teaching and learning take place. The Educational Technology and Innovation Course (Adlt704) was designed to enable students to create, use and manage appropriate technological processes…

  19. Teaching a Second Core Course in Information Technology: A West Point Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Wolfe

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The United States Military Academy (USMA at West Point has the mission to produce officers for the U.S. Army. As part of the curriculum, the Academy requires all non-ABET major cadets (students to take two courses on information technology (IT with both courses focused on problem solving with technology. The first course is an introductory course offered in the freshman year while the second course is a more detailed course offered in the junior year. The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department uses an expanded definition of information technology; that is, any technology that acquires, transmits, processes, or displays information. Information technology is becoming increasingly important in the Army with the development and use of sensors, command and control systems, and other technologies to achieve information dominance. The course is divided into six modules: acquisition of data and sensors, transmission of data and networks, processing of data into information, display of information, legal and ethical issues of IT, and information dominance and operations. Cadets use a four-step problem solving methodology to develop and implement the components of an Information System to solve a real-world problem. The short-term impact of the course on the cadets has been very positive, and we are confident that the long-term impact will be substantial on the cadets and the Army. Cadets are exposed to a number of different technologies, gaining an understanding of how these technologies are used to acquire data, transmit data, process data into information, and display information to support decision making. In addition, the course projects help enforce the problem solving methodology where cadets analyze, design, implement, and test their solutions.

  20. Are groups working in the Information Technology class? | Mentz ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We discuss teache rs' perce ption of the use of group work in the Information Technology (IT) classroom. We describe the current situation regarding the implementation of group work in IT classrooms in South Africa as well as the challenges that IT teachers face when implementing group work. This information will be used ...

  1. Concepts first: A course with improved educational outcomes and parity for underrepresented minority groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, D. J.

    2017-08-01

    Two active learning physics courses were taught and compared. The "concepts first" course was organized to teach only concepts in the first part of the class, the ultimate goal being to increase students' problem-solving abilities much later in the class. The other course was taught in the same quarter by the same instructor using the same curricular materials, but covered material in the standard (chapter-by-chapter) order. After accounting for incoming student characteristics, students from the concepts-first course scored significantly better in two outcome measures: their grade on the final exam and the grade received in their subsequent physics course. Moreover, in the concepts-first class course, students from groups underrepresented in physics had final exam scores and class grades that were indistinguishable from other students. Finally, students who took at least one concepts-first course in introductory physics were found to have significantly higher rates of graduation with a STEM major than students from this cohort who did not.

  2. Utilizing Computer Mediated Technology in the Basic Communication Course: "Organizational Implications."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. Derek

    A basic public speaking/communication course at the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, a general degree requirement, is using computer mediated technologies to make the class more innovative and applicable. The basic course should provide experiential knowledge of the fundamentals of delivering an effective presentation, and, in a more general…

  3. The Course of Innovation: Using Technology to Transform Higher Education. Education Sector Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Ben

    2010-01-01

    The National Center for Academic Transformation (NCAT), a small nonprofit considered to be the intellectual center of the technology-based course transformation movement, has labored mightily and with much success to help more colleges bring their undergraduate courses into the modern age. But it has labored precisely because colleges have yet to…

  4. Design and Delivery of a New Course of Information Technology for Small Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shouhong; Wang, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Many university or college business programs offer majors or concentrations of small business management, but few of them offer a course of information technology (IT) for small business, despite the fact that IT plays an important role in the management of innovative small businesses. While introductory information systems (IS) courses emphasize…

  5. Integration of problem-based learning and innovative technology into a self-care course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFalls, Marsha

    2013-08-12

    To assess the integration of problem-based learning and technology into a self-care course. Problem-based learning (PBL) activities were developed and implemented in place of lectures in a self-care course. Students used technology, such as computer-generated virtual patients and iPads, during the PBL sessions. Students' scores on post-case quizzes were higher than on pre-case quizzes used to assess baseline knowledge. Student satisfaction with problem-based learning and the use of technology in the course remained consistent throughout the semester. Integrating problem-based learning and technology into a self-care course enabled students to become active learners.

  6. Group processing in an undergraduate biology course for preservice teachers: Experiences and attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberger, Lauren Brownback

    Group processing is a key principle of cooperative learning in which small groups discuss their strengths and weaknesses and set group goals or norms. However, group processing has not been well-studied at the post-secondary level or from a qualitative or mixed methods perspective. This mixed methods study uses a phenomenological framework to examine the experience of group processing for students in an undergraduate biology course for preservice teachers. The effect of group processing on students' attitudes toward future group work and group processing is also examined. Additionally, this research investigated preservice teachers' plans for incorporating group processing into future lessons. Students primarily experienced group processing as a time to reflect on past performance. Also, students experienced group processing as a time to increase communication among group members and become motivated for future group assignments. Three factors directly influenced students' experiences with group processing: (1) previous experience with group work, (2) instructor interaction, and (3) gender. Survey data indicated that group processing had a slight positive effect on students' attitudes toward future group work and group processing. Participants who were interviewed felt that group processing was an important part of group work and that it had increased their group's effectiveness as well as their ability to work effectively with other people. Participants held positive views on group work prior to engaging in group processing, and group processing did not alter their atittude toward group work. Preservice teachers who were interviewed planned to use group work and a modified group processing protocol in their future classrooms. They also felt that group processing had prepared them for their future professions by modeling effective collaboration and group skills. Based on this research, a new model for group processing has been created which includes extensive

  7. Pre-service teachers' competencies for technology integration: Insights from a mathematics-specific instructional technology course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyei, D.D.; Voogt, Joke; Resta, P.

    2012-01-01

    A combination of various measures (self-report, learning outcomes and written reports) was employed to investigate 104 pre-service teachers’ competencies in spreadsheet integration after enrolling in an Instructional Technology course. The pre-service teachers engaged in a “learning technology by

  8. Examining the Impact of Educational Technology Courses on Pre-Service Teachers' Development of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pi-Sui

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the impact of educational technology courses on pre-service teachers' development of knowledge of technology integration in a teacher preparation program in the USA. The present study was conducted with eight pre-service teachers enrolled in the elementary teacher education program at a large…

  9. Development of a future teachers’ group in a Teaching Practice course of Physics and Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Villani

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the development of a future teachers’ group in a Teaching Practice course of Physics and Biology. During the course the students should propose a collective and interdisciplinary planning for a set of classes to be taught in basic teaching of a public school. We will try to show the evolution of the group and the teachers’ contributions, interpreting them from the point of view of Bion (1970, Kaës (1997 and Winnicott’s (1975. We will conclude with some considerations on teachers' initial formation.

  10. Development of a future teachers’ group in a Teaching Practice course of Physics and Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Villani; Marisa Franzoni; Juarez Melgaço Valadares

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the development of a future teachers’ group in a Teaching Practice course of Physics and Biology. During the course the students should propose a collective and interdisciplinary planning for a set of classes to be taught in basic teaching of a public school. We will try to show the evolution of the group and the teachers’ contributions, interpreting them from the point of view of Bion (1970), Kaës (1997) and Winnicott’s (1975). We will conclude with some considerations on...

  11. Peer Learning and Support of Technology in an Undergraduate Biology Course to Enhance Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaushu, Masha; Tal, Tali; Sagy, Ornit; Kali, Yael; Gepstein, Shimon; Zilberstein, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This study offers an innovative and sustainable instructional model for an introductory undergraduate course. The model was gradually implemented during 3 yr in a research university in a large-lecture biology course that enrolled biology majors and nonmajors. It gives priority to sources not used enough to enhance active learning in higher education: technology and the students themselves. Most of the lectures were replaced with continuous individual learning and 1-mo group learning of one topic, both supported by an interactive online tutorial. Assessment included open-ended complex questions requiring higher-order thinking skills that were added to the traditional multiple-choice (MC) exam. Analysis of students’ outcomes indicates no significant difference among the three intervention versions in the MC questions of the exam, while students who took part in active-learning groups at the advanced version of the model had significantly higher scores in the more demanding open-ended questions compared with their counterparts. We believe that social-constructivist learning of one topic during 1 mo has significantly contributed to student deep learning across topics. It developed a biological discourse, which is more typical to advanced stages of learning biology, and changed the image of instructors from “knowledge transmitters” to “role model scientists.” PMID:23222836

  12. Peer learning and support of technology in an undergraduate biology course to enhance deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaushu, Masha; Tal, Tali; Sagy, Ornit; Kali, Yael; Gepstein, Shimon; Zilberstein, Dan

    2012-01-01

    This study offers an innovative and sustainable instructional model for an introductory undergraduate course. The model was gradually implemented during 3 yr in a research university in a large-lecture biology course that enrolled biology majors and nonmajors. It gives priority to sources not used enough to enhance active learning in higher education: technology and the students themselves. Most of the lectures were replaced with continuous individual learning and 1-mo group learning of one topic, both supported by an interactive online tutorial. Assessment included open-ended complex questions requiring higher-order thinking skills that were added to the traditional multiple-choice (MC) exam. Analysis of students' outcomes indicates no significant difference among the three intervention versions in the MC questions of the exam, while students who took part in active-learning groups at the advanced version of the model had significantly higher scores in the more demanding open-ended questions compared with their counterparts. We believe that social-constructivist learning of one topic during 1 mo has significantly contributed to student deep learning across topics. It developed a biological discourse, which is more typical to advanced stages of learning biology, and changed the image of instructors from "knowledge transmitters" to "role model scientists."

  13. Young Adults, Technology, and Weight Loss: A Focus Group Study

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, Janna; Moscou-Jackson, Gyasi; Allen, Jerilyn K.

    2015-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are a major concern in young adults. Technology has been integrated into many weight loss interventions; however little is known about the use of this technology in young adults. The purpose of this study was to explore through focus group sessions the opinions of young adults on the use of technology for weight loss. A total of 17 young adults, between 18 and 25 years of age, participated in three focus group sessions. Major results indicated that young adults have ver...

  14. Establishing Peer Mentor-Led Writing Groups in Large First-Year Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcoux, Sarah; Marken, Liv; Yu, Stan

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a pilot project designed to improve students' academic writing in a large (200-student) first-year Agriculture class at the University of Saskatchewan. In collaboration with the course's professor, the Writing Centre coordinator and a summer student designed curriculum for four two-hour Writing Group sessions…

  15. The potential use of mobile technology: enhancing accessibility and communication in a blended learning course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabisa Mayisela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile technology is increasingly being used to support blended learning beyond computer centres. It has been considered as a potential solution to the problem of a shortage of computers for accessing online learning materials (courseware in a blended learning course. The purpose of the study was to establish how the use of mobile technology could enhance accessibility and communication in a blended learning course. Data were solicitedfrom a purposive convenience sample of 36 students engaged in the blended learning course. The case study utilized a mixed-methods approach. An unstructured interview was conducted with the course lecturer and these data informed the design of the students' semi-structured questionnaire. It was found that students with access to mobile technology had an increased opportunity to access the courseware of the blended learning course. Mobile technology further enhanced student-to-student and student-to-lecturer communication by means of social networks. The study concludes that mobile technology has the potential to increase accessibility and communication in a blended learning course. Recommendations, limitations of the present study, and suggestionsforfuture research were made.

  16. Effect of farmer group membership on agricultural technology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uganda Census of Agriculture database of 2008 - 2009 was used to evaluate the effect of farmer group membership on agricultural technology adoption and crop productivity. This particular study aimed at providing policy; answers to whether the use of farmer' groups approach in agricultural information dissemination is ...

  17. Life-course events and experiences: association with fruit and vegetable consumption in 3 ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, C M; Wolfe, W S; Frongillo, E A; Bisogni, C A

    1999-03-01

    To examine how life-course experiences and events are associated with current fruit and vegetable consumption in 3 ethnic groups. A theoretic model developed from previous qualitative research guided the development of a telephone survey. Data were collected on fruit and vegetable consumption, sociodemographic characteristics, ethnic identity, and life-course events and experiences, including food upbringing, social roles, food skills, dietary changes for health, and practice of food traditions. Low- to moderate-income adults living in a northeastern US city were selected randomly from 3 ethnic groups: black (n = 201), Hispanic (n = 191), and white (n = 200). Bivariate and multiple linear regression analysis of associations between life-course variables and fruit and vegetable consumption. Black, Hispanic, and white respondents differed significantly in life-course experiences, family roles, socio-demographic characteristics, and place of birth. Explanatory models for fruit and vegetable consumption differed among ethnic groups and between fruits and vegetables. Among black respondents, a college education was positively associated with fruit consumption; education and family roles contributed most to differences in fruit (R2 = .16) and vegetable (R2 = .09) consumption. Among Hispanic respondents, life-course experiences such as liking fruits and vegetables in youth, making dietary changes for health, and food skills were positively associated with fruit (R2 = .25) and vegetable (R2 = .35) consumption. Among white respondents, socio-demographic characteristics, such as being married with a young child or single with no child and having a garden as an adult, were positively associated with fruit (R2 = .20) and vegetable (R2 = .22) consumption. An understanding of the determinants of food choice in different subcultural groups can be used to design effective nutrition interventions to increase fruit and vegetable consumption. Experiences such as eating fresh

  18. Technology Enhanced Learning in Programming Courses--International Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Mirjana; Xinogalos, Stelios; Pitner, Tomáš; Savic, Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Technology enhanced learning (TEL) is increasingly influencing university education, mainly in overcoming disadvantages of direct instruction teaching approaches, and encouraging creativity, problem solving and critical thinking in student-centered, interactive learning environments. In this paper, experiences from object-oriented programming…

  19. The Fusion of Learning Theory and Technology in an Online Music History Course Redesign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarnati, Blase; Garcia, Paula

    2008-01-01

    Teaching today's students requires an integration of learner-centered pedagogy with innovative technological resources. In this article, Blase Scarnati and Paula Garcia describe the redesign of a junior-level music history course guided by learner-centered principles and driven by a fusion of stimulating technology-based learning tools and…

  20. Information Technology Training within Traineeships: Options for TAFE-Based Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, W.; And Others

    A study explored ways in which traineeship courses could be designed to include training in information technology. The skills and performance standards required of information technology training in the printing, tourism, banking, construction, and computer industries were identified. Next, the current provision of such training in Australia and…

  1. Integrating iPad Technology in Earth Science K-12 Outreach Courses: Field and Classroom Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Davin J.; Witus, Alexandra E.

    2013-01-01

    Incorporating technology into courses is becoming a common practice in universities. However, in the geosciences, it is difficult to find technology that can easily be transferred between classroom- and field-based settings. The iPad is ideally suited to bridge this gap. Here, we fully integrate the iPad as an educational tool into two…

  2. Technological Minimalism: A Cost-Effective Alternative for Course Design and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, George

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the use of minimum levels of technology, or technological minimalism, for Web-based multimedia course content. Highlights include cost effectiveness; problems with video streaming, the use of XML for Web pages, and Flash and Java applets; listservs instead of proprietary software; and proper faculty training. (LRW)

  3. An Investigation of Science and Technology Teachers' Views on the 5th Grade Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasdemir, Ikramettin

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the science and technology teachers' views on the implementation of 5th grade science course. Open-ended questions were used as a data collection tool. The study sample consisted of 28 science and technology teachers working in Erzurum in 2012-2013 education year. The data gathered were analysed via content…

  4. Assessment of Student Performance for Course Examination Using Rasch Measurement Model: A Case Study of Information Technology Fundamentals Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Mohamed Talib

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a measurement model that is used to measure the student performance in the final examination of Information Technology (IT Fundamentals (IT280 course in the Information Technology (IT Department, College of Computer & Information Sciences (CCIS, Al-Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU. The assessment model is developed based on students’ mark entries of final exam results for the second year IT students, which are compiled and tabulated for evaluation using Rasch Measurement Model, and it can be used to measure the students’ performance towards the final examination of the course. A study on 150 second year students (male = 52; female = 98 was conducted to measure students’ knowledge and understanding for IT280 course according to the three level of Bloom’s Taxonomy. The results concluded that students can be categorized as poor (10%, moderate (42%, good (18%, and successful (24% to achieve Level 3 of Bloom’s Taxonomy. This study shows that the students’ performance for the set of IT280 final exam questions was comparatively good. The result generated from this study can be used to guide us to determine the appropriate improvement of teaching method and the quality of question prepared.

  5. Trainees' reactions to training: shaping groups and courses for happier trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giangreco, Antonio; Carugati, Andrea; Sebastiano, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The extensive use of training demands more extensive evaluations of its real effects. Human resource scholars attempt to develop multi-dimensional training evaluation models, often ignored by practitioners, whereas training managers tend to evaluate only reaction evaluations, the first dimension....... Structured survey data from a sample of 13,753 trainees, grouped in 1230 courses, involving 3047 companies, and financed by an Italian inter-professional fund, confirm the role of all three antecedents of OST. Moreover, of the five course- and participantrelated variables, participation of female workers...

  6. Enriching Information Technology Course Materials by Using Youtube

    OpenAIRE

    Abdillah, Leon Andretti

    2017-01-01

    IT offers some benefits and collaborations in various sectors. This research focuses on exploring higher education subjects via social technology, YouTube. YouTube is the world largest video based contents application in the world. Current learning materials are not only in text and images, but included video contents. This research enriching students learning materials may involving YouTube as learning sources. The study observed 118 sophomore students in computer science faculty. The result...

  7. TERRA-KLEEN RESPONSE GROUP, INC. SOLVENT EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY: INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of a field demonstration conducted under the SITE program. The technology which was demonstrated was a solvent extraction technology developed by Terra-Kleen Response Group. Inc. to remove organic contaminants from soil. The technology employs...

  8. The performance of ethics course for increasing students intention to blow the whistle using information technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munandar, Agus

    2017-10-01

    The profession of accounting believes that ethics is very important in the workplace. For that, profession recommends that ethics course should be taught for accounting student. Unfornutaly, the impact of ethics courses on accounting students intention to blow the whistle on organizational wrongdoing using information technology have not been determined. For that, this paper attempts to measure the impact of ethics courses on accounting student intention to blow the whistle on organizational wrongdoing. The research using experimental design for investigate the impact of ethic course on students intention to blow the whistle using IT. The respondents for this study are 40 accountig students. The respondent were given the ethical scenarios and were measured their intention to blow the whistle using information technology. This result of study reports that 70% of accounting student who completed ethic course indicated high intention to blow the whistle on organizational wrongdoing using information technology. Hence, ethics course is beneficial for increasing accounting professionalism especially their intentio to blow the whistle wrongdoing using information technology.

  9. Construction and Implementation of Teaching Mode for Digital Mapping based on Interactive Micro-course Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Gao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The era of “Internet + education” has caused reforms in teaching ideas, teaching modes, and learning styles. The emergence of micro-course technology provides new strategies for integrating learning styles. Task-driven digital mapping teaching, known as traditional classroom organization, has poor teaching effect due to single learning style and strategy. A new teaching mode for digital mapping was constructed in this study based on micro-course technology by combining interactive micro-course technology and digital mapping teaching to adapt to the demands of modern teaching. This teaching mode mainly included four modules, namely, micro-courseware, micro-video, micro-exercise, and micro-examination. It realized the hierarchical teaching of knowledge points in digital mapping course, simplification of basic principles, simulation of engineering cases, and self-evaluation of learning outcomes. The teaching mode was applied to 114 students from the Mapping Engineering Department of Henan University of Urban Construction. Results indicate that the proposed teaching mode based on interactive micro-course technology promoting the independent after-class learning of the students, stimulating their learning enthusiasm, enhancing their practical abilities of the students, and improving the effect of teaching. This mode of teaching provides a new concept for the teaching mode reform of other courses in mapping engineering.

  10. Design Lessons about Participatory Self-Directed Online Learning in a Graduate-Level Instructional Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa C.; Do, Jaewoo; Skutnik, Anne L.; Thompson, Duren J.; Stephens, Adam F.; Tays, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a case of participatory self-directed online learning within the context of a graduate-level instructional technology course. The course was about online learning environments and relied on both asynchronous and synchronous technologies. In this case, the instructor and students engaged in collaborative course design…

  11. A Mixed Methods Study of Online Course Facilitators' Perceptions of Mobile Technology, Design, and TPaCK Affordances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Helen Louise

    2017-01-01

    The increase in mobile technology options for students in post-secondary, continuing education influences how instructors design and implement courses, specifically online courses (Sozcu, Ipek, & Kinay, 2016). Much of the current research addresses technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPaCK), course design, and/or mobile…

  12. THE TECHNOLOGIES OF DESIGNING THE DISTANCE COURSE FOR PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS’ TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliia Katasonova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays distance education became one of the main forms of studying and became popular in many countries of the world. The rash development of technologies, increasing of the education significance and global informatization makes distance learning one of the foreground directions of the modern education. Nowadays distance learning became an essential part of Primary school teachers professional preparation. There is an actual question of the creation and the implementation of distance courses to the preparation of the future primary school teachers, that will significantly increase the quality of studying. During the process of analyzing the literature, it was identified, that distance learning – is a pedagogical technology. That`s why, before beginning the designing of a distance course, you should remember the main components of a pedagogical technology. In the work «The components of the pedagogical technology», written by V. Bespalko, the foundation of the pedagogical techoogy is considered to be didactics. Modern scientists (V. Kremen, Ye. Rybalko, S. Sysoieva, A. Khutorskyi support the position of V.Bespalko and connect didactic principles with the organization of distance learning.The closest to our understanding appeared some theoretical positions of the work by V. Bikov, V. Kuharenko e.tc., that is called «The technologies of developing of the distance course:tutorial»,in which they offer five stages of designing of the online course: analysis, designing, development, implementation, valuation. During designing of a course, you also should remember about technical methods of realization of the distance education. V. Vishnivsky mentions, that a choice of the e-learning platform is a very important step. Modern platforms divide into two big categories: commercial and free. Try to determine basic steps of designing and creating of a distance course for the future Primary school teachers and use the result during the creation of the

  13. Modern TRIZ A Practical Course with EASyTRIZ Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Orloff, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    This is the first open practical guide for Modern TRIZ technology of effective inventive thinking. Modern TRIZ makes possible creating the innovations and inventions with systematic methods supported with effective EASyTRIZ technology and software. Vang Venming, company owner, inventor, participant of a 2-day workshop for 1,000 students at the North-Eastern Forestry University, Harbin, China: Right here, at this Modern TRIZ workshop, I came up with a new idea which improves my own patent. This is simply fabulous! I would never have believed before that it is possible! Seung-Hyen Yoo, professor of Mechanical Engineering, AJOU University, Suwon, Republic of Korea: We have known TRIZ for more than 10 years, and have successfully used it in engineering consulting and student training. And we saw a new TRIZ at lectures and workshops delivered by Professor Orloff in the Republic of Korea before experts working for SAMSUNG and other companies, and before faculty and students of several universities. Heinrich Kochs, ...

  14. "Blogging" about course concepts: using technology for reflective journaling in a communications class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouldin, Alicia S; Holmes, Erin R; Fortenberry, Michael L

    2006-08-15

    Web log technology was applied to a reflective journaling exercise in a communication course during the second-professional year at the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, to encourage students to reflect on course concepts and apply them to the environment outside the classroom, and to assess their communication performance. Two Web log entries per week were required for full credit. Web logs were evaluated at three points during the term. At the end of the course, students evaluated the assignment using a 2-page survey instrument. The assignment contributed to student learning and increased awareness level for approximately 40% of the class. Students had few complaints about the logistics of the assignment. The Web log technology was a useful tool for reflective journaling in this communications course. Future versions of the assignment will benefit from student feedback from this initial experience.

  15. “Blogging” About Course Concepts: Using Technology for Reflective Journaling in a Communications Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouldin, Alicia S.; Holmes, Erin R.; Fortenberry, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    Objective Web log technology was applied to a reflective journaling exercise in a communication course during the second-professional year at the University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy, to encourage students to reflect on course concepts and apply them to the environment outside the classroom, and to assess their communication performance. Design Two Web log entries per week were required for full credit. Web logs were evaluated at three points during the term. At the end of the course, students evaluated the assignment using a 2-page survey instrument. Assessment The assignment contributed to student learning and increased awareness level for approximately 40% of the class. Students had few complaints about the logistics of the assignment. Conclusion The Web log technology was a useful tool for reflective journaling in this communications course. Future versions of the assignment will benefit from student feedback from this initial experience. PMID:17136203

  16. Incorporating Geodetic Technologies in to Field and Campus Courses at the University of Michigan: Best Practices and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, N. A.; Clark, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    For the past 6 years, the University of Michigan has implemented geodetic techniques into both summer field courses and on-campus courses. The primary means for incorporating these technologies has been a partnership with UNAVCO to introduce terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) at summer field courses, although employing Structure from Motion(SfM), ArcCollector for iPads and RTK GPS surveying have also been explored. The nature of these types of data lend themselves readily to geomorphology, environmental, and natural hazards-based projects, and we have developed field projects or labs around neotectonics (fault-scarp scanning and diffusion analysis), change detection (braided stream evolution, landslide and rock glacier motion, coastal change) and mass wasting processes (rock avalanche scanning and analysis). While we have primarily developed multi-day projects that use these tools in a field camp setting, we have also developed weekend field trip projects and traditional afternoon lab exercises associated with on-campus courses. The use of geodetic technology is generally well received by students. Reasons for this are the use of somewhat different skill sets from traditional geologic mapping problems, including research survey design, real-time data acquisition, and quantitative data analysis. Students also perceive that they are engaged in learning technology which they may use in their future employment. Challenges encountered, particularly in the field, include managing large student groups with a finite pool of equipment, rapid data processing pressures, variable student experience with analysis software and limited technical support for field-based computational resources. We will describe the positive attributes of incorporating geodetic technologies into undergraduate courses and elaborate on some best practices learned from our experiences.

  17. Light-based science and technologies and human civilization: an optical course for general education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaotong; Wang, Kaiwei; Yang, Qing; Si, Ke

    2017-08-01

    Starting from 2015, a general education course named "Light-based science and technologies and human civilization" has been offered in Zhejiang University. We try to give a humanism view angle to observe optics and optical engineering, and combine them with the relationship of human and the nature, the development of human society and human health. In this course we introduce different historical periods of light-based science and technologies, the great optical researchers, the typical research methods, advantages, academic discussions and the relationship with human civilization. The relevant cross-fields of learning and Nobel Prize winners are also included. This course provides the students with the typical examples about how academic revolution influences the world development, and also with humanism sight which exceeds the range of science and technologies themselves.

  18. Science, Technology and Social Change Course's Effects on Technological Literacy Levels of Social Studies Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, E. Ozlem

    2013-01-01

    Social studies curricula are required in order to prepare to educate children who continue to learn after their formal training, and it is vital that teachers receive an education properly. In Social Studies Education Departments of Education Faculties Science, Technology and Social Change course is convenient to this aim and it contributes to…

  19. The Effect of Computer Assisted Mind Mapping on Students’ Academic Achievement, Attitudes and Retention in Science and Technology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Nuri GÖMLEKSİZ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims at determining the effects of computer assisted mind mapping (CAMM technique on students’ academic achievement, attitudes and retention in Science and Technology course. Mixed-method research design which included both quantitative and qualitative methods was used in the study. Pretest-posttest control group experimental design, interview and observation techniques were used. The study included one experimental (N:36 one control group (N:32. The study was conducted on seventh grade students at an elementary school in 2011-2012 academic year. While experimental group used CAMM technique, control group used traditional method. The achievement test, administered as a pre-, post- and delayed post-test, included 34 questions. The mean difficulty of the test was calculated to be .54 and KR-20 reliability coefficient was measured to be .73. To determine students' attitudes towards Science and Technology course, a 20-item five-point Likert-style attitude scale (α: .89 developed by Akınoğlu (2001 was used. The results revealed that CAMM technique had a positive effect on students’ achievement and attitudes towards learning science and technology

  20. N-1: Safeguards Science and Technology Group, Tour Areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geist, William H.

    2012-01-01

    Group N-1 develops and provides training on nondestructive assay (NDA) technologies intended for nuclear material accounting and control to fulfill both international and domestic obligations. The N-1 group is located at Technical Area (TA)-35 in Buildings 2 and 27. Visitors to the area can observe developed and fielded NDA technologies, as well as the latest research efforts to develop the next generation of NDA technologies. Several areas are used for NDA training. The N-1 School House area typically is used for basic training on neutron- and gamma-ray-based NDA techniques. This area contains an assortment of gamma-ray detector systems, including sodium iodide and high-purity germanium and the associated measurement components. Many types of neutron assay systems are located here, including both standard coincidence and multiplicity counters. The N-1 School House area is also used for holdup training; located here are the mock holdup assemblies and associated holdup measurement tools. Other laboratory areas in the N-1 space are used for specialized training, such as waste NDA, calorimetry, and advanced gamma-ray NDA. Also, many research laboratories in the N-1 space are used to develop new NDA technologies. The calorimetry laboratory is used to develop and evaluate new technologies and techniques that measure the heat signature from nuclear material to determine mass. The micro calorimetry laboratory is being used to develop advanced technologies that can measure gamma rays with extremely high resolution. This technique has been proven in the laboratory setting, and the team is now working to cultivate a field-capable system. The N-1 group also develops remote and unattended systems for the tracking and control of nuclear material. A demonstration of this technology is located within one of the laboratory spaces. The source tracker software was developed by N-1 to monitor the locations and quantities of nuclear materials. This software is currently used to track

  1. Applied Problems and Use of Technology in an Aligned Way in Basic Courses in Probability and Statistics for Engineering Students--A Way to Enhance Understanding and Increase Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterqvist, Lena

    2017-01-01

    Researchers and teachers often recommend motivating exercises and use of mathematics or statistics software for the teaching of basic courses in probability and statistics. Our courses are given to large groups of engineering students at Lund Institute of Technology. We found that the mere existence of real-life data and technology in a course…

  2. Planning and Programming of Education and Training Courses on the Radiation Fusion Technologies for Next Generations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Nam, Y. M.; Choi, P. H.

    2009-06-01

    In order to program education and training courses on the radiation technologies and to have the WNU RT School to be held in Korea, this project was carried out. It was also done to make a strategy for running the programmed courses, and to build and knit a global network among radiation specialists such as international advisory board, domestic advisory board and steering committee. A plan for the WNU RT School in Korea was made under this project. Curricula in all subjects related to radiation technology and the lecture materials were prepared, which are essential for education and training courses on radiation technologies for next generations. Lecturers were selected among global CEOs and professionals in radiation industries and university professors and radiation specialists. In addition, a global network among radiation specialists such as international advisory board, domestic advisory board and steering committee was built and organized. As a model for the international education and training courses in RT field as well as the other fields, it can be used for making fundamentals of technology exports and promoting Korea's national image in science and technology

  3. Filling in the Distance Between Us: Group Metacognition During Problem Solving in a Secondary Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Marcelle A.

    2012-06-01

    While a body of research exists on individual metacognition, research on reflective communities is just beginning. This study generated a framework for conceptualizing metacognition in groups by describing likely components of group metacognition. I focused on a group of five preservice science teachers engaged in problem-based learning (PBL). The purpose of the PBL course was to help students gain useful concepts from the learning sciences to apply to teaching. I investigated forms of metacognition and the role reflective discourse played during the learning process. The group and facilitator were videotaped during PBL sessions. A segment of video to study further was identified through interaction analysis. I analyzed the discourse of this segment of the transcribed group discussion, and I examined the group's final paper. Supplementary data sources included the interaction analysis transcript of the full 8-h videotape and, specifically, the comments the group made about the resources they used to solve the problem. Categories of group metacognition were identified, claims proposed, and recombined or rejected until saturation. I identified three components of group metacognition that helped the group members solve the instructional redesign problem: (1) metasocial awareness about other member's expertise, (2) monitoring of understanding, and (3) monitoring of process. Future research directions and instructional implications are discussed.

  4. Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Readiness: Ethno-linguistic and gender differences in high-school course selection patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamuti-Trache, Maria; Sweet, Robert

    2014-03-01

    The study examines science-related course choices of high-school students in the culturally diverse schools of the province of British Columbia, Canada. The analysis employs K-12 provincial data and includes over 44,000 students born in 1990 who graduated from high school by 2009. The research sample reflects the presence of about 27% of students for whom English is not a first language. We construct an empirical model that examines ethno-linguistic and gender differences in Grade 12 course choices while accounting for personal and situational differences among students. The study employs a course selection typology that emphasizes readiness for science, technology, engineering and math fields of study. Findings indicate that math- and science-related course selection patterns are strongly associated with ethnicity, qualified not only by gender and prior math and science achievement but also by the individual's grade level at entry to the system and enrollment in English as a Second Language program. Students who are more likely to engage in math and science courses belong to Asian ethno-linguistic groups and entered the provincial school system during the senior high-school years. We suggest that ethnic diversity and broader academic exposure may play a crucial role in changing the gender composition of science classrooms, university fields of study and science-related occupations.

  5. Evaluation of Small Student-Led Discussion Groups as an Adjunct to a Course in Abnormal Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Geoffry D.

    1978-01-01

    Presents data related to student involvement in biweekly student-led discussion groups in an undergraduate abnormal psychology course. Evaluates the degree to which students felt they benefited from discussion groups composed of similar and dissimilar students. (Author/AV)

  6. 75 FR 71464 - Metlife Technology, Operations, and Information Technology Groups Including On-Site Leased...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-23

    ... Employment and Training Administration Metlife Technology, Operations, and Information Technology Groups Including On-Site Leased Workers From Adecco, Cognizant, IBM, Infosys, Kana, Patni, Siemens, Tapfin, Veritas... Workers From At&T Solutions, Chimes, Cognizant, Patni, Siemens, Xerox Clarks Summit, PA; Notice of Revised...

  7. Experience in presenting short courses in waste management technologies for secondary science and mathematics teachers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, W.J.; Smith, T.H.; Garcia, M.M.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) and its Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing educational programs that will help avert projected shortages in scientific and engineering manpower. One approach to this end is to help teachers become better prepared to teach topics that enthuse more students. INEL developed and offered a Short Course in Waste Management Technologies for Secondary Science and Mathematics Teachers. Short Course has two purposes: (1) to provide secondary-level science and mathematics teachers with training and information that will be useful to them in the classroom, and (2) to provide information on a topic of widespread interest in today's society, i.e., the management of hazardous and radioactive wastes and the restoration and preservation of the environment. This paper describes the development of the Short Course and summarizes some of the lessons learned in the preparation and presentation of such courses. 2 refs., 2 tabs

  8. Views of Teachers on the Use of Drama Method in Science and Technology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duban, Nil Yildiz; Duzgun, Merve Evsen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the views of the teachers on the use of drama as a teaching method in the science and technology courses. In the current study, qualitative research method was used. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews. The participants of the study were selected via maximum variation sampling. The…

  9. The Effects of Animation Technique on the 7th Grade Science and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of animation technique on academic achievement of students in the "Human and Environment" unit lectured as part of the Science and Technology course of the seventh grade in primary education. The sample of the study consists of 58 students attending to the 7th grade of Erzurum MEB…

  10. A Sample Application for Use of Biography in Social Studies; Science, Technology and Social Change Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Harun

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the opinions of social studies teacher candidates on use of biography in science, technology and social change course given in the undergraduate program of social studies education. In this regard, convergent parallel design as a mixed research pattern was used to make use of both qualitative and quantitative…

  11. The Potential Use of Mobile Technology: Enhancing Accessibility and Communication in a Blended Learning Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayisela, Tabisa

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technology is increasingly being used to support blended learning beyond computer centres. It has been considered as a potential solution to the problem of a shortage of computers for accessing online learning materials (courseware) in a blended learning course. The purpose of the study was to establish how the use of mobile technology…

  12. Seventh Grade Students' Perceptions of Using Concept Cartoons in Science and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ören, Fatma Sasmaz; Meriç, Gülçin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the efficiency of use of concept cartoons in elementary school 7th grade students Science and Technology course according to students' perceptions. In terms of this aim, the unit of "Force and Motion" has been taught by concept cartoons and at the end of this period, semi-structured interviews were…

  13. Vertical and Horizontal Integration of Laboratory Curricula and Course Projects across the Electronic Engineering Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wei; Goulart, Ana; Morgan, Joseph A.; Porter, Jay R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the details of the curricular development effort with a focus on the vertical and horizontal integration of laboratory curricula and course projects within the Electronic Engineering Technology (EET) program at Texas A&M University. Both software and hardware aspects are addressed. A common set of software tools are…

  14. METHODS FOR EVALUATION OF COMPANIES’ INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES EFFICIENCY AND CONTROL IN TEACHING COURSE "INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY GOVERNANCE"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samchynska Yaroslava

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of the information systems and technologies in economic activity is called to represent companies’ corporate principles, aims, traditions, to help in realization of the planned strategies, thanks to that the management efficiency and the cost of enterprise increases. Teaching for educational discipline «IT Governance» is directed on a study and research of these intercommunications by students of the 5th course on specialties «Computer Science», «Software Engineering» for educational level Specialist (Past Bachelor Degree, Master degree. The auditing services belong to the actual methods for evaluation of the information systems and technologies efficiency and control, which are studied according to the course «IT Governance». The article deals with the methodological basis of providing auditing services for evaluation of efficiency and control of information systems (technologies for the purpose of satisfaction of growing informational needs of companies and functional activation in their information resources. The main task of auditing services for control of information systems (information communication technologies efficiency is to evaluate independently and objectively if the information technologies provide the necessary services. The basic criteria, data ware, subject and object of audit necessary for drawing up an audit report and assurance declaring are established. The program and a detailed list of auditing procedures for evaluation of efficiency of information systems and technologies have been presented

  15. CELL FORMATION IN GROUP TECHNOLOGY: A SIMILARITY ORDER CLUSTERING APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godfrey C. Onwubolu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Grouping parts into families which can be produced by a cluster of machine cells is the cornerstone of cellular manufacturing, which in turn is the building block for flexible manufacturing systems. Cellular manufacturing is a group technology (GT concept that has recently attracted the attention of manufacturing firms operating under jobshop environment to consider redesigning their manufacturing systems so as to take advantage of increased throughput, reduction in work-in-progress, set-up time, and lead times; leading to product quality and customer satisfaction. The paper presents a generalised approach for machine cell formation from a jobshop using similarity order clustering technique for preliminary cell grouping and considering machine utilisation for the design of nonintergrouping material handling using the single-pass heuristic. The work addresses the shortcomings of cellular manufacturing systems design and implementations which ignore machine utilisations, group sizes and intergroup moves.

  16. GROUP TECHNOLOGY IN CONTEXT OF THE PRODUCT CLASSIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Debnárová

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In the intensive competitive environment of the global economy, the survival of even the most well-established the world manufacturers depends on the ability to improve continuously quality while reducing costs. The resulting higher productivity is the key to market leadership and gaining sustainable competitive advantage. This paper outlines a group technology and classification of products which improve productivity, quality, inventory management of a company and reduce production times.

  17. "From resistance to challenge": child health service nurses experiences of how a course in group leadership affected their management of parental groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Åsa; Lundqvist, Pia; Drevenhorn, Eva; Hallström, Inger

    2017-01-01

    All parents in Sweden are invited to child health service (CHS) parental groups, however only 49% of the families participate. The way the parental groups are managed has been shown to be of importance for how parents experience the support and CHS nurses describe feeling insecure when running the groups. Lack of facilitation, structure and leadership might jeopardise the potential benefit of such support groups. This study describes CHS nurses' experiences of how a course in group leadership affected the way they ran their parental groups. A course in group leadership given to 56 CHS nurses was evaluated in focus group interviews 5-8 months after the course. The nurses felt strengthened in their group leader role and changed their leadership methods. The management of parental groups was after the course perceived as an important work task and the nurses included time for planning, preparation and evaluation, which they felt improved their parental groups. Parental participation in the activities in the group had become a key issue and they used their new exercises and tools to increase this. They expressed feeling more confident and relaxed in their role as group leaders and felt that they could adapt their leadership to the needs of the parents. Specific training might strengthen the CHS nurses in their group leader role and give them new motivation to fulfil their work with parental groups.  Clinical Trials.gov ID: NCT02494128.

  18. Basic radiation knowledge for school education course. Nuclear technology seminar 2014 (Contract program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoko; Arai, Nobuyoshi; Sawada, Makoto; Kanaizuka, Seiichi; Shimada, Mayuka; Ishikawa, Tomomi; Nakamura, Kazuyuki

    2015-11-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has conducted Nuclear Technology Seminar for Asian countries which plan to introduce nuclear power plant in future, in order to increase the number of engineers and specialists in nuclear related field. The Nuclear Technology Seminar on the Basic Radiation Knowledge for School Education Course was launched in 2012 due to increased recognition of the dissemination of the basic knowledge of radiation in public and education sectors as an important issue in the aftermath of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident in 2011. It was the third time to conduct this course and fifteen trainees from eight Asian countries participated in 2014. In response to the requests of past participants, a new exercise 'Joint experiment with high school students' was introduced from 2014 to provide an international learning experience for the course participants and the local Japanese students by jointly conducting radiation related exercises. A new learning material was also developed in 2014 to help participants to study the basics of radiation in English. All the course activities including the details of preparatory process and course evaluation were described in this report. (author)

  19. METHODS FOR EVALUATION OF COMPANIES’ INFORMATION SYSTEMS AND TECHNOLOGIES EFFICIENCY AND CONTROL IN TEACHING COURSE "INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY GOVERNANCE"

    OpenAIRE

    Samchynska Yaroslava

    2014-01-01

    The use of the information systems and technologies in economic activity is called to represent companies’ corporate principles, aims, traditions, to help in realization of the planned strategies, thanks to that the management efficiency and the cost of enterprise increases. Teaching for educational discipline «IT Governance» is directed on a study and research of these intercommunications by students of the 5th course on specialties «Computer Science», «Software Engineering» for educational ...

  20. Applying Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) model to develop an online English writing course for nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Hung-Cheng; Pan, Mei-Yu; Lee, Bih-O

    2015-06-01

    Learning English as foreign language and computer technology are two crucial skills for nursing students not only for the use in the medical institutions but also for the communication needs following the trend of globalization. Among language skills, writing has long been ignored in the curriculums although it is a core element of language learning. To apply the TPACK (Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge) model to design an online English writing course for nursing students, and to explore the effects of the course to the students' learning progress as well as their satisfactions and perceptions. A single-group experimental study, utilizing the CEEC (College Entrance Examination Center) writing grading criteria and a self-designed course satisfaction questionnaire, is used. Fifty one nursing students who were in their first/four semesters of the two year vocational pre-registration nursing course in a Taiwan university were selected using convenience sampling. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and repeated measure MANOVA. Qualitative data were analyzed by content analysis. Students' writing competence had been improved significantly in every dimension after the instruction. Only half of the learners preferred online writing compared to the traditional way of writing by hand. Additionally, participants reported that they would prefer to receive feedback from the teacher than peers, yet they did not like the indirect feedback. The teacher perceived the course as meaningful but demanding for both learning and teaching sides. To implement the peer review activities and give feedback on time were two major challenges during the cycles. The TPACK model suggests a comprehensive and effective teaching approach that can help enhance nursing students' English writing performance. Teachers are advised to consider its implementation when designing their syllabus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Supporting academic publication: evaluation of a writing course combined with writers' support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Claire M; McGrail, Matthew R; Jones, Rebecca; O'Meara, Peter; Robinson, Anske; Burley, Mollie; Ray-Barruel, Gillian

    2009-07-01

    Publication rates are a vital measure of individual and institutional performance, yet many nurse academics publish rarely or not at all. Despite widespread acceptance of the need to increase academic publication rates and the pressure university faculty may experience to fulfil this obligation, little is known about the effectiveness of practical strategies to support academic writing. In this small cohort study (n=8) comprising nurses and other professionals involved in university education, a questionnaire survey was used to evaluate the effectiveness of a one-week "Writing for Publication" course combined with a monthly writers support group to increase publication rates. Two year pre and post submissions increased from 9 to 33 articles in peer-reviewed journals. Publications (in print) per person increased from a baseline of 0.5-1.2 per year. Participants reported increased writing confidence and greater satisfaction with the publishing process. Peer support and receiving recognition and encouragement from line managers were also cited as incentives to publish. Writing for publication is a skill that can be learned. The evaluated model of a formal writing course, followed by informal monthly group support meetings, can effectively increase publication rates.

  2. Pros and cons of a group webpage design project in a freshman anatomy and physiology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Kevin M; Jensen, Murray; Moore, Randy

    2007-12-01

    To generate motivation and promote the development of written communication skills, students in a freshman-level anatomy and physiology course for nonmajors created group webpages describing historically important diseases. After the groups had been formed, each individual was assigned specific components of the disease (e.g., causes or treatments), which were subsequently combined into a final product. Interviews and questionnaires were used to document students' previous educational experiences regarding, and attitudes toward, the project. Students learned more about website design than about anatomy and physiology, but students preferred the assignment over traditional term papers. Although most students could find relevant information for this project on the internet, they were uncritical in judging the accuracy of the information they found.

  3. Enhancement in evaluating small group work in courses with large number of students. Machine theory at industrial engineering degrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluïsa Jordi Nebot

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines new tutoring evaluation methods to be adopted in the course, Machine Theory, in the Escola Tècnica Superior d’Enginyeria Industrial de Barcelona (ETSEIB, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya. These new methods have been developed in order to facilitate teaching staff work and include students in the evaluation process. Machine Theory is a required course with a large number of students. These students are divided into groups of three, and required to carry out a supervised work constituting 20% of their final mark. These new evaluation methods were proposed in response to the significant increase of students in spring semester of 2010-2011, and were pilot tested during fall semester of academic year 2011-2012, in the previous Industrial Engineering degree program. Pilot test results were highly satisfactory for students and teachers, alike, and met proposed educational objectives. For this reason, the new evaluation methodology was adopted in spring semester of 2011-2012, in the current bachelor’s degree program in Industrial Technology (Grau en Enginyeria en Tecnologies Industrials, GETI, where it has also achieved highly satisfactory results.

  4. Social Relations of Science and Technology: perceptions of teachers of technical training, PARFOR course participants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuella Candéo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present in this paper a study on the perceptions of teachers of technical training, course participants (PARFOR National Plan for Training Teachers of Basic Education , offered by the Federal Technological University of Paraná, Campus Ponta Grossa (PG - UTFPR on the social relations of science and technology. The study conducted with 15 teachers from various disciplines. The methodological approach was quantitative research , the instrument of data collection was based questionnaire with open questions . The main results show that the vast majority of teachers had a very narrow view about science and technology , consider that the scientific and technological development always bring benefits to its own population of traditional / classic , positivist view. The need to promote reflection on social issues of science and technology in education technology in order to train professionals aware of their responsibilities as citizens in a highly technological age was observed. It is emphasized that these are recorded in the master's thesis entitled Scientific and Technological Literacy (ACT by Focus Science, Technology and Society (STS from commercial films of the University Program Graduate School of Science and Technology Tecnológica Federal do Paraná ( UTFPR Campus Ponta Grossa, Brazil.

  5. Evolution of project-based learning in small groups in environmental engineering courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús M. Requies

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the assessment of the development and evolution of an active methodology (Project-Based Learning –PBL- implemented on the course “Unit Operations in Environmental Engineering”, within the bachelor’s degree in Environmental Engineering, with the purpose of decreasing the dropout rate in this course. After the initial design and implementation of this methodology during the first academic year (12/13, different modifications were adopted in the following ones (13-14, 14-15 & 15-16 in order to optimize the student’s and professor’s work load as well as correct some malfunctions observed in the initial design of the PBL. This active methodology seeks to make students the main architects of their own learning processes. Accordingly, they have to identify their learning needs, which is a highly motivating approach both for their curricular development and for attaining the required learning outcomes in this field of knowledge. The results obtained show that working in small teams (cooperative work enhances each group member’s self–learning capabilities. Moreover, academic marks improve when compared to traditional learning methodologies. Nevertheless, the implementation of more active methodologies, such as project-based learning, in small groups has certain specific characteristics. In this case it has been implemented simultaneously in two different groups of 10 students each one. Such small groups are more heterogeneoussince the presence of two highly motivated students or not can vary or affect the whole group’s attitude and academic results.

  6. Higher education technological knowledge and patterns of technology adoptions in undergraduate STEM courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Zarka Asghar

    Identifying, examining, and understanding faculty members' technological knowledge development and the process of technology adoption in higher education is a multifaceted process. Past studies have used Rogers (1995, 2003) diffusion of innovation theoretical framework to delineate the technology adoption process. These studies, however, have frequently reported the influencing factors based on the statistical analysis such as regression analysis-based approach, and have not focused on the emerging process of technology adoptions or the developing process of technological knowledge and pedagogical knowledge. A mixed method study was designed to see how faculty members acquire different technologies and develop technological knowledge that might help them adopt technologies in their classrooms and online using different pedagogies. A sample of STEM teaching faculty members with different ranks, tenure, teaching experience, and varied degree of experience in the use of educational technologies participated in the study. A survey was designed to identify internal and external factors affecting technology adoption and its effective use in different teaching activities. To elaborate survey results, the study also included class observations as well as pre- and post-observation interviews. Online classrooms used by the faculty via Blackboard learning management system, online flipped classrooms, or other websites such as Piazza were also examined for data triangulation. The findings of the study indicate that faculty members are influenced by their own professional motivations and student learning to improve their teaching methods and to enhance student interactions and learning through the use of different educational technologies. The adoption process was identified as spreading over a period of time and it looked at how faculty members' developed their technological knowledge and pedagogical knowledge. With the recognition of the social, organizational, and

  7. The Effect of Student Working Group Establishment on Teaching General Embryology Course to Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozafar Khazaei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quantitative and qualitative enhancement of educational activities is an essential issue. Learners’ cooperation in the teaching process in order to increase teaching effectiveness and promotion is considered significant. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of establishment of student working group on the teaching general embryology course to medical students.Methods: Ten students (1% of medical embryology course were selected to analyze the topics to be taught before each session according to lesson plan, and observe the whole teaching process during lesson presentation. Then, having asked the other students’ viewpoints and discussing with one another, they provided the teacher with a written report on the strengths and weaknesses of the teaching and its problems. The teacher analyzed the problems proposed by the working group to improve teaching process in the next session. At the end of the semester, a questionnaire was administered to all the participants. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.Results: The mean of students’ scores was 74.26%. The most important findings obtained in this study included positive role of film projection in teaching the materials (95.34%, significance of presentation of various pictures from different books (88.4%, changing students’ attitude toward application of embryology in different diseases (86%, and repetition of previous session’s pictures (83.75%. The weak points mentioned, however, were physical problems of the classroom and deficiency of audio visual equipment.Conclusion: Student working group has a positive impact on the teaching medical general embryology.

  8. Investigation and application of recent web-based technologies to the teaching of electrical engineering courses

    OpenAIRE

    Low, Koon Huat

    2000-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited This thesis is part of an effort by the Department of Electrical and Computer (ECE) Engineering to implement distributed learning to better serve its students. Distributed learning is especially useful for a modem technologically- oriented military, which is geographically distributed. The goal of this thesis is to develop a prototype web-based course, specifically, EC2820 - Digital Logic Design. A primary sub-goal is to quantify time ...

  9. Practice and thinking on examination way reform of optoelectronic detection technology course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xue-lian; Zhang, Jia-cheng; Shen, Tao; Xiong, Yan-ling; Yang, Wen-long

    2017-08-01

    Choosing a reasonable examination way is beneficial to the cultivation of high quality talents. Recently, the conventional college examination methods involve writing and oral test, which is extremely focused on academic performance and caused the separation between teachers and examinations. Optoelectronic detection technology is a specialized course with strong applicability. Therefore, we proposed a diverse form and scientific content method. It is proved that the students receive better learning effect and improve learning and engineering practice ability compared with the traditional assessment methods.

  10. Combining different Technologies in a Funerary Archaeology content and language integrated Learning (CLIL) Course

    OpenAIRE

    Cignoni, Laura; Fornaciari, Gino

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a project in which Italian undergraduate students at the Palaeopathology Division of Pisa University will attend a two-year Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) course combining the study of funerary archaeology with English as vehicular language. At the presence of a subject and language teacher working together, the trainees will use different types of technology including devices such as electronic blackboards and Word applications with user-...

  11. SPECIAL FEATURES OF USE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN A PRACTICAL COURSE OF DISCIPLINE "ECOLOGICAL MAPPING"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola A. Fedoniuk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the need of the use of information technologies for students of environmental profile is shown. The estimated themes and the content of some teaching sessions of a course «Ecological mapping» for students of specialty «Ecology and environmental protection» is offered. Features of a choice of the software for studies are proved. Some methods of teaching of creation of thematic ecological maps within modern GIS is considered. Prospects of further improvement of the organization of educational process with use of information technologies are estimated.

  12. Anxiety and depression symptoms among women attending group-based patient education courses for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    List?l, Wenche; H?berg-Vetti, Hildegunn; Eide, Geir Egil; Bjorvatn, Cathrine

    2017-01-01

    Background Women carrying BRCA-mutations are facing significant challenges, including decision making regarding surveillance and risk-reducing surgery. They often report that they are left alone with these important decisions. In order to enhance the genetic counselling session we organized a group-based patient education (GPE) course for women with BRCA-mutations. The study aims were to characterize women attending a group-based patient education (GPE) course for hereditary breast and ovaria...

  13. The Role of Self-Perception in Predicting the Performance of Graduate-Level Cooperative Groups in Research Methodology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    DaRos-Voseles, Denise A.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Jiao, Qun G.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the role that self-perception plays in predicting academic performance of cooperative learning groups in graduate-level research methodology courses. A total of 29 groups (n = 102 students) are examined. A series of multiple regression analyses reveals that the groups attaining the lowest scores on the article critique…

  14. Changes and events over life course: a comparative study between groups of older adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luípa Michele; Silva, Antônia Oliveira; Tura, Luiz Fernando Rangel; Moreira, Maria Adelaide Silva Paredes; Nogueira, Jordana Almeida; Cavalli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to identify the changes which had occurred over the last year in the life of older adults, as well as the values attributed to these changes. METHOD: this is a multicentric, cross-sectional study, of the inquiry type, undertaken in three cities of the Brazilian Northeast, investigating two distinct groups of older adults. RESULTS: among the 236 older adults interviewed, it was observed that 30.0% reported health as the main change in their life course in the last year, this category being the most significant response among the older adults aged between 80 and 84 years old (37.7%). Changes in the family were mentioned by 11.5% of the older adults; death (9.6%) and alterations in routine activities (9.6%). In relation to the value attributed to these changes, it was ascertained that for 64.7% of the older adults aged between 65 and 69 years old, these changes were positive. In the older group, 49.4% of the older adults believe that their changes were related to losses. CONCLUSION: the knowledge of the changes mentioned, the value attributed to these changes, and the self-evaluation of health provide information which assists in formulating actions which are more specific to the real needs of these age groups. They also provide the health professionals with a better understanding of how some experiences are experienced in the life trajectories of these older adults. PMID:25806625

  15. Changes and events over life course: a comparative study between groups of older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luípa Michele Silva

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to identify the changes which had occurred over the last year in the life of older adults, as well as the values attributed to these changes.METHOD: this is a multicentric, cross-sectional study, of the inquiry type, undertaken in three cities of the Brazilian Northeast, investigating two distinct groups of older adults.RESULTS: among the 236 older adults interviewed, it was observed that 30.0% reported health as the main change in their life course in the last year, this category being the most significant response among the older adults aged between 80 and 84 years old (37.7%. Changes in the family were mentioned by 11.5% of the older adults; death (9.6% and alterations in routine activities (9.6%. In relation to the value attributed to these changes, it was ascertained that for 64.7% of the older adults aged between 65 and 69 years old, these changes were positive. In the older group, 49.4% of the older adults believe that their changes were related to losses.CONCLUSION: the knowledge of the changes mentioned, the value attributed to these changes, and the self-evaluation of health provide information which assists in formulating actions which are more specific to the real needs of these age groups. They also provide the health professionals with a better understanding of how some experiences are experienced in the life trajectories of these older adults.

  16. [The Positionality of Caring Action: Small Group Dialogue in a Course on Nursing Ethics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2016-12-01

    The content of nursing-ethics education has typically focused on the external standards of caring behavior and neglected the relationship between the ethical attitudes and internal experiences of caregivers. To explore the embodied experience in order to define the positionality of caring action, which is necessary to enrich the content of nursing ethics through small-group-learning-based dialogue. The researcher, as a participant observer, teaches a course on nursing ethics. Reflective analysis was used to analyze the data from the process of small group learning, a reflective group of faculty members, and 30 reflective journals submitted by 10 students. The results identified three items that were related to the positionality of caring action: the attitudes of belief, including the choice to belief and deep understanding; articulating the value system, including exploring affectivity and positionality; and cultivating the self through self-dialogues and dialogues with others. The attitudes of belief promote trust in interpersonal relationships. Articulating the value system deepens the meaning of caring. Cultivating the self may facilitate the ethical self.

  17. Development of e-Learning Courses for Promoting Student's Global Competency-Basic Courses as a Guide to ESP Education in Advanced Science and Technology-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Mikako; Nakajima, Mikio; Iwai, Chiharu; Ogasawara, Fumie; Kishino, Fumio; Fukui, Kiichi

    Osaka University has been chosen for the FY2005's “Selected Efforts of the Distinctive University Education Support Program (Gendai GP/Good Practice) ”by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) . The aim of this project is to improve English proficiency of undergraduate students with scientific backgrounds. Under this strategic fund, e-Learning course contents were developed for instructing basic, yet practical English for Biotechnology during FY2005. Throughout the project, e-Learning contents will be developed for five other selected subjects of science i.e., 1) biotechnology, 2) information technology, 3) nano-technology, 4) environmental technology and 5) robotics technology, for undergraduate students as guiding courses to ESP education in graduate (higher) level.

  18. Production ready feature recognition based automatic group technology part coding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, A.L.

    1990-01-01

    During the past four years, a feature recognition based expert system for automatically performing group technology part coding from solid model data has been under development. The system has become a production quality tool, capable of quickly the geometry based portions of a part code with no human intervention. It has been tested on over 200 solid models, half of which are models of production Sandia designs. Its performance rivals that of humans performing the same task, often surpassing them in speed and uniformity. The feature recognition capability developed for part coding is being extended to support other applications, such as manufacturability analysis, automatic decomposition (for finite element meshing and machining), and assembly planning. Initial surveys of these applications indicate that the current capability will provide a strong basis for other applications and that extensions toward more global geometric reasoning and tighter coupling with solid modeler functionality will be necessary.

  19. Group in-course assessment promotes cooperative learning and increases performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratten, Margaret K; Merrick, Deborah; Burr, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe and evaluate a method to motivate medical students to maximize the effectiveness of dissection opportunities by using In-Course-Assessments (ICAs) to encourage teamwork. A student's final mark was derived by combining the group dissection mark, group mark for questions, and their individual question mark. An analysis of the impact of the ICA was performed by comparing end of module practical summative marks in student cohorts who had, or had not, participated in the ICAs. Summative marks were compared by two-way ANOVA followed by Dunnets test, or by repeated measures ANOVA, as appropriate. A cohort of medical students was selected that had experienced both practical classes without (year one) and with the new ICA structure (year two). Comparison of summative year one and year two marks illustrated an increased improvement in year two performance in this cohort. A significant increase was also noted when comparing this cohort with five preceding year two cohorts who had not experienced the ICAs (P learning resources in an active, team-based, cooperative learning environment. © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  20. Construction of Interactive Teaching System for Course of Mechanical Drawing Based on Mobile Augmented Reality Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Cheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The teaching aim of Mechanical Drawing is to cultivate the students' graphics interpreting ability, plotting ability, inter-space imagination and innovation ability. For engineering students in China Universities, Mechanical Drawing course with the characteristics of 3D and 2D inter-space transformation, is often difficult to master. The ordinary dull teaching method is not enough for stimulating students’ spatial imagination capability, interest in learning, and cannot meet teachers’ teaching needs to explain complicated graphs relationships. In this paper, we design an interactive teaching system based on mobile augmented reality to improve the learning efficiency of Mechanical Drawing course. To check the effect of the proposed system, we carried out a case study of course teaching of Mechanical Drawing. The results demonstrate that the class for which interactive teaching system based on mobile augmented reality technology was adopted is significantly superior to the class for which the ordinary dull teaching approach was adopted with regard to the degree of proficiency of course key and difficult points content,spatial imagination capability, students’ interest in learning and study after class, especially in respect of students’ learning interest and spatial imagination capability.

  1. Principles and software realization of a multimedia course on theoretical electrical engineering based on enterprise technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penev Krasimir

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Department of Theoretical Electrical Engineering (TEE of Technical University of Sofia has been developing interactive enterprise-technologies based course on Theoretical Electrical Engineering. One side of the project is the development of multimedia teaching modules for the core undergraduate electrical engineering courses (Circuit Theory and Electromagnetic Fields and the other side is the development of Software Architecture of the web site on which modules are deployed. Initial efforts have been directed at the development of multimedia modules for the subject Electrical Circuits and on developing the web site structure. The objective is to develop teaching materials that will enhance lectures and laboratory exercises and will allow computerized examinations on the subject. This article outlines the framework used to develop the web site structure, the Circuit Theory teaching modules, and the strategy of their use as teaching tool.

  2. Mixed Learning Approach to Teaching Ethics in Leadership and Management : A Case Course in a Multicultural Group

    OpenAIRE

    Pucėtaitė; Lämsä, Anna-Maija; Kujala, Johanna; Medeišienė, Raimonda Agnè; Riivari, Elina; Bulatova, Julija; Kooskora, Mari; Brinkmann, Johannes; Heikkinen, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to analyse how a mixed learning approach (MLA) (e.g. case studies, applied drama) can facilitate teaching and learning ethics in business management. Partners from five different countries organized an international higher education course in the years 2013, 2014 and 2015. The aim of the course was to provide the students with skills to evaluate and solve ethical problems constructively in a multicultural group. This case portrays the benefits and ch...

  3. Exploring the Relevance of Single-Gender Group Formation: What We Learn from a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayeck, Rebecca Yvonne; Hristova, Adelina; Jablokow, Kathryn W.; Bonafini, Fernanda

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an exploratory study on participants' perception of the importance of single-gender grouping in a massive open online course (MOOC) delivered through the Coursera platform. Findings reveal that female and male learners' perception of single-gender grouping differs. Female students more than males indicated less…

  4. Learning about Foodborne Pathogens: Evaluation of Student Perceptions of Group Project Work in a Food Microbiology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Mark S.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of students in an active learning group work exercise in an introductory food microbiology course involving the study of foodborne pathogens. Small groups were required to access, analyze, and present information regarding a single food poisoning bacterium. The presentations contained features and…

  5. A blended learning course taught to different groups of learners in a dental school: follow-up evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahinis, Kimon; Stokes, Christopher W; Walsh, Trevor F; Tsitrou, Effrosyni; Cannavina, Giuseppe

    2008-09-01

    This article reports the results of a follow-up study conducted to investigate students' perceptions about a blended learning health informatics course that combined online and traditional classroom instruction. The course is taught to five different groups of students at the School of Clinical Dentistry of the University of Sheffield each academic year: first-, third-, and fourth-year dental students, dental hygiene and therapy students, and postgraduate dental students. The goal of the study was to determine the impact of the modifications made to the course after the first year of implementation. To accomplish this goal, students' perceptions of this blended learning course were compared after the first and second implementations. The methodology used for this study was action research. The data were collected using three processes: questionnaires were used to collect contextual data from the students taking the course; a student-led, nominal group technique was used to collect group data from the participants; and a non-participant observer technique was used to record the context in which certain group and individual behaviors occurred. Depending on group assignment, between 41.5 and 91.5 percent of students believed that the blended-learning course had added to their skills. The online learning environment was perceived as a useful resource by 75 percent of students in four of the five student groups, but only 45 percent of the fourth-year dental students indicated it was a useful resource. The perceived lack of sufficient online support material was one of the main concerns of the students at the nominal group evaluation sessions. The non-participant observer technique identified different engagement levels among the student groups. Discernible differences were identified, with improvement in some areas and a decline in others compared to a previous evaluation. The change in the delivery method influenced the students' comprehension of the material

  6. FORMING OF INFORMATION COMPETENCE OF STUDENTS IN THE PRCESS OF TEACHING ELECTIVE COURSES MEANS OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Liskovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approaches to the definition of information competence, investigated the possibility of elective courses in physics for the formation of information competence through the use of modern information and communication technologies.

  7. Use of information technologies in teaching course "Analytical geometry" in higher schools on example of software "ANALYTICAL GEOMETRY"

    OpenAIRE

    V. B. Grigorieva

    2009-01-01

    In article are considered the methodical questions of using of computer technologies, for example, the software "Analytical geometry", in process of teaching course of analytical geometry in the higher school.

  8. Development and analysis of educational technologies for a blended organic chemistry course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael James

    Blended courses incorporate elements of both face-to-face and online instruction. The extent to which blended courses are conducted online, and the proper role of the online components of blended courses, have been debated and may vary. What can be said in general, however, is that online tools for blended courses are typically culled together from a variety of sources, are often very large scale, and may present distractions for students that decrease their utility as teaching tools. Furthermore, large-scale educational technologies may not be amenable to rigorous, detailed study, limiting evaluation of their effectiveness. Small-scale educational technologies run from the instructor's own server have the potential to mitigate many of these issues. Such tools give the instructor or researcher direct access to all available data, facilitating detailed analysis of student use. Code modification is simple and rapid if errors arise, since code is stored where the instructor can easily access it. Finally, the design of a small-scale tool can target a very specific application. With these ideas in mind, this work describes several projects aimed at exploring the use of small-scale, web-based software in a blended organic chemistry course. A number of activities were developed and evaluated using the Student Assessment of Learning Gains survey, and data from the activities were analyzed using quantitative methods of statistics and social network analysis methods. Findings from this work suggest that small-scale educational technologies provide significant learning benefits for students of organic chemistry---with the important caveat that instructors must offer appropriate levels of technical and pedagogical support for students. Most notably, students reported significant learning gains from activities that included collaborative learning supported by novel online tools. For the particular context of organic chemistry, which has a unique semantic language (Lewis

  9. Student evaluation team focus groups increase students' satisfaction with the overall course evaluation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Katharina; Mandel, Jess; Winegarden, Babbi

    2017-02-01

    Most medical schools use online systems to gather student feedback on the quality of their educational programmes and services. Online data may be limiting, however, as the course directors cannot question the students about written comments, nor can students engage in mutual problem-solving dialogue with course directors. We describe the implementation of a student evaluation team (SET) process to permit course directors and students to gather shortly after courses end to engage in feedback and problem solving regarding the course and course elements. Approximately 16 students were randomly selected to participate in each SET meeting, along with the course director, academic deans and other faculty members involved in the design and delivery of the course. An objective expert facilitates the SET meetings. SETs are scheduled for each of the core courses and threads that occur within the first 2 years of medical school, resulting in approximately 29 SETs annually. SET-specific satisfaction surveys submitted by students (n = 76) and course directors (n = 16) in 2015 were used to evaluate the SET process itself. Survey data were collected from 885 students (2010-2015), which measured student satisfaction with the overall evaluation process before and after the implementation of SETs. Students and course directors valued the SET process itself as a positive experience. Students felt that SETs allowed their voices to be heard, and that the SET increased the probability of suggested changes being implemented. Students' satisfaction with the overall evaluation process significantly improved after implementation of the SET process. Our data suggest that the SET process is a valuable way to supplement online evaluation systems and to increase students' and faculty members' satisfaction with the evaluation process. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  10. An analysis of the information technology discipline in archival sciences undergraduate courses of universities from the south of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelma Camêlo Araujo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The present article is part of a research conducted at universities of the south of Brazil that offers disciplines of Information Technology in Archival Sciences undergraduate courses. The research objective to identify through the educational project of these courses the subjects which have emphasis in the Information Technology, as well as to identify the teachers’ perception about the condition of these subjects in enabling the student for the challenges of the work market

  11. CERN Technical Training 2006: Software and System Technologies Curriculum - Scheduled Course Sessions (August-December 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Software and System Technologies Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme offers comprehensive training in C++, Java, Perl, Python, XML, OO programming, JCOP/PVSS, database design and Oracle. In the PERL, C++, OO and Java course series there are some places available on the following course sessions, scheduled until the end of this year: PERL 5 - Introduction: 31.8-1.9.2006 (2 days) C++ for Particle Physicists: 16-20.10.2006 (6 half days, the popular course given by Paul Kunz) Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17-19.10.2006 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications: 19-20.10.2006 (2 days) JAVA - Level 1: 30.10-1.11.2006 (3 days) PERL 5 - Advanced Aspects: 2.11.2006 (1 day) C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming: 14-16.11.2006 (3 days) JAVA - Level 2: 4-7.12.2006 (4 days) C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls: 12-15.12.2006 (4 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBea...

  12. New technologies applied to radiation protection training: Rp course for technical qualified expert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llorente Herranz, Cristina; Rodriguez, M.; Marco Arboli, Marisa

    2008-01-01

    This paper shows the development and results of the first Course for technical qualified expert in radiation protection (RP) using the advantages of Communication and Information Technologies (CITs). This project in modality b-learning has born as a result of the RP specialised course demand, the necessity of working-private life balance and working-training time combination as well as the geographic widespread of those interested. The methodology selected has been b-learning (blended learning), which consists of a mixture of e-learning plus face-to-face learning. The RP course for technical qualified RP expert has been designed for 10 weeks using online learning methodology and 2 days of face-to-face learning in a radioactive facility to take account practical sessions and the final knowledge evaluation. A multidisciplinary team of experts has elaborated the RP programme and the docent material, following national normative. The material consists of: a) Multimedia material with theoretical content to be visualised online; b) Additional material to be un-load or printed; c) Practical exercises within multimedia content; d) Practical online and face-to-face sessions. (author)

  13. The Impact of a Group Communication Course on Veterinary Medical Students' Perceptions of Communication Competence and Communication Apprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedrowicz, April A

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of a group communication course on veterinary medical students' perceptions of communication competence and communication anxiety. Students enrolled in the Group Communication in Veterinary Medicine course completed the Personal Report of Communication Apprehension and the Communicative Competence Scale at the beginning (Time 1) and end (Time 2) of the semester. Results show that first-year veterinary students' self-perceptions of communication competence increased and their self-reported levels of communication apprehension decreased across multiple contexts from Time 1 to Time 2. This research provides support for experiential communication training fostering skill development and confidence.

  14. Piloting a new approach: making use of technology to present a distance learning computer science course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Wilson

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching projects which make use of new technology are becoming of interest to all academic institutions in the UK due to economic pressure to increase student numbers. CMC (Computer- Mediated Communication such as computer conferencing appears an attractive solution to higher education's 'numbers' problem, with the added benefit that it is free from time and place constraints. Researchers have discussed CMC from a number of different perspectives, for example Mason and Kaye (1989 describe a CMC system as a system of interactivity between tutors, students, resources and organizational structure. Steeples et al (1993 consider CMC in terms of group cohesion, modes of discourse and intervention strategies to stimulate and structure participation. Goodyear et al (1994 discuss the Just in Time (TT-Based Open Learning (JTTOL model in terms of a set of educational beliefs, role definitions, working methods and learning resources, together with a definition of infrastructure requirements for CMC. Shedletsky (1993 suggests that a CMC should be viewed in terms of an 'intrapersonal communication' model, while Mayes et al (1994 identify three types of learning which is mediated by telematics, that is, learning by conceptualization, construction and dialogue. Other researchers, such as Velayo (1994, describe the teacher as 'an active agent', and present a model for computer conferencing which neglects the social aspect of CMC, while Berge (1995 mentions the importance of social activity between students and the importance of the role of the moderator. From these accounts, there appear to be a number of dimensions which can be used to evaluate CMC. Not all researchers emphasize the same dimensions; however, this paper proposes that computer conferencing systems should be designed to encourage students to participate in all three of the following dimensions. These can be summarized as: (a a knowledge dimension (includes domain and meta knowledge; (b a social

  15. Technology revenue management system for customer groups in hotels

    OpenAIRE

    Guadix Martín, José; Cortés, Pablo; Onieva Giménez, Luis Gerardo; Muñuzuri Sanz, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses revenue management; a technique that focuses on decision making that will maximize profit from the sale of perishable inventory units. New technologies management plays an important role in the development of revenue management techniques. Each new advance in technology management leads to more sophisticated revenue business capabilities. Today decision support revenue management systems and technologies management are crucial factors for the success of ...

  16. Effects of '"Environmental Chemistry" Elective Course via Technology-Embedded Scientific Inquiry Model on Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalik, Muammer; Özsevgeç, Tuncay; Ebenezer, Jazlin; Artun, Hüseyin; Küçük, Zeynel

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of "environmental chemistry" elective course via Technology-Embedded Scientific Inquiry (TESI) model on senior science student teachers' (SSSTs) conceptions of environmental chemistry concepts/issues, attitudes toward chemistry, and technological pedagogical content knowledge…

  17. Pre-service teachers’ TPACK competencies for spreadsheet integration: insights from a mathematics-specific instructional technology course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyei, D.D.; Voogt, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This article explored the impact of strategies applied in a mathematics instructional technology course for developing technology integration competencies, in particular in the use of spreadsheets, in pre-service teachers. In this respect, 104 pre-service mathematics teachers from a teacher training

  18. Evaluating a technology supported interactive response system during the laboratory section of a histology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Vera D; Lorr, Nancy A; Williams, Kimberly

    2017-07-01

    Monitoring of student learning through systematic formative assessment is important for adjusting pedagogical strategies. However, traditional formative assessments, such as quizzes and written assignments, may not be sufficiently timely for making adjustments to a learning process. Technology supported formative assessment tools assess student knowledge, allow for immediate feedback, facilitate classroom dialogues, and have the potential to modify student learning strategies. As an attempt to integrate technology supported formative assessment in the laboratory section of an upper-level histology course, the interactive application Learning Catalytics TM , a cloud-based assessment system, was used. This study conducted during the 2015 Histology courses at Cornell University concluded that this application is helpful for identifying student misconceptions "on-the-go," engaging otherwise marginalized students, and forming a new communication venue between students and instructors. There was no overall difference between grades from topics that used the application and grades from those that did not, and students reported that it only slightly helped improve their understanding of the topic (3.8 ± 0.99 on a five-point Likert scale). However, they highly recommended using it (4.2 ± 0.71). The major limitation was regarding the image display and graphical resolution of this application. Even though students embrace the use of technology, 39% reported benefits of having the traditional light microscope available. This cohort of students led instructors to conclude that the newest tools are not always better, but rather can complement traditional instruction methods. Anat Sci Educ 10: 328-338. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  19. The Fritz Roethlisberger Memorial Award Goes to "Using Leadered Groups in Organizational Behavior and Management Survey Courses"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Lisa M.; Loyd, Denise Lewin; Hoobler, Jenny M.

    2012-01-01

    The Fritz J. Roethlisberger Memorial Award for the best article in the 2011 "Journal of Management Education" goes to Rae Andre for her article, Using Leadered Groups in Organizational Behavior and Management Survey Courses ("Journal of Management Education," Volume 35, Number 5, pp. 596-619). In keeping with Roethlisberger's legacy, this year's…

  20. Effects of Collective Efficacy, Teamwork Attitudes, and Experience on Group Project Performance: Comparisons between 2 Food Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Poppy Lauretta; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia

    2018-01-01

    The relationship between past teamwork and task-related experiences, attitude toward teamwork, collective efficacy, and task performance among undergraduates (N = 298) assigned to group projects (N = 48) in 2 different Food Science courses was examined. The results of survey data collected at the beginning and end of the projects showed that past…

  1. Effects of Cooperative Learning on Learning Achievement and Group Working Behavior of Junior Students in Modern French Literature Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orprayoon, Soudaya

    2014-01-01

    This study reported on the results of a quasi-experimental research to explore the effectiveness of using a cooperative learning method on students' academic achievement, their group working behavior and their perception and opinions towards cooperative learning in a Modern French Literature course. The sample included twelve junior students…

  2. Anxiety and depression symptoms among women attending group-based patient education courses for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Listøl, Wenche; Høberg-Vetti, Hildegunn; Eide, Geir Egil; Bjorvatn, Cathrine

    2017-01-01

    Women carrying BRCA -mutations are facing significant challenges, including decision making regarding surveillance and risk-reducing surgery. They often report that they are left alone with these important decisions. In order to enhance the genetic counselling session we organized a group-based patient education (GPE) course for women with BRCA -mutations. The study aims were to characterize women attending a group-based patient education (GPE) course for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, consider the usefulness of the course, evaluate symptoms of anxiety and depression among the participants, and finally investigate whether their levels of anxiety and depression changed from before to after the course session. A prospective study was conducted. Two weeks before (T1) and 2 weeks after (T2) attending the GPE-course the participants received questionnaires by mail. We collected information on demographic- and medical variables, anxiety and depression using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), self-efficacy using The Bergen Genetic Counseling Self-Efficacy scale (BGCSES) and coping style using the Threatening Medical Situations Inventory (TMSI). A total of N  = 100 (77% response rate) women participated at baseline and 75 (58% response rate) also completed post-course assessment. The mean level of anxiety symptoms was elevated among participants but decreased significantly during follow-up. Lower anxiety symptom levels were associated with "longer time since disclosure of gene test result", "higher levels of self-efficacy" and having experienced "loss of a close relative due to breast or ovarian cancer". Lower depression symptom levels were associated with "higher levels of education" and "loss of a close relative due to breast or ovarian cancer". The women in this study seemed to benefit from the GPE course. Women newly diagnosed with a BRCA mutation who reported lower levels of self-efficacy and lower levels of education were more vulnerable. These

  3. CERN Technical Training 2006: Software and System Technologies Curriculum - Scheduled Course Sessions (October-December 2006)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    he Software and System Technologies Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme offers comprehensive training in C++, Java, Perl, Python, XML, OO programming, JCOP/PVSS, database design and Oracle. In the PERL, C++, OO and Java course series there are some places available on the following course sessions, scheduled until the end of this year: Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17-19 October 2006 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications: 19-20 October 2006 (2 days) JAVA - Level 1: 30 Oct. -1 Nov. 2006 (3 days) PERL 5 - Advanced Aspects: 2 November 2006 (1 day) C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming: 14-16 November 2006 (3 days) JAVA - Level 2: 4-7 December 2006 (4 days) C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls: 12-15 December 2006 (4 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans : 18.20 December 2006 (3 days) All the above sessions will be given in English, at the CERN Training Centre....

  4. CERN Technical Training 2006: Software and System Technologies Curriculum - Scheduled Course Sessions (October 2006-March 2007)

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Software and System Technologies Curriculum of the CERN Technical Training Programme offers comprehensive training in C++, Java, Perl, Python, XML, OO programming, JCOP/PVSS, database design and Oracle. In the Oracle, C++, OO and Java course series there are some places available on the following course sessions, currently scheduled until March 2007: Object-Oriented Analysis and Design using UML: 17-19 October 2006 (3 days) JAVA - Level 1: 30 October - 1 November 2006 (3 days) C++ Programming Part 1 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Design and Programming: 14-16 November 2006 (3 days) Oracle Database Server Administration: 23-29 November 2007 (5 days) JAVA - Level 2: 4-7 December 2006 (4 days) C++ Programming Part 2 - Advanced C++ and its Traps and Pitfalls: 12-15 December 2006 (4 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 2: Enterprise JavaBeans: 18-20 December 2006 (3 days) JAVA 2 Enterprise Edition - Part 1: Web Applications: 15-16 January 2007 (2 days) C++ Programming Part 3 - Templates and the STL (St...

  5. FACTORS OF INFLUENCE ON THE ENTREPRENEURIAL INTEREST: AN ANALYSIS WITH STUDENTS OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RELATED COURSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Guilherme Bonfim

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research was to analyze the entrepreneurial interest of students in information technology related courses. A literature review was performed, from which four hypotheses were announced, affirming that the student interest in entrepreneurial activity is influenced by (1 the perceived vocation of the area, (2 the ownership of a company, (3 the perceived social support from friends and family, and (4 the entrepreneurial skills mastery. A field study was developed, with data collected from the 171 students of higher education institutions from Fortaleza. The data were analyzed by using statistical techniques of descriptive analysis, analysis of variance, and multiple regression analysis. It was found that: (1 students, in general, have a moderate predisposition to engage in entrepreneurial activities; (2 the entrepreneurial interest is influenced by the perceived entrepreneurial vocation of the area, the social support, and the perceived strategic entrepreneurial skills mastery.

  6. Creation of e-Courses in English for Students of Production Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gluchmanova

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available E-learning is one of the most fashionable trends in contemporary teaching. It can be defined as an integrated system of education with the central focus placed on the students. Students use given forms of learning - electronic methods for the processing, transmission and storage of information on the creation and delivery of content, activities, problem solving, evaluation, communication, administration and management of education. The aim of creating e-courses in compulsory and optional subjects within the English language for students at Bachelor and Engineer’s level at the Faculty of Manufacturing Technologies - in new accredited study programs is not to create a system that does not use traditional education during the semester within language seminars, but such a system, which would meet the requirements of the best foreign language learners and ensure the highest quality of education.

  7. Entrepreneurship Course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    +++++++ Turn your idea into a company +++++++ Starting date: Thursday 23 October 2003 Timing: Every Thursday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Venue: University of Geneva, Sciences II Duration: 1 semester Registration: http://www.startupcafe.ch/learn More Information: info@createswitzerland.ch Deadline to submit the application: 10 October 2003. Check the CREATE website for alternative dates and venues. The course is restricted to 30 pre-selected participants. The course covers important aspects of launching a business from initial idea to growth and international expansion and addresses two kind of skills requested to start a high tech company which are divided into personal skills (entrepreneur skills) and those to start a company (Start-up tools). The 14 week course is free of charge. For any question, please, contact Ilias.Goulas@cern.ch from the Technology Transfer Group (http://cern.ch/ttdb).

  8. Assessing Peer Leader Skill Acquisition and Group Dynamics in a First-Year Calculus Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Rebecca; Hammond, Nicholas B.; Smith, Justin; Guerra, Dalyana

    2018-01-01

    Peer-led team learning (PLTL), specifically the model known as 'Workshops', has been shown to contribute positively and significantly to student success in STEM courses across subjects (Gosser et al., 2001). Our research adds to the SOTL literature describing the effectiveness of Workshops by reporting on the changes in student leaders. We examine…

  9. Recoding of Information as a Component of Cognitive Training Technologies in the Course "Engineering Graphics"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Lunina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency to understand scientific and technical information is a relevant problem for a modern type of students. It is particularly acute for the freshmen learning the course of engineering graphics, which is one of the basic disciplines in engineering education.This problem, generally, arises from the information blow-up and cognitive students’ deficiency. The students need to perceive, understand, take in, and apply a huge amount of information to acquire obligatory professional competencies. The cognitive deficiency is because of the poor school knowledge in geometry and graphics, underdeveloped spatial and logical thinking, lack of skills to work with educational and reference books, clip thinking.The modern engineering graphics teaches a technology for the visual presentation of information, graphical illustration, and interpretation of scientific and technical texts. The text is considered to be a completed piece of information that is described in any way – verbal, graphical, symbolic. Graphical language is a professionally oriented language of engineers.One of the components of cognitive learning technologies aimed at understanding the meaning of the studied texts is the development the skills for recoding some information, because a criterion of understanding the meaning of the text is the independent student’s ability to represent the verbal texts in the form of drawings, blueprints, charts, diagrams, tables, formulae, and numeric entries.The article explores some examples of transcoding texts used in the course of engineering graphics (in lectures, seminars, homework, tests. It is emphasized that integrated presentation (verbal + graphical + symbolic that creates the cohesion of the verbal and figurative components of thinking allows students to gain the most thorough understanding the meaning of educational information. This enables students to minimize their cognitive deficiency, elevate scientific mind, and promote

  10. The perceived benefits of belonging to an extra curricular group within a pre-registration nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Sabina; Billington, John

    2014-05-01

    This study describes a qualitative research design that focuses on nursing students who were aligned to different extra-curricular groups (a student representative committee, a Nurses' Day Committee and a magazine editorial team) within the School of Health. The study explores the nursing students' experiences and perceptions of belonging to an extra-curricular group within a pre-registration nursing course. Data were collected using focus groups. The findings of this study suggest that students who are members of extra-curricular groups perceive group membership to have many positive benefits. The findings were grouped into three main themes namely: employability, retention and personal gain. The findings suggest that students are clearly aware of their career development and expressed how group membership meant they were able to develop skills around employability. Students highlighted that they gained support and built lasting relationships through the groups which supported and reassured them which it was felt enabled them to progress successfully through the course. These themes reinforce the value of having established groups within a pre-registration curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. 76 FR 66327 - Iron Mountain Information Management, Inc., Corporate Service Group, Information Technology (IT...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-26

    ... Employment and Training Administration Iron Mountain Information Management, Inc., Corporate Service Group..., applicable to workers of Iron Mountain Information Management, Inc., Corporate Service Group, Information... Management, Inc., Corporate Service Group, Information Technology (IT) Division. The Department has...

  12. THE USE OF MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGY IN THE INSTRUCTIONAL DELIVERY OF THE COURSE „GARMENT CONSTRUCTION”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALCAZ Olga

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Against the backdrop of the rapid change and growth of information and communication technology (ICT, the use of computer technology in education has become an essential requisite. With the Millennial generation, who has been surrounded by high volume of multimedia content, the concept of computer-assisted learning is intrinsic. Computer is simultaneously perceived as a toy, tool, and a source of information, which has ingrained in people’s habits of communication, education and research. The concept of the computer-assisted learning refers to the delivery of new knowledge; the use, consolidation, and synthesis of the newly acquired knowledge. As suggested, computer technology is „the most important innovation in the modern pedagogy” for its impact on the efficiency of education. The pupil-computer interaction enables the diversification of teaching strategies and opens up a whole wealth of structured information with many opportunities for its visualisation. However, it is not the computer in itself with its multimedia configurations that lead to the educational enhancement; but, the quality of the digital learning resources and their appropriate incorporation in classroom aligned to the innovative pedagogy that counts the most. The modernization of pedagogy involves, thus, the presence of hardware (computer, software (programs and the capacity to use, adapt, and harness the ICT in the instructional environment. This paper presents the experience of the use of computer technology in one of the courses offered by vocational schools that aims to develop both general and professional competencies, as well as the capacity to work with diverse types of multimedia contents.

  13. 4 years of successful knowledge transfer - the nuclear technology training center of the TUeV Nord Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willenbockel, I.; Tietze, U.

    2007-01-01

    In connection with the 2002 amendment to the German Atomic Energy Act, the topics of generational change and maintenance of competence grew in importance and necessitated new solution approaches. To this end, various activities were launched, with the aim of conducting conceptual analyses of these topics. Examples include the 'National Competence Network for Nuclear Technology' (Nationaler Kompetenzverbund fuer Kerntechnik), various networks established by colleges and universities, the 'Knowledge Management for the Maintenance and Transfer of Competence in Reactor Safety' (Wissensmanagement zum Kompetenzerhalt und -transfer in der Reaktorsicherheit) workshop held in 2001 in Garching near Munich (Germany) and the 'Ad-hoc Workgroup on the Maintenance of Competence' (Ad-hoc-Arbeitskreis Kompetenzerhalt) of the VdTUeV. The nuclear technology departments of the TUeV Nord Group were aware of te challenges associated with the generational change early on. By establishing the 'Nuclear Technology Training Center' (Ausbildungszentrum fuer Kerntechnik, AfK), the TUeV Nord Group intended to ensure the required knowledge transfer during the generational change as well as maintain the renowned high qualification as regards the subject of nuclear technology and thus continue to provide - in the sense of social responsibility - crucial contribution to the long-term safety of nuclear plants. Four years have passed since the training center held the first courses in the fall of 2002. Up to now, more than 350 participants have been trained in the courses conducted by the AfK. In the opinion of the TUeV Nord Group, the activities of the AfK have laid the foundation for a successful change of generations within the group's nuclear technology organizations. (orig.)

  14. From Geocaching to Virtual Reality: Technology tools that can transform courses into interactive learning expeditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moysey, S. M.; Lazar, K.; Boyer, D. M.; Mobley, C.; Sellers, V.

    2016-12-01

    Transforming classrooms into active learning environments is a key challenge in introductory-level courses. The technology explosion over the last decade, from the advent of mobile devices to virtual reality, is creating innumerable opportunities to engage students within and outside of traditional classroom settings. In particular, technology can be an effective tool for providing students with field experiences that would otherwise be logistically difficult in large, introductory earth science courses. For example, we have created an integrated platform for mobile devices using readily accessible "off the shelf" components (e.g., Google Apps, Geocaching.com, and Facebook) that allow individual students to navigate to geologically relevant sites, perform and report on activities at these locations, and share their findings through social media by posting "geoselfies". Students compete with their friends on a leaderboard, while earning incentives for completing extracurricular activities in courses. Thus in addition to exposing students to a wider range of meaningful and accessible geologic field experiences, they also build a greater sense of community and identity within the context of earth science classrooms. Rather than sending students to the field, we can also increasingly bring the field to students in classrooms using virtual reality. Ample mobile platforms are emerging that easily allow for the creation, curation, and viewing of photospheres (i.e., 360o images) with mobile phones and low-cost headsets; Google Street View, Earth, and Expeditions are leading the way in terms of ease of content creation and implementation in the classroom. While these tools are an excellent entry point to show students real-world sites, they currently lack the capacity for students to interact with the environment. We have therefore also developed an immersive virtual reality game that allows students to study the geology of the Grand Canyon using their smartphone and Google

  15. Teaching a Course on Deviant Groups: A Neglected Aspect of Deviance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David Horton

    1996-01-01

    Reports on a class on deviance that focuses on sociological and transformative processes imbedded in deviant groups. Specifically examines "deviance production groups," groups that turn normal people into deviants (Branch Davidians, Ku Klux Klan). The class is largely structured around group discussions and presentations. (MJP)

  16. Can technical laboratory skills be taught at a distance? An analysis of a semiconductor course taught at a distance via interactive technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Lalita

    2000-10-01

    This study investigated extending synchronous distance learning to teaching courses in the psychomotor domain in real-time, with immediate, direct feedback on technical skills performance from an instructor at a remote site via interactive technologies such as videoconferencing. This study focused on two research questions (1) can interactive distance learning technologies be used to teach technical and/or trouble shooting skills that fall under psychomotor domain? and, (2) to what degree can psychomotor skills be taught at a distance? A technical course, "RF Power PC 211L" from a technical and vocational institute was selected and the instructor who had no prior experience in teaching a distance learning course taught the course. Data on cognitive skills, psychomotor technical skills, attitudes and perceptions, demographics as well as boundary conditions on teaching psychomotor skills was gathered from both remote and the main campus. Instruments used for data gathering were final course grades, total points in laboratory exercise, pre and post course surveys, demographic survey and open-ended interviews with the instructor, student and review of instructor journal were used to address the two research questions. The main campus course was taught to the remote campus via distance learning technology in a distance learning format. The main technology used was videoconferencing. Both campus classrooms had the RF Trainer equipment. The rooms were set up to facilitate distance learning in the classroom. The instructor was present only at the main campus. The students on the remote campus were the experimental group. The experimental group participated in all course activities such as demonstrations, laboratory exercises, learning conceptual skills and tests only via distance. These students only had the benefit of laboratory assistant. The role of the laboratory assistant was to assist students/instructor as needed, ensure the safety of students and equipment and

  17. Understanding Science and Technology Interactions Through Ocean Science Exploration: A Summer Course for Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, J.; Denton, J.

    2003-12-01

    In order to replenish the national supply of science and mathematics educators, the National Science Foundation has supported the formation of the Center for Applications of Information Technology in the Teaching and Learning of Science (ITS) at Texas A&M University. The center staff and affiliated faculty work to change in fundamental ways the culture and relationships among scientists, educational researchers, and teachers. ITS is a partnership among the colleges of education, science, geosciences, agriculture and life science at Texas A&M University. Participants (teachers and graduate students) investigate how science is done and how science is taught and learned; how that learning is assessed, and how scholarly networks among all engaged in this work can be encouraged. While the center can offer graduate degrees most students apply as non-degree seekers. ITS participants are schooled on classroom technology applications, experience working on project teams, and access very current research work being conducted by scientists. ITS offers a certificate program consisting of two summer sessions over two years that results in 12 hours of graduate credit that can be applied to a degree. Interdisciplinary project teams spend three intense weeks connecting current research to classroom practices. During the past summer with the beginning of the two-year sequence, a course was implemented that introduced secondary teachers to Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) contributions to major earth science themes, using core and logging data, engineering (technology) tools and processes. Information Technology classroom applications were enhanced through hands-on laboratory exercises, web resources and online databases. The course was structured around the following objectives. 1. Distinguish the purpose and goals of the Ocean Drilling Program from the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program and describe the comparable science themes (ocean circulation, marine sedimentation, climate history

  18. Engine Family Groups for Verification of Clean Diesel Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    These documents show engine family boxes that represent groupings of engine families with similar characterists (i.e., the emissions standards that the engines were built to) for current and past model years.

  19. Filling in the Distance between Us: Group Metacognition during Problem Solving in a Secondary Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Marcelle A.

    2012-01-01

    While a body of research exists on individual metacognition, research on reflective communities is just beginning. This study generated a framework for conceptualizing metacognition in groups by describing likely components of group metacognition. I focused on a group of five preservice science teachers engaged in problem-based learning (PBL). The…

  20. An Empirical Study of Neural Network-Based Audience Response Technology in a Human Anatomy Course for Pharmacy Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; López-González, Laura; González-Sequeros, Ofelia; Jayne, Chrisina; López-Jiménez, Juan José; Carrillo-de-Gea, Juan Manuel; Toval, Ambrosio

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents an empirical study of a formative neural network-based assessment approach by using mobile technology to provide pharmacy students with intelligent diagnostic feedback. An unsupervised learning algorithm was integrated with an audience response system called SIDRA in order to generate states that collect some commonality in responses to questions and add diagnostic feedback for guided learning. A total of 89 pharmacy students enrolled on a Human Anatomy course were taught using two different teaching methods. Forty-four students employed intelligent SIDRA (i-SIDRA), whereas 45 students received the same training but without using i-SIDRA. A statistically significant difference was found between the experimental group (i-SIDRA) and the control group (traditional learning methodology), with T (87) = 6.598, p SIDRA and the methodology used during the process of learning anatomy (M = 4.59). The new empirical contribution presented in this paper allows instructors to perform post hoc analyses of each particular student's progress to ensure appropriate training.

  1. KNOWLEDGE HUB: SPIRAL MATRIX THINKING AS A COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP LEARNING IN ONE DRIVE AND WORD ONLINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталья Валерьевна Комиссарова

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article represents the modification of the Knowledge Hub communicative technique of teaching English and other disciplines based on the OneDrive\\Word-online cloud service. Specific options for the organization of group work and individual activities are considered. The article highlights the advantage and the efficiency of teaching and learning by the BYOD (Bring Your Own Device mode. The paper includes examples of organizing of mass support of the study of the course of English for Business and Entrepreneurship (MOOC-Coursera and of information technology of the Humanities program in the computer class and relying on BYOD mobile Internet access of students.

  2. Farmer groups key to boosting technology adoption in Kenya | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-09-20

    Sep 20, 2013 ... Kenya Medical Research Institute: Nutrition and health. Farmers share lessons and successes. Engaging farmers in evaluating improved crops and practices and sharing their lessons and successes with more farmer groups is proving to be an effective way to scale up techno- logy adoption — and one that ...

  3. Report of the task group on fermentation technology.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Andrews, RJ

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available on the facilities and needs of the South African fermentation industry, with economic and strategic implications, and submit recommendations on areas where further research was required. The Task Group was requested to pay specific attention to the potential...

  4. Group delay functions and its applications in speech technology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fourier transform phase; group delay functions; feature extraction from phase; feature switching; mutual information; K-L divergence. 1. Introduction. Speech is the output of a quasistationary process, since the characteristics of speech change con- tinuously with time. As the ear perceives frequencies to understand sound, ...

  5. Empirical evidence of the effectiveness of concept mapping as a learning intervention for nuclear medicine technology students in a distance learning radiation protection and biology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Gregory G; Owen, Mary Anne; Prabakaran, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    Metacognitive learning strategies are based on instructional learning theory, which promotes deep, meaningful learning. Educators in a baccalaureate-level nuclear medicine technology program demonstrated that students enrolled in an online, distance learning section of an introductory radiation protection and radiobiology course performed better when traditional instruction was supplemented with nontraditional metacognitive learning strategies. The metacognitive learning strategy that was used is best known as concept mapping. The concept map, in addition to the standard homework problem assignment and opportunity for question-answer sessions, became the template for misconception identification and remediation interactions between the instructor and the student. The control group relied on traditional homework problems and question-answer sessions alone. Because students in both the "treatment" groups (i.e., students who used concept mapping) and the control group were distance learning students, all personal communications were conducted via e-mail or telephone. The final examination of the course was used to facilitate a quantitative comparison of the performance of students who used concept mapping and the performance of students who did not use concept mapping. The results demonstrated a significantly higher median final examination score for the concept mapping group than for the non-concept mapping group (z = -2.0381, P = 0.0415), with an appropriately large effect size (2.65). Concept mapping is a cognitive learning intervention that effectively enables meaningful learning and is suitable for use in the independent learner-oriented distance learning environments used by some nuclear medicine technology programs.

  6. A Group Interview regarding Disaster Preparedness for Food Assistance in a University that Offers a Training Course for Registered Dietitians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seira Ito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mass care feeding for disaster evacuees is an important component of public health preparedness. If universities that offer a training course for registered dietitians could provide food assistance to the evacuated people in their campus, it could contribute to maintain their health. Many universities are expected to become a base of support activities for people affected by disaster. This study aimed to reveal disaster preparedness in a university that offers a training course for registered dietitians, from the aspect of provision of mass care feeding. As Japan has 124 universities that offer such training courses, this case study could serve as a useful reference for them and contribute to the improvement of health of the affected people. A group interview was conducted in University A in 2012. The participants included two faculty members in the course, a vice president, a staff member, and a faculty member in charge of disaster preparedness and response. Stockpiled foods were limited to dry bread and pre-processed rice. No alternative heat sources were stored. It was concluded that to provide nutrients other than carbohydrate, hot meals should be served for the evacuees. Additionally, it would be difficult to provide meal service when the essential utilities such as gas and electricity are disrupted.

  7. Developing Statistical Physics Course Handout on Distribution Function Materials Based on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riandry, M. A.; Ismet, I.; Akhsan, H.

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to produce a valid and practical statistical physics course handout on distribution function materials based on STEM. Rowntree development model is used to produce this handout. The model consists of three stages: planning, development and evaluation stages. In this study, the evaluation stage used Tessmer formative evaluation. It consists of 5 stages: self-evaluation, expert review, one-to-one evaluation, small group evaluation and field test stages. However, the handout is limited to be tested on validity and practicality aspects, so the field test stage is not implemented. The data collection technique used walkthroughs and questionnaires. Subjects of this study are students of 6th and 8th semester of academic year 2016/2017 Physics Education Study Program of Sriwijaya University. The average result of expert review is 87.31% (very valid category). One-to-one evaluation obtained the average result is 89.42%. The result of small group evaluation is 85.92%. From one-to-one and small group evaluation stages, averagestudent response to this handout is 87,67% (very practical category). Based on the results of the study, it can be concluded that the handout is valid and practical.

  8. [Co-ordinate groups: reflexion in the light of the National Curriculum Guidings of the Nursing Graduation Course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, Denise Bouttelet; Fernandes, Carla Natalina da Silva

    2004-04-01

    The goal of this reflexion is to discuss about the necessary nurse characteristics as group co-ordinater and analyse, in the New National Curriculum Guidings of the Nursing Graduation Course, aspects that are necessary in this specific knowledge. For this, we base on the specific literature about the subject and in the official document of MEC about the Curriculum Guidings. It was possible to identify many points where this knowledge seams necessary to the development of the nurse abilities and competences in the management of people, groups and teams, even so signalize some indicators to make stronger the professional formation in this direction.

  9. Modalidad de curso semipresencial. Aplicación en la asignatura Procesos Tecnológicos. // Blended e-learning courses. Teaching experiences in Technology Process courses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. García Domínguez

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Los cursos en estudios semipresenciales son propios de estudiantes que no disponen de tiempo suficiente para los estudiospor razones laborales o similares. Por sus características, permiten enfrentar mayores niveles de acceso y demandas depoblaciones estudiantiles geográficamente distantes de las sedes universitarias centrales, llevando los estudiosuniversitarios allí donde ellos residen o laboran, con lo cual se abren nuevas posibilidades para todos los que aspiran acursar estudios universitarios. En el presente artículo se expone el concepto de Semipresencialidad, así como la experienciaacumulada en la impartición de la asignatura de Procesos Tecnológicos utilizando ese modo de enseñanza.Palabras claves: Curso semipresencial, docencia, procesos tecnológicos, guía de estudio, guía del profesor._______________________________________________________________________________Abstract:Studies based in blended e-learning courses are distinctive for students with have not enough time for regular studiesdue to working or similar reasons. For their characteristics, blended e-learning courses allow to face access greaterlevels and demand of student in populations geographically far-away of the central headquarters. This modality ofstudies give new possibilities for all those that aspire to carry out university studies, bringing near the university topeople in their residence places or work. The concept of studies based in blended e-learning and some teachingexperiences in the Technology Process courses by this learning mode is exposed in the present article.Key words: Blended e-learning courses, teaching, technology process, professor’s manual, student’s manual.

  10. A Study of the Impact of the Graduate Course "Professional Presentations Using Technology."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kristin Dee

    1993-01-01

    A survey of 41 graduate students who had and 211 who had not taken a course on using graphics for presentations found that course participants used more sophisticated media, are more critical of their performance, thought the course should be required, present often and expect to be required to make presentations in their future work. (SK)

  11. Graduate Employment Outcomes for Qualifying Library and Records Management Courses at Curtin University of Technology, 1998-2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genoni, Paul; Smith, Kerry

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of a survey of destinations for students from librarianship and records management courses at Curtin University of Technology for the period 1998-2002. The survey includes the type of work currently being undertaken by graduates, the security of tenure in their position, the level of professionalism in their…

  12. Examination of the Effects of STEM Education Integrated as a Part of Science, Technology, Society and Environment Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Bekir; Selvi, Mahmut

    2016-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the view of prospective teachers with regard to STEM education given in Science, Technology, Society and Environment course and the effects of STEM education on prospective teachers' attitudes towards renewable energy sources and awareness of environment problems. The study was carried out in 2014-2015…

  13. Assessing the Role of Peer Relationships in the Small Group Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott A.; Shimotsu, Stephanie; Byrnes, Kerry; Frisby, Brandi N.; Durbin, James; Loy, Brianna N.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the typology posited by Kram and Isabella (1985) that identifies three peer relationships present in organizations (i.e., information, collegial, and special), this assessment examined the association between students' perceptions of their in-class group members and six group outcomes (i.e., grouphate, cohesion, relational satisfaction,…

  14. Heterogeneous vs. Homogeneous Groups: Methodology for Class Instruction for Post-Secondary Business Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Theodore E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of racial and gender diversity on group process and problem solving in an academic setting. The importance of this dynamic is its value in preparing students for the workplace. The supposition is if a group is homogeneous, commitment and performance is improved. Data for the study…

  15. Does a Case-Based Online Group Project Increase Students' Satisfaction with Interaction in Online Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Joon; Ngampornchai, Anchalee; Trail-Constant, Trudian; Abril, Andres; Srinivasan, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    Due to the realistic, complex natures of authentic cases involved in case-based learning, the use of group work has been encouraged and expected to enhance the quality of interaction among participants and to improve students' learning experiences. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the case-based online group work increased…

  16. Information Technology Support For Debiasing Group Judgments: An Empirical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbasat; Lim

    2000-09-01

    Human judgments, made by either individuals or groups, have been found to contain biases. One of the most prevalent biases identified is the availability bias, associated with the phenomenon that events which are more available to human memory are correspondingly judged as occurring more frequently or as being more important. This paper is concerned with how to reduce the availability bias in the group context. It reports an experiment in which two computer-based support facilities, electronic brainstorming and electronic mail, were tested for their contributions to reducing the availability bias. A 2 x 2 experimental design was used: electronic brainstorming (available or not) and communication mode (electronic or verbal). Forty teams of three members each were asked to work on a task involving the rating of the importance of a number of items associated with a secretary's task. Both electronic brainstorming and electronic communication helped reduce the availability bias. In both cases, the reduction in bias was due to increased attention paid to items that were found to have low availability in the absence of these support tools. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  17. Value Added: History of Physics in a ``Science, Technology, and Society'' General Education Undergraduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Dwight

    2016-03-01

    In thirty years of teaching a capstone ``Science, Technology, and Society'' course to undergraduate students of all majors, I have found that, upon entering STS, to most of them the Manhattan Project seems about as remote as the Civil War; few can describe the difference between nuclear and large non-nuclear weapons. With similar lack of awareness, many students seem to think the Big Bang was dreamed up by science sorcerers. One might suppose that a basic mental picture of weapons that held entire populations hostage should be part of informed citizenship. One might also suppose that questions about origins, as they are put to nature through evidence-based reasoning, should be integral to a culture's identity. Over the years I have found the history of physics to be an effective tool for bringing such subjects to life for STS students. Upon hearing some of the history behind (for example) nuclear weapons and big bang cosmology, these students can better imagine themselves called upon to help in a Manhattan Project, or see themselves sleuthing about in a forensic science like cosmology. In this talk I share sample student responses to our class discussions on nuclear weapons, and on cosmology. The history of physics is too engaging to be appreciated only by physicists.

  18. SUMMARY OF THE RF TECHNOLOGY WORKING GROUP (T3).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, Chris

    2002-09-23

    The next-generation linear collider will require high-power microwave sources and accelerating systems vastly more challenging than its predecessor, the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). Cost efficiency will demand high accelerating gradient to achieve beam energies five to ten times greater than in the SLC. Luminosity goals 10,000 times greater than the SLC demand efficient creation of the highest possible beam power without degradation of beam emittance. The past decade of R&D has demonstrated the feasibility of two technical approaches for building a 500-GeV center-of-mass system (cms) collider with attractive options for future upgrade. The TESLA R&D program offers the prospect of 1.3-GHz superconducting rf (srf) linacs with 23.4 MV/m gradient that can be upgraded later to 35 MV/m gradient by doubling the number of klystrons and the cryo-plant, to reach 800 GeV cms [1]. The Next Linear Collider (NLC) and Japanese Linear Collider (JLC) R&D programs offer the prospect of 11.4-GHz room-temperature linacs that can later be extended to 1 TeV by doubling the number of structures and klystrons, and to 1.5 TeV by additionally increasing gradient or length [2-4]. Both programs offer a 500-GeV linear collider project start within the next few years (2-3 years for TESLA, 3-4 years for NLC) based on available technology validated by experiments at several complementary test facilities. Both offer their upgrades as a result of further progress in R&D that is already underway.

  19. Consistent Multigroup Theory Enabling Accurate Course-Group Simulation of Gen IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahnema, Farzad; Haghighat, Alireza; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2013-11-29

    The objective of this proposal is the development of a consistent multi-group theory that accurately accounts for the energy-angle coupling associated with collapsed-group cross sections. This will allow for coarse-group transport and diffusion theory calculations that exhibit continuous energy accuracy and implicitly treat cross- section resonances. This is of particular importance when considering the highly heterogeneous and optically thin reactor designs within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) framework. In such reactors, ignoring the influence of anisotropy in the angular flux on the collapsed cross section, especially at the interface between core and reflector near which control rods are located, results in inaccurate estimates of the rod worth, a serious safety concern. The scope of this project will include the development and verification of a new multi-group theory enabling high-fidelity transport and diffusion calculations in coarse groups, as well as a methodology for the implementation of this method in existing codes. This will allow for a higher accuracy solution of reactor problems while using fewer groups and will reduce the computational expense. The proposed research represents a fundamental advancement in the understanding and improvement of multi- group theory for reactor analysis.

  20. Major depressive disorder in vulnerable groups of older adults, their course and treatment, and psychiatric comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Kee-Lee; Cheung, Kelvin Chi-Kin

    2013-06-01

    Although a number of epidemiology studies of major depressive disorder (MDD) in older adults have been reported, most of them suffer four limitations: (1) the sample was not nationally representative; (2) the sample was relatively small or only one or two sociodemographic correlates of MDD were examined; (3) psychiatric comorbidity was not examined; and (4) the clinical characteristics of MDD were not reported. This study (1) examines the prevalence of DSM-IV MDD across different demographics, especially the vulnerable ones; (2) identifies clinical characteristics of DSM-IV MDD, such as onset, course, and treatment; and (3) evaluates the comorbidity of DSM-IV MDD with anxiety disorder, substance-use disorder, and personality disorder. We analyzed data on 8,205 individuals aged 65 or older from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (2001-2002), a nationally representative survey of the noninstitutionalized U.S. household population. The Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV version assessed MDD, anxiety, substance use, personality disorders, and pathological gambling. The survey also included demographic characteristics: age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, employment status, personal income, urban vs. rural residence, and region of the country. Marital status and gender were associated with MDD, whereas race and socioeconomic characteristics were not. Specifically, the prevalence rates of past-year MDD were significant greater for females (3.6%) than males (2.0%) and higher for widowed (4.9%) or separated/divorced (3.5%) than married (1.85%). The mean onset age was 50 years and the average number of lifetime episodes was 4.4. Only half of older adults with MDD had received treatment, even though one-fourth had thought about suicide. Anxiety disorder, substance dependence, and pathological gambling were highly associated with MDD. Prevention could be targeted to older women and those

  1. Knowledge Transfer Plan of Action for Biomass. Working Group Technology and Knowledge August 2003 - August 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ree, R.; Beekes, M.L.; Knoef, H.; Koppejan, J.; Driegen, J.; Vos, R.

    2005-05-01

    As part of the title Plan of Action six working groups are involved in finding solutions to the most important bottlenecks in the market introduction of bio-energy systems. In the working group on Technology and Knowledge an overview is given of the best biomass technology/product combinations [nl

  2. Examining Educational Climate Change Technology: How Group Inquiry Work with Realistic Scientific Technology Alters Classroom Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Drew; Sieber, Renee; Seiler, Gale; Chandler, Mark

    2018-01-01

    This study with 79 students in Montreal, Quebec, compared the educational use of a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) global climate model (GCM) to climate education technologies developed for classroom use that included simpler interfaces and processes. The goal was to show how differing climate education technologies succeed…

  3. Impact of Adding Internet Technology on Student Performance and Perception of Autonomy in Fundamentals of Electronics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosero-Zambrano, Carlos Andrés; Avila, Alba; Osorio, Luz Adriana; Aguirre, Sandra

    2017-11-01

    The coupling of the traditional classroom instruction and a virtual learning environment (VLE) in an engineering course is critical to stimulating the learning process and to encouraging students to develop competencies outside of the classroom. This can be achieved through planned activities and the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs), resources designed to complement students' autonomous learning needs. A quantitative analysis of students' academic performance using final course grades was performed for a fundamentals of electronics course and we examine students' perception of their autonomy using surveys. The students' progress and attitudes were monitored over four consecutive semesters. The first began with the design of the intervention and the following three consisted in the implementation. The strategy was focused on the development of course competencies through autonomous learning with ICT tools presented in the VLE. Findings indicate that the students who did the activities in the VLE showed an increase in performance scores in comparison with students who did not do them. The strategy used in this study, which enhanced perceived autonomy, was associated with a positive effect on their learning process. This research shows that a technology-enhanced course supported by ICT activities can both improve academic performance and foster autonomy in students.

  4. Impact of Adding Internet Technology on Student Performance and Perception of Autonomy in Fundamentals of Electronics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosero-Zambrano, Carlos Andrés; Avila, Alba; Osorio, Luz Adriana; Aguirre, Sandra

    2018-04-01

    The coupling of the traditional classroom instruction and a virtual learning environment (VLE) in an engineering course is critical to stimulating the learning process and to encouraging students to develop competencies outside of the classroom. This can be achieved through planned activities and the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs), resources designed to complement students' autonomous learning needs. A quantitative analysis of students' academic performance using final course grades was performed for a fundamentals of electronics course and we examine students' perception of their autonomy using surveys. The students' progress and attitudes were monitored over four consecutive semesters. The first began with the design of the intervention and the following three consisted in the implementation. The strategy was focused on the development of course competencies through autonomous learning with ICT tools presented in the VLE. Findings indicate that the students who did the activities in the VLE showed an increase in performance scores in comparison with students who did not do them. The strategy used in this study, which enhanced perceived autonomy, was associated with a positive effect on their learning process. This research shows that a technology-enhanced course supported by ICT activities can both improve academic performance and foster autonomy in students.

  5. Remote sensing technologies applied to the irrigation water management on a golf course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedras, Celestina; Lança, Rui; Martins, Fernando; Soares, Cristina; Guerrero, Carlos; Paixão, Helena

    2015-04-01

    An adequate irrigation water management in a golf course is a complex task that depends upon climate (multiple microclimates) and land cover (where crops differ in morphology, physiology, plant density, sensitivity to water stress, etc.). These factors change both in time and space on a landscape. A direct measurement provides localized values of the evapotranspiration and climate conditions. Therefore this is not a practical or economical methodology for large-scale use due to spatial and temporal variability of vegetation, soils, and irrigation management strategies. Remote sensing technology combines large scale with ground measurement of vegetation indexes. These indexes are mathematical combinations of different spectral bands mostly in the visible and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. They represent the measures of vegetation activity that vary not only with the seasonal variability of green foliage, but also across space, thus they are suitable for detecting spatial landscape variability. The spectral vegetation indexes may enhance irrigation management through the information contained in spectral reflectance data. This study was carried out on the 18th fairway of the Royal Golf Course, Vale do Lobo, Portugal, and it aims to establish the relationship between direct measurements and vegetation indexes. For that it is required (1) to characterize the soil and climatic conditions, (2) to assessment of the irrigation system, (3) to estimate the evapotranspiration (4) and to calculate the vegetation indices. The vegetation indices were determined with basis on spectral bands red, green and blue, RGB, and near Infrared, NIR, obtained from the analysis of images acquired from a unpiloted aerial vehicle, UAV, platform. The measurements of reference evapotranspiration (ETo) were obtained from two meteorological stations located in the study area. The landscape evapotranspiration, ETL, was determined in the fairway with multiple microclimates

  6. Traditional Geology Field Camp: A capstone course at South Dakota School of Mines and Technology (BHNSFS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunlar, N.; Lisenbee, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    The Black Hills Natural Sciences Field Station (BHNSFS) has provided field training in geology and geological engineering for more than 40 years, and since the 1980's as a consortium serving five schools with South Dakota School of Mines and Technology as the coordinator. The traditional summer geology field camp is a five week long, intense program aimed to prepare students for subsequent professional geologic experiences. It is delivered from two separate facilities, one in the Black Hills (South Dakota) from a beautiful log lodge along Sand Creek, in eastern Wyoming, and a second from the town of Taskesti along the North Anatolian fault approximately 200 km east of Istanbul, Turkey. At both locations, the courses maintain a strong emphasis on basic field applications, including the use of GPS as a mapping tool in most exercises. The preparation of well-written reports, based on field descriptions supplemented by research on the web or through published documents, is strongly emphasized. Projects at the Black Hills field camp includes mapping of Precambrian basement, Paleozoic stratigraphy, and Laramide Tertiary plutons and structural features as welll as post-Laramide,, faulted continental strata. The popular Taskesti field camp utilizes the diverse geology of the Tethyan realm, as well as the culture and history, of central Turkey (Anatolia). The course is based at a Turkish Government Earthquake Research Center facility along the North Anatolian fault. Students examine and map selected locations across the Izmir-Ankara suture including: 1) Deformed Cretaceous and Tertiary carbonate and clastic strata of the Sakarya micro-continent in a fore-arc basin; 2) Marble and skarn surrounding Eocene, subduction-related granite intruded into a passive margin sequence in the Sivrihisar region of central Anatolia; 3) Faulted and folded Neogene strata in the northern flank of the post-Tethyan, Haymana Basin and the contrasting terrains across the North Anatolian fault (J

  7. Quantitative Modeling of Membrane Transport and Anisogamy by Small Groups Within a Large-Enrollment Organismal Biology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Haag

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative modeling is not a standard part of undergraduate biology education, yet is routine in the physical sciences. Because of the obvious biophysical aspects, classes in anatomy and physiology offer an opportunity to introduce modeling approaches to the introductory curriculum. Here, we describe two in-class exercises for small groups working within a large-enrollment introductory course in organismal biology. Both build and derive biological insights from quantitative models, implemented using spreadsheets. One exercise models the evolution of anisogamy (i.e., small sperm and large eggs from an initial state of isogamy. Groups of four students work on Excel spreadsheets (from one to four laptops per group. The other exercise uses an online simulator to generate data related to membrane transport of a solute, and a cloud-based spreadsheet to analyze them. We provide tips for implementing these exercises gleaned from two years of experience.

  8. An Examination of Which Implications New Media Platforms Can Have on Study Group Work and Learning Opportunities in the Environment of the Course Information Systems for Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Simone Quach; Trankjær, Mie Bohn; Schlichter, Bjarne Rerup

    2014-01-01

    The Information Society is characterised by its technological development; the many New Media platforms offered on the World Wide Web have changed the communication culture from a traditional one-way transaction to a co-creation culture (Mangold and Faulds 2009). This paper investigates which...... implications New Media platforms – with special emphasis on Blackboard, Facebook, Google Docs and Dropbox – have on study group work in the environment of the course Information Systems for Business (ISB) at Aarhus University. Additionally, it is investigated which opportunities these platforms potentially...... could have on the learning environment at the university, as this could be of significant importance in the future educational system. The research is based on literature about New Media and New Media’s role in collaboration and learning environments. In order to establish some empirical grounding...

  9. A case-based, small-group cooperative learning course in preclinical veterinary science aimed at bridging basic science and clinical literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, J P; van Schoor, M; van der Merwe, L L; Meintjes, R A

    2009-03-01

    In 1999 a dedicated problem-based learning course was introduced into the lecture-based preclinical veterinary curriculum of the University of Pretoria. The Introduction to Clinical Studies Course combines traditional lectures, practical sessions, student self-learning and guided tutorials. The self-directed component of the course utilises case-based, small-group cooperative learning as an educational vehicle to link basic science with clinical medicine. The aim of this article is to describe the objectives and structure of the course and to report the results of the assessment of the students' perceptions on some aspects of the course. Students reacted very positively to the ability of the course to equip them with problem-solving skills. Students indicated positive perceptions about the workload of the course. There were, however, significantly lower scores for the clarity of the course objectives. Although the study guide for the course is very comprehensive, the practice regarding the objectives is still uncertain. It is imperative to set clear objectives in non-traditional, student-centred courses. The objectives have to be explained at the outset and reiterated throughout the course. Tutors should also communicate the rationale behind problem-based learning as a pedagogical method to the students. Further research is needed to verify the effectiveness of this course in bridging the gap between basic science and clinical literacy in veterinary science. Ongoing feedback and assessment of the management and content are important to refine this model for integrating basic science with clinical literacy.

  10. Time course of virulence factors produced by group A streptococcus during a food-borne epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Takeshi; Sakaguchi, Kazuko; Suzuki, Jun

    2012-02-01

    We studied the protein amount and activity of the major virulence factors hemolysin, cysteine protease streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B (SpeB), and NAD glycohydrolase (NADase), which are produced by Streptococcus pyogenes type T-25, with a food poisoning outbreak. The three virulence factors were analyzed by activity and amount of protein using supernatants at 2-30 h of culture. All these virulence factors were confirmed by their activity. Streptolysin O (SLO), SpeB, and NADase were immunochemically confirmed at protein level by Western blot analysis. Two hemolytic forms (70 and 60 kDa) of SLO were identified. SpeB was detected as a 44-kDa precursor form and a 30-kDa mature form. NADase was 50 kDa. SLO protein peaked at 8 h of culture, which corresponded with the hemolytic activity peak. Conversion from precursor to SpeB protein peaked at 14 h of culture. The conversion peak corresponded to the activity expression time. Also, mature SpeB protein peaked at 24 h of culture and corresponded to SpeB activity peak. Electrophoretic analysis clarified the relationship between SLO protein and SpeB protein, although amounts of SLO and SpeB have been reported to be inversely proportional to activity. NADase protein peaked at 12 h of culture, but protein level did not correspond to the peak. Because the NADase protein peak was closer to SpeB activity than SLO protein, our results suggested NADase protein was degraded at 12 h of culture. The time course production of these virulence factors is discussed.

  11. Review and environmental impact assessment of green technologies for base courses in bituminous pavements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthonissen, Joke; Van den bergh, Wim; Braet, Johan

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a critical review of different approaches applied in the Belgian asphalt sector in order to reduce the environmental impact of bituminous road construction works. The focus is on (1) reusing reclaimed asphalt pavement, (2) reducing the asphalt production temperature, and (3) prolonging the service life of the pavement. Environmental impact assessment of these methods is necessary to be able to compare these approaches and understand better the ability to reduce the environmental impact during the life cycle of the road pavement. Attention should be drawn to the possible shift in environmental impact between various life cycle stages, e.g., raw material production, asphalt production, or waste treatment. Life cycle assessment is necessary to adequately assess the environmental impact of these approaches over the entire service life of the bituminous pavement. The three approaches and their implementation in the road sector in Flanders (region in Belgium) are described and the main findings from life cycle assessment studies on these subjects are discussed. It was found from the review that using reclaimed asphalt pavement in new bituminous mixtures might yield significant environmental gains. The environmental impact of the application of warm mix asphalt technologies, on the other hand, depends on the technique used. - Highlights: • Recycling, lower production temperature and durability of asphalt are investigated. • The use of RAP in new asphalt mixtures yields significant environmental advantages. • It would be beneficial to allow RAP in asphalt mixtures for wearing courses. • The use of particular additives might counteract the environmental gain from WMA. • The service life and the environmental data source influence the LCA results.

  12. Review and environmental impact assessment of green technologies for base courses in bituminous pavements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anthonissen, Joke, E-mail: joke.anthonissen@uantwerpen.be [Faculty of Applied Engineering, University of Antwerp, Rodestraat 4, 2000 Antwerp (Belgium); Van den bergh, Wim, E-mail: wim.vandenbergh@uantwerpen.be [Faculty of Applied Engineering, University of Antwerp, Rodestraat 4, 2000 Antwerp (Belgium); Braet, Johan, E-mail: johan.braet@uantwerpen.be [Department Engineering Management, Faculty of Applied Economics, University of Antwerp, Prinsstraat 13, 2000 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2016-09-15

    This paper provides a critical review of different approaches applied in the Belgian asphalt sector in order to reduce the environmental impact of bituminous road construction works. The focus is on (1) reusing reclaimed asphalt pavement, (2) reducing the asphalt production temperature, and (3) prolonging the service life of the pavement. Environmental impact assessment of these methods is necessary to be able to compare these approaches and understand better the ability to reduce the environmental impact during the life cycle of the road pavement. Attention should be drawn to the possible shift in environmental impact between various life cycle stages, e.g., raw material production, asphalt production, or waste treatment. Life cycle assessment is necessary to adequately assess the environmental impact of these approaches over the entire service life of the bituminous pavement. The three approaches and their implementation in the road sector in Flanders (region in Belgium) are described and the main findings from life cycle assessment studies on these subjects are discussed. It was found from the review that using reclaimed asphalt pavement in new bituminous mixtures might yield significant environmental gains. The environmental impact of the application of warm mix asphalt technologies, on the other hand, depends on the technique used. - Highlights: • Recycling, lower production temperature and durability of asphalt are investigated. • The use of RAP in new asphalt mixtures yields significant environmental advantages. • It would be beneficial to allow RAP in asphalt mixtures for wearing courses. • The use of particular additives might counteract the environmental gain from WMA. • The service life and the environmental data source influence the LCA results.

  13. Evaluation of an Adaptive Learning Technology in a First-year Extended Curriculum Programme Physics course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Mushe Basitere

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Personalised, adaptive online learning platforms that form part of web-based proficiency tests play a major role in the improvement of the quality of learning in physics and assist learners in building proficiency, preparing for tests and using their time more effectively. In this study, the effectiveness of an adaptive learning platform, Wiley Plus ORION, was evaluated using proficiency test scores compared to paper-based test scores in a first-year introductory engineering physics course. Learners’ performance activities on the adaptive learning platform as well as their performance on the proficiency tests and their impact on the paper-based midterm averaged test were investigated using both qualitative and quantitative methods of data collection. A comparison between learners’ performance on the proficiency tests and a paper-based midterm test was done to evaluate whether there was a correlation between their performance on the proficiency tests and the midterm test. Focus group interviews were carried out with three categories of learners to elicit their experiences. Results showed that there was a positive relationship between high-performing learners’ proficiency score in the midterm averaged test and that the proficiency test enhanced learners’ performance in the paper-based midterm averaged test.

  14. Teaching Presence in Online Courses: Practical Applications, Co-Facilitation, and Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhai, Stephanie Smith; Williams, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    The number of online courses being offered at the postsecondary level has constantly increased. However, online instructors are still investigating ways to translate their pedagogical instruction into the online forum, while maintaining a strong presence instructionally. This paper aims to address how to build teaching presence in online courses.…

  15. Joint Working Group-39, Manufacturing Technology Subworking Group-F, remote handling and automation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrill, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    The terms of reference were reviewed and continue to encompass the scope of activities of the SUBWOG. No revisions to the terms of reference were proposed. The list of site contacts who should receive copies of SUBWOG correspondence and meeting minutes was reviewed and updated. Documents exchanged related to the meeting include: Minutes of the sixth SUBOG 39F meeting; transactions of the fifth topical meeting on robotics and remote handling; data on manipulators was forwarded to LLNL from the robotics group at AEA Harwell; and the specifications of the duct remediation robot from the Rocky Flats Plant.

  16. Exploration of offering photoelectric experimental general elective courses for college students of science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shen; Sun, Binchao

    2017-08-01

    The necessity of offering photoelectric experiment general elective courses, such as the experiments of modern optical and innovational photoelectric design for non optic-electric's science and engineering students were discussed based on the analysis of the status quo and problems in experimental general elective course in science and engineering colleges of our country. And the characters of photoelectric disciplines, the goal of science and engineering quality-oriented education and the reform of science education at home and abroad were also considered. The instructional objectives, contents and characteristics of the courses were investigated. The specific methods, the CDIO (conceive, design, implement and operate) mode in the general courses has been proposed; the experiences and practical effects of offering these courses were concluded.

  17. Elementary Education Pre-Service Teachers' Development of Mathematics Technology Integration Skills in a Technology Integration Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, Drew

    2015-01-01

    Preparing pre-service teachers to effectively integrate technology in the classroom requires rich experiences that deepen their knowledge of technology, pedagogy, and content and the intersection of these aspects. This study examined elementary education pre-service teachers' development of skills and knowledge in a technology integration course…

  18. Preventive effects of group dance movement therapy on participants of oriental dance courses

    OpenAIRE

    Jevšenak, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    The connection of mind and body as well as the impact of physical activity on mental state of the person is defined in the theoretical part of the thesis. It featured dance as an expressive means of non-verbal communication in the therapeutic process in the group and stressed the importance of creativity in dance expression. It has given a historical overview of the role of women in dance and described the therapeutic characteristics of oriental dance. In addition to presenting dance - moveme...

  19. An action research study on the effect of an examination preparation course on Veterinary Technology National Examination scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limon, Jennifer S.

    The action research project used for this dissertation was intended to examine the effect of implementing an examination preparation course for graduates taking the Veterinary Technology National Examination in Louisiana. Previous data showed that scores on the VTNE were declining at not only the state, but also the national level, thus allowing less graduates to enter the workforce as Registered Veterinary Technicians in Louisiana. The research question was "What impact did the exam prep course have on VTNE test scores?" The researcher focused on helping to better prepare graduates from a local community college Veterinary Technology program to take the VTNE by implementing an exam review course in the semester prior to graduation from the program. The focus of the review course was not only content review, but also test taking techniques, help with study habits, as well as presentation of techniques to help deal with test anxiety. Three sources of data were collected by the researcher including pre and post intervention VTNE scores, as well as survey results completed by the graduates participating in the study. There were 13 graduates who participated in the study, and the data for 50 prior graduates was used as a comparison for score improvement. Upon completion of the intervention, Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) tests were used to analyze the data. The results revealed that while the intervention did have a positive effect on the graduates in terms of feeling prepared for the exam, it did not improve VTNE scores. A survey was administered to the participants upon completion of the course, and thematic coding was used to analyze the qualitative data. Overall the results indicated the learners felt the course helped prepare them for the VTNE, and the majority recommended implementing it for future learners.

  20. IMIA Working Group 15 : Technology assessment and quality development in health informatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gennip, E.M.S.J. van

    1999-01-01

    The working group on technology assessment and quality development in health informatics was established as a follow-up to the recommendations made at the IMIA-ISTAHC working conference in 1990. The working group was approved by the IMIA General Assembly at Kyoto, September, 1993. The working group

  1. Students’ Perceptions About Learning Environment of a Distance Course Based on Technology Acceptance Model: A Descriptive Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erman UZUN

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Technology Acceptance Model (TAM is a measure to assess the underlying reasons about the use of a technology. In this study an extended version of TAM were used. This extended version composed of three factors. These are “perceived motivation towards learning environment”, “perceived usefulness” and “perceived ease of use”. In this study, the learning environment of a distance course was investigated to see students’ perceptions. This distance course was delivered from one university to the other university via video-conferencing with ITL Learning Gateway content management system during the whole semester. The participants were the 32 first year vocational higher education institution students. The descriptive findings revealed that each factor of TAM perceived by students as having moderate advantages. It is believed that the underlying reason of this situation was based on the students’ low computer competency and e-learning experiences.

  2. Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Technology Course: Sustainable Growth of Professional Competency

    OpenAIRE

    Ermac, Eugenio A; Malabago, Nolasco K

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore a practical discussion on helping the students' professional competency. More specifically, this study conducted two studies developing a competency analysis profile on refrigeration and air conditioning technology, and examining the essential core competencies for training undergraduate students in Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology specializing Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technology at Cebu Technological University. The qualitative and qu...

  3. A Comparative Analysis of Point-of-View Modeling for Industrial and Technology Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros J.; Fantz, Todd D.; Jones, Millie

    2013-01-01

    Enrollment in technology education at the college level has been declining, so it is becoming essential for technology teacher educators to investigate ways to increase the enrollment in their programs. Technology teacher educators are exploring the extent to which distance-learning technologies such as video modeling can be used by industrial and…

  4. Visual object-oriented technology and case-tools of developing the Internet / Intranet-oriented training courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salaimeh S. A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New information technologies, modern computers, LAN, WAN networks enable us to modernize the whole education system. One of the most perspective ways of the modern educational system’s development is online education. The questions of developing the visual instrumental system PIECE designed to automate processes of creation the cross- platform hypermedia training and controlling course (HTCC are viewed in this paper.

  5. Information Technology Tools Analysis in Quantitative Courses of IT-Management (Case Study: M.Sc.-Tehran University)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshlaghy, Abbas Toloie; Kaveh, Haydeh

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the most suitable ICT-based education and define the most suitable e-content creation tools for quantitative courses in the IT-management Masters program. ICT-based tools and technologies are divided in to three categories: the creation of e-content, the offering of e-content, and access to e-content. In…

  6. What it Takes to Successfully Implement Technology for Aging in Place: Focus Groups With Stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Sebastiaan Theodorus Michaël; Wouters, Eveline J M; Luijkx, Katrien G; Vrijhoef, Hubertus J M

    2016-05-03

    There is a growing interest in empowering older adults to age in place by deploying various types of technology (ie, eHealth, ambient assisted living technology, smart home technology, and gerontechnology). However, initiatives aimed at implementing these technologies are complicated by the fact that multiple stakeholder groups are involved. Goals and motives of stakeholders may not always be transparent or aligned, yet research on convergent and divergent positions of stakeholders is scarce. To provide insight into the positions of stakeholder groups involved in the implementation of technology for aging in place by answering the following questions: What kind of technology do stakeholders see as relevant? What do stakeholders aim to achieve by implementing technology? What is needed to achieve successful implementations? Mono-disciplinary focus groups were conducted with participants (n=29) representing five groups of stakeholders: older adults (6/29, 21%), care professionals (7/29, 24%), managers within home care or social work organizations (5/29, 17%), technology designers and suppliers (6/29, 21%), and policy makers (5/29, 17%). Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. Stakeholders considered 26 different types of technologies to be relevant for enabling independent living. Only 6 out of 26 (23%) types of technology were mentioned by all stakeholder groups. Care professionals mentioned fewer different types of technology than other groups. All stakeholder groups felt that the implementation of technology for aging in place can be considered a success when (1) older adults' needs and wishes are prioritized during development and deployment of the technology, (2) the technology is accepted by older adults, (3) the technology provides benefits to older adults, and (4) favorable prerequisites for the use of technology by older adults exist. While stakeholders seemed to have identical aims, several underlying differences emerged, for example, with regard

  7. The Effect of Cooperative Learning on Students’ Achievement and Views on the Science and Technology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertel ALTUN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficiency of learning plan implementation prepared with the cooperative learning method. In particular, the study addresses the effect of cooperative learning on students’ achievement and their views regarding the ‘Systems in Our Body’ unit of the 6th grade Science and Technology lesson. For this purpose, mixed method was used. The study is conducted in the second term of the 2013-2014 academic year, on a study group consisted of 7 girls and 13 boys, a total of 20 students of a private middle school in Istanbul. An achievement scale was utilized for the quantitative data and focus group interviews were hold for the qualitative data. While t-test was used for the quantitative findings, content analysis technique was used for the qualitative data. The result of the study indicated that CL method had a favorable effect on learning. The cooperation based learning-teaching environment provided cooperation, supported permanent learning, provided opportunities to be successful, contributed to the development of social and personal skills, but also caused worry as it requires students to be successful at all stages.

  8. The effect of cooperative learning on students’ achievement and views on the science and technology course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sertel Altun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficiency of learning plan implementation prepared with the cooperative learning method. In particular, the study addresses the effect of cooperative learning on students’ achievement and their views regarding the ‘Systems in Our Body’ unit of the 6th grade Science and Technology lesson. For this purpose, mixed method was used. The study is conducted in the second term of the 2013-2014 academic year, on a study group consisted of 7 girls and 13 boys, a total of 20 students of a private middle school in Istanbul. An achievement scale was utilized for the quantitative data and focus group interviews were hold for the qualitative data. While t-test was used for the quantitative findings, content analysis technique was used for the qualitative data. The result of the study indicated that CL method had a favorable effect on learning. The cooperation based learning-teaching environment provided cooperation, supported permanent learning, provided opportunities to be successful, contributed to the development of social and personal skills, but also caused worry as it requires students to be successful at all stages.

  9. TESTING AS THE BASIC TECHNOLOGY OF THE KNOWLEDGE CONTROL OF LISTENERS OF COURSE ECDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kravtsov

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Results of research of distance testing systems and their introduction for the knowledge control in the course of professional skill improvement under program ECDL with use of distance learning are presented.

  10. Mathematics Prerequisites for Introductory Geoscience Courses: Using Technology to Help Solve the Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, H. E.; Wenner, J. M.; Baer, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    The quantitative components of introductory geoscience courses can pose significant barriers to students. Many academic departments respond by stripping courses of their quantitative components or by attaching prerequisite mathematics courses [PMC]. PMCs cause students to incur additional costs and credits and may deter enrollment in introductory courses; yet, stripping quantitative content from geoscience courses masks the data-rich, quantitative nature of geoscience. Furthermore, the diversity of math skills required in geoscience and students' difficulty with transferring mathematical knowledge across domains suggest that PMCs may be ineffective. Instead, this study explores an alternative strategy -- to remediate students' mathematical skills using online modules that provide students with opportunities to build contextual quantitative reasoning skills. The Math You Need, When You Need It [TMYN] is a set of modular online student resources that address mathematical concepts in the context of the geosciences. TMYN modules are online resources that employ a "just-in-time" approach - giving students access to skills and then immediately providing opportunities to apply them. Each module places the mathematical concept in multiple geoscience contexts. Such an approach illustrates the immediate application of a principle and provides repeated exposure to a mathematical skill, enhancing long-term retention. At the same time, placing mathematics directly in several geoscience contexts better promotes transfer of learning by using similar discourse (words, tools, representations) and context that students will encounter when applying mathematics in the future. This study uses quantitative and qualitative data to explore the effectiveness of TMYN modules in remediating students' mathematical skills. Quantitative data derive from ten geoscience courses that used TMYN modules during the fall 2010 and spring 2011 semesters; none of the courses had a PMC. In all courses

  11. The impact of a dedicated Science-Technology-Society (STS) course on student knowledge of STS content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Paul E.

    In the last half century, public awareness of issues such as population growth, environmental pollution and the threat of nuclear war has pressured science education to reform to increase student social responsibility. The emerging Science-Technology-Society (STS) movement addressed these concerns by developing numerous strategies and curricula. Considerable diagnostic research has been conducted on student knowledge of the nature of science, but not on the wider scope of STS content (e.g., the nature of science and technology and their interactions with society). However, researchers have not widely studied the impact of comprehensive STS curricula on students' knowledge of STS content nor the nature of STS teaching practice that influenced this knowledge gain. This study examined student success and teacher performance in a special STS course in Ontario, Canada. Research questions focused on the STS content knowledge gain by students completing this course and the impact of the STS teachers' teaching practices on this knowledge gain. Student data were collected using pre-course and post-course assessments of students' STS content knowledge. Teacher data were obtained using semi-structured interviews, classroom observations and videotapes. Statistical analysis indicated that, after completing the STS course, students significantly increased their STS content knowledge as measured by the Views on Science Technology Society instrument. Gender and academic achievement had no significant impact on this knowledge gain, implying that this course, as taught by these teachers, could appeal to a wide range of students as a general education course. The second part of the study indicated that detailed research is needed on the relationship between STS teaching practice and student STS content knowledge gain. The small sample size prevents generalizations but initial indications show that factors such constructivist teaching practices and strong teacher STS content knowledge

  12. An innovative pedagogical experience based on flipped classroom and new technologies. Analysis of learning and satisfaction results in a university course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cegarra Leiva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to answer the following questions: «does the flipped classroom methodology supported by the use of new technologies improve learning and student satisfaction?» and «what are the suggestions for improvement after applying this methodology?». This study is based on the experience of a group of students who completed the human resource management (HRM course in 2015/2016 using this innovative methodology and comparing them with three other groups that used the traditional teaching methodology. The results were measured by conducting the same student exam, the distribution of an anonymous questionnaire (with qualitative questions and the official teacher satisfaction surveys carried out at the university. In terms of learning, scores were significantly higher for the group that underwent the pilot experience. However, the satisfaction of students with the quality of teaching was lower than that of the other groups. The qualitative comments of the students helped us to understand these heterogeneous results and to establish improvements for the following courses. The contributions of the study, as well as limitations and future lines of research and teaching are indicated at the end of the article.

  13. Do Technological and Course-Related Variables Impact Undergraduates' Perceived Favorability and Willingness to Recommend Online/Hybrid Business Courses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, Gary; Drennan, Rob B., Jr.; Karnik, Satyajit; Kapanjie, Darin

    2017-01-01

    Lower teaching evaluations can affect students' willingness to recommend an online course. To maintain online course quality, it is important to keep the "integrity" of a course, that is, offer to the extent possible, the same content and learning outcomes in an online course as the face-to-face (F2F) equivalent. This study explored the…

  14. [Improving the teaching quality by multiple tools and technology in oral histopathology experimental course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Wang, Li-Zhen; Hu, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Chun-Ye; Li, Jiang

    2017-04-01

    Oral histopathology is a course which needs to be combined with theory and practice closely. Experimental course plays an important role in teaching oral histopathology. Here, we aim to explore a series of effective measures to improve the teaching quality of experimental course and tried to train observation, thinking, analysis and problem solving skills of dental students. We re-edited and updated the experimental textbook "guidelines of experimental course of oral histopathology", and published the reference book for experimental course--"color pocket atlas of oral histopathology: experiment and diadactic teaching". The number of clinicopathological cases for presentation and class discussion was increased, and high-quality teaching slides were added and replaced the poor-quality or worn out slides. We established a variety of teaching methods based on the internet, which provided an environment of self-directed learning for dental students. Instead of simple slice-reading examination, a new evaluation system based on computer was established. The questionnaire survey showed that the students spoke positively on the teaching reform for experimental course. They thought that the reform played a significant role in enriching the teaching content, motivating learning interest and promoting self-study. Compared with traditional examination, computer-based examination showed a great advantage on mastering professional knowledge systematically and comprehensively. The measures adopted in our teaching reform not only effectively improve the teaching quality of experimental course of oral histopathology, but also help the students to have a clear, logical thinking when facing complicated diseases and have the ability to apply theoretical knowledge into clinical practice.

  15. Comparing Graduate Courses Taught by the Same Instructor Using Competing Approaches: Traditional vs. Technology-Infused

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisicki, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The use of educational technologies as a tool to improve academic achievement continues to increase as more technologies becomes available to students. However, teachers are entering the classroom not fully prepared to integrate technology into their daily classroom teaching because they have not been adequately prepared to do so. Teacher…

  16. Tools, courses, and learning pathways offered by the National Interagency Fuels, Fire, and Vegetation Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eva K. Strand; Kathy H. Schon; Jeff Jones

    2010-01-01

    Technological advances in the area of fuel and wildland fire management have created a need for effective decision support tools and technology training. The National Interagency Fuels Committee and LANDFIRE have chartered a team to develop science-based learning tools for assessment of fire and fuels and to provide online training and technology transfer to help...

  17. Factors Influencing Agricultural Leadership Students' Behavioral Intentions: Examining the Potential Use of Mobile Technology in Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Robert; Irby, Travis L.; Dooley, Larry M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technology is pervasive at institutions across the U.S. The study was framed with self-efficacy theory, self-directed learning theory, and the unified theory for acceptance and use of technology. The purpose of this study was to assess undergraduate students' behavioral intention towards mobile technology acceptance in agricultural…

  18. GIS tools, courses, and learning pathways offered by The National Interagency Fuels, Fire, and Vegetation Technology Transfer (NIFTT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather Heward; Kathy H. Schon

    2009-01-01

    As technology continues to evolve in the area of fuel and wildland fire management so does the need to have effective tools and training on these technologies. The National Interagency Fuels Coordination Group has chartered a team of professionals to coordinate, develop, and transfer consistent, efficient, science-based fuel and fire ecology assessment GIS tools and...

  19. Comparison of the effectiveness of collaborative groups and peer instruction in a large introductory physics course for science majors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalman, C.S.; Milner-Bolotin, M.; Antimitova, T.

    2010-01-01

    We report on an experiment comparing examinations of concepts using slightly modified peer instruction (MPI) interventions with a conceptual conflict strategy based on collaborative groups (CG). Four interventions were utilized in two sections of an introductory physics course for science students. Both instructors and strategies were alternated in the two classes so that instructor dependence could be factored out and so that each class could serve as both an experimental and a control group. The gain on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) used as a pre- and post-test is essentially the same in both classes. The instructors were experienced in use of MPI, but this was the first time that these instructors had used a collaborative group activity in their classes and only used it for the two interventions in each class described in this paper. CG appears to be more effective as a teaching method than PI. It also should be noted that the effectiveness of both teaching methods seems to be instructor independent as long as the instructors followed the same protocol. (author)

  20. Comparison of the effectiveness of collaborative groups and peer instruction in a large introductory physics course for science majors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalman, C.S., E-mail: Calvin.Kalman@concordia.ca [Concordia Univ., Dept. of Physics, Montreal, QC (Canada); Milner-Bolotin, M. [Univ. of British Columbia, Dept. of Curriculum and Pedagogy, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Antimitova, T. [Ryerson Univ., Dept. of Physics, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    We report on an experiment comparing examinations of concepts using slightly modified peer instruction (MPI) interventions with a conceptual conflict strategy based on collaborative groups (CG). Four interventions were utilized in two sections of an introductory physics course for science students. Both instructors and strategies were alternated in the two classes so that instructor dependence could be factored out and so that each class could serve as both an experimental and a control group. The gain on the Force Concept Inventory (FCI) used as a pre- and post-test is essentially the same in both classes. The instructors were experienced in use of MPI, but this was the first time that these instructors had used a collaborative group activity in their classes and only used it for the two interventions in each class described in this paper. CG appears to be more effective as a teaching method than PI. It also should be noted that the effectiveness of both teaching methods seems to be instructor independent as long as the instructors followed the same protocol. (author)

  1. Introducing Backchannel Technology into a Large Undergraduate Course | Introduction d’une technologie d’arrière-plan dans un vaste cours de premier cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Neustifter

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Backchannel technology can be used to allow students in large lecture courses to communicate with each other and the instructor during the delivery of lecture content and class discussions. It can also be utilized by instructors to capture, summarize, and integrate student questions, ideas, and needs into course content both immediately and throughout the course. The authors integrated backchannel software in one of two sections of a course, leaving the other section as a control; combined, the two sections contained a total number of 871 students. Data was gathered comparing both groups using online surveys and semester grades; results showed that the section using backchannel software had higher class satisfaction and perception of engagement, used their mobile devices more for accessing class content, felt more comfortable participating in class discussions, and had a higher grade average than the section that did not. The authors also explore their own experiences of finding, integrating, and maintaining backchannel technology. La technologie d’arrière-plan peut permettre aux étudiants de grands cours magistraux de communiquer les uns avec les autres et avec l’instructeur durant le cours et les discussions en classe. Les instructeurs peuvent aussi l’utiliser pour saisir, résumer et intégrer les questions, idées et besoins des étudiants dans le contenu du cours, et ce, immédiatement et pendant toute la durée du cours. Les auteurs ont intégré un logiciel d’arrière-plan dans l’une des deux sections d’un cours, faisant de l’autre section son groupe témoin. Ensemble, les deux sections comprenaient 871 étudiants. Des données ont été recueillies pour comparer les deux groupes à l’aide de sondages en ligne et des notes du trimestre. Les résultats ont démontré que la section utilisant le logiciel d’arrière-plan avait une plus grande satisfaction et une meilleure perception de l’engagement, que ses

  2. Technology-Assisted Sheltered Instruction: Instructional Streaming Video in an EFL Multi-Purpose Computer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Hsuan; Chuang, Tsung-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Content-based instruction (CBI) has been widely adopted for decades. However, existing CBI models cannot always be effectively put into practice, especially for learners of lower English proficiency in English as a foreign language (EFL) context. This study examined an animation design course adopting CBI to promote reading abilities of English…

  3. An Investigative Laboratory Course in Human Physiology Using Computer Technology and Collaborative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65…

  4. Nuclear Technology. Course 31: Quality Assurance Practices. Module 31-7, Auditing for Quality Assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Jim; Espy, John

    This seventh in a series of eight modules for a course titled Quality Assurance Practices describes the key features of an audit system and offers practice in carrying out tasks of the technicians. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to…

  5. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-2, Fixed Gages, Dividers, Calipers, and Micrometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This second in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology dscribes fixed gages, dividers, calipers, vernier and dial calipers, and micrometers. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (l) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject matter, (6)…

  6. Nuclear Technology. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I. Module 26-3, Hydrostatic Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Rick; Espy, John

    This third in a series of seven modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I describes the principles and practices associated with hydrostatic testing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student,…

  7. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-7, Pressure Vessel Inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupiec, Chet; Espy, John

    This seventh in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection is devoted to the design and fabrication of the reactor pressure vessel. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3) objectives, (4) notes to instructor/student, (5) subject matter, (6)…

  8. Students' Perceptions of a Twitter-Based Assignment in a Graduate-Level Instructional Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygard, Shanda; Day, Micah; Fricke, Gretchen; Knowlton, Dave S.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines Twitter as an innovation to enhance student learning within an online graduate-level course. Specifically, this article includes 3 narratives from students who were charged with using Twitter as a medium for sharing photographs and accompanying analysis. Within each narrative, students' experiences and opinions are…

  9. Structures and Technology Encouraging Discussion in Human Sexuality Courses: Strategies to Engage a Range of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angera, Jeffrey J.; Latty, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Human sexuality courses are common across many college/university campuses. The methods of instruction typically encourage discussion to increase knowledge and critical thinking about self, relationships, and professional pathways. However, often the pedagogical practices do not include methods to draw out students with a range of personalities,…

  10. Nuclear Technology. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I. Module 26-5, Fundamentals of Radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groseclose, Richard

    This fifth in a series of seven modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I explains the radiographic process, from radiation source selection to equipment and specimen selection and arrangement, and film processing. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module…

  11. Nuclear Technology. Course 26: Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I. Module 26-6, Radiography Inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelton, Rick; Espy, John

    This sixth in a series of seven modules for a course titled Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Techniques I explains radiographic inspection as a means of nondestructively examining components, assemblies, structures, and fabricated piping. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module…

  12. Building Innovative Online Korean and Japanese Courses: A Pilot on Technology-Enhanced Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eriko; Sohn, Heejeong; Chen, Julian ChengChiang; Adebowale, Kayode C. V.; Jourdain, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Our pilot project created blended/online courses to accommodate the growing needs of precollegiate and collegiate students interested in learning Korean and Japanese. In the initial phase, we conducted a survey of students' experiences with and perceptions about blended/online Asian language learning. We found a general lack of familiarity with,…

  13. Nuclear Technology. Course 28: Welding Inspection. Module 28-2, Shielded Metal Arc and Oxyacetylene Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, John; Selleck, Ben

    This second in a series of ten modules for a course titled Welding Inspection describes the key features of the oxyacetylene and shielded metal arc welding process. The apparatus, process techniques, procedures, applications, associated defects, and inspections are presented. The module follows a typical format that includes the following…

  14. Nuclear Technology. Course 30: Mechanical Inspection. Module 30-6, Protective Coating Inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espy, John

    This sixth in a series of eight modules for a course titled Mechanical Inspection describes the duties of the nuclear quality assurance/quality control technician that are associated with protective coatings, and the national standards that govern the selection, application, and inspection of protective coatings for the reactor containment…

  15. Fixing Higher Education through Technology: Canadian Media Coverage of Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrica, Delia

    2017-01-01

    The popularization of massive open online courses (MOOCs) has been shrouded in promises of disruption and radical change in education. In Canada, official partnerships struck by higher education institutions with platform providers such as "Coursera", "Udacity" and "edX" were publicized by dailies and professional…

  16. An investigative laboratory course in human physiology using computer technology and collaborative writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A

    2004-12-01

    Active investigative student-directed experiences in laboratory science are being encouraged by national science organizations. A growing body of evidence from classroom assessment supports their effectiveness. This study describes four years of implementation and assessment of an investigative laboratory course in human physiology for 65 second-year students in sports medicine and biology at a small private comprehensive college. The course builds on skills and abilities first introduced in an introductory investigations course and introduces additional higher-level skills and more complex human experimental models. In four multiweek experimental modules, involving neuromuscular, reflex, and cardiovascular physiology, by use of computerized hardware/software with a variety of transducers, students carry out self-designed experiments with human subjects and perform data collection and analysis, collaborative writing, and peer editing. In assessments, including standard course evaluations and the Salgains Web-based evaluation, student responses to this approach are enthusiastic, and gains in their skills and abilities are evident in their comments and in improved performance.

  17. Crossing the Atlantic: Integrating Cross-Cultural Experiences into Undergraduate Business Courses Using Virtual Communities Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luethge, Denise J.; Raska, David; Greer, Bertie M.; O'Connor, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Today's business school academics are tasked with pedagogy that offers students an understanding of the globalization of markets and the cross-cultural communication skills needed in today's business environment. The authors describe how a virtual cross-cultural experience was integrated into an undergraduate business course and used as an…

  18. Profile of Nursing research groups of the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Cristina Barbosa Costa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nursing has been developing in the research field, therefore, it is important to be inserted into a research group of the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development, a funding agency that supports studies and strengthens the knowledge. This is a descriptive, retrospective and cross-sectional study that aimed to investigate the profile of Nursing research groups registered in the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development. A survey of data from research groups in Nursing took place in the first half of 2012, finding 440 groups. The Southeast region was the one that presented more research groups registered (49.5%. The leaders of the groups had from one to ten productions with Impact Factor (49.1%. It is concluded that Nursing is expanding in the research field, and that many Brazilian regions need to be encouraged, as this is a form of developing the area.

  19. The Role of Executive Functioning and Technological Anxiety (FOMO in College Course Performance as Mediated by Technology Usage and Multitasking Habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry D. Rosen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated how technology use impacts academic performance. A proposed model postulated that academic performance could be predicted by a cognitive independent variable-executive functioning problems-and an affective independent variable-technological anxiety or FOMO (fear of missing out-mediated by how students choose to use technology. An unobtrusive smartphone application called “Instant Quantified Self” monitored daily smartphone unlocks and daily minutes of use. Other mediators included self-reported smartphone use, self-observed studying attention, self-reported multitasking preference, and a classroom digital metacognition tool that assessed the student’s ability to understand the ramifications of technology use in the classroom that is not relevant to the learning process. Two hundred sixteen participants collected an average of 56 days of “Instant” application data, demonstrating that their smartphone was unlocked more than 60 times a day for three to four minutes each time for a total of 220 daily minutes of use. Results indicated that executive functioning problems predicted academic course performance mediated by studying attention and a single classroom digital metacognition subscale concerning availability of strategies of when to use mobile phones during lectures. FOMO predicted performance directly as well as mediated by a second classroom digital metacognition concerning attitudes toward mobile phone use during lectures. Implications for college students and professors include increasing metacognition about technology use in the classroom and taking “tech breaks” to reduce technology anxiety.

  20. Older Adults Perceptions of Technology and Barriers to Interacting with Tablet Computers: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaportzis, Eleftheria; Clausen, Maria Giatsi; Gow, Alan J

    2017-10-04

    New technologies provide opportunities for the delivery of broad, flexible interventions with older adults. Focus groups were conducted to: (1) understand older adults' familiarity with, and barriers to, interacting with new technologies and tablets; and (2) utilize user-engagement in refining an intervention protocol. Eighteen older adults (65-76 years old; 83.3% female) who were novice tablet users participated in discussions about their perceptions of and barriers to interacting with tablets. We conducted three separate focus groups and used a generic qualitative design applying thematic analysis to analyse the data. The focus groups explored attitudes toward tablets and technology in general. We also explored the perceived advantages and disadvantages of using tablets, familiarity with, and barriers to interacting with tablets. In two of the focus groups, participants had previous computing experience (e.g., desktop), while in the other, participants had no previous computing experience. None of the participants had any previous experience with tablet computers. The themes that emerged were related to barriers (i.e., lack of instructions and guidance, lack of knowledge and confidence, health-related barriers, cost); disadvantages and concerns (i.e., too much and too complex technology, feelings of inadequacy, and comparison with younger generations, lack of social interaction and communication, negative features of tablets); advantages (i.e., positive features of tablets, accessing information, willingness to adopt technology); and skepticism about using tablets and technology in general. After brief exposure to tablets, participants emphasized the likelihood of using a tablet in the future. Our findings suggest that most of our participants were eager to adopt new technology and willing to learn using a tablet. However, they voiced apprehension about lack of, or lack of clarity in, instructions and support. Understanding older adults' perceptions of technology

  1. An Exploration of the Roles of Communication Apprehension, Online Technology Self-Efficacy, and Retention in an Online Public Speaking Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, Carla Sulivant

    2012-01-01

    Although the growth rate of online learning continues to increase, online courses are yielding higher attrition rates compared to traditional learning courses (Carswell, Thomas, Petre, Price, & Richards, 2000; Clark & Jones, 2001; Nash, 2005; Park & Choi, 2009). The literature has previously linked online technology self-efficacy and…

  2. Successful Engagement of Undergraduate Information Technology Management Students in a Compulsory Course in Ethical Issues in IT in a Large Class Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Candace T.

    2010-01-01

    The inclusion of ethics in business school programs including those focusing on business and Information Technology is seen as an increasingly important issue in curriculum design. This paper describes the planning, development and delivery of such a course in a large IT focused business school. It discusses both course content and teaching…

  3. Direct or Directed: Orchestrating a More Harmonious Approach to Teaching Technology within an Art & Design Higher Education Curriculum with Special Reference to Visual Communications Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Lindsey; Meachem, Lester

    2007-01-01

    In this scoping study we have investigated the integration of subject-specific software into the structure of visual communications courses. There is a view that the response within visual communications courses to the rapid developments in technology has been linked to necessity rather than by design. Through perceptions of staff with day-to-day…

  4. Context matters: volunteer bias, small sample size, and the value of comparison groups in the assessment of research-based undergraduate introductory biology lab courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Sara E; Kloser, Matthew J; Fukami, Tadashi; Shavelson, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    The shift from cookbook to authentic research-based lab courses in undergraduate biology necessitates the need for evaluation and assessment of these novel courses. Although the biology education community has made progress in this area, it is important that we interpret the effectiveness of these courses with caution and remain mindful of inherent limitations to our study designs that may impact internal and external validity. The specific context of a research study can have a dramatic impact on the conclusions. We present a case study of our own three-year investigation of the impact of a research-based introductory lab course, highlighting how volunteer students, a lack of a comparison group, and small sample sizes can be limitations of a study design that can affect the interpretation of the effectiveness of a course.

  5. A paperless course on structural engineering programming: investing in educational technology in the times of the Greek financial recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sextos, Anastasios G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the structure of an undergraduate course entitled 'programming techniques and the use of specialised software in structural engineering' which is offered to the fifth (final) year students of the Civil Engineering Department of Aristotle University Thessaloniki in Greece. The aim of this course is to demonstrate the use of new information technologies in the field of structural engineering and to teach modern programming and finite element simulation techniques that the students can in turn apply in both research and everyday design of structures. The course also focuses on the physical interpretation of structural engineering problems, in a way that the students become familiar with the concept of computational tools without losing perspective from the engineering problem studied. For this purpose, a wide variety of structural engineering problems are studied in class, involving structural statics, dynamics, earthquake engineering, design of reinforced concrete and steel structures as well as data and information management. The main novelty of the course is that it is taught and examined solely in the computer laboratory ensuring that each student can accomplish the prescribed 'hands-on' training on a dedicated computer, strictly on a 1:1 student over hardware ratio. Significant effort has also been put so that modern educational techniques and tools are utilised to offer the course in an essentially paperless mode. This involves electronic educational material, video tutorials, student information in real time and exams given and assessed electronically through an ad hoc developed, personalised, electronic system. The positive feedback received from the students reveals that the concept of a paperless course is not only applicable in real academic conditions but is also a promising approach that significantly increases student productivity and engagement. The question, however, is whether such an investment in educational technology is indeed

  6. Evaluation of warm mix technologies for use in asphalt rubber - asphaltic concrete friction courses (AR\\0x2010ACFC) : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this research project was to determine whether warm mix asphalt (WMA) technologies can be : used by the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) for the production of an asphalt rubberasphaltic : concrete friction course (AR...

  7. Lecture Capture Technology and Student Performance in an Operations Management Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Thomas W.; Lewis, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Lecture capture technologies (LCT) such as Echo360, Mediasite, and Tegrity have become very popular in recent years. Many studies have shown that students favor the use of such technology, but relatively little research has studied the impact of LCT on learning. This article examines two research questions: (1) whether the use of LCT actually…

  8. The Design and Implementation of Authentic Learning with Mobile Technology in Vocational Nursing Practice Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Ying-Hung; Wu, Ting-Ting; Chiu, Po-Sheng; Huang, Yueh-Min

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, along with the development of mobile technology, vocational nursing education has improved greatly. In light of this emerging mobile technology, it brings the clinical practice of vocational nursing education closer to authentic learning than ever. In fact, some studies revealed that learners' learn states and learning outcomes…

  9. To Move Forward, We Must Be Mobile: Practical Uses of Mobile Technology in Literacy Education Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbye, Nicholas E.; Elsener, Anne A.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to shift the definition of what it means to be literate. As literacy educators in teacher preparation programs, we must consider how emerging and mobile technology may be used within coursework to not only create multiple ways to conceptualize teaching 21st century literacy, but also as a professional imperative. This article…

  10. A Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Based Instructional Design Model: A Third Version Implementation Study in a Technology Integration Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Jung; Kim, ChanMin

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the third version of a technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) based instructional design model that incorporates the distinctive, transformative, and integrative views of TPACK into a comprehensive actionable framework. Strategies of relating TPACK domains to real-life learning experiences, role-playing, and…

  11. Mobile Technology Use Across Age Groups in Patients Eligible for Cardiac Rehabilitation: Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robyn; Roach, Kellie; Sadler, Leonie; Glinatsis, Helen; Belshaw, Julie; Kirkness, Ann; Zhang, Ling; Gallagher, Patrick; Paull, Glenn; Gao, Yan; Partridge, Stephanie Ruth; Parker, Helen; Neubeck, Lis

    2017-10-24

    Emerging evidence indicates mobile technology-based strategies may improve access to secondary prevention and reduce risk factors in cardiac patients. However, little is known about cardiac patients' use of mobile technology, particularly for health reasons and whether the usage varies across patient demographics. This study aimed to describe cardiac patients' use of mobile technology and to determine variations between age groups after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence with using mobile technology. Cardiac patients eligible for attending cardiac rehabilitation were recruited from 9 hospital and community sites across metropolitan and rural settings in New South Wales, Australia. Participants completed a survey on the use of mobile technology devices, features used, confidence with using mobile technology, willingness and interest in learning, and health-related use. The sample (N=282) had a mean age of 66.5 (standard deviation [SD] 10.6) years, 71.9% (203/282) were male, and 79.0% (223/282) lived in a metropolitan area. The most common diagnoses were percutaneous coronary intervention (33.3%, 94/282) and myocardial infarction (22.7%, 64/282). The majority (91.1%, 257/282) used at least one type of technology device, 70.9% (200/282) used mobile technology (mobile phone/tablet), and 31.9% (90/282) used all types. Technology was used by 54.6% (154/282) for health purposes, most often to access information on health conditions (41.4%, 117/282) and medications (34.8%, 98/282). Age had an important independent association with the use of mobile technology after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence. The youngest group (mobile technology than the oldest (>69 years) age group (odds ratio [OR] 4.45, 95% CI 1.46-13.55), 5 times more likely to use mobile apps (OR 5.00, 95% CI 2.01-12.44), and 3 times more likely to use technology for health-related reasons (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.34-8.18). Compared with the older group, the middle age group (56

  12. Implications of smart wear technology for family caregiving relationships: focus group perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott S; Kandiah, Jayanthi; Saiki, Diana; Nam, Jinhee; Harden, Amy; Park, Soonjee

    2014-10-01

    Technological advances in monitoring vulnerable care-recipients are on the rise. Recent and future development of Smart Wear technology (devices integrated into clothing that monitor care-recipients) might assist family caregivers with tasks related to caring for young children, relatives with disabilities, and frail spouses or parents. However, the development and use of this technology in family caregiving contexts is in its infancy. Focus group interviews of family caregivers were conducted to explore perspectives regarding the potential integration of Smart Wear technology into their family caregiving. Responses were analyzed qualitatively for themes related to perceptions of how Smart Wear could impact relationships between caregivers and care-recipients. Three major themes emerged: quality and quantity of interaction, boundary issues, and implications for anxiety. Implications and recommendations are discussed regarding maximizing the potential benefits of Smart Wear technology in ways that promote and protect healthy relationships among caregivers and care-recipients.

  13. The association between tolerance for ambiguity and fear of negative evaluation: A study of engineering technology capstone courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubikovsky, Sergey I.

    For many students in engineering and engineering technology programs in the US, senior capstone design courses require students to form a team, define a problem, and find a feasible technical solution to address this problem. Students must integrate the knowledge and skills acquired during their studies at the college or university level. These truly integrative design activities do not have a single "correct" solution. Instead, there is an array of solutions, many of which could be used to achieve the final result. This ambiguity can cause students to experience anxiety during the projects. This study examined the main topics: • To what extent is a social anxiety (measured as fear of negative evaluation) related to tolerance for ambiguity in senior engineering capstone courses? • How does exposure to ambiguity prior to and during capstone courses affect tolerance for ambiguity? The study looked at the standard educational practices to see if they have unintended consequences, such a social anxiety in dealing with ambiguity. Those consequences are highly undesirable because they reduce students' learning. It was hypothesized that the lecture-based approaches that are more common in the first three years of study would not prepare students for self-directed capstone courses because the students would rarely have experienced problem-based learning before. The study used a quantitative approach and examined students' perceptions of their tolerance for ambiguity, and social anxiety before and after their senior capstone design experience. A survey instrument was adapted to measure exposure to ambiguity, which was studied as a potential moderator of the relationship between social anxiety and tolerance for ambiguity. The study indicated that social anxiety, as measured by fear of negative evaluation, does not play a major role in capstone courses. The second finding is that a single course, even if it was administered as a problem-based senior class, failed to

  14. Embedding Probeware Technology in the Context of Ocean Acidification in Elementary Science Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensign, Todd I.; Rye, James A.; Luna, Melissa J.

    2017-12-01

    Research indicates that preservice teacher (PT) education programs can positively impact perceptions of scientific probeware use in K-8 environments. Despite the potential of probeware to improve science instruction and student engagement, its use in elementary education has been limited. Sixty-seven PT enrolled across three sections of an elementary science methods course participated in a mixed-methods study through which they utilized probeware in a thematic experience on ocean acidification. One-way repeated measures ANOVA of pre and post survey data measuring subscales of utility, ability, and intent to use probeware demonstrated a statistically significant increase with medium to large effect sizes for all subscales across all sections (pscience more enjoyable and engaging. Mapping of the unitized data from the journals on the Next Generation Science Standards suggested that probeware use especially engages learners in planning and carrying out investigations and in analyzing and interpreting data. Journals also revealed that despite PT having prior experience with probeware in science courses, its use in their future elementary classroom is conditional on having a positive experience with probeware in a science methods course. Further, embedding a probeware experience in a unit on ocean acidification provides PT with strategies for addressing climate change and engaging in argument from evidence.

  15. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II (this volume) describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Specific INEL problem areas/contaminants are identified along with technology solutions, the status of the technologies, precise science and technology needs, and implementation requirements. Volume III provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are referenced by a TEDS codenumber in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II

  16. Cloud Pedagogy: Utilizing Web-Based Technologies for the Promotion of Social Constructivist Learning in Science Teacher Preparation Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Miri

    2017-10-01

    The new guidelines for science education emphasize the need to introduce computers and digital technologies as a means of enabling visualization and data collection and analysis. This requires science teachers to bring advanced technologies into the classroom and use them wisely. Hence, the goal of this study was twofold: to examine the application of web-based technologies in science teacher preparation courses and to examine pre-service teachers' perceptions of "cloud pedagogy"—an instructional framework that applies technologies for the promotion of social constructivist learning. The study included university teachers ( N = 48) and pre-service science teachers ( N = 73). Data were collected from an online survey, written reflections, and interviews. The findings indicated that university teachers use technologies mainly for information management and the distribution of learning materials and less for applying social constructivist pedagogy. University teachers expect their students (i.e., pre-service science teachers) to use digital tools in their future classroom to a greater extent than they themselves do. The findings also indicated that the "cloud pedagogy" was perceived as an appropriate instructional framework for contemporary science education. The application of the cloud pedagogy fosters four attributes: the ability to adapt to frequent changes and uncertain situations, the ability to collaborate and communicate in decentralized environments, the ability to generate data and manage it, and the ability to explore new venous.

  17. Engaging the public with low-carbon energy technologies: Results from a Scottish large group process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, Rhys; Shackley, Simon; Mabon, Leslie; Ashworth, Peta; Jeanneret, Talia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a large group process conducted in Edinburgh, Scotland investigating public perceptions of climate change and low-carbon energy technologies, specifically carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS). The quantitative and qualitative results reported show that the participants were broadly supportive of efforts to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and that there is an expressed preference for renewable energy technologies to be employed to achieve this. CCS was considered in detail during the research due to its climate mitigation potential; results show that the workshop participants were cautious about its deployment. The paper discusses a number of interrelated factors which appear to influence perceptions of CCS; factors such as the perceived costs and benefits of the technology, and people's personal values and trust in others all impacted upon participants’ attitudes towards the technology. The paper thus argues for the need to provide the public with broad-based, balanced and trustworthy information when discussing CCS, and to take seriously the full range of factors that influence public perceptions of low-carbon technologies. - Highlights: • We report the results of a Scottish large group workshop on energy technologies. • There is strong public support for renewable energy and mixed opinions towards CCS. • The workshop was successful in initiating discussion around climate change and energy technologies. • Issues of trust, uncertainty, costs, benefits, values and emotions all inform public perceptions. • Need to take seriously the full range of factors that inform perceptions

  18. Training course on optical telecommunication and multimedia technologies for specialists in endoscopic video surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliullin, Arthur F.; Gusev, Valery F.; Morozov, Oleg G.; Samigullin, Rustem R.; Akul'shin, Alexander, Iv.; Bagapov, Nail N.

    2011-04-01

    The program of courses is recommended for the experts working in endoscopy area, surgery, diagnostics, to developers of optical, optoelectronic and electronic equipment, and also for students and the post-graduate students of telecommunication high schools in addition trained on specializations of biomedical engineering. It urged to help the future researcher, engineer and doctor to understand mechanisms of images formation and display, to understand more deeply procedures of their processing and transfer on telecommunication channels of the various natures, to master modern reports of record and video and audio information reproduction. The separate section is devoted to questions of designing of surgical toolkit compatible with fiber-optical endoscopes.

  19. [Genotyping of ABO Blood Group in Partial Population of Yunnan Province by SNaPshot Technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S X; Zeng, F M; Jin, Y Z; Wan, H J; Zhai, D; Xing, Y M; Cheng, B W

    2017-06-01

    To detect the genotype of ABO blood group by SNaPshot technology. DNA were extracted from the peripheral blood samples with known blood groups (obtained by serology) of 107 unrelated individuals in Yunnan. Six SNP loci of the 261th, 297th, 681th, 703th, 802th, and 803th nucleotide positions were detected by SNaPshot Multiplex kit, and relevant genetics parameters were calculated. In 107 blood samples, the allele frequencies of types A, B, O A , and O G were 0.355 1, 0.168 2, 0.230 0 and 0.247 6, respectively, while that of types A G and cis AB were not detected. The genotyping results of ABO blood group were consistent with that of serologic testing. SNaPshot technology can be adapted for genotyping of ABO blood group. Copyright© by the Editorial Department of Journal of Forensic Medicine

  20. Development and evaluation of an advanced training technology course within a union-based industrial emergency response training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Jennifer A; Vazquez, Luis; Daltuva, Judith A; Robins, Thomas G; Williams, Melina

    2003-04-01

    The Health and Safety Department of the United Automobile Workers recently introduced the use of Advanced Training Technologies (ATTs) into a previously successful Industrial Emergency Response (IER) program. The new curriculum attempted to incorporate web-based technology, while preserving the historical emphasis on the use of peer trainers and the Small Group Activity Method (SGAM) to promote team problem solving and worker empowerment. The University of Michigan evaluated the program by administering a survey combining open- and closed-ended questions to trainees. Of the 46 respondents, most rated the program very highly, found that the use of internet technology allowed faster access to current information, reported peer trainers as one of program aspects they liked best, and did not find working in groups of three per computer difficult. It is possible to enhance a workplace health and safety training program through the introduction of ATT without compromising participant-centered, group learning program philosophies. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Profile of scientific and technological production in nursing education research groups in the south of Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino, Mônica Motta; Backes, Vânia Marli Schubert; Canever, Bruna Pedroso; Ferraz, Fabiane; Prado, Marta Lenise

    2010-01-01

    This research aimed to present the profile of production of Nursing Education Research Groups (NERG) scientific and technological production in the South of Brazil. This documentary, quantitative, exploratory-descriptive retrospective research was guided by the active search for products in the Lattes curriculum of previously selected NERG researchers, based on the 2006 Census of the Research Group Directory/CNPq, between 1995 and 2008. The results indicated that the 18 NERG from southern Brazil produced 453 papers in proceedings, 371 book chapters, 206 books, 1,437 scientific articles and 08 technological products, but no patent was registered. NERGs scientific production in the research region has grown progressively over the past 14 years. To strengthen this structure, the establishment of collaborative networks can be used as a strategy, so that political-scientific joint actions in the sector can advance science and technology.

  2. Computer-Supported Co-operative Learning Systems: Interactive Group Technologies and Open Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Dick

    1988-01-01

    Discussion of interactive technologies and open learning focuses on computer supported cooperative work (CSCW), especially computer based message systems, and their effects on open learning. Topics discussed include cooperative learning; distance learning; individualized instruction; local area networks; group communication; and design principles…

  3. Quantifying the Effect of Discussion Group Membership on Technology Adoption and Farm Profit on Dairy Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Thia; Heanue, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Participatory extension, specifically farm discussion groups, has become a very popular form of agricultural extension in Ireland. The purpose of this article is to assess its effectiveness in promoting the adoption of new technologies and improving farm profit. Design/Methodology/Approach: Following a review of the background and theory…

  4. Best practice in undertaking and reporting health technology assessments : Working Group 4 report

    OpenAIRE

    Busse, R.; Orvain, J.; Velasco, M.; Perleth, M.; Drummond, M.; Gurtner, F.; Jorgensen, T.; Jovell, A.; Malone, J.; Ruther, A; Wild, C.

    2002-01-01

    [Executive Summary] The aim of Working Group 4 has been to develop and disseminate best practice in undertaking and reporting assessments, and to identify needs for methodologic development. Health technology assessment (HTA) is a multidisciplinary activity that systematically examines the technical performance, safety, clinical efficacy, and effectiveness, cost, costeffectiveness, organizational implications, social consequences, legal, and ethical considerations of the application of a heal...

  5. 77 FR 28411 - Adrenalina, Affinity Technology Group, Inc., Braintech, Inc., Builders Transport, Incorporated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] Adrenalina, Affinity Technology Group, Inc., Braintech, Inc., Builders Transport, Incorporated, and Catuity, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading May 10... information concerning the securities of Adrenalina because it has not filed any periodic reports since the...

  6. Terra-Kleen Response Group, Inc. Solvent Extraction Technology Rapid Commercialization Initiative Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra-Kleen Response Group Inc. (Terra-Kleen), has commercialized a solvent extraction technology that uses a proprietary extraction solvent to transfer organic constituents from soil to a liquid phase in a batch process at ambient temperatures. The proprietary solvent has a rel...

  7. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: TERRA KLEEN SOLVENT EXTRACTION TECHNOLOGY - TERRA-KLEEN RESPONSE GROUP, INC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Terra-Kleen Solvent Extraction Technology was developed by Terra-Kleen Response Group, Inc., to remove polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and other organic constituents from contaminated soil. This batch process system uses a proprietary solvent at ambient temperatures to treat ...

  8. Designing, Developing, and Implementing a Course on LEGO Robotics for Technology Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Joan M.; Carbonaro, Mike

    2003-01-01

    Within a constructivist philosophy of learning, teachers, as students, are introduced to different perspectives of teaching with robotic technology while immersed in what Papert called a "constructionist" environment. Robotics allows students to creatively explore computer programming, mechanical design and construction, problem solving,…

  9. Crossword Puzzle Makes It Fun: Introduce Green Manufacturing in Wood Technology Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iley, John L.; Hague, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable, or "green," manufacturing and its practices are becoming more and more a part of today's industry, including wood product manufacturing. This article provides introductory information on green manufacturing in wood technology and a crossword puzzle based on green manufacturing terms. The authors use the puzzle at the college level to…

  10. Evaluating a Technology Supported Interactive Response System during the Laboratory Section of a Histology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Vera D.; Lorr, Nancy A.; Williams, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    Monitoring of student learning through systematic formative assessment is important for adjusting pedagogical strategies. However, traditional formative assessments, such as quizzes and written assignments, may not be sufficiently timely for making adjustments to a learning process. Technology supported formative assessment tools assess student…

  11. An Application of Flipped Classroom Method in the Instructional Technologies and Material Development Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özpinar, Ilknur; Yenmez, Arzu Aydogan; Gökçe, Semirhan

    2016-01-01

    A natural outcome of change in technology, new approaches towards teaching and learning have emerged and the applicability of the flipped classroom method, a new educational strategy, in the field of education has started to be discussed. It was aimed with the study to examine the effect of using flipped classroom method in academic achievements…

  12. The Effect of Cooperative Learning on Students' Achievement and Views on the Science and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Sertel

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficiency of learning plan implementation prepared with the cooperative learning method. In particular, the study addresses the effect of cooperative learning on students' achievement and their views regarding the "Systems in Our Body" unit of the 6th grade Science and Technology lesson.…

  13. Improving Content and Technology Skills in ADD/ADHD via a Web Enhanced Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, LuAnn; Smith, Sean; Dillon, Ann S.; Algozzine, Bob; Beattie, John; Spooner, Fred; Fisher, Ashlee L.

    2004-01-01

    Attention Deficit Disorder and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADD/ADHD) create concerns in public education and in teacher education programs. Because of continuous advances in technology, distance learning is a viable option for delivering coursework to preservice and inservice teacher education students challenged by geography, time…

  14. A Short Course on Patent Reference for Science and Technology Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackle, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Now that the full text of patents as well as patent searching tools are available for free on the Internet, every librarian who is responsible for assisting people with science and technology information should have a basic knowledge of this aspect of intellectual property. Whether a school librarian helping children discover the world of…

  15. Implementing a High School Level Geospatial Technologies and Spatial Thinking Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Curtis P.; Oberle, Alex; Sugumaran, Ramanathan

    2011-01-01

    Understanding geospatial technologies (GSTs) and spatial thinking is increasingly vital to contemporary life including common activities and hobbies; learning in science, mathematics, and social science; and employment within fields as diverse as engineering, health, business, and planning. As such, there is a need for a stand-alone K-12…

  16. Annual report to the Working Group on Technology, Growth, and Employment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    A meeting of the Working Group on High Energy Physics was convened in Brussels, Belgium, in July 1984, and impaneled new groups of technical experts to report on long-term planning, technical collaborations, and the identification of administrative obstacles experienced within the Summit countries that impede international collaboration. The charges to these three new groups are contained in this report under the section on the Brussels meeting. The reports prepared by the technical experts were then reviewed at the January 1985 meeting at Cadarache, France, and the results are contained in this report under the section on the Cadarache meeting. The Summit Working Group on High Energy Physics believes progress is being made toward cooperation among the Summit countries in the exploration of scientific and technological development upon which the Summit Heads of State and Government declared at Versailles revitalization and growth of the world economy will depend - to a large extent. At Cadarache, the Group found that, since its establishment, international collaboration has increased in the use of present accelerators and in the planning for future accelerators. The Group also found that there are specific areas of technology in which near-term research cooperation is possible. Finally, the Group identified administrative regulations that hamper effective international collaboration in science and technology and that could be revised or eliminated through coordinated, high level Summit action. The major accomplishment of the Working Group thus far has been the creation of a forum for discussions on collaboration in a major field of science by seven industrialized countries. The Group recommends the continuation of its review of long-term plans for major facilities on an intergovernmental basis

  17. Split-course radiation therapy of carcinoma of the nasopharynx: results of a national collaborative clinical trial of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcial, V.A.; Hanley, J.A.; Chang, C.; Davis, L.W.; Moscol, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The initial results of a prospective randomized collaborative therapeutic trial of split-course radiotherapy in carcinoma of the nasopharynx are reported. The split-course therapy consisted of two irradiation courses, each delivering 3000 rad in 2 weeks, in 10 fractions of 300 rad. The courses were separated by a rest period of 3 weeks. Continuous radiation therapy consisted of 30 fractions of 220 rad each, for a total dose of 6600 rad. One hundred and nine patients were eligible for analysis with a minimal follow-up period of 1 year. No statistically significant differences were observed in the two therapeutic groups with regard to acute toxicity (normal tissue reactions, completion of therapy, and need of hospitalization during radiotherapy), late toxicity, incidence of distant metastases, patients who became free of clinically detectable tumor in the primary and neck sites at last follow-up or at death, and survival after therapy

  18. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet

  19. Leveraging Global Geo-Data and Information Technologies to Bring Authentic Research Experiences to Students in Introductory Geosciences Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.

    2014-12-01

    The 2012 PCAST report identified the improvement of "gateway" science courses as critical to increasing the number of STEM graduates to levels commensurate with national needs. The urgent need to recruit/ retain more STEM graduates is particularly acute in the geosciences, where growth in employment opportunities, an aging workforce and flat graduation rates are leading to substantial unmet demand for geoscience-trained STEM graduates. The need to increase the number of Bachelors-level geoscience graduates was an identified priority at the Summit on the Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education (http://www.jsg.utexas.edu/events/future-of-geoscience-undergraduateeducation/), as was the necessity of focusing on 2-year colleges, where a growing number of students are being introduced to geosciences. Undergraduate research as an instructional tool can help engage and retain students, but has largely not been part of introductory geoscience courses because of the challenge of scaling such activities for large student numbers. However, burgeoning information technology resources, including publicly available earth and planetary data repositories and freely available, intuitive data visualization platforms makes structured, in-classroom investigations of geoscience questions tractable, and open-ended student inquiry possible. Examples include "MARGINS Mini-Lessons", instructional resources developed with the support of two NSF-DUE grant awards that involve investigations of marine geosciences data resources (overseen by the Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) portal: www.iedadata.org) and data visualization using GeoMapApp (www.geomapapp.org); and the growing suite of Google-Earth based data visualization and exploration activities overseen by the Google Earth in Onsite and Distance Education project (geode.net). Sample-based investigations are also viable in introductory courses, thanks to remote instrument operations technologies that allow real student

  20. Computerized Laboratory in Science and Technology Teaching: Course in Machine Elements

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan KOLAROV

    2005-01-01

    The computer registration of physical and mechanical quantities gives a lot of possibilities for machine elements and mechanisms research. The advantages of well-organized computer laboratory both technical and methodological are namely: registration and on-line observation of a number of processes with random speed; replacement of high-cost specialized laboratory equipment; mathematical data processing; solving educational problems by modern technologies. The purpose of this paper is to ...

  1. Advisory group meeting on new trends and developments in radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    High energy, ionizing radiation (gamma and electron beams) has been used by industry for many years and for different applications. Well established applications include: industrial sterilization of health care products (medical products and medicinals), radiation modification of plastics (crosslinking of wire and cable insulation, heat shrinkable materials, etc.) and radiation curing of adhesives and coatings on different substrates. The main purpose of the Advisory Group Meeting was to provide a forum for an exchange of information about the new developments in radiation technology, to review the status of these developments and to discuss potential for commercial applications. A further objective was to discuss the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in promoting new technologies, research and transfer of technology to developing countries. The meeting was expected to prepare recommendations to the Agency for future activities and programmes in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges (standing, center) poses with members of the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG), which is holding the 1999 Technology Fair Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  3. Changing teaching techniques and adapting new technologies to improve student learning in an introductory meteorology and climate course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Cutrim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Responding to the call for reform in science education, changes were made in an introductory meteorology and climate course offered at a large public university. These changes were a part of a larger project aimed at deepening and extending a program of science content courses that model effective teaching strategies for prospective middle school science teachers. Therefore, revisions were made to address misconceptions about meteorological phenomena, foster deeper understanding of key concepts, encourage engagement with the text, and promote inquiry-based learning. Techniques introduced include: use of a flash cards, student reflection questionnaires, writing assignments, and interactive discussions on weather and forecast data using computer technology such as Integrated Data Viewer (IDV. The revision process is described in a case study format. Preliminary results (self-reflection by the instructor, surveys of student opinion, and measurements of student achievement, suggest student learning has been positively influenced. This study is supported by three grants: NSF grant No. 0202923, the Unidata Equipment Award, and the Lucia Harrison Endowment Fund.

  4. Introduction to vacuum technology: supplementary study material developed for IVS sponsored vacuum courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhusan, K.G.

    2008-01-01

    Vacuum technology has advanced to a large extent mainly from the demands of experimental research scientists who have more than ever understood the need for clean very low pressure environments. This need only seems to increase as the lowest pressures achievable in a laboratory setup are dropping down by the decade. What is not usually said is that conventional techniques of producing ultrahigh vacuum have also undergone a metamorphosis in order to cater to the multitude of restrictions in modern day scientific research. This book aims to give that practical approach to vacuum technology. The basics are given in the first chapter with more of a definition oriented approach - which is practically useful. The second chapter deals with the production of vacuum and ultrahigh vacuum with an emphasis on the working principles of several pumps and their working pressure ranges. Measurement of low pressures, both total and partial is presented in the third chapter with a note on leak detection and mass spectrometric techniques. Chapter 4 gives an overview of the materials that are vacuum compatible and their material properties. Chapter 5 gives the necessary methods to be followed for cleaning of vacuum components especially critical if ultrahigh vacuum environment is required. The practical use of a ultrahigh vacuum environment is demonstrated in Chapter 6 for production of high quality thin films through vapour deposition

  5. Case-Based Learning in Virtual Groups--Collaborative Problem Solving Activities and Learning Outcomes in a Virtual Professional Training Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Birgitta; Hasenbein, Melanie; Mandl, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the collaborative problem solving activities and learning outcomes of five groups that worked on two different complex cases in a virtual professional training course. In this asynchronous virtual learning environment, all knowledge management content was delivered virtually and collaboration took place through forums. To…

  6. An Undergraduate Two-Course Sequence in Biomedical Engineering Design: A Simulation of an Industrial Environment with Group and Individual Project Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jendrucko, Richard J.

    The first half of a Biomedical Engineering course at Texas A&M University is devoted to group projects that require design planning and a search of the literature. The second half requires each student to individually prepare a research proposal and conduct a research project. (MLH)

  7. A case study of the change process of integrating technology into an elementary science methods course from 1997 to 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Pi-Sui

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to provide a detailed description of the change process of technology integration into a science methods course, SCIED 458, as well as to interpret and analyze essential issues involved in the change process and examine how these factors influenced the change process. This study undertook qualitative research that employed case study research design. In-depth interviewing and review of the documents were two major data collection methods in this study. Participants included the three key faculty members in the science education program, a former graduate student who participated in writing the Link-to-Learn grant proposal, a former graduate student who taught SCIED 458, and two current graduate students who were teaching SCIED 458. A number of data analysis strategies were used in this study; these strategies included (1) coding for different periods of time and project categories and roles of people, (2) identifying themes, trends and coding for patterns, (3) reducing the data for analysis of trends and synthesizing and summarizing the data, and (4) integrating the data into one analytical framework. The findings indicated that this change process had evolved through the stages of adoption and diffusion, implementation, and institutionalization and a number of strategies facilitated the changes in individual stages, including the formation of a leadership team in the early stages, gradual adoption of technology tools, use of powerful pedagogy and methodology, the formation of a research community, and separation of technology training and subject teaching. The findings also indicated the essential factors and systems that interacted with each other and sustained the change process; these included a transformational shared leadership team, the formation of a learning and research community, reduced resistance of the elementary prospective teachers to technology, availability of university resources, involvement of the

  8. Part 2 of the summary for the electronics, DAQ, and computing working group: Technological developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaughter, A.J.

    1993-01-01

    The attraction of hadron machines as B factories is the copious production of B particles. However, the interesting physics lies in specific rare final states. The challenge is selecting and recording the interesting ones. Part 1 of the summary for this working group, open-quote Comparison of Trigger and Data Acquisition Parameters for Future B Physics Experiments close-quote summarizes and compares the different proposals. In parallel with this activity, the working group also looked at a number of the technological developments being proposed to meet the trigger and DAQ requirements. The presentations covered a wide variety of topics, which are grouped into three categories: (1) front-end electronics, (2) level 0 fast triggers, and (3) trigger and vertex processors. The group did not discuss on-line farms or offine data storage and computing due to lack of time

  9. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory waste area groups 1--7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Technology Logic Diagram was developed to provide technical alternatives for environmental restoration projects at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The diagram (three volumes) documents suggested solutions to the characterization, retrieval, and treatment phases of cleanup activities at contaminated sites within 8 of the laboratory's 10 waste area groups. Contaminated sites at the laboratory's Naval Reactor Facility and Argonne National Laboratory-West are not included in this diagram

  10. Working Group 2: Future Directions for Safeguards and Verification, Technology, Research and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zykov, S.; Blair, D.

    2013-01-01

    For traditional safeguards it was recognized that the hardware presently available is, in general, addressing adequately fundamental IAEA needs, and that further developments should therefore focus mainly on improving efficiencies (i.e. increasing cost economies, reliability, maintainability and user-friendliness, keeping abreast of continual advancements in technologies and of the evolution of verification approaches). Specific technology areas that could benefit from further development include: -) Non-destructive measurement systems (NDA), in particular, gamma-spectroscopy and neutron counting techniques; -) Containment and surveillance tools, such as tamper indicating seals, video-surveillance, surface identification methods, etc.; -) Geophysical methods for design information verification (DIV) and safeguarding of geological repositories; and -) New tools and methods for real-time monitoring. Furthermore, the Working Group acknowledged that a 'building block' (or modular) approach should be adopted towards technology development, enabling equipment to be upgraded efficiently as technologies advance. Concerning non-traditional safeguards, in the area of satellite-based sensors, increased spatial resolution and broadened spectral range were identified as priorities. In the area of wide area surveillance, the development of LIDAR-like tools for atmospheric sensing was discussed from the perspective of both potential benefits and certain limitations. Recognizing the limitations imposed by the human brain in terms of information assessment and analysis, technologies are needed that will enable the more effective utilization of all information, regardless of its format and origin. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (A.C.)

  11. Assessing the impact of automated coding & grouping technology at St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, M H

    1993-12-01

    In 1992 the Hospital recognised that the existing casemix data reporting systems were too removed from individual patients to have any meaning for clinicians, analysis of the data was difficult and the processes involved in the DRG assignment were subject to considerable error. Consequently, the Hospital approved the purchase of technology that would facilitate the coding and grouping process. The impact of automated coding and grouping technology is assessed by three methods. Firstly, by looking at by-product information systems, secondly, through subjective responses by coders to a satisfaction questionnaire and, thirdly, by objectively measuring hospital activity and identified coding elements before and after implementation of the 3M technology. It was concluded that while the 3M Coding and Grouping software should not be viewed as a panacea to all coding and documentation ills, objective evidence and subjective comment from the coders indicated an improvement in data quality and more accurate DRG assignment. Development of an in-house casemix information system and a feedback mechanism between coder and clinician had been effected. The product had been used as a training tool for coders and had also proven to be a useful auditing tool. Finally, linkage with other systems and the generation of timely reports had been realised.

  12. The Effective of Using 5 Simple Steps (QSCCS) Learning Activities on Facebook to Promote Self-Learning in the 21st Century in Technology Printing and Advertising Course for Undergraduate Students in Education Technology and Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittiwong, Tipparat; Wongnam, Thanet

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to: 1) study the result of implementing QSCCS with Facebook; 2) study students' opinions concerning the implementation of QSCCS with Facebook. The samples were 38 Technology and Communications undergraduates who attended Printing and Advertising Technology course in academic year of 2013. The information was…

  13. Course workshop for teachers Nuclear energy in education: A didactic focus, an interactive approach with contributions from the new communications and information technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Matzen, Claudio; Herrera Carmona, Erik

    2000-01-01

    A teacher education activity is describes, a course-workshop with a mixed interactive approach, N uclear Energy in Education: A Didactic Focus , which was undertaken from July to October 2000 from Region III to X in Chile, in university rooms with video-conferencing and with Internet communications support. It is a course-workshop that uses the new information and communications (NTIC) technologies to present and discuss the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, as crossover curricular content that exemplifies the relationships between science, technology and society, while presenting methodological proposals for transferring the contents and activities to the Educational System's primary and secondary levels

  14. Evaluation of Public E-Services and Information Technology Accessibility in Different Social Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramutė Naujikienė

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop an approach based on the social quality evaluation square model for evaluation of information technology usage in different social groups. Componential view to the accessibility of e-services including IT means providing the possibility to research the influences of different life conditions to usage of the public e-services. The task of this empirical study is directed towards revealing the differences of e-inclusion and e-services accessibility for social groups of citizens of Lithuania, and to compare this accessibility data with other EU countries. Design/methodology/approach—the approach is based on the square model of social quality evaluation of information technology usage in different social groups. The social division square model includes an assessment of quality according to the evaluation of socioeconomic security, social inclusion, social cohesion, and empowerment. Empowerment can be defined as consisting of individual or collective decisions to act on one’s own life. Findings—the results are demonstrated by the accessibility of public e-services data, which are evaluated by the quality of social group development according to IT applications. The hypothesis was confirmed that the e-government activities can be realized by properly selecting and installing technologies, and using technology facilities. E-services influence the capabilities of state officials to apply modern technology and increase the availability of e-services for social groups. Results consist of individual or collective decisions to act on one’s own life, to implementation of effective information technologies in the e-government activities and using of e-services. An important indicator is the implementation of e-services in the activity of citizens. It is submitted as the index of e-participation in dealing with the activities of citizens and the possibilities of authorities directly related with providing

  15. Remote technology in spent fuel management. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Spent fuel management has always been one of the important stages in the nuclear fuel cycle and it is still one of the most vital problems common to all countries with nuclear reactors. It begins with the discharge of spent fuel from a power or research reactor and ends with its ultimate disposition either by direct disposal or by reprocessing of the spent fuel. Continuous attention is being given by the IAEA to the collection, analysis and exchange of information on spent fuel management. Its role in this area is to provide a forum for exchanging information and development activities that are of common interest. Within its spent fuel management programme, the IAEA has monitored the progress, the benefits and the implementation of remote technologies such as remote tools, robotics, etc. An Advisory Group Meeting on Remote Technology in Spent Fuel Management was held in September 1997 in order to bring together specialists working in this field and to collect information on new technical and economic developments. The objective of the Advisory Group meeting was to review remote technologies in use for the complete range of spent fuel handling and spent fuel management covering wet and dry environments, to describe ongoing developments and to prepare a technical report. This document contains contributions presented at the Meeting. Each paper was indexed and provided with an abstract

  16. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegford, Janice M.; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K.; Daigle, Courtney L.; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G.; Hernandez, Carlos E.; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Tracking of individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. We describe several tracking systems that are currently in use for laying hens and review each, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suited, and relevant issues to fit the best technology for the intended purpose. Abstract Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns

  17. Using student motivation to design groups in a non-majors biology course for team-based collaborative learning: Impacts on knowledge, views, attitudes, and perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Kristi L.

    The importance of student motivation and its connection to other learning variables (i.e., attitudes, knowledge, persistence, attendance) is well established. Collaborative work at the undergraduate level has been recognized as a valuable tool in large courses. However, motivation and collaborative group work have rarely been combined. This project utilized student motivation to learn biology to place non-major biology undergraduates in collaborative learning groups at East Carolina University, a mid-sized southeastern American university, to determine the effects of this construct on student learning. A pre-test measuring motivation to learn biology, attitudes toward biology, perceptions of biology and biologists, views of science, and content knowledge was administered. A similar post-test followed as part of the final exam. Two sections of the same introductory biology course (n = 312) were used and students were divided into homogeneous and heterogeneous groups (based on their motivation score). The heterogeneous groups (n = 32) consisted of a mixture of different motivation levels, while the homogeneous groups (n = 32) were organized into teams with similar motivation scores using tiers of high-, middle-, and low-level participants. Data analysis determined mixed perceptions of biology and biologists. These include the perceptions biology was less intriguing, less relevant, less practical, less ethical, and less understandable. Biologists were perceived as being neat and slightly intelligent, but not very altruistic, humane, ethical, logical, honest, or moral. Content knowledge scores more than doubled from pre- to post-test. Half of the items measuring views of science were not statistically significantly different from pre- to post-test. Many of the factors for attitudes toward biology became more agreeable from pre- to post-test. Correlations between motivation scores, participation levels, attendance rates, and final course grades were examined at both the

  18. Combining a leadership course and multi-source feedback has no effect on leadership skills of leaders in postgraduate medical education. An intervention study with a control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malling, Bente; Mortensen, Lene; Bonderup, Thomas; Scherpbier, Albert; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2009-12-10

    Leadership courses and multi-source feedback are widely used developmental tools for leaders in health care. On this background we aimed to study the additional effect of a leadership course following a multi-source feedback procedure compared to multi-source feedback alone especially regarding development of leadership skills over time. Study participants were consultants responsible for postgraduate medical education at clinical departments. pre-post measures with an intervention and control group. The intervention was participation in a seven-day leadership course. Scores of multi-source feedback from the consultants responsible for education and respondents (heads of department, consultants and doctors in specialist training) were collected before and one year after the intervention and analysed using Mann-Whitney's U-test and Multivariate analysis of variances. There were no differences in multi-source feedback scores at one year follow up compared to baseline measurements, either in the intervention or in the control group (p = 0.149). The study indicates that a leadership course following a MSF procedure compared to MSF alone does not improve leadership skills of consultants responsible for education in clinical departments. Developing leadership skills takes time and the time frame of one year might have been too short to show improvement in leadership skills of consultants responsible for education. Further studies are needed to investigate if other combination of initiatives to develop leadership might have more impact in the clinical setting.

  19. Perceptions of male versus female students enrolled in science, technology, engineering and mathematics courses regarding peer tutoring, a component for student retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingsbury, Cheryl D.

    Academic departments in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, strive to develop in students the ability to problem solve, analyze, and to critically think about solutions to problems. Academic departments are committed to success, yet retention rates are lower than would be expected for females in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields of study, where female students are underrepresented. The purpose of the study was to explore the perceptions of male and female traditional and nontraditional students who participated in a science, technology, engineering or mathematics STEM course during the spring 2010 semester regarding peer tutoring, and to understand why females are underrepresented and not retained at the same level as males in science, technology, engineering and mathematics STEM courses at the University of North Dakota. The participants in this quantitative study were students enrolled at the University of North Dakota who voluntarily completed a peer tutoring usage survey. A total of 231 students enrolled in Concepts of Biology (Biol 111), Introduction to Chemistry (Chem 115), Advanced Applications of CADD (Tech 202), Material Properties and Selection (ME 313), and College Algebra (Math 103), completed a survey about their spring 2010 semester. Five research questions searched for the differences between male and female perceptions regarding peer tutoring, a component of student retention. The independent variable was gender, the dependent variables were the factors regarding peer tutoring: academic preparedness, academic support and cost, and demographics. Two significant differences were found: (a) females viewed themselves as less prepared for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics courses than did male students, and (b) females were more in favor of the costs of peer tutoring than were male students. These findings support Merton's Self-fulfilling Prophecy Theory. Female students perceived

  20. To Hybrid or Not to Hybrid, that Is the Question! Incorporating VoiceThread Technology into a Traditional Communication Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecot-Hebert, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    A hybrid course, which combines the face-to-face interactions of a traditional course with the flexibility of an online course, provides an alternative option for educating students in a new media environment. While educators often interact with their students through various electronic learning management systems that are set up within the…

  1. A Teacher Action Research Study: Enhancing Student Critical Thinking Knowledge, Skills, Dispositions, Application and Transfer in a Higher Education Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Jack Gordon

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a critical thinking instructional intervention in a higher education technology course with the purpose of determining the extent to which the intervention enhanced student critical thinking knowledge, skills, dispositions, application and transfer abilities. Historically, critical thinking has been considered…

  2. Determination of Motivation of 5th Grade Students Living in Rural and Urban Environments towards Science Learning and Their Attitudes towards Science-Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenar, Ismail; Köse, Mücahit; Demir, Halil Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    In this research, determination of motivation of 5th grade students living in rural and urban environments towards science learning and their attitudes towards science-technology course is aimed. This research is conducted based on descriptive survey model. Samples are selected through teleological model in accordance with the aim of this…

  3. Effect of Computer Animation Technique on Students' Comprehension of the "Solar System and Beyond" Unit in the Science and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of computer animation technique on academic achievement of students in the "Solar System and Beyond" unit lecture as part of the Science and Technology course of the seventh grade in primary education. The sample of the study consists of 60 students attending to the 7th grade of primary school…

  4. The Effect of Online Learning Environment Based on Caricature Animation Used in Science and Technology Course on the Success and Attitude of the Student for Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basarmak, Ugur; Mahiroglu, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    The purpose in this study is to examine the effect of "Online Learning Environment based of Caricature Animation" which is prepared for "Human and Environment" and "Sun and Space" units in the secondary school 7th Grade Science and Technology course, on the success and attitude of the students for humor. The…

  5. [Isolation and identification methods of enterobacteria group and its technological advancement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Itaru

    2007-08-01

    In the last half-century, isolation and identification methods of enterobacteria groups have markedly improved by technological advancement. Clinical microbiology tests have changed overtime from tube methods to commercial identification kits and automated identification. Tube methods are the original method for the identification of enterobacteria groups, that is, a basically essential method to recognize bacterial fermentation and biochemical principles. In this paper, traditional tube tests are discussed, such as the utilization of carbohydrates, indole, methyl red, and citrate and urease tests. Commercial identification kits and automated instruments by computer based analysis as current methods are also discussed, and those methods provide rapidity and accuracy. Nonculture techniques of nucleic acid typing methods using PCR analysis, and immunochemical methods using monoclonal antibodies can be further developed.

  6. Technologies That Assist in Online Group Work: A Comparison of Synchronous and Asynchronous Computer Mediated Communication Technologies on Students' Learning and Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockinson-Szapkiw, Amanda; Wendt, Jillian

    2015-01-01

    While the benefits of online group work completed using asynchronous CMC technology is documented, researchers have identified a number of challenges that result in ineffective and unsuccessful online group work. Fewer channels of communication and lack of immediacy when compared to face-to-face group work are a few of the noted limitations. Thus,…

  7. AANA journal course: new technologies in anesthesia: update for nurse anesthetists--monitoring ventilation and compliance with Side Stream Spirometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, L M

    1991-06-01

    A new anesthesia technology, Side Stream Spirometry, now allows clinicians to monitor pressure, volume, flow, compliance, and resistance during routine anesthesia practice. Continuous monitoring with Side Stream Spirometry is a major adjunct to patient safety because numerical and visual references show how change in one respiratory parameter affects the mechanics of the entire breath cycle. To optimize ventilation and ensure adequate oxygenation, it is common practice for clinicians to verify that the proper volume per breath is being delivered to the patient at the lowest possible pressure. For artificial ventilation to be most physiologic, each breath must be delivered with the most appropriate flow, at the required volume, under the pressure appropriate for each patient's pulmonary system, and at the correct respiratory breath rate. Side Stream Spirometry makes it possible to continuously measure lung mechanics and the gas dynamics of flow, volume and pressure. Using a simple sensor, the D-lite, Side Stream Spirometry is compatible with all common models of anesthesia machines, ventilators and breathing circuits. Side Stream Spirometry measures all parameters closest to the patient, at the tracheal tube or mask. This sensor location provides actual patient information which is not altered by the volume of gas compressed in the breathing circuit, the absorber system, or in the bellows of the ventilator. This installment of the AANA Journal Course will discuss the technology of Side Stream Spirometry and its application to monitoring pulmonary ventilation. Clinical evidence of ventilatory changes will be graphically demonstrated using the CAPNOMAC ULTIMA, a respiratory gas monitoring system, equipped with Side Stream Spirometry.

  8. A blended learning concept for an engineering course in the field of color representation and display technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauderwange, Oliver; Wozniak, Peter; Javahiraly, Nicolas; Curticapean, Dan

    2016-09-01

    The Paper presents the design and development of a blended learning concept for an engineering course in the field of color representation and display technologies. A suitable learning environment is crucial for the success of the teaching scenario. A mixture of theoretical lectures and hands-on activities with practical applications and experiments, combined with the advantages of modern digital media is the main topic of the paper. Blended learning describes the didactical change of attendance periods and online periods. The e-learning environment for the online period is designed toward an easy access and interaction. Present digital media extends the established teaching scenarios and enables the presentation of videos, animations and augmented reality (AR). Visualizations are effective tools to impart learning contents with lasting effect. The preparation and evaluation of the theoretical lectures and the hands-on activities are stimulated and affects positively the attendance periods. The tasks and experiments require the students to work independently and to develop individual solution strategies. This engages and motivates the students, deepens the knowledge. The authors will present their experience with the implemented blended learning scenario in this field of optics and photonics. All aspects of the learning environment will be introduced.

  9. Technology Solutions to Support Care Continuity in Home Care: A Focus Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowding, Dawn W; Russell, David; Onorato, Nicole; Merrill, Jacqueline A

    2017-09-01

    Elevated hospital readmission rates from home care are an indicator of poor care quality, and rates are particularly high for patients with heart failure. Readmissions may be avoided by optimizing continuity of care. To explore perceptions among home care clinicians of the barriers they face and the information they need to improve care continuity for patients with heart failure. Focus groups were conducted with teams of home care clinicians at a large certified home healthcare agency in the Northeastern United states. In total, there were 61 participants across 6 focus groups. Three overarching themes emerged: continuity of care and communication on care transitions, maintaining continuity of care during a home care episode (with subthemes tracking signs and symptoms and patient teaching), and health information technology (HIT) characteristics to support communication and care continuity. Our study highlights areas of improvement for HIT solutions that could support care delivery for patients with heart failure in a home care setting. Home care agencies planning to introduce technology can use these findings to assess if and how potential systems can support nurses to provide continuity of care across healthcare organizations and home care visits.

  10. Improving student’s technical drawing in building technology course with shared and digital enrichment material in order to support green technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizaka, W.; Nurdiani, N.

    2017-12-01

    Technical drawing is a step that is absolutely necessary to be mastered by the architects in presenting their product in design development phase. The easy readiness and completeness of information in a drawing determine the quality and timeliness of a project. An incomplete engineering drawing is difficult to read by foreman or craftsman, and the risk of misunderstanding of the drawing will cost expensive and have potential risk to create many bad implications in the project. Unfortunately, the knowledge and skill of drawing technique are often not completely mastered by most students. On the other hand, according to the regional development situation in architectural and construction issue, the drawing standards must be fully utilized in international standards in order to facilitate cooperative work involving workers and engineers from these region countries. This research will be described some errors that often made by students and of international drafting symbols that supposed to be well used by students and then insert multi-media resources as digital enrichment material that supposed to be used as an additional material. The goal of this study will be to examine how multi-media is employed to positively impact student learning in a Building Technology course.

  11. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegford, Janice M; Berezowski, John; Biswas, Subir K; Daigle, Courtney L; Gebhardt-Henrich, Sabine G; Hernandez, Carlos E; Thurner, Stefan; Toscano, Michael J

    2016-02-02

    Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength) and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns with selecting focal birds.

  12. Assessing Activity and Location of Individual Laying Hens in Large Groups Using Modern Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M. Siegford

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tracking individual animals within large groups is increasingly possible, offering an exciting opportunity to researchers. Whereas previously only relatively indistinguishable groups of individual animals could be observed and combined into pen level data, we can now focus on individual actors within these large groups and track their activities across time and space with minimal intervention and disturbance. The development is particularly relevant to the poultry industry as, due to a shift away from battery cages, flock sizes are increasingly becoming larger and environments more complex. Many efforts have been made to track individual bird behavior and activity in large groups using a variety of methodologies with variable success. Of the technologies in use, each has associated benefits and detriments, which can make the approach more or less suitable for certain environments and experiments. Within this article, we have divided several tracking systems that are currently available into two major categories (radio frequency identification and radio signal strength and review the strengths and weaknesses of each, as well as environments or conditions for which they may be most suitable. We also describe related topics including types of analysis for the data and concerns with selecting focal birds.

  13. Nursing and midwifery students' experiences with the course of infertility and assisted reproductive techniques: A focus group study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbir, Gozde Gokçe; Ozan, Yeter Durgun

    2018-01-01

    Nurses and midwifes without sufficient knowledge of infertilitare not likely to provide counseling and support for people suffering from infertility. This study aimed to evaluate nursing and midwifery students' experiences with the Course on Infertility and Assisted Reproductive Techniques. Our study had a qualitative descriptive design. Total number of the participants was 75. The analysis revealed five primary themes and twenty-one sub-themes. The themes were (1) action, (2) learner centered method, (3) interaction, (4) nursing competencies, and (5) evaluation. The active learning techniques enabled the students to retrieve the knowledge that they obtained for a long time, contributed to social and cultural development and improved skills required for selfevaluation, communication and leadership, enhanced critical thinking, skills increased motivation and satisfaction and helped with knowledge integration. Infertility is a biopsychosocial condition, and it may be difficult for students to understand what infertile individuals experience. The study revealed that active learning techniques enabled the students to acquire not only theoretical knowledge but also an emotional and psychosocial viewpoint and attitude regarding infertility. The content of an infertility course should be created in accordance with changes in the needs of a given society and educational techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The effectiveness of a group self-management education course for adults with poorly controlled epilepsy, SMILE (UK): A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridsdale, Leone; Wojewodka, Gabriella; Robinson, Emily J; Noble, Adam J; Morgan, Myfanwy; Taylor, Stephanie J C; McCrone, Paul; Richardson, Mark P; Baker, Gus; Landau, Sabine; Goldstein, Laura H

    2018-04-16

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological conditions affecting about 1% of adults. Up to 40% of people with epilepsy (PWE) report recurring seizures while on medication. And optimal functioning requires good self-management. Our objective was to evaluate a group self-management education courses for people with epilepsy and drug-resistant seizures by means of a multicenter, pragmatic, parallel group, randomized controlled trial. We recruited adults with epilepsy, having ≥2 seizures in the prior 12 months, from specialist clinics. Consenting participants were randomized 1:1 to a group course or treatment as usual. The primary outcome measure was quality of life 12 months after randomization using Quality of Life 31-P (QOLIE-31-P). Secondary outcome measures were seizure frequency and recency, psychological distress, impact and stigma of epilepsy, self-mastery, medication adherence, and adverse effects. Analysis of outcomes followed the intention-to-treat principle using mixed-effects regression models. We enrolled 404 participants (intervention: n = 205, control: n = 199) with 331 (82%) completing 12-month follow-up (intervention: n = 163, control: n = 168). Mean age was 41.7 years, ranging from 16 to 85, 54% were female and 75% were white. From the intervention arm, 73.7% attended all or some of the course. At 12-month follow-up, there were no statistically significant differences between trial arms in QOLIE-31-P (intervention mean: 67.4, standard deviation [SD]: 13.5; control mean: 69.5, SD 14.8) or in secondary outcome measures. This is the first pragmatic trial of group education for people with poorly controlled epilepsy. Recruitment, course attendance, and follow-up rates were higher than expected. The results show that the primary outcome and quality of life did not differ between the trial arms after 12 months. We found a high prevalence of felt-stigma and psychological distress in this group of people with drug-resistant seizures. To address this

  15. [Documentation of course and results of crime scene reconstruction and virtual crime scene reconstruction possibility by means of 3D laser scanning technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymowicz, Krzysztof; Zołna, Małgorzata M; Kościuk, Jacek; Dawidowicz, Bartosz

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the study was to present both the possibilities of documenting the course and results of crime scene reconstruction using 3D laser scanning technology and the legal basis for application of this technology in evidence collection. The authors present the advantages of the aforementioned method, such as precision, objectivity, resistance of the measurement parameters to manipulation (comparing to other methods), high imaging resolution, touchless data recording, nondestructive testing, etc. Moreover, trough the analysis of the current legal regulations concerning image recording in criminal proceedings, the authors show 3D laser scanning technology to have a full complete ability to be applied in practice in documentation of the course and results of crime scene reconstruction.

  16. The "Project": Putting Student Controlled, Small Group Work and Transferable Skills at the Core of a Geography Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Brian Paul

    1993-01-01

    Describes how a cooperative group project has become a foundation of the first two years of a three-year program in college-level geography. Discusses the origin, development, and topic selection for each of the cohort groups working in the program. Asserts that the program has been favorably received by both students and faculty members. (CFR)

  17. Supporting Active Learning in an Undergraduate Geotechnical Engineering Course Using Group-Based Audience Response Systems Quizzes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Shane

    2014-01-01

    The use of audience response systems (ARSs) or "clickers" in higher education has increased over the recent years, predominantly owing to their ability to actively engage students, for promoting individual and group learning, and for providing instantaneous feedback to students and teachers. This paper describes how group-based ARS…

  18. Cooperative Group Performance in Graduate Research Methodology Courses: The Role of Study Coping and Examination-Taking Coping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Qun G.; Collins, Kathleen M. T.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to examine the extent to which cooperative group members' levels of coping strategies (study and examination-taking coping strategies) and the degree that heterogeneity (variability of study coping strategies and examination-taking coping strategies) predict cooperative groups' levels of achievement in research methodology…

  19. Group tutoring and Formative Asynchronous Peer Assessment using e-learning technologies to Complement Staff Tutoring in Academic Writing

    OpenAIRE

    Hedin, Björn

    2006-01-01

    Writing a master's thesis is a lonely task, which often takes longer than the nominal time. A previous study has shown that a way to counter this is to give tutoring in groups instead of individually. This paper describes and evaluates an attempt to complement individual staff tutoring with group tutoring, formative peer assessment and a self-study methodology course, using e-learning methods and without increasing the total teacher time invested for each student. The results clearly indicate...

  20. Adherence to technology-mediated insomnia treatment: a meta-analysis, interviews, and focus groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, C.; Lancee, J.; Beun, R.J.; Neerincx, M.A.; Brinkman, W.-P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several technologies have been proposed to support the reduction of insomnia complaints. A user-centered assessment of these technologies could provide insight into underlying factors related to treatment adherence. Objective: Gaining insight into adherence to technology-mediated

  1. Combining a leadership course and multi-source feedback has no effect on leadership skills of leaders in postgraduate medical education. An intervention study with a control group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malling, Bente Vigh; Mortensen, Lene; Bonderup, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    regarding development of leadership skills over time. METHODS: Study participants were consultants responsible for postgraduate medical education at clinical departments. STUDY DESIGN: pre-post measures with an intervention and control group. The intervention was participation in a seven-day leadership...... not improve leadership skills of consultants responsible for education in clinical departments. Developing leadership skills takes time and the time frame of one year might have been too short to show improvement in leadership skills of consultants responsible for education. Further studies are needed......BACKGROUND: Leadership courses and multi-source feedback are widely used developmental tools for leaders in health care. On this background we aimed to study the additional effect of a leadership course following a multi-source feedback procedure compared to multi-source feedback alone especially...

  2. Effects on functional groups and zeta potential of SAP1pulsed electric field technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rong; Li, Xuenan; Lin, Songyi; Wang, Jia

    2017-01-01

    SAP 1 pulsed electric field (PEF) technology. The effects of electric field intensity and pulse frequency on SAP 1 electric field intensity 15 kV cm -1 , pulse frequency 1600 Hz and flow velocity 2.93 mL min -1 ). Furthermore, the PEF-treated SAP 1 < MW < 3kDa under optimal conditions lacked the characteristic absorbance of N-H, C = C and the amide band and the zeta potential was reduced to -18.0 mV. Overall, the results of the present study suggest that the improvement of antioxidant activity of SAP 1 < MW < 3kDa is a result of the contribution of the functional groups and the change in zeta potential when treated with PEF. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Education on Risk Management with Gender Equity: Experiences in United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) courses using on-site education and synchronous technologies for distance education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, J.; Marroquín, W.; Villar, Y.

    2009-04-01

    The experiences in two Risk Management courses organised by the Universidad Centroamericana "José Simeón Cañas" (UCA) and the "América Latina Genera" project of the BCPR-UNDP (Bureau for Crisis Prevention and Recovery of the United Nations Development Programme) are presented focusing on the design of teaching material and the selection and use of information-communication technologies (ICT) during the learning process. The organisation of these courses has posed three main challenges: the integration of a gender-equity approach in a subject that has traditionally lacked of it, the preparation of specialised teaching material for an audience with varied backgrounds and experience, and a widespread distribution of students and lecturers in different countries and with significant differences in ICT resources. These courses have combined tutorials, video-conferences, forums, chats, a media centre with video and podcast, and other resources to allow a close follow-up of the students' progress and strengthen the learning process. A specialised database of information within the "América Latina Genera" project has also been used intensively. Even though the building of capacity has been important, the emphasis of the courses has been on the practical application of projects in the students' work environment and in other real situations. The first course took place between June and December 2008 and consisted of a combination of on-site and distance education. The 15 students that registered the course included officials of local and central government institutions, private consultants, university staff and members of non-governmental organisations. Lecturers from the United States Geological Survey and the International Centre for Geohazards broadcasted videoconferences from the United States and Norway, respectively. The second course started in November 2008 and is scheduled to finish in February 2009. This course has been fully developed using distance education

  4. Media influence on pre-middle school African Americans' perceptions toward science, mathematics, and technology courses and careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Sharon Campbell

    2005-07-01

    A variety of previous studies have suggested that inaccurate, stereotypical or missing media depictions of science, engineering, and technology (SET) workers and fields have contributed to a growing shortage of youth interested in pursuing careers within the scientific endeavor. However, studies on the perceptions of African American youth have not usually been the focus of such research. In this exploratory study, in-depth interviews were conducted with 34 fifth grade African American students to determine the relative influence television and film portrayals of SET workers had on these children's perceptions of roles in SET fields and careers and school coursework related to them. Framed within the theoretical perspectives of cultivation analysis and the construction of social reality, results indicated the majority of participants perceived scientists as ambiguous, possessing either mythic characteristics of the fantastic persona or they saw them as altruistically inclined figures that saved the world from disease, destruction, and decay. Television and film portrayals of SET workers were found in varying degrees and ways to shape these African American children's perceptions toward SET careers. While children exhibited self-concepts about SET workers that were sometimes idealistic, distorted, or unrealistic, most had favorable perceptions toward math and science courses in school. However, it was the absence of television and film portrayals of African Americans in SET roles that was problematic for the majority of students. Recommendations for media producers, educators, scientific research foundations, and parents were suggested to dispel some of these commonly found media stereotypes of SET workers and African Americans in these roles and their effects.

  5. Massive Open Online Courses in Dental Education: Two Viewpoints: Viewpoint 1: Massive Open Online Courses Offer Transformative Technology for Dental Education and Viewpoint 2: Massive Open Online Courses Are Not Ready for Primetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Rachel C; Premaraj, Sundaralingam; Smith, Becky M; Olson, Gregory W; Williamson, Anne E; Romanos, Georgios

    2016-02-01

    This point/counterpoint article discusses the strengths and weaknesses of incorporating Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) into dental education, focusing on whether this relatively new educational modality could impact traditional dental curricula. Viewpoint 1 asserts that MOOCs can be useful in dental education because they offer an opportunity for students to learn through content and assessment that is delivered online. While specific research on MOOCs is limited, some evidence shows that online courses may produce similar learning outcomes to those in face-to-face courses. Given that MOOCs are intended to be open source, there could be opportunities for dental schools with faculty shortages and financial constraints to incorporate these courses into their curricula. In addition to saving money, dental schools could use MOOCs as revenue sources in areas such as continuing education. Viewpoint 2 argues that the hype over MOOCs is subsiding due in part to weaker than expected evidence about their value. Because direct contact between students, instructors, and patients is essential to the dental curriculum, MOOCs have yet to demonstrate their usefulness in replacing more than a subset of didactic courses. Additionally, learning professionalism, a key component of health professions education, is best supported by mentorship that provides significant interpersonal interaction. In spite of the potential of early MOOC ideology, MOOCs in their current form require either further development or altered expectations to significantly impact dental education.

  6. Predictive Value of the School-leaving Grade and Prognosis of Different Admission Groups for Academic Performance and Continuity in the Medical Course – a Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadmon, Guni; Resch, Franz; Duelli, Roman; Kadmon, Martina

    2014-01-01

    Background: The school-leaving GPA and the time since completion of secondary education are the major criteria for admission to German medical schools. However, the predictive value of the school-leaving grade and the admission delay have not been thoroughly examined since the amendment of the Medical Licensing Regulations and the introduction of reformed curricula in 2002. Detailed information on the prognosis of the different admission groups is also missing. Aim: To examine the predictive values of the school-leaving grade and the age at enrolment for academic performance and continuity throughout the reformed medical course. Methods: The study includes the central admission groups “GPA-best” and “delayed admission” as well as the primary and secondary local admission groups of three consecutive cohorts. The relationship between the criteria academic performance and continuity and the predictors school-leaving GPA, enrolment age, and admission group affiliation were examined up to the beginning of the final clerkship year. Results: The academic performance and the prolongation of the pre-clinical part of undergraduate training were significantly related to the school-leaving GPA. Conversely, the dropout rate was related to age at enrolment. The students of the GPA-best group and the primary local admission group performed best and had the lowest dropout rates. The students of the delayed admission group and secondary local admission group performed significantly worse. More than 20% of these students dropped out within the pre-clinical course, half of them due to poor academic performance. However, the academic performance of all of the admission groups was highly variable and only about 35% of the students of each group reached the final clerkship year within the regular time. Discussion: The school-leaving grade and age appear to have different prognostic implications for academic performance and continuity. Both factors have consequences for the

  7. Roles of Course Facilitators, Learners, and Technology in the Flow of Information of a cMOOC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrypnyk, Oleksandra; Joksimovic, Srec´ko; Kovanovic, Vitomir; Gas?evic, Dragan; Dawson, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Distributed Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are based on the premise that online learning occurs through a network of interconnected learners. The teachers' role in distributed courses extends to forming such a network by facilitating communication that connects learners and their separate personal learning environments scattered around the…

  8. A Combined MIS/DS Course Uses Lecture Capture Technology to "Level the Playing Field" in Student Numeracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovich, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the process taken to develop a quantitative-based and Excel™-driven course that combines "BOTH" Management Information Systems (MIS) and Decision Science (DS) modeling outcomes and lays the foundation for upper level quantitative courses such as operations management, finance and strategic management. In addition,…

  9. A Paperless Course on Structural Engineering Programming: Investing in Educational Technology in the Times of the Greek Financial Recession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sextos, Anastasios G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the structure of an undergraduate course entitled "programming techniques and the use of specialised software in structural engineering" which is offered to the fifth (final) year students of the Civil Engineering Department of Aristotle University Thessaloniki in Greece. The aim of this course is to demonstrate the…

  10. Exploring technological and architectural solutions for nursing home residents, care professionals and technical staff: Focus groups with professional stakeholders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Wetzels; H.T.G. Weffers; A.M.C. Dooremalen; Joost van Hoof; Eveline Wouters

    2014-01-01

    Buildings with innovative technologies and architectural solutions are needed as a means of support for future nursing homes alongside adequate care services. This study investigated how various groups of stakeholders from healthcare and technology envision the nursing home of the future in the

  11. A Learning Style-Based Grouping Collaborative Learning Approach to Improve EFL Students' Performance in English Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yu-Chen; Chu, Hui-Chun; Huang, Chi-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Learning English is an important and challenging task for English as Foreign Language (EFL) students. Educators had indicated that, without proper learning support, most EFL students might feel frustrated while learning English, which could significantly affect their learning performance. In the past research, learning usually utilized grouping,…

  12. Group Projects as a Method of Promoting Student Scientific Communication and Collaboration in a Public Health Microbiology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Kristen L. W.; Baker, Jason C.

    2009-01-01

    Communication of scientific and medical information and collaborative work are important skills for students pursuing careers in health professions and other biomedical sciences. In addition, group work and active learning can increase student engagement and analytical skills. Students in our public health microbiology class were required to work…

  13. The personality patterns in patients with duodenal ulcer and ulcer-like dyspepsia and their relationship to the course of the diseases. Hvidovre Ulcer Project Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, P; Eldrup, J

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. To compare personality characteristics in duodenal ulcer patients and patients with ulcer-like dyspepsia from the primary health sector with duodenal ulcer patients from a hospital and to evaluate the relationship of the personality characteristics to the course of the diseases. DESIGN......, Denmark. SUBJECTS. Sixty hospital patients with duodenal ulceration and 17 patients with duodenal ulceration plus 25 patients with ulcer-like dyspepsia from the primary health sector. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. MMPI scores. RESULTS. The hospital patients differed from the two other groups of patients...

  14. Mobile technologies and communication strategies in an urban Midwifery Group Practice setting. An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forti, Amanda; Stapleton, Helen; Kildea, Sue

    2013-12-01

    Around-the-clock access to a known midwife is a distinct feature of Midwifery Group Practice (MGP) and caseload midwifery settings; although the literature suggests this aspect of working life may hinder recruitment and retention to this model of care. Mobile technologies, known as mHealth where they are used in health care, facilitate access and hence communication, however little is known about this area of midwifery practice. Which communication modalities are used, and most frequently, by MGP midwives and clients? A prospective, cross sectional design included a purposive sample of MGP midwives from an Australian tertiary maternity hospital. Data on modes of midwife-client contact were collected 24h/day, for two consecutive weeks, and included: visits, phone-calls, texts and emails. Demographic data were also collected. Details about 1442 midwife-client contacts were obtained. The majority of contact was via text, between the hours of 07:00 and 14:59, with primiparous women, when the primary midwife was on-call. An average of 96 contacts per fortnight occurred. The majority of contact was between the midwife and their primary clients, reiterating a key tenet of caseload models and confirming mobile technologies as a significant and evolving aspect of practice. The pattern of contact within social (or daytime) hours is reassuring for midwives considering caseload midwifery, who are concerned about the on-call burden. The use of text as the preferred communication modality raises issues regarding data security and retrieval, accountability, confidentiality and text management during off-duty periods. The development of Australian-wide guidelines to inform local policies and best practice is recommended. Copyright © 2013 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Emerging technologies in hemostasis diagnostics: a report from the Australasian Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis Emerging Technologies Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Murray; Ward, Chris; Thom, Jim; Bianchi, Alessandra; Perrin, Emma; Coghlan, Douglas; Smith, Mark

    2007-04-01

    Technology in hemostasis laboratories has evolved enormously during the last 30 years. Although many scientists and clinicians will remember the traditional tilt-tube techniques to screen for coagulation abnormalities and to monitor anticoagulant therapy, the hemostasis laboratory today uses a variety of modern technologies. These include flow cytometry, chromogenic assays, molecular typing (e.g., polymerase chain reaction), immunologic assays (e.g., enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), functional assays of specific coagulation proteins, and platelet function analyzers. Although these advances in technology have resulted in greater capability, productivity, sensitivity, specificity, and ultimately, improvement in the clinical care of patients, controversies and limitations remain. This article highlights new and emerging technologies in hemostasis and discusses whether they have improved or are likely to improve laboratory diagnostics by specifically addressing the following: (1) Can new technologies help predict likelihood of thrombosis recurrence? (2) Has an understanding of the role of A Disintegrin-like And Metalloprotease with Thrombo Spondin type 1 motifs (ADAMTS13) in microangiopathy resulted in improved diagnostic methods for this disorder? (3) Does thrombelastography allow better definition of bleeding risk than conventional hemostasis assays, especially in settings of acute hemostatic pathology?

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS - BHA GROUP, INC. QG061 FILTER SAMPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) pilot of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of th...

  17. Review of ride quality technology needs of industry and user groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckenzie, J. R.; Brumaghim, S. H.

    1975-01-01

    A broad survey of ride quality technology state-of-the-art and a review of user evaluation of this technology were conducted. During the study 17 users of ride quality technology in 10 organizations representing land, marine and air passenger transportation modes were interviewed. Interim results and conclusions of this effort are reported.

  18. How Undergraduate Students Use Social Media Technologies to Support Group Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and become accessible to students in higher education. Concurrently, teamwork has become an important skill in academia and the workplace and students have adopted established technologies to support their learning in both individual and team project work. Given the emergence of social media technologies, I examined…

  19. The effect of oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation on the course and outcome of acute pancreatitis: a randomized, double-blind parallel-group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Stefan; Schütte, Kerstin; Glasbrenner, Bernhard; Mayerle, Julia; Simon, Peter; Henniges, Friederike; Sander-Struckmeier, Suntje; Lerch, Marcus M; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-03-10

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a significant problem after acute pancreatitis. To evaluate whether oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation improves the recovery of pancreatic exocrine function and to explore the efficacy, safety and tolerability of pancreatic enzyme supplementation in patients during the refeeding period after acute pancreatitis. Prospective double-blind, placebo controlled, randomized study. The sudy included 56 patients with acute pancreatitis. Primary efficacy variable was recovery from pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Secondary objectives were body weight, abdominal pain, course of APACHE II score, patient's symptoms and quality of life. Twenty of the 56 patients showed low fecal elastase values indicating pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after acute pancreatitis. Median time to recovery from exocrine pancreatic insufficiency was 14 days in the enzyme supplementation group and 23 days in the placebo group but overall differences for primary and all but one secondary endpoint did not reach statistical significance. However, a positive tendency in favour of enzyme supplementation was found for quality of life parameters (FACT-Pa) in all subscores. There were no relevant differences between placebo and oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation detected with respect to safety and tolerability. Enzyme supplementation positively effects the course of acute pancreatitis if administered during the early refeeding phase after acute pancreatitis. There is evidence that oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation has a positive impact on the course of the disease and the global health status (less weight loss, less flatulence, improved quality of life). Oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation was safely administered and can be added to the treatment regimen of patients in a refeeding status after severe acute pancreatitis.

  20. Stakeholder Focus Groups to Inform a Technology-Based Strategy of Preceptor Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia A. Blum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While preceptors are a vital link in student nurse practice education, ongoing support beyond an initial orientation is often lacking. It has been reported in the literature that preceptors experience stress related to difficulties in handling preceptee situations. They are frustrated by negative experiences centered on preceptor-identified hallmarks of unsafe practice including the inability to demonstrate knowledge and skills; attitude problems; unprofessional behavior; and poor communication skills. Their unrealized expectations for novices threaten their commitment to their preceptor role. As part of a larger study testing the effectiveness of podcasts as an ongoing method of preceptor support, this paper addresses the developmental stage of the podcasts. A team of academic and acute care nurse educators developed scripts for eventual filming of four podcasts focusing on unsafe practice issues, designed to provide continual support through web-based availability. The use of podcast technology is consistent with the learning styles of digital natives and is a demonstrated and valuable educational resource to review, reinforce, and clarify difficult concepts. These podcasts were informed through preceptor focus groups to address situational and environmental realism for student behaviors and preceptor responses.

  1. Cut-laceration injuries and related career groups in New Jersey career, vocational, and technical education courses and programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendell, Derek G; Mizan, Samina S; Marshall, Elizabeth G; Kelly, Sarah W; Therkorn, Jennifer H; Campbell, Jennifer K; Miller, Ashley E

    2012-09-01

    Investigations of young workers, including limited surveys in supervised school settings, suggested their elevated injury risk. This study identified factors contributing to cuts-lacerations among adolescents in New Jersey secondary school career, technical, and vocational education programs. Of 1,772 injuries reported between December 1, 1998, and September 1, 2010, 777 (44%) were cuts-lacerations; analyses focused on 224 reports (n = 182 post-exclusions) submitted after fall 2005 in three career groups-Food, Hospitality & Tourism (FH&T) (n = 71), Manufacturing & Construction (M&C) (n = 84), and Automotive & Transportation (A&T) (n = 27). Most students were "struck by" tools or hard surfaces (n = 93, 51%); 63 cuts were from knives in FH&T. In M&C, most cuts-lacerations were caused by hand-held tools (n = 18) and being "struck against/by" or "caught between hard surfaces" (n = 19). Males reported more cuts-lacerations (n = 145), most commonly among 11th graders (n = 54) and ages 16 to 17 years (n = 79). Fingers (n = 117) were most often injured, usually by cutting tools (n = 83). Training, supervision, and appropriate equipment, and further assessments of "struck by" and "pinch point" hazards, are needed. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Undergraduate Student Perceptions Regarding the Use of Educational Technology--A Case Study in a Statistics Service Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Verena T.; Swart, Arthur J.

    2015-01-01

    Integrating theory with practice has become a mandatory requirement for universities of technology. Using educational technology to supplement traditional pedagogical approaches has contributed significantly to achieving this mandate. However, which educational technologies could help improve the educational experience of students in a statistical…

  3. Education in Care and Technology; Development and Evaluation of a First Cohort of an International Master Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Charles G

    2017-01-01

    A report written as a personal communication based on the experience gathered by developing and delivery of a international professional master course. The organization of the curriculum consists of 16 modules. Using a framework of the user centered design and development cycle students receive domain knowledge related to user-orientation, business, innovation and implementation. Also, introduction is given to tools that can be used to investigate certain aspects. The course will be completed by the performance of master thesis research related of a practice oriented problem relevant to the work environment of the student. This master-course has been followed by a first cohort of 8 students. In this report, an evaluation is given on this first delivery. Organization of this course is complicated by the marketing conditions that have to be used. Students and teachers are well supported by the distance based learning environment. The 16 modules representing the content of the course contains a variety of subjects and methods and represents a huge educational load to the students. Translating this content to the development of the own applied research subject contributes to the learning process. The first cohort of students will complete their master thesis in July 2017. Further introduction of new cohorts will mainly depend on the possibility to reduce the financial constraints to participation.

  4. Design Skills Education for Students of Advanced Course in College of Technology in Cooperation with the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Naoyuki; Sakabe, Toshiya; Koshiba, Takashi; Ishitobi, Manabu

    Since 2004, Nara National College of Technology has been conducting “The Super Science Teacher Delivery Lecture Project”, in which the staff of our college visit elementary or junior high schools to provide special classes on science, technology or other subjects. This project was adopted as part of the Support Program for Contemporary Educational Needs by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. To provide education on design skills for students in the advanced mechanical engineering course and advanced electronic and information engineering course of the faculty of advanced engineering of our college, Problem Based Learning (PBL) has been conducted with the cooperation of the Super Science Teacher Delivery Lecture Project. In the PBL, students developed the teaching materials and experiments for science and technology lessons of elementary or junior high school students. In addition, the design skills of the students were evaluated by the reports on design skills, the demonstration of the delivery lecture and the records of the their efforts. From the results of the student questionnaire on this PBL, it is clear that most of the students understood “what are the design skills?” and acquired design skills.

  5. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AS A MEANS TO CAPTURE THE STUDENTS OF THE COURSE "METHODS OF "MATHEMATICS" EDUCATIONAL TEACHING FIELD"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skvortsova S.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an analysis of the concepts of "information technology", "Information Technologies in Education", "Information technology education", "computer technology", "New Information Technologies", "New Information Technologies in Education". Found that the most common concept in this list is the concept of "information technology" as a set of methods and technical means for collecting, processing, storing, processing, transmission and presentation of data. Slightly narrower in this context, the concept of "new information technologies," which mandates the involvement of computer and other technical means to work with data. The emphasis on the learning process of information technology requires detailed terms "Information Technologies in Education" and "New Information Technologies in Education", which are defined as involvement of information technology and accordingly, including the technical means to create new perceptions and knowledge transfer, evaluation studies and all-round development of the individual in the educational process. Along with these terms also used such as "information technology training," which denotes a set of training and educational materials, and technical tools for educational purposes, as well as the system of scientific knowledge about their role and place in the educational process. Meanwhile, the term "information technology" encompasses all these concepts, so in a broad sense can be used to denote any signified concepts. As an extension of the term "information technology", the term information and communication technologies (ICT, and "information technology education", understood as educational technology using special methods, software and hardware to work with information and "ICT training "- as IT training focused on the use of computer communications networks for solving instructional problems or their fragments. Taking into account tasks, such as creating methodical maintenance of discipline

  6. MODEL OF COLLABORATIVE COURSES DEVELOPMENT IN DISTANCE LEARNING PLATFORMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro S. Morozov

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The research paper outlines the problem of organization collaboration of users group on creation distance learning courses. The article contains analysis of the courses data structure. According to proposed structure the model of developer’s collaboration on creating distance learning courses based on basic principles of source code management was proposed. The article also provides result of research on necessary tools for collaborative development of courses in distance learning platforms. According to the requirements of flexibility and simplicity of access to system for any level educational institutions, technological decisions on granting permissions on performing basic operations on course elements and providing to user moderation’s privileges were proposed.

  7. Application of IT-technologies in visualization of innovation project life-cycle stages during the study of the course "Management of innovation projects"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolychev, V. D.; Prokhorov, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents a methodology for the application of IT-technologies in teaching discipline "Management of innovation projects," which helps students to be more competitive and gather the useful skills for their future specialization in high-tech areas. IT-technologies are widely used nowadays in educational and training spheres especially in knowledge-intensive disciplines such as systems analysis, the theory of games, operations research, theory of risks, innovation management etc. For studying such courses it is necessary to combine both mathematical models and information technology approaches for the clear understanding of the investigated object. That is why this article comprises both the framework of research and the IT-tools for investigation in the educational process. Taking into consideration the importance of the IT-system implementation especially for the university we assume to suggest the methods of research in the area of innovation projects with the help of IT-support.

  8. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II (this volume) describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Specific INEL problem areas/contaminants are identified along with technology solutions, the status of the technologies, precise science and technology needs, and implementation requirements. Volume III provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are referenced by a TEDS codenumber in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II.

  9. Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Readiness: Ethno-Linguistic and Gender Differences in High-School Course Selection Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamuti-Trache, Maria; Sweet, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The study examines science-related course choices of high-school students in the culturally diverse schools of the province of British Columbia, Canada. The analysis employs K-12 provincial data and includes over 44,000 students born in 1990 who graduated from high school by 2009. The research sample reflects the presence of about 27% of students…

  10. Nuclear Technology. Course 27: Metrology. Module 27-4, Angle Measurement Instruments, Optical Projections and Surface Texture Gages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleck, Ben; Espy, John

    This fourth in a series of eight modules for a course titled Metrology describes the universal bevel protractor and the sine bar, the engineering microscope and optical projector, and several types of surface texture gages. The module follows a typical format that includes the following sections: (1) introduction, (2) module prerequisites, (3)…

  11. Small Private Online Research: A Proposal for A Numerical Methods Course Based on Technology Use and Blended Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, Francisco Javier Delgado

    2017-01-01

    This work presents a proposed model in blended learning for a numerical methods course evolved from traditional teaching into a research lab in scientific visualization. The blended learning approach sets a differentiated and flexible scheme based on a mobile setup and face to face sessions centered on a net of research challenges. Model is…

  12. Registered nurses' thoughts on blended learning in a postgraduate course in cancer care--content analyses of web surveys and a focus group interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arving, Cecilia; Wadensten, Barbro; Johansson, Birgitta

    2014-06-01

    Purpose of the research was to describe registered nurses' (RNs) (n = 53) thoughts on the blended learning format in a 'specialist nursing programme in cancer care'. The study was conducted in autumn 2007 and 2008. A content analysis of answers to open-ended questions in a web-based questionnaire and a focus group interview were carried out. The analysis revealed that the RNs appreciated blended learning. The web lectures facilitated learning and gave RNs access to the education at any time. However, according to the RNs, knowledge is gained through interaction between RNs and teachers, and this aspect needed to be improved. The RNs also thought that the content of the seminars on campus should focus on evidence-based nursing knowledge and practical skills, not just taught as stable facts and procedures. The result from the present study could help to improve the design and content of advanced nursing courses using a blended learning format.

  13. An Arrangement of the Items Influencing Assessment of the Electrotechnical Technology Course / PROEJA, campuses Campos Centro and Itaperuna: The Learners’ View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Luíz Clemente Gomes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to organize pre-defined items that affect the students’ answers when assessing the Electrotechnical Technology Course / PROEJA. The research was carried out from October / 2011 to December / 2012 with questionnaires applied with 1st to 6th period students. At campus Campos Centro, “Technical Visits” and “Internship” presented high levels of importance and low satisfaction, while “Personal Realization” and “Professional Achievement” presented high levels of relevance and satisfaction. At campus Itaperuna, “Job opportunities” and “Professional Achievement” presented high levels of relevance and satisfaction. Items “Faculty” and “New Technologies”, presented high importance but low satisfaction. The research aims at improving the quality of the course.

  14. Text-Based Language Teaching and the Analysis of Tasks Presented in English Course Books for Students of Information Technology and Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerija Marina

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the essential features of a connected text helping to raise learners’ awareness of its structure and organization and improve their skills of reading comprehension. Classroom applications of various approaches to handling texts and text-based activities are also discussed and their main advantages and disadvantages are outlined.Tasks based on text transformation and reconstruction found in the course books of English for students of computing and information technology are analysed and their types are determined. The efficiency of the tasks is determined by considering the experience of the authors gained in using text-based assignments provided in these course books with the students of the above specialities. Some problems encountered in classroom application of the considered text-based tasks are also outlined.

  15. A Joint Venture Model for Teaching Required Courses in "Ethics and Engineering" to Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandvoort, H.; Van Hasselt, G. J.; Bonnet, J. A. B. A. F.

    2008-01-01

    We present our experience, spanning more than 10 years of teaching a course on "ethics and engineering" for a group of MSc programmes in applied sciences at Delft University of Technology. The course is taught by a team of teachers from the faculty of Applied Sciences and from the department of Philosophy of the Faculty of Technology,…

  16. Interim report deliverable 3.2 : focus group management process of the restricted use technology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-09-30

    The Altarum Institute, under contract to the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT), currently is engaged in a project called the Altarum Restricted Use Technology Study. This study, an 18-month effort, seeks to apply restricted use techn...

  17. Collaborative Communication Technologies and Learning in College Courses: Which Are Used, for What Purposes, and to What Ends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldeck, Jennifer H.; Dougherty, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Web-based communication technologies that enable collaboration and sharing of information among users - such as podcasts, wikis, blogs, message boards, and others--are used commonly in contemporary organizations to increase and manage employee learning. In this investigation, we identify which of these collaborative communication technologies are…

  18. Cloud Pedagogy: Utilizing Web-Based Technologies for the Promotion of Social Constructivist Learning in Science Teacher Preparation Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barak, Miri

    2017-01-01

    The new guidelines for science education emphasize the need to introduce computers and digital technologies as a means of enabling visualization and data collection and analysis. This requires science teachers to bring advanced technologies into the classroom and use them wisely. Hence, the goal of this study was twofold: to examine the…

  19. Technology-Enabled Nurturing of Creativity and Innovation: A Specific Illustration from an Undergraduate Engineering Physics Course

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalski, F. V.; Kowalski, S. E.; Kohl, P. B.; Kuo, V. H.

    2013-01-01

    There is general agreement that creativity and innovation are desirable traits in the toolbox of 21\\textsuperscript{st} century engineers, as well as in the future workforce in general. However, there is a dearth of exemplars, pedagogical models, or best practices to be implemented in undergraduate engineering education to develop and nurture those talents. In this paper, we use a specific example of a classroom activity from a course designed to help bridge the transition from learning the f...

  20. Distance courses on the subject «Management of information projects» based on technology Moodle

    OpenAIRE

    ZIANGIROVA LINEZA FAATOVNA

    2016-01-01

    The article is devoted to development of a remote course on discipline "Management of information projects" in the direction of preparation "Applied informatics" on the basis of distance learning MOODLE (Modular Object-Oriented Dynamic Learning Environment) system. There are considered the methodology of information systems introduction, decisions introduction organization unified model in the methodologies of Microsoft Solutions Framework (MSF), the project integration and contents managemen...

  1. PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF NEW TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COURSE OF CONSTRUCTION OF MODERN BUILDINGS AND STRUCTURES (AS EXPEMPLIFIED BY MOSCOW-CITY INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinenko Sergey Anatol'evich

    2012-07-01

    The application of advanced design techniques has proven their efficiency. Advanced methodology of design has reduced the time and cost of design due to repetitive use of the information accumulated in the course of design development, timely information support throughout the whole project development period, and the quality and timeliness of decision-making in terms of technology-related issues. The new design methodology was, to some extent, implemented by means of assurance of the standard functionality of construction-related systems and organizational actions, and through the customization of the system to assure the implementation of both the new functions and the methodology-related solutions.

  2. 15 CFR 770.3 - Interpretations related to exports of technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Interpretations related to exports of technology and software to destinations in Country Group D:1. 770.3 Section 770.3 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. Revisiting group-based technology adoption as a dynamic process: The role of changing attitude-rationale configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.S. Bayerl (Saskia); K. Lauche (Kristina); Axtell, C. (Carolyn)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIn this study, we set out to better understand the dynamics behind group-based technology adoption by investigating the underlying mechanisms of changes in collective adoption decisions over time. Using a longitudinal multi-case study of production teams in the British oil and gas

  4. Risk of stillbirth and infant deaths after assisted reproductive technology: a Nordic study from the CoNARTaS group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Anna-Karina Aaris; Wennerholm, U. B.; Gissler, M.

    2014-01-01

    Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE), the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, the Danish Agency for Science, Technology and Innovation and Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden supported the project. The CoNARTaS group has received travel and meeting funding from the Nordic...

  5. Perceptions of Technology and Its Use for Therapeutic Application for Individuals With Hemiparesis: Findings From Adult and Pediatric Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Melanie Y; Tatla, Sandy K; Lohse, Keith R; Shirzad, Navid; Hoens, Alison M; Miller, Kimberly J; Holsti, Liisa; Virji-Babul, Naznin; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2015-02-10

    Digital technology is becoming an increasingly popular means of delivering meaningful therapy to individuals with neurological impairments. An understanding of clients' technology use and their perspectives on incorporating technology into rehabilitation can provide researchers and designers with valuable information to inform development of technologies and technology-based rehabilitation programs. This study was designed to establish the current use and perceptions of gaming, social media, and robotics technologies for rehabilitative purposes from the perspective of adults and children with upper limb impairments to identify barriers and enablers to their adoption and use. We conducted three focus groups consisting of pediatric (n=7, mean age 11.0 years) and adult (n=8, mean age 60.8 years) participants with hemiparesis affecting their upper limb. We applied thematic analysis methods to the resulting data. We identified three key themes: (1) clients' use of technology in everyday life and rehabilitation, (2) barriers to use, and (3) enablers to therapy. Participants had limited exposure to technology for therapeutic purposes, but all acknowledged the potential benefits in providing motivation and interest for the performance of repetitive task practice. Adult participants requested efficacious, simple, and easy-to-use technology for rehabilitation with programs that could be individualized for them and expressed that they wanted these programs to provide a motivating means of repeated practice of therapeutic movements. In contrast, pediatric participants emphasized a desire for technology for rehabilitation that offered opportunities for social interaction and interactive games involving their whole body and not only their affected limb. Perceived safety and privacy were concerns for both groups. Our findings highlight that all participants were open to the integration of technology into rehabilitation. Adult participants were more pragmatically motivated by

  6. New course: "Introduction to knowledge transfer tools"

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    The Knowledge Transfer group is now offering a half-day course that will give an introduction to intellectual property, contracts for knowledge transfer, and projects involving industry and other external partners.   The purpose of the course is to give the essential information about how one can secure ownership of inventions and to provide information on legal and contractual considerations when transferring knowledge and technology or when doing collaborative R&D. The course will also highlight some common pitfalls that should be avoided to increase the chances of successfully transferring knowledge and technology. In addition, the course will involve examples of real projects and challenges. The first session will take place the 19 May 2014. To enroll, please follow this link: “Introduction to knowledge transfer tools”.

  7. Psychosocial predictors of changes in adolescent girls' physical activity and dietary behaviors over the course of the Go Girls! group-based mentoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, A Justine; Chen, Michelle Y; Schmader, Toni; Jung, Mary E; Zumbo, Bruno D; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2016-08-01

    Changes in social cognitions targeted within a group-based mentoring program for adolescent girls were examined as predictors of changes in physical activity (PA) and dietary behavior (in two separate models) over the course of the 7-week program. Data were collected from 310 participants who participated in the program. Multilevel path models were used to assess changes in psychosocial variables predicting changes in behavioral outcomes from pre- to post-program. Analyses revealed that 24.4 and 12.3% of the variance in increases in PA and dietary behavior, respectively, was explained by increases in affective and instrumental attitudes, self-regulatory efficacy (SRE), and intentions. Increases in intentions partially mediated the effects of increases in SRE and affective attitudes on increases in PA behavior. In relation to improvements in dietary behavior, increases in intentions and SRE directly predicted improvements in dietary behavior. These findings suggest potential psychological mechanisms through which a group-based mentoring program may lead to changes in adolescent girls' health-enhancing PA and dietary behaviors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Volume III (this volume) provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are reference by a TEDS code number in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II. Data sheets are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each sheet.

  9. Developing Energy Technology Course for Undergraduate Engineering Management Study Program in Lake Toba Area with Particular Focus to Sustainable Energy Systems in Development Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manik, Yosef; Sinaga, Rizal; Saragi, Hadi

    2018-02-01

    Undergraduate Engineering Management Study Program of Institut Teknologi Del is one of the pioneers for its field in Indonesia. Located in Lake Toba Area, this study program has a mission to provide high quality Engineering Management education that produces globally competitive graduates who in turn will contribute to local development. Framing the Energy Technology course—one of the core subjects in Engineering Management Body of Knowledge—in the context of sustainable development of Lake Toba Area is very essential. Thus, one particular focus in this course is sustainable energy systems in local development context that incorporates identification and analysis of locally available energy resources. In this paper we present our experience in designing such course. In this work, we introduce the domains that shape the Engineering Management Body of Knowledge. Then, we explain the results of our evaluation on the key considerations to meet the rapidly changing needs of society in local context. Later, we present the framework of the learning outcomes and the syllabus as a result of mapping the road map with the requirement. At the end, the summary from the first two semesters of delivering this course in academic year 2015/2016 and 2016/2017 are reported.

  10. 4 years of successful knowledge transfer - the nuclear technology training center of the TUeV Nord Group; 4 Jahre erfolgreicher Wissenstransfer - das Ausbildungszentrum fuer Kerntechnik der TUeV Nord Gruppe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willenbockel, I. [TUeV NORD EnSys Hannover GmbH und Co. KG, Abt. ETE, Hannover (Germany); Tietze, U. [TUeV NORD SysTec, Ausbildungszentrum fuer Kerntechnik, Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    In connection with the 2002 amendment to the German Atomic Energy Act, the topics of generational change and maintenance of competence grew in importance and necessitated new solution approaches. To this end, various activities were launched, with the aim of conducting conceptual analyses of these topics. Examples include the 'National Competence Network for Nuclear Technology' (Nationaler Kompetenzverbund fuer Kerntechnik), various networks established by colleges and universities, the 'Knowledge Management for the Maintenance and Transfer of Competence in Reactor Safety' (Wissensmanagement zum Kompetenzerhalt und -transfer in der Reaktorsicherheit) workshop held in 2001 in Garching near Munich (Germany) and the 'Ad-hoc Workgroup on the Maintenance of Competence' (Ad-hoc-Arbeitskreis Kompetenzerhalt) of the VdTUeV. The nuclear technology departments of the TUeV Nord Group were aware of te challenges associated with the generational change early on. By establishing the 'Nuclear Technology Training Center' (Ausbildungszentrum fuer Kerntechnik, AfK), the TUeV Nord Group intended to ensure the required knowledge transfer during the generational change as well as maintain the renowned high qualification as regards the subject of nuclear technology and thus continue to provide - in the sense of social responsibility - crucial contribution to the long-term safety of nuclear plants. Four years have passed since the training center held the first courses in the fall of 2002. Up to now, more than 350 participants have been trained in the courses conducted by the AfK. In the opinion of the TUeV Nord Group, the activities of the AfK have laid the foundation for a successful change of generations within the group's nuclear technology organizations. (orig.)

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS, BHA GROUP, INC., QP131 FILTER SAMPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Verification Center. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of the size of those particles equal to and smalle...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS, POLYMER GROUP, INC., DURAPEX PET FILTER SAMPLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghouse filtration products (BFPs) were evaluated by the Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Verification Center. The performance factor verified was the mean outlet particle concentration for the filter fabric as a function of the size of those particles equal to and smalle...

  13. Inclusion in the Study Groups, the Social Readaptation and Rehabilitation by Psychological Technology of Microgroups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dontsov D.A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the justification of modern psycho-pedagogical paradigms of interactive methods of training and personal development of schoolchildren, seniors, students and other categories of students in a holistic educational and socio-developing process. The article reveals microgroups technology implies, in particular, as a universal means of implementation of inclusive education and social rehabilitation of different ages and of different health categories of people in interactive forms, including activities carried out with the elderly in social service centers. Development and adaptive psycho-rehabilitation programs using the method microgroups involves reliance on the principle of adequacy of the technology targets and objectives of the program, the systems principle, which means that coverage of all sides of the cognitive, behavioral and personal spheres of program participants; the principle of integrity, that is, the use of various and diverse psychocorrectional and rehabilitation methods and technologies in each program; principle of conformity of the proposed methods and technologies of the age peculiarities, the level of intellectual and language development, as well as the specifics of the features of the limited possibilities of health of program participants.

  14. 77 FR 8284 - Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Hard Drive Development Engineering Group Irvine (Formerly at...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... that appear to relate to production and design work and one position advertised by Western Digital in... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-72,949] Western Digital... Former Employees of Western Digital Technologies, Inc. v. United States Secretary of Labor (Court No. 11...

  15. Analysis of the conceptions and expectations of students in the courses of pedagogy, administration and human resources about the discipline of science, technology and society

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Alexandre; de Oliveira Neves, Jobert; Ferreira, Orlando Rodrigues; Lúcia Costa Amaral, Carmem; Delourdes Maciel, Maria; Voelzke, Marcos Rincon; Nascimento, Rômulo Pereira

    2012-10-01

    Provided for the education curricula since 1960, the focus on Science, Technology and Society (STS) has been poorly implemented even until today. Set as a goal to be achieved at all levels of education by 2014, in Brazil it is necessary to undertake specific actions in pursuit of putting into practice what has been stalled over the years in Education. As a result of joint efforts of teachers and students of the Masters in Teaching Science and Mathematics at the Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul comes the challenge of providing a specific discipline dealing with the concepts of STS, offered as a optional special, initially for students of Pedagogy and later, due to the interest of some students, for the course of Administration and Human Resources of this institution. The survey of previous conceptions of students enrolled in the Special Discipline Elective Science, Technology and Society (CTS DOP) on the triad of STS showed a great ignorance on the same theme. The reports reveal conceptions of students who approach the linear model of development. As to the generated expectations in terms of discipline, there stand out the desires of expansion of knowledge for possible applications in personal and professional life. This research aims to evaluate the current course, while identifying ways to improve and strengthen the STS movement in education.

  16. The Use of Technology in Group-Work: A Situational Analysis of Students' Reflective Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Pamela; Sen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Group work is a powerful constructivist pedagogy for facilitating students' personal and professional development, but it can be difficult for students to work together in an academic context. The assessed reflective writings of undergraduate students studying Information Management are used as data in this exploration of the group work situation…

  17. Second meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Helsinki, 6-9 June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The Second Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) was held in Helsinki, Finland, from 6-9 June 1988. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes since the first meeting of IWGATWR in May 1987 in the field of Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 12 papers presented at the meeting. Figs and tabs

  18. A group decision-making tool for the application of membrane technologies in different water reuse scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadr, S M K; Saroj, D P; Kouchaki, S; Ilemobade, A A; Ouki, S K

    2015-06-01

    A global challenge of increasing concern is diminishing fresh water resources. A growing practice in many communities to supplement diminishing fresh water availability has been the reuse of water. Novel methods of treating polluted waters, such as membrane assisted technologies, have recently been developed and successfully implemented in many places. Given the diversity of membrane assisted technologies available, the current challenge is how to select a reliable alternative among numerous technologies for appropriate water reuse. In this research, a fuzzy logic based multi-criteria, group decision making tool has been developed. This tool has been employed in the selection of appropriate membrane treatment technologies for several non-potable and potable reuse scenarios. Robust criteria, covering technical, environmental, economic and socio-cultural aspects, were selected, while 10 different membrane assisted technologies were assessed in the tool. The results show this approach capable of facilitating systematic and rigorous analysis in the comparison and selection of membrane assisted technologies for advanced wastewater treatment and reuse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Leveraging Technology for Chemical Sciences Education: An Early Assessment of WebCT Usage in First-Year Chemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlesworth, Paul; Vician, Chelley

    2003-11-01

    In this article, early results of combining information technologies with the intent of improving the science-learning environment in terms of student motivation and learning are presented. The assessment focuses on student reactions to these instructional innovations. Results show that students appreciate the scheduling flexibility found in technology supported learning (TSL) and take advantage of this to maximize their scores on online quizzes and exams. Results also show that students perceive a more positive impact on their learning and confidence when using the TSL environment.

  20. 9th Annual CMMI Technology Conference and User Group-Tuesday

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-19

    de CV SILAC Ingenieria de Software S.A. de C.V. SKIZCorp Technology Software Engineering Competence Center...Productora de Software S.A. (06) Advanced Information Services Inc. ais © AIS 20073 AIS CMM/CMMI Assessment History Date Levels Assessed Levels Satisfied...Davis Systems DEK International GmbH Delaware Software , S.A. de C.V. Delivery Excellence Grupo Empresarial Eisei, S.A. de C.V. Herbert

  1. The Implications of Virtual World Technology for K-12 Students in a Foreign Language Course of Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The use of virtual world technology for language instruction is a recent development in education. The goal of this study was to provide a functioning 3D environment for German language students to experience as avatars. The student's impressions, attitudes, and perceptions of this learning activity would be recorded and analyzed to see if this…

  2. Appraisal of Information and Communication Technology Courses in Business Education Programme of Universities in South East Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ile, Chika Madu; Ementa, Christiana Ngozi

    2016-01-01

    The trend of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) usage in the business world necessitates that business education students be fortified with ICT skills as to be relevant and highly valued in the job market. The purpose of the study was to examine the four-year standard academic degree programme in business education department of five…

  3. The Incorporation of Micro-Computer Technology into School Mathematics: Some Suggestions for Middle and Senior Mathematics Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Bill

    1987-01-01

    Argues that the use of computer technologies in secondary schools should change the nature of mathematics education. Urges the rethinking of the uses of traditional paper-and-pencil computations. Suggests some computer applications for elementary algebra and for problem solving in arithmetic and calculus. (TW)

  4. Exploring Teachers' Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) in an Online Course: A Mixed Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varguez, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The constant expansion of Web 2.0 applications available on the World Wide Web and expansion of technology resources has prompted the need to better prepare current and future educators to make more effective use of such resources in their classrooms. The purpose of this embedded mixed methods case study was to describe the experiences and changes…

  5. Technology Support for Discussion Based Learning: From Computer Supported Collaborative Learning to the Future of Massive Open Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosé, Carolyn Penstein; Ferschke, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    This article offers a vision for technology supported collaborative and discussion-based learning at scale. It begins with historical work in the area of tutorial dialogue systems. It traces the history of that area of the field of Artificial Intelligence in Education as it has made an impact on the field of Computer-Supported Collaborative…

  6. Cooperative Learning and Soft Skills Training in an IT Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aimao

    2012-01-01

    Pedagogy of higher education is shifting from passive to active and deep learning. At the same time, the information technology (IT) industry and the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) are demanding soft skills training. Thus, in designing an IT course, we devised group teaching projects where students learn to work with…

  7. Computational and Genomic Analysis of Mycobacteriophage: A Longitudinal Study of Technology Engineered Biology Courses That Implemented an Inquiry Based Laboratory Practice Designed to Enhance, Encourage, and Empower Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollowell, Gail P.; Osler, James E.; Hester, April L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an applied research rational for a longitudinal investigation that involved teaching a "Technology Engineered Science Education Course" via an Interactive Laboratory Based Genomics Curriculum. The Technology st Engineering [TE] methodology was first introduced at the SAPES: South Atlantic Philosophy of Education…

  8. Utilizing the NASA Data-enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education Resource for Elementary Pre-service Teachers in a Technology Integration Education Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, E. M.; Moore, T.; Hale, S. R.; Hayden, L. B.; Johnson, D.

    2014-12-01

    The preservice teachers enrolled in the EDUC 203 Introduction to Computer Instructional Technology course, primarily for elementary-level had created climate change educational lessons based upon their use of the NASA Data-enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education (DICCE). NASA climate education datasets and tools were introduced to faculty of Minority Serving Institutions through a grant from the NASA Innovations in Climate Education program. These lessons were developed to study various ocean processes involving phytoplankton's chlorophyll production over time for specific geographic areas using the Giovanni NASA software tool. The pre-service teachers had designed the climate change content that will assist K-4 learners to identify and predict phytoplankton sources attributed to sea surface temperatures, nutrient levels, sunlight, and atmospheric carbon dioxide associated with annual chlorophyll production. From the EDUC 203 course content, the preservice teachers applied the three phases of the technology integration planning (TIP) model in developing their lessons. The Zunal website (http://www.zunal.com) served as a hypermedia tool for online instructional delivery in presenting the climate change content, the NASA climate datasets, and the visualization tools used for the production of elementary learning units. A rubric was developed to assess students' development of their webquests to meet the overall learning objectives and specific climate education objectives. Accompanying each webquest is a rubric with a defined table of criteria, for a teacher to assess students completing each of the required tasks for each lesson. Two primary challenges of technology integration for elementary pre-service teachers were 1) motivating pre-service teachers to be interested in climate education and 2) aligning elementary learning objectives with the Next Generation science standards of climate education that are non-existent in the Common Core State

  9. Evaluation of Quality of Output Product in the Technology Group for Pyrolisis of Organic Waste Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav HONUS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The issue of ecological removal of organic polymer materials and wastes polluting the environment is very much alive and it is clear that it will take on ever greater importance. a promising and innovative technology for environmentally friendly disposal of waste organic matter is pyrolysis. This method of thermal processing of waste for its degradation as well as a source of valuable energy products using the new system Pyromatic. This paper presents its technical description and evaluation of the quality of output product from the pyrolysis of tires, plastics and coal.

  10. FORMING PROFESSIONAL SKILLS OF THE PROSPECTIVE HEADS OF CHILDREN'S DANCE GROUPS DURING THE CHOREOGRAPHIC ACTIVITIES IN THE COURSE "FOLK DANCE THEORY AND METHODOLOGY"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Kotov

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the urgent problem of contemporary art pedagogy – involvement to training future professional choreographic traditions of different nations. Addressing to this problem is caused by a number of socio-political events in Ukraine, mainstreaming of national and international education, integration of Ukrainian education with the European educational space, intensive development of domestic students’ intercultural communication with young people from different countries, which is the basis for updating national art education. Prospective choreographers, who are being training at pedagogical universities to manage children's dance groups, should actively be involved into creating their own productions of folk dance various genres. It promotes the formation of choreographers’ professional competence and pedagogical skills. The development of Georgian "Lezginka" is proposed – a joint creative work of the teacher and students who get higher education degree in SHEE “Donbass State Pedagogical University” (Bachelor's Degree. Development of the dance contains schematic drawings of dance figures, it is recommended for use in forming choreographers’ professional skills while studying the course "Folk Dance Theory and Methodology". The author admits that folklore material requires a cautious, respectful attitude. Therefore, modern folk stage dances are integrally to combine traditional choreographic manner with its new interpretations. The author believes the actual capture of different nations’ choreographic culture improves intercultural youth communication; involves future professionals into the traditions of different nations; form professional skills of managers of children’s dance groups. The author concluded that a dance always reflects consciousness of different nations; future choreographers should be aware of characteristic features of dances of different world nations so that on the basis of traditional

  11. Optimizing Safety Stock Levels in Modular Production Systems Using Component Commonality and Group Technology Philosophy: A Study Based on Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Edgar Hernandez-Ruiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modular production and component commonality are two widely used strategies in the manufacturing industry to meet customers growing needs for customized products. Using these strategies, companies can enhance their performance to achieve optimal safety stock levels. Despite the importance of safety stocks in business competition, little attention has been paid to the way to reduce them without affecting the customer service levels. This paper develops a mathematical model to reduce safety stock levels in organizations that employ modular production. To construct the model, we take advantage of the benefits of aggregate inventories, standardization of components, component commonality, and Group Technology philosophy in regard to stock levels. The model is tested through the simulation of three years of operation of two modular product systems. For each system, we calculated and compared the safety stock levels for two cases: (1 under the only presence of component commonality and (2 under the presence of both component commonality and Group Technology philosophy. The results show a reduction in safety stock levels when we linked the component commonality with the Group Technology philosophy. The paper presents a discussion of the implications of each case, features of the model, and suggestions for future research.

  12. THE USE OF EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION DESIGN TECHNOLOGY IN THE COURSE OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE DISTANCE LEARNING AT NON-PHILOLOGICAL FACULTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Ye. Kravets

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates the view that the intensification of information flows as one of the main factors entering the world in the era of the global information society actualizes the problem of the organization of educational information space in the classroom for foreign language in higher educational institutions. The authors have proposed the educational information design technology in foreign languages distance learning at non-philological faculties. The article analyzes the experimental results verification of the technological effectiveness used in the learning content design in a foreign language for professional purposes; it has been proved the basic criterion of effective informational product – information-oriented competence of professional foreign language knowledge.

  13. Examination of engineering design teacher self-efficacy and knowledge base in secondary technology education and engineering-related courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vessel, Kanika Nicole

    2011-12-01

    There is an increasing demand for individuals with engineering education and skills of varying fields in everyday life. With the proper education students of high-needs schools can help meet the demand for a highly skilled and educated workforce. Researchers have assumed the supply and demand has not been met within the engineering workforce as a result of students' collegiate educational experiences, which are impacted by experiences in K-12 education. Although factors outside of the classroom contribute to the inability of universities to meet the increasing demand for the engineering workforce, most noted by researchers is the academic unpreparedness of freshman engineering students. The unpreparedness of entering freshman engineering students is a result of K-12 classroom experiences. This draws attention not only to the quality and competence of teachers present in the K-12 classroom, but the type of engineering instruction these students are receiving. This paper was an effort to systematically address one of the more direct and immediate factors impacting freshman engineering candidates, the quality of secondary engineering educators. Engineers develop new ideas using the engineering design process, which is taught at the collegiate level, and has been argued to be the best approach to teach technological literacy to all K-12 students. However, it is of importance to investigate whether technology educators have the knowledge and understanding of engineering design, how to transfer that knowledge in the classroom to students through instructional strategies, and their perception of their ability to do that. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to show the need for examining the degree to which technology and non-technology educators are implementing elements of engineering design in the curriculum.

  14. The Sociocultural Factors That Influenced the Success of Non-Traditional, Latina, Pre-Service Teachers in a Required Online Instructional Media and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Reyes, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    Home computer ownership and Internet access have become essential to education, job security and economic opportunity. The digital divide, the gap between those who can afford and can use computer technologies remains greatest for ethnic/racial groups placing them at a disadvantage for economic and educational opportunities. The purpose of the…

  15. Preparation of a technology development roadmap for the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) System : report of the ATW separations technologies and waste forms technical working group.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, E.; Duguid, J.; Henry, R.; Karell, E.; Laidler, J.; McDeavitt, S.; Thompson, M.; Toth, M.; Williamson, M.; Willit, J.

    1999-08-12

    In response to a Congressional mandate to prepare a roadmap for the development of Accelerator Transmutation of Waste (ATW) technology, a Technical Working Group comprised of members from various DOE laboratories was convened in March 1999 for the purpose of preparing that part of the technology development roadmap dealing with the separation of certain radionuclides for transmutation and the disposal of residual radioactive wastes from these partitioning operations. The Technical Working Group for ATW Separations Technologies and Waste Forms completed its work in June 1999, having carefully considered the technology options available. A baseline process flowsheet and backup process were identified for initial emphasis in a future research, development and demonstration program. The baseline process combines aqueous and pyrochemical processes to permit the efficient separation of the uranium, technetium, iodine and transuranic elements from the light water reactor (LWR) fuel in the head-end step. The backup process is an all- pyrochemical system. In conjunction with the aqueous process, the baseline flowsheet includes a pyrochemical process to prepare the transuranic material for fabrication of the ATW fuel assemblies. For the internal ATW fuel cycle the baseline process specifies another pyrochemical process to extract the transuranic elements, Tc and 1 from the ATW fuel. Fission products not separated for transmutation and trace amounts of actinide elements would be directed to two high-level waste forms, one a zirconium-based alloy and the other a glass/sodalite composite. Baseline cost and schedule estimates are provided for a RD&D program that would provide a full-scale demonstration of the complete separations and waste production flowsheet within 20 years.

  16. Using group technology to plan data processing in computer-aided control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaitsev, KS

    For the computer-aided control system of an enterprise, consideration was given to the methods of task grouping on the basis of Q-analysis. The methods and algorithms can be used to improve the procedure of task allocation to the general resources of a corporate network.

  17. Learning Mathematics with Technology: The Influence of Virtual Manipulatives on Different Achievement Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer-Packenham, Patricia; Suh, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of virtual manipulatives on different achievement groups during a teaching experiment in four fifth-grade classrooms. During a two-week unit focusing on two rational number concepts (fraction equivalence and fraction addition with unlike denominators) one low achieving, two average achieving, and one high…

  18. Distance educational technologies as means of increase of student’s motivation in the learning of general physics course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubkin, M. K.; Ivanov, D. A.; Ivanova, I. V.; Spivak, V. S.

    2017-11-01

    The Department of General physics and nuclear fusion, National Research University “Moscow Power Engineering Institute”, developed a set of tests (over 1000 questions) for the current control of knowledge of students in the section “Electricity and magnetism” of the General physics course using the internet distance learning system “Prometheus” (fourth generation). Under this section of the proposed test tasks are divided into sections corresponding to the topics section. These tasks include quality issues, design tasks, tasks with a choice of answers (one of many, many of many), the job with the selection region in the figure, tasks with detailed answer. The variety of tasks allows the teacher not only to objectively assess the student acquired knowledge but also to develop his problem-solving skills, to learn to be fluent in theory. The results of testing conducted for several years, show the high interest of students in the repeated independent execution of tasks and correlate well with the results of intermediate certification (exams).

  19. Validation of the academic management evaluation instru-ment based on principal component analysis for engineering and technological courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albano Oliveira Nunes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the expansion of higher education in Brazil has led to a series of demands related to aspects concerning training at the college level. These processes relate to: academics, professionals, entering in the labor market, among others. In this context, an important aspect is the quality of the courses. Thus, the evaluation becomes a critical diagnostic process of reality and starting point for possible interventions to be put in practice by the coordinators of the programs. This article presents the results of a questionnaire administered at the Federal University of Ceará (UFC, especially to  Systems & Digital Media and Engineering Programs professors. This research aims to identify how the professors from each department see the administrative procedures developed by the departments and also investigate the possibility of using Principal Components Analysis (PCA as a support for management of the higher education training. The methodology included the implementation of Likert scale questionnaire and subsequent mathematical treatment with PCA. The results indicate the potential application of PCA to support the management of higher education; it was possible to extract preliminaries inferences related to management methods and their characteristics. This suggests the possibility of developing the Educametrics field.

  20. A Visual Cryptography Based Watermark Technology for Individual and Group Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzam Sleit

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The ease by which digital information can be duplicated and distributed has led to the need for effective copyright protection tools. Various techniques including watermarking have been introduced in attempt to address these growing concerns. Most watermarking algorithms call for a piece of information to be hidden directly in media content, in such a way that it is imperceptible to a human observer, but detectable by a computer. This paper presents an improved cryptographic watermark method based on Hwang and Naor-Shamir [1, 2] approaches. The technique does not require that the watermark pattern to be embedded in to the original digital image. Verification information is generated and used to validate the ownership of the image or a group of images. The watermark pattern can be any bitmap image. Experimental results show that the proposed method can recover the watermark pattern from the marked image (or group of images even if major changes are reflected on the original digital image or any member of the image group such as rotation, scaling and distortion.

  1. USE OF NEAR INFRARED TECHNOLOGY TO PREDICT FATTY ACID GROUPS IN COMMERCIAL GROUND MEAT PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Ton

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Near infrared transmittance (NIT, 850 to 1048 nm spectroscopy was used to predict groups of fatty acids (FA, namely saturated FA (SFA, monounsaturated FA (MUFA and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA, in commercial ground meat samples aiming to develope a fast and reliable method for their determination in support of label declaration by the new EC Regulation 1169/2011. Dataset was built using 81 samples of commercial ground meat from different species: beef, pork, chicken and turkey. In some samples, meat was mixtured with different ingredients such as bread, cheese, spices and additives. Samples were first analysed by NIT instrument for spectral information and reference FA values were obtained by gas chromatographic analysis. Prediction models for SFA, MUFA and PUFA expressed on total FA exhibited coefficients of determination of calibration of 0.822, 0.367 and 0.780 on intact samples, and 0.879, 0.726 and 0.908 on minced samples, respectively. Good results were also obtained when FA groups were expressed as g/100g of fresh meat: the coefficient of determination of calibration increased to values larger than 0.915. Moreover, comparing the slightly lower coefficient of determination in crossvalidation of intact compared with minced meat suggested that equations developed for minced samples were more accurate than those built for intact products. Results highlighted the effectiveness of NIT spectroscopy to predict the major FA groups in commercial meat products.

  2. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EDUCATION: THE SYNTHESIS OF TRADITIONAL FORMAT AND E-LEARNING (AN EXPERIENCE OF DEVELOPING A NEW MODEL OF A LECTURE COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla L. Nazarenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Russian system of education is undergoing a process of modernization where ICT play a decisive role. It presupposes not only providing advanced technical equipment but also integrating technologies into a traditional teaching and learning process based on a well-developed and scholarly-proven methodology. A sound didactic solution is the introduction of an element of e-learning for structuring and monitoring students’ autonomous active study.A lecture course in a traditional format can be transformed into a mode of blended learning via combining classroom face-to-face teaching with students’ self-preparation in an interactive learning environment to enhance the efficacy the educational process. An experience of such a transformation is considered. 

  3. HEALTH RELATED APPLIED TECHNOLOGY OF SPECIAL HEALTH GROUP GIRL STUDENTS’ PHYSICAL TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Bartnovskay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to work out health related applied technology for special health girl students (with health problems and assess its influence on their physical condition. Material: 1st-3rd year girl students were the object of the research. All girl students were trained by discipline “Physical culture”. Somatic (body length and mass and physiometrical (vital capacity of lungs indicators were studied. Results: confident changes in morphological indicators (body mass and vital capacity of lungs were determined. We also noted demand in change of students’ approaches to assessment their physical condition. Principally new methods of students’ health protection and strengthening are offered. In its base there is methodology of human individual health, person’s deeply motivated social demands in being healthy. Conclusions: For strengthening girl students’ physical condition we recommend the following: prophylaxis health related physical culture measures; new approaches to assessment of own health; teachers’ pedagogic control; working out individual recommendations on correction of health related applied trainings.

  4. Study on technology for utilization of the comprehensive functions of human group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numano, Masayoshi; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Fukuto, Junji; Mitomo, Nobuo; Miyazaki, Keiko; Matsukura, Hiroshi; Ando, Hirotomo

    1998-01-01

    This study was made aiming to prevent misoperation in intellectual works during plant operation. Development of a tool to support various operations in a nuclear plant was attempted using multi-media projection system and transmission head-mount display. A geometric resemblance model of fast breeder reactor plant was constructed in 3D-VR space to express the quantity of state, and tools for surveillance support and group operation support were also produced experimentally. The efficacies of these tools were examined. When used in combination with support tools such as FTA, ETA, on-line manual, etc., 3D-VR spatial representation was considered useful to avoid human errors in judgement and operation. If a plant operation in group is regarded as a multi-agent consisting of a plant and humans, it was thought possible to make a modeling for sharing of roles and information exchange among agents in different intellectual levels. Thus, 3D-VR display was found useful for information exchange among highly intelligent operators. (M.N.)

  5. Multi-stage ranking of emergency technology alternatives for water source pollution accidents using a fuzzy group decision making tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jianhua; Meng, Xianlin; You, Hong

    2016-06-05

    Due to the increasing number of unexpected water source pollution events, selection of the most appropriate disposal technology for a specific pollution scenario is of crucial importance to the security of urban water supplies. However, the formulation of the optimum option is considerably difficult owing to the substantial uncertainty of such accidents. In this research, a multi-stage technical screening and evaluation tool is proposed to determine the optimal technique scheme, considering the areas of pollutant elimination both in drinking water sources and water treatment plants. In stage 1, a CBR-based group decision tool was developed to screen available technologies for different scenarios. Then, the threat degree caused by the pollution was estimated in stage 2 using a threat evaluation system and was partitioned into four levels. For each threat level, a corresponding set of technique evaluation criteria weights was obtained using Group-G1. To identify the optimization alternatives corresponding to the different threat levels, an extension of TOPSIS, a multi-criteria interval-valued trapezoidal fuzzy decision making technique containing the four arrays of criteria weights, to a group decision environment was investigated in stage 3. The effectiveness of the developed tool was elaborated by two actual thallium-contaminated scenarios associated with different threat levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Being an outpatient with rheumatoid arthritis - a focus group study on patients' self-efficacy and experiences from participation in a short course and one of three different outpatient settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Jette; Wagner, Lis; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    A Danish study compared three different outpatient settings for persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). All participants completed a short course before random allocation to one of three groups. A third of the patients continued with planned medical consultations. A third was allocated to a shared...

  7. Study on a low complexity adaptive modulation algorithm in OFDM-ROF system with sub-carrier grouping technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong-xin; Liu, Bo; Zhang, Li-jia; Xin, Xiang-jun; Tian, Qing-hua; Tian, Feng; Wang, Yong-jun; Rao, Lan; Mao, Yaya; Li, Deng-ao

    2018-01-01

    During the last decade, the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing radio-over-fiber (OFDM-ROF) system with adaptive modulation technology is of great interest due to its capability of raising the spectral efficiency dramatically, reducing the effects of fiber link or wireless channel, and improving the communication quality. In this study, according to theoretical analysis of nonlinear distortion and frequency selective fading on the transmitted signal, a low-complexity adaptive modulation algorithm is proposed in combination with sub-carrier grouping technology. This algorithm achieves the optimal performance of the system by calculating the average combined signal-to-noise ratio of each group and dynamically adjusting the origination modulation format according to the preset threshold and user's requirements. At the same time, this algorithm takes the sub-carrier group as the smallest unit in the initial bit allocation and the subsequent bit adjustment. So, the algorithm complexity is only 1 /M (M is the number of sub-carriers in each group) of Fischer algorithm, which is much smaller than many classic adaptive modulation algorithms, such as Hughes-Hartogs algorithm, Chow algorithm, and is in line with the development direction of green and high speed communication. Simulation results show that the performance of OFDM-ROF system with the improved algorithm is much better than those without adaptive modulation, and the BER of the former achieves 10e1 to 10e2 times lower than the latter when SNR values gets larger. We can obtain that this low complexity adaptive modulation algorithm is extremely useful for the OFDM-ROF system.

  8. Contribution of information and communication technologies in education and training in radiation protection: feedback of ENETRAP pilot e-learning course and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livolsi, Paul; Marco, Marisa; Llorente, Cristina; Rodriguez, Monica; Michel, Xavier; Balosso, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    A radiation protection pilot course using Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and cooperative tools has been proposed to students at Master level, MSc in Radiation Protection. The objectives and purposes are to introduce ICTs in order to improve the Education and Training (E and T) in Radiation Protection by facilitating the access to resources and services, and the exchanges and collaborative work between learners and teachers. The use of Open and Distance Learning (ODL) is one of the means to ensure the future supply of appropriately educated and skilled personnel for those who use ionising radiations across Europe and secondly, to meet the increasing demand and decreasing number of Radiation Protection Experts available in Europe. Open and Distance Learning contributes by promoting mobility of workers and students throughout the European countries. Assessment of this pilot course points out the benefits and inconveniences of such pedagogical approach in the Radiation Protection domain. This new approach has been considered attractive and efficient by students for specific topics. Students feel more involved in their own training by learning topics whenever they want, at their own pace. Concerning the content, an improvement has to be implemented by integrating Rich Media contents, and a more efficient track of each students knowledge by a tutor. Full complete distance learning seems not to be the best way, because students need to exchange in a face to face environment, with teachers, lecturers and tutors. A blended learning (b-Learning) is preferred by proposing various pedagogical sequences such as face to face, e-Learning, case studies and simulation activities. E-Learning or b-Learning can contribute to the capitalization of already existing good practices in the field of occupational, public and medical exposures. This pedagogical approach will be integrated in a part of the future European Master degree in Radiation Protection which starts in

  9. Wearable cardioverter defibrillators for the prevention of sudden cardiac arrest: a health technology assessment and patient focus group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ettinger S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sabine Ettinger,1 Michal Stanak,1 Piotr Szymański,2 Claudia Wild,1 Romana Tandara Haček,3 Darija Erčević,3 Renata Grenković,3 Mirjana Huić3 1Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Health Technology Assessment, Vienna, Austria; 2Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw, Poland; 3Department for Development, Research and Health Technology Assessment, Agency for Quality and Accreditation in Health Care and Social Welfare, Zagreb, Croatia Aim: To summarize the evidence on clinical effectiveness and safety of wearable cardioverter defibrillator (WCD therapy for primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac arrest in patients at risk. Methods: We performed a systematic literature search in databases including MEDLINE via OVID, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and CRD (DARE, NHS-EED, HTA. The evidence obtained was summarized according to GRADE methodology. A health technology assessment (HTA was conducted using the HTA Core Model® for rapid relative effectiveness assessment. Primary outcomes for the clinical effectiveness domain were all-cause and disease-specific mortality. Outcomes for the safety domain were adverse events (AEs and serious adverse events (SAEs. A focus group with cardiac disease patients was conducted to evaluate ethical, organizational, patient, social, and legal aspects of the WCD use. Results: No randomized- or non-randomized controlled trials were identified. Non-comparative studies (n=5 reported AEs including skin rash/itching (6%, false alarms (14%, and palpitations/light-headedness/fainting (9% and discontinuation due to comfort/lifestyle issues (16–22%, and SAEs including inappropriate shocks (0–2%, unsuccessful shocks (0–0.7%, and death (0–0.3%. The focus group results reported that experiencing a sense of security is crucial to patients and that the WCD is not considered an option for weeks or even months due to expected restrictions in living a “normal” life. Conclusion: The WCD appears to be relatively safe for short

  10. Contribution of information and communication technologies in education and training in radiation protection: feedback of ENETRAP pilot e-learning course and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livolsi, Paul; Marco Arboli, Marisa; Llorente Herranz, Cristina; Rodriguez, Monica; Michel, Xavier; Balosso, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Full text: In the Framework of European ENETRAP project, a Radiation Protection pilot course using Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) and cooperative tools has been proposed to students of the French Master in Radiation Protection, in October 2007. The objectives and purposes are to introduce ICT in order to improve the Education and Training (E and T) in Radiation Protection by facilitating on the one hand the access to resources and services, and on the other hand, the exchanges and collaborative works between learners and teachers. The use of Open and Distance Learning (ODL) is one of the means to ensure the future supply of appropriately educated and skilled personnel for those who use ionising radiations across Europe and secondly, to meet the increasing demand and decreasing number of radiation protection experts available in Europe. Open and Distance Learning contributes to promote mobility of workers and students throughout the European countries where students can be taught at 'Anytime, anyplace, anywhere'. Assessment of this pilot course points out the benefits and inconveniences of such pedagogical approach in the Radiation Protection domain. This new approach has been considered attractive and efficient by students for topics such as radioactivity, interaction of radiation with matter. Students feel more involved in their own training by learning topics whenever they want, at their own rhythm. Concerning the content, an improvement has to be implemented by integrating Rich Media contents (video, sound, simulation, flash animation) and a more efficient track of the knowledge by a tutor. A full complete distance learning seems not to be the best way, because students need to exchange in a face to face period, with teachers, lecturers and tutors. A blended learning (b-learning) is preferred by proposing various pedagogical sequences such as face to face, e-learning, case studies and simulation activities. This distance learning approach could

  11. Technology Revolution = Education Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLafferty, Charles L., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Outlines one attempt to infuse technology into an educational psychology course, discussing commonly available tools and techniques (e.g., online syllabus, e-mail, World Wide Web, presentation packages, and use of learning teams and electronic discussion groups). The paper examines obstacles, student responses, application in the K-12 classroom,…

  12. A university course timetabling problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. Phala

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a university course timetabling problem. The problem as experienced at Unibo is formulated in such a way that simple heuristics can be used to achieve the objective of finding either an 'optimal' or a feasible practical solution. the problem is divided into three phases, namely grouping of courses into course groups, allocation of lecture rooms to courses within groups, and finally, scheduling of periods to course groups. Heuristic algorithms are proposed to solve this problem. The computerised algorithms which have been integrated into Unibo's Student Management System are fully implemented.

  13. Social Communications, Course Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Harry J.; Anderson, Floyd L.

    Using federal, state, and local funds, the Work Opportunity Center provides guidance, skill training, and supportive services for the dropout and/or hard-core unemployed youth 16 to 21 years of age. This paper describes the social communications course offered by the Center. Offering individual as well as group coverage, the course includes…

  14. Quality of Life as Medicine III. A Qualitative Analysis of the Effect of a Five-Day Intervention with Existential Holistic Group Therapy or a Quality of Life Course as a Modern Rite of Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2004-01-01

    The courses teach the participants respect, love, and intimacy; help them to draw on their seemingly unlimited hidden resources; and inspire them to take more responsibility for their own life. Exercises are accomplished with a partner chosen at the course as: (1 a person you like, (2 a person you do not know already, or (3 a person to whom you want to give help, support, and holding more than you want to get help from him or her. Pilot studies with 5-day quality of life interventions that combine training in quality of life philosophy with psychotherapy and bodywork have proved effective on patients with chronic pain and alcoholism. The present design aims to take this a step further and engage the patients in a process of personal growth that will last for years. The aim is to lead them to a stabile state of quality of life, health, and ability, from where they will not again fall into sickness and unhappiness. The focus of these courses is as much on prevention as is it on healing. The existential group therapy induces spontaneous healing of body, mind, and soul that seems to be highly efficient with hopefully lasting results. Every course is intended to give an immediate improvement in the quality of life, so its efficiency can be measured with the square curve paradigm. We have studied the participant’s accounts from their experience with the courses and have analyzed the remarkably large, qualitative changes in the state of being, quality of life, health, and consciousness, which many participants experience during the course. The long-term and preventative effects of the courses have yet to be documented.

  15. Gamma gamma technology group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    month after this David Miller suffered a major stroke which disrupted our efforts considerably. The organisation of the Laser Cavity meeting was taken over by myself and was postponed to 10 January 2006. I presented the outcome of this meeting at this conference [2]. I am happy to report that David continues to make.

  16. Assessing Student Attitudes Towards Science in an Adaptive Online Astrobiology Course: Comparing Online and On-Campus Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Perera, V.; Mead, C.; Horodyskyj, L.; Semken, S. C.; Lopatto, D.; Anbar, A. D.

    2016-12-01

    General-education Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses are considered essential to a college education, in part, to train students to think critically and to make informed decisions about complex scientific issues such as climate change and public health. Therefore, the goals of these STEM courses go beyond content knowledge to include generating positive attitudes towards science, developing competence in evaluating scientific information in everyday life, and understanding the nature of science. The Classroom Undergraduate Research Experience (CURE) survey is frequently used to measure these attitudes, but it has not previously been used in an online, general education course. In this work, we administered the CURE survey for three semesters (N = 774) before and after completion of an online astrobiology course called Habitable Worlds. We compare students taking this course as part of fully-online degree programs (o-course) with those taking it as part of traditional undergraduate programs (i-course). More females and older students were among the o-course group, while overall the course had more white students than the Arizona State University average. Mean course grades were similar between the two groups but attitudes toward science differred significantly. O-course students began the course with more positive attitudes than i-course students, and o-course students also showed more positive changes at the end of the course. These differences suggest lesser intrinsic motivation among the i-course students. Additionally, pre-course attitudes correlated with final course grade for o-course students, but not for i-course students, which implies that success among o-course students is influenced by different factors than i-course students. Thus, effective student support strategies may differ for online-only students. Future work will include student interviews to better calibrate the CURE survey to online science courses.

  17. Trends of Students of the College of Basic Science towards Teaching the Course of Athletics and Health by Using Computer Technology in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University (WISE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Ibrahim Abdul Ghani; Khawaldeh, Mohammad Falah Ali

    2014-01-01

    The Study aimed at identifying the trends of the students of basic sciences College in the World Islamic Sciences and Education University towards teaching health and sport course by using computer technology as a teaching method, and to identify also the impact of the variables of academic level and the gender on the students' trends. The study…

  18. The Type and Impact of Evidence Review Group Exploratory Analyses in the NICE Single Technology Appraisal Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Christopher; Kaltenthaler, Eva; Hill-McManus, Daniel; Scope, Alison; Holmes, Michael; Rice, Stephen; Rose, Micah; Tappenden, Paul; Woolacott, Nerys

    2017-06-01

    As part of the UK National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) single technology appraisal process, independent evidence review groups (ERGs) critically appraise a company's submission relating to a specific technology and indication. To explore the type of additional exploratory analyses conducted by ERGs and their impact on the recommendations made by NICE. The 100 most recently completed single technology appraisals with published guidance were selected for inclusion. A content analysis of relevant documents was undertaken to identify and extract relevant data, and narrative synthesis was used to rationalize and present these data. The types of exploratory analysis conducted in relation to companies' models were fixing errors, addressing violations, addressing matters of judgment, and the provision of a new, ERG-preferred base case. Ninety-three of the 100 ERG reports contained at least one of these analyses. The most frequently reported type of analysis in these 93 ERG reports related to the category "Matters of judgment," which was reported in 83 reports (89%). At least one of the exploratory analyses conducted and reported by an ERG is mentioned in 97% of NICE appraisal consultation documents and 94% of NICE final appraisal determinations, and had a clear influence on recommendations in 72% of appraisal consultation documents and 47% of final appraisal determinations. These results suggest that the additional analyses undertaken by ERGs in the appraisal of company submissions are highly influential in the policy-making and decision-making process. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Health Technology Assessment for Molecular Diagnostics: Practices, Challenges, and Recommendations from the Medical Devices and Diagnostics Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Susan; Polisena, Julie; S Spinner, Daryl; Postulka, Anne; Y Lu, Christine; Tiwana, Simrandeep K; Faulkner, Eric; Poulios, Nick; Zah, Vladimir; Longacre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Health technology assessments (HTAs) are increasingly used to inform coverage, access, and utilization of medical technologies including molecular diagnostics (MDx). Although MDx are used to screen patients and inform disease management and treatment decisions, there is no uniform approach to their evaluation by HTA organizations. The International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research Devices and Diagnostics Special Interest Group reviewed diagnostic-specific HTA programs and identified elements representing common and best practices. MDx-specific HTA programs in Europe, Australia, and North America were characterized by methodology, evaluation framework, and impact. Published MDx HTAs were reviewed, and five representative case studies of test evaluations were developed: United Kingdom (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence's Diagnostics Assessment Programme, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase mutation), United States (Palmetto's Molecular Diagnostic Services Program, OncotypeDx prostate cancer test), Germany (Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare, human papillomavirus testing), Australia (Medical Services Advisory Committee, anaplastic lymphoma kinase testing for non-small cell lung cancer), and Canada (Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health, Rapid Response: Non-invasive Prenatal Testing). Overall, the few HTA programs that have MDx-specific methods do not provide clear parameters of acceptability related to clinical and analytic performance, clinical utility, and economic impact. The case studies highlight similarities and differences in evaluation approaches across HTAs in the performance metrics used (analytic and clinical validity, clinical utility), evidence requirements, and how value is measured. Not all HTAs are directly linked to reimbursement outcomes. To improve MDx HTAs, organizations should provide greater transparency, better communication and collaboration between industry and HTA

  20. International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. Summary report of the 14. plenary meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The fourteenth Plenary Meeting of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 21 to 23 May 1997. Twenty-seven participants, from twenty two Member States and two international organizations, attended the meeting. These presentations generally gave: The general situation of the nuclear industry in the country; Fuel fabrication; Fuel performance, high burnup fuel (including MOX) operational experience; Status and trends in fuel research programmes directed to achievement sufficient safety margins at high burnups with regard to normal and transient operational conditions. Majority of countries reported on the stable situation of the nuclear fuel industry, i.e. without significant additions/cuts in nuclear power plant and fuel fabrication plant (NPP) capacities. Refs, figs, tabs

  1. Environmental technology. Toshiba's approach to environmental protection. Kankyo gijutsu. Toshiba group no kankyo hozen eno torikumi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoi, Y. (Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-05-01

    The present report introduces the vicissitude of Toshiba Group's grappling with the preservation of global environment since its start in 1988. Positioned at the top of Toshiba's entire organization, the Global Environmental Committee deals with all matters concerning the administration, engineering, production and sales, and take actions for the preservation to concretize the 'Freonless, Recycling, Energy-saving and Earth-protection'. Its sub-organization comprises the Environmental Technology Promotion Committee, Environmental Protection Management Committee and Product Recycling Legal Committee. Cycling through 'Plan-Do-See' is being executed. Given to the motto for the environment preserving action, the particular symbol mark of 'Free+2A' is having 2A executed. The 2A stands for the 'Action Plan' and 'Auditing'. The execution result is duly reported to the administration conference which is Toshiba's highest decision-making organ. Together with the environment managing action, connection must be built up between the system of social economy and vicissitude of technological development. Toward the political and industrial fields in Japan and abroad, the 'Voluntary Plan' has been stepping ahead since 1993 for the environmental preservation. 5 figs.

  2. Benefits of agricultural technology innovation capacity to peasant farmers in rural poor areas: The case of DBN-Group, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Agri Eneji

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available DaBeiNong (DBN Technology Group Co Ltd is a private enterprise, at the cutting edge of the agricultural high-tech industry in China. It has developed its innovative capabilities through Research and Development (R&D activities, skilled R&D personnel, new products, services, processes and markets. This study contributes to knowledge by identifying and constructing a model of the enterprise innovation capacity; the inputs and outputs of innovation in DBN and 9 other agricultural high-tech enterprises in China. We analyzed the enterprise technology innovation capacity and offered recommendations. Two sets of questionnaires were used; for the peasant farmers, and for the agricultural enterprises. We used the rank factors on an ordinal scale and simple percentages. We used econometric model to analyze seven factors of agricultural enterprise innovation capacity. The results show that R&D is strategic to Agricultural Enterprise Innovation Capacity (AETIC. However, the benefits to the peasant farmers need to be further intensified, and stepped up from its present average level. We found that enterprises with higher capital and larger sales have more R&D investment than those with smaller sales. Promoting agricultural research and rural development is crucial to pro-poor growth, given the potential for smallholder agriculture to rapidly absorb and adopt innovations.

  3. Veterans’ Preferences for Exchanging Information Using Veterans Affairs Health Information Technologies: Focus Group Results and Modeling Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Margeaux; Nazi, Kim; Antinori, Nicole; Melillo, Christine; Cotner, Bridget A; Hathaway, Wendy; Cook, Ashley; Wilck, Nancy; Noonan, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    Background The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has multiple health information technology (HIT) resources for veterans to support their health care management. These include a patient portal, VetLink Kiosks, mobile apps, and telehealth services. The veteran patient population has a variety of needs and preferences that can inform current VA HIT redesign efforts to meet consumer needs. Objective This study aimed to describe veterans’ experiences using the current VA HIT and identify their vision for the future of an integrated VA HIT system. Methods Two rounds of focus group interviews were conducted with a single cohort of 47 veterans and one female caregiver recruited from Bedford, Massachusetts, and Tampa, Florida. Focus group interviews included simulation modeling activities and a self-administered survey. This study also used an expert panel group to provide data and input throughout the study process. High-fidelity, interactive simulations were created and used to facilitate collection of qualitative data. The simulations were developed based on system requirements, data collected through operational efforts, and participants' reported preferences for using VA HIT. Pairwise comparison activities of HIT resources were conducted with both focus groups and the expert panel. Rapid iterative content analysis was used to analyze qualitative data. Descriptive statistics summarized quantitative data. Results Data themes included (1) current use of VA HIT, (2) non-VA HIT use, and (3) preferences for future use of VA HIT. Data indicated that, although the Secure Messaging feature was often preferred, a full range of HIT options are needed. These data were then used to develop veteran-driven simulations that illustrate user needs and expectations when using a HIT system and services to access VA health care services. Conclusions Patient participant redesign processes present critical opportunities for creating a human-centered design. Veterans value virtual health

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION COATINGS AND COATING EQUIPMENT PROGRAM (ETV CCEP), FINAL TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS GROUP TAGNITE--TESTING AND QUALITY ASSURANCE PLAN (T/QAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overall objective of the Environmental Testing and Verification Coatings and Coating Equipment Program is to verify pollution prevention and performance characteristics of coating technologies and make the results of the testing available to prospective coating technology use...

  5. ATLes: the strategic application of Web-based technology to address learning objectives and enhance classroom discussion in a veterinary pathology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Stephen A; Collins, Peggy L; Quitadamo, Ian J; Brahler, C Jayne; Knudson, Cameron D; Crouch, Gregory J

    2005-01-01

    A case-based program called ATLes (Adaptive Teaching and Learning Environments) was designed for use in a systemic pathology course and implemented over a four-year period. Second-year veterinary students working in small collaborative learning groups used the program prior to their weekly pathology laboratory. The goals of ATLes were to better address specific learning objectives in the course (notably the appreciation of pathophysiology), to solve previously identified problems associated with information overload and information sorting that commonly occur as part of discovery-based processes, and to enhance classroom discussion. The program was also designed to model and allow students to practice the problem-oriented approach to clinical cases, thereby enabling them to study pathology in a relevant clinical context. Features included opportunities for students to obtain additional information on the case by requesting specific laboratory tests and/or diagnostic procedures. However, students were also required to justify their diagnostic plans and to provide mechanistic analyses. The use of ATLes met most of these objectives. Student acceptance was high, and students favorably reviewed the online ''Content Links'' that made useful information more readily accessible and level appropriate. Students came to the lab better prepared to engage in an in-depth and high-quality discussion and were better able to connect clinical problems to underlying changes in tissue (lesions). However, many students indicated that the required time on task prior to lab might have been excessive relative to what they thought they learned. The classroom discussion, although improved, was not elevated to the expected level-most likely reflecting other missing elements of the learning environment, including the existing student culture and the students' current discussion skills. This article briefly discusses the lessons learned from ATLes and how similar case-based exercises might be

  6. First meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 18-21 May 1987. (Pt. 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The first meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria from 18-21 May 1987. Part I of the Summary Report contains the minutes of the meeting

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Preferred Learning and Teaching Styles for Engineering, Industrial, and Technology Education Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Fantz, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    In the spring semester of 2010, a materials process course was selected as a means to perform a preferred learning style research study. This course was selected because it contained three groups of students: technology education, engineering technology, and industrial technology. The researchers believed that the differences in the students'…

  8. The Distribution of Instructional Time and Its Effect on Group Cohesion in the Foreign Language Classroom: A Comparison of Intensive and Standard Format Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinger, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    This paper argues for the influence of the distribution of instructional time on group cohesion in the foreign language classroom and postulates that concentrating classroom time enhances group cohesion. To test the hypothesis, a comparative classroom study of two groups of Spanish learners in their second year of learning, one following an…

  9. Disinvestment policy and the public funding of assisted reproductive technologies: outcomes of deliberative engagements with three key stakeholder groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgetts, Katherine; Hiller, Janet E; Street, Jackie M; Carter, Drew; Braunack-Mayer, Annette J; Watt, Amber M; Moss, John R; Elshaug, Adam G

    2014-05-05

    Measures to improve the quality and sustainability of healthcare practice and provision have become a policy concern. In addition, the involvement of stakeholders in health policy decision-making has been advocated, as complex questions arise around the structure of funding arrangements in a context of limited resources. Using a case study of assisted reproductive technologies (ART), deliberative engagements with a range of stakeholder groups were held on the topic of how best to structure the distribution of Australian public funding in this domain. Deliberative engagements were carried out with groups of ART consumers, clinicians and community members. The forums were informed by a systematic review of ART treatment safety and effectiveness (focusing, in particular, on maternal age and number of treatment cycles), as well as by international policy comparisons, and ethical and cost analyses. Forum discussions were transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Each forum demonstrated stakeholders' capacity to understand concepts of choice under resource scarcity and disinvestment, and to countenance options for ART funding not always aligned with their interests. Deliberations in each engagement identified concerns around 'equity' and 'patient responsibility', culminating in a broad preference for (potential) ART subsidy restrictions to be based upon individual factors rather than maternal age or number of treatment cycles. Community participants were open to restrictions based upon measures of body mass index (BMI) and smoking status, while consumers and clinicians saw support to improve these factors as part of an ART treatment program, as distinct from a funding criterion. All groups advocated continued patient co-payments, with measures in place to provide treatment access to those unable to pay (namely, equity of access). Deliberations yielded qualitative, socially-negotiated evidence required to inform ethical, accountable policy decisions in the specific

  10. PRODUCTIVE PROGRESS IN A GOAT PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION, "CAPRINOCULTORES UNIDOS DE GUANAJUATO AC", THROUGH A TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER SYSTEM GGAVATT (LIVESTOCK VALIDATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER GROUP (2001-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Oliveros-Oliveros

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the effect of technology adoption on milk goat producers in central México. The association has 13 producers, with an average age 41.5 years old, the average schooling reaches junior high school (3rd year, and  a mean of 6 dependants per family. This association has an average number of 246 female goats per herd, a total of 3447 females, and 2190 females in production control. The income in relation to investment is 36%. Technological practices implemented to date and the percentage of use are: Weighing milk (100%, Animal Nutrition consulting (71%, Estrus synchronization and reproductive management techniques (40%, Gestation Diagnosis (93%, Brucellosis control herd program (100%, Artificial kids raising in slat (46%, Disease diagnosis and management (61%, Certification of good milking practice (53%, Linear and genetics evaluation (87% Evaluation of genetic records ( 61%, Forage  conservation by silage (93%, Milk components analysis (100%, dispersion of genetic material (71%, Analysis and data processing for replacement selection and animal sale (Sire and females(100%, Bacteriological analysis of milk (93%, Cryoscopic point of milk (100%, and Diagnosis of subclinical mastitis (cytometryc flow (100%. An 80% of the producers have adopted different practices, and the association has promoted and implemented different programs such as: control milk production, milk quality, genealogical records, disease control, marketing in group, sales of fluid milk and dehydration of milk for conservation and sale. Accordingly to such practices, results are as follows: 11,180 kids born, from which 52% were females and 48% males, with 56.9%, 24.3%, 15.7% and 2.9% of double, triple, simple and quadruple births, respectively. The mean birth weight was 3.32 kg and 15.7 kg weaning at 60 days, with a daily gain weight (DGW of 206.33 g. For milk production, 3534 lactations were analyzed from 1999 to 2007 in a 90.4% of animals

  11. Using Internet Groups in the Learning of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Arda

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, an application of one aspect of the Internet technology, namely Internet groups, into the teaching of American and British literatures is evaluated by means of a content analysis of the Internet group which was used as the course component. The aim of this paper was to see how students used the Internet group in the learning of…

  12. Student perceptions of gamified audience response system interactions in large group lectures and via lecture capture technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, Robin K; McCoy, Lise; Kinney, Marjorie; Schwartz, Frederic N

    2015-05-22

    Higher education students have positive attitudes about the use of audience response systems (ARS), but even technology-enhanced lessons can become tiresome if the pedagogical approach is exactly the same with each implementation. Gamification is the notion that gaming mechanics can be applied to routine activities. In this study, TurningPoint (TP) ARS interactions were gamified and implemented in 22 large group medical microbiology lectures throughout an integrated year 1 osteopathic medical school curriculum. A 32-item questionnaire was used to measure students' perceptions of the gamified TP interactions at the end of their first year. The survey instrument generated both Likert scale and open-ended response data that addressed game design and variety, engagement and learning features, use of TP questions after class, and any value of lecture capture technology for reviewing these interactive presentations. The Chi Square Test was used to analyze grouped responses to Likert scale questions. Responses to open-ended prompts were categorized using open-coding. Ninety-one students out of 106 (86 %) responded to the survey. A significant majority of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed that the games were engaging, and an effective learning tool. The questionnaire investigated the degree to which specific features of these interactions were engaging (nine items) and promoted learning (seven items). The most highly ranked engagement aspects were peer competition and focus on the activity (tied for highest ranking), and the most highly ranked learning aspect was applying theoretical knowledge to clinical scenarios. Another notable item was the variety of interactions, which ranked in the top three in both the engagement and learning categories. Open-ended comments shed light on how students use TP questions for exam preparation, and revealed engaging and non-engaging attributes of these interactive sessions for students who review them via lecture capture

  13. Risk of stillbirth and infant deaths after assisted reproductive technology: a Nordic study from the CoNARTaS group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henningsen, A A; Wennerholm, U B; Gissler, M; Romundstad, L B; Nygren, K G; Tiitinen, A; Skjaerven, R; Nyboe Andersen, A; Lidegaard, Ø; Forman, J L; Pinborg, A

    2014-05-01

    Is the risk of stillbirth and perinatal deaths increased after assisted reproductive technology (ART) compared with pregnancies established by spontaneous conception (SC)? A significantly increased risk of stillbirth in ART singletons was only observed before 28 + 0 gestational weeks. The current literature indicates that children born after ART have an increased risk of perinatal death. The knowledge on stillbirth in ART pregnancies is limited. A population based case-control study. A total of 62 485 singletons and 29 793 twins born after ART in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden, from 1982 to 2007, were compared with 362 798 spontaneously conceived (SC) singletons and 132 181 twins. The adjusted rate ratio for stillbirth at gestational weeks 22 + 0 to 27 + 6 was 2.08 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.55-2.78] for ART versus SC singletons. After 28 + 0 gestational weeks there was no significant difference in the risk of stillbirth between ART and SC singletons. ART twins had a lower risk of stillbirth compared with SC twins, but when restricting the analysis to opposite-sex twins and excluding all monozygotic twins, there was no significant difference between the groups. Singletons conceived by ART had an overall increased risk of early neonatal death (adjusted odds ratio 1.54, 95% CI 1.28-1.85) and death within the first year after birth (1.45, 1.26-1.68). No difference regarding these two parameters was found when further adjusting for the gestational age [(0.97, 0.80-1.18) and (0.99, 0.85-1.16), respectively]. ART twins had a lower risk of early neonatal and infant deaths than SC twins, but no difference was found when restricting the analyses to opposite-sex twins. We were not able to adjust for potential confounders, such as a prior history of stillbirth, induction of labour, body mass index or smoking. The risk of stillbirth in ART versus SC singletons was only increased for very early gestational ages (before 28 weeks). This might indicate that the current

  14. Degarelix for Treating Advanced Hormone-Dependent Prostate Cancer: An Evidence Review Group Perspective of a NICE Single Technology Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttley, Lesley; Whyte, Sophie; Gomersall, Timothy; Ren, Shijie; Wong, Ruth; Chambers, Duncan; Tappenden, Paul

    2017-07-01

    As part of its Single Technology Appraisal Process, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited the manufacturer of degarelix (Ferring Pharmaceuticals) to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of degarelix for the treatment of advanced hormone-dependent prostate cancer. The School of Health and Related Research Technology Appraisal Group at the University of Sheffield was commissioned to act as the independent Evidence Review Group (ERG). The ERG produced a critical review of the evidence contained within the company's submission to NICE. The evidence, which included a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of degarelix versus leuprorelin, found that degarelix was non-inferior to leuprorelin for reduction of testosterone levels and that degarelix achieved a more rapid suppression of prostate-specific antigen levels and subsequently decreased incidences of testosterone flare associated with luteinising hormone releasing-hormone (LHRH) agonists. However, protection against testosterone flare for the comparators in the clinical trials was not employed in line with UK clinical practice. Further claims surrounding overall survival, cardiovascular adverse events and clinical equivalence of the comparator drugs from six RCTs of degarelix should be regarded with caution because of flaws and inconsistencies in the pooling of trial data to draw conclusions. The cost-effectiveness evidence included a de novo economic model. Based on the ERG's preferred base case, the deterministic incremental cost-effectiveness analysis (ICER) for degarelix versus 3-monthly triptorelin was £14,798 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Additional scenario analyses undertaken by the ERG resulted in ICERs for degarelix versus 3-monthly triptorelin ranging from £17,067 to £35,589 per QALY gained. Subgroup analyses undertaken using the Appraisal Committee's preferred assumptions suggested that degarelix was not cost effective for the subgroup with

  15. Math 3310--Technical Mathematics I. Course Outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York Inst. of Tech., Old Westbury.

    This document contains the course syllabus and 12 independent practice modules for a college pre-calculus designed as the first course in a two-semester sequence for students in a Bachelor of Technology program. The course emphasizes engineering technology applications and verbal problems. Topics include a review of elementary algebra; factoring…

  16. Blended Course Design: Where's the Pedagogy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Blended or hybrid course design is generally considered to involve a combination of online and classroom activities. However defining blended courses solely based on delivery mode suggests there is nothing more to a blended course than where students meet and how they use technology. Ultimately there is a risk that blended courses defined in this…

  17. Veterans' Preferences for Exchanging Information Using Veterans Affairs Health Information Technologies: Focus Group Results and Modeling Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jolie N; Chavez, Margeaux; Nazi, Kim; Antinori, Nicole; Melillo, Christine; Cotner, Bridget A; Hathaway, Wendy; Cook, Ashley; Wilck, Nancy; Noonan, Abigail

    2017-10-23

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) has multiple health information technology (HIT) resources for veterans to support their health care management. These include a patient portal, VetLink Kiosks, mobile apps, and telehealth services. The veteran patient population has a variety of needs and preferences that can inform current VA HIT redesign efforts to meet consumer needs. This study aimed to describe veterans' experiences using the current VA HIT and identify their vision for the future of an integrated VA HIT system. Two rounds of focus group interviews were conducted with a single cohort of 47 veterans and one female caregiver recruited from Bedford, Massachusetts, and Tampa, Florida. Focus group interviews included simulation modeling activities and a self-administered survey. This study also used an expert panel group to provide data and input throughout the study process. High-fidelity, interactive simulations were created and used to facilitate collection of qualitative data. The simulations were developed based on system requirements, data collected through operational efforts, and participants' reported preferences for using VA HIT. Pairwise comparison activities of HIT resources were conducted with both focus groups and the expert panel. Rapid iterative content analysis was used to analyze qualitative data. Descriptive statistics summarized quantitative data. Data themes included (1) current use of VA HIT, (2) non-VA HIT use, and (3) preferences for future use of VA HIT. Data indicated that, although the Secure Messaging feature was often preferred, a full range of HIT options are needed. These data were then used to develop veteran-driven simulations that illustrate user needs and expectations when using a HIT system and services to access VA health care services. Patient participant redesign processes present critical opportunities for creating a human-centered design. Veterans value virtual health care options and prefer standardized, integrated

  18. Assessing Aptitude and Attitude Development in a Translation Skills Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekheimer, Mohamed Amin A.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates the effects on EFL students of using Blackboard technology and online dictionaries in developing translating skills and building positive attitudes towards translation in male Saudi college students. The study compares two groups of students in a translation course; one in a traditional, face-to-face setting (control) and…

  19. CERN accelerator school: Introductory course in Poland

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    For the first time since the CERN Accelerator School (CAS) was set up, the 'Introduction to Accelerator Physics' course was held in Zakopane, Poland. This course was organised together with the National Atomic Energy Agency, Warsaw, and the AGH University of Science and Technology, Cracow, and was held from 1-13 October 2006 at the foot of the Tatra Mountains. The course was very well attended with 113 participants representing 26 different nationalities. Although most of the participants originated from Europe, some students came from countries as far away as Canada, China, India and North America. The intensive programme comprised 35 lectures, 3 seminars given by local Polish lecturers, 5 tutorials where the students were split into four groups, a poster session where students could present their own work and 7 hours of guided and private study. The participants appreciated these study periods, which encouraged collaboration and knowledge-sharing in solving problems and gave them the opportunity to get t...

  20. The Combination Design of Enabling Technologies in Group Learning: New Study Support Service for Visually Impaired University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangsri, Chatcai; Na-Takuatoong, Onjaree; Sophatsathit, Peraphon

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to show how the process of new service technology-based development improves the current study support service for visually impaired university students. Numerous studies have contributed to improving assisted aid technology such as screen readers, the development and the use of audiobooks, and technology that supports individual…