WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology core competencies

  1. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY AS A CORE COMPETENCE IN THE HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY IN THE CITY OF CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, Lynda Priscilla Vincent

    2012-01-01

    A core competence is a competitively important activity which a company performs better than other internal activities. Information and communication technology (ICT) is one of the core competencies that an organization possesses. The study focuses on the extent to which ICT as core competency is contributing to the success of hospitality industry in Cape Town, South Africa. The researcher reckoned that that ICT stands out to be a core competence in the hospitality industry in Cape Town, Sout...

  2. 78 FR 22527 - Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background. The Terms of Reference (TOR) provided by the Office of the Secretary of... Technology (S&T) Essential Core Competencies.'' In accordance with the TOR, this study will analyze the... Security Service (DSS) Site for the NISPOM is: http://www.dss.mil/isp/fac_clear/download_nispom.html...

  3. Core Competence and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Gary; Hooper, Nick

    2000-01-01

    Outlines the concept of core competence and applies it to postcompulsory education in the United Kingdom. Adopts an educational perspective that suggests accreditation as the core competence of universities. This economic approach suggests that the market trend toward lifetime learning might best be met by institutions developing a core competence…

  4. Assessing Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  5. Adult educators' core competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators’ required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural...... environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or “core......” requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students’ prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator’s reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence...

  6. What Core Competencies Are Related to Teachers' Innovative Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Wang, Di; Cai, Yonghong; Engels, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate teachers' core competencies in relation to their innovative teaching performance. Based on the literature and previous studies in this field, four competencies (learning competency, educational competency, social competency and technological competency) are theorised as core competencies for teachers'…

  7. Discovering the Army's Core Competencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudesheim, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    This paper seeks to answer the question, "Has the Army correctly identified its core competencies to ensure the Army can adequately respond to the national military strategy?" FM 1, The Army (Prototype Draft...

  8. Developing a Consensus-Driven, Core Competency Model to Shape Future Audio Engineering Technology Curriculum: A Web-Based Modified Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tough, David T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this online study was to create a ranking of essential core competencies and technologies required by AET (audio engineering technology) programs 10 years in the future. The study was designed to facilitate curriculum development and improvement in the rapidly expanding number of small to medium sized audio engineering technology…

  9. One Health Core Competency Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Frankson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting ‘One Health’ approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education as they describe the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  10. Linking Core Competence, Innovation and Firm Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öznur Gökkaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Organizational resources and capabilities realized by business practitioners and researchershave significant importanceas they support firmperformance and competitive advantage. However, what exactly core competence is not clearly understood since terms such as resource, capability and compe tence are used interchangeably by researchers. From this point forth, this article provides a framework for separating organization's core competencies from resource and capability. We propose three empirical determiners such as uniqueness,inimitability and extendibilityto the research modelfor separating organization's core competencies from resource and capability.Second, the proposed core competence framework serves as a tool for assessing the relationship between core competencies and innovation. Finally, the paper intended to help leaders and managers about how they can enhance firm performance by means of supporting core competencies and innovation.

  11. Information professionals: core competencies and professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We discuss the concept of core competencies applied to policies for teaching and training information professionals, particularly librarians. Method. Sixty graduates of the Institute were employed as information professionals. These sixty were asked to attribute degrees of importance to specific items associated with knowledge and skills that, within the scope of this research, were considered core competencies for meeting the demands of their jobs. Participants were also asked to cite knowledge they acquired in school and knowledge they use in exercising their profession, the skills that they consider necessary but that they did not gain in school, and the difficulties they encounter in exercising their profession and for which they were not sufficiently well prepared. Analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative data analyses were performed. The data were tabulated using Access and several reports and cross-tabulations were generated. Results. The results suggest a gulf between knowledge and skills acquired in library school and those that are required by the job market. In particular, participants lacked the skills they needed to work with information and communication technologies. Conclusion. The concept of core competencies is increasingly taken into account by the productive sector of the economy. The educational system ought to keep up with this change. The empirical research described shows that there is a need to establish advanced and modern policies for the education of librarians, participants in the market for information professionals.

  12. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  13. [Essential professional core competencies for nurses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih

    2010-10-01

    Core competency is vital to the nursing profession. Such helps guarantee the high quality and effectiveness of delivered care and maintains the social value and status of the nursing profession. This article introduces the definition of nursing core competency and its connotations. The core competency profile for the nursing profession embraces basic behavioral attributes as well as mastery of advanced practice skills. The former include such attributes as gentleness, willingness to serve, keen observation and judgment, efficiency, skillfulness, responsibility and accountability. The latter embraces skills in general care, communication and collaboration, management, self-development, innovation and research, and stress-adjustment. To cultivate competent nurses, academic education should emphasize critical thinking skills, integrate problem-based and evidence-based learning approaches into curricula, and use objective structured clinical examination to evaluate learning outcomes. In the healthcare sector, systematic professional training models such as the clinical ladder with multidiscipline rotation hold the potential to train novice nurses as expert professionals. Meanwhile, to advance the professional capabilities of nurses, nursing administrators should provide a positive work environment to fuel and maintain learning motivation. Education and healthcare systems should work closely together to promote the professional competence of nurses and to strengthen the value of the nursing profession.

  14. Core Competencies for Training Effective School Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie Lynn Sutton

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and validate a set of core competencies of effective school-based consultants for preservice school psychology consultation training. With recent changes in service delivery models, psychologists are challenged to engage in more indirect, preventative practices (Reschly, 2008). Consultation emerges as…

  15. Marketing Competencies: A Core Course of Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Elric A.

    The document provides a systematic analysis of curriculum in marketing, focusing on the design and evaluation of a vocational course in the distributive education curriculum. The core course, entitled basic marketing, was selected because marketing competencies are essential to every distributive education student. The following areas are…

  16. Fostering Communicative Competence through Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aslam Sipra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the use of technology in EFL classes to promote communicative competence. It elucidates communicative competence and explicates obstructions in communicative tasks. Moreover, it interprets the use of technology in fostering and supporting the development of communicative competence and explains how it is pragmatic in maintaining learners’ level of motivation and interest in learning a foreign language. The present article identifies the significance and use of mobile phone, camera, computer and internet, tape recorder, projector, and language labs in EFL classes. Besides, it discusses the use of technology as an educational tool in language teaching and learning.

  17. Discusses the core competence of professional information agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tao; Wang Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the connotation of core competence theory, Discusses the definition, composition and main aspects of the theory in professional information agency, And analyzes the core competence of an authoritative information agency-Energy Information Administration, discusses the main measures of improving core competencies in professional information agency. (authors)

  18. Ohio Construction Technologies Competency Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Lavonna; Bowermeister, Bob

    This document, which lists construction technologies competencies as identified by representatives from government agencies and labor organizations as well as secondary and postsecondary educators throughout Ohio, is intended to assist individuals and organizations in developing both college tech prep programs and apprenticeship training/education…

  19. Examination of core competencies of agricultural development professionals in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvedi, Murari; Ghimire, Ramjee; Channa, Ty

    2018-04-01

    This cross-sectional study examined perceived level of importance, perceived level of competency in extension core competencies, and whether and how perceptions of competency vary by respondents' demographics; ascertained gaps in competency, if any; and identified ways for agricultural development professionals in Cambodia to acquire core competencies. Data were collected using a group-administered survey among 39 agricultural development professionals participating in a national workshop in December 2015. The survey consisted of 48 competencies representing eight core competencies, and each competency had level of importance and level of competency parts. The findings show that extension workers in Cambodia deemed all competencies highly or very highly important to their extension work; however, their perceived level of competency in those competencies appeared not to meet the expectations. The level of competency in all but communication skills and diversity significantly differed by gender but not by age and experience. Respondents indicated all four methods-preservice, in-service, basic induction training, and participation in seminars, workshops, and webinars-equally appropriate to acquire core competencies. The findings imply that the agricultural development authority in Cambodia should review, update, or design extension education curricula incorporating the competencies highlighted in this study and train its extension cadres on those competencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Information Superiority: Outsourcing an Air Force Core Competency?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McTerman, Hugh

    1997-01-01

    .... This thesis explores the perceived relationship between the core competency requirements for information superiority and the tasks defined for the Air Force communication, computer, and information career field...

  1. Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Technology Course: Sustainable Growth of Professional Competency

    OpenAIRE

    Ermac, Eugenio A; Malabago, Nolasco K

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore a practical discussion on helping the students' professional competency. More specifically, this study conducted two studies developing a competency analysis profile on refrigeration and air conditioning technology, and examining the essential core competencies for training undergraduate students in Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology specializing Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Technology at Cebu Technological University. The qualitative and qu...

  2. Core skills assessment to improve mathematical competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael; Bowe, Brian; Fhloinn, Eabhnat Ní

    2013-12-01

    Many engineering undergraduates begin third-level education with significant deficiencies in their core mathematical skills. Every year, in the Dublin Institute of Technology, a diagnostic test is given to incoming first-year students, consistently revealing problems in basic mathematics. It is difficult to motivate students to address these problems; instead, they struggle through their degree, carrying a serious handicap of poor core mathematical skills, as confirmed by exploratory testing of final year students. In order to improve these skills, a pilot project was set up in which a 'module' in core mathematics was developed. The course material was basic, but 90% or higher was required to pass. Students were allowed to repeat this module throughout the year by completing an automated examination on WebCT populated by a question bank. Subsequent to the success of this pilot with third-year mechanical engineering students, the project was extended to five different engineering programmes, across three different year-groups. Full results and analysis of this project are presented, including responses to interviews carried out with a selection of the students involved.

  3. Update on the Health Services Research Doctoral Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, James F; Menachemi, Nir; Maciejewski, Matthew L

    2018-03-13

    To present revised core competencies for doctoral programs in health services research (HSR), modalities to deliver these competencies, and suggested methods for assessing mastery of these competencies. Core competencies were originally developed in 2005, updated (but unpublished) in 2008, modestly updated for a 2016 HSR workforce conference, and revised based on feedback from attendees. Additional feedback was obtained from doctoral program directors, employer/workforce experts and attendees of presentation on these competencies at the AcademyHealth's June 2017 Annual Research Meeting. The current version (V2.1) competencies include the ethical conduct of research, conceptual models, development of research questions, study designs, data measurement and collection methods, statistical methods for analyzing data, professional collaboration, and knowledge dissemination. These competencies represent a core that defines what HSR researchers should master in order to address the complexities of microsystem to macro-system research that HSR entails. There are opportunities to conduct formal evaluation of newer delivery modalities (e.g., flipped classrooms) and to integrate new Learning Health System Researcher Core Competencies, developed by AHRQ, into the HSR core competencies. Core competencies in HSR are a continually evolving work in progress because new research questions arise, new methods are developed, and the trans-disciplinary nature of the field leads to new multidisciplinary and team building needs. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  4. Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Please cite as: Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning. In H. H. Adelsberger, Kinshuk, J. M. Pawlowski & D. Sampson (Eds.), International Handbook on Information Technologies for Education and Training, 2nd Edition, Springer, June 2008

  5. Core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals: consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moher, David; Galipeau, James; Alam, Sabina; Barbour, Virginia; Bartolomeos, Kidist; Baskin, Patricia; Bell-Syer, Sally; Cobey, Kelly D; Chan, Leighton; Clark, Jocalyn; Deeks, Jonathan; Flanagin, Annette; Garner, Paul; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Groves, Trish; Gurusamy, Kurinchi; Habibzadeh, Farrokh; Jewell-Thomas, Stefanie; Kelsall, Diane; Lapeña, José Florencio; MacLehose, Harriet; Marusic, Ana; McKenzie, Joanne E; Shah, Jay; Shamseer, Larissa; Straus, Sharon; Tugwell, Peter; Wager, Elizabeth; Winker, Margaret; Zhaori, Getu

    2017-09-11

    Scientific editors are responsible for deciding which articles to publish in their journals. However, we have not found documentation of their required knowledge, skills, and characteristics, or the existence of any formal core competencies for this role. We describe the development of a minimum set of core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals. The 14 key core competencies are divided into three major areas, and each competency has a list of associated elements or descriptions of more specific knowledge, skills, and characteristics that contribute to its fulfillment. We believe that these core competencies are a baseline of the knowledge, skills, and characteristics needed to perform competently the duties of a scientific editor at a biomedical journal.

  6. The Core Competencies for Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfers, John; Carlton, Lidia; Gibson, Paul; Puffer, Maryjane; Smith, Sharla; Todd, Kay

    2014-01-01

    The Adolescent Sexual Health Work Group commissioned the development of core competencies that define the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for all providers of adolescent sexual and reproductive health. This article describes the background and rationale for this set of competencies, the history and use of competencies, and the process…

  7. Corning lightweight core fabrication technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBrocklin, Randy R.; Edwards, Mary J.; Hobbs, Thomas W.

    2003-12-01

    Fabrication of lightweight mirrors from low expansion glasses can be achieved using various core and faceplate lightweighting techniques. Lightweighting can be achieved using abrasive waterjet cutting, CNC milling and a new approach that Corning is developing to produce lightweight cores based on Corning's patented ceramic extrusion process. The selection of which lightweighting technology to use is dependent on customer design considerations of the lightweight mirror. These lightweighting techniques are reviewed and discussed, along with advantages and disadvantages of each technique. Corning will also introduce and discuss their new core lightweighting process.

  8. Organizational Change for Acquisition Reform: Proposed Core Competencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Green, Robert

    1997-01-01

    .... These core competencies are derived from a comparison of theory with actual practice. A discussion of possible change strategies shows various matters/methods to achieve Lewin's framework of organizational change...

  9. Core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Honorio; Stonier, Peter; Buhler, Fritz; Deslypere, Jean-Paul; Criscuolo, Domenico; Nell, Gerfried; Massud, Joao; Geary, Stewart; Schenk, Johanna; Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Koski, Greg; Clemens, Norbert; Klingmann, Ingrid; Kesselring, Gustavo; van Olden, Rudolf; Dubois, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine), are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes (LO) of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain LO anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide. PMID:23986704

  10. Core Competencies of the Certified Pediatric Doctor of Chiropractic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hewitt, Elise; Hestbaek, Lise; Pohlman, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    An outline of the minimum core competencies expected from a certified pediatric doctor of chiropractic was developed using a Delphi consensus process. The initial set of seed statements and substatements was modeled on competency documents used by organizations that oversee chiropractic and medic...

  11. Core Competencies for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honorio eSilva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine, are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain Learning Outcomes anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide.

  12. Development of new core competencies for Taiwanese Emergency Medical Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Tung; Tsai, Kuang-Chau; Williams, Brett

    2018-01-01

    Core competencies are considered the foundation for establishing Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and paramedic curricula, and for ensuring performance standards in the delivery of prehospital care. This study surveyed EMT instructors and medical directors to identify the most desirable core competencies for all levels of EMTs in Taiwan. A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted. An online questionnaire was distributed to obtain perspectives of EMT instructors and medical directors on the most desirable core competencies for EMTs. The target population was EMT training-course instructors and medical directors of fire departments in Taiwan. The questionnaire comprised 61 competency items, and multiple-choice and open-ended questions were used to obtain respondents' perspectives of the Taiwanese EMT training and education system. The results identified three factors at EMT-1 and EMT-2 levels and five factors at the EMT-Paramedic level. The factors for EMT-1 and EMT-2 were similar, and those for EMT-Paramedics identified further comprehensive competence perspectives. The key factors that appear to influence the development of the Taiwanese Emergency Medical Services (EMS) education system are the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation. The findings present new core competencies for the Taiwanese EMT system and provide capacity to redesign curricula and reconsider roles for EMT-1 and EMT-2 technicians. At the EMT-Paramedic level, the findings demonstrate the importance of incorporating competency standards in the current skills-based curriculum. Moreover, the core-competencies gap that exists between Taiwanese EMT-1s, EMT-2s, and EMT-Paramedics and internationally recognized core competencies needs to be addressed. By identifying the key factors that potentially impact the development of the EMS education system, such as the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation, these findings will inform

  13. 75 FR 52596 - Financial Education Core Competencies; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    .... Furthermore, the Core Competencies are particularly important in establishing a baseline of knowledge, which... that should be deleted, revised, or expanded. Core concept Knowledge Action/behavior Earning Gross... financial system. Know about financial Comparison shop. assets (savings Balance risk and accounts, bonds...

  14. Comparing Written Competency in Core French and French Immersion Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin-Fortin, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have compared the written competency of French immersion students and their core French peers, and research on these learners at a postsecondary level is even scarcer. My corpus consists of writing samples from 255 students from both backgrounds beginning a university course in French language. The writing proficiency of core French…

  15. The Army’s Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    Taxonomy supports the rigorous scientific process of discovery and a common language enables other members of the firm to devise ways to use those...physical assets such as small arms and camels . This competency led to the Arab 43 irregulars being used in a different role than the regulars whose role

  16. CORE COMPETENCES OF PIRACY AND MARITIME TERRORISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Gawliczek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of the attacks, the level of violence, the scale of destruction in the maritime areas forces creation of certain security conditions. Recognizing the enemy - piracy and maritime terrorism - by identifying their resources, skills and competences is necessary action in building the safety of vessels and maritime infrastructure. Building competence of terrorist organization and maritime piracy requires the involvement of many interrelated resources and their proper coordination. It seems that, as in a business model, in these criminal organizations there are similar resources, skills and competences that determine the advantage and strategic value of the organization. However, the weight of each factor is different. The same assumption can be related to piracy and the activities of the terrorist organization at sea. The results of the study suggest that the main sources of success of analyzed criminal organizations generate harm for national security. In the case of piracy, they result from the following spheres: human capital, attributable to the skills capital; structural capital, belonging to innovation capital; relational capital, depending on customers' capital. As for terrorist activities, they stem from the spheres of: human capital, belonging to social capital; structural capital, attributable to the process capital; relational capital and determined by capital of standing out. In summary, this article is intended to show a terrorist organization and maritime piracy through the prism of resources theory, skills and competences of strategic management. As one of the first, it places many questions, formulate some theses in the area of competences of organizations. Answering the questions, verification of posed theses, requires also in-depth research that will be published in subsequent works.

  17. Consensus on core competencies for preventive medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, D S; Ross, V

    1994-01-01

    Of the currently available literature on assessment of physician competency, very little applies to the needs of preventive medicine specialists. Yet the diversity of the field and the confusion among other medical specialists about the particular expertise of preventive medicine physicians suggest a need for consensus on fundamental competencies expected of graduates of preventive medicine residency training programs. We apply theoretical material on competency-based education from teacher training and instructional development to professional training in preventive medicine. We describe the process by which the Graduate Medical Education Subcommittee of the American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM), a working group of specialists, derived and refined core competencies in working sessions at professional meetings. The drafts produced at these sessions were circulated widely to residency directors and other individuals and groups in preventive medicine before being approved by the ACPM Board of Regents and included in the Residency Training Manual distributed by ACPM. This article includes this list of core competencies for preventive medicine residents. In addition, the article describes assumptions about competency development that guided the process and identifies recurrent problems in competency development. This information may be helpful to readers who wish to develop additional competencies or to tailor these competencies for their own preventive medicine residency programs.

  18. Pennsylvania State Core Competencies for Education on Opioids and Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburn, Michael A; Levine, Rachel L

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this project was to develop core competencies for education on opioids and addiction to be used in all Pennsylvania medical schools. The Pennsylvania Physician General created a task force that was responsible for the creation of the core competencies. A literature review was completed, and a survey of graduating medical students was conducted. The task force then developed, reviewed, and approved the core competencies. The competencies were grouped into nine domains: understanding core aspects of addiction; patient screening for substance use disorder; proper referral for specialty evaluation and treatment of substance use disorder; proper patient assessment when treating pain; proper use of multimodal treatment options when treating acute pain; proper use of opioids for the treatment of acute pain (after consideration of alternatives); the role of opioids in the treatment of chronic noncancer pain; patient risk assessment related to the use of opioids to treat chronic noncancer pain, including the assessment for substance use disorder or increased risk for aberrant drug-related behavior; and the process for patient education, initiation of treatment, careful patient monitoring, and discontinuation of therapy when using opioids to treat chronic noncancer pain. Specific competencies were developed for each domain. These competencies will be incorporated into the educational process at all Pennsylvania medical schools. It is hoped that these curriculum changes will improve student knowledge and attitudes in these areas, thus improving patient outcomes. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  19. Development of the Learning Health System Researcher Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Christopher B; Chesley, Francis D; Tregear, Michelle L; Mistry, Kamila B

    2017-08-04

    To develop core competencies for learning health system (LHS) researchers to guide the development of training programs. Data were obtained from literature review, expert interviews, a modified Delphi process, and consensus development meetings. The competencies were developed from August to December 2016 using qualitative methods. The literature review formed the basis for the initial draft of a competency domain framework. Key informant semi-structured interviews, a modified Delphi survey, and three expert panel (n = 19 members) consensus development meetings produced the final set of competencies. The iterative development process yielded seven competency domains: (1) systems science; (2) research questions and standards of scientific evidence; (3) research methods; (4) informatics; (5) ethics of research and implementation in health systems; (6) improvement and implementation science; and (7) engagement, leadership, and research management. A total of 33 core competencies were prioritized across these seven domains. The real-world milieu of LHS research, the embeddedness of the researcher within the health system, and engagement of stakeholders are distinguishing characteristics of this emerging field. The LHS researcher core competencies can be used to guide the development of learning objectives, evaluation methods, and curricula for training programs. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  20. Core Competence, Distinctive Competence, and Competitive Advantage: What Is the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Core competence, distinctive competence, and competitive advantage are 3 of the most important business concepts that managers, researchers, and educators rely on for decision making, pedagogy, and research. However, little attention has been paid to defining these concepts. As a result, they have become buzzwords that are used so frequently that…

  1. Development of new core competencies for Taiwanese Emergency Medical Technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang YT

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Tung Chang,1,2 Kuang-Chau Tsai,2 Brett Williams1,3 1Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan; 3Division of Paramedicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia Objectives: Core competencies are considered the foundation for establishing Emergency Medical Technician (EMT and paramedic curricula, and for ensuring performance standards in the delivery of prehospital care. This study surveyed EMT instructors and medical directors to identify the most desirable core competencies for all levels of EMTs in Taiwan. Methods: A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted. An online questionnaire was distributed to obtain perspectives of EMT instructors and medical directors on the most desirable core competencies for EMTs. The target population was EMT training-course instructors and medical directors of fire departments in Taiwan. The questionnaire comprised 61 competency items, and multiple-choice and open-ended questions were used to obtain respondents’ perspectives of the Taiwanese EMT training and education system. Results: The results identified three factors at EMT-1 and EMT-2 levels and five factors at the EMT-Paramedic level. The factors for EMT-1 and EMT-2 were similar, and those for EMT-Paramedics identified further comprehensive competence perspectives. The key factors that appear to influence the development of the Taiwanese Emergency Medical Services (EMS education system are the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation. Conclusion: The findings present new core competencies for the Taiwanese EMT system and provide capacity to redesign curricula and reconsider roles for EMT-1 and EMT-2 technicians. At the EMT-Paramedic level, the findings demonstrate the importance of

  2. International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis core curriculum project: core competencies in clinical thrombosis and hemostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLintock, C.; Pabinger, I.; Bauer, K. A.; Laffan, M.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Rezende, S. M.; Middeldorp, S.; Ross, M.

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The priority of ISTH was to establish a global core curriculum in thrombosis and hemostasis. International survey to determine competencies required for clinical specialists was carried out in the field. Competency framework provides a reference point for mapping and developing regional

  3. Core competencies in clinical neuropsychology training across the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessen, Erik; Hokkanen, Laura; Ponsford, Jennie; van Zandvoort, Martine; Watts, Ann; Evans, Jonathan; Haaland, Kathleen Y

    2018-05-01

    This work aimed to review main competency requirements from training models in countries with well-established specialties in clinical neuropsychology and to extract core competencies that likely will apply to clinical neuropsychologists regardless of regional and cultural context. We reviewed standards for post-graduate training in clinical neuropsychology from countries in Europe, Australia, and North America based on existing literature, presentations at international conferences, and from description of the training models from national psychological or neuropsychological associations. Despite differences, the reviewed models share similar core competencies considered necessary for a specialty in clinical neuropsychology: (1) In-depth knowledge of general psychology including clinical psychology (post-graduate level), ethical, and legal standards. (2) Expert knowledge about clinically relevant brain-behavioral relationships. (3) Comprehensive knowledge about, and skills in, related clinical disciplines. (4) In-depth knowledge about and skills in neuropsychological assessment, including decision-making and diagnostic competency according to current classification of diseases. (5) Competencies in the area of diversity and culture in relation to clinical neuropsychology. (6) Communication competency of neuropsychological findings and test results to relevant and diverse audiences. (7) Knowledge about and skills in psychological and neuropsychological intervention, including treatment and rehabilitation. All the models have undergone years of development in accordance with requirements of national health care systems in different parts of the world. Despite differences, the common core competency requirements across different regions of the world suggest generalizability of these competencies. We hope this summary can be useful as countries with less established neuropsychology training programs develop their models.

  4. Survival in Transition or Implementing Information Science Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Margaret T.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Identifies and examines four information science core competencies of the Du Pont Corporation's information science services: ability to conceptualize information; knowledge of internal and external information resources; understanding of information resource management; and ability to synthesize and tailor information. Describes the…

  5. Factors influencing disaster nursing core competencies of emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2017-10-01

    Emergency nurses are expected to provide required nursing services by using their professional expertise to reduce the risk posed by disasters. Thus, emergency nurses' disaster nursing core competencies are essential for coping with disasters. The purpose of the study reported here was to identify factors influencing the disaster nursing core competencies of emergency nurses. A survey was conducted among 231 emergency nurses working in 12 hospitals in South Korea. Data were collected on disaster-related experience, attitude, knowledge, and disaster nursing core competencies by means of a questionnaire. In multiple regression analysis, disaster-related experience exerted the strongest influence on disaster nursing core competencies, followed by disaster-related knowledge. The explanatory power of these factors was 25.6%, which was statistically significant (F=12.189, pcompetencies of emergency nurses could be improved through education and training programs that enhance their disaster preparedness. The nursing profession needs to participate actively in the development of disaster nursing education and training programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Stability and Change in Markers of Core Numerical Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Robert; Reynolds, Fiona; Humberstone, Judi; Butterworth, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Dot enumeration (DE) and number comparison (NC) abilities are considered markers of core number competence. Differences in DE/NC reaction time (RT) signatures are thought to distinguish between typical and atypical number development. Whether a child's DE and NC signatures change or remain stable over time, relative to other developmental…

  7. [Technological competencies in cardiovascular nursing education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Rika Miyahara; Leite, Maria Madalena Januário

    2015-12-01

    To identify the perception of the coordinators of the Specialization Courses in Cardiovascular Nursing about inserting content from Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and analyze them in relation to the technological competencies and regarding its applicability, relevance and importance in assisting, teaching and management. Descriptive study with 10 coordinators of the Specialization course in Cardiologic Nursing, who replied to the questionnaire for the development of technological competency adapted from the Technology Initiative Guidelines Education Reforms (TIGER), and analyzed using the Delphi technique for obtaining consensus and scored according to the relevance, pertinence and applicability using Likert scale according to degree of agreement. Six courses developed ICT content. The contents of the TIGER were considered relevant, pertinent and applicable. The coordinators recognize the need for technological competencies of the Cardiovascular Nurse for healthcare applicability.

  8. A competency-based longitudinal core curriculum in medical neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Lisa R; Horak, Holli A; Milligan, Tracey A; Kraakevik, Jeff A; Ali, Imran I

    2014-07-29

    Current medical educational theory encourages the development of competency-based curricula. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 6 core competencies for resident education (medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice) have been embraced by medical schools as the building blocks necessary for becoming a competent licensed physician. Many medical schools are therefore changing their educational approach to an integrated model in which students demonstrate incremental acquisition and mastery of all competencies as they progress through medical school. Challenges to medical schools include integration of preclinical and clinical studies as well as development of learning objectives and assessment measures for each competency. The Undergraduate Education Subcommittee (UES) of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) assembled a group of neuroscience educators to outline a longitudinal competency-based curriculum in medical neuroscience encompassing both preclinical and clinical coursework. In development of this curriculum, the committee reviewed United States Medical Licensing Examination content outlines, Liaison Committee on Medical Education requirements, prior AAN-mandated core curricula for basic neuroscience and clinical neurology, and survey responses from educators in US medical schools. The newly recommended curriculum provides an outline of learning objectives for each of the 6 competencies, listing each learning objective in active terms. Documentation of experiences is emphasized, and assessment measures are suggested to demonstrate adequate achievement in each competency. These guidelines, widely vetted and approved by the UES membership, aspire to be both useful as a stand-alone curriculum and also provide a framework for neuroscience educators who wish to develop a more detailed focus in certain areas of study. © 2014 American Academy

  9. Competence at the core of performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stricker, L.

    2008-01-01

    This series of slides presents the viewpoint of EDF on the renaissance of nuclear power in the world. This presentation is divided into 5 main parts. Part 1: energy a necessity; huge investment for the production of electricity are expected throughout the world for instance 1300 GW in China or 660 GW in Europe by 2030. Because of its stable costs and weak environmental impact nuclear power will have to take its part. Part 2: Nuclear power throughout the world; today 439 reactors are operating in the world generating 17% of the amount of the whole electricity produced. Some exceptions France (80%), Belgium (55%), Japan, Sweden and finland (50%). EDF is the world leader in nuclear power production operating 58 reactors ( 34 * 900 MW + 20 * 1300 MW + 4 * 1450 MW). Part 3: the renaissance of nuclear power; in most countries new legislation favourable to nuclear power have been implemented. From now to 2030 about 300 GW of nuclear power will installed: 50% to replace today's operating reactors and 50% to create new units. In 2050 the world nuclear power capacity will have increased by a factor between 1.5 and 3.8. Part 4: new projects of nuclear power plants; EDF aspires to be co-owner and co-operator of 10 EPR in 10 years and international cooperation has been set up with China, United-Kingdom, Usa and South-Africa for new plants. The technological assets of the EPR are: -) an increase of 36% of the annual power output compared to existing reactors, -) a higher level of safety, -) occupational dosimetry lower by 40%, and -) a sharp reduction of gas and liquid waste releases. Part 5: Skills, The nuclear sector is expected to recruit very much in the years to come but is likely to face a shortage in skilled workers, engineers... A master dedicated to nuclear engineering and another to nuclear safety have been set. EDF has launched a program to promote nuclear sciences in the universities and in engineer curricula. (A.C.)

  10. International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis core curriculum project: core competencies in clinical thrombosis and hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLintock, C; Pabinger, I; Bauer, K A; Laffan, M; Angchaisuksiri, P; Rezende, S M; Middeldorp, S; Ross, M

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The priority of ISTH was to establish a global core curriculum in thrombosis and hemostasis. International survey to determine competencies required for clinical specialists was carried out in the field. Competency framework provides a reference point for mapping and developing regional curricula. Core curriculum informs and links to a variety of ISTH educational materials. Background The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) identified the need for an international core curriculum on thrombosis and hemostasis for its society members and the larger thrombosis and hemostasis community. Aims The current research sought consensus on the core competencies required by medical doctors who are ready to practise as independent clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis with the aim of developing a core clinical curriculum for specialists in the field. Method A draft list of competencies was developed by the Working Group and formed the basis of an online survey. ISTH members and the larger thrombosis and hemostasis community were asked to rate the importance of each competency, on a Likert scale, for clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis. Results There were a total of 644 responses to the online survey with broad geographical representation. There was general agreement on what level of competency would be required for clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis at the specified level of training. Conclusions Using the survey to gain consensus on the level of competency required by clinical specialists in the field of thrombosis and hemostasis enabled the development of a core clinical curriculum that has been endorsed by the ISTH Council. The curriculum will offer a framework and international reference that will be used by the society, by national and regional organizations, and for further research. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  11. Core competency requirements among extension workers in peninsular Malaysia: Use of Borich's needs assessment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Sulaiman; Man, Norsida; Nawi, Nolila Mohd; Latif, Ismail Abd; Samah, Bahaman Abu

    2017-06-01

    The study described the perceived importance of, and proficiency in core agricultural extension competencies among extension workers in Peninsular Malaysia; and evaluating the resultant deficits in the competencies. The Borich's Needs Assessment Model was used to achieve the objectives of the study. A sample of 298 respondents was randomly selected and interviewed using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Thirty-three core competency items were assessed. Instrument validity and reliability were ensured. The cross-sectional data obtained was analysed using SPSS for descriptive statistics including mean weighted discrepancy score (MWDS). Results of the study showed that on a scale of 5, the most important core extension competency items according to respondents' perception were: "Making good use of information and communication technologies/access and use of web-based resources" (M=4.86, SD=0.23); "Conducting needs assessments" (M=4.84, SD=0.16); "organizing extension campaigns" (M=4.82, SD=0.47) and "Managing groups and teamwork" (M=4.81, SD=0.76). In terms of proficiency, the highest competency identified by the respondents was "Conducting farm and home visits (M=3.62, SD=0.82) followed by 'conducting meetings effectively' (M=3.19, SD=0.72); "Conducting focus group discussions" (M=3.16, SD=0.32) and "conducting community forums" (M=3.13, SD=0.64). The discrepancies implying competency deficits were widest in "Acquiring and allocating resources" (MWDS=12.67); use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and web-based resources in agricultural extension (MWDS=12.59); and report writing and sharing the results and impacts (MWDS=11.92). It is recommended that any intervention aimed at developing the capacity of extension workers in Peninsular Malaysia should prioritize these core competency items in accordance with the deficits established in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. School Principals' Technology Leadership Competency and Technology Coordinatorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoglu, Koksal

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the primary and high school principals' competency in technology leadership and so to define implications for advanced competency. The population of the study was formed by 134 school principals in Maltepe and Kadikoy districts in Istanbul. On account of the fact that population was reachable, no specific…

  13. Managing Research & Development for Core Competence Building in an Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.P.S. Ahuja

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The uncertainties due to globalization of Indian market after economic reforms have led to drastic changes in the approach of manufacturing organizations for developing various competencies to get competitive advantage. These formidable changes have left the organizations with no choice but to upgrade the existing systems, products and technologies for their survival. The external acquisition of technology in the initial stages may be desirable or even necessary in the high technology areas, but no industry can prosper in the long run unless it builds up a self reliant base for carrying out indigenization of process and product technologies. Technology upgradation has become mandatory for economic development, industrial growth, enhanced corporate image, more flexible responses, strategic self-reliance and sustained competitiveness of an enterprise. The present study is aimed at highlighting the need of R&D initiatives in Indian enterprises for harnessing competencies through indigenized R&D.

  14. Assessing core clinical competencies required of medical graduates in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Huang, Yu-Sheng; Liu, Keh-Min

    2006-10-01

    Medical students are assumed to be competent to provide basic patient care independently on graduation. However, there is a gap between what students are expected to learn and what they have actually learned. This may be due to the lack of clearly defined learning objectives, well-organized curriculum, and properly administered assessment. In an attempt to tackle this problem, we conducted a three-step study. Firstly, we identified the core clinical competencies required of medical graduates in Taiwan. Secondly, we incorporated these clinical competencies into a new medical curriculum. Finally, we identified the most appropriate assessment methods for each clinical competency. In 2004, a set of minimally required clinical competencies for medical undergraduates in Taiwan was developed, which included 92 clinical skills, four communication skills, and seven kinds of attitudes. In order to prepare 3rd and 4th year medical students at Kaohsiung Medical University (KMU) for later clinical work, the medical curriculum committee integrated the teaching and assessment of the core clinical skills identified previously into relevant organ-system blocks of the new curriculum. To identify appropriate assessment methods for each clinical skill, a structured questionnaire of assessment methods based on the Toolbox of Assessment Methods (Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education) and The Scottish Doctor (Scottish Deans' Medical Curriculum Group) was developed and distributed to 40 senior clinical faculty members at KMU. Simulations and Models, Standardized Patient Examination (SP), and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) were suggested to be most suitable to assess two-thirds of the core clinical skills. These assessment methods are commonly used in American and European medical schools. We believe that the implementation of the new curriculum at KMU accompanied by the use of Simulations and Models, SP, OSCE, and other teaching and assessment methods will

  15. Assessing Core Clinical Competencies Required of Medical Graduates in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Medical students are assumed to be competent to provide basic patient care independently on graduation. However, there is a gap between what students are expected to learn and what they have actually learned. This may be due to the lack of clearly defined learning objectives, well- organized curriculum, and properly administered assessment. In an attempt to tackle this problem, we conducted a three-step study. Firstly, we identified the core clinical competencies required of medical graduates in Taiwan. Secondly, we incorporated these clinical competencies into a new medical curriculum. Finally, we identified the most appropriate assessment methods for each clinical competency. In 2004, a set of minimally required clinical competencies for medical undergraduates in Taiwan was developed, which included 92 clinical skills, four communication skills, and seven kinds of attitudes. In order to prepare 3rd and 4th year medical students at Kaohsiung Medical University (KMU for later clinical work, the medical curriculum committee integrated the teaching and assessment of the core clinical skills identified previously into relevant organ-system blocks of the new curriculum. To identify appropriate assessment methods for each clinical skill, a structured questionnaire of assessment methods based on the Toolbox of Assessment Methods (Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and The Scottish Doctor (Scottish Deans' Medical Curriculum Group was developed and distributed to 40 senior clinical faculty members at KMU. Simulations and Models, Standardized Patient Examination (SP, and Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE were suggested to be most suitable to assess two-thirds of the core clinical skills. These assessment methods are commonly used in American and European medical schools. We believe that the implementation of the new curriculum at KMU accompanied by the use of Simulations and Models, SP, OSCE, and other teaching and

  16. Pediatric hospital medicine core competencies: development and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Erin R; Ottolini, Mary C; Maniscalco, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric hospital medicine is the most rapidly growing site-based pediatric specialty. There are over 2500 unique members in the three core societies in which pediatric hospitalists are members: the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) and the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM). Pediatric hospitalists are fulfilling both clinical and system improvement roles within varied hospital systems. Defined expectations and competencies for pediatric hospitalists are needed. In 2005, SHM's Pediatric Core Curriculum Task Force initiated the project and formed the editorial board. Over the subsequent four years, multiple pediatric hospitalists belonging to the AAP, APA, or SHM contributed to the content of and guided the development of the project. Editors and collaborators created a framework for identifying appropriate competency content areas. Content experts from both within and outside of pediatric hospital medicine participated as contributors. A number of selected national organizations and societies provided valuable feedback on chapters. The final product was validated by formal review from the AAP, APA, and SHM. The Pediatric Hospital Medicine Core Competencies were created. They include 54 chapters divided into four sections: Common Clinical Diagnoses and Conditions, Core Skills, Specialized Clinical Services, and Healthcare Systems: Supporting and Advancing Child Health. Each chapter can be used independently of the others. Chapters follow the knowledge, skills, and attitudes educational curriculum format, and have an additional section on systems organization and improvement to reflect the pediatric hospitalist's responsibility to advance systems of care. These competencies provide a foundation for the creation of pediatric hospital medicine curricula and serve to standardize and improve inpatient training practices. (c) 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  17. Global and public health core competencies for nursing education: A systematic review of essential competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Megan; Raffray, Marie; Hendricks, Kristin; Gagnon, Anita J

    2016-05-01

    Nurses are learning and practicing in an increasingly global world. Both nursing schools and nursing students are seeking guidance as they integrate global health into their learning and teaching. This systematic review is intended to identify the most common global and public health core competencies found in the literature and better inform schools of nursing wishing to include global health content in their curricula. Systematic review. An online search of CINAHL and Medline databases, as well as, inclusion of pertinent gray literature was conducted for articles published before 2013. Relevant literature for global health (GH) and public and community health (PH/CH) competencies was reviewed to determine recommendations of both competencies using a combination of search terms. Studies must have addressed competencies as defined in the literature and must have been pertinent to GH or PH/CH. The databases were systematically searched and after reading the full content of the included studies, key concepts were extracted and synthesized. Twenty-five studies were identified and resulted in a list of 14 global health core competencies. These competencies are applicable to a variety of health disciplines, but particularly can inform the efforts of nursing schools to integrate global health concepts into their curricula. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Capability and core competency identification of a knowledge-based organization

    OpenAIRE

    Calle, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The concept of core competencies has been discussed for the last 20 years; however concept itself has yet to be standardized. Using the theories concerning core competencies as laid out by Porter, Prahalad, and Hamel, and using a framework created by Clayton M. Christensen that adds support to the identification of core competencies through the examination of capabilities, this paper illustrates a path that supports a method of identifying core competencies through the capabilities of an orga...

  19. Proposed core competencies and empirical validation procedure in competency modeling: confirmation and classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Katarzyna Baczynska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Competency models provide insight into key skills which are common to many positions in an organization. Moreover, there is a range of competencies that is used by many companies. Researchers have developed core competency terminology to underline their cross-organizational value. The article presents a theoretical model of core competencies consisting of two main higher-order competencies called performance and entrepreneurship. Each of them consists of three elements: the performance competency includes cooperation, organization of work and goal orientation, while entrepreneurship includes innovativeness, calculated risk-taking and pro-activeness. However, there is lack of empirical validation of competency concepts in organizations and this would seem crucial for obtaining reliable results from organizational research. We propose a two-step empirical validation procedure: 1 confirmation factor analysis, and 2 classification of employees. The sample consisted of 636 respondents (M = 44.5; SD = 15.1. Participants were administered a questionnaire developed for the study purpose. The reliability, measured by Cronbach’s alpha, ranged from .60 to .83 for six scales. Next, we tested the model using a confirmatory factor analysis. The two separate, single models of performance and entrepreneurial orientations fit quite well to the data, while a complex model based on the two single concepts needs further research. In the classification of employees based on the two higher order competencies we obtained four main groups of employees. Their profiles relate to those found in the literature, including so-called niche finders and top performers. Some proposal for organizations is discussed.

  20. Clinical Core Competency Training for NASA Flight Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, J. D.; Schmid, Josef; Hurst, Victor, IV; Doerr, Harold K.; Doerr, Harold K.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The cohort of NASA flight surgeons (FS) is a very accomplished group with varied clinical backgrounds; however, the NASA Flight Surgeon Office has identified that the extremely demanding schedule of this cohort prevents many of these physicians from practicing clinical medicine on a regular basis. In an effort to improve clinical competency, the NASA FS Office has dedicated one day a week for the FS to receive clinical training. Each week, an FS is assigned to one of five clinical settings, one being medical patient simulation. The Medical Operations Support Team (MOST) was tasked to develop curricula using medical patient simulation that would meet the clinical and operational needs of the NASA FS Office. Methods: The MOST met with the Lead FS and Training Lead FS to identify those core competencies most important to the FS cohort. The MOST presented core competency standards from the American Colleges of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine as a basis for developing the training. Results: The MOST identified those clinical areas that could be best demonstrated and taught using medical patient simulation, in particular, using high fidelity human patient simulators. Curricula are currently being developed and additional classes will be implemented to instruct the FS cohort. The curricula will incorporate several environments for instruction, including lab-based and simulated microgravity-based environments. Discussion: The response from the NASA FS cohort to the initial introductory class has been positive. As a result of this effort, the MOST has identified three types of training to meet the clinical needs of the FS Office; clinical core competency training, individual clinical refresher training, and just-in-time training (specific for post-ISS Expedition landings). The MOST is continuing to work with the FS Office to augment the clinical training for the FS cohort, including the integration of Web-based learning.

  1. Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The UCLA-DOE Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Facility provides the UCLA biochemistry community with easy access to sophisticated instrumentation for a wide variety...

  2. Validation of core competencies during residency training in anaesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spies, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and goal: Curriculum development for residency training is increasingly challenging in times of financial restrictions and time limitations. Several countries have adopted the CanMEDS framework for medical education as a model into their curricula of specialty training. The purpose of the present study was to validate the competency goals, as derived from CanMEDS, of the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine of the Berlin Charité University Medical Centre, by conducting a staff survey. These goals for the qualification of specialists stipulate demonstrable competencies in seven areas: expert medical action, efficient collaboration in a team, communications with patients and family, management and organisation, lifelong learning, professional behaviour, and advocacy of good health. We had previously developed a catalogue of curriculum items based on these seven core competencies. In order to evaluate the validity of this catalogue, we surveyed anaesthetists at our department in regard to their perception of the importance of each of these items. In addition to the descriptive acquisition of data, it was intended to assess the results of the survey to ascertain whether there were differences in the evaluation of these objectives by specialists and registrars. Methods: The questionnaire with the seven adapted CanMEDS Roles included items describing each of their underlying competencies. Each anaesthetist (registrars and specialists working at our institution in May of 2007 was asked to participate in the survey. Individual perception of relevance was rated for each item on a scale similar to the Likert system, ranging from 1 (highly relevant to 5 (not at all relevant, from which ratings means were calculated. For determination of reliability, we calculated Cronbach’s alpha. To assess differences between subgroups, we performed analysis of variance.Results: All seven roles were rated as relevant. Three of the seven

  3. Teaching the basics: core competencies in global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Megan A M; Battat, Robert; Brewer, Timothy F

    2011-06-01

    Compelling moral, ethical, professional, pedagogical, and economic imperatives support the integration of global health topics within medical school curriculum. Although the process of integrating global health into medical education is well underway at some medical schools, there remain substantial challenges to initiating global health training in others. As global health is a new field, faculties and schools may benefit from resources and guidance to develop global health modules and teaching materials. This article describes the Core Competencies project undertaken by the Global Health Education Consortium and the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada's Global Health Resource Group. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Dentistry, nursing, and medicine: a comparison of core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielman, Andrew I; Fulmer, Terry; Eisenberg, Elise S; Alfano, Michael C

    2005-11-01

    Health care, including oral health care and oral health education, is under great stress in the United States. The cost of and access to care, the cost of dental education, and a shortage of educators have led leaders in dental education, organized dentistry, and the public sector to underscore the problem. One of the proposed solutions is to find synergies and new health care and education models by building bridges among the health professions. One potential solution is being implemented at the NYU College of Dentistry (NYUCD). Dentistry and nursing are seemingly unrelated professions, and they are rarely if ever modeled together. That is about to change with the joining together of NYUCD and the Division of Nursing of the NYU Steinhardt School of Education in creating a College of Nursing within the College of Dentistry. This process has not been without controversy. Following the Division of Nursing's request to join NYUCD, and the subsequent announcement of the proposed combination by NYU in December 2004, some members of the dental profession responded by questioning the appropriateness of the merger and the similarity of the two programs. Nevertheless, substantial parallels exist in the education and practice of dentists and nurse practitioners (NP) including basic, social, and some clinical science education, practice models, research synergies, and community service. However, similarities in the core competencies of these professions have not been analyzed formally and in detail. Accordingly, the purpose of this study was to compare the core competencies of nurse practitioner and dental education programs. The results show a surprising overlap of the core competencies of the dental and nursing professions (38 percent partial or total overlap). A similar overlap with medicine also exists, albeit lower (25.4 percent). These results are notable because they demonstrate that the three health professions, independently of one another, developed very similar

  5. Core principles of assessment in competency-based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Jocelyn; Carraccio, Carol; Chan, Ming-Ka; Hart, Danielle; Smee, Sydney; Touchie, Claire; Holmboe, Eric S; Frank, Jason R

    2017-06-01

    The meaningful assessment of competence is critical for the implementation of effective competency-based medical education (CBME). Timely ongoing assessments are needed along with comprehensive periodic reviews to ensure that trainees continue to progress. New approaches are needed to optimize the use of multiple assessors and assessments; to synthesize the data collected from multiple assessors and multiple types of assessments; to develop faculty competence in assessment; and to ensure that relationships between the givers and receivers of feedback are appropriate. This paper describes the core principles of assessment for learning and assessment of learning. It addresses several ways to ensure the effectiveness of assessment programs, including using the right combination of assessment methods and conducting careful assessor selection and training. It provides a reconceptualization of the role of psychometrics and articulates the importance of a group process in determining trainees' progress. In addition, it notes that, to reach its potential as a driver in trainee development, quality care, and patient safety, CBME requires effective information management and documentation as well as ongoing consideration of ways to improve the assessment system.

  6. Developing and implementing core competencies for integrative medicine fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Melinda; Brodsky, Marc; Low Dog, Tieraona; Sierpina, Victor; Bailey, Michelle; Locke, Amy; Kogan, Mikhail; Rindfleisch, James A; Saper, Robert

    2014-03-01

    The Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine defines integrative medicine as "the practice of medicine that reaffirms the importance of the relationship between practitioner and patient, focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches, health care professionals, and disciplines to achieve optimal health and healing." Over the past three decades, the U.S. public increasingly has sought integrative medicine approaches. In an effort to train medical professionals to adequately counsel patients on the safe and appropriate use of these approaches, medical schools and residencies have developed curricula on integrative medicine for their trainees. In addition, integrative medicine clinical fellowships for postresidency physicians have emerged to provide training for practitioners interested in gaining greater expertise in this emerging field. Currently, 13 clinical fellowships in integrative medicine exist in the United States, and they are predominantly connected to academic medical centers or teaching affiliate hospitals. In 2010, the Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine, represented by 56 member academic health care institutions with a shared commitment to advance the principles and practices of integrative medicine, convened a two-year task force to draft integrative medicine fellowship core competencies. These competencies would guide fellowship curriculum development and ensure that graduates possessed a common body of knowledge, skills, and attitudes. In this article, the authors discuss the competencies and the task force's process to develop them, as well as associated teaching and assessment methods, faculty development, potential barriers, and future directions.

  7. Principled, Transformational Leadership: Analyzing the Discourse of Leadership in the Development of Librarianship's Core Competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Deborah; Given, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Using discourse analysis, this article explores three questions: (a) Why was "principled, transformational leadership" the leadership style added to Core Competences? (b) What was the discourse of leadership in the profession surrounding the development of the Core Competences? (c) How might this competence affect LIS education? And what measures,…

  8. Functional Management Competence and Growth of Young Technology-Based Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomo, Søren; Brinckmann, Jan; Talke, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    Acknowledging an increased research interest into the success factors for young technology-based firms in the last decade, the present study serves two main purposes. First, we aim at developing a comprehensive concept of functional management competence in young technology-based firms. Functional...... management competence covers the understanding of and proficiency in managing specific functional tasks (Katz, 1974). As we focus on young technology-based firms, it is suggested that marketing, financial and technology management tasks are at the core of functional management competence. Second, we aim...... based on partial least squares modelling to investigate the performance effects. The results suggest that functional management competences generally are significant drivers of firm development speed. In particular, technology and marketing management competences are shown to impact development speed...

  9. Extension Organization of the Future: Linking Emotional Intelligence and Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Deliece; Stone, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    A Texas extension survey identified core competencies of outstanding extension educators. The competencies are similar to the characteristics of emotional intelligence, qualities needed in the 21st century workplace. (SK)

  10. Core communication competencies in patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boykins, Anita Davis

    2014-01-01

    Effective communication between the patient and nurse is an essential requirement for nursing practice and for patient-centered care. Nursing faculty that teach in undergraduate and graduate nursing programs play a significant role in preparing the nursing workforce to communicate effectively and provide patient-centered care. Patient-centered care, interprofessional collaboration, and informatics are necessary knowledge, skills, and attitudes for nurses across educational levels in order to meet the needs of patients, and improve the quality and safety of the health care system environment. The focus of this article is to provide information on core nursing competencies for effective communication and to discuss communication tools used in patient-centered care, interprofessional collaboration, and informatics.

  11. Interrelationship between core interventions and core competencies of forensic psychiatric nursing in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenkanen, Helena; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Kinnunen, Juha

    2011-03-01

    The importance of core competencies (CC) and their relationship to core interventions in clinical practice guidelines on schizophrenia (CPGS), and the abilities to master these competencies were studied among registered nurses (RN) and practical mental nurses (PMN) in a forensic psychiatric setting. Data were collected from RNs, PMNs, and managers of all five forensic psychiatric facilities in Finland. The research material was obtained by using a 360-degree feedback method. The response rate was 68% (N = 428). The differences between the nurse groups were statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) regarding the importance of and ability to master the following CCs: (1) pharmacotherapy, (2) knowledge in forensic psychiatry and violent behavior, (3) the treatment of violent patients, (4) processing patient's and own emotion, and (5) need-adapted treatment of the patient. Overall, RNs exceeded PMNs in mastering the CCs, however the principles of the CPGS were not achieved within the current resources in Finland. In summary, RNs, rather than PMNs, should be recruited for work in forensic psychiatric nursing, although a considerable amount of specific training would still be required to achieve competence. Implications of our research indicate that all nurses working in this area need to receive further education in forensic psychiatry and in forensic psychiatric nursing. © 2011 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  12. Research on the Intrinsic Relationship of Customer Value and Corporate Core Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Guoping

    The article defined customer value and corporate core competence using induction method and described the characteristics of these two concepts. Then the author analyzed the intrinsic relationship of customer value and corporate core competence via the survey and case analysis methods. The author found that customer value was the basic point to cultivate corporate core competence which was the platform to achieve customer value. The article is of great help to provide some ideas of cultivating and developing corporate core competence based on customer value.

  13. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhmeyer, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  14. Geriatric core competencies for family medicine curriculum and enhanced skills: care of elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A C; Dobbs, Bonnie M; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents' clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Iterative expert panel process for the development of the core competencies, with a pre-defined process for implementation of the core competencies. Eighty-five core competencies were selected overall by the Working Group, with 57 core competencies selected for the PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and an additional 28 selected for the PGY-III COE residents. The core competencies follow the CanMEDS Family Medicine roles. Both sets of core competencies are based on consensus. Due to demographic changes, it is essential that Family Physicians have the required skills and knowledge to care for the frail elderly. The core competencies described were developed for PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE, with a focus on the development of geriatric expertise for those patients that would most benefit.

  15. The German competence network on nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczera, B.; Fritz, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The present German energy policy is based on the phase-out of nuclear electricity generation, which means that the last of the currently operating eighteen German nuclear power plants will run until about 2022. While the plants will be shut down one after the other, decommissioning will start together with interim storage of the radioactive waste. The safe waste disposal in a final repository is planned to start around 2030 and may take another two decades, i.e., in Germany nuclear competence is further needed, at least until the mid of this century. Against this background, a high-ranking commission under the direction of the Federal Ministry of Economy and Technology evaluated the publicly funded nuclear safety related research and development (R and D) activities in Germany. One of the recommendations made by the commission was the foundation of a Competence Network on Nuclear Technology for an optimum coordination of the remaining nuclear activities including aspects of future human resources in this area. This Network was established in March 2000 with the following member institutions: Research Centre Juelich, Research Centre Karlsruhe, Research Centre Rossendorf and the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) in Munich and their neighbouring Technical Universities. The strategic objectives of the Competence Network include: Trend investigations on job development and on university education capacities in the nuclear technology sector; Enhanced cooperation of the Research Centres with universities in the nuclear field and support of international education initiatives (e.g. ENEN, WNU); Coordination and bundling of the activities in publicly funded reactor safety and waste management R and D programmes; Support of qualified young scientists and engineers (pre-doctoral students) - also by third-party funds; Participation in and collaboration with international projects and activities for advancements of international nuclear safety

  16. Comparing Written Competency in Core French and French Immersion Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Lappin-Fortin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Few studies have compared the written competency of French immersion students and their core French peers, and research on these learners at a postsecondary level is even scarcer. My corpus consists of writing samples from 255 students from both backgrounds beginning a university course in French language. The writing proficiency of core French and French immersion graduates was compared based on total output and several measures of grammatical and syntactical accuracy. Few statistically significant differences emerge. However, a subgroup of core French learners who had benefitted from an authentic immersion experience appears to outperform both regular core French and French immersion groups. The purpose of this quantitative study is primarily diagnostic; the results should help universities better serve the needs of first-year students. Résumé Les études comparant la compétence écrite des étudiants de programmes d’immersion française et de français cadre sont peu nombreuses—particulièrement au niveau postsecondaire. Mon corpus consiste en des échantillons du français écrit de 255 étudiants issus de ces deux formations qui commencent un cours de français à l’université. J’ai comparé leur production globale et leur précision sur le plan morphosyntaxique. Peu de différences statistiquement significatives en émergent. Toutefois, un sous-groupe d’étudiants cadre ayant bénéficié d’une expérience d’immersion authentique se révèle comme le plus compétent selon plusieurs des mesures utilisées. Les résultats de cette étude quantitative devraient aider les universités à mieux répondre aux besoins des étudiants de première année.

  17. Core Competences of River Ports: Case Study of Pearl River Delta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Hui Lisa Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available With the sound development of ASEAN, more and more attention is paid to hub ports that support cargo and information flows in this marine region. However there are few studies on river and feeder ports. To fill this gap, this study takes a river port as an example to illustrate how to utilize the Balanced Scorecard for evaluating the Core Competences of river and feeder ports. Core competences are helpful for terminal operators when focusing on core strategies, core business and core products / services development for resource limitation. The business pattern which regards core competences as a foundation is beneficial for terminal operators to achieve sustainable competitive advantages. A questionnaire survey has been conducted. The Cronbach alpha method confirms testing reliability of the questionnaire. Study results reveal that two core competences are “capabilities of valuing employee and organization improvement” and “national and municipal government support” for a river port.

  18. Factors Affecting Teachers' Competence in the Field of Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Hamonangan

    2014-01-01

    The development of learning technology today, have a direct impact on improving teachers' information technology competence. This paper is presented the results of research related to teachers' information technology competence. The study was conducted with a survey of some 245 vocational high school teachers. There are two types of instrument…

  19. [Construction of the addiction prevention core competency model for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Sook; Jung, Sun Young

    2013-12-01

    This study was done to provide fundamental data for the development of competency reinforcement programs to prevent addictive behavior in adolescents through the construction and examination of an addiction prevention core competency model. In this study core competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling were identified, and the addiction prevention core competency model was developed. It was validated methodologically. Competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents as defined by the addiction prevention core competency model are as follows: positive self-worth, self-control skill, time management skill, reality perception skill, risk coping skill, and positive communication with parents and with peers or social group. After construction, concurrent cross validation of the addiction prevention core competency model showed that this model was appropriate. The study results indicate that the addiction prevention core competency model for the prevention of addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling can be used as a foundation for an integral approach to enhance adolescent is used as an adjective and prevent addictive behavior. This approach can be a school-centered, cost-efficient strategy which not only reduces addictive behavior in adolescents, but also improves the quality of their resources.

  20. The CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Margaret M.; Battel-Kirk, Barbara; Dempsey, Colette

    2012-01-01

    Background: The CompHP Project on Developing Competencies and Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe was developed in response to the need for new and changing health promotion competencies to address health challenges. This article presents the process of developing the CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion across…

  1. Evolution dynamics modeling and simulation of logistics enterprise's core competence based on service innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Tong, Yuting

    2017-04-01

    With the rapid development of economy, the development of logistics enterprises in China is also facing a huge challenge, especially the logistics enterprises generally lack of core competitiveness, and service innovation awareness is not strong. Scholars in the process of studying the core competitiveness of logistics enterprises are mainly from the perspective of static stability, not from the perspective of dynamic evolution to explore. So the author analyzes the influencing factors and the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises, using the method of system dynamics to study the cause and effect of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, construct a system dynamics model of evolution of core competence logistics enterprises, which can be simulated by vensim PLE. The analysis for the effectiveness and sensitivity of simulation model indicates the model can be used as the fitting of the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises and reveal the process and mechanism of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, and provide management strategies for improving the core competence of logistics enterprises. The construction and operation of computer simulation model offers a kind of effective method for studying the evolution of logistics enterprise core competence.

  2. High Impact Technology Compact Combustion (HITCC) Compact Core Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    were combusted in a vitiated stream. The molecular weight and hydrogen -to-carbon ratios of these fuels were measured by Princeton University [17...AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2016-0010 HIGH IMPACT TECHNOLOGY COMPACT COMBUSTION (HITCC) COMPACT CORE TECHNOLOGIES Andrew W. Caswell Combustion ...ANDREW W. CASWELL CHARLES J. CROSS, Branch Chief Program Engineer Combustion Branch Combustion Branch Turbine Engine Division Turbine

  3. Industry-Oriented Competency Requirements for Mechatronics Technology in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyr, Wen-Jye

    2012-01-01

    This study employed a three-phase empirical method to identify competency indicators for mechatronics technology according to industry-oriented criteria. In Phase I, a list of required competencies was compiled using Behavioral Event Interviews (BEI) with three engineers specializing in the field of mechatronics technology. In Phase II, the Delphi…

  4. Athletic Training Student Core Competency Implementation During Patient Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallario, Julie M; Van Lunen, Bonnie L; Hoch, Johanna M; Hoch, Matthew; Manspeaker, Sarah A; Pribesh, Shana L

    2018-02-08

      Health care research evidence suggests that early patient encounters (PEs), as well as the purposeful implementation of professional core competencies (CCs), for athletic training students (ATSs) may be beneficial to their ability to provide care. However, no investigators have related facets of the clinical education experience with CC implementation as a form of summative assessment of the clinical experience.   To determine the relationship between the frequency and length of PEs, as well as the student's role and clinical site during PEs, and the students' perceived CC implementation during these encounters.   Cross-sectional study.   Professional athletic training program, National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I institution.   We purposefully recruited 1 athletic training program that used E*Value software; 40 participants (31 females, 9 males) enrolled in the professional phase (12 first year, 14 second year, 14 third year) participated.   Participants viewed a 20-minute recorded CC educational module followed by educational handouts, which were also posted online for reference throughout the semester. The E*Value software was used to track Pes, including the type of encounter (ie, actual patient, practice encounter, didactic practice scenario), the type of site where the encounter occurred (university, high school), and the participant's role (observed, assisted, performed), as well as responses to an added block of questions indicating which, if any, of the CCs were implemented during the PE.   Variables per patient were PE length (minutes), participant role, site at which the encounter occurred, and whether any of the 6 CCs were implemented ( yes/ no). Variables per participant were average encounter length (minutes), encounter frequency, modal role, clinical site assignment, and the number of times each CC was implemented. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were used to examine the relationships between role or clinical site

  5. Redefining E-3 Core Competencies for Dominant Battlespace Knowledge in Future Combat Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirkendall, David A

    2005-01-01

    .... The study focuses on how E-3 training is driven by the maintenance of a set of battle management core competencies rooted in the basics of aircraft tactical fluid control force accountability and aerial refueling...

  6. Otolaryngology Resident Education and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucett, Erynne A; Barry, Jonnae Y; McCrary, Hilary C; Saleh, Ahlam A; Erman, Audrey B; Ishman, Stacey L

    2018-03-08

    To date, there have been no reports in the current literature regarding the use of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in otolaryngology residency training. An evaluation may help educators address these core competencies in the training curriculum. To examine the quantity and nature of otolaryngology residency training literature through a systematic review and to evaluate whether this literature aligns with the 6 core competencies. A medical librarian assisted in a search of all indexed years of the PubMed, Embase, Education Resources Information Center (via EBSCOhost), Cochrane Library (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Methodology Register), Thomson Reuters Web of Science (Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index Expanded, Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science, and Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Social Science and Humanities), Elsevier Scopus, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases to identify relevant English-language studies. Included studies contained original human data and focused on otolaryngology resident education. Data regarding study design, setting, and ACGME core competencies addressed were extracted from each article. Initial searches were performed on May 20, 2015, and updated on October 4, 2016. In this systematic review of 104 unique studies, interpersonal communication skills were reported 15 times; medical knowledge, 48 times; patient care, 44 times; practice-based learning and improvement, 31 times; professionalism, 15 times; and systems-based practices, 10 times. Multiple studies addressed more than 1 core competency at once, and 6 addressed all 6 core competencies. Increased emphasis on nonclinical core competencies is needed, including professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, and systems-based practices in the otolaryngology residency training curriculum. A formal curriculum

  7. Exploring LIS Students' Beliefs in Importance and Self-Efficacy of Core Information Literacy Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Maria; Pascual, Rosaura Fernandez

    2016-01-01

    Understanding perceptions of Library and Information Science (LIS) students on two dimensions--belief in the importance (BIM) of a set of core information competencies, and Self-Efficacy (SE)--is pursued. Factor analysis implementation raises a clear distinction between BIM and SE results. This analysis points to two sets of competencies:…

  8. Student Technology Readiness and Its Impact on Cultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Kevin M.; Hall, Mark C.; Meng, Juan

    2008-01-01

    The creation of an effective learning environment requires cultural competency--the ability to interact effectively with people of different cultures. Cultural competency means knowing and understanding the people that you serve. This study compares American and Chinese student's readiness and willingness to use innovative technology by assessing…

  9. Factors Motivating and Hindering Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Adile Askim; Akbulut, Yavuz; Odabasi, H. Ferhan; Ceylan, Beril; Kuzu, Elif Bugra; Donmez, Onur; Izmirli, Ozden Sahin

    2013-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence (ICTAC) can be defined as "individuals' motivation and capacity to voluntarily employ their ICT skills for initiating or taking part in civic actions". Since academic staff and teachers in ICT related fields have crucial roles in training action-competent individuals, this…

  10. The CompHP core competencies framework for health promotion in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Margaret M; Battel-Kirk, Barbara; Dempsey, Colette

    2012-12-01

    The CompHP Project on Developing Competencies and Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe was developed in response to the need for new and changing health promotion competencies to address health challenges. This article presents the process of developing the CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion across the European Union Member States and Candidate Countries. A phased, multiple-method approach was employed to facilitate a consensus-building process on the development of the core competencies. Key stakeholders in European health promotion were engaged in a layered consultation process using the Delphi technique, online consultations, workshops, and focus groups. Based on an extensive literature review, a mapping process was used to identify the core domains, which informed the first draft of the Framework. A consultation process involving two rounds of a Delphi survey with national experts in health promotion from 30 countries was carried out. In addition, feedback was received from 25 health promotion leaders who participated in two focus groups at a pan-European level and 116 health promotion practitioners who engaged in four country-specific consultations. A further 54 respondents replied to online consultations, and there were a number of followers on various social media platforms. Based on four rounds of redrafting, the final Framework document was produced, consisting of 11 core domains and 68 core competency statements. The CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion provides a resource for workforce development in Europe, by articulating the necessary knowledge, skills, and abilities that are required for effective practice. The core domains are based on the multidisciplinary concepts, theories, and research that make health promotion distinctive. It is the combined application of all the domains, the knowledge base, and the ethical values that constitute the CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health

  11. Recommendations for Training in Pediatric Psychology: Defining Core Competencies Across Training Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicke, David M.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Mullins, Larry L.; Robins, Paul M.; Wu, Yelena P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective As a field, pediatric psychology has focused considerable efforts on the education and training of students and practitioners. Alongside a broader movement toward competency attainment in professional psychology and within the health professions, the Society of Pediatric Psychology commissioned a Task Force to establish core competencies in pediatric psychology and address the need for contemporary training recommendations. Methods The Task Force adapted the framework proposed by the Competency Benchmarks Work Group on preparing psychologists for health service practice and defined competencies applicable across training levels ranging from initial practicum training to entry into the professional workforce in pediatric psychology. Results Competencies within 6 cluster areas, including science, professionalism, interpersonal, application, education, and systems, and 1 crosscutting cluster, crosscutting knowledge competencies in pediatric psychology, are presented in this report. Conclusions Recommendations for the use of, and the further refinement of, these suggested competencies are discussed. PMID:24719239

  12. Identifying Core Mobile Learning Faculty Competencies Based Integrated Approach: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbarbary, Rafik Said

    2015-01-01

    This study is based on the integrated approach as a concept framework to identify, categorize, and rank a key component of mobile learning core competencies for Egyptian faculty members in higher education. The field investigation framework used four rounds Delphi technique to determine the importance rate of each component of core competencies…

  13. Precision Machining Technologies. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), which is one of a series of OCAPs developed to identify the skills that Ohio employers deem necessary to entering a given occupation/occupational area, lists the occupational, academic, and employability skills required of individuals entering the occupation of precision machinist. The…

  14. Information and communication technology (ict) competencies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Possession of ICT competencies by the business educators will invariably help in reducing the obstacles in teaching modern business courses thereby making it possible for actualization the of Vision 2020 agenda through business education. It was recommended that for the actualization of Vision 2020 agenda through ...

  15. Creating value-focused healthcare delivery systems: Part three--Core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, R N

    1997-01-01

    Value is created through the delivery of high-quality, cost--effective healthcare services. The ability to create value from the providers' perspective is facilitated through the development and implementation of essential, customer-focused core competencies. These core competencies include customer relationship management, payer/provider relationship management, disease management, outcomes management, financial/cost management, and information management. Customer relationship management is the foundation upon which all core competencies must be built. All of the core competencies must focus on the needs of the customers, both internal and external. Structuring all processes involved in the core competencies from the perspective of the customer will ensure that value is created throughout the system. Payer/provider relationship management will become a crucial pillar for healthcare providers in the future. As more vertical integration among providers occurs, the management of the relationships among providers and with payers will become more important. Many of the integration strategies being implemented across the country involve the integration of hospitals, physicians, and payers to form accountable health plans. The relationships must be organized to form "win/win" situations, where all parties are focused on a shared vision of creating value and none of the parties benefits at the expense of the others. Disease management in creating value requires that we begin examining the disease process along the entire continuum. Not only must providers be able to provide high-quality acute and chronic care, but they must also begin to focus more heavily on programs of prevention. Value is created throughout the system through reducing the prevalence and incidence of disease. Only through managing the full continuum of health will value be created throughout the healthcare delivery system. Outcomes management ensures that the outcomes are the highest quality at a cost

  16. Core competencies for shared decision making training programs: insights from an international, interdisciplinary working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Moumjid-Ferdjaoui, Nora; Drolet, Renée; Stacey, Dawn; Härter, Martin; Bastian, Hilda; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Borduas, Francine; Charles, Cathy; Coulter, Angela; Desroches, Sophie; Friedrich, Gwendolyn; Gafni, Amiram; Graham, Ian D; Labrecque, Michel; LeBlanc, Annie; Légaré, Jean; Politi, Mary; Sargeant, Joan; Thomson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Shared decision making is now making inroads in health care professionals' continuing education curriculum, but there is no consensus on what core competencies are required by clinicians for effectively involving patients in health-related decisions. Ready-made programs for training clinicians in shared decision making are in high demand, but existing programs vary widely in their theoretical foundations, length, and content. An international, interdisciplinary group of 25 individuals met in 2012 to discuss theoretical approaches to making health-related decisions, compare notes on existing programs, take stock of stakeholders concerns, and deliberate on core competencies. This article summarizes the results of those discussions. Some participants believed that existing models already provide a sufficient conceptual basis for developing and implementing shared decision making competency-based training programs on a wide scale. Others argued that this would be premature as there is still no consensus on the definition of shared decision making or sufficient evidence to recommend specific competencies for implementing shared decision making. However, all participants agreed that there were 2 broad types of competencies that clinicians need for implementing shared decision making: relational competencies and risk communication competencies. Further multidisciplinary research could broaden and deepen our understanding of core competencies for shared decision making training. Copyright © 2013 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  17. Core Competencies for Pain Management: Results of an Interprofessional Consensus Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Scott M; Young, Heather M; Lucas Arwood, Ellyn; Chou, Roger; Herr, Keela; Murinson, Beth B; Watt-Watson, Judy; Carr, Daniel B; Gordon, Debra B; Stevens, Bonnie J; Bakerjian, Debra; Ballantyne, Jane C; Courtenay, Molly; Djukic, Maja; Koebner, Ian J; Mongoven, Jennifer M; Paice, Judith A; Prasad, Ravi; Singh, Naileshni; Sluka, Kathleen A; St Marie, Barbara; Strassels, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this project was to develop core competencies in pain assessment and management for prelicensure health professional education. Such core pain competencies common to all prelicensure health professionals have not been previously reported. Methods An interprofessional executive committee led a consensus-building process to develop the core competencies. An in-depth literature review was conducted followed by engagement of an interprofessional Competency Advisory Committee to critique competencies through an iterative process. A 2-day summit was held so that consensus could be reached. Results The consensus-derived competencies were categorized within four domains: multidimensional nature of pain, pain assessment and measurement, management of pain, and context of pain management. These domains address the fundamental concepts and complexity of pain; how pain is observed and assessed; collaborative approaches to treatment options; and application of competencies across the life span in the context of various settings, populations, and care team models. A set of values and guiding principles are embedded within each domain. Conclusions These competencies can serve as a foundation for developing, defining, and revising curricula and as a resource for the creation of learning activities across health professions designed to advance care that effectively responds to pain. PMID:23577878

  18. Identifying Core Competencies of Infection Control Nurse Specialists in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai Fong; Bond, Trevor G; Adamson, Bob; Chow, Meyrick

    2016-01-01

    To confirm a core competency scale for Hong Kong infection control nurses at the advanced nursing practice level from the core competency items proposed in a previous phase of this study. This would serve as the foundation of competency assurance in Hong Kong hospitals. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All public and private hospitals in Hong Kong. All infection control nurses in hospitals of Hong Kong. The 83-item proposed core competency list established in an earlier study was transformed into a questionnaire and sent to 112 infection control nurses in 48 hospitals in Hong Kong. They were asked to rate the importance of each infection prevention and control item using Likert-style response categories. Data were analyzed using the Rasch model. The response rate of 81.25% was achieved. Seven items were removed from the proposed core competency list, leaving a scale of 76 items that fit the measurement requirements of the unidimensional Rasch model. Essential core competency items of advanced practice for infection control nurses in Hong Kong were identified based on the measurement criteria of the Rasch model. Several items of the scale that reflect local Hong Kong contextual characteristics are distinguished from the overseas standards. This local-specific competency list could serve as the foundation for education and for certification of infection control nurse specialists in Hong Kong. Rasch measurement is an appropriate analytical tool for identifying core competencies of advanced practice nurses in other specialties and in other locations in a manner that incorporates practitioner judgment and expertise.

  19. Testing of a measurement model for baccalaureate nursing students' self-evaluation of core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling; Hsieh, Suh-Ing

    2009-11-01

    Testing of a measurement model for baccalaureate nursing students' self-evaluation of core competencies. This paper is a report of a study to test the psychometric properties of the Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale for baccalaureate nursing students. Baccalaureate nursing students receive basic nursing education and continue to build competency in practice settings after graduation. Nursing students today face great challenges. Society demands analytic, critical, reflective and transformative attitudes from graduates. It also demands that institutions of higher education take the responsibility to encourage students, through academic work, to acquire knowledge and skills that meet the needs of the modern workplace, which favours highly skilled and qualified workers. A survey of 802 senior nursing students in their last semester at college or university was conducted in Taiwan in 2007 using the Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale. Half of the participants were randomly assigned either to principal components analysis with varimax rotation or confirmatory factor analysis. Principal components analysis revealed two components of core competencies that were named as humanity/responsibility and cognitive/performance. The initial model of confirmatory factor analysis was then converged to an acceptable solution but did not show a good fit; however, the final model of confirmatory factor analysis was converged to an acceptable solution with acceptable fit. The final model has two components, namely humanity/responsibility and cognitive/performance. Both components have four indicators. In addition, six indicators have their correlated measurement errors. Self-Evaluated Core Competencies Scale could be used to assess the core competencies of undergraduate nursing students. In addition, it should be used as a teaching guide to increase students' competencies to ensure quality patient care in hospitals.

  20. Facilitating creativity as a core competence in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, P.; Onarheim, Balder

    2015-01-01

    In Engineering Education (EE) there is a growing emphasis on providing students with skills and competences within innovation and entrepreneurship. This development has emerged from an identified need for establishment of new enterprises, creation of new possibilities for employment...... competences in EE [1]. Still it is well known that there is inertia in Engineering Education to develop new structures and traditions in teaching and learning [2]. In the whole education system there is a growing interest in creative engagement of pupils and students, and the body of research in the area...... and to contribute to enhanced growth. Engineers are considered to have a key position in this development, and many engineering challenges call for new solutions. Creativity is a prerequisite for the ability to combine present knowledge into new solutions. Hence, creativity is an important subset in innovation...

  1. Competences of Technology Teachers within Education Paradigm Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijolė Bankauskienė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the 21st century, when technologies change and the knowledge society develops, the requirements for the activity of profession teachers have increased. It is particularly because that the change of education paradigms from teaching and impact paradigms towards learning paradigm. Teacher’s roles change, new functions in the activity technologies’ teachers emerge. The aim of the article – is to find out in what competences a teacher of technologies should distinguish when education paradigm changes. The article consists of three parts. The first part discusses three education paradigms and their peculiarities by stressing the activity of a teacher and pupil. The second part distinguishes the competences characteristic for a teacher of technologies in the context of long-life and sustainable development education by considering the Competencies of European Qualification Structure and the Inventory of Teacher’s Profession Competences (2007. The third part presents the results of the empirical research: the final projects of six teachers-students (respondents, who in 2011 graduated from the non-degree study programme ‘Pedagogy’ at the Department of Educational Systems, Faculty of Social Sciences, Kaunas University of Technology, were analysed. These teachers already possessing the diploma of the bachelor in technologies wanted to acquire the certificate of technology teacher’s qualification. Beside theoretical study subjects the teachers–students, when studying at one-year programme, prepared and defended their final and qualification project by applying action research in order to get the certificate of a technology teacher. In the project they presented the inventory of acquired and developed competences as well as analysed their pedagogical activity. The research results showed what competences the teachers-students who graduated from the study programme ‘Pedagogy’ possess and what competences they lack. Referring to

  2. Improving information technology competencies: implications for psychiatric mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    While substantial evidence links information technology (IT) with improved patient safety, care quality, access, and efficiency, nurses must demonstrate competencies in computers, informatics, and information literacy in order to use IT for practice, education, and research. The nursing profession has established IT competencies for all nurses at beginning and experienced levels. Newly revised standards also articulate role-specific expectations for advanced practice nurses. Unfortunately, there is a concern that many nurses may not possess these capabilities and that nurse educators are not prepared to teach them. IT competency evaluations, which have focused predominately on nursing education, indicate novice skill levels for most faculty and students. In numerous studies, again conducted largely in nursing education, significant improvement in IT competencies has been achieved only with intensive interventions. Deficits in IT competencies are a significant concern, because the federal government has mandated full implementation of Electronic Health Records (EHR) by 2014. EHR will require all nurses to use IT to deliver, document, and obtain reimbursement for patient care. In response to these concerns, two recent initiatives, the "Health Information Technology Scholars (HITS)" and "Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform (TIGER)" projects, have been launched. By enhancing IT competencies, these projects will enable nurses to use evidence-based practice and other innovations to transform clinical care, education, and research. This report updates psychiatric-mental health nurses on the IT competencies literature, recent enhancement initiatives and innovations, and their implications for the specialty.

  3. Regulatory body core competencies: when should a regulator contract a TSO?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, Patricia; Salati de Almeida, Ivan P.; Almeida, Claudio U.; Costa, Eduardo M.

    2008-01-01

    The main nuclear regulatory functions are authorization, safety review and assessment, inspection and enforcement and development of regulations and guides. Additionally, the following supplementary functions may be executed by the regulatory body: research and development, emergency response and international cooperation. In order to function properly, the regulatory body should also have the following support functions: general management, logistics, training, communication and information, information technology support, institutional relationship, internal controls and audits, ombudsman and legal support. Technical Support Organizations (TSOs) may assist the regulatory body in meeting the challenges in a rapid growing and changing environment. Specially when there is a temporary need for a wider technical expertise diversity, short time to finish a project or when the cost of developing and maintaining infrastructure of their own laboratories for analysis and research is too high and may deviate the focus on the regulator's mission. Decision on the 'size' of the regulatory body and on what can be contracted to a Technical Support Organization (TSO) depends on the resources and capabilities needed to fulfil the regulatory functions efficiently. It is important to establish the core competencies that must be at the regulatory body, keeping the focus on the regulatory goals and define the real need to contract a TSO, weighting the benefits and disadvantages. As a contribution to the definition of the regulatory core competencies, the paper discusses what is essential to be kept at the regulatory body and what can be delegated to a TSO; how to manage and control the work of the TSO; the cost effectiveness of contracting, sharing of tacit knowledge; how to handle eventual conflicts between the parties involved in the licensing process; contract types and risk evaluation, concerning the dependence on a TSO, eventual change of partners and the intellectual capital

  4. Core competencies in sexual and reproductive health for the interprofessional primary care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappiello, Joyce; Levi, Amy; Nothnagle, Melissa

    2016-05-01

    A primary care workforce that is well prepared to provide high-quality sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care has the potential to enhance access to care and reduce health disparities. This project aimed to identify core competencies to guide SRH training across the primary care professions. A six-member interprofessional expert working group drafted SRH competencies for primary care team members. Primary care providers including family physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners and certified nurse midwives, physician assistants and pharmacists were invited to participate in a three-round electronic Delphi survey. In each round, participants voted by email to retain, eliminate or revise each competency, with their suggested edits to the competencies incorporated by the researchers after each round. Fifty providers from six professions participated. In Round 1, 17 of 33 draft competencies reached the 75% predetermined agreement level to be accepted as written. Five were combined, reducing the total number to 28. Based on Round 2 feedback, 21 competencies were reworded, and 2 were combined. In Round 3, all 26 competencies reached at least 83.7% agreement, with 9 achieving 100% agreement. The 33 core competencies encompass professional ethics and reproductive justice, collaboration, SRH services and conditions affecting SRH. These core competencies will be disseminated and adapted to each profession's scope of practice to inform required curricula. SRH competencies for primary care can inform the required curricula across professions, filling the gap between an established standard of care necessary to meet patient needs and the outcomes of that care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Outsourcing of mutual funds' non-core competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Sorhage, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Fund families strategically shape their member funds' behavior to target specific groups of investors with varying performance and service needs. In this paper I introduce a new measure to identify performance-oriented and service-oriented funds. Matching theories from the industrial organization literature, I suggest that funds whose families outsource the execution of services unrelated to portfolio management to external specialists are the same funds with an emphasis on their core busines...

  6. Nonclinical core competencies and effects of interprofessional teamwork in disaster and emergency response training and practice: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Jennifer; Schwartz, Brian; Kitto, Simon

    2013-08-01

    To define and delineate the nontechnical core competencies required for disaster response, Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) members were interviewed regarding their perspectives and experiences in disaster management. Also explored was the relationship between nontechnical competencies and interprofessional collaboration. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 Canadian DMAT members to explore how they viewed nontechnical core competencies and how their experiences influenced their perceptions toward interprofessonalism in disaster response. Data were examined using thematic analysis. Nontechnical core competencies were categorized under austere skills, interpersonal skills, and cognitive skills. Research participants defined interprofessionalism and discussed the importance of specific nontechnical core competencies to interprofessional collaboration. The findings of this study established a connection between nontechnical core competencies and interprofessional collaboration in DMAT activities. It also provided preliminary insights into the importance of context in developing an evidence base for competency training in disaster response and management. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2013;0:1-8).

  7. An Interprofessional Consensus of Core Competencies for Prelicensure Education in Pain Management: Curriculum Application for Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Keela; St. Marie, Barbara; Gordon, Debra B.; Paice, Judith A.; Watt-Watson, Judy; Stevens, Bonnie J.; Bakerjian, Debra; Young, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ineffective assessment and management of pain is a significant problem. A gap in prelicensure health science program pain content has been identified for the improvement of pain care in the United States. Method Through consensus processes, an expert panel of nurses, who participated in the interdisciplinary development of core competencies in pain management for prelicensure health professional education, developed recommendations to address the gap in nursing curricula. Results Challenges and incentives for implementation of pain competencies in nursing education are discussed, and specific recommendations for how to incorporate the competencies into entry-level nursing curricula are provided. Conclusion Embedding pain management core competencies into prelicensure nursing education is crucial to ensure that nurses have the essential knowledge and skills to effectively manage pain and to serve as a foundation on which clinical practice skills can be later honed. PMID:26057425

  8. Core health promotion competencies in Australia: are they compatible with climate change action?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Rebecca; Smith, James A

    2011-12-01

    Health promotion principles for practice are closely aligned with that of environmental sustainability. Health promotion practitioners are well positioned to take action on climate change. However, there has been scant discussion about practice synergies and subsequently the type and nature of professional competencies that underpin such action. This commentary uses the Australian Health Promotion Association (AHPA) national core competencies for Health Promotion Practitioners as a basis to examine the synergies between climate change and health promotion action. We demonstrate that AHPA core competencies, such as program planning, evaluation and partnership building, are highly compatible for implementing climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. We use food security examples to illustrate this case. There appears to be considerable synergy between climate change and health promotion action. This should be a key focus of future health promotion competency development in Australia.

  9. Comparative Analysis of Ukrainian and Foreign Scholars' Views on Interpretation of Such Terms as Competency, Professional Competency, Professional Competency of Technicians in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovchuk, Olha

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with a comparative analysis of the content of such terms as competency, competence and professional competency of technicians in food technology. Special attention has been given to domestic and foreign scholars' research findings on the matter in order to consider the genesis of the term "competency" and its spreading…

  10. Examining the importance of incorporating emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into allied health curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Preparation for responding to emergency events that does not warrant outside help beyond the local community resources or responding to disaster events that is beyond the capabilities of the local community both require first responders and healthcare professionals to have interdisciplinary skills needed to function as a team for saving lives. To date, there is no core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies that have been standardized at all levels across the various allied health curricula disciplines. To identify if emergency preparedness and disaster training content are currently being taught in allied health program courses, to identify possible gaps within allied health curricula, and to explore the perceptions of allied health college educators for implementing emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into their existing curricula, if not already included. A quantitative Internet-based survey was conducted in 2013. Convenient sample. Fifty-one allied health college educators completed the survey. Descriptive statistics indicated that the majority of allied health college instructors do not currently teach emergency preparedness and disaster training core competency content within their current allied health discipline; however, their perceived level of importance for inclusion of the competencies was high. The results of this study supported the need for developing and establishing a basic national set of standardized core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies at all levels across various allied health curricula disciplines to ensure victims receive the best patient care and have the best possible chance of survival.

  11. [Development and validation of a tool for evaluating core competencies in nursing cancer patients on chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Hae; Park, Jae Hyun

    2012-10-01

    This study was done to develop tool to evaluate the core competencies regarding nursing cancer patients on chemotherapy, and to verify the reliability and efficacy of the developed tool. A tool to evaluate the core competencies was developed from a preliminary tool consisting of 112 items verified by expert groups. The adequacy of the preliminary tool was analyzed and refined to the final evaluation tool containing 76 items in 8 core competencies and 18 specific competencies. The evaluation tool is in the form of a self-report, and each item is evaluated according to a 3-point scale. From September 22 to October 14, 2011, 349 survey responses were analyzed using SPSS 20.0 and the WINSTEPS program that employs the Rasch model. Results indicated that there were no inappropriate items and the items had low levels of difficulty in comparison with the knowledge levels of the study participants. The results of factor analysis yielded 18 factors, and the reliability of the tools was very high with Cronbach's α=.97. The results of this study can be used for training and evaluation of core competencies for nursing cancer patients, and for standardizing nursing practices associated with chemotherapy.

  12. Learning theories and tools for the assessment of core nursing competencies in simulation: A theoretical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Patrick; Michaud, Cécile; Bélisle, Marilou; Boyer, Louise; Gosselin, Émilie; Grondin, Myrian; Larue, Caroline; Lavoie, Stéphan; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2018-02-01

    To identify the theories used to explain learning in simulation and to examine how these theories guided the assessment of learning outcomes related to core competencies in undergraduate nursing students. Nurse educators face the challenge of making explicit the outcomes of competency-based education, especially when competencies are conceptualized as holistic and context dependent. Theoretical review. Research papers (N = 182) published between 1999-2015 describing simulation in nursing education. Two members of the research team extracted data from the papers, including theories used to explain how simulation could engender learning and tools used to assess simulation outcomes. Contingency tables were created to examine the associations between theories, outcomes and tools. Some papers (N = 79) did not provide an explicit theory. The 103 remaining papers identified one or more learning or teaching theories; the most frequent were the National League for Nursing/Jeffries Simulation Framework, Kolb's theory of experiential learning and Bandura's social cognitive theory and concept of self-efficacy. Students' perceptions of simulation, knowledge and self-confidence were the most frequently assessed, mainly via scales designed for the study where they were used. Core competencies were mostly assessed with an observational approach. This review highlighted the fact that few studies examined the use of simulation in nursing education through learning theories and via assessment of core competencies. It also identified observational tools used to assess competencies in action, as holistic and context-dependent constructs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Advances in Technology of Soluble Cores for Die Castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelínek P.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A number of technologies is developed that substitute simple metal cores in the high-pressure casting technology. Soluble cores, namely on the salt basis, represent the highest prospect. The contribution gives the results of the production of salt cores by high-pressure squeezing and shooting with using a binder. Special attention is paid to the shape of NaCl salt crystals with additives and the influence on strength properties of cores. A technology of bonding the salt cores is developing. Salinity of circulating water is studied and it is checked with the aid of electrical conductance.

  14. Friday Forum and the AICPA Core Competency Framework: Honing Students' Personal Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Grace F.

    2013-01-01

    This paper shares one learning technique for honing undergraduate students' personal competencies. The senior accounting capstone course at a small Midwestern private liberal college includes a weekly seminar series, called the Friday Forum, where students and practitioners meet to discuss a current professional accounting article. Since Spring…

  15. Business Students’ Attitudes Towards and Competency in Information Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Halil Seyrek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of wide spread use of information technology (IT in businesses, the need for IT-competent workforce is escalating. This need is also becoming very important for business graduates who can work in many areas and in different positions. The purpose of this study is to determine the IT competency of undergraduate business students and find out their attitudes towards IT since attitude is an important factor for the acceptance of IT. For this purpose, the attitudes of business students towards and competence in IT have been studied using data gathered from 394 undergraduate business students. As a result of the study, it has been found that most of the students own computers and have a good level of access to IT resources but their perceived level of competency is low. Moreover, female students compared to male students, students who don’t own a computer compared to students owning a computer and students who have high levels of access to IT compared to those with lower access show higher anxiety about IT, feel they have less control when they face a problem related to IT and have lower perceived level of IT competence. Also, depending on which year they are in, students show different attitudes towards IT and their competence increases as they become more senior. Finally, it has been found that different dimensions of attitude have effects on IT competence

  16. What Is "Competence" and How Should Education Incorporate New Technology's Tools to Generate "Competent Civic Agents"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haste, Helen

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the competences needed in twenty-first-century life, especially in relation to civic participation, and the educational requirements to foster them in young people. New technologies are widely used by young people for informal social interaction, video game-playing and giving voice to their views. Incorporation of these…

  17. Validation of a New Instrument for Self-Assessment of Nurses’ Core Competencies in Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Slåtten

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Competence can be seen as a prerequisite for high quality nursing in clinical settings. Few research studies have focused on nurses’ core competencies in clinical palliative care and few measurement tools have been developed to explore these core competencies. The purpose of this study was to test and validate the nurses’ core competence in palliative care (NCPC instrument. A total of 122 clinical nurse specialists who had completed a postbachelor program in palliative care at two university colleges in Norway answered the questionnaire. The initial analysis, with structural equation modelling, was run in Mplus 7. A modified confirmatory factor analysis revealed the following five domains: knowledge in symptom management, systematic use of the Edmonton symptom assessment system, teamwork skills, interpersonal skills, and life closure skills. The actual instrument needs to be tested in a practice setting with a larger sample to confirm its usefulness. The instrument has the potential to be used to refine clinical competence in palliative care and be used for the training and evaluation of palliative care nurses.

  18. A core competency model for Chinese baccalaureate nursing graduates: a descriptive correlational study in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang Yu; Zhao, Rong Rong; Liu, Yi Si; Wu, Ying; Jin, Ning Ning; Li, Rui Ying; Shi, Shu Ping; Shao, Yue Ying; Guo, Ming; Arthur, David; Elliott, Malcolm

    2013-12-01

    A review of the literature showed that the core competencies needed by newly graduated Chinese nurses were not as of yet undocumented. To develop a psychometrically sound instrument for identifying and measuring the core competencies needed by Chinese nursing baccalaureate graduates. Descriptive correlational and multicentre study. Seven major tertiary teaching hospitals and three major medical universities in Beijing. 790 subjects, including patients, nursing faculty members, doctors and nurses. A reliable and valid self-report instrument, consisting of 58 items, was developed using multiple methods. It was then distributed to 790 subjects to measure nursing competency in a broader Chinese context. The psychometric characteristics of reliability and validity were supported by descriptive and inferential analyses. The final instrument consists of six dimensions with 47 items. The content validity index was 0.90. The overall scale reliability was 0.97 with dimensions range from 0.87 to 0.94. Six domains of core competencies were identified: professionalism; direct care; support and communication; application of professional knowledge; personal traits; and critical thinking and innovation. The findings of this study provide valuable evidence for a psychometrically sound measurement tool, as well as for competency-based nursing curriculum reform. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The core competencies for mental, neurological, and substance use disorder care in sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Pamela Y.; Musisi, Seggane; Frehywot, Seble; Patel, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study points to a changing landscape in which non-communicable diseases, such as mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders, account for an increasing proportion of premature mortality and disability globally. Despite evidence of the need for care, a remarkable deficit of providers for MNS disorder service delivery persists in sub-Saharan Africa. This critical workforce can be developed from a range of non-specialist and specialist health workers who have access to evidence-based interventions, whose roles, and the associated tasks, are articulated and clearly delineated, and who are equipped to master and maintain the competencies associated with providing MNS disorder care. In 2012, the Neuroscience Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a meeting of key stakeholders in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss a set of candidate core competencies for the delivery of mental health and neurological care, focusing specifically on depression, psychosis, epilepsy, and alcohol use disorders. This article discusses the candidate core competencies for non-specialist health workers and the complexities of implementing core competencies in low- and middle-income country settings. Sub-Saharan Africa, however, has the potential to implement novel training initiatives through university networks and through structured processes that engage ministries of health. Finally, we outline challenges associated with implementing competencies in order to sustain a workforce capable of delivering quality services for people with MNS disorders. PMID:25783229

  20. The core competencies for mental, neurological, and substance use disorder care in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Pamela Y; Musisi, Seggane; Frehywot, Seble; Patel, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study points to a changing landscape in which non-communicable diseases, such as mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders, account for an increasing proportion of premature mortality and disability globally. Despite evidence of the need for care, a remarkable deficit of providers for MNS disorder service delivery persists in sub-Saharan Africa. This critical workforce can be developed from a range of non-specialist and specialist health workers who have access to evidence-based interventions, whose roles, and the associated tasks, are articulated and clearly delineated, and who are equipped to master and maintain the competencies associated with providing MNS disorder care. In 2012, the Neuroscience Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a meeting of key stakeholders in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss a set of candidate core competencies for the delivery of mental health and neurological care, focusing specifically on depression, psychosis, epilepsy, and alcohol use disorders. This article discusses the candidate core competencies for non-specialist health workers and the complexities of implementing core competencies in low- and middle-income country settings. Sub-Saharan Africa, however, has the potential to implement novel training initiatives through university networks and through structured processes that engage ministries of health. Finally, we outline challenges associated with implementing competencies in order to sustain a workforce capable of delivering quality services for people with MNS disorders.

  1. Baccalaureate nursing students' information technology competence--agency perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetter, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    Baccalaureate nurses must meet information technology (IT) competencies expectations for employment and future professional development. Unfortunately, educational programs and accrediting groups have not identified specific outcomes, and IT is not integrated formally into many undergraduate program curricula. Meanwhile, nursing students and faculty are practicing in clinical agencies undergoing an informatics and technology revolution. Adding courses and content, hardware, software, and strategies such as distance learning and simulation have been recommended to improve competency development. However, little is known regarding nursing students' experiences with IT in clinical practice. Agencies used as sites for one undergraduate program were surveyed and asked to identify barriers and facilitators to students' IT competencies attainment. Ten agency, program, and policy factors affecting the quality of the learning experience in clinical agencies were identified. Results underscored that leadership to improve collaboration and communication between nursing practice, education, and policy groups is necessary to improve clinical environments for IT learning.

  2. Core Competencies and the Prevention of High-Risk Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Vignetta Eugenia; Blum, Robert Wm.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescent sexual risk-taking behavior has numerous individual, family, community, and societal consequences. In an effort to contribute to the research and propose new directions, this chapter applies the core competencies framework to the prevention of high-risk sexual behavior. It describes the magnitude of the problem, summarizes explanatory…

  3. Teaching through Research: Alignment of Core Chemistry Competencies and Skills within a Multidisciplinary Research Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Eman; Long, S. Reid; Rodenbusch, Stacia E.; Shear, Ruth I.; Beckham, Josh T.; Procko, Kristen; DePue, Lauren; Stevenson, Keith J.; Robertus, Jon D.; Martin, Stephen; Holliday, Bradley; Jones, Richard A.; Anslyn, Eric V.; Simmons, Sarah L.

    2018-01-01

    Innovative models of teaching through research have broken the long-held paradigm that core chemistry competencies must be taught with predictable, scripted experiments. We describe here five fundamentally different, course-based undergraduate research experiences that integrate faculty research projects, accomplish ACS accreditation objectives,…

  4. [Self-evaluation of core competencies and related factors among baccalaureate nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Ting; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2013-02-01

    Evaluations of higher education programs are increasingly centered on the learner and designed to assess learning effectiveness and core competencies. Although the Taiwan Nursing Accreditation Council (TNAC) has established eight core competencies for college nursing departments, little research has been done to identify the most salient contributors to undergraduate nursing students' perceived competency levels. This paper investigates the influence of student demographic factors and learning experience on students' development in terms of a selected sample of core nursing competencies and then identifies factors that significantly predicts such development. This is a cross-sectional descriptive correlational study. We collected data from a sample of freshmen students currently enrolled in a two-year nursing bachelor degree program at a private vocational university in Taipei, Taiwan. Participants self-assessed abilities in designated core nursing competencies using the Competency Inventory of Nursing Students (CINS). A total of 279 of 290 distributed questionnaires were returned and used in data collection, giving this study a valid return rate of 96.2%. Participants earned a mean CINS score of 5.23 (SD = 0.49). Scale dimensions from highest to lowest mean score rank were: ethics, accountability, caring spirit, communication and cooperation, lifelong learning, general clinical nursing skills, critical thinking, and basic biomedical science. Differentiated analysis revealed that nursing students who expressed a strong interest in nursing, had a clear career plan, held aspirations to pursue higher nursing education, designated "major hospital" as their first workplace of choice, designated a post-college department / workplace preference, had participated in campus activities, were outspoken in classroom discussions and debates, made consistent effort to complete homework assignments and prepare for examinations, and performed relatively strong academically earned

  5. Emergency Preparedness Education for Nurses: Core Competency Familiarity Measured Utilizing an Adapted Emergency Preparedness Information Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgino, Madeline M; Kress, Terri; Alexander, Sheila; Beach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to measure trauma nurse improvement in familiarity with emergency preparedness and disaster response core competencies as originally defined by the Emergency Preparedness Information Questionnaire after a focused educational program. An adapted version of the Emergency Preparedness Information Questionnaire was utilized to measure familiarity of nurses with core competencies pertinent to first responder capabilities. This project utilized a pre- and postsurvey descriptive design and integrated education sessions into the preexisting, mandatory "Trauma Nurse Course" at large, level I trauma center. A total of 63 nurses completed the intervention during May and September 2014 sessions. Overall, all 8 competencies demonstrated significant (P in familiarity. In conclusion, this pilot quality improvement project demonstrated a unique approach to educating nurses to be more ready and comfortable when treating victims of a disaster.

  6. Core areas of practice and associated competencies for nurses working as professional cancer navigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sandra; Fillion, Lise; Fitch, Margaret; Veillette, Anne-Marie; Matheson, Tanya; Aubin, Michèle; de Serres, Marie; Doll, Richard; Rainville, François

    2013-01-01

    Fillion et al. (2012) recently designed a conceptual framework for professional cancer navigators describing key functions of professional cancer navigation. Building on this framework, this study defines the core areas of practice and associated competencies for professional cancer navigators. The methods used in this study included: literature review, mapping of navigation functions against practice standards and competencies, and validation of this mapping process with professional navigators, their managers and nursing experts and comparison of roles in similar navigation programs. Associated competencies were linked to the three identified core areas of practice, which are: 1) providing information and education, 2) providing emotional and supportive care, and 3) facilitating coordination and continuity of care. Cancer navigators are in a key position to improve patient and family empowerment and continuity of care. This is an important step for advancing the role of oncology nurses in navigator positions and identifying areas for further research.

  7. Development of core design technology for LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim Young In; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Y. G.; Kim, S. J.; Song, H.; Kim, T. K.; Kim, W. S.; Hwang, W.; Lee, B. O.; Park, C. K.; Joo, H. K.; Yoo, J. W.; Kang, H. Y.; Park, W. S.

    2000-05-01

    For the development of KALIMER (150 MWe) core conceptual design, design evolution and optimization for improved economics and safety enhancement was performed in the uranium metallic fueled equilibrium core design which uses U-Zr binary fuel not in excess of 20 percent enrichment. Utilizing results of the uranium ,metallic fueled core design, the breeder equilibrium core design with breeding ratio being over 1.1 was developed. In addition, utilizing LMR's excellent neutron economy, various core concepts for minor actinide burnup, inherent safety, economics and non-proliferation were realized and its optimization studies were performed. A code system for the LMR core conceptual design has been established through the implementation of needed functions into the existing codes and development of codes. To improve the accuracy of the core design, a multi-dimensional nodal transport code SOLTRAN, a three-dimensional transient code analysis code STEP, MATRA-LMR and ASSY-P for T/H analysis are under development. Through the automation of design calculations for efficient core design, an input generator and several interface codes have been developed. (author)

  8. Development of core design technology for LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim Young In; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Y. G.; Kim, S. J.; Song, H.; Kim, T. K.; Kim, W. S.; Hwang, W.; Lee, B. O.; Park, C. K.; Joo, H. K.; Yoo, J. W.; Kang, H. Y.; Park, W. S

    2000-05-01

    For the development of KALIMER (150 MWe) core conceptual design, design evolution and optimization for improved economics and safety enhancement was performed in the uranium metallic fueled equilibrium core design which uses U-Zr binary fuel not in excess of 20 percent enrichment. Utilizing results of the uranium ,metallic fueled core design, the breeder equilibrium core design with breeding ratio being over 1.1 was developed. In addition, utilizing LMR's excellent neutron economy, various core concepts for minor actinide burnup, inherent safety, economics and non-proliferation were realized and its optimization studies were performed. A code system for the LMR core conceptual design has been established through the implementation of needed functions into the existing codes and development of codes. To improve the accuracy of the core design, a multi-dimensional nodal transport code SOLTRAN, a three-dimensional transient code analysis code STEP, MATRA-LMR and ASSY-P for T/H analysis are under development. Through the automation of design calculations for efficient core design, an input generator and several interface codes have been developed. (author)

  9. Role understanding and effective communication as core competencies for collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Esther; Arndt, Julia; Arthur, Nancy; Parboosingh, John; Taylor, Elizabeth; Deutschlander, Siegrid

    2009-01-01

    The ability to work with professionals from other disciplines to deliver collaborative, patient-centred care is considered a critical element of professional practice requiring a specific set of competencies. However, a generally accepted framework for collaborative competencies is missing, which makes consistent preparation of students and staff challenging. Some authors have argued that there is a lack of conceptual clarity of the "active ingredients" of collaboration relating to quality of care and patient outcomes, which may be at the root of the competencies issue. As part of a large Health Canada funded study focused on interprofessional education and collaborative practice, our goal was to understand the competencies for collaborative practice that are considered most relevant by health professionals working at the front line. Interview participants comprised 60 health care providers from various disciplines. Understanding and appreciating professional roles and responsibilities and communicating effectively emerged as the two perceived core competencies for patient-centred collaborative practice. For both competencies there is evidence of a link to positive patient and provider outcomes. We suggest that these two competencies should be the primary focus of student and staff education aimed at increasing collaborative practice skills.

  10. Development of Pre-Service Teachers' Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Education Competencies in a Mainland Chinese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cher Ping; Yan, Hanbing; Xiong, Xibei

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how the design and implementation of a core teacher education course develops pre-service teachers' information communication technology (ICT) in education competencies in a mainland Chinese university. This course adopted a four-component instructional design system to develop its curriculum, incorporated an inquiry-based…

  11. Bioinformatics and Computational Core Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE COMPUTER CORE FACILITYEvaluation, purchase, set up, and maintenance of the computer hardware and network for the 170 users in the research...

  12. Core competencies of radiographers working in rural hospitals of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Mung'omba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rural radiographers require, over and above traditional radiographic expertise, additional competencies which to a certain degree are unique however not limited to rural practice. Previous studies, however, have focused more attention primarily on other rural health professionals such as doctors and nurses leaving a research need in this field. This article focuses on the additional competencies that may be required for rural radiographers.Aim: To investigate and identify additional core competencies required by radiographers working in rural hospitals of KwaZulu-Natal in order to propose a continuous professional development strategy aimed at rural radiographers.Methods: An exploratory sequential design was utilised with qualitative (Phase I and quantitative (Phase II strands involving seven participants and 109 respondents, respectively. Only radiographers working in rural KwaZulu-Natal hospitals were included in the study. The four major themes and categories identified in Phase I were used to develop data collection instrument for Phase II of the study.Results: Collectively, the results revealed that there were a number of additional core competencies such as, but not limited to, teamwork, ability to do basic obstetric ultrasound scans, leadership, management and reporting on plain radiographs, all of which are required by rural radiographers. In 2014 when these competencies were checked against a single curriculum, it was found that majority of them were either partially covered or not at all covered.Conclusion: The study provides additional information on context specific core competencies and, therefore, may act as a catalyst to influence the future of radiographers working in rural areas of South Africa.

  13. Toward validation of a minimal competence core of morphosyntax for African American children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, Ida J; Guillory, Barbara; Seibert, Marilyn; Boult, Johanna

    2013-02-01

    The authors set out to determine (a) whether African American children's spontaneous spoken language met use criteria for a revised minimal competence core with original and added morphosyntactic patterns at different geographical locations, and (b) whether pass/fail status on this core was differentiated on other criterion measures of language maturity. The authors used a common set of activities and stimuli to elicit spontaneous speech samples from Head Start students, age 3;0 (years; months). The 119 participants were distributed at a northern (Lansing, MI) and a southern (Baton Rouge, LA) location. More than 80% of the children at each location met criteria for 10 core competencies. They included sentence length, type, complexity, and morphosyntactic elaborations of sentences at the lexical, phrasal, and clausal levels. The 2 most significant predictors of pass/fail outcomes in a regression analysis were (a) clinical referral status and (b) the number of different words (NDW(100)) spoken in a speech sample. A minimal competence core analyses of spontaneous oral language samples may help to identify delayed spoken grammars in African American children.

  14. Mediated Effects of Technology Competencies and Experiences on Relations among Attitudes Towards Technology Use, Technology Ownership, and Self Efficacy about Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerdelen-Damar, Sevda; Boz, Yezdan; Aydın-Günbatar, Sevgi

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the relations of preservice science teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology ownership, technology competencies, and experiences to their self-efficacy beliefs about technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). The present study also investigated interrelations among preservice teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology ownership, technology competencies, and experiences. The participants of study were 665 elementary preservice science teachers (467 females, 198 males) from 7 colleges in Turkey. The proposed model based on educational technology literature was tested using structural equation modeling. The model testing results revealed that preservice teachers' technology competencies and experiences mediated the relation of technology ownership to their TPACK self efficacy beliefs. The direct relation of their possession of technology to their TPACK self efficacy beliefs was insignificant while the indirect relation through their technology competencies and experiences was significant. The results also indicated there were significant direct effects of preservice teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology competencies, and experiences on their TPACK self efficacy beliefs.

  15. Developing core competencies for monitoring and evaluation tracks in South Asian MPH programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negandhi, Himanshu; Negandhi, Preeti; Tiwari, Ritika; Sharma, Anjali; Zodpey, Sanjay; Kulatilaka, Hemali; Tikyani, Sangeeta

    2015-08-05

    Monitoring and evaluation (M&E) provides vital information for decision-making and its structures, systems and processes are expected to be integrated throughout the life-cycle of public health programs. The acquisition of these skills should be developed in a structured manner and needs educational systems to identify core competencies in M&E teaching. This article presents our work on harmonizing M&E competencies for Masters level programs in the South Asian context and undertaking the global review of M&E track/ concentration offered in various Masters of Public Health (MPH) programs. Through an online search and snow-balling, we mapped institutions offering M&E tracks/ concentrations in Masters of Public Health (MPH) programs globally. We obtained detailed information about their M&E curriculum from university websites and brochures. The data on curricular contents was extracted and compiled. We analyzed the curricular contents using the framework for core competencies developed by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH); and the Miller's triangle. This data was then used to inform a consultative exercise aimed at identifying core competencies for an M&E track/ concentration in MPH programs in the South Asian context. Our curricular review of M&E content within MPH programs globally showed that different domains or broad topic areas relating to M&E are covered differently across the programs. The quantitative sciences (Biostatistics and Epidemiology) and Health Policy and Management are covered in much greater depth than the other two domains (Social & Behavioral Sciences and Environmental Health Sciences). The identification of core competencies for an M&E track/ concentration in the South Asian context was undertaken through a consultative group exercise involving representation from 11 institutions across Bangladesh, India, Nepal and Sri Lanka. During the consultation, the group engaged in a focused discussion to reach consensus on a set of 15

  16. Core Competencies in Integrative Pain Care for Entry-Level Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tick, Heather; Chauvin, Sheila W; Brown, Michael; Haramati, Aviad

    2015-11-01

    The objective was to develop a set of core competencies for graduating primary care physicians in integrative pain care (IPC), using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) domains. These competencies build on previous work in competencies for integrative medicine, interprofessional education, and pain medicine and are proposed for inclusion in residency training. A task force was formed to include representation from various professionals who are involved in education, research, and the practice of IPC and who represent broad areas of expertise. The task force convened during a 1.5-day face-to-face meeting, followed by a series of surveys and other vetting processes involving diverse interprofessional groups, which led to the consensus of a final set of competencies. The proposed competencies focus on interprofessional knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) and are in line with recommendations by the Institute of Medicine, military medicine, and professional pain societies advocating the need for coordination and integration of services for effective pain care with reduced risk and cost and improved outcomes. These ACGME domain compatible competencies for physicians reflect the contributions of several disciplines that will need to be included in evolving interprofessional settings and underscore the need for collaborative care. These core competencies can guide the incorporation of KSAs within curricula. The learning experiences should enable medical educators and graduating primary care physicians to focus more on integrative approaches, interprofessional team-based, patient-centered care that use evidence-based, traditional and complementary disciplines and therapeutics to provide safe and effective treatments for people in pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Effects of Team-Based Learning on the Core Competencies of Nursing Students: A Quasi-Experimental Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung Eun

    2018-04-01

    An important goal of nursing education is helping students achieve core competencies efficiently. One proposed way of improving nursing education is team-based learning (TBL). The aim of this study was to assess the comparative effectiveness of TBL and lecture-style classes in terms of teaching core competencies in nursing education, which include clinical competence skills, problem-solving ability, communication competencies, critical thinking ability, and self-leadership. This quasi-experimental study enrolled 183 students as participants, with 95 and 88 in the experimental and control groups, respectively. These two groups attended 6 hours (2 hours weekly for 3 weeks) of TBL and lecture-style classes, respectively. Differences in core competencies between the two groups were compared before and after the intervention. The experimental group achieved significantly higher scores for clinical competence skills, communication competence, critical thinking ability, and self-leadership at posttest than at pretest, whereas the control group achieved significantly higher scores for clinical competence skills and critical thinking ability at posttest than at pretest. After the intervention, the experimental group had significantly better clinical competence skills, communication competence, and self-leadership than the control group. TBL is an effective approach method to teaching core competencies in nursing education.

  18. 2010 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Workshop on ''Preservation of competence in nuclear technology''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Within the two-day workshop on ''Preservation of Competence in Nuclear Technology'', 21 young scientists competed for the ''Competence Prize'' awarded by Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik for the twelfth time. They reported about their term papers, diploma or doctoral theses focusing on reactor technology and reactor safety, the development of innovative reactor systems, and waste management. For the first time, contributions this year were presented also from the field of radiation protection. The jury composed of Prof. T. Schulenberg (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), Prof. M.K. Koch (Ruhr University, Bochum), and Dr. W. Steinwarz (Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik) assessed the advance compacts as well as the oral presentations. The winner of the 2010 Competence Prize is Heiko Herbell of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Cornelia Heintze of the Dresden-Rossendorf Research Center, and Carola Hartel of the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research won the second and third prizes. (orig.)

  19. 48{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2017). Workshop: Preserving competence in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2017-10-15

    On the 19{sup th} workshop ''Preserving Competence in Nuclear Technology'' 17 young scientists presented the results from their thesis work for a diploma, mastership or a PhD covering a broad spectrum of technical areas. This demonstrated again the strong engagement of the younger generation for the nuclear technology and the significant support by the involved German institutions. The jury awarded Thomas Schaefer (Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden- Rossendorf) with the Siempelkamp Competence Price 2017.

  20. [Core values in nursing education enhances nursing competence: example of oxygen administration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Ya-Li; Hsieh, Hsiu-Fang; Lin, Li-Chuan; Chang, Pei-Rong

    2010-10-01

    The goal of nursing education is to enhance the capabilities of nurses for the benefit of patients and their families. Training toward this goal should begin from the nursing school curriculum, with courses addressing professional knowledge, psychomotor skills, and appropriate attitudes. However, course design has traditionally focused largely on psychomotor skills only. The purpose of this study was to describe the core value infused teaching strategy for nursing competency using nasal cannula oxygen administration as an example. Oxygen therapy standard procedures comprise twenty-eight nursing care steps. Six main nursing behaviors enforced in the enhanced curricula covered cleansing and asepsis, physical comfort and safety, psychological well-being, interpersonal interaction, caring, and critical thinking and reasoning concepts. The teaching method covered teaching goals, content, strategies, and evaluation. Findings support the efficacy of improving student nursing competency using teaching courses infused with core nursing values and enhanced through simulation-based teaching.

  1. A novel Internet-based blended learning programme providing core competency in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugihashi, Yukio; Kakudate, Naoki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Mishina, Hiroki; Fukumori, Norio; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Takegami, Misa; Ohno, Shinya; Wakita, Takafumi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2013-04-01

    We developed a novel Internet-based blended learning programme that allows busy health care professionals to attain core competency in clinical research. This study details the educational strategies and learning outcomes of the programme. This study was conducted at Kyoto University and seven satellite campuses from September 2009 to March 2010. A total of 176 health care professionals who had never attempted to attain core competency in clinical research were enrolled. The participants were supplied with a novel programme comprising the following four strategies: online live lectures at seven satellite campuses, short examinations after each lecture, an Internet-based feedback system and an end-of-course examination. We assessed the proportion of attendance at the lectures as the main outcome. In addition, we evaluated interaction via the feedback system and scores for end-of-course examination. Of the 176 participants, 134 (76%) reported working more than 40 hours per week. The mean proportion of attendance over all 23 lectures was 82%. A total of 156 (89%) participants attended more than 60% of all lectures and were eligible for the end-of-course examination. A total of the participants accessed the feedback system 3564 times and asked 284 questions. No statistically significant differences were noted in the end-of-course scores among medical doctors, pharmacists, registered nurses and other occupations. We developed an Internet-based blended learning programme providing core competency in clinical research. Most busy health care professionals completed the programme successfully. In addition, the participants could attain the core competency effectively, regardless of their occupation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. ACGME core competency training, mentorship, and research in surgical subspecialty fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca Monn, M; Wang, Ming-Hsien; Gilson, Marta M; Chen, Belinda; Kern, David; Gearhart, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the perceived effectiveness of surgical subspecialty training programs in teaching and assessing the 6 ACGME core competencies including research. Cross-sectional survey. ACGME approved training programs in pediatric urology and colorectal surgery. Program Directors and recent trainees (2007-2009). A total of 39 program directors (60%) and 57 trainees (64%) responded. Both program directors and recent trainees reported a higher degree of training and mentorship (75%) in patient care and medical knowledge than the other core competencies (peffective to a lesser degree. Specifically, in the areas of teaching residents and medical students and team building, program directors, compared with recent trainees, perceived training to be more effective, (p = 0.004, p = 0.04). Responses to questions assessing training in systems based practice ubiquitously identified a lack of training, particularly in financial matters of running a practice. Although effective training in research was perceived as lacking by recent trainees, 81% reported mentorship in this area. According to program directors and recent trainees, the most effective method of teaching was faculty supervision and feedback. Only 50% or less of the recent trainees reported mentorship in career planning, work-life balance, and job satisfaction. Not all 6 core competencies and research are effectively being taught in surgery subspecialty training programs and mentorship in areas outside of patient care and research is lacking. Emphasis should be placed on faculty supervision and feedback when designing methods to better incorporate all 6 core competencies, research, and mentorship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing Workforce Capacity in Public Health Informatics: Core Competencies and Curriculum Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Wholey

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a master’s level public health informatics (PHI curriculum to support workforce development. Public health decision-making requires intensive information management to organize responses to health threats and develop effective health education and promotion. PHI competencies prepare the public health workforce to design and implement these information systems. The objective for a Master’s and Certificate in PHI is to prepare public health informaticians with the competencies to work collaboratively with colleagues in public health and other health professions to design and develop information systems that support population health improvement. The PHI competencies are drawn from computer, information, and organizational sciences. A curriculum is proposed to deliver the competencies and result of a pilot PHI program is presented. Since the public health workforce needs to use information technology effectively to improve population health, it is essential for public health academic institutions to develop and implement PHI workforce training programs.

  4. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies at a Community Teaching Hospital: Is There a Gap in Awareness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Temimi, Mohammed; Kidon, Michael; Johna, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Reports evaluating faculty knowledge of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in community hospitals without a dedicated residency program are uncommon. Faculty evaluation regarding knowledge of ACGME core competencies before a residency program is started. Physicians at the Kaiser Permanente Fontana Medical Center (N = 480) were surveyed for their knowledge of ACGME core competencies before starting new residency programs. Knowledge of ACGME core competencies. Fifty percent of physicians responded to the survey, and 172 (71%) of respondents were involved in teaching residents. Of physicians who taught residents and had complete responses (N = 164), 65 (39.7%) were unsure of their knowledge of the core competencies. However, most stated that they provided direct teaching to residents related to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes stated in each of the 6 competencies as follows: medical knowledge (96.3%), patient care (95.7%), professionalism (90.7%), interpersonal and communication skills (86.3%), practice-based learning (85.9%), and system-based practice (79.6%). Physician specialty, years in practice (1-10 vs > 10), and number of rotations taught per year (1-6 vs 7-12) were not associated with knowledge of the competencies (p > 0.05); however, full-time faculty (teaching 10-12 rotations per year) were more likely to provide competency-based teaching. Objective assessment of faculty awareness of ACGME core competencies is essential when starting a residency program. Discrepancy between knowledge of the competencies and acclaimed provision of competency-based teaching emphasizes the need for standardized teaching methods that incorporate the values of these competencies.

  5. 2012 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Workshop on 'Preservation of competence in nuclear technology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Within the 2-day workshop on 'Preservation of Competence in Nuclear Technology,' 31 young scientists competed for the 'Competence Prize' awarded by Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik for the 14th time. They reported about their papers focusing on nuclear technology, reactor technology, innovative reactor systems, radioactive waste management, radiological protection and energy supply systems. The jury composed of Prof. J. Starflinger (Universitaet Stuttgart, IKE), Prof. M.K. Koch (Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, LEE), and Dr. W. Steinwarz (Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik) assessed the advance compacts as well as the oral presentations. The winner of the 2012 Competence Prize is Dipl.-Ing.(M.S.) Thomas M. Fesich (University Stuttgart). Dr.-Ing. Oliver Czaikowski (Techn. University Clausthal) and Dipl.-Ing. Mario Kuschewski (Universitaet Stuttgart) won the second and third prizes. (orig.)

  6. A goodness of fit and validity study of the Korean radiological technologists' core job competency model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chang Seon [Dept. of Radiological Science, Konyang University College of Medical Sciences, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, A Ra [Dept. of Medical Education, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Yera [Dept. of Medical Education, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong Youl [Dept. of Occupational Therapy, Kwangju women’s University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Radiological Technologists deals with the life of a person which means professional competency is essential for the job. Nevertheless, there have been no studies in Korea that identified the job competence of radiologists. In order to define the core job competencies of Korean radiologists and to present the factor models, 147 questionnaires on job competency of radiology were analyzed using 'PASW Statistics Version 18.0' and 'AMOS Version 18.0'. The valid model consisted of five core job competencies ('Patient management', 'Health and safety', 'Operation of equipment', 'Procedures and management') and 17 sub – competencies. As a result of the factor analysis, the RMSEA value was 0.1 and the CFI, and TLI values were close to 0.9 in the measurement model of the five core job competencies. The validity analysis showed that the mean variance extraction was 0.5 or more and the conceptual reliability value was 0.7 or more , And there was a high correlation between subordinate competencies included in each subordinate competencies. The results of this study are expected to provide specific information necessary for the training and management of human resources centered on competence by clearly showing the job competence required for radiologists in Korea's health environment.

  7. A goodness of fit and validity study of the Korean radiological technologists' core job competency model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chang Seon; Cho, A Ra; Hur, Yera; Choi, Seong Youl

    2017-01-01

    Radiological Technologists deals with the life of a person which means professional competency is essential for the job. Nevertheless, there have been no studies in Korea that identified the job competence of radiologists. In order to define the core job competencies of Korean radiologists and to present the factor models, 147 questionnaires on job competency of radiology were analyzed using 'PASW Statistics Version 18.0' and 'AMOS Version 18.0'. The valid model consisted of five core job competencies ('Patient management', 'Health and safety', 'Operation of equipment', 'Procedures and management') and 17 sub – competencies. As a result of the factor analysis, the RMSEA value was 0.1 and the CFI, and TLI values were close to 0.9 in the measurement model of the five core job competencies. The validity analysis showed that the mean variance extraction was 0.5 or more and the conceptual reliability value was 0.7 or more , And there was a high correlation between subordinate competencies included in each subordinate competencies. The results of this study are expected to provide specific information necessary for the training and management of human resources centered on competence by clearly showing the job competence required for radiologists in Korea's health environment

  8. Science and Technology Text Mining: Mexico Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A. del Río, and A.M. Ramírez, Analisis De La Evaluacion De Las Revistas Latinoamericanas A Traves Del Factor De Impacto Renormalizado, Rev. Esp. Doc...contam 0.6%, emiss 0.6%, soil 0.5%, mex 0.5%, hidraul 0.5%, epa 0.4%, meteorol 0.4%, concentr 0.4%, ambient 0.4%, ozon 0.4%, toxic 0.4

  9. Development of core design and analyses technology for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C. C.; Kim, K. Y.

    2002-03-01

    In general, small and medium-sized integral reactors adopt new technology such as passive and inherent safety concepts to minimize the necessity of power source and operator actions, and to provide the automatic measures to cope with any accidents. Specifically, such reactors are often designed with a lower core power density and with soluble boron free concept for system simplification. Those reactors require ultra long cycle operation for higher economical efficiency. This cycle length requirement is one of the important factors in the design of burnable absorbers as well as assurance of shutdown margin. Hence, both computer code system and design methodology based on the today's design technology for the current commercial reactor cores require intensive improvement for the small and medium-sized soluble boron free reactors. New database is also required for the development of this type of reactor core. Under these technical requirements, conceptual design of small integral reactor SMART has been performed since July 1997, and recently completed under the long term nuclear R and D program. Thus, the final objectives of this work is design and development of an integral reactor core and development of necessary indigenous design technology. To reach the goal of the 2nd stage R and D program for basic design of SMART, design bases and requirements adequate for ultra long cycle and soluble boron free concept are established. These bases and requirements are satisfied by the core loading pattern. Based on the core loading pattern, nuclear, and thermal and hydraulic characteristics are analyzed. Also included are fuel performance analysis and development of a core protection and monitoring system that is adequate for the soluble boron free core of an integral reactor. Core shielding design analysis is accomplished, too. Moreover, full scope interface data are produced for reactor safety and performance analyses and other design activities. Nuclear, thermal and

  10. The Seneca Babcock Business Plan: A Case Study in Using Service Learning to Meet the AICPA Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author explains the trend toward service learning projects in higher education and justifies their use in the field of accounting. He describes a service learning project that was used to directly address the development of the competencies listed in the Core Competency Framework created by the American Institute of Certified…

  11. Nuclear technology centre. Preserving and developing competence and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiren, I.

    1995-01-01

    The Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm provides one third of Sweden's capacity for engineering studies and technical research at the post-high-school level. Altogether, the institute includes about 8000 students and 900 active postgraduate students and has a staff of nearly 2500. The research activities cover a broad spectrum of the natural sciences and technology, as well as architecture, industrial economics, urban planning, work science and environmental technology. In 1993, a Nuclear Technology Centre was established at the institute. The purpose of this Centre is to stimulate education and research in nuclear technology in order to contribute to the preservation and development of competence in the nuclear field. The formation of the Centre should be regarded as one of several recent initiatives aimed at maintaining a high level of safety and reliability in the operation of nuclear power plants at a time when there are political manoeuvres to phase out nuclear energy in Sweden. The paper summarizes the motives that led to the formation of the Centre, its goals and organization, and its initial activities and results. The paper may be of interest to similar organizations in other countries which are also faced with uncertainties regarding the future of existing nuclear power plants or of current programmes, and which consider that co-operation between the industry and universities is an important factor in ensuring the quality of technological development. (author). 4 refs

  12. The development and application of bioinformatics core competencies to improve bioinformatics training and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooksbank, Cath; Morgan, Sarah L.; Rosenwald, Anne; Warnow, Tandy; Welch, Lonnie

    2018-01-01

    Bioinformatics is recognized as part of the essential knowledge base of numerous career paths in biomedical research and healthcare. However, there is little agreement in the field over what that knowledge entails or how best to provide it. These disagreements are compounded by the wide range of populations in need of bioinformatics training, with divergent prior backgrounds and intended application areas. The Curriculum Task Force of the International Society of Computational Biology (ISCB) Education Committee has sought to provide a framework for training needs and curricula in terms of a set of bioinformatics core competencies that cut across many user personas and training programs. The initial competencies developed based on surveys of employers and training programs have since been refined through a multiyear process of community engagement. This report describes the current status of the competencies and presents a series of use cases illustrating how they are being applied in diverse training contexts. These use cases are intended to demonstrate how others can make use of the competencies and engage in the process of their continuing refinement and application. The report concludes with a consideration of remaining challenges and future plans. PMID:29390004

  13. Core Competencies of the Certified Pediatric Doctor of Chiropractic: Results of a Delphi Consensus Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Elise; Hestbaek, Lise; Pohlman, Katherine A

    2016-04-01

    An outline of the minimum core competencies expected from a certified pediatric doctor of chiropractic was developed using a Delphi consensus process. The initial set of seed statements and substatements was modeled on competency documents used by organizations that oversee chiropractic and medical education. These statements were distributed to the Delphi panel, reaching consensus when 80% of the panelists approved each segment. The panel consisted of 23 specialists in chiropractic pediatrics (14 females) from across the broad spectrum of the chiropractic profession. Sixty-one percent of panelists had postgraduate pediatric certifications or degrees, 39% had additional graduate degrees, and 74% were faculty at a chiropractic institution and/or in a postgraduate pediatrics program. The panel were initially given 10 statements with related substatements formulated by the study's steering committee. On all 3 rounds of the Delphi process the panelists reached consensus; however, multiple rounds occurred to incorporate the valuable qualitative feedback received. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Core Addiction Medicine Competencies for Doctors, An International Consultation on Training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ayu, Astri Parawita

    2017-07-18

    Despite the high prevalence of substance use disorders, associated comorbidities and the evidence-base upon which to base clinical practice, most health systems have not invested in standardised training of healthcare providers in addiction medicine. As a result, people with substance use disorders often receive inadequate care, at the cost of quality of life and enormous direct health care costs and indirect societal costs. Therefore, we undertook this study to assess the views of international scholars, representing different countries, on the core set of addiction medicine competencies that need to be covered in medical education.

  15. Factors Motivating and Hindering Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adile Aşkım Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence (ICTAC can be defined as “individuals’ motivation and capacity to voluntarily employ their ICT skills for initiating or taking part in civic actions”. Since academic staff and teachers in ICT related fields have crucial roles in training action-competent individuals, this study aimed to determine the views of preservice teachers and instructors in Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT departments about the motivating and hindering factors regarding ICTAC. Researchers used purposeful sampling technique and identified seven instructors and 16 students attending outlier CEIT departments from four different Turkish state universities. Since there is no contemporary framework on factors motivating or hindering ICTAC, the study was conducted with a qualitative approach and the data were collected through semi-structured interviews. Factors motivating and hindering ICTAC were identified through a content analysis. Findings of the study are believed to guide ICT and ICT education professionals in training students with higher levels of ICTAC and guide the course developers to focus on relevant social responsibility issues

  16. Residual morphogenetic competence in the proximal core region of stage 25 chick limbs: Zwilling's hypothesis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, D F; Miller, J W; Bentley, P A; Donald, M R

    1986-06-01

    Morphogenetic competence (MC) exists in embryonic limb tissue once thought to have lost this property as a consequence of cytodifferentiation. By stage 25 of chick embryonic development, cells in the proximal core of the limb have committed to the cartilage phenotype and are producing their characteristic extracellular matrix. Recombinant limb-bud grafts constructed using isolated fragments of this tissue produce outgrowths with a limb-like skeletal pattern. Inclusion of proximal peripheral tissue in the grafts (with or without the polarizing tissue) inhibits outgrowth and skeletal morphogenesis, explaining the failure of earlier studies to reveal the MC of the proximal core (chondrogenic) cells. Since definitive chondroblasts express MC in more permissive surroundings, it appears that Zwilling's assertion, that the onset of cytodifferentiation causes the loss of MC, is an oversimplification and that complex tissue interactions are probably involved.

  17. Core competencies for patient safety research: a cornerstone for global capacity strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andermann, Anne; Ginsburg, Liane; Norton, Peter; Arora, Narendra; Bates, David; Wu, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Background Tens of millions of patients worldwide suffer disabling injuries or death every year due to unsafe medical care. Nonetheless, there is a scarcity of research evidence on how to tackle this global health priority. The shortage of trained researchers is a major limitation, particularly in developing and transitional countries. Objectives As a first step to strengthen capacity in this area, the authors developed a set of internationally agreed core competencies for patient safety research worldwide. Methods A multistage process involved developing an initial framework, reviewing the existing literature relating to competencies in patient safety research, conducting a series of consultations with potential end users and international experts in the field from over 35 countries and finally convening a global consensus conference. Results An initial draft list of competencies was grouped into three themes: patient safety, research methods and knowledge translation. The competencies were considered by the WHO Patient Safety task force, by potential end users in developing and transitional countries and by international experts in the field to be relevant, comprehensive, clear, easily adaptable to local contexts and useful for training patient safety researchers internationally. Conclusions Reducing patient harm worldwide will require long-term sustained efforts to build capacity to enable practical research that addresses local problems and improves patient safety. The first edition of Competencies for Patient Safety Researchers is proposed by WHO Patient Safety as a foundation for strengthening research capacity by guiding the development of training programmes for researchers in the area of patient safety, particularly in developing and transitional countries, where such research is urgently needed. PMID:21228081

  18. Exploring the Impact of Technological Competence Development on Speed and NPD Program Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acur, Nuran; Kandemir, Destan; de Weerd-Nederhof, Petronella C.; Song, Michael; Song, Michael

    2010-01-01

    With growing levels of competition across industries, technological competence is increasingly viewed as crucial for businesses to maintain their long-term competitive advantage. Although there are many theoretical arguments about how firms' competences can yield competitive advantage and

  19. The Health Information Technology Competencies Tool: Does It Translate for Nursing Informatics in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipes, Carolyn; Hunter, Kathleen; McGonigle, Dee; West, Karen; Hill, Taryn; Hebda, Toni

    2017-12-01

    Information technology use in healthcare delivery mandates a prepared workforce. The initial Health Information Technology Competencies tool resulted from a 2-year transatlantic effort by experts from the US and European Union to identify approaches to develop skills and knowledge needed by healthcare workers. It was determined that competencies must be identified before strategies are established, resulting in a searchable database of more than 1000 competencies representing five domains, five skill levels, and more than 250 roles. Health Information Technology Competencies is available at no cost and supports role- or competency-based queries. Health Information Technology Competencies developers suggest its use for curriculum planning, job descriptions, and professional development.The Chamberlain College of Nursing informatics research team examined Health Information Technology Competencies for its possible application to our research and our curricular development, comparing it originally with the TIGER-based Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies and Nursing Informatics Competency Assessment of Level 3 and Level 4 tools, which examine informatics competencies at four levels of nursing practice. Additional analysis involved the 2015 Nursing Informatics: Scope and Standards of Practice. Informatics is a Health Information Technology Competencies domain, so clear delineation of nursing-informatics competencies was expected. Researchers found TIGER-based Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies and Nursing Informatics Competency Assessment of Level 3 and Level 4 differed from Health Information Technology Competencies 2016 in focus, definitions, ascribed competencies, and defined levels of expertise. When Health Information Technology Competencies 2017 was compared against the nursing informatics scope and standards, researchers found an increase in the number of informatics competencies but not to a significant degree. This is not surprising

  20. AMIA Board white paper: definition of biomedical informatics and specification of core competencies for graduate education in the discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikowski, Casimir A; Shortliffe, Edward H; Currie, Leanne M; Elkin, Peter L; Hunter, Lawrence E; Johnson, Todd R; Kalet, Ira J; Lenert, Leslie A; Musen, Mark A; Ozbolt, Judy G; Smith, Jack W; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter Z

    2012-01-01

    The AMIA biomedical informatics (BMI) core competencies have been designed to support and guide graduate education in BMI, the core scientific discipline underlying the breadth of the field's research, practice, and education. The core definition of BMI adopted by AMIA specifies that BMI is ‘the interdisciplinary field that studies and pursues the effective uses of biomedical data, information, and knowledge for scientific inquiry, problem solving and decision making, motivated by efforts to improve human health.’ Application areas range from bioinformatics to clinical and public health informatics and span the spectrum from the molecular to population levels of health and biomedicine. The shared core informatics competencies of BMI draw on the practical experience of many specific informatics sub-disciplines. The AMIA BMI analysis highlights the central shared set of competencies that should guide curriculum design and that graduate students should be expected to master. PMID:22683918

  1. Identification of Pediatric Oral Health Core Competencies through Interprofessional Education and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hallas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past seven years, the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at New York University College of Dentistry (NYUCD and the Advanced Practice: Pediatrics and the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP program at New York University College of Nursing (NYUCN have engaged in a program of formal educational activities with the specific goals of advancing interprofessional education, evidence-based practice, and interprofessional strategies to improve the oral-systemic health of infants and young children. Mentoring interprofessional students in all health care professions to collaboratively assess, analyze, and care-manage patients demands that faculty reflect on current practices and determine ways to enhance the curriculum to include evidence-based scholarly activities, opportunities for interprofessional education and practice, and interprofessional socialization. Through the processes of interprofessional education and practice, the pediatric nursing and dental faculty identified interprofessional performance and affective oral health core competencies for all dental and pediatric primary care providers. Students demonstrated achievement of interprofessional core competencies, after completing the interprofessional educational clinical practice activities at Head Start programs that included interprofessional evidence-based collaborative practice, case analyses, and presentations with scholarly discussions that explored ways to improve the oral health of diverse pediatric populations. The goal of improving the oral health of all children begins with interprofessional education that lays the foundations for interprofessional practice.

  2. Feasibility analysis of real-time physical modeling using WaveCore processor technology on FPGA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraelen, Martinus Johannes Wilhelmina; Pfeifle, Florian; Bader, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    WaveCore is a scalable many-core processor technology. This technology is specifically developed and optimized for real-time acoustical modeling applications. The programmable WaveCore soft-core processor is silicon-technology independent and hence can be targeted to ASIC or FPGA technologies. The

  3. TPACK Competencies and Technology Integration Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Hafize; Karaoglan Yilmaz, Fatma Gizem; Yilmaz, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) competency of pre-service teachers with their self-efficacy perception towards technology integration, based on various variables; and the correlation between their TPACK competencies and self-efficacy perceptions towards technology integration were examined. The study…

  4. The Galway Consensus Conference: international collaboration on the development of core competencies for health promotion and health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Margaret M; Allegrante, John P; Lamarre, Marie-Claude; Auld, M Elaine; Taub, Alyson

    2009-06-01

    Developing a competent health promotion workforce is a key component of capacity building for the future and is critical to delivering on the vision, values and commitments of global health promotion. This paper reports on an international consensus meeting to identify core competencies, jointly organized by the International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE), the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) and the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC), with participation from international leaders in the field, that took place at the National University of Ireland, Galway, in June 2008. The purpose of the meeting is outlined and the outcomes in terms of strengthening global exchange, collaboration and common approaches to capacity building and workforce development are discussed. The Consensus Statement, based on the proceedings of the meeting, outlines core values and principles, a common definition and eight domains of core competency that are required to engage in effective health promotion practice. The core domains of competency agreed to at the meeting are: catalysing change, leadership, assessment, planning, impementation, evaluation, advocacy and partnerships. A summary of the Consensus Statement is presented and further dialogue and discussion are invited in order to continue the process of building international consensus with regard to health promotion core competencies.

  5. Applications of simulation experiments in LMFBR core materials technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    The development of charged particle bombardment experiments to simulate neutron irradiation induced swelling in austenitic alloys is briefly described. The applications of these techniques in LMFBR core materials technology are discussed. It is shown that use of the techniques to study the behavior of cold-worked Type-316 was instrumental in demonstrating at an early date the need for advanced materials. The simulation techniques then were used to identify alloying elements which can markedly decrease swelling and thus a focused reactor irradiation program is now in place to allow the future use of a lower swelling alloy for LMFBR core components

  6. Partnering to provide simulated learning to address Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Judy I; Nimmagadda, Jayashree

    2015-05-01

    Learning to effectively communicate and work with other professionals requires skill, yet interprofessional education is often not included in the undergraduate healthcare provider curriculum. Simulation is an effective pedagogy to bring students from multiple professions together for learning. This article describes a pilot study where nursing and social work students learned together in a simulated learning activity, which was evaluated to by the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS). The RIPLS was used before and after the simulated activity to determine if this form of education impacted students' perceptions of readiness to learn together. Students from both professions improved in their RIPLS scores. Students were also asked to identify their interprofessional strengths and challenges before and after the simulation. Changes were identified in qualitative data where reports of strengths and challenges indicated learning and growth had occurred. In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that interprofessional simulation can be an effective method to integrate Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies into the curriculum.

  7. Integrating Morbidity and Mortality Core Competencies and Quality Improvement in Otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laury, Adrienne M; Bowe, Sarah N; Lospinoso, Joshua

    2017-02-01

    To date, an otolaryngology-specific morbidity and mortality (M&M) conference has never been reported or evaluated. To propose a novel otolaryngology-specific M&M format and to assess its success using a validated assessment tool. Preintervention and postintervention cohort study spanning 14 months (September 2014 to November 2015), with 32 faculty, residents, and medical students attending the department of otolaryngology M&M conference, conducted at the the San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium. A novel quality assurance conference was implemented in the department of otolaryngology at the San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium. This conference incorporates patient safety reports, otolaryngology-specific quality metrics, and individual case presentations. The revised format integrates the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies and Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (QI/PS) system. This format was evaluated by faculty, residents, and medical students every other month for 14 months to assess changes in attitudes regarding the M&M conference as well as changes in presentation quality. Overall, 13 faculty, 12 residents, and 7 medical students completed 232 evaluations. Summary statistics of both resident and faculty attitudes about the success of the M&M format seem to improve over the 14 months between the prequestionnaires and postquestionnaires. General attitudes for both residents and faculty significantly improved from the pretest to posttest (odds ratio, 0.32 per month; 95% CI, 0.29-0.35). In the pretest period, "established presentation format" was considered the most necessary improvement, whereas in the posttest period this changed to "incorporate more QI." For resident presentations evaluated using the situation, background, assessment, and review/recommendations (SBAR) tool, all evaluations, from all participants, improved over time. The M&M conference is an essential

  8. Critical Competencies To Promote A Customer Service Core Capability In A Human Resources Call Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Grobbelaar

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In today’s information-intensive environment customer service is an important aspect that differentiates one organisation from another. This research focuses on those individual competencies which will lead to a customer service core capability in a Human Resources Call Centre. Data was obtained from Call Centre agents (n=18, supervisors (n=3 and customers (n=25 by means of five focus group-, three individual- and 25 telephonic interviews, respectively. The transcendental realism research procedure was applied within a qualitative research paradigm. Ten key competencies were identified by all groups of participants. Opsomming In vandag se inligtings-intensiewe omgewing is kliëntediens ’n belangrike aspek wat organisasies van mekaar onderskei. Hierdie navorsing fokus op welke individuele bevoegdhede tot ’n kliëntedienssleutelbekwaamheid in ’n Menslikehulpbron-oproepsentrum sal lei. Data is van Oproepsentrumagente (n=18, -toesighouers (n=3 en -kliënte (n=25 ingewin deur middel van onderskeidelik vyf fokusgroep-, drie individuele- en 25 telefoniese onderhoude. Die transendentale realisme navorsingsprosedure is binne ’n kwalitatiewe navorsingsparadigma toegepas. Tien sleutelbevoegdhede is deur al drie groepe deelnemers geïdentifiseer.

  9. Evaluating the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education core clinical competencies: techniques and feasibility in a urology training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C; Montie, James E; Faerber, Gary J

    2003-10-01

    We describe several traditional and novel techniques for teaching and evaluating the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core clinical competencies in a urology residency training program. The evolution and underpinnings of the ACGME Outcome Project were reviewed. Several publications related to the evaluation of clinical competencies as well as current assessment techniques at our institution were also analyzed. Several tools for the assessment of clinical competencies have been developed and refined in response to the ACGME Outcome project. Standardized patient encounters and expanded patient satisfaction surveys may prove useful with regard to assessing resident professionalism, patient care and communication skills. A feasible and possibly undervalued technique for evaluating a number of core competencies is the implementation of formal written appraisals of the nature and quality of resident performance at departmental conferences. The assessment of competency in practice based learning and systems based practice may be achieved through innovative exercises, such as practice guideline development, that assess the evidence for various urologic interventions as well as the financial and administrative aspects of such care. We describe several contemporary methods for teaching and evaluating the core clinical competencies in a urology training program. While the techniques described are neither comprehensive nor feasible for every program, they nevertheless provide an important starting point for a meaningful exchange of ideas in the urological graduate medical education community.

  10. Mediated Effects of Technology Competencies and Experiences on Relations among Attitudes towards Technology Use, Technology Ownership, and Self Efficacy about Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerdelen-Damar, Sevda; Boz, Yezdan; Aydin-Günbatar, Sevgi

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the relations of preservice science teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology ownership, technology competencies, and experiences to their self-efficacy beliefs about technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). The present study also investigated interrelations among preservice teachers' attitudes towards…

  11. Status of core nuclear design technology for future fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Jung, Hyung Guk; Noh, Jae Man; Kim, Yeong Il; Kim, Taek Kyum; Gil, Choong Sup; Kim, Jung Do; Kim, Young Jin; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1997-01-01

    The effective utilization of nuclear resource is more important factor to be considered in the design of next generation PWR in addition to the epochal consideration on economics and safety. Assuming that MOX fuel can be considered as one of the future fuel corresponding to the above request, the establishment of basic technology for the MOX core design has been performed : : the specification of the technical problem through the preliminary core design and nuclear characteristic analysis of MOX, the development and verification of the neutron library for lattice code, and the acquisition of data to be used for verification of lattice and core analysis codes. The following further studies will be done in future: detailed verification of library E63LIB/A, development of the spectral history effect treatment module, extension of decay chain, development of new homogenization for the MOX fuel assembly. (author). 6 refs., 7 tabs., 2 figs

  12. Information Technology as the Main Competence in the Design of the Strategic Planning of Logistics Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Varella

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The creation of logistical support structures aims to help improve the performance of logistics along supply chains, a context where the Logistics Platforms have been gaining increasing prominence. A frequent difficulty in these ventures is to align strategic planning with the flow of cargo and the ability of the adjacent port areas. Aiming to contribute to the understanding of the importance of Information Technology in a Logistics Platform, this article systematize some of the operational core competencies of Logistics Platforms, inter-relating them with the strategic planning of these projects and showing their convergence to a solid information management structure. This study indicates the importance of this essential skill in the operation of a logistics enterprise and the preparation of its strategic plan, shown to be fundamental in the design of its operations, the adequacy of the enterprise to the region and to supply chains integrated into this environment.

  13. [A Delphi Method Survey of the Core Competences of Post-Acute-Care Nurses in Caring for Acute Stroke Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shu-Ching; Yeh, Lily; Lu, Meei-Shiow; Lin, Pei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Post-acute care (PAC) service is becoming increasingly important in Taiwan as a core focus of government policies that are designed to ensure continuity of care. In order to improve PAC nursing education and quality of care, the present study applies a modified Delphi method to identify the core competences of nurses who provide PAC services to acute stroke patients. We surveyed 18 experts in post-acute care and long-term care anonymously using a 29-question questionnaire in order to identify the essential professional skills that are required to perform PAC effectively. The results of this survey indicate that the core competences of PAC may be divided into two categories: Case Management and Care Management. Case Management includes Direct Care, Communication, Health Care Education, Nursing Consulting, and Family Assessment & Health Care. Care Management includes Interdisciplinary Teamwork, Patient Care Management, and Resource Integration. The importance and practicality of each item was evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. The experts required 2 rounds to reach a consensus about the importance and 3 rounds to determine the practicality of PAC core competences. This process highlighted the differing points of view that are held by professionals in the realms of nursing, medicine, and national health policy. The PAC in-job training program in its current form inadequately cul-tivates core competence in Care Management. The results of the present study may be used to inform the development of PAC nurse orientation training programs and continuing education courses.

  14. QUALITATIVE INDICATORS OF EFFICIENCY OF TECHNOLOGIES DEVELOPING ESP COMPETENCE IN STUDENTS MAJORING IN SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Микитинко

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to identifying and diagnosing qualitative indicators of efficiency of technologies developing ESP competence in students majoring in Sciences, namely: indicators of objective and subjective assessment  of students’ ESP competence, students’ motivation regarding professional choice, organizational features of professional training, its contents, the most popular learning activities, use of active methods of study in educational process. The paradigm of experimental research of efficiency of technologies developing ESP competence in students majoring in Sciences has been defined. Based on the interpretation of the qualitative indicators the hypothesis of efficiency of technologies developing ESP competence in students majoring in Sciences has been proven.

  15. Exposure to ACGME Core Competencies through Mentored Basic Science Research: A Pilot Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J. Wisco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1998, the Short-Term Training Program (STTP at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles has nearly tripled (from 30 to 89 in the number of first-year undergraduate medical students participants. STTP supports mentored research projects in the areas of basic sciences, clinical sciences, medical education, and public health (local and international. Although projects can be very specific in scope, the overall experience in STTP exposes students to some, if not all, of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME six core competencies–-Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, Practice-based Learning and Improvement, Interpersonal and Communication Skills, Professionalism, and Systems-based Practice. Thus, STTP has been an important aspect of medical education to prepare our students for residency programs. We describe and analyze the STTP as a model system to introduce the ACGME core competencies at an early point in undergraduate medical education. We conclude with a call to provide more mentored anatomical sciences basic and clinically applied research opportunities.

  16. The Impact of Assessing Technology Competencies of Incoming Teacher Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, Rachel A.; Banister, Savilla

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to establish a baseline of technology competency among our entering education students, our College of Education began implementing the Assessment of Technology Competencies (ATC) in Fall 2003. This performance-based assessment evaluates word-processing, presentation, spreadsheet, graphic/drawing, and Internet skills. Although…

  17. Meeting International Society for Technology in Education Competencies with a Problem-Based Learning Video Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoretz, Yvonne M.; Cottle, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Meeting International Society for Technology in Education competencies creates a challenge for teachers. The authors provide a problem-based video framework that guides teachers in enhancing 21st century skills to meet those competencies. To keep the focus on the content, the authors suggest teaching the technology skills only at the point the…

  18. Gas core reactor concepts and technology - Issues and baseline strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.; Kahook, Samer; Maya, Isaac

    1991-01-01

    Results of a research program including phenomenological studies, conceptual design, and systems analysis of a series of gaseous/vapor fissile fuel driven engines for space power platforms and for thermal and electric propulsion are reviewed. It is noted that gas and vapor phase reactors provide the path for minimum mass in orbit and trip times, with a specific impulse from 1020 sec at the lowest technololgical risk to 5200 sec at the highest technological risk. The discussion covers various configurations of gas core reactors and critical technologies and the nuclear vapor thermal rocket engine.

  19. Principlesand technology competence approach to formation of professional career students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Biskup

    2016-03-01

    In general, the article features acquired theoretical justification of career development of students in conjunction with practical mechanisms for achieving the appropriate level of career competence.

  20. Development of Enriched Core Competencies for Health Services and Policy Research: Training for Stronger Career Readiness and Greater Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Stephen; Heritage, Melissa; Chudak, Amanda; Tamblyn, Robyn; McMahon, Meghan; Brown, Adalsteinn

    2018-03-11

    To develop an enriched set of core competencies for health services and policy research (HSPR) doctoral training that will help graduates maximize their impact across a range of academic and nonacademic work environments and roles. Data were obtained from multiple sources, including literature reviews, key informant interviews, stakeholder consultations, and Expert Working Group (EWG) meetings between January 2015 and March 2016. The study setting is Canada. The study used qualitative methods and an iterative development process with significant stakeholder engagement throughout. The literature reviews, key informant interviews, existing data on graduate career trajectories, and EWG deliberations informed the identification of career profiles for HSPR graduates and the competencies required to succeed in these roles. Stakeholder consultations were held to vet, refine, and validate the competencies. The EWG reached consensus on six sectors and eight primary roles in which HSPR doctoral graduates can bring value to employers and the health system. Additionally, 10 core competencies were identified that should be included or further emphasized in the training of HSPR doctoral students to increase their preparedness and potential for impact in a variety of roles within and outside of traditional academic workplaces. The results offer an expanded view of potential career paths for HSPR doctoral graduates and provide recommendations for an expanded set of core competencies that will better equip graduates to maximize their impact on the health system. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  1. Linking the Prevention of Problem Behaviors and Positive Youth Development: Core Competencies for Positive Youth Development and Risk Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Nancy G.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a brief review of the developmental literature linking healthy adjustment to five core competencies: (1) positive sense of self, (2) self-control, (3) decision-making skills, (4) a moral system of belief, and (5) prosocial connectedness. A central premise of this chapter and the rest of the volume is that promoting…

  2. Core competencies for health care ethics consultants: in search of professional status in a post-modern world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, H Tristram

    2011-09-01

    The American Society for Bioethics and the Humanities (ASBH) issued its Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation just as it is becoming ever clearer that secular ethics is intractably plural and without foundations in any reality that is not a social-historical construction (ASBH Core Competencies for Health Care Ethics Consultation, 2nd edn. American Society for Bioethics and Humanities, Glenview, IL, 2011). Core Competencies fails to recognize that the ethics of health care ethics consultants is not ethics in the usual sense of a morally canonical ethics. Its ethics is the ethics established at law and in enforceable health care public policy in a particular jurisdiction. Its normativity is a legal normativity, so that the wrongness of violating this ethics is simply the legal penalties involved and the likelihood of their being imposed. That the ethics of ethics consultation is that ethics legally established accounts for the circumstance that the major role of hospital ethics consultants is as quasi-lawyers giving legal advice, aiding in risk management, and engaging in mediation. It also indicates why this collage of roles has succeeded so well. This article shows how moral philosophy as it was reborn in the 13th century West led to the ethics of modernity and then finally to the ethics of hospital ethics consultation. It provides a brief history of the emergence of an ethics that is after morality. Against this background, the significance of Core Competencies must be critically reconsidered.

  3. Study of the Results in the Acquisition of Core Competencies in Schools That Integrate Primary Education and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu Duran, Maria; Godall Castell, Pere; Amador Guillem, Miquel; Castro Morera, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this research was to carry out an exploratory study on how music education integrated into primary schooling (children from 6 to 12 years old) can help in acquiring the core competencies characteristic of this stage. The study was conducted by developing a validated instrument, pilot-tested for reliability, to assess the eight core…

  4. How core competencies are taught during clinical supervision: participatory action research in family medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, Danielle; Paré, Line; Côté, Luc; Baillargeon, Lucie

    2012-12-01

    The development of professional competence is the main goal of residency training. Clinical supervision is the most commonly used teaching and learning method for the development of core competencies (CCs). The literature provides little information on how to encourage the learning of CCs through supervision. We undertook an exploratory study to describe if and how CCs were addressed during supervision in a family medicine residency programme. We selected a participatory action research design to engage participants in exploring their precepting practices. Eleven volunteer faculty staff and six residents from a large family medicine residency programme took part in a 9-month process which included three focus group encounters alternating with data gathering during supervision. We used mostly qualitative methods for data collection and analysis, with thematic content analysis, triangulation of sources and of researchers, and member checking. Participants realised that they addressed all CCs listed as programme outcomes during clinical supervision, albeit implicitly and intuitively, and often unconsciously and superficially. We identified a series of factors that influenced the discussion of CCs: (i) CCs must be both known and valued; (ii) discussion of CCs occurs in a constant adaptation to numerous contextual factors, such as residents' characteristics; (iii) the teaching and learning of CCs is influenced by six challenges in the preceptor-resident interaction, such as residents' active engagement, and (iv) coherence with other curricular elements contributes to learning about CCs. Differences between residents' and preceptors' perspectives are discussed. This is the first descriptive study focusing on the teaching of CCs during clinical supervision, as experienced in a family medicine residency programme. Content and process issues were equally influential on the discussion of CCs. Our findings led to a representation of factors determining the teaching and

  5. Genetic education and the challenge of genomic medicine: development of core competences to support preparation of health professionals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skirton, Heather; Lewis, Celine; Kent, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    in professional education and regulation between European countries, setting curricula may not be practical. Core competences are used as a basis for health professional education in many fields and settings. An Expert Group working under the auspices of the EuroGentest project and European Society of Human......The use of genetics and genomics within a wide range of health-care settings requires health professionals to develop expertise to practise appropriately. There is a need for a common minimum standard of competence in genetics for health professionals in Europe but because of differences...... health professionals and patient groups. Sets of competences for practitioners working in primary, secondary and tertiary care have been agreed and were approved by the European Society of Human Genetics. The competences provide an appropriate framework for genetics education of health professionals...

  6. Organizational Learning, Building and Sustaining Core Competencies: Knowledge Management Initiatives on Inspection and Regulatory Enforcement in BAPETEN Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daeng Beta, W. P.; Nurwidi Astuti, Y. H.; Hermawan, A. S.; Syaifulloh, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Regulatory inspection and law enforcement are among the core competencies of the Indonesia Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN). Knowledge management (KM) initiatives are based on strategic planning of BAPETEN. KM in BAPETEN is in its early stage, it is realized since 2015–2016, although its elements have stayed in service for 18 years. Its architecture and performance-information are: to conduct risk based inspection for medical, industrial and research facilities; to plan, monitor and evaluate of effective inspection, including standard operating procedures (SOPs); to utilize inspectors for safety security of radiation sources along with coordination with related stakeholders; to enforce the safety and security facilities report to users; to optimize reliable data communication, processing and information technology (B@LIS); to perform regulatory enforcement along with other related stakeholders. KM processes are performed through the “Socialization, Externalization, Combination, Internalization” (SECI) model. Technical knowledge for inspectors are based on the IAEA–TECDOC–1526 plus supporting knowledge. With KM, innovation products can easily be used, because they are documented, distributed in a KM portal, knowledge is shared through the BAPETEN website, B@LIS database and others. Our challenge is that KM initiatives still need a tremendous effort, not only internally, but also externally, especially in coordination and collaboration. Information access brings about not only positive but also negative impacts. Innovations in regulatory inspection and law enforcement in BAPETEN are planned innovations, sustained, and systematically performed. (author

  7. Core informatics competencies for clinical and translational scientists: what do our customers and collaborators need to know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, Annette L; Meagher, Emma A; Tachinardi, Umberto; Starren, Justin

    2016-07-01

    Since the inception of the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program in 2006, leaders in education across CTSA sites have been developing and updating core competencies for Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) trainees. By 2009, 14 competency domains, including biomedical informatics, had been identified and published. Since that time, the evolution of the CTSA program, changes in the practice of CTS, the rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), the growth of biomedical informatics, the explosion of big data, and the realization that some of the competencies had proven to be difficult to apply in practice have made it clear that the competencies should be updated. This paper describes the process undertaken and puts forth a new set of competencies that has been recently endorsed by the Clinical Research Informatics Workgroup of AMIA. In addition to providing context and background for the current version of the competencies, we hope this will serve as a model for revision of competencies over time. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Core informatics competencies for clinical and translational scientists: what do our customers and collaborators need to know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenta, Annette L; Meagher, Emma A; Tachinardi, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    Since the inception of the Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program in 2006, leaders in education across CTSA sites have been developing and updating core competencies for Clinical and Translational Science (CTS) trainees. By 2009, 14 competency domains, including biomedical informatics, had been identified and published. Since that time, the evolution of the CTSA program, changes in the practice of CTS, the rapid adoption of electronic health records (EHRs), the growth of biomedical informatics, the explosion of big data, and the realization that some of the competencies had proven to be difficult to apply in practice have made it clear that the competencies should be updated. This paper describes the process undertaken and puts forth a new set of competencies that has been recently endorsed by the Clinical Research Informatics Workgroup of AMIA. In addition to providing context and background for the current version of the competencies, we hope this will serve as a model for revision of competencies over time. PMID:27121608

  9. Scientific Skills as Core Competences in Medical Education: What do medical students think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Laura; Severo, Milton; Pereira, Margarida; Amélia Ferreira, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Background: Scientific excellence is one of the most fundamental underpinnings of medical education and its relevance is unquestionable. To be involved in research activities enhances students' critical thinking and problem-solving capacities, which are mandatory competences for new achievements in patient care and consequently to the improvement of clinical practice. Purposes: This work aimed to study the relevance given by Portuguese medical students to a core of scientific skills, and their judgment about their own ability to execute those skills. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on students attending the first, fourth and sixth years of medical course in the same period. An assessment istrument, exploring the importance given by Portuguese medical students to scientific skills in high school, to clinical practice and to their own ability to execute them, was designed, adapted and applied specifically to this study. Results: Students' perceptions were associated with gender, academic year, previous participation in research activities, positive and negative attitudes toward science, research integration into the curriculum and motivation to undertake research. The viewpoint of medical students about the relevance of scientific skills overall, and the ability to execute them, was independently associated with motivation to be enrolled in research. Conclusions: These findings have meaningful implications in medical education regarding the inclusion of a structural research program in the medical curriculum. Students should be aware that clinical practice would greatly benefit from the enrollment in research activities. By developing a solid scientific literacy future physicians will be able to apply new knowledge in patient care.

  10. An Analysis of Competencies for Managing Science and Technology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-19

    Literature attributes the genesis of the concept to personality and social psychologist David McClelland, who in 1973 suggested that competencies... psychologist David McClelland, who opposed the practice of traditional intelligence tests as a means for measuring aptitude and performance as...Supportive • competencies are an overly logic-based approach lacking the humanistic dimension • if “demonstrated proficiency” equates to

  11. Financial Management Competence of Founding Teams and Growth of New Technology-Based Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinckmann, Jan; Gemuenden, Hans Georg; Salomo, Søren

    2009-01-01

    firms. We explore the relevance of strategic financial planning competence, external financing competence, competence in financing from cash flow, and controlling competence of entrepreneurial teams for the growth of new technology-based firms. A total of 212 founding teams provided self......This article draws on the resource-based view to analyze the role founding teams' financial management competencies play for firm growth. Prior research stressed the importance of acquiring external financial resources. In this study, we broaden the understanding of financial management in new......-assessments of their financial management competencies at start-up. We apply the partial least squares approach to determine the effects of the different financial management competencies on firm growth....

  12. FORMING AND EVALUATION OF ICT COMPETENCE OF SCIENTIFIC AND PEDAGOGICAL STAFF IN CONDITIONS OF DISTANCE LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES INTRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia V. Morze

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Readiness of teachers to the use of distance learning technologies requires them to have the appropriate competencies, which is part of the ICT-competence of teachers. It influences their level of professional competence and is one of the primary needs of modern training and self-teaching staff. The aim of this article is to define the content and technologies of forming competence, which provides competent and effective implementation of distance learning technologies. During the research was defined the competence of distance learning technologies, substantiated indicators for their evaluation, approbated method of 360 degrees with using specialized software.

  13. THE TECHNOLOGY OF FORMING THE PROSPECTIVE UKRAINIAN LANGUAGE TEACHERS’ LINGUOMETHODOLOGICAL COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Ishutina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article the author determines the concept of the technology of forming linguomethodological competence of prospective Ukrainian language teachers. The technology of forming the prospective Ukrainian language teachers’ linguomethodological competence in the process of their professional training is theoretically grounded: it consists of the targeted, content, technology and procedure, and effective stages. Experimental teaching was organized taking into account the pedagogical conditions and included the following forms and methods of work: problem lectures, discussions, round tables, simulation games, portfolio, project work, and testing. As a part of implementing the technology we have actively applied the specific methods of forming linguomethodological competence, such as the method of observing and analyzing linguomethodological activities, the method of modelling linguomethodological activities and training linguomethodological activities in the real conditions. The efficiency of the technology of forming linguomethodological competence of prospective Ukrainian language teachers in interrelation with monitoring of its quality was practically tested taking into account the specified criteria (cognitive, operational and activity, motivational and cultural and the indicators and levels of the concept. The developed technology of forming future Ukrainian language teachers’ linguomethodological competence allows to illustrate the progress of the process under study, demonstrates the functioning of all its components in close relationship. The proposed technology can be added and is not meant to finally solve the problem of forming linguomethodological competence of future Ukrainian language teachers; it can be improved theoretically and experimentally in the future and adapted and used by universities according to field of study.

  14. The Development of Sociocultural Competence with the Help of Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhimova, Alina E.; Yashina, Marianna E.; Mukhamadiarova, Albina F.; Sharipova, Astrid V.

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the description of the process of development sociocultural knowledge and competences using computer technologies. On the whole the development of modern computer technologies allows teachers to broaden trainees' sociocultural outlook and trace their progress online. Observation of modern computer technologies and estimation…

  15. Relationship of Technology Skill Competencies and Reading and Math Standardized Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Stacie L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if a relationship exists between technology skills and academic achievement among eighth-grade students. Previous studies investigated the relationship between the use of technology as a teaching tool and student outcomes, but none had specifically examined students' technology skill competencies with…

  16. Developing the Principal Technology Leadership Competency Indicators for Technical High Schools in K-12 in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyr, Wen-Jye

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop principal technology leadership competency indicators for technical high schools in K-12 in Taiwan in order to improve the effectiveness of school administration and teaching. In the first part of the study, five experts in the technology leadership field are interviewed to explore the technology leadership…

  17. Achieving generic competences through a cross-disciplinary research based course in Arctic Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Hansen, Claus Thorp; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2014-01-01

    successful in achieving both the scientific and generic competences than the students who did not. The students evaluate the course as being highly motivating for further learning and they get confident by successfully having executed a research based project in a new context. The project and field work...... engineering competences, so they are more aware of this, instead of just focussing on improving their scientific competences.......In a research based course in Arctic Technology, different teaching activities were used to support learning of both technical and generic competences. The active learning was based around a 3-weeks field work period in Greenland in combination with lectures, assignments, project and peer group...

  18. A study of professional competence for radiological technology department students in Taiwan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Kai-Yuan; Hsieh Bor-Tsung; Huang W.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, so many medical institutions established and the increasing use of the high technological medical imaging equipment, it makes radiological technology become the main instrument for the medical diagnostic and radiation therapy. However, the medical radiological technologies play the important role to operate all the related radiological machines. If they do not use the machines adequately, it will increase the patients' radiation absorbed dose. Then, the whole society health may be influenced. Therefore, constructing the professional competence of the medical radiological technologists is an important course. The purpose of this research are: (1) to construct the index of professional competence with radiological technology students, (2) to discuss the professional competence for the graduates from the department of radiological technology to be the reference for the Ministry of Examination for the license test of radiological technologists, (3) to provide the direction of the radiological technology department development. (author)

  19. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Julie; O'Connor, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in…

  20. Competency Based Modular Experiments in Polymer Science and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Eli M; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a competency-based, modular laboratory course emphasizing the synthesis and characterization of polymers and directed toward senior undergraduate and/or first-year graduate students in science and engineering. One module, free-radical polymerization kinetics by dilatometry, is included as a sample. (CS)

  1. Healthcare technology management competency and its impacts on IT-healthcare partnerships development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jen-Her; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Greenes, Robert A

    2009-02-01

    This study presents a conceptual model to investigate the healthcare technology management (HTM) competency required by healthcare IS professionals and the impact of such competency in gaining strategic advantages through information technology (IT) by development of partnerships with people from different divisions of healthcare organizations. First, a scale to measure HTM competency was developed and validated, then it was used to collect the large-scale survey data. Second, the partial least squares (PLS) method was used to empirically test the conceptual model and hypotheses through the large-scale survey data collected. The empirical results support the proposed structure for HTM competency encompassing the four skills/knowledge domains: healthcare organization overview, external knowledge networking, healthcare technology integration, and management and interpersonal. The findings indicate that HTM competency positively influences the attitudes of information system (IS) professionals towards their willingness to develop partnerships with healthcare professionals. The findings improve our understanding of the concept of HTM competency and its influence on IT-healthcare partnerships. The conceptual model of HTM is of particular value to those concerned with skills/knowledge training and competency development for IS professionals in healthcare organizations. Healthcare organizations can develop HTM profiles for individual IS professionals in accordance with their own organization contexts. Executive management can take advantage of such HTM profiles to assist in making succession-planning decisions by evaluating the competency levels and development needs of their employees.

  2. Graduate students' self assessment of competency in grief education and training in core accredited rehabilitation counseling programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Richard Jude

    The study examined whether 93 master's level rehabilitation counselor trainees from select Midwestern CORE-accredited schools report having been adequately trained to identify and work with clients who are having grief-related issues from a loss or disability. Using the Grief Counseling Competency Scale (GCCS), participants showed a wide range of scores regarding personal competency related to grief; however, scores tended to be low when examining skills and knowledge relating to grief, with most respondents scoring between "this barely describes me" and "this somewhat describes me." Although presence or history of a disability was found to be related to personal competency, a number of variables were not related, including: gender, age, race/ethnicity, course work in grief theories and grief interventions, practica/internship setting, and attitudes toward people with disabilities. Implications for further research are discussed.

  3. Improving the biomedical research literature: insights from authors' editors can help journal editors define and refine their core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matarese, Valerie; Shashok, Karen

    2018-01-01

    A team of stakeholders in biomedical publishing recently proposed a set of core competencies for journal editors, as a resource that can inform training programs for editors and ultimately improve the quality of the biomedical research literature. This initiative, still in its early stages, would benefit from additional sources of expert information. Based on our experiences as authors' editors, we offer two suggestions on how to strengthen these competencies so that they better respond to the needs of readers and authors - the main users of and contributors to research journals. First, journal editors should be able to ensure that authors are given useful feedback on the language and writing in submitted manuscripts, beyond a (possibly incorrect) blanket judgement of whether the English is "acceptable" or not. Second, journal editors should be able to deal effectively with inappropriate text re-use and plagiarism. These additional competencies would, we believe, be valued by other stakeholders in biomedical research publication as markers of editorial quality.

  4. Constructing core competency indicators for clinical teachers in Taiwan: a qualitative analysis and an analytic hierarchy process

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ai-Tzu; Lin, Jou-Wei

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to construct a framework of core competency indicators of medical doctors who teach in the clinical setting in Taiwan and to evaluate the relative importance of the indicators among these clinical teachers. Methods The preliminary framework of the indicators was developed from an in-depth interview conducted with 12 clinical teachers who had previously been recognized and awarded for their teaching excellence in university hospitals. The framework wa...

  5. Genetic education and the challenge of genomic medicine: development of core competences to support preparation of health professionals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skirton, Heather; Lewis, Celine; Kent, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    The use of genetics and genomics within a wide range of health-care settings requires health professionals to develop expertise to practise appropriately. There is a need for a common minimum standard of competence in genetics for health professionals in Europe but because of differences in profe...... and professions has resulted in an adaptable framework for both pre-registration and continuing professional education. This competence framework has the potential to improve the quality of genetic health care for patients globally....... in professional education and regulation between European countries, setting curricula may not be practical. Core competences are used as a basis for health professional education in many fields and settings. An Expert Group working under the auspices of the EuroGentest project and European Society of Human...... Genetics Education Committee agreed that a pragmatic solution to the need to establish common standards for education and practice in genetic health care was to agree to a set of core competences that could apply across Europe. These were agreed through an exhaustive process of consultation with relevant...

  6. Core competencies for cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention professionals: 2010 update: position statement of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Larry F; Sanderson, Bonnie K; Ades, Philip A; Berra, Kathy; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Roitman, Jeffrey L; Williams, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention (CR/SP) services are typically delivered by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) recognizes that to provide high-quality services, it is important for these health care professionals to possess certain core competencies. This update to the previous statement identifies 10 areas of core competencies for CR/SP health care professionals and identifies specific knowledge and skills for each core competency. These core competency areas are consistent with the current list of core components for CR/SP programs published by the AACVPR and the American Heart Association and include comprehensive cardiovascular patient assessment; management of blood pressure, lipids, diabetes, tobacco cessation, weight, and psychological issues; exercise training; and counseling for psychosocial, nutritional, and physical activity issues.

  7. The Time Is Now! Creating Technology Competencies for Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, Teresa S.; Graziano, Kevin J.; Slykhuis, David; Schmidt-Crawford, Denise; Trust, Torrey

    2016-01-01

    The way preservice teachers learn to use technology within their practice varies widely depending on the learning opportunities available (e.g., technology-infused teacher preparation program vs. standalone education technology course), and the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of the teacher educators within their teacher preparation programs.…

  8. Conversational competences model for information technology and business strategic alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Kalb Roses

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is the development of a model of conversational competences for Business and IT managers aiming at the strategic alignment between their areas. The theory of this alignment highlights the importance of communication between Business and IT areas, which is explored in the social dimension of their managers’ relationship through conversational competences. A survey research was performed with Business and IT managers from public and private organizations in Brazil, whose data were analyzed through multivariate statistical techniques – exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis – and thematic content analysis. The results confirmed the constructs and most of the hypotheses of the proposed research model, which was expanded with new constructs and hypotheses.

  9. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Edwards

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in addressing unique learning needs. Competency in informatics will allow the beginning nursing student to navigate the on-line teaching software used by colleges. With rigorous expectations in nursing programs, students may feel overwhelmed with assignments, organization, and time management. Frustration may build when students struggle with basic informatics competency, often leaving them unable to navigate instructional websites or work with necessary on-line learning content. The purpose of this project, Passport Project for Nursing Success, was to assess the skills, knowledge, and informatics comfort level of students, while providing computer training and teaching for beginning nursing students in an undergraduate nursing program in Central Illinois. The community college encompassed students from a ten county area, with 20 percent of the student population enrolled in the Applied Science curriculum. Initial implementation occurred prior to the students' first nursing course and emphasized basic skills necessary to navigate on-line learning software, library search engines, and electronic communication. The greatest barrier to successful implementation was faculty resistance and academic support during completion of the initial implementation of the Passport Project. Post- project surveys indicated overwhelming student support for the education received and improved retention rates of first semester nursing students.

  10. Core competencies in teaching and training for doctors in Scotland: a review of the literature and stakeholder survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael T; Macrae, Claire; Scott, Jayne; Renwick, Lynne; Moffat, Mandy; Needham, Gillian; Scott, Hazel; Shippey, Ben; Jackson, Catherine; Edgar, Simon; Aitken, Debbie; Evans, Phillip; Irvine, Stewart

    2014-06-01

    The UK General Medical Council requires all registered doctors to be competent in all areas of their work, including teaching and training. The current research sought consensus on core competencies for all consultants and GPs involved in teaching and training in Scotland. A draft list of 80 competencies was developed from the literature and made available as a survey to all consultants and GPs with teaching roles and all final year speciality trainees working in Scotland. Respondents rated the importance of each competency and provided free text comments. There were 1026 responses. Eighteen competencies were rated as "high priority", and are recommended as a baseline for all doctors involved in teaching and training; 55 were rated as "medium priority", and are recommended in relation to specific teaching and training roles; and 7 were rated as "low priority". Free text responses suggested the topic was controversial and emotive, and emphasised the importance of further work to engage trainers. The findings appeared to have face validity, and it was felt these could be used as the basis for developing a "Scottish Trainer Framework" for doctors and others involved in teaching and training in Scotland.

  11. Critical Workplace Competencies: Essential? Generic? Core? Employability? Non-technical? What's in a Name?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpern, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the concern over the lack of employability competencies that high school and college graduates bring to the workplace. Suggests that the dissatisfaction is often with what are called "soft skills" or one of many other terms. Attempts to clarify the semantic confusion regarding workplace competencies. (JOW)

  12. Learners' perspective: where and when pre-residency trainees learn more to achieve their core clinical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eusang; Ahn, Ducksun; Lee, Young-Mee

    2016-12-01

    While it is known that effective clinical education requires active involvement of its participants, regular feedback, communication skills and interprofessional training, limited studies have been conducted in Korea that demonstrate how pre-residency trainees acquire their core clinical skills. This is a cross-sectional study of interns and students across a third-tier university hospital in Korea to examine where and when they acquire core clinical skills. A total of 74 students and 91 interns were asked to participate in a closed-ended questionnaire, and 50 participants (20 students and 30 interns) were involved in semistructured individual interviews. The questionnaire was based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. The majority of core clinical skills were acquired during their rotations in emergency medicine, general surgery, and cardiothoracic surgery. The semistructured interviews revealed that these departments required their trainees to be highly involved and analytical, and participate in clinical discourse. The common factor among the three departments is an environment in which trainees are highly involved in clinical duties, and are expected to make first-contact patient encounters, participate in clinical discourse, interpret investigative results and arrive at their own conclusions. Work-based learning appear to be key to the trends observed, and further study is warranted to determine whether these findings are indicative of true acquisition of clinical competence.

  13. Learners’ perspective: where and when pre-residency trainees learn more to achieve their core clinical competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eusang Ahn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose While it is known that effective clinical education requires active involvement of its participants, regular feedback, communication skills and interprofessional training, limited studies have been conducted in Korea that demonstrate how pre-residency trainees acquire their core clinical skills. This is a cross-sectional study of interns and students across a third-tier university hospital in Korea to examine where and when they acquire core clinical skills. Methods A total of 74 students and 91 interns were asked to participate in a closed-ended questionnaire, and 50 participants (20 students and 30 interns were involved in semistructured individual interviews. The questionnaire was based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Results The majority of core clinical skills were acquired during their rotations in emergency medicine, general surgery, and cardiothoracic surgery. The semistructured interviews revealed that these departments required their trainees to be highly involved and analytical, and participate in clinical discourse. Conclusion The common factor among the three departments is an environment in which trainees are highly involved in clinical duties, and are expected to make first-contact patient encounters, participate in clinical discourse, interpret investigative results and arrive at their own conclusions. Work-based learning appear to be key to the trends observed, and further study is warranted to determine whether these findings are indicative of true acquisition of clinical competence.

  14. Pre-service teachers' competencies for technology integration: Insights from a mathematics-specific instructional technology course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyei, D.D.; Voogt, Joke; Resta, P.

    2012-01-01

    A combination of various measures (self-report, learning outcomes and written reports) was employed to investigate 104 pre-service teachers’ competencies in spreadsheet integration after enrolling in an Instructional Technology course. The pre-service teachers engaged in a “learning technology by

  15. The Effect of Instructional Technology and Material Design Course to Teacher Candidates' Gaining of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozkoparam, Süleyman Burak; Kiliç, Muhammet Emre; Usta, Ertugrul

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies of teacher candidates in Turkish Teaching department of Mevlana (Rumi) University and the effect of Instructional Technology and Material Design (ITMD) Course on TPACK. The study is a study of quantitative type and single-group pretest-posttest…

  16. Basic Technology Competencies, Attitude towards Computer Assisted Education and Usage of Technologies in Turkish Lesson: A Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Serpil

    2017-01-01

    The present research was done to determine the basic technology competency of Turkish teachers, their attitude towards computer-assisted education, and their technology operation level in Turkish lessons, and to designate the relationship between them. 85 Turkish teachers studying in public schools in Bartin participated in the research. The…

  17. Core identity e core competence dello psicologo nella cooperazione allo sviluppo e nell’assistenza umanitaria. Una ricerca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenza Rossi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to examine in depth the role of psychologists in development cooperation and humanitarian assistance, defining their competence and identity. We aim also at understanding which space can community psychology have in these contexts. The method used is the content analysis, performed on 21 interviews, 12 with psychologists and 9 with humanitarian agencies. Thanks to this research it was possible to define the functions of the psychologist as an operator which works in the field and within humanitarian agencies. The author notices a difficulty in communication between psychology and cooperation world. Moreover, community psychology in general emerges as an effective tool in cooperation field.

  18. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Mai; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Numano, Rika; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Kakeyama, Masaki; Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. ► Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. ► Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  19. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Mai [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Tetsuya [Cell Signaling Group, Waseda Bioscience Research Institute in Singapore (WABOIS), Waseda University, 11 Biopolis Way, 05-01/02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Numano, Rika [The Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS), Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tennpaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Ikematsu, Kazuya [Forensic Pathology and Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kakeyama, Masaki [Laboratory of Environmental Health Sciences, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Tsuboi, Takashi, E-mail: takatsuboi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  20. FORMING OF INFORMATION COMPETENCE OF STUDENTS IN THE PRCESS OF TEACHING ELECTIVE COURSES MEANS OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Liskovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approaches to the definition of information competence, investigated the possibility of elective courses in physics for the formation of information competence through the use of modern information and communication technologies.

  1. Music Technology Competencies for Education: A Proposal for a Pedagogical Architecture for Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Fátima Weber; Rocha Machado, Leticia; Behar, Patricia Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a pedagogical architecture (PA) focused on the development of competencies for music technology in education. This PA used free Web 3.0 technologies, mainly those related to production and musical composition. The pedagogical architecture is geared for teachers and those pursing a teaching degree, working in distance…

  2. Reflections of Teachers of Visually Impaired Students on Their Assistive Technology Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajuwon, Paul M.; Meeks, Melanie Kalene; Griffin-Shirley, Nora; Okungu, Phoebe A.

    2016-01-01

    Central to the issues of assistive technology utilization and competency is the need to understand how in-service and preservice teachers feel about their knowledge and skill levels. In order to identify teachers of students with visual impairments' perceptions of their mastery of assistive technology devices and services, two studies were…

  3. Integrating Information Technology's Competencies into Academic Nursing Education--An Action Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Ayala; Sharon, Dganit; Lev-Ari, Lilac

    2016-01-01

    Today, in the digital age, we are committed to prepare the future nurse for the information technology-rich workplace, and to help them reducing the "shock reality" upon arriving at the clinical setting. The main aim of the study is to promote the knowledge of Information Competencies Technology among nurses' educators and student. The…

  4. TECHNOLOGICAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE ENGINEER: FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT IN COMPUTER INTEGRATED LABORATORY WORKSHOP ON PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihor S. Chernetskyi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the category «technological competence» and the definition of its components according to the educational process. A structural and functional model of technological competence of future engineers through forms, means, methods and technologies of computer oriented laboratory work. Selected blocks and elements of the model in the course of a typical student laboratory work on the course of general physics. We consider the possibility of using some type of digital labs «Phywe», «Fourier» and modern electronic media (flash books to optimize laboratory work at the Technical University. The analysis of the future research of structural elements model of technological competence.

  5. Intercultural competence for future leaders of educational technology and its evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Niki; Ok Cho, Mi

    2005-01-01

    Demands of globalization today continue to increase pressure for the education of global citizens who preserve the variety and vitality of life. Our transatlantic project has been developing a shared community of graduate students and faculty experts in educational technology across six universities. Evidence of the development of intercultural competence was analyzed from artifacts, self-report, interviews, and surveys. The findings showed that students gained intercultural competence in pro...

  6. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations. PMID:27486351

  7. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations.

  8. Integrating Intercultural Competence into Language Learning through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin-Jones, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Culture has long been seen as a fundamental component of language learning. While its importance is universally recognized, there is no consensus on what the term encompasses, how culture should be integrated into language instruction, or on what role technology can and should play in that process. In this column, we will be looking at the latter…

  9. Improving University Students' Science-Technology-Society-Environment Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalaki, Yalçin

    2016-01-01

    Science, Technology, Society, Environment (STSE) is an education movement that started and developed from 70s through early 2000s. Although this movement had lost emphasis in recent years, it is one of the most important educational reform attempts in science education history. Today, concepts like Socio Scientific Issues (SSI) or Science,…

  10. FACTORS AND CONDITIONS OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE ECONOMISTS BY MEANS OF NETWORK TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiia М. Boliubash

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In the article factors and conditions of formation of professional competence of future economists revealed by the author are considered in case of introduction of network technologies on the basis of information Moodle environment into the system of traditional vocational training. The author has given the characteristic of the designated conditions, made their theoretical substantiation, has opened the importance of their use in vocational training of the future experts and has carried out the scientific substantiation of diagnostics of levels of formation of professional competence. The relevance of the research is caused by needs of society in introduction of the newest information technology into the vocational education.

  11. Developing Core Competencies for the Prevention and Management of Prescription Drug Misuse: A Medical Education Collaboration in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antman, Karen H; Berman, Harris A; Flotte, Terence R; Flier, Jeffrey; Dimitri, Dennis M; Bharel, Monica

    2016-10-01

    Drug overdose has become the leading cause of injury death in the United States. More than half of those deaths involve prescription drugs, specifically opioids. A key component of addressing this national epidemic is improving prescriber practices.A review of the curricula at the four medical schools in Massachusetts revealed that, although they taught components of addiction medicine, no uniform standard existed to ensure that all students were taught prevention and management strategies for prescription drug misuse. To fill this gap, the governor and the secretary of health and human services invited the deans of the state's four medical schools to convene to develop a common educational strategy for teaching safe and effective opioid-prescribing practices. With leadership from the Department of Public Health and Massachusetts Medical Society, the deans formed the Medical Education Working Group in 2015. This group reviewed the relevant literature and current standards for treating substance use disorders and defined 10 core competencies for the prevention and management of prescription drug misuse.The medical schools have incorporated these competencies into their curricula and have committed to assessing students' competence in these areas. The members of the Medical Education Working Group have agreed to continue to work together on key next steps, including connecting these competencies to those for residents, equipping interprofessional teams to address prescription drug misuse, and developing materials in pain management and opioid misuse for practicing physicians. This first-in-the-nation partnership has yielded cross-institutional competencies that aim to address a public health emergency in real time.

  12. Core Competencies and the Prevention of School Failure and Early School Leaving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; McNeely, Clea A.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that school failure and early school leaving are processes, rather than discrete events, that often co-occur and can have lasting negative effects on children's development. Most of the literature has focused on risk factors for failure and dropout rather than on the promotion of competencies that can increase…

  13. Meeting Tomorrow's Expectations: In Search of Core Competencies and Ways of Assessing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolskiy, O. A.; Pogozhina, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    Today, experts agree that the level of cognitive development of modern young people affects the long-term life goals and outcomes that they set for themselves. During the course of numerous studies experts have identified such key competencies as problem solving, information literacy, and critical thinking. However, there are still many unanswered…

  14. Core characteristics of the competent general practice trainer, a Delphi study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boendermaker, P.M.; Schuling, J.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.; Zwierstra, R.P.; Metz, J.C.; Conradi, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: The specific skills, attitude, knowledge, and personality characteristics, which should define the competent GP-trainer have been subject of research for many years. What are the most important of these characteristics have yet to be delineated. Aim: The aim of this study is to

  15. Hubungan antara Knowledge-Technology-Innovation (KTI, Commitment, Competence, Leadership, Government Policy, Human Capital, dan Competitive Advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darjat Sudrajat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In current tight competitive situation, companies always try to create differentiation anytime to achieve better and sustainable performance. Rapid and unpredictable changes insist the companies should always be innovative, so that aspects of globalization, e-business, technology innovation, creativity, global competition, knowledge creation, diffusion of new technologies and knowledge revolution should be sources of performance and competitiveness improvement. Therefore, tomaintain core competencies and competitive advantage, the companies should develop continuous innovation, technologylearning, and knowledge management. Knowledge-Technology-Innovation (KTI can be a driver for country’s development and growth. Japan, South Korea, and Singapore are the countries that have limited natural and human resources, but able to achieve sustainable economic development. KTI is not only to be practiced at individual and organizational level, but also can be implemented at the community, national, or state level. KTI, therefore, can encourage expected competitive advantage creation and become a decisive factor for a country to achieve stable and sustainable economic growth. This research intends to analyze relationships of KTI, competitive advantage, commitment, leadership, human capital, government policy,and competence. This research used correlational method and literature study approach. The result of this research is a relationship model of each of these aspects that can be used as a framework for further research. The relationships model isas follows: Leadership, competence, and human capital (as independent variables have direct relationship (influence oncompetitive advantage (dependent variable or indirectly (through KTI as an intervening variable; KTI has direct relationship (effect on competitive advantage; Government policy and commitment are moderator variables for relationshipof KTI and competitive advantage.

  16. Internal Medicine Residency Program Directors' Views of the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency: An Opportunity to Enhance Communication of Competency Along the Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven V; Vu, T Robert; Willett, Lisa L; Call, Stephanie; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Chaudhry, Saima

    2017-06-01

    To examine internal medicine (IM) residency program directors' (PDs') perspectives on the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (Core EPAs)-introduced into undergraduate medical education to further competency-based assessment-and on communicating competency-based information during transitions. A spring 2015 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey asked PDs of U.S. IM residency programs for their perspectives on which Core EPAs new interns must or should possess on day 1, which are most essential, and which have the largest gap between expected and observed performance. Their views and preferences were also requested regarding communicating competency-based information at transitions from medical school to residency and residency to fellowship/employment. The response rate was 57% (204/361 programs). The majority of PDs felt new interns must/should possess 12 of the 13 Core EPAs. PDs' rankings of Core EPAs by relative importance were more varied than their rankings by the largest gaps in performance. Although preferred timing varied, most PDs (82%) considered it important for medical schools to communicate Core EPA-based information to PDs; nearly three-quarters (71%) would prefer a checklist format. Many (60%) would be willing to provide competency-based evaluations to fellowship directors/employers. Most (> 80%) agreed that there should be a bidirectional communication mechanism for programs/employers to provide feedback on competency assessments. The gaps identified in Core EPA performance may help guide medical schools' curricular and assessment tool design. Sharing competency-based information at transitions along the medical education continuum could help ensure production of competent, practice-ready physicians.

  17. Educational Technology in Iranian High Schools: EFL Teachers’ Attitudes, Perceived Competence, and Actual Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Jahanban-Isfahlan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It goes without saying that technology has influenced virtually all spheres of our lives, and teaching English as a foreign language (EFL is not an exception to this rule. Also, teachers’ undeniable and decisive role in the integration of technology into teaching is not to be taken a blind eye on. With this in mind, this study explored Iranian high school EFL teachers’ attitudes toward, their perceived competency in, and their actual use of instructional technology in their classrooms. 120 randomly selected junior and senior high school Iranian EFL teachers filled out The Survey of High School EFL Teachers’ Attitudes toward Computer Technology. Over 600 junior and senior high school students filled out Students’ Questionnaire Surveying the Use of Educational Technology by English Teachers in Classrooms. The results indicated that even though Iranian teachers have an overall positive attitude toward (computer technology, they are not sufficiently competent to use it in their classes, and this lack of competence may be one of the main barriers to the full use of technology in their classes.

  18. New Hybrid Multiple Attribute Decision-Making Model for Improving Competence Sets: Enhancing a Company’s Core Competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Wei Huang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A company’s core competitiveness depends on the strategic allocation of its human resources in alignment with employee capabilities. Competency models can identify the range of capabilities at a company’s disposal, and this information can be used to develop internal or external education training policies for sustainable development. Such models can ensure the importation of a strategic orientation reflecting the growth of its employee competence set and enhancing human resource sustainably. This approach ensures that the most appropriate people are assigned to the most appropriate positions. In this study, we proposed a new hybrid multiple attributed decision-making model by using the Decision-making trial and Evaluation Laboratory Technique (DEMATEL to construct an influential network relation map (INRM and determined the influential weights by using the basic concept of the analytic network process (called DEMATEL-based ANP, DANP; the influential weights were then adopted with a modified Vise Kriterijumska Optimizacija I Kompromisno Resenje (VIKOR method. A simple forecasting technique as an iteration function was also proposed. The proposed model was effective. We expect that the proposed model can facilitate making timely revisions, reflecting the growth of employee competence sets, reducing the performance gap toward the aspiration level, and ensuring the sustainability of a company.

  19. Competencies Required for Healthcare Information Technology to Be an Effective Strategic Business Change Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davalos, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    One of the core strategies to transform the United States national healthcare system is the implementation of key technologies such as the electronic patient medical record. Such key technologies improve patient care and help the organization gain competitive advantage. With a high demand for strategic and operational change, healthcare providers…

  20. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olopade FE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Funmilayo Eniola Olopade,1 Oluwatosin Adekunle Adaramoye,2 Yinusa Raji,3 Abiodun Olubayo Fasola,4 Emiola Oluwabunmi Olapade-Olaopa5 1Department of Anatomy, 2Department of Biochemistry, 3Department of Physiology, 4Department of Oral Pathology, 5Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Abstract: The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula

  1. Constructing core competency indicators for clinical teachers in Taiwan: a qualitative analysis and an analytic hierarchy process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ai-Tzu; Lin, Jou-Wei

    2014-04-11

    The objective of this study was to construct a framework of core competency indicators of medical doctors who teach in the clinical setting in Taiwan and to evaluate the relative importance of the indicators among these clinical teachers. The preliminary framework of the indicators was developed from an in-depth interview conducted with 12 clinical teachers who had previously been recognized and awarded for their teaching excellence in university hospitals. The framework was categorized into 4 dimensions: 1) Expertise (i.e., professional knowledge and skill); 2) Teaching Ability; 3) Attitudes and Traits; and 4) Beliefs and Values. These areas were further divided into 11 sub-dimensions and 40 indicators. Subsequently, a questionnaire built upon this qualitative analysis was distributed to another group of 17 clinical teachers. Saaty's eigenvector approach, or the so-called analytic hierarchy process (AHP), was applied to perform the pairwise comparisons between indicators and to determine the ranking and relative importance of the indicators. Fourteen questionnaires were deemed valid for AHP assessment due to completeness of data input. The relative contribution of the four main dimensions was 31% for Attitudes and Traits, 30% for Beliefs and Values, 22% for Expertise, and 17% for Teaching Ability. Specifically, 9 out of the 10 top-ranked indicators belonged to the "Attitudes and Traits" or "Beliefs and Values" dimensions, indicating that inner characteristics (i.e., attitudes, traits, beliefs, and values) were perceived as more important than surface ones (i.e., professional knowledge, skills, and teaching competency). We performed a qualitative analysis and developed a questionnaire based upon an interview with experienced clinical teachers in Taiwan, and used this tool to construct the key features for the role model. The application has also demonstrated the relative importance in the dimensions of the core competencies for clinical teachers in Taiwan.

  2. Proficiency in identifying, managing and communicating medical errors: feasibility and validity study assessing two core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Dabrh, Abd Moain; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Newcomb, Richard D; Buchta, William G; Steffen, Mark W; Wang, Zhen; Lovett, Amanda K; Steinkraus, Lawrence W

    2016-09-02

    Communication skills and professionalism are two competencies in graduate medical education that are challenging to evaluate. We aimed to develop, test and validate a de novo instrument to evaluate these two competencies. Using an Objective Standardized Clinical Examination (OSCE) based on a medication error scenario, we developed an assessment instrument that focuses on distinctive domains [context of discussion, communication and detection of error, management of error, empathy, use of electronic medical record (EMR) and electronic medical information resources (EMIR), and global rating]. The aim was to test feasibility, acceptability, and reliability of the method. Faculty and standardized patients (SPs) evaluated 56 trainees using the instrument. The inter-rater reliability of agreement between faculty was substantial (Fleiss k = 0.71) and intraclass correlation efficient was excellent (ICC = 0.80). The measured agreement between faculty and SPs evaluation of resident was lower (Fleiss k = 0.36). The instrument showed good conformity (ICC = 0.74). The majority of the trainees (75 %) had satisfactory or higher performance in all six assessed domains and 86 % found the OSCE to be realistic. Sixty percent reported not receiving feedback on EMR use and asked for subsequent training. An OSCE-based instrument using a medical error scenario can be used to assess competency in professionalism, communication, using EMRs and managing medical errors.

  3. Pre-Service Teachers' Competence to Teach Science through Information and Communication Technologies in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jita, Thuthukile

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that there is a need for better training of prospective teachers on information and communication technologies (ICTs) in order to encourage their use for teaching and learning in schools. This paper presents findings on the self-perceptions of competence by pre-service teachers to use ICTs for teaching science content. A mixed…

  4. Competence Visualisation: Making Sense of Data from 21st-Century Technologies in Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Susan; Wasson, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces an open learner model approach to learning analytics to combine the variety of data available from the range of applications and technologies in language learning, for visualisation of language learning competences to learners and teachers in the European language context. Specific examples are provided as illustrations…

  5. Marketing Technology. FasTrak Specialization Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC). Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document presents the Ohio Integrated Technical and Academic Competency profile for marketing technology. The profile is to serve as the basis for curriculum development in Ohio's secondary, adult, and postsecondary programs. The profile includes a comprehensive listing of 580 specialty and foundation key indicators for evaluating mastery of…

  6. Teachers' Attitude and Competence in the Use of Assistive Technologies in Special Needs Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onivehu, Adams Ogirima; Ohawuiro, Onyiyeche Emilia; Oyeniran, Bunmi Juliana

    2017-01-01

    This study examined teachers' attitude and competence in the use of assistive technologies in special needs schools. The descriptive survey method was employed for the study among 100 teachers who were drawn using purposive sampling technique from special needs schools in Osun State, Nigeria. Six research questions were generated while four…

  7. Jordanian Social Studies Teachers' Perceptions of Competency Needed for Implementing Technology in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bataineh, Mohammad; Anderson, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This study used a cross-sectional, ten-point Likert-type scale survey design, to examine the perception of Jordanian seventh to twelfth-grade social studies teachers of the competency needed for technology implementation in their classrooms. The instrument for this study was a modified version of a survey developed by Kelly (2003) called the…

  8. Ready or Not? Assessing Change Readiness for Implementation of the Geospatial Technology Competency Model[c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annulis, Heather M.; Gaudet, Cyndi H.

    2007-01-01

    A shortage of a qualified and skilled workforce exists to meet the demands of the geospatial industry (NASA, 2002). Solving today's workforce issues requires new and innovative methods and techniques for this high growth, high technology industry. One tool to support workforce development is a competency model which can be used to build a…

  9. Effects of Video Streaming Technology on Public Speaking Students' Communication Apprehension and Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupagne, Michel; Stacks, Don W.; Giroux, Valerie Manno

    2007-01-01

    This study examines whether video streaming can reduce trait and state communication apprehension, as well as improve communication competence, in public speaking classes. Video streaming technology has been touted as the next generation of video feedback for public speaking students because it is not limited by time or space and allows Internet…

  10. Problems of Teacher’s Professional Competence Development, Using Information Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roza R. Dauletalieva

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Teacher’s professional competence development, using information technologies is characterized by the orientation towards flexible change of activity profile and content owing to the change of technologies or market requirements, possibilities to provide trainees with thorough knowledge, eligible for the general and professional culture, rapid adaptation to new specialties and specializations, fleeting nature of training process, providing equality of roles and functions of all the components of instruction system.

  11. Effect of self-directed learning process on multimedia competencies of educational technology students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Bagheri

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study employed to investigate the effectiveness of the Self-directed learning (SDL process on multimedia competencies of educational technology students of Arak university in Iran. The population of the study consisted of all educational technology students of Arak university. The sample included students who selected project course in the second semester of academic year 2014-2015. The quasi-experimental research, pre-test, post-test design was applied. Before the treatment, the pretest of multimedia competencies was employed, then students in project course educated through SDL process. the Period was 13 weeks, then the post-test was conducted. In this study to data collection, the researcher-made questionnaire of multimedia competencies with three subscales (multimedia instructional design, multimedia production skills, and multimedia production tools was employed. The validity of the questionnaire was confirmed by experts in the field of Educational Technology and Cronbach's alpha coefficient was obtained as a reliability (0.90. To analyze data, independent and paired-samples t-test was used. The results showed that: 1 there was a significant difference between students scores in pre-test and post-test. 2 there was no significant difference between male and female in terms of multimedia competencies.

  12. Core personal competencies important to entering students' success in medical school: what are they and how could they be assessed early in the admission process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Thomas W; Parrish, Samuel K; Terregino, Carol A; Williams, Joy P; Dunleavy, Dana M; Volsch, Joseph M

    2013-05-01

    Assessing applicants' personal competencies in the admission process has proven difficult because there is not an agreed-on set of personal competencies for entering medical students. In addition, there are questions about the measurement properties and costs of currently available assessment tools. The Association of American Medical College's Innovation Lab Working Group (ILWG) and Admissions Initiative therefore engaged in a multistep, multiyear process to identify personal competencies important to entering students' success in medical school as well as ways to measure them early in the admission process. To identify core personal competencies, they conducted literature reviews, surveyed U.S and Canadian medical school admission officers, and solicited input from the admission community. To identify tools with the potential to provide data in time for pre-interview screening, they reviewed the higher education and employment literature and evaluated tools' psychometric properties, group differences, risk of coaching/faking, likely applicant and admission officer reactions, costs, and scalability. This process resulted in a list of nine core personal competencies rated by stakeholders as very or extremely important for entering medical students: ethical responsibility to self and others; reliability and dependability; service orientation; social skills; capacity for improvement; resilience and adaptability; cultural competence; oral communication; and teamwork. The ILWG's research suggests that some tools hold promise for assessing personal competencies, but the authors caution that none are perfect for all situations. They recommend that multiple tools be used to evaluate information about applicants' personal competencies in deciding whom to interview.

  13. The role of alliance network redundancy in the creation of core and non-core technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhaverbeke, W.P.M.; Gilsing, V.A.; Beerkens, B.E.; Duijsters, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of a focal firm, and its partners' local alliance actions, on the creation of technological innovations by the former. More specifically, we study how two types of redundancy in a focal firm's ego network affect its ability to create new technologies in its technology

  14. Students’ perceptions about their competencies in Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María García-Valcárcel Muñoz-Repiso, Ph.D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In contemporary times, human life is greatly affected by the Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs, which enable the generation of virtual spaces, knowledge, and interactions that were unimaginable in the past. Within this context, it is important to analyse students’ competencies in the use of ICTs. This article presents the results of a research project aimed to identify the ICT competency levels among students from the Spanish university of Salamanca and the Mexican universities of Veracruz and Chihuahua. The sample included the pupils of 60 professors (20 from each university, who significantly used ICTs in their classes. The data were obtained from questionnaires applied to the students of the selected ICT-mediated classes. Results show that students trust their competency in ICTs to interact in ICT-mediated environments.

  15. Formative method of the competence for educational orientation on Technology Faculty teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamilet Ávila-Seco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article started from considering insufficiency on teachers’ professional work at Health Technology Faculty in Santiago de Cuba, which is a limitation for their formative action towards their own students. It aimed to give a methodology with a system of reflexive procedures to the competence formation for educational orientation in the Faculty, and it consequently may contribute to a right teachers’ professional work as a way to improve the students’ formative process. Taking into consideration the social role corresponding to those teachers on integrated formation of their students; it is assumed that method in forming the competence. This method is useful for teachers reflecting and being aware of their own insufficiency, and it is driven dynamically through reflexive procedures, so that they allow getting structured all valuable criteria to test that competence formation. 

  16. Core competencies in the science and practice of knowledge translation: description of a Canadian strategic training initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straus Sharon E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, healthcare systems are attempting to optimize quality of care. This challenge has resulted in the development of implementation science or knowledge translation (KT and the resulting need to build capacity in both the science and practice of KT. Findings We are attempting to meet these challenges through the creation of a national training initiative in KT. We have identified core competencies in this field and have developed a series of educational courses and materials for three training streams. We report the outline for this approach and the progress to date. Conclusions We have prepared a strategy to develop, implement, and evaluate a national training initiative to build capacity in the science and practice of KT. Ultimately through this initiative, we hope to meet the capacity demand for KT researchers and practitioners in Canada that will lead to improved care and a strengthened healthcare system.

  17. Perceptions of desirable graduate competencies for science and technology new graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Richard K.; Zegwaard, Karsten E.

    2006-05-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) programmes that combine on-campus classroom-based study with off-campus authentic work experience are a growing area of interest internationally. Despite widespread practice of WIL, there are few reports that shed light on appropriate pedagogies for the work experience in particular. As with any form of education, providers hold certain views as to desirable outcomes in terms of graduate profiles and of desirable graduate competencies. A complication for multi-party WIL programmes is that educational stakeholders (e.g., staff working in tertiary education provider institutions and employers) may hold different views as to desirable graduate competencies. Here we argue that an understanding of stakeholder views of desirable graduate competencies is an essential prerequisite of pedagogical design. The research reported here is an intrinsic case study and comprised an investigation of perceptions of 24 desirable graduate competencies for new science and technology graduates entering the workforce both today, and in ten years’ time. Stakeholders for four sector stakeholder groups (n = 458): undergraduate students (n = 71), recent graduates (n = 143), employers of graduates (n = 172), and faculty (n = 72), were surveyed using a previously reported and validated instrument. The research findings suggest that science and technology stakeholders see all 24 competencies as desirable, and see the importance of all skills and some skills in particular as likely to increase in ten years’ time. Despite emphasis on cognitive and technical skills (often termed ‘hard’ skills), the single most desirable skill is ability and willingness to learn, a behavioural skill (often termed ‘soft’ skills). It is proposed that classroom-based instruction is unlikely to produce graduates with the desired skills, and that work-integrated learning may have a role to play in the development of graduate competencies.

  18. Current Market Demand for Core Competencies of Librarianship—A Text Mining Study of American Library Association’s Advertisements from 2009 through 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghong Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As librarianship evolves, it is important to examine the changes that have taken place in professional requirements. To provide an understanding of the current market demand for core competencies of librarianship, this article conducts a semi-automatic methodology to analyze job advertisements (ads posted on the American Library Association (ALA Joblist from 2009 through 2014. There is evidence that the ability to solve unexpected complex problems and to provide superior customer service gained increasing importance for librarians during those years. The authors contend that the findings in this report question the status quo of core competencies of librarianship in the US job market.

  19. AAOHN Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The AAOHN Competency document is one of the core documents that define occupational health nursing practice. This article provides a description of the process used to update the competencies, as well as a description of the new competencies. © 2015 The Author(s).

  20. Core Competencies for Medical Teachers (KLM)--A Position Paper of the GMA Committee on Personal and Organizational Development in Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlitz, Anja; Ebert, Thomas; Bauer, Daniel; Grasl, Matthäus; Hofer, Matthias; Lammerding-Köppel, Maria; Fabry, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in medical education have created increasing challenges for medical teachers which is why the majority of German medical schools already offer educational and instructional skills trainings for their teaching staff. However, to date no framework for educational core competencies for medical teachers exists that might serve as guidance for the qualification of the teaching faculty. Against the background of the discussion about competency based medical education and based upon the international literature, the GMA Committee for Faculty and Organizational Development in Teaching developed a model of core teaching competencies for medical teachers. This framework is designed not only to provide guidance with regard to individual qualification profiles but also to support further advancement of the content, training formats and evaluation of faculty development initiatives and thus, to establish uniform quality criteria for such initiatives in German-speaking medical schools. The model comprises a framework of six competency fields, subdivided into competency components and learning objectives. Additional examples of their use in medical teaching scenarios illustrate and clarify each specific teaching competency. The model has been designed for routine application in medical schools and is thought to be complemented consecutively by additional competencies for teachers with special duties and responsibilities in a future step.

  1. Inquiring the Most Critical Teacher's Technology Education Competences in the Highest Efficient Technology Education Learning Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung-Kuan, Chan; Hsieh, Ming-Yuan; Lee, Chin-Feng; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Ho, Li-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Under the hyper-dynamic education situation, this research, in order to comprehensively explore the interplays between Teacher Competence Demands (TCD) and Learning Organization Requests (LOR), cross-employs the data refined method of Descriptive Statistics (DS) method and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Principal Components Analysis (PCA)…

  2. Elasticity of cores manufactured in cold box technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobosz St. M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the foundry industry, as in many other fields we seek to achieve the best quality with the least losses and the lowest cost. To meet these demands numerous plants increased automatization of their manufacturing processes. However, with changes in the production process it is necessary to change also the materials used. Not only casting alloys that are used in production, but also applied moulding and core sands are important. Proper selection and evaluation of the properties of used moulding mixtures is crucial in order to achieve a highly efficient production. In this article a new issue concerning the use of flexibility in foundry molding and core was mentioned. It explains the principles of measurement and interpretation of the obtained results for the cold-box moulding sands.

  3. Moving Spent Fuel and Wastes in the USA: Concentrating on Core Competencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, V. H.; Gallo, B.

    2003-01-01

    With the study progress toward a US national reporting at Yucca Mountain, organizing the transport system becomes a more pressing necessity. The present paper will try to provide operators whose core business is not transport a frame of reference through which a transport supplier/system can be selected, not only on the mere criterion of regulatory compliance, but also beyond, taking into account the resilience of the system, the ability for the operator to protect its image by fulfilling its general duty to society and sustainable development. For that purpose the paper will take us through the basics up to the ''post graduate level'' of what transport and associated services should look like, from a theoretical point of view and also from illustrations from the current European field will be presented, illustrating the evolution of practice and interfacing of the actors

  4. A Study of Core Humanistic Competency for Developing Humanism Education for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hee-Yeon; Kim, Jae-Won; Lee, Seunghee; Yoo, Seong Ho; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Kim, Tae-Woo; Park, Joong Shin; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Oh, Seo Jin; Kim, Eun Jung; Shin, Min-Sup

    2016-06-01

    The authors conducted a survey on essential humanistic competency that medical students should have, and on teaching methods that will effectively develop such attributes. The participants consisted of 154 medical school professors, 589 medical students at Seoul National University College of Medicine, 228 parents, and 161 medical school and university hospital staff. They answered nine questions that the authors created. According to the results, all groups chose "morality and a sense of ethics," a "sense of accountability," "communication skills," and "empathic ability" were selected as essential qualities. According to the evaluation on the extent to which students possess each quality, participants believed students had a high "sense of accountability" and "morality," whereas they thought students had low "empathic ability," "communicate," or "collaborate with others". In terms of effective teaching methods, all sub-groups preferred extracurricular activities including small group activities, debates, and volunteer services. With regard to the speculated effect of humanism education and the awareness of the need for colleges to offer it, all sub-groups had a positive response. However the professors and students expressed a relatively passive stance on introducing humanism education as a credited course. Most participants responded that they preferred a grading method based on their rate of participation, not a relative evaluation. In order to reap more comprehensive and lasting effects of humanism education courses in medical school, it is necessary to conduct faculty training, and continuously strive to develop new teaching methods.

  5. IMPaCT - Integration of Missions, Programs, and Core Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balacuit, Carlos P.; Cutts, James A.; Peterson, Craig E.; Beauchamp, Patricia M.; Jones, Susan K.; Hang, Winnie N.; Dastur, Shahin D.

    2013-01-01

    IMPaCT enables comprehensive information on current NASA missions, prospective future missions, and the technologies that NASA is investing in, or considering investing in, to be accessed from a common Web-based interface. It allows dependencies to be established between missions and technology, and from this, the benefits of investing in individual technologies can be determined. The software also allows various scenarios for future missions to be explored against resource constraints, and the nominal cost and schedule of each mission to be modified in an effort to fit within a prescribed budget.

  6. Large core plastic planar optical splitter fabricated by 3D printing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajzler, Václav; Kulha, Pavel; Knietel, Marian; Enser, Herbert

    2017-10-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and optical properties of large core multimode optical polymer splitter fabricated using fill up core polymer in substrate that was made by 3D printing technology. The splitter was designed by the beam propagation method intended for assembling large core waveguide fibers with 735 μm diameter. Waveguide core layers were made of optically clear liquid adhesive, and Veroclear polymer was used as substrate and cover layers. Measurement of optical losses proved that the insertion optical loss was lower than 6.8 dB in the visible spectrum.

  7. USING MEANS OF GEOINFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN THE PROCESS OF ECOLOGICAL COMPETENCE FORMATION OF THE FUTURE MINING ENGINEERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana М. Hryshchenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of the material covered in the article is caused by the need to ensure the effectiveness of the educational process in the preparation of the future mining engineers. The sources on the problems of ecological competence formation have been analyzed. The article focuses on geoinformation technologies software used in the formation of ecological competence of the future mining engineers. It has been revealed the concept of geoinformation information and communication technologies, ecological competence in the specialists training, the means of geoinformation technologies, which are necessary for the preparation of the future mining engineers.

  8. The HTA core model: a novel method for producing and reporting health technology assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampe, Kristian; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Garrido, Marcial Velasco

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to develop and test a generic framework to enable international collaboration for producing and sharing results of health technology assessments (HTAs). METHODS: Ten international teams constructed the HTA Core Model, dividing information contained....... The Model and Core HTAs were both validated. Guidance on the use of the HTA Core Model was compiled into a Handbook. RESULTS: The HTA Core Model considers health technologies through nine domains. Two applications of the Model were developed, one for medical and surgical interventions and another...... in a comprehensive HTA into standardized pieces, the assessment elements. Each element contains a generic issue that is translated into practical research questions while performing an assessment. Elements were described in detail in element cards. Two pilot assessments, designated as Core HTAs were also produced...

  9. The NGWA Experience with Education and Core Competencies for Groundwater Scientists and Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, K. B.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1988, the National Ground Water Association has formally supported recognition, through certification or some other means, of the unique qualifications necessary to perform hydrogeologic investigations. NGWA has believed reliance on professional engineers or individuals certified in an allied field without a determination as to their knowledge of groundwater science is not a justified position. Observation today suggests a need remains for greater hydrogeologic awareness among those that may create infrastructure intrusions into the groundwater environment, such as those designing and installing large-scale installations of geothermal heating and cooling systems. NGWA has responded with development of hydrogeologic guidelines for such projects. Also in partial response to the above named circumstances, the Association has begun development of an ANSI/NGWA standard defining the skills and competencies of groundwater personnel - from the trades to the science, and has explored the potential value of creating a career pathways guidance document for groundwater science professionals. Historically, NGWA scientific members have resisted the idea of accreditation of academic geosciences programs, including those for hydrogeology, although such discussions continue to be raised from time to time by groups such as the Geological Society of America and the American Geosciences Institute. The resistance seems to have been born out of recognition of the multi-disciplinary reality of groundwater science. NGWA funded research found that more than half of the respondents to a study of the business development practices for consulting groundwater professionals had been involved with groundwater issues for more than 20 years, and less than one percent had worked in the field for fewer than two years, raising the question of whether too few young people are being attracted to hydrogeology. Some speculate the seemingly minor emphasis on Earth science education in the U.S. K-12

  10. First-Year College Students' Attitudes toward Communication Technologies and Their Perceptions of Communication Competence in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreale, Sherwyn; Staley, Constance; Stavrositu, Carmen; Krakowiak, Maja

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to better understand new college students' attitudes toward and perceptions of communication media and technology and themselves as communicators in the context of communication competence. Building on the results of a previous qualitative study, the researchers developed a survey focused on communication competence in…

  11. Enhancing economic competiveness of dish Stirling technology through production volume and localization: Case study for Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larchet, Kevin; Guédez, Rafael; Topel, Monika; Gustavsson, Lars; Machirant, Andrew; Hedlund, Maria-Lina; Laumert, Björn

    2017-06-01

    The present study quantifies the reduction in the levelized cost of electricity (LCoE) and capital expenditure (CAPEX) of a dish Stirling power plant (DSPP) through an increase in localization and unit production volume. Furthermore, the localization value of the plant is examined to determine how much investment is brought into the local economy. Ouarzazate, Morocco, was chosen as the location of the study due to the country's favorable regulatory framework with regards to solar power technologies and its established industry in the concentrating solar power (CSP) field. A detailed techno-economic model of a DSPP was developed using KTH's in-house modelling tool DYESOPT, which allows power plant evaluation by means of technical and economic performance indicators. Results on the basis of LCoE and CAPEX were compared between two different cases of production volume, examining both a minimum and maximum level of localization. Thereafter, the DSPP LCoE and localization value were compared against competing solar technologies to evaluate its competitiveness. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted around key design parameters. The study confirms that the LCoE of a DSPP can be reduced to values similar to solar photovoltaic (PV) and lower than other CSP technologies. Furthermore, the investment in the local economy is far greater when compared to PV and of the same magnitude to other CSP technologies. The competiveness of a DSPP has the potential to increase further when coupled with thermal energy storage (TES), which is currently under development.

  12. Occupational therapy students’ perspectives on the core competencies of graduates to practise in the field of neurology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Jacobs-Nzuzi Khuabi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. The South African (SA health system is characterised by limited resources, high bed turnover rates and a high therapist-to-patient ratio. Patients with neurological dysfunction form a large majority of the caseload of occupational therapists. Feedback from stakeholders alluded to some discrepancies between the content taught in the Stellenbosch University undergraduate curriculum and what is expected within the clinical setting. This raises questions regarding the relevance and applicability of what undergraduate occupational therapists are taught, given the nature and demands of the SA public health system. Objective. To explore the perspectives of final-year occupational therapy students with regard to the core competencies required for optimal preparation of students for practice in the field of neurology. Methods. This explorative study used three focus groups to obtain the perspectives of 18 final-year students who had experienced clinical placements in neurology. Information from the focus groups was transcribed and analysed thematically to determine the findings. Results. Analysis of the data revealed four themes, i.e. core knowledge and skills; attitude; resource and time constraints in clinical areas; and factors influencing optimal learning experiences. Conclusion. The curriculum should prepare students to be well equipped for the current climate of the profession. While the current neurology curriculum may be viewed as having some positive features, there are some aspects that need to be updated and revised. Key considerations to optimise learning include a more regular interface between clinical areas and the university, scheduling of teaching blocks, and applying relevant teaching methods.

  13. The approach to detection and application of the company’s technological competences to form a business-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chursin, A. A.; Kashirin, A. I.; Strenalyuk, V. V.; Semenov, A. S.; Ostrovskaya, A. A.; Kokuytseva, T. V.

    2018-02-01

    The most important condition for increasing the competitiveness of business is the formation, retention, and development of key competences of the organization, which reflect the competitive advantage. This problem is especially urgent for high-tech industries, which are the most sensitive to all kinds of changes and innovations. The ways of applying the company’s technological competences to form a business model, the proper form of competence description and analysis on the example of the company “Teplolux” are considered. The following from is recommended to use in IT solutions for competence databases.

  14. The concept of competence and its relevance for science, technology, and mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropohl, Mathias; Nielsen, Jan Alexis; Olley, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 21st century the concept of competence has been introduced as a new paradigm in several educational systems. It reflects the need of educational systems to respond to societal and economic changes, i.e. the transition from industrial- to information-based societies...... of Bildung as well as of the labour market influence today’s definition of educational goals. In order to address these perspectives, 21st century skills were defined that encompass skills believed to be critically important to success in today’s world like e.g., innovation and communication. Chapter 1....... In contrast to earlier ed-ucational goals that focused more on basic skills and knowledge expectations, competences are more functionally oriented. They involve the ability to solve complex problems in a particular context, e.g. in vocational or everyday situations. In science, technology, and mathematics...

  15. USING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN FORMATION INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE OF FUTURE ENGLISH TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    П А Кудабаева

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the problem of the use of information technologies in the formation of intercultural communicative competence of future teachers of English. Some issues connected with the formation of intercultural competence in the process of teaching a foreign communication taking into account cultural and mental distinctions, that is a necessary condition for the successful dialogue of cultures of native speakers are mentioned in this article. Also, the article dwells on some scientific researchers’ works in Kazakhstan appeared on the issue of informatization of education that brought their contribution to the development of science. The use of ICT in the classroom realized in the forms such as: the use of computer presentations; the use of interactive whiteboard; work with educational multimedia CDs programs; work with Internet resources are also reflected in the article.

  16. Competing with the Soviets science, technology, and the state in Cold War America

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Audra J

    2013-01-01

    For most of the second half of the twentieth century, the United States and its allies competed with a hostile Soviet Union in almost every way imaginable except open military engagement. The Cold War placed two opposite conceptions of the good society before the uncommitted world and history itself, and science figured prominently in the picture. Competing with the Soviets offers a short, accessible introduction to the special role that science and technology played in maintaining state power during the Cold War, from the atomic bomb to the Human Genome Project. The high-tech machinery of nuclear physics and the space race are at the center of this story, but Audra J. Wolfe also examines the surrogate battlefield of scientific achievement in such diverse fields as urban planning, biology, and economics; explains how defense-driven federal investments created vast laboratories and research programs; and shows how unfamiliar worries about national security and corrosive questions of loyalty crept into the sup...

  17. Effects of Technology Immersion on Teachers' Growth in Technology Competency, Ideology, and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapley, Kelly; Sheehan, Daniel; Maloney, Catherine; Caranikas-Walker, Fanny

    2010-01-01

    In the study of the Technology Immersion model, high-need middle schools were "immersed" in technology by providing laptops for each teacher and student, instructional and learning resources, professional development, and technical and pedagogical support. This article reports third-year findings for the teacher component of the…

  18. FUNCTIONING FEATURES OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY WHILE FORMING PRIMARY SCHOOLCHILDREN’S COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Beskorsa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the problem of functioning features of computer technology while forming primary schoolchildren’s communicative competence whose relevance is proved by the increasing role of a foreign language as a means of communication and modernization of foreign language education. There is a great deal of publications devoted to the issue of foreign language learning at primary school by N. Biriukevych, O. Kolominova, O. Metolkina, O. Petrenko, V. Redko, S. Roman. Implementing of innovative technology as well as computer one is to intensify the language learning process and to improve young learners’ communicative skills. The aim of the article is to identify computer technology functioning features while forming primary schoolchildren communicative competence. In this study we follow the definition of the computer technology as an information technology whose implementation may be accompanied with a computer as one of the tools, excluding the use of audio and video equipment, projectors and other technical tools. Using computer technologies is realized due to a number of tools which are divided into two main groups: electronic learning materials; computer testing software. The analysis of current textbooks and learning and methodological complexes shows that teachers prefer authentic electronic materials to the national ones. The most available English learning materials are on the Internet and they are free. The author of the article discloses several on-line English learning tools and depict the opportunities to use them while forming primary schoolchildren’s communicative competence. Special attention is also paid to multimedia technology, its functioning features and multimedia lesson structure. Computer testing software provides tools for current and control assessing results of mastering language material, communicative skills, and self-assessing in an interactive way. For making tests for assessing English skill

  19. Risk communication as a core public health competence in infectious disease management: Development of the ECDC training curriculum and programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickmann, Petra; Abraham, Thomas; Sarkar, Satyajit; Wysocki, Piotr; Cecconi, Sabrina; Apfel, Franklin; Nurm, Ülla-Karin

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication has been identified as a core competence for guiding public health responses to infectious disease threats. The International Health Regulations (2005) call for all countries to build capacity and a comprehensive understanding of health risks before a public health emergency to allow systematic and coherent communication, response and management. Research studies indicate that while outbreak and crisis communication concepts and tools have long been on the agenda of public health officials, there is still a need to clarify and integrate risk communication concepts into more standardised practices and improve risk communication and health, particularly among disadvantaged populations. To address these challenges, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) convened a group of risk communication experts to review and integrate existing approaches and emerging concepts in the development of a training curriculum. This curriculum articulates a new approach in risk communication moving beyond information conveyance to knowledge- and relationship-building. In a pilot training this approach was reflected both in the topics addressed and in the methods applied. This article introduces the new conceptual approach to risk communication capacity building that emerged from this process, presents the pilot training approach developed, and shares the results of the course evaluation.

  20. Comparison of African American Children's Performances on a Minimal Competence Core for Morphosyntax and the Index of Productive Syntax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, Ida J; Newkirk-Turner, Brandi L; Swartzlander, Elaina; Morris, Lekeitha R

    2016-02-01

    This study is a response to the need for evidence-based measures of spontaneous oral language to assess African American children under the age of 4 years. We determined if pass/fail status on a minimal competence core for morphosyntax (MCC-MS) was more highly related to scores on the Index of Productive Syntax (IPSyn)-the measure of convergent criterion validity-than to scores on 3 measures of divergent validity: number of different words (Watkins, Kelly, Harbers, & Hollis, 1995), Percentage of Consonants Correct-Revised (Shriberg, Austin, Lewis, McSweeney, & Wilson, 1997), and the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Roid & Miller, 1997). Archival language samples for 68 African American 3-year-olds were analyzed to determine MCC-MS pass/fail status and the scores on measures of convergent and divergent validity. Higher IPSyn scores were observed for 60 children who passed the MCC-MS than for 8 children who did not. A significant positive correlation, rpb = .73, between MCC-MS pass/fail status and IPSyn scores was observed. This coefficient was higher than MCC-MS correlations with measures of divergent validity: rpb = .13 (Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised), rpb = .42 (number of different words in 100 utterances), and rpb = .46 (Percentage of Consonants Correct-Revised). The MCC-MS has convergent criterion validity with the IPSyn. Although more research is warranted, both measures can be potentially used in oral language assessments of African American 3-year-olds.

  1. Competence formation of engineering directions students in the field of energy saving as a way to create new generation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanshin, I. R.; Gilmanshina, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The urgency of the formation of competence in the field of energy saving in the process of studying engineering and technical disciplines at the university is substantiated. The author’s definition of the competence in the field of energy saving is given, allowing to consider the necessity of its formation among students - future engineers as a way to create technologies of a new generation. The essence of this competence is revealed. The system of work, pedagogical conditions and technologies of its formation in the conditions of the federal university is substantiated.

  2. Using the Case Study Technology in Developing the Students’ Environmental Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Ignatov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The case study technology is considered to be an effective tool for developing the students’ environmental competence. Numerous modern interactive techniques, facilitating the competence approach, can be fitted into its framework. The essence of the case-study is defined as the teaching method of problem-solving. The technology in question makes it possible to use the so called triad of «training – education – development», and provides such teaching opportunities as streaming the students according to their interests, skills, abilities and psychological peculiarities; and, therefore, assigning the relevant and motivating individual tasks.The paper traces the history of the case-study, as well as some theoretical and methodological aspects of its implementation in teaching process; the pedagogic goals fulfilled by means of the given technology are listed along with its advantages compared to other methods. The «case-study» term, its structure and working algorithms are defined. The application examples relating to environmental education at different levels are given. 

  3. Using innovative interactive technologies for forming linguistic competence in global mining education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chistyakova Galina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Globalization of mining education imposes new requirements for mining engineer competence. Nowadays linguistic competence is one of the most demanded. It guarantees technical university graduates the possibility of global employment, on the one hand, and the chance of getting cutting edge education in leading training centers of the world, on the other hand. Distance education is actively developing all over the world and is widely used in technical colleges and universities, as well. Interactive method that involves active engagement of students appears to be of the greatest interest due to introduction of modern information and communication technologies for distance learning. The paper presents step-by-step implementation of several interactive technologies (jigsaw, case study, brainstorming, and role-play that can be used in distance education in the process of teaching subjects in foreign languages with the help of information and communication technologies. In response to the changes in the conditions of educational process, the implementation of the methods has been transformed to a combination of traditional (in-class and distance (online learning.

  4. Toward a Comprehensive Framework for Evaluating the Core Integration Features of Enterprise Integration Middleware Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Moradi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve greater automation of their business processes, organizations face the challenge of integrating disparate systems. In attempting to overcome this problem, organizations are turning to different kinds of enterprise integration. Implementing enterprise integration is a complex task involving both technological and business challenges and requires appropriate middleware technologies. Different enterprise integration solutions provide various functions and features which lead to the complexity of their evaluation process. To overcome this complexity, appropriate tools for evaluating the core integration features of enterprise integration solutions is required. This paper proposes a new comprehensive framework for evaluating the core integration features of both intra-enterprise and inter-enterprise Integration's enabling technologies, which simplify the process of evaluating the requirements met by enterprise integration middleware technologies.The proposed framework for evaluating the core integration features of enterprise integration middleware technologies was enhanced using the structural and conceptual aspects of previous frameworks. It offers a new schema for which various enterprise integration middleware technologies are categorized in different classifications and are evaluated based on their supporting level for the core integration features' criteria. These criteria include the functional and supporting features. The proposed framework, which is a revised version of our previous framework in this area, has developed the scope, structure and content of the mentioned framework.

  5. Operational Concept of the NEXTSat-1 for Science Mission and Space Core Technology Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goo-Hwan Shin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The next generation small satellite-1 (NEXTSat-1 program has been kicked off in 2012, and it will be launched in 2016 for the science missions and the verification of space core technologies. The payloads for these science missions are the Instrument for the Study of Space Storms (ISSS and NIR Imaging Spectrometer for Star formation history (NISS. The ISSS and the NISS have been developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST and Korea Astronomy and Space science Institute (KASI respectively. The ISSS detects plasma densities and particle fluxes of 10 MeV energy range near the Earth and the NISS uses spectrometer. In order to verify the spacecraft core technologies in the space, the total of 7 space core technologies (SCT will be applied to the NEXTSat-1 for space verification and those are under development. Thus, the operation modes for the ISSS and the NISS for space science missions and 7 SCTs for technology missions are analyzed for the required operation time during the NEXTSat-1’s mission life time of 2 years. In this paper, the operational concept of the NEXTSat-1’s science missions as well as the verification of space core technologies are presented considering constraints of volume, mass, and power after launch.

  6. Action-oriented knowledge, Information and Communcation Technology and Action Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B. B.; Simovska, Venka

    2005-01-01

    In this chapter we address the action-focused approach to teaching about health and its interplay with the use of information and communication technology (ICT) within the framework of the health promoting schools approach. The overall framework for the discussion is shaped by the distinction...... outcomes and it is concerned with the development of pupils? ?action competence? or ability to act to bring about positive changes with regard to health matters whereas the moralistic approach is concerned with promoting information and encouraging behaviour change. We begin by discussing the concept...

  7. CRITICAL THINKING TECHNOLOGY AS EFFECTIVE MEANS OF DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE MANAGERS’ LANGUAGE COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Masharova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to consider the problem of the improvement of the students-managers linguistic competence.Methods. The analysis of the features of the linguistic competence formation of the future managers with the help of critical thinking technology was used at the initial stage. The model of the organization of the effective foreign language practicals is developed by means of pedagogical simulation. The testing of the control and the experimental groups with the future statistical data processing is used to evaluate the developed model effectiveness.Results. Methods and teaching techniques are used in compliance with each stage of cognitive activity. The necessary requirements while the organization and the conducting of the foreign language practicals when critical thinking skills learning are stated. The role of the professionally-oriented foreign texts in the higher educational institutions for the critical thinking development and the improvement of the future managers’ linguistic competence is identified.Scientific novelty. A model of foreign language practicals for students of economics using the stages of cognitive activity and methods and techniques of critical thinking is developed. The dependence between the requirements for foreign language practicals and information mastery level is defined.Practical significance. The complex of foreign language practicals for students of economics increasing the level of language training is developed on the basis of theoretical survey and experimental data.

  8. IMPROVING TEACHING MATHEMATICS USING MODERN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN FORMATION MATHEMATICAL COMPETENCE REQUIRED FUTURE SKIPPERS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gudyreva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to consideration of issues related to identifying the potential for teaching mathematics using network (Internet technology and the introduction of elements of distance learning into educational process of higher educational establishments of the sea profile, as well as achievement of formation of mathematical competence of students of the University generally, and of the University's Maritime profile, in particular. Based on the analysis of psychological and pedagogical literature highlights the factors that influence the increase of efficiency of independent work of students of higher educational institutions and on the formation of steady skills of self-education that ultimately leads to quality of formation of mathematical competence of a student. Specific features of teaching mathematics at the University of the sea profile. The description of the project (complex sites "KSMA. Higher mathematics navigators", who developed and used in the Kherson state Maritime Academy in the teaching of mathematics and the organization of individual techniques of distance learning, shows the simplicity and accessibility of working with complex sites, as well as the simplicity and accessibility of design "personal website", but in fact complex sites, by a teacher of any discipline of higher education. Shown, also a training process with the use of the project "KSMA. Higher mathematics navigators", analyzes the experience of teaching the course "Higher mathematics" in a higher educational institution of the marine profile with the use of a personal website, a teacher and shown positive results in students mastery of basic mathematical competencies.

  9. Foreign language teacher''s competence in using information and communication technologies

    OpenAIRE

    SYSOYEV PAVEL; EVSTIGNEEV M.N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of foreign language teachers'' ICT competence development. The author (a) states the importance of the problem; (b) defines terms "ICT competence" and "ICT competency" of foreign language teachers; (c) suggests components and content of ICT competency of foreign language teachers; (d) develops criteria, indicators, and levels of ICT competence of foreign language teachers.

  10. Interactive educational technologies as a method of communicative competency development of optical and fiber optic communication systems specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, Tatiana U.; Osadchiy, Igor S.; Husnutdinova, Marina N.

    2017-04-01

    The article examines the process of formation of communicative competencies of optic and fiber optic communication systems specialists; the role of communicative competencies is examined in the structure of professionally important skills, together with the contents of professional activity. The stages of empirical research into formation of communicative competencies have been presented, and the values of statistical reliability of data have been provided. The model of formation of communicative competency using interactive technology has been developed based on the research done, and main stages of model implementation and motives of formation of communicative competency have been highlighted. A scheme of "Communicative competence as a base of future success" training session has been suggested as one of the basic interactive technologies. Main components of education that are used during the stages of the training cycle have been examined. The statistical data on the effectiveness of use of interactive educational technologies has been presented; it allowed development of communicative competency of specialists in the field of optical and fiber optic communication system.

  11. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art in network coding for wireless, meshed networks typically considers two problems separately. First, the problem of providing reliability for a single session. Second, the problem of opportunistic combination of flows by using minimalistic coding, i.e., by XORing packets from...... different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...

  12. Simulation Technology for Skills Training and Competency Assessment in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, Vivian T.; Issenberg, S. Barry

    2007-01-01

    Medical education during the past decade has witnessed a significant increase in the use of simulation technology for teaching and assessment. Contributing factors include: changes in health care delivery and academic environments that limit patient availability as educational opportunities; worldwide attention focused on the problem of medical errors and the need to improve patient safety; and the paradigm shift to outcomes-based education with its requirements for assessment and demonstration of competence. The use of simulators addresses many of these issues: they can be readily available at any time and can reproduce a wide variety of clinical conditions on demand. In lieu of the customary (and arguably unethical) system, whereby novices carry out the practice required to master various techniques—including invasive procedures—on real patients, simulation-based education allows trainees to hone their skills in a risk-free environment. Evaluators can also use simulators for reliable assessments of competence in multiple domains. For those readers less familiar with medical simulators, this article aims to provide a brief overview of these educational innovations and their uses; for decision makers in medical education, we hope to broaden awareness of the significant potential of these new technologies for improving physician training and assessment, with a resultant positive impact on patient safety and health care outcomes. PMID:18095044

  13. Learning and Living Technologies: A Longitudinal Study of First-Year Students' Frequency and Competence in the Use of ICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein, Anesa; Ramanau, Ruslan; Jones, Chris

    2010-01-01

    This article presents results from a longitudinal survey of first-year students' time spent on living and learning technologies at university, their frequency of using specific learning technologies and their competence with these tools. Data were analysed from two similar surveys at the start and at the end of the academic year for students…

  14. Teacher educators' competences in fostering student teachers' proficiency in teaching and learning with technology : An overview of relevant research literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dana Uerz; Monique Volman; Marijke Kral

    2018-01-01

    Teacher educators play an important role in preparing student teachers to integrate technology into their classrooms. This article presents an overview of research literature on teacher educators' competences in preparing their students to teach with technology. A literature search yielded 26

  15. Identifying Multimedia Production Competencies and Skills of Instructional Design and Technology Professionals: An Analysis of Recent Job Postings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, William; Hoard, Brent; Brown, Abbie; Daniels, Lee

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to document necessary multimedia production competencies of Instructional Design and Technology graduates, a recent analysis of over 7 months' worth of Instructional Design and Technology job advertisements (n = 615) were conducted. Specific job skills from these postings were categorized and analyzed. The data set includes three job…

  16. Jordanian Social Studies Teachers' Attitudes and Their Perceptions of Competency Needed for Implemeting Technology in Their Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bataineh, Mohammad T.

    2013-01-01

    This study used a cross-sectional survey design to examine the attitudes of Jordanian seventh to twelfth-grade social studies teachers toward technology, and their perceptions of the competency needed for implementing technology in their classrooms. It also explored the relationship between teachers' attitudes and their percptions of competency…

  17. Pre-service teachers’ TPACK competencies for spreadsheet integration: insights from a mathematics-specific instructional technology course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyei, D.D.; Voogt, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This article explored the impact of strategies applied in a mathematics instructional technology course for developing technology integration competencies, in particular in the use of spreadsheets, in pre-service teachers. In this respect, 104 pre-service mathematics teachers from a teacher training

  18. Peptide Microencapsulation by Core-Shell Printing Technology for Edible Film Application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco-Pascual, N.; Koldeweij, R.B.J.; Stevens, R.S.A.; Montero, M.P.; Gómez-Guillén, M.C.; Cate, A.T.T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new microencapsulation methodology for incorporation of functional ingredients in edible films. Core-shell microcapsules filled with demineralized water (C) or 1 % (w/v) peptide solution (Cp) were prepared using the microencapsulation printer technology. Shell material,

  19. Effects of high-fidelity patient simulation led clinical reasoning course: Focused on nursing core competencies, problem solving, and academic self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuHee; Lee, Yoonju; Lee, Senah; Bae, Juyeon

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effects of high-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) led clinical reasoning course among undergraduate nursing students. A quasi-experimental study of non-equivalent control group pretest-post test design was applied. A total of 49 senior nursing students participated in this study. The experimental group consisted of the students who took the "clinical reasoning" course (n = 23) while the control group consisted of students who did not (n = 26). Self-administered scales including the nursing core competencies, problem solving, academic self-efficacy, and Kolb learning style inventory were analyzed quantitatively using SPSS version 20.0. Data analysis was conducted using one-way ancova due to a significant difference in nursing core competencies between the experimental group and control group. There was a significant improvement in nursing core competencies in the experimental group (F = 7.747, P = 0.008). The scores of problem solving and academic self-efficacy were higher in the experimental group after the HFPS led clinical reasoning course without statistical difference. There is a need for the development of effective instructional methods to improve learning outcomes in nursing education. Future research is needed related to simulation education as well as management strategies so that learning outcomes can be achieved within different students' learning style. © 2015 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  20. Fused-core particle technology in high-performance liquid chromatography: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Kirkland

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The advent of superficially porous particles (SPPs for packed HPLC columns has changed the way that many practitioners have approached the problem of developing needed separations. The very high efficiency of such columns, combined with convenient operating conditions, modest back pressures and the ability to use conventional HPLC instruments has resulted in intense basic studies of SPP technology, and widespread applications in many sciences. This report contains an overview of the SPP technology first developed in 2006 by Advanced Materials Technology, Inc., for sub-3-μm particles, then expanded into a family of SPP products with different particle sizes, pore sizes and other physical parameters. This approach was designed so that each particle of the family could be optimized for separating a particular group of compounds, usually based on solute size. Keywords: Superficially porous particles, Fused-core particles, Core–shell particles, Peptides, Proteins, Drug separations

  1. Researcher readiness for participating in community-engaged dissemination and implementation research: a conceptual framework of core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Christopher M; Young, Tiffany L; Powell, Byron J; Rohweder, Catherine; Enga, Zoe K; Scott, Jennifer E; Carter-Edwards, Lori; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2017-09-01

    Participating in community-engaged dissemination and implementation (CEDI) research is challenging for a variety of reasons. Currently, there is not specific guidance or a tool available for researchers to assess their readiness to conduct CEDI research. We propose a conceptual framework that identifies detailed competencies for researchers participating in CEDI and maps these competencies to domains. The framework is a necessary step toward developing a CEDI research readiness survey that measures a researcher's attitudes, willingness, and self-reported ability for acquiring the knowledge and performing the behaviors necessary for effective community engagement. The conceptual framework for CEDI competencies was developed by a team of eight faculty and staff affiliated with a university's Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). The authors developed CEDI competencies by identifying the attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors necessary for carrying out commonly accepted CE principles. After collectively developing an initial list of competencies, team members individually mapped each competency to a single domain that provided the best fit. Following the individual mapping, the group held two sessions in which the sorting preferences were shared and discrepancies were discussed until consensus was reached. During this discussion, modifications to wording of competencies and domains were made as needed. The team then engaged five community stakeholders to review and modify the competencies and domains. The CEDI framework consists of 40 competencies organized into nine domains: perceived value of CE in D&I research, introspection and openness, knowledge of community characteristics, appreciation for stakeholder's experience with and attitudes toward research, preparing the partnership for collaborative decision-making, collaborative planning for the research design and goals, communication effectiveness, equitable distribution of resources and credit, and

  2. Technology-Based Communication and the Development of Interpersonal Competencies Within Adolescent Romantic Relationships: A Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Jacqueline; Widman, Laura; Choukas-Bradley, Sophia; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated longitudinal associations between adolescents' technology-based communication and the development of interpersonal competencies within romantic relationships. A school-based sample of 487 adolescents (58% girls; M age  = 14.1) participated at two time points, one year apart. Participants reported (1) proportions of daily communication with romantic partners via traditional modes (in person, on the phone) versus technological modes (text messaging, social networking sites) and (2) competence in the romantic relationship skill domains of negative assertion and conflict management. Results of cross-lagged panel models indicated that adolescents who engaged in greater proportions of technology-based communication with romantic partners reported lower levels of interpersonal competencies one year later, but not vice versa; associations were particularly strong for boys. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2016 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  3. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary S. Ferenchick

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student’s actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT, to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees’ observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student

  4. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenchick, Gary S; Solomon, David

    2013-01-01

    Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student's actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT), to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees' observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents) performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student-patient encounters and by

  5. Establishment of computer aided technology for operation, maintenance, and core management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Masaki; Isomura, Kazutoshi; Okawa, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Naoto

    2003-01-01

    In Fugen, the accumulated know-how of skilled operators, maintenance engineers, and core management engineers have been systematized by using the latest computer technology. These computerized systems have enhanced the technology of operating, maintenance and core management. This report describes the development of a reactor feed water control system with fuzzy logic, a refueling support system, and an automatic refueling planning system. Since operation of reactor feedwater control at low power requires a delicate operational technique and the knowledge and experience of operators, the application of a fuzzy algorithm was deemed effective in Fugen. Its good performance comparable to that of experienced operators can be realized. The fuel-handling operation takes proposed plans, fuel management and efficient operation by skilled operators. AI technology was applied to fuel-handling support system using past operation results and experience of skilled operators. This system is as capable of fuel-handling as skilled operators. Planning an adequate fuel loading pattern is time-consuming even for expert core management engineers. The Automatic Refueling Planning System (ARPS) was developed using Genetic Algorithms (GA) and a Simulated Annealing (SA). It has been verified that long-term fuel loading patterns of the Fugen NPS evaluated by ARPS are equivalent to that of an expert core management engineer. (author)

  6. Development of Comprehensive Competences with Information and Communication Technologies in Distance Learning Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Muñoz Vargas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify and implement educational strategies through the use of Information and Communication Technologies in order for students of distance learning (who belong to the academic degrees of Natural Sciences and Environmental Education at the University of Córdoba to develop comprehensive competences. We used the action research method divided in two cycles, with the participation of three teachers and 242 students. The data analysis of the first cycle established three analysis categories and designed four intervention strategies based on the scientific knowledge and the academic experience of the teachers. The results of the second cycle showed an improvement of the academic performance of the students in a comprehensive way.

  7. Transformation through expeditionary change using online learning and competence-building technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald M. Norris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a patterns-based model of the evolution of learning and competence-building technologies, grounded in examples of current practice. The model imagines five simple stages in how institutions use ‘expeditionary change' to innovate more nimbly. It builds upon three assertions. First, the pervasiveness of web-based knowledge-sharing in higher education's communities, observatories and social networks makes it easier to: introduce relevant technologies, find people doing similar things, learn from their experiences, find and collaborate with early adopters of learning technologies, hear about relevant innovations, and discover and exploit news of opportunities, threats and trends. Second, expeditionary change based on such knowledge-sharing facilitates transformations in: production functions for learning, roles of faculty and mentors, business models, patterns and cadences of interactivity, use of open resources, and the roles of learners. Third, those transformations make it easier for disruptive forms of higher education to emerge; for example, dynamically updated curricula that address emerging and important knowledge gaps, and thereby increase students' employability.

  8. The Medical Mission and Modern Core Competency Training: A 10-Year Follow-Up of Resident Experiences in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline A; Swanson, Jordan; McCullough, Meghan; Taro, Trisa B; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Bradshaw, Allison; Campbell, Alex; Magee, William P; Magee, William P

    2016-09-01

    The emphasis on cultural competency for physicians and surgeons is increasingly important, as communication with both patients and other providers significantly affects individual and system-wide outcomes. International surgical training has been shown to improve leadership skills, cultural competency, and technical proficiency of participants in short-term follow-up. This study explores the long-term impact of international surgical mission experiences on developing participants' core competencies, professional outcomes, and commitment to global health. All 208 plastic and reconstructive surgeons who completed the Operation Smile Regan/Stryker fellowship programs between 2006 and 2015 were surveyed electronically. One hundred sixty-five surveys were returned, for an overall response rate of 79.3 percent. The majority of participants reported that the fellowship positively impacted all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Most participants who were attending physicians at the time of the survey were practicing general plastic surgery, with 42 percent in an academic/teaching environment, 32 percent in assistant/associate professor positions, and 6 percent in either a program director or department chairman position. The majority currently volunteer on local or international missions, and all respondents would consider volunteering again. Carefully structured and rigorously proctored programs such as the Regan/Stryker Fellowship offer plastic surgery residents the opportunity to gain valuable professional and personal experiences that benefit them long after their service experience. Programs of this nature can not only effectively improve cultural competency of physicians, but also positively influence their attitudes toward leadership and direct that potential to meet the growing need for surgical care in low- and middle-income countries.

  9. Technology competences, agency and collaborative challenges: from teacher expertise to continuing professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Urbani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The teacher Continuing Professional Development (CPD requires today the re-thinking of teachersʼ expertise, in connection to a new definition of professional competence. For example, in the case of technology competences, the continuing training shouldn’t be limited to promoting their learning and practice, however to encourage the re-thinking of the sense and the value of personal agency, that allows to express the competences acquired and link them into an authentic and self-determined dimension. This project research examines the correlation between the pre-school teachers continuing professional development and the agency’s capability processes, trying to define how technologies can affect the professional agency’s qualification. First evidences about the increased value acquired by the extracurricular aspects of networking and governance suggest how teachers’ agency appears focused on interaction with enlarged learning contexts, suggesting the opportunity to invest in socio-relational aspects and integrate them into traditional professional education and training processes.Competenze tecnologiche, agency e sfide collaborative: dall’expertise allo sviluppo professionale docenteLo sviluppo professionale degli insegnanti richiede oggi il ripensamento dellʼexpertise docente nel dialogo con una nuova definizione della competenza professionale. Ad esempio, nel caso delle competenze tecnologiche, la formazione continua non deve limitarsi a promuovere il loro apprendimento ed esercizio, bensì a stimolare il ripensamento del senso e del valore dell’azione, che permette di esprimere pienamente le competenze e ricondurle ad un orizzonte di significazione personale. Il progetto di ricerca sulla correlazione esistente tra lo sviluppo professionale continuo degli insegnanti prescolastici e i processi di capacitazione dellʼazione (agency permette di formulare alcune ipotesi sulla capacità delle tecnologie di influire sulla qualificazione

  10. The research of the evaluation system towards a core enterprise's network capability in the industrial technology alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guangshi; Tian, Xuelian; Shen, Xue; You, Yue

    2017-05-01

    The social network theory is introduced for the industrial technology alliance based on the actual needs of the development of the industrial technology alliance. Through discussing the influence of the core enterprise network capacity on alliance performance, this article establishes evaluation system and index model of core enterprise network ability. We also evaluate and analyze the network capacity of core enterprise by fuzzy comprehensive evaluation method. So, the evaluation method is very important and full of practical value with a new research vision.

  11. HRM, technology and innovation: new HRM competences for old business challenges?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondarouk, Tatiana; Marsman, Eline; Rekers, Marc; Bondarouk, Tanya; Olivas-Luján, Mguel R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this chapter is to explore the requirements modern companies expect of HR professionals’ competences. Design/Methodology/Approach: Departing from the widely acknowledged HR competence studies of Ulrich and associates, we extended them with the continuous learning competence

  12. Influence of the Reclaim from the Cordis Technology on the Core Sand Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dańko J.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The investigation results of the mechanical reclamation of spent moulding sands from the Cordis technology are presented in the paper. The quality assessment of the obtained reclaim and the influence of the reclaim fraction in a matrix on the core sand strength is given. The reclaim quality assessment was performed on the basis of the determination of losses on ignition, Na2O content on reclaim grains and pH values. The reclaim constituted 100%, 75% and 50% of the core sand matrix, for which the bending strength was determined. The matrix reclamation treatment was performed in the experimental rotor reclaimer RD-6. Spent sands were applied in as-delivered condition and after the heating to a temperature of 140 °C. Shaped samples for strength tests were made by shooting and hardening of sands in the warmbox technology.

  13. Determinants and effects of medical students' core self-evaluation tendencies on clinical competence and workplace well-being in clerkship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Kai Lin

    Full Text Available Core self-evaluation (CSE is a personality trait that involves a person's evaluation of his or her own worth, competence, and capability. The objective of this study was to determine whether medical students' CSEs exert beneficial effects on their adaptation to their clerkship in terms of their clinical competence and workplace well-being and whether their preclinical academic performance can be a trait-relevant situation that enhances their CSE expression. In total, 127 medical students from 2 cohorts were included as participants in this study. We analyzed complete measures of personal background, objective and subjective preclinical academic performance (course evaluation grades and self-reported efficacy, CSE tendencies, and clinical competence (as objective structured clinical examination scores and workplace well-being (as compassion satisfaction and burnout during their 2-year clerkship. Mixed linear models for repeated measures and multiple regressions were employed. Participants' CSE tendencies had positive effects on their workplace compassion satisfaction and burnout but not on their clinical competence during their clerkship. Additionally, using the objective and subjective preclinical academic performance of the medical students as indicators, we observed that neither could be trait-relevant situations to enhance their CSE expression. CSE personality tendencies might be key to medical students' ability to noncognitively adapt to clinical training during their clerkships. These tendencies should be identified earlier so that mentors can provide prompt care and support to mentees (medical students during clerkships.

  14. TECHNOLOGY FOR INSTALLATION OF REINFORCED CONCRETE FLOOR SLABS LIGHTENED BY CORE DRIVERS WITH PRELIMINARY REINFORCEMENT STRESS

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Leonovich; I. I. Peredkov

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents technology for installation of floor slabs lightened by plastic core drivers which are preliminary stressed under construction conditions.  Efficiency of such constructive solution is justified by the action of preliminary concrete compression in the tensile zone while reducing structure dead weight due to void arrangement.  The paper provides classification of systems for preliminary stress and contains recommendations on selection of the system depending on peculiariar fe...

  15. Mars Technology Rover with Arm-Mounted Percussive Coring Tool, Microimager, and Sample-Handling Encapsulation Containerization Subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younse, Paulo J.; Dicicco, Matthew A.; Morgan, Albert R.

    2012-01-01

    A report describes the PLuto (programmable logic) Mars Technology Rover, a mid-sized FIDO (field integrated design and operations) class rover with six fully drivable and steerable cleated wheels, a rocker-bogey suspension, a pan-tilt mast with panorama and navigation stereo camera pairs, forward and rear stereo hazcam pairs, internal avionics with motor drivers and CPU, and a 5-degrees-of-freedom robotic arm. The technology rover was integrated with an arm-mounted percussive coring tool, microimager, and sample handling encapsulation containerization subsystem (SHEC). The turret of the arm contains a percussive coring drill and microimager. The SHEC sample caching system mounted to the rover body contains coring bits, sample tubes, and sample plugs. The coring activities performed in the field provide valuable data on drilling conditions for NASA tasks developing and studying coring technology. Caching of samples using the SHEC system provide insight to NASA tasks investigating techniques to store core samples in the future.

  16. Attitude in English and Competence of Students at Integrated Refinery Petro-Chemical Complex (IRPCT) Technological College, Rayong, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Chinebeth

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted at IRPC Technological College, Thailand. The objectives of this study were to investigate (1) The attitude of students towards English; (2) The attitude of students towards teaching English; (3) The competence level of their English. The participants were asked to answer and complete the survey questionnaires that would…

  17. Pre-Service Teachers' Perception of and Technology Competency at Creating and Using E-Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Joon; Yang, Youjin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated pre-service teachers' perception of and technology competency in creating and using e-picture books in their future classrooms. Participants were 114 pre-service teachers in a required Early Childhood Education undergraduate course at a mid-western university in the United States. As part of the course assignments,…

  18. Two-Stage Hands-On Technology Activity to Develop Preservice Teachers' Competency in Applying Science and Mathematics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuen-Yi; Williams, P. John

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of a two-stage hands-on technology learning activity, based on Dewey's learning experience theory that is designed to enhance preservice teachers' primary and secondary experiences in developing their competency to solve hands-on problems that apply science and mathematics concepts. The major conclusions…

  19. Section 7033 of the America COMPETES Act: Hispanic-Serving Institutions and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    On March 1, 2009 from 2 pm to 5 pm at the Madison Hotel in Washington, DC, the National Science Foundation hosted a listening session, requesting input on Section 7033 of the America COMPETES (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science) Act regarding Hispanic-serving institutions and science,…

  20. Assessing medical students' performance in core competencies using multiple admission programs for colleges and universities: from the perspective of multi-source feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ji-Tseng; Ko, Yu-Shien; Chien, Chu-Chun; Yu, Kuang-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Since 1994, Taiwanese medical universities have employed the multiple application method comprising "recommendations and screening" and "admission application." The purpose of this study is to examine whether medical students admitted using different admission programs gave different performances. To evaluate the six core competencies for medical students proposed by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), this study employed various assessment tools, including student opinion feedback, multi-source feedback (MSF), course grades, and examination results.MSF contains self-assessment scale, peer assessment scale, nursing staff assessment scale, visiting staff assessment scale, and chief resident assessment scale. In the subscales, the CronbachÊs alpha were higher than 0.90, indicating good reliability. Research participants consisted of 182 students from the School of Medicine at Chang Gung University. Regarding studentsÊ average grade for the medical ethics course, the performance of students who were enrolled through school recommendations exceeded that of students who were enrolled through the National College University Entrance Examination (NCUEE) p = 0.011), and all considered "teamwork" as the most important. Different entry pipelines of students in the "communication," "work attitude," "medical knowledge," and "teamwork" assessment scales showed no significant difference. The improvement rate of the students who were enrolled through the school recommendations was better than that of the students who were enrolled through the N CUEE in the "professional skills," "medical core competencies," "communication," and "teamwork" projects of self-assessment and peer assessment scales. However, the students who were enrolled through the NCUEE were better in the "professional skills," "medical core competencies," "communication," and "teamwork" projects of the visiting staff assessment scale and the chief resident assessment scale. Collectively

  1. Assessing medical students' performance in core competencies using multiple admission programs for colleges and universities: From the perspective of multi-source feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Tseng Fang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since 1994, Taiwanese medical universities have employed the multiple application method comprising "recommendations and screening" and "admission application." The purpose of this study is to examine whether medical students admitted using different admission programs gave different performances. Methods: To evaluate the six core competencies for medical students proposed by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME, this study employed various assessment tools, including student opinion feedback, multi-source feedback (MSF, course grades, and examination results.MSF contains self-assessment scale, peer assessment scale, nursing staff assessment scale, visiting staff assessment scale, and chief resident assessment scale. In the subscales, the CronbachÊs alpha were higher than 0.90, indicating good reliability. Research participants consisted of 182 students from the School of Medicine at Chang Gung University. Results: Regarding studentsÊ average grade for the medical ethics course, the performance of students who were enrolled through school recommendations exceeded that of students who were enrolled through the National College University Entrance Examination (NCUEE p = 0.011, and all considered "teamwork" as the most important. Different entry pipelines of students in the "communication," "work attitude," "medical knowledge," and "teamwork" assessment scales showed no significant difference. The improvement rate of the students who were enrolled through the school recommendations was better than that of the students who were enrolled through the N CUEE in the "professional skills," "medical core competencies," "communication," and "teamwork" projects of self-assessment and peer assessment scales. However, the students who were enrolled through the NCUEE were better in the "professional skills," "medical core competencies," "communication," and "teamwork" projects of the visiting staff assessment scale and the

  2. Genetic education and the challenge of genomic medicine: development of core competences to support preparation of health professionals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skirton, Heather; Lewis, Celine; Kent, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    health professionals and patient groups. Sets of competences for practitioners working in primary, secondary and tertiary care have been agreed and were approved by the European Society of Human Genetics. The competences provide an appropriate framework for genetics education of health professionals...... across national boundaries, and the suggested learning outcomes are available to guide development of curricula that are appropriate to the national context, educational system and health-care setting of the professional involved. Collaboration between individuals from many European countries...... and professions has resulted in an adaptable framework for both pre-registration and continuing professional education. This competence framework has the potential to improve the quality of genetic health care for patients globally....

  3. Toward core inter-professional health promotion competencies to address the non-communicable diseases and their risk factors through knowledge translation: curriculum content assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Elizabeth; Moffat, Marilyn; Skinner, Margot; Dornelas de Andrade, Armele; Myezwa, Hellen; Söderlund, Anne

    2014-07-14

    To increase the global impact of health promotion related to non-communicable diseases, health professionals need evidence-based core competencies in health assessment and lifestyle behavior change. Assessment of health promotion curricula by health professional programs is a first step. Such program assessment is a means of 1. demonstrating collective commitment across health professionals to prevent non-communicable diseases; 2. addressing the knowledge translation gap between what is known about non-communicable diseases and their risk factors consistent with 'best' practice; and, 3. establishing core health-based competencies in the entry-level curricula of established health professions. Consistent with the World Health Organization's definition of health (i.e., physical, emotional and social wellbeing) and the Ottawa Charter, health promotion competencies are those that support health rather than reduce signs and symptoms primarily. A process algorithm to guide the implementation of health promotion competencies by health professionals is described. The algorithm outlines steps from the initial assessment of a patient's/client's health and the indications for health behavior change, to the determination of whether that health professional assumes primary responsibility for implementing health behavior change interventions or refers the patient/client to others.An evidence-based template for assessment of the health promotion curriculum content of health professional education programs is outlined. It includes clinically-relevant behavior change theory; health assessment/examination tools; and health behavior change strategies/interventions that can be readily integrated into health professionals' practices. Assessment of the curricula in health professional education programs with respect to health promotion competencies is a compelling and potentially cost-effective initial means of preventing and reversing non-communicable diseases. Learning evidence

  4. Assessing competence at a higher level among older adults: development of the Japan Science and Technology Agency Index of Competence (JST-IC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Hajime; Masui, Yukie; Inagaki, Hiroki; Yoshida, Yuko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Rika; Kikuchi, Kazunori; Nonaka, Kumiko; Yoshida, Hiroto; Yoshida, Hideyo; Suzuki, Takao

    2018-04-01

    Older adults' ever-improving health and changing lifestyles necessitate the development of a scale that can better measure their competence at a higher level. We developed the Japan Science and Technology Agency Index of Competence (JST-IC) via item analysis and assessed its psychometric properties. Participants were 1306 community-dwelling older adults (623 men and 683 women, 74.0 ± 2.8 years old) who completed the 54-item draft JST-IC to determine their level of independence. Three procedures (including item selection, factor analyses, and reliability and validity analyses) were conducted to finalize the JST-IC and evaluate its psychometric properties. The item selection resulted in exclusion of 26 items for the following reasons: (a) 15 because of very high ratios (80% or more) of responders who answered "yes", (b) one because of gender differences (phi coefficient = 0.34), (c) five because of their weak association with the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence (TMIG-IC) (Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.30 or smaller), and (d) five because of redundancy of meaning with other items. Through factor analyses, we selected 16 items with a four-factor solution for the final version. JST-IC score exhibited a near-normal distribution and significant gender and age differences, and had moderate correlations with size of social network and level of subjective well-being and strong correlations with TMIG-IC score, physical fitness, and health literacy. The JST-IC is useful for assessing competence at a higher level in community-dwelling older adults.

  5. THE ISSUE OF FORMING FUTURE MUSIC TEACHERS’ PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE BY COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY TOOLS IN THE THEORY OF NATIONAL ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Gavrilova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical aspects of forming future music teachers’ professional competence by computer technology tools. The concept of professional competence has become a major criterion of preparing students for professional activities. The issue of the article is relevant as the competence approach has become a basis of implementing computer technologies into future music teachers’ training. The authors give a detailed analysis of implementing computer technologies into musical education. The special attention is paid to using a computer in musical education and making electronic pedagogical resources. The aim of the article is to outline the directions of national art research in the process of implementing computer tools that is one of the most efficient ways of updating process of future music teachers’ training. The article reveals theoretical aspects of forming future music teachers’ professional competence by computer technology tools. The authors point out that implementing musical and computer technologies into music art practice is realized in some directions: using a computer as a new musical instrument in composers, sound engineers, and arrangers’ activities; using a computer for studying the quality of music sound, analysing sounds and music compositions, spectral analysis of acoustic characteristics of singers’ voice; studying ancient music manuscripts due to digital technology; developing hardware and software for music education. A distinct direction of research is the pedagogical aspect of using a computer in music education (music and the use of special software for recording and editing music, the use of multimedia to enhance visibility in education, development of e-learning resources, etc.. The authors conclude that implementing computer technologies into future music teachers’ training makes this process more efficient. In the authors’ opinion the widespread introduction of distance learning

  6. Learners? perspective: where and when pre-residency trainees learn more to achieve their core clinical competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Eusang; Ahn, Ducksun; Lee, Young-Mee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose While it is known that effective clinical education requires active involvement of its participants, regular feedback, communication skills and interprofessional training, limited studies have been conducted in Korea that demonstrate how pre-residency trainees acquire their core clinical skills. This is a cross-sectional study of interns and students across a third-tier university hospital in Korea to examine where and when they acquire core clinical skills. Methods A total of 74 stud...

  7. Medical student self-reported confidence in obstetrics and gynaecology: development of a core clinical competencies document

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical competencies in obstetrics and gynaecology have not been clearly defined for Australian medical students, the growing numbers of which may impact clinical teaching. Our aim was to administer and validate a competencies list, for self-evaluation by medical students of their confidence to manage common clinical tasks in obstetrics and gynaecology; to evaluate students’ views on course changes that may result from increasing class sizes. Methods A draft list of competencies was peer-reviewed, and discussed at two student focus groups. The resultant list was administered as part of an 81 item online survey. Results Sixty-eight percent (N = 172) of those eligible completed the survey. Most respondents (75.8%) agreed or strongly agreed that they felt confident and well equipped to recognise and manage most common and important obstetric and gynaecological conditions. Confidence was greater for women, and for those who received a higher assessment grade. Free-text data highlight reasons for lack of clinical experience that may impact perceived confidence. Conclusions The document listing competencies for medical students and educators is useful for discussions around a national curriculum in obstetrics and gynaecology in medical schools, including the best methods of delivery, particularly in the context of increasing student numbers. PMID:23634953

  8. Competing Cultural Worldviews in the United States: A Phenomenological Examination of the Essential Core Elements of Transnationalism and Transculturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbe, Mark P.; Drummond, Darlene K.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore inductively the complex ways in which everyday discourse reflects larger--and often competing--cultural worldviews. A phenomenological framework was used to analyze transcripts generated through 13 focus group discussions involving 100 individuals. This particular analysis highlights how individuals who…

  9. Core Competencies for 4-H Volunteer Leaders Differentiated by Occupation, Level of Education, and College Major: Implications for Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestor, Patrick; McKee, Renee K.; Culp, Ken, III

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demographically describe 4-H volunteer leaders' competencies for effective delivery of 4-H youth development programs. As a subset of the data, occupation, level of education, college major of the volunteer leaders, staff and faculty were gathered as the primary focus of the article. The study was descriptive and…

  10. An international survey and modified Delphi process revealed editors’ perceptions, training needs, and ratings of competency-related statements for the development of core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Galipeau

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scientific editors (i.e., those who make decisions on the content and policies of a journal have a central role in the editorial process at biomedical journals. However, very little is known about the training needs of these editors or what competencies are required to perform effectively in this role. Methods: We conducted a survey of perceptions and training needs among scientific editors from major editorial organizations around the world, followed by a modified Delphi process in which we invited the same scientific editors to rate the importance of competency-related statements obtained from a previous scoping review. Results: A total of 148 participants completed the survey of perceptions and training needs. At least 80% of participants agreed on six of the 38 skill and expertise-related statements presented to them as being important or very important to their role as scientific editors. At least 80% agreed on three of the 38 statements as necessary skills they perceived themselves as possessing (well or very well.  The top five items on participants’ list of top training needs were training in statistics, research methods, publication ethics, recruiting and dealing with peer reviewers, and indexing of journals. The three rounds of the Delphi were completed by 83, 83, and 73 participants, respectively, which ultimately produced a list of 23 “highly rated” competency-related statements and another 86 “included” items. Conclusion: Both the survey and the modified Delphi process will be critical for understanding knowledge and training gaps among scientific editors when designing curriculum around core competencies in the future.

  11. An international survey and modified Delphi process revealed editors' perceptions, training needs, and ratings of competency-related statements for the development of core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, James; Cobey, Kelly D; Barbour, Virginia; Baskin, Patricia; Bell-Syer, Sally; Deeks, Jonathan; Garner, Paul; Shamseer, Larissa; Sharon, Straus; Tugwell, Peter; Winker, Margaret; Moher, David

    2017-01-01

    Background: Scientific editors (i.e., those who make decisions on the content and policies of a journal) have a central role in the editorial process at biomedical journals. However, very little is known about the training needs of these editors or what competencies are required to perform effectively in this role. Methods: We conducted a survey of perceptions and training needs among scientific editors from major editorial organizations around the world, followed by a modified Delphi process in which we invited the same scientific editors to rate the importance of competency-related statements obtained from a previous scoping review. Results: A total of 148 participants completed the survey of perceptions and training needs. At least 80% of participants agreed on six of the 38 skill and expertise-related statements presented to them as being important or very important to their role as scientific editors. At least 80% agreed on three of the 38 statements as necessary skills they perceived themselves as possessing (well or very well).  The top five items on participants' list of top training needs were training in statistics, research methods, publication ethics, recruiting and dealing with peer reviewers, and indexing of journals. The three rounds of the Delphi were completed by 83, 83, and 73 participants, respectively, which ultimately produced a list of 23 "highly rated" competency-related statements and another 86 "included" items. Conclusion: Both the survey and the modified Delphi process will be critical for understanding knowledge and training gaps among scientific editors when designing curriculum around core competencies in the future.

  12. An international survey and modified Delphi process revealed editors’ perceptions, training needs, and ratings of competency-related statements for the development of core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, James; Cobey, Kelly D.; Barbour, Virginia; Baskin, Patricia; Bell-Syer, Sally; Deeks, Jonathan; Garner, Paul; Shamseer, Larissa; Sharon, Straus; Tugwell, Peter; Winker, Margaret; Moher, David

    2017-01-01

    Background: Scientific editors (i.e., those who make decisions on the content and policies of a journal) have a central role in the editorial process at biomedical journals. However, very little is known about the training needs of these editors or what competencies are required to perform effectively in this role. Methods: We conducted a survey of perceptions and training needs among scientific editors from major editorial organizations around the world, followed by a modified Delphi process in which we invited the same scientific editors to rate the importance of competency-related statements obtained from a previous scoping review. Results: A total of 148 participants completed the survey of perceptions and training needs. At least 80% of participants agreed on six of the 38 skill and expertise-related statements presented to them as being important or very important to their role as scientific editors. At least 80% agreed on three of the 38 statements as necessary skills they perceived themselves as possessing (well or very well).  The top five items on participants’ list of top training needs were training in statistics, research methods, publication ethics, recruiting and dealing with peer reviewers, and indexing of journals. The three rounds of the Delphi were completed by 83, 83, and 73 participants, respectively, which ultimately produced a list of 23 “highly rated” competency-related statements and another 86 “included” items. Conclusion: Both the survey and the modified Delphi process will be critical for understanding knowledge and training gaps among scientific editors when designing curriculum around core competencies in the future. PMID:28979768

  13. Using principal components analysis to explore competence and confidence in student nurses as users of information and communication technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todhunter, Fern

    2015-07-01

    To report on the relationship between competence and confidence in nursing students as users of information and communication technologies, using principal components analysis. In nurse education, learning about and learning using information and communication technologies is well established. Nursing students are one of the undergraduate populations in higher education required to use these resources for academic work and practice learning. Previous studies showing mixed experiences influenced the choice of an exploratory study to find out about information and communication technologies competence and confidence. A 48-item survey questionnaire was administered to a volunteer sample of first- and second-year nursing students between July 2008-April 2009. The cohort ( N  =   375) represented 18·75% of first- and second-year undergraduates. A comparison between this work and subsequent studies reveal some similar ongoing issues and ways to address them. A principal components analysis (PCA) was carried out to determine the strength of the correlation between information and communication technologies competence and confidence. The aim was to show the presence of any underlying dimensions in the transformed data that would explain any variations in information and communication technologies competence and confidence. Cronbach's alpha values showed fair to good internal consistency. The five component structure gave medium to high results and explained 44·7% of the variance in the original data. Confidence had a high representation. The findings emphasized the shift towards social learning approaches for information and communication technologies. Informal social collaboration found favour with nursing students. Learning through talking, watching and listening all play a crucial role in the development of computing skills.

  14. 47{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2016). Key Topic / Outstanding know-how and sustainable excellence. Workshop: Preserving competence in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2016-10-15

    On the 18{sup th} workshop Preserving Competence in Nuclear Technology 24 young scientists presented the scientific results from their work covering a broad spectrum of technical areas. This demonstrated again the strong engagement of the younger generation as part of the German nuclear society. Prof.Dr.-Ing. Eckart Laurin, Prof.Dr.-Ing. Marco K. Koch, Dr. Katharina Stummeyer, and Dr.-Ing. Wolfgang Steinwarz as members of the jury assessed the written compacts and the oral presentations to award the Siempelkamp Competence Price 2016 to Andreas Wanninger from Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  15. Psychological Technologies of Communicative Competence Development in Children Aged 6-8 Years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarechnaya A.A.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the data of a developmental research that involved group training aimed at developing key elements of communicative competence in early school-age children. Communicative competence reflects a child’s ability and readiness to be effective in communication with peers and adults and is comprised of three basic competencies corresponding with three aspects of communication (speech/linguistic, evaluative/reflective, and social/behavioural. It was experimentally proved that there is a positive correlation between the general level of communicative competence in children aged 6-8 years and their abilities to plan, coordinate efforts, organise and carry out interactions in pairs in the process of accomplishing mutual tasks. The authors argue that activities aimed at developing key communicative actions in children become the ground for communicative competence development.

  16. RAISING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES COMPETENCE OF SCIENTIFIC AND PEDAGOGICAL EMPLOYEES - A KEY REQUIREMENT OF THE QUALITY OF EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia V. Morze

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article it was analyzed one of the basic conditions of providing the quality of higher education according to the system of internal quality assurance standards ESG (European quality assurance standards and guidelines to increase the ICT competence of scientific-pedagogical staff of the University. It was described the modular system of training for scientific and pedagogical staff of the Borys Grinchenko Kyiv University. Special attention is paid to the description of the system of raising the level of formation the ICT competence as one of the key competences of the modern teacher. The system of professional development, which is based on creating mixed studying and technology of "flipped classroom", formative assessment, innovative educational and ICT technologies according to the specially designed informative module "Informational and communication technologies", which allows scientific-pedagogical staff to use modern ICT and educational technologies effectively for their further applying in the provision of educational services and the development of quality of open educational content and open educational e-environment available to the student at any convenient time, which will significantly improve the quality of the educational process.

  17. Building technology and information competences among university students through an academic contest and social networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Eugenia Ruiz-Molina

    2013-08-01

    effectively make students aware of the existence of the informational video about technology and information competences and to watch it with full attention.

  18. Assistência pré-natal: competências essenciais desempenhadas por enfermeiros Atención prenatal: competencias esenciales desempeñadas por enfermeros Prenatal care: core competencies performed by nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida de Aquino Cunha

    2009-03-01

    para mejorar la calidad de los servicios a fin de alcanzar un nivel óptimo de competencia en la atención prenatal.This research aimed to analyze the core competencies developed in practice by nurses working in prenatal care. This descriptive study with a quantitative approach was carried out at 16 basic health network units in Rio Branco-AC, Brazil, in 2006. Data were collected through systematic and non-participant observation. Only two (11.76% of the nurses working in prenatal consultations had taken a specialization course in obstetrics. Although the large majority of core competencies expected in prenatal care were developed, some were practiced with low frequency levels, that is, not in all consultations. The results revealed that, despite the nurses' good performance, the need for clarifications should be assessed, about the importance of incorporating care protocols to improve service quality, with a view to reach an excellent competency level in prenatal care.

  19. An Analysis of Ethics Laws, Compliance with Ethical Standards, and Ethical Core Competency within the Department of the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-15

    set of core principles, were determined to be ineffective in altering unethical behavior because compliance-based ethics training courses are less...leadership by DA personnel to assess the health of the organization . The impact and effectiveness of ethics training achievements should be addressed in...Cohen & Burns, 2006). Others believe that while ethics courses have “a very low chance of changing people’s behavior in the long run, they are still an

  20. Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D. [eds.

    1995-12-01

    To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program.

  1. Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program

  2. Technology Assisted Language Learning is a silver bullet for enhancing Language competence and performance: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameel Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Technology Assisted Language Learning (TALL is an infallible means to develop profound knowledge and wide range of language skills. It instills in EFL learners an illimitable passion for task-based and skills oriented learning rather than rote memorization. New technological gadgets have commoditized a broad-based learning and teaching avenues and brought the whole learning process to life. A vast variety of authentic online- learning resources, motivational visual prompts, exciting videos, web-based interactivity and customizable language software, email, discussion forums, Skype, Twitter, apps, Internet mobiles, Facebook and YouTube have become obtrusive tools to enhance competence and performance in EFL teaching and learning realms. Technology can also provide various types of scaffolding for students learning to read. Nevertheless, instructors can also enhance their pedagogical effectiveness. However, the main focus of interest in this study is to ascertain to what extent the modern technological devices augment learners’ competence and performance specifically in vocabulary learning, grammatical accuracy and listening/ speaking skills. The remarkable scores of empirical surveys conducted in the present study reveal that TALL does assist learners to improve listening / speaking skills, pronunciation, extensive vocabulary and grammatical accuracy. The findings also manifest that the hybridity, instantaneity and super-diversity of digital learning lay far-reaching impact on learners' motivation for learning and incredibly maneuver learners to immerse in the whole learning process.

  3. Engineering and technology talent for innovation and knowledge-based economies competencies, leadership, and a roadmap for implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Abdulwahed, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces and analyzes the models for engineering leadership and competency skills, as well as frameworks for industry-academia collaboration and is appropriate for students, researchers, and professionals interested in continuous professional development. The authors look at the organizational structures of engineering education in knowledge-based economies and examine the role of innovation and how it is encouraged in schools. It also provides a methodological framework and toolkit for investigating the needs of engineering and technology skills in national contexts. A detailed empirical case study is included that examines the leadership competencies that are needed in knowledge-based economies and how one university encourages these in their program. The book concludes with conceptual modeling and proposals of specific organizational structures for implementation in engineering schools, in order to enable the development of necessary skills for future engineering graduates.

  4. Using Powder Cored Tubular Wire Technology to Enhance Electron Beam Freeform Fabricated Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Devon; Liu, Stephen; Domack, Marcia; Hafley, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) is an additive manufacturing technique, developed at NASA Langley Research Center, capable of fabricating large scale aerospace parts. Advantages of using EBF3 as opposed to conventional manufacturing methods include, decreased design-to-product time, decreased wasted material, and the ability to adapt controls to produce geometrically complex parts with properties comparable to wrought products. However, to fully exploit the potential of the EBF3 process development of materials tailored for the process is required. Powder cored tubular wire (PCTW) technology was used to modify Ti-6Al-4V and Al 6061 feedstock to enhance alloy content, refine grain size, and create a metal matrix composite in the as-solidified structures, respectively.

  5. [Perspectives on nursing education, licensing examinations and professional core competence in Taiwan in the context of globalization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yu-Mei Yu; Dai, Yu-Tzu; Yeh, Mei-Chang

    2010-10-01

    There are today some 130,000 nurses in Taiwan, practicing in different specialties and in various capacities and positions. Good nurses are society's "guardian angels of health" who provide protection and safe healthcare for the people. Improving nursing education quality and ensuring nurse competency by licensure examination are essential to both helping nurses realize the full potential of their role and earning recognition for Taiwan healthcare as positive contributors to the global community of nations. Three themes were explored in this paper, including: (1) Issues and problems with the current nursing education, license examination and nursing education quality monitoring systems in Taiwan; (2) Comparing Taiwan's situation with that in certain other countries; and (3) Recommending changes ÷ revisions in Taiwan's nursing educational system and license examinations based on comparative findings. In order to plug into the rapid pace of globalization, Taiwan should upgrade and limit its pre-licensure nursing programs at the bachelor level. Also, nursing education quality should be continuously improved through peer-review.

  6. Therapist Adherence and Competence with Manualized Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PTSD Delivered via Videoconferencing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, B. Christopher; Monnier, Jeannine; Grubaugh, Anouk L.; Elhai, Jon D.; Yim, Eunsil; Knapp, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Using secondary analyses from a randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder, we compared ratings of therapist competency and adherence between two service delivery modes: telepsychiatry (TP) and same room (SR). Patients were 38 male treatment-seeking veterans recruited…

  7. TECHNOLOGY FOR INSTALLATION OF REINFORCED CONCRETE FLOOR SLABS LIGHTENED BY CORE DRIVERS WITH PRELIMINARY REINFORCEMENT STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Leonovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents technology for installation of floor slabs lightened by plastic core drivers which are preliminary stressed under construction conditions.  Efficiency of such constructive solution is justified by the action of preliminary concrete compression in the tensile zone while reducing structure dead weight due to void arrangement.  The paper provides classification of systems for preliminary stress and contains recommendations on selection of the system depending on peculiariar features of the designed construction.  Main products and materials required for execution of works , requirements to stressed wire rope reinforcement, its main characteristics have been considered in the paper.Principal diagram of the lightened preliminary stressed slab stipulates arrangement of so called  dummy caisson. Strands of reinforcement ropes are located within the framework of bars passing over supporting structures (over vertical bearing structures of  the framework and voids are formed in the cells between bars by laying hollow plastic items joined together by a cage. The paper presents technological sequence of operations required for arrangement of the lightened preliminary stressed slab, schemes for equipment arrangement and characteristics of the applied devices and units (pushing device for reinforcement ropes, hydraulic jack with delivery hydraulic pump, mixing station, injection pump and others.  Recommendations have been given for execution of works in cold weather. The paper considers problems pertaining to control quality of the materials and items which are supplied to a construction site and directly execution of works on preliminary stress of a cellular slab.The executed analysis of technology permits to conclude that it is characterized by high level of applicability for import substitution. It is necessary to consider the possibility to apply the technology at objects of various application while comparing it with other

  8. The use of software agents and distributed objects to integrate enterprises: Compatible or competing technologies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancerella, C.M.

    1998-04-01

    Distributed object and software agent technologies are two integration methods for connecting enterprises. The two technologies have overlapping goals--interoperability and architectural support for integrating software components--though to date little or no integration of the two technologies has been made at the enterprise level. The primary difference between these two technologies is that distributed object technologies focus on the problems inherent in connecting distributed heterogeneous systems whereas software agent technologies focus on the problems involved with coordination and knowledge exchange across domain boundaries. This paper addresses the integration of these technologies in support of enterprise integration across organizational and geographic boundaries. The authors discuss enterprise integration issues, review their experiences with both technologies, and make recommendations for future work. Neither technology is a panacea. Good software engineering techniques must be applied to integrate an enterprise because scalability and a distributed software development team are realities.

  9. Comparing Graduate Courses Taught by the Same Instructor Using Competing Approaches: Traditional vs. Technology-Infused

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisicki, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The use of educational technologies as a tool to improve academic achievement continues to increase as more technologies becomes available to students. However, teachers are entering the classroom not fully prepared to integrate technology into their daily classroom teaching because they have not been adequately prepared to do so. Teacher…

  10. Cognitive competencies - Products of genes, experience, and technology. [for training of primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper examines methods used in studying cognitive competency in primates. Citing experiments on teaching language skills to chimpanzees, it is shown that some methods used for inquiry might lead to the cultivation and generation of new competencies, and specifically to the development of observational and relational learning skills. It is noted that methods can also limit the generality of conclusions; erroneous conclusions may be made based on certain generally accepted methods, whereby the research might be treatments that profoundly determine the assessment of dependent variables. Particular attention is given to the role of age in learning, showing that young primates can be taught the meaning of lexigrams and many specific tasks in much shorter time than adults; on the basis of these experiments, it was concluded that cultural gains did evolve primarily as a consequence of context within which infants were growing.

  11. Head-camera video recordings of trauma core competency procedures can evaluate surgical resident's technical performance as well as colocated evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Pasley, Jason; Garofalo, Evan; Shackelford, Stacy; Chen, Hegang; Longinaker, Nyaradzo; Granite, Guinevere; Pugh, Kristy; Hagegeorge, George; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2017-07-01

    Unbiased evaluation of trauma core competency procedures is necessary to determine if residency and predeployment training courses are useful. We tested whether a previously validated individual procedure score (IPS) for individual procedure vascular exposure and fasciotomy (FAS) performance skills could discriminate training status by comparing IPS of evaluators colocated with surgeons to blind video evaluations. Performance of axillary artery (AA), brachial artery (BA), and femoral artery (FA) vascular exposures and lower extremity FAS on fresh cadavers by 40 PGY-2 to PGY-6 residents was video-recorded from head-mounted cameras. Two colocated trained evaluators assessed IPS before and after training. One surgeon in each pretraining tertile of IPS for each procedure was randomly identified for blind video review. The same 12 surgeons were video-recorded repeating the procedures less than 4 weeks after training. Five evaluators independently reviewed all 96 randomly arranged deidentified videos. Inter-rater reliability/consistency, intraclass correlation coefficients were compared by colocated versus video review of IPS, and errors. Study methodology and bias were judged by Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument and the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies criteria. There were no differences (p ≥ 0.5) in IPS for AA, FA, FAS, whether evaluators were colocated or reviewed video recordings. Evaluator consistency was 0.29 (BA) - 0.77 (FA). Video and colocated evaluators were in total agreement (p = 1.0) for error recognition. Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.73 to 0.92, dependent on procedure. Correlations video versus colocated evaluations were 0.5 to 0.9. Except for BA, blinded video evaluators discriminated (p Education Research Study Quality Instrument criteria scored 15.5/19, Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies 2 showed low bias risk. Video evaluations of AA, FA, and FAS procedures with IPS are unbiased, valid, and

  12. Use of internet technologies for students' communicative competence development in the process of professional foreign language study in technical universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanova, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    Problems of mature thinking formation and development of foreign-language professional communicative competence of competitive graduates of technical universities are considered in the article. The most important factors influencing the achievement of high standard of knowledge, students' abilities and skills and increase of their abilities to establish deep meta-subject connections due to Internet technologies in the course of professional foreign language training are analyzed. The article is written on the basis of project material "Network School of National Research Nuclear University MEPhI" aimed at optimization of technological aspect of training. The given academic on-line program assigns to the teacher a part of an organizer who only coordinates creative, academic students' activity.

  13. Competence is Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramming, Pia

    2004-01-01

    The article will address competence, its' diffusion, application, and the consequence of this application within the field of Human Resource Management (HRM). The concept competence-in-practice will be presented and in conclusion the article will consider implications and possibilities...... of competence-in-practice as an alternative approach to Competence Development within Human Resource Management....

  14. Prosumers and smart grid technologies in Denmark: developing user competences in smart grid households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Meiken; Hauge, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores and describes resident’s experiences from a smart grid project that involved 20 households in a rural area in Denmark and ran from 2014 to 2015. The study is based on qualitative data from the participating households, collected 6, 12 and 18 months after the start...... of the intervention. Drawing on theories of social practice and the three intertwined elements of a practice: competences, images and materials, the paper contributes with an in-depth analysis of a complex intervention, focusing on how the participants changed energy practices as a result of the installed smart grid...

  15. Learning transfer of geospatial technologies in secondary science and mathematics core areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Curtis P.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the transfer of geospatial technology knowledge and skill presented in a social sciences course context to other core areas of the curriculum. Specifically, this study explored the transfer of geospatial technology knowledge and skill to the STEM-related core areas of science and mathematics among ninth-grade students. Haskell's (2001) research on "levels of transfer" provided the theoretical framework for this study, which sought to demonstrate the experimental group's higher ability to transfer geospatial skills, higher mean assignment scores, higher post-test scores, higher geospatial skill application and deeper levels of transfer application than the control group. The participants of the study consisted of thirty ninth-graders enrolled in U.S. History, Earth Science and Integrated Mathematics 1 courses. The primary investigator of this study had no previous classroom experiences with this group of students. The participants who were enrolled in the school's existing two-section class configuration were assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group had ready access to Macintosh MacBook laptop computers, and the control group had ready access to Macintosh iPads. All participants in U.S. History received instruction with and were required to use ArcGIS Explorer Online during a Westward Expansion project. All participants were given the ArcGIS Explorer Online content assessment following the completion of the U.S. History project. Once the project in U.S. History was completed, Earth Science and Integrated Mathematics 1 began units of instruction beginning with a multiple-choice content pre-test created by the classroom teachers. Experimental participants received the same unit of instruction without the use or influence of ArcGIS Explorer Online. At the end of the Earth Science and Integrated Math 1 units, the same multiple-choice test was administered as the content post-test. Following the

  16. Digital Competence--An Emergent Boundary Concept for Policy and Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilomäki, Liisa; Paavola, Sami; Lakkala, Minna; Kantosalo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Digital competence is an evolving concept related to the development of digital technology and the political aims and expectations of citizenship in a knowledge society. It is regarded as a core competence in policy papers; in educational research it is not yet a standardized concept. We suggest that it is a useful boundary concept, which can be…

  17. Competing recombinant technologies for environmental innovation: extending Arthur’s model of lock-in

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeppini, P.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a model of sequential decisions about investments in environmentally dirty and clean technologies, which extends the path-dependence framework of Arthur (1989). This allows us to evaluate if and how an economy locked into a dirty technology can be unlocked and move towards the

  18. Impact of an Event Reporting System on Resident Complication Reporting in Plastic Surgery Training: Addressing an ACGME and Plastic Surgery Milestone Project Core Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Rajiv P; Snyder-Warwick, Alison; Naidoo, Sybill; Skolnick, Gary B; Patel, Kamlesh B

    2017-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and Plastic Surgery Milestone Project has identified practice-based learning and improvement, which involves systematically analyzing current practices and implementing changes, as a core competency in residency education. In surgical care, complication reporting is an essential component of practice-based learning and improvement as complications are analyzed in morbidity and mortality conference for quality improvement. Unfortunately, current methods for capturing a comprehensive profile of complications may significantly underestimate the true occurrence of complications. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to evaluate an intervention for complication reporting and compare this to current practice, in a plastic surgery training program. This is a preintervention and postintervention study evaluating resident reporting of complications on a plastic surgery service. The intervention was an online event reporting system developed by department leadership and patient safety experts. The cohorts consisted of all patients undergoing surgery during two separate 3-month blocks bridged by an implementation period. A trained reviewer recorded complications, and this served as the reference standard. Fisher's exact test was used for binary comparisons. There were 32 complications detected in 219 patients from June to August of 2015 and 35 complications in 202 patients from October to December of 2015. The proportion of complications reported in the preintervention group was nine of 32 (28.1 percent). After the intervention, this significantly increased to 32 of 35 (91.4 percent) (p plastic surgery residents.

  19. Rising to the Challenge: The Ebola Outbreak in Sierra Leone and How Insights Into One Nongovernmental Organization's Response Can Inform Future Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursky, Elin A

    2015-10-01

    Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) play a critical humanitarian role in the developing world. Over 100 NGOs currently operate in Sierra Leone, a country in West Africa that ranks 183 out of 187 in the United Nation's Human Development Index. Following a brutal 11-year war that ended in January 2002, the country has been unsuccessful at building a sufficiently resourced, robust, and anticipatory public health and medical care infrastructure. Consequently, Sierra Leone suffers from high levels of poverty, infant mortality, and limited access to safe drinking water, as well as morbidity from malnutrition, diarrheal diseases, hepatitis A, cholera, and typhoid fever. Large international NGOs such as Doctors Without Borders have attempted to fill the void left by fragile and fragmented government health services but have been overwhelmed and saturated by the continual spread of Ebola virus disease and growing numbers of cases and deaths. Smaller NGOs endeavored to assist during this crisis as well. One of them, Caritas, has actively sought public health knowledge and has applied public health principles to reduce and contain Ebola virus disease transmission. The Ebola outbreak illuminates the importance of building basic public health capabilities within the core competences of NGOs.

  20. Integrative platform based on the mechatronics model for educational technologies focused on competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaşin, I.; Greta, S.; Dache, L.; Mătieş, V.

    2016-08-01

    Mechatronics is a model of transdisciplinary integration, entirely functional, with remarkable results for mankind. The incredible progress that the global economy has taken in the last decades is based on this new approach, the integrative type, which is present at the foundation of mechatronics. This kind of integrative approach is necessary for building a quality education focused on competence. The requirements from the social and economic environment, the needs of the young people who prepare themselves for an active life and the offers of the education providers are still not too interconnected to offer a satisfying education. This is the reason why the efforts to balance the demand, the needs and the offer are essential to ensure a better integration of students into society. Using a transcultural perspective, we can achieve a constructive approach. The education providers, together with the socio-economic environment, establish a clear structure of competence in multiple domains and of the instruments which can assure it. The scientific demarche, in the spirit of this paper approach the, answers the natural questions from the educational process: „Why, How and What do I learn?”.

  1. SIMULATIONS IN TECHNOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENTS AS A TOOL FOR TRAINING IN TRANSVERSAL COMPETENCES FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Gisbert Cervera

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of a reflection on how the technological environments can play a key role in the current Higher Education scene. This reflection observes the structural configuration and the key agents of the educational process. The content is developed firstly locating the student in the University of the 21st century; the methodological renovation is analyzed from two perspectives: the development of the technologies and the new role of teacher and student in this new scene; finally the simulations in technological environments are proposed as a valuable strategy to give response to the formative needs of the student in the current society.

  2. The Victoria West: earliest prepared core technology in the Acheulean at Canteen Kopje and implications for the cognitive evolution of early hominids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Kuman, Kathleen; Lotter, Matt G; Leader, George M; Gibbon, Ryan J

    2017-06-01

    Prepared core technology illustrates in-depth planning and the presence of a mental template during the core reduction process. This technology is, therefore, a significant indicator in studying the evolution of abstract thought and the cognitive abilities of hominids. Here, we report on Victoria West cores excavated from the Canteen Kopje site in central South Africa, with a preliminary age estimate of approximately 1 Ma (million years ago) for these cores. Technological analysis shows that the Victoria West cores bear similarities to the 'Volumetric Concept' as defined for the Levallois, a popular and widely distributed prepared core technology from at least 200 ka (thousand years ago). Although these similarities are present, several notable differences also occur that make the Victoria West a unique and distinctive prepared core technology; these are: elongated and convergent core shapes, consistent blow directions for flake removal, a predominance of large side-struck flakes, and the use of these flakes to make Acheulean large cutting tools. This innovative core reduction strategy at Canteen Kopje extends the roots of prepared core technology to the latter part of the Early Acheulean and clearly demonstrates an increase in the cognitive abilities and complexities of hominids in this time period.

  3. Attracting the Best. How the Military Competes for Information Technology Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hosek, James R; Mattock, Michael G; Fair, C. C; Kavanagh, Jennifer; Sharp, Jennifer; Totten, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The late-1990s peak in demand for information technology (IT) workers led private firms to respond by offering higher pay, enhanced on-the-job training opportunities, flexible work hours, and support for career development...

  4. A Technology Integration Education (TIE) Model: Millennial Preservice Teachers' Motivations about Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Denise D.; Piper, Randy T.

    2014-01-01

    Nobel laureates Schultz (1971) and Becker (1964, 1993) reinvigorated the analysis of education investments. Human capital investments that improve cognitive skills for elementary and secondary students have important economic implications. An interdisciplinary, 12-construct technology integration education (TIE) model was developed. The sample…

  5. Currency and Competence of Occupational Therapists and Consumers with Rapidly Changing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J. Steel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Assistive technology was once a specialised field of practice, involving products designed for populations with specific impairments or functional goals. In Australia, occupational therapists have, at times, functioned as gatekeepers to public funding, prescribing products from a predefined list. An expanding range of accessible mainstream products available via international and online markets has changed the meaning and application of assistive technology for many people with disability. In the policy context of consumer choice and cost-effectiveness, have occupational therapists been left behind? This paper describes the change in context for access to assistive technology resulting in expanded possibilities for participation and inclusion. A case study of environmental control systems is used to explore the overlap of mainstream and assistive products and the funding and services to support their uptake. The analysis describes a future policy and practice context in which assistive technology includes a spectrum of products decoupled from access to independent advice and support services. A broader scope of occupational therapy practice has potential to enhance the occupational rights of people with disability and the efficiency and effectiveness of assistive technology provision.

  6. A study on the framework for selecting core R and D programmes in Energy Technology Roadmap by the DEA approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Kon; Mogi, Gento; Kim, Jong Wook

    2007-07-01

    South Korea is the 10th largest energy consumer in the world because of the poor country of natural resources such as petroleum, coal, and natural gas. It is essential to solve the energy difficulty of secure supply and demand of national energy. We established the energy technology roadmap to prepare for the next 10 years. We clustered 3 core technological sectors such as technology for high oil prices, the United nations framework for climate change, and the hydrogen economy. But we didn't prioritize the weights of energy technology development in energy technology roadmap. To allocate the finite resources efficiently, we cluster the preferred groups and non-preferred groups by the data envelopment analysis (DEA) approach. Through the scientific decision making approach, we can allocate R and D capacity, budget, and infrastructures efficiently to produce outstanding R and D outputs. (auth)

  7. Core discrete event simulation model for the evaluation of health care technologies in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vataire, Anne-Lise; Aballéa, Samuel; Antonanzas, Fernando; Roijen, Leona Hakkaart-van; Lam, Raymond W; McCrone, Paul; Persson, Ulf; Toumi, Mondher

    2014-03-01

    A review of existing economic models in major depressive disorder (MDD) highlighted the need for models with longer time horizons that also account for heterogeneity in treatment pathways between patients. A core discrete event simulation model was developed to estimate health and cost outcomes associated with alternative treatment strategies. This model simulated short- and long-term clinical events (partial response, remission, relapse, recovery, and recurrence), adverse events, and treatment changes (titration, switch, addition, and discontinuation) over up to 5 years. Several treatment pathways were defined on the basis of fictitious antidepressants with three levels of efficacy, tolerability, and price (low, medium, and high) from first line to third line. The model was populated with input data from the literature for the UK setting. Model outputs include time in different health states, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and costs from National Health Service and societal perspectives. The codes are open source. Predicted costs and QALYs from this model are within the range of results from previous economic evaluations. The largest cost components from the payer perspective were physician visits and hospitalizations. Key parameters driving the predicted costs and QALYs were utility values, effectiveness, and frequency of physician visits. Differences in QALYs and costs between two strategies with different effectiveness increased approximately twofold when the time horizon increased from 1 to 5 years. The discrete event simulation model can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of different therapeutic options in MDD, compared with existing Markov models, and can be used to compare a wide range of health care technologies in various groups of patients with MDD. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Building upon Historical Competencies: Next-generation Clean-up Technologies for World-Wide Application - 13368

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara, K.C. [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States); Fellinger, A.P.; Aylward, R.S.; Griffin, J.C.; Hyatt, J.E.; Bush, S.R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has a 60-year history of successfully operating nuclear facilities and cleaning up the nuclear legacy of the Cold War era through the processing of radioactive and otherwise hazardous wastes, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, management of nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning of excess facilities. SRS recently unveiled its Enterprise.SRS (E.SRS) strategic vision to identify and facilitate application of the historical competencies of the site to current and future national and global challenges. E.SRS initiatives such as the initiative to Develop and Demonstrate Next generation Clean-up Technologies seek timely and mutually beneficial engagements with entities around the country and the world. One such ongoing engagement is with government and industry in Japan in the recovery from the devastation of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. (authors)

  9. Competence and Usage of Web 2.0 Technologies by Higher Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Kamal Ahmed; Zai, Sajid Yousuf; Jafri, Iftikhar Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Literature on Web 2.0 experiences of higher education faculty in developing countries such as Pakistan is very limited. An insight on awareness and practices of higher education faculty with these tools can be helpful to map strategies and plan of action for adopting latest technologies to support teaching-learning processes in higher education of…

  10. Correlational Study of Project Managers' Competence Experience, Education, and Technology Experience on Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosford, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Organizations continue to rely on information technology (IT) as a foundational element, yet poor IT project success continues to impact growth and innovation. Research into IT project success is widespread yet has focused on high-level project management attributes, not specific IT solutions. A review of the research literature revealed that the…

  11. Methods of Formation of Students Technological Competence in the Speciality "Garment Industry and Fashion Design"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zholdasbekova, S.; Karataev, G.; Yskak, A.; Zholdasbekov, A.; Nurzhanbaeva, J.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the major components of required technological skills (TS) for future designers taught during the academic process of a college. It considers the choices in terms of the various logical operations required by the fashion industry including fabric processing, assembly charts, performing work operations, etc. The article…

  12. Strategies Information and Communication Technology Managers Use to Build Employee Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabogadi, Thulaganyo Arnold

    2017-01-01

    The World Economic Forum (WEF) found that Botswana's information and communication technology (ICT) networked readiness index (NRI) had declined from position 89 in 2012 to 104 in 2015. A decline in Botswana's ICT NRI resulted in a modest gross domestic product (GDP) growth increasing from 4.2% in 2012 to 5.0% in 2015. The purpose of this…

  13. Employers' Perceptions of Information Technology Competency Requirements for Management Accounting Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spraakman, Gary; O'Grady, Winifred; Askarany, Davood; Akroyd, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Management accountants work in a computerized workplace with information technology (IT) for producing financial ledgers and for reporting. Thus, the role of the management accountant has shifted from capturing and recording transactions to analyzing business issues. The research question is: what IT knowledge and skills do employers require of…

  14. Future impact of new technologies: Three scenarios, their competence gaps and research implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne; Sonne, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    What will the impact of science be ten years from now in the food industry? Large or overwhelming most people will probably agree. But before we can be any more specific, we need to address the questions of what type or aspect of science or technology we have in mind and secondly, what kind...

  15. Impact of information technology on vendor objectives, capabilities, and competences in contract electronic manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perunovic, Zoran; Mefford, Robert; Christoffersen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Many factors influence the success of an outsourcing arrangement but vendor capabilities have been recognized as one of the main contributors. This paper investigates how information technology (IT) utilization contributes to success in outsourcing. We take a vendor's perspective and study how...

  16. Preparing Accounting Graduates for Digital Revolution: A Critical Review of Information Technology Competencies and Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Gary; Seow, Poh-Sun

    2016-01-01

    The pervasiveness of information technology (IT) in businesses has altered the nature and economies of accounting activities. In particular, the emergence of cloud computing, eXtensible Business Reporting Language, and business analytics in recent years have transformed the way companies report financial performance and make business decisions. As…

  17. Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies of Preservice Teachers at a Small Rural University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Denise D.

    2014-01-01

    Some members of the Millennial generation entered postsecondary education at the end of the first decade of the 21st century. From 1980-2009, the importance of technology training for preservice teachers was increasingly recognized. During this same time period, administrators and educators of teacher education programs were urged to prepare…

  18. Future impact of new technologies: Three scenarios, their competence gab and research implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne; Sonne, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    2004-01-01

    impact it will have in the future. Our approach is to construct a number of likely scenarios of the future and then look at the role and impact of technology in each of the scenarios. We do this by using an industry-level scenario technique, in which we rely heavily on expert and industry participants......, who represents both "technology push" and "market pull", which we feel are both very important basic driving forces. The aim is to get an idea of the very different roles acience or technology can play in the near future for a specific industry, in this case the Danish food industry, and present......What will the impact of science in the food industry be 10 years from now? Large or overwhelming most people will probably agree. But of we want to be more specific, we might start by defining, what type of technology we have in mind and secondly, what kind of impact we are talking about. Since...

  19. Market Concepts, Competing Technologies and Cost Challenges for Automotive and Stationary Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lipman, Todd; Sperling, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The concept of the fuel cell traces its roots all the way back to William Grove’s famous experiments on water electrolysis in 1839, but the commercialization history of fuel cell technologies remains rather limited over 150 years later. Throughout the later part of the 19th and early part of the 20th centuries, attempts were made to develop fuel cells that could directly convert coal or some other carbon material into electricity, but these attempts were unsuccessful because scientific knowle...

  20. The Potential of Digital Technologies to Support Literacy Instruction Relevant to the Common Core State Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Amy C.; Colwell, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Digital tools have the potential to transform instruction and promote literacies outlined in the Common Core State Standards. Empirical research is examined to illustrate this potential in grades 6-12 instruction.

  1. Energy Performance Impacts from Competing Low-slope Roofing Choices and Photovoltaic Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagengast, Amy L.

    With such a vast quantity of space, commercial low-slope roofs offer significant potential for sustainable roofing technology deployment. Specifically, building energy performance can be improved by installing rooftop energy technologies such as photovoltaic (PV) panels, and/or including designs such as white or green roofs instead of traditional black. This research aims to inform and support roof decisions through quantified energy performance impacts across roof choices and photovoltaic technologies. The primary dataset for this research was measured over a 16 month period (May 24, 2011 to October 13, 2012) from a large field experiment in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on top of a commercial warehouse with white, black and green roof sections, each with portions covered by polycrystalline photovoltaic panels. Results from the Pittsburgh experiment were extended to three different cities (San Diego, CA; Huntsville, AL; and Phoenix, AZ) chosen to represent a wide range of irradiance and temperature values. First, this research evaluated the difference in electricity production from a green-moss roof and black roof underneath photovoltaic panels to determine if the green roof's cooler air increases the panel efficiency. Second, separate studies examine 1) average hourly heat flux by month for unobstructed and shaded roof membranes 2) heat flux peak time delay, and 3) air temperature across roof types. Results of this research show green roofs slightly increased (0.8-1.5%) PV panel efficiency in temperatures approximately at or above 25° C (77°F) compared to black roofs. However in cool climates, like Pittsburgh, the roof type under the PV panels had little overall impact on PV performance when considering year round temperatures. Instead, roof decisions should place a stronger emphasis on heat flux impacts. The green roof outperformed both black and white roofs at minimizing total conductive heat flux. These heat flow values were used to develop a new, straight

  2. Perceptions of Blended Learning Competencies and Obstacles among Educational Technology Students in Light of Different Anxiety Levels and Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldalalah, Osamah Ahmad; Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of locus of control and anxiety level on the Jordanian educational technology students' perceived blended learning competencies and obstacles. The independent variables were the locus of control (Internal, External) and anxiety level (Low, Moderate, High). The dependent variables were the…

  3. Implications seen from the angle of the expert and referee: Loss in nuclear technology competence in the context of international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, F.

    2000-01-01

    A policy for maintaining the present nuclear technology competence will have to ensure that scientific and technological know-how and expertise have a chance to continue and to grow, particularly on the basis of exchange and communication with scientists and engineers abroad. Let us hope that the policy makers are aware that this is possible only in fields of science which are not doomed to die. (orig./CB) [de

  4. Lean VOC-Air Mixtures Catalytic Treatment: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Competing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Baldissone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Various processing routes are available for the treatment of lean VOC-air mixtures, and a cost-benefit analysis is the tool we propose to identify the most suitable technology. Two systems have been compared in this paper, namely a “traditional” plant, with a catalytic fixed-bed reactor with a heat exchanger for heat recovery purposes, and a “non-traditional” plant, with a catalytic reverse-flow reactor, where regenerative heat recovery may be achieved thanks to the periodical reversal of the flow direction. To be useful for decisions-making, the cost-benefit analysis must be coupled to the reliability, or availability, analysis of the plant. Integrated Dynamic Decision Analysis is used for this purpose as it allows obtaining the full set of possible sequences of events that could result in plant unavailability, and, for each of them, the probability of occurrence is calculated. Benefits are thus expressed in terms of out-of-services times, that have to be minimized, while the costs are expressed in terms of extra-cost for maintenance activities and recovery actions. These variable costs must be considered together with the capital (fixed cost required for building the plant. Results evidenced the pros and cons of the two plants. The “traditional” plant ensures a higher continuity of services, but also higher operational costs. The reverse-flow reactor-based plant exhibits lower operational costs, but a higher number of protection levels are needed to obtain a similar level of out-of-service. The quantification of risks and benefits allows the stakeholders to deal with a complete picture of the behavior of the plants, fostering a more effective decision-making process. With reference to the case under study and the relevant operational conditions, the regenerative system was demonstrated to be more suitable to treat lean mixtures: in terms of time losses following potential failures the two technologies are comparable (Fixed bed

  5. Improvements in Sand Mold/Core Technology: Effects on Casting Finish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prof. John J. Lannutti; Prof. Carroll E. Mobley

    2005-08-30

    In this study, the development and impact of density gradients on metal castings were investigated using sand molds/cores from both industry and from in-house production. In spite of the size of the castings market, almost no quantitative information about density variation within the molds/cores themselves is available. In particular, a predictive understanding of how structure and binder content/chemistry/mixing contribute to the final surface finish of these products does not exist. In this program we attempted to bridge this gap by working directly with domestic companies in examining the issues of surface finish and thermal reclamation costs resulting from the use of sand molds/cores. We show that these can be substantially reduced by the development of an in-depth understanding of density variations that correlate to surface finish. Our experimental tools and our experience with them made us uniquely qualified to achieve technical progress.

  6. Implementing new technologies for public safety communication: competing frequency demands and standardization issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kathryn J.

    1997-01-01

    Attempting to incorporate new technology into an existing environment is often very difficult. The problems are lengthy to resolve, wrought with confusion and seldom turn out like anyone expected. This document represents an overview of one such attempt. It outlines the general areas of concern which could be affected by a transition, and potential problems that may be encountered as a result of the effort. Over the past several decades, many local, state and federal agencies are pressing for more efficient use of frequency spectrums. The urgency of this issue has grown due to the demands of several groups wanting access to these channels for commercial use. Pager systems, cellular telephones, radio systems for private businesses all demand more space. Public safety agencies are starting to fear their needs will diminish in importance as the available channel spectrums are consumed by commercial ventures. How to share these channels, purchase appropriate equipment to meet your needs, and stay within a reasonable budget are not easy tasks. Public safety agencies who rely on communication networks in the performance of their jobs also know why encryption is important. Protecting the rights of citizens as police exchange information over the air, maintaining the integrity of an investigation and officer safety are all concerns police must address each time they use a radio.

  7. The Role of Engineering Design in Technological and 21st Century Competencies Capacity Building: Comparative Case Study in the Middle East, Asia, and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Abdulwahed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Engineering design is considered an effective means for developing engineering technical skills. Normally, engineering design is conducted in teams and is a collaborative open-ended approach under constraints. This nature of engineering design involves engagement of several interpersonal, cognitive, and management skills or competencies such as teamwork, communications, decision making, problem solving, etc. While modern engineers are supposed to be technically competent, they need to posses a wide set of interpersonal, cognitive, and management competencies to function effectively in the workplace. Increasingly there has been more deployment of engineering design competitions (EDCs in engineering education to address some gaps in current curricula system. In this study, the impact of a complex engineering design competition on developing 21st century competencies of engineering and technology talent is investigated. A mix of quantitative and qualitative methods in the approach to self-reporting perceptions were utilized. Data was collected through interviews from students and faculty, and through surveys from students. Triangulating quantitative and qualitative data from students and faculty indicate that the investigated EDC have positive impact on a large set of 21st century engineering and technology competencies, this has been consistent across groups of students from the EU, Middle East, and Asia, as well as across genders. This is one of the few available investigations that sheds light in further depth on the impact of engineering design on non-technical skills.

  8. 76 FR 6839 - ActiveCore Technologies, Inc., Battery Technologies, Inc., China Media1 Corp., Dura Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... International, Inc. (n/k/a Dexx Corp.), Global Mainframe Corp., GrandeTel Technologies, Inc., Magna... that there is a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Global Mainframe...

  9. Electrically Heated Testing of the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) Experiment Using a Depleted Uranium Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sanzi, James

    2017-01-01

    The Kilopower project aims to develop and demonstrate scalable fission-based power technology for systems capable of delivering 110 kW of electric power with a specific power ranging from 2.5 - 6.5 Wkg. This technology could enable high power science missions or could be used to provide surface power for manned missions to the Moon or Mars. NASA has partnered with the Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos National Labs, and Y-12 National Security Complex to develop and test a prototypic reactor and power system using existing facilities and infrastructure. This technology demonstration, referred to as the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling TechnologY (KRUSTY), will undergo nuclear ground testing in the summer of 2017 at the Nevada Test Site. The 1 kWe variation of the Kilopower system was chosen for the KRUSTY demonstration. The concept for the 1 kWe flight system consist of a 4 kWt highly enriched Uranium-Molybdenum reactor operating at 800 degrees Celsius coupled to sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes deliver heat to the hot ends of eight 125 W Stirling convertors producing a net electrical output of 1 kW. Waste heat is rejected using titanium-water heat pipes coupled to carbon composite radiator panels. The KRUSTY test, based on this design, uses a prototypic highly enriched uranium-molybdenum core coupled to prototypic sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes transfer heat to two Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E2s) and six thermal simulators, which simulate the thermal draw of full scale power conversion units. Thermal simulators and Stirling engines are gas cooled. The most recent project milestone was the completion of non-nuclear system level testing using an electrically heated depleted uranium (non-fissioning) reactor core simulator. System level testing at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) has validated performance predictions and has demonstrated system level operation and control in a test configuration that replicates the one

  10. New Graduate Nurses' Developmental Trajectories for Capability Beliefs Concerning Core Competencies for Healthcare Professionals: A National Cohort Study on Patient-Centered Care, Teamwork, and Evidence-based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, Anna; Gustavsson, Petter; Wallin, Lars; Boström, Anne-Marie; Rudman, Ann

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to describe the developmental trajectories of registered nurses' capability beliefs during their first 3 years of practice. The focus was on three core competencies for health professionals-patient-centered care, teamwork, and evidence-based practice. A national cohort of registered nurses (n = 1,205) was recruited during their nursing education and subsequently surveyed yearly during the first 3 years of working life. The survey included 16 items on capability beliefs divided into three subscales for the assessment of patient-centered care, teamwork, and evidence-based practice, and the data were analyzed with linear latent growth modeling. The nurses' capability beliefs for patient-centered care increased over the three first years of working life, their capability beliefs for evidence-based practice were stable over the 3 years, and their capability beliefs for teamwork showed a downward trend. Through collaboration between nursing education and clinical practice, the transition to work life could be supported and competence development in newly graduated nurses could be enhanced to help them master the core competencies. Future research should focus on determining which factors impact the development of capability beliefs in new nurses and how these factors can be developed by testing interventions. © 2016 The Authors. Worldviews on Evidence-Based Nursing published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Sigma Theta Tau International The Honor Society of Nursing.

  11. Exploring the information and communication technology competence and confidence of nursing students and their perception of its relevance to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett-Jones, Tracy; Kenny, Raelene; Van der Riet, Pamela; Hazelton, Michael; Kable, Ashley; Bourgeois, Sharon; Luxford, Yoni

    2009-08-01

    This paper profiles a study that explored nursing students' information and communication technology competence and confidence. It presents selected findings that focus on students' attitudes towards information and communication technology as an educational methodology and their perceptions of its relevance to clinical practice. Information and communication technology is integral to contemporary nursing practice. Development of these skills is important to ensure that graduates are 'work ready' and adequately prepared to practice in increasingly technological healthcare environments. This was a mixed methods study. Students (n=971) from three Australian universities were surveyed using an instrument designed specifically for the study, and 24 students participated in focus groups. The focus group data revealed that a number of students were resistant to the use of information and communication technology as an educational methodology and lacked the requisite skills and confidence to engage successfully with this educational approach. Survey results indicated that 26 per cent of students were unsure about the relevance of information and communication technology to clinical practice and only 50 per cent felt 'very confident' using a computer. While the importance of information and communication technology to student's learning and to their preparedness for practice has been established, it is evident that students' motivation is influenced by their level of confidence and competence, and their understanding of the relevance of information and communication technology to their future careers.

  12. Development of visual inspection technology for HTTR core support graphite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, So; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Masuma, Yoshitaka; Miki, Toshiya.

    1996-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is now constructing the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which employs a visual inspection of core support graphite structure, as an inservice inspection (ISI). In this inspection, TV camera will be used to investigate the alignment and integrity of the structure. Therefore, the ISI system, a combination of radiation tolerant TV camera and graphic processing system, is developed and examined its detectability and viewing angles using a simulated hot plenum of HTTR, which has artificial defects. As a result of a series of tests, it was confirmed that this system satisfied the requirements and was quite applicable for the ISI system of HTTR core support graphite structure. In addition, further improvement of the system, like a remote control procedure, will be investigated. (author)

  13. A study of ECC water bypass reduction technology for an improvement of core cooling capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C. G.; Kwon, T. S.; Yun, B. J.

    2006-02-01

    The research for the reduction of ECC water bypass fraction was mainly performed to develop the flow mechanisms that ECC water can penetrate more effectively into a lower downcomer. Evaluation were carried out for the effect of major parameters on the bypass of ECC water in the downcomer with DVI. The following various physical models were derived for the reduction of the bypass fraction of ECC water: models of changing DVI injection angle, models of rearranging relative angles of DVI nozzles, model of grooved-and-subchannel type core barrel, model of dual core barrel. CFD analysis and MARS design verification were performed for the derived models as a first step performance estimation. Through out air-water verification experiments, quantitative evaluation were performed for each model, and three most efficient models were suggested. Examination were carried out for the requirement of structural modification and the change in structural integrity due to the adoption of one of the schemes

  14. Proceedings of JSPS-CAS core university program seminar on PWI/PFC and fusion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Tomoaki; Chen Junling

    2009-01-01

    The present symposium has the topics on plasma wall interaction, plasma facing materials and components, core plasma behavior, blanket, tritium, superconductor, ITER related R and D and theory. The number of the presented papers was 39, and the participants were 45, 18 from Japan and 27 from China. Very aggressive discussions were conducted in this symposium, and the understanding for important issues toward to ITER and Demonstration Reactor was deepened. The 29 of the papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  15. Preparing Pre-Service Teachers to Integrate Technology: An Analysis of the Emphasis on Digital Competence in Teacher Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instefjord, Elen; Munthe, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on integration of digital competence in curriculum documents for teacher education in Norway. A model inspired by the work of Zhao, Pugh, Sheldon and Byers, as well as Krumsvik and Mishra and Koehler, has been developed as an analytical framework. Teachers' digital competence is here understood as comprising three knowledge…

  16. Planning of the development of the MMIS core technology based on nuclear-IT convergence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Kim, Chang Hwoi; Hwang, In Koo

    2012-01-01

    - Drive nuclear-IT convergence technologies such as middleware applied new concept nuclear instrumentation and control architecture, automated operation of future nuclear power plant, virtual reality/augmented reality, design and verification technology of a nuclear power plant main control room, software dependability, and cyber security technology - Write state-of-the-art report for the nuclear instrumentation and control based on IT convergence - A prototype which implemented related equipment and software subject to nuclear reactor operator that reside in the main control room (Reactor Operator, RO) order to a on-site operator (Local Operator, LO) and confirm the task performance matches the RO's intention - 'IT Convergence intelligent instrumentation and control technology' project planning for the Fourth Nuclear Power Research and Development in the long-term plan

  17. Strategic plan for the development of core technologies for the Korean advanced nuclear power reactor for export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joo Hyun; Cho, Young Ho

    2010-01-01

    With the soaring oil price and worsening global warming, nuclear power has attracted considerable attention on a global scale and a new large market of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is expected. The Korean government aims to export up to 10 NPPs by 2012, based on the successful export of 2 NPPs to the UAE in 2009. It is also going to develop a follow-up model of the Advanced Power Reactor (APR) 1400, and join the world's NPP market under the banner of Korea's original reactor type. For this, it promulgated the strategic plan, NuTech 2012, a technology development plan intended for the early acquisition of core technologies for the Korean advanced NPP design and domestic production of the main components in NPP. This paper introduces the strategic plan of NuTech 2012. (orig.)

  18. Many-core technologies: The move to energy-efficient, high-throughput x86 computing (TFLOPS on a chip)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    With Moore's Law alive and well, more and more parallelism is introduced into all computing platforms at all levels of integration and programming to achieve higher performance and energy efficiency. Especially in the area of High-Performance Computing (HPC) users can entertain a combination of different hardware and software parallel architectures and programming environments. Those technologies range from vectorization and SIMD computation over shared memory multi-threading (e.g. OpenMP) to distributed memory message passing (e.g. MPI) on cluster systems. We will discuss HPC industry trends and Intel's approach to it from processor/system architectures and research activities to hardware and software tools technologies. This includes the recently announced new Intel(r) Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture for highly-parallel workloads and general purpose, energy efficient TFLOPS performance, some of its architectural features and its programming environment. At the end we will have a br...

  19. Teaching a Second Core Course in Information Technology: A West Point Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Wolfe

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The United States Military Academy (USMA at West Point has the mission to produce officers for the U.S. Army. As part of the curriculum, the Academy requires all non-ABET major cadets (students to take two courses on information technology (IT with both courses focused on problem solving with technology. The first course is an introductory course offered in the freshman year while the second course is a more detailed course offered in the junior year. The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department uses an expanded definition of information technology; that is, any technology that acquires, transmits, processes, or displays information. Information technology is becoming increasingly important in the Army with the development and use of sensors, command and control systems, and other technologies to achieve information dominance. The course is divided into six modules: acquisition of data and sensors, transmission of data and networks, processing of data into information, display of information, legal and ethical issues of IT, and information dominance and operations. Cadets use a four-step problem solving methodology to develop and implement the components of an Information System to solve a real-world problem. The short-term impact of the course on the cadets has been very positive, and we are confident that the long-term impact will be substantial on the cadets and the Army. Cadets are exposed to a number of different technologies, gaining an understanding of how these technologies are used to acquire data, transmit data, process data into information, and display information to support decision making. In addition, the course projects help enforce the problem solving methodology where cadets analyze, design, implement, and test their solutions.

  20. Care Management In The Family Health Support Core: Technologies Operated In The Professional Dimension

    OpenAIRE

    José Maria Ximenes Guimarães; Gerlane Holanda de Freitas; Aretha Feitosa de Araújo; Maria Claudia de Freitas Lima; Élcio Basílio Pereira Machado; Cleide Carneiro; Maria Elidiana de Araújo Gomes; Fernando Luiz Affonso Fonseca; Maria do Socorro Sousa; Myrla Alves de Oliveira; Tatyane Oliveira Rebouças; Eduardo Carvalho de Souza; Ana Maria Araújo Salomão

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The Centre for Health Support Family - NASF has a innovative character with potential to concretize change in the organization of services and in care practices, supporting and expanding the solvability of the actions of the teams of the Family Health Strategy - FHS. To this end, it must operationalize technologies, arrangements and care management devices. Objective: To describe the care management technologies, particularly in the professional dimension, operated by the t...

  1. Experts views' on Digital Competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, José; Stoyanov, Slavi

    2013-01-01

    Janssen, J., & Stoyanov, S. (2012, 20 November). Online Consultation for a Digital Competence Framework: Experts' views on Digital Competence. Workshop presentation at the Institute for Prospective Technological Studies, Seville, Spain.

  2. Determining the directions of increasing the innovative potential of the region by developing innovative technologies and competences when preparing and implementing large investment projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur V. Kramin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective to determine the directions of increasing the innovative potential of a region through the development of innovative technologies and competences in the process of preparation and implementation of large investment projects in the Republic of Tatarstan. Methods methodology of project management institutional approach. Results it is proved that the main largescale directions of innovative potential development in the Republic of Tatarstan as a result of preparation and implementing of Universiade 2013 in Kazan are knowledge management information technologies risk management. It is shown that in the framework of the considered innovative areas a complete system was formed of competences of employees and managers in the fields of education trade hospitality and service. Scientific novelty the key directions were defined of increasing the innovative potential of a region through the development of innovative technologies and competences in the process of preparation and implementation of large investment projects by the example of the World Summer Student Games in Kazan in 2013. Practical significance on the basis of specific examples the authors illustrate the practiceoriented mechanism of innovative potential development of a region as a result of implementation of large investment projects. nbsp

  3. Advanced Process Technology: Combi Materials Science and Atmospheric Processing (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet for the National Center for Photovoltaics: Process Technology and Advanced Concepts -- High-Throughput Combi Material Science and Atmospheric Processing that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information.

  4. Sulfur technology update: selected research topics from the ASRL core research program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P. D.; Dowling, N. I.; Marriott, R.A.; Primak, A.; Davis, P.M. [Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This conference presentation is a combined effort by Alberta Sulfur Research, Ltd (ASRL) and the University of Calgary; it focuses on sulfur production technology and the ongoing research behind it. This presentation deals mainly with the use of sulfur in the oil sand industry, sulfur recovery in Claus systems, and sulfur management issues. Sulfur formation, mainly in the form of hydrogen sulfide, and the use of liquid sulfur in bitumen coking in the petrochemical industries were discussed first. This was later followed by an illustration of how sulfur recovery efficiency is greatly enhanced by catalytic tail gas incineration and improved liquid sulfur degassing technologies. A comparative scheme between the current process and the new research in utilizing sulfur in nickel metal production was also presented, showing how the new research results in less waste. In conclusion, the effects of polymeric sulfur on the strength of the solid were discussed, showing a linear relationship between the two parameters.

  5. Current status of design technology on core thermal-hydraulic performance in FLWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Akira; Kobayashi, Noboru

    2008-01-01

    R and D project to investigate thermal-hydraulic performance in tight-lattice rod bundles for Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) has been progressed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency in collaboration with power utilities, reactor vendors and universities. The FLWR adopts a triangular tight-lattice rod bundle with around 1mm gap width between rods and the thermal-hydraulic performance is being recognized as one of the major subjects. We have performed the R and D using large-scale test facility (37-rod bundle with full-height and full-pressure), model experiments and advanced numerical simulation technology. This paper described the master plan for the development of design technology and showed an executive summary for this project. The thermal-hydraulic characteristics in the tight-lattice configuration were investigated and the feasibility was confirmed based on the experiments. We have developed the design technology including subchannel and 3-D numerical simulation one to evaluate the effects of geometry/scale on the thermal-hydraulic behaviors. (author)

  6. Care Management In The Family Health Support Core: Technologies Operated In The Professional Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Ximenes Guimarães

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Centre for Health Support Family - NASF has a innovative character with potential to concretize change in the organization of services and in care practices, supporting and expanding the solvability of the actions of the teams of the Family Health Strategy - FHS. To this end, it must operationalize technologies, arrangements and care management devices. Objective: To describe the care management technologies, particularly in the professional dimension, operated by the teams of the Support Centre for Family Health, in its dialogue with the Health Strategy. Methods: case study with a qualitative approach, with the 12 professionals from a NASF team of Maracanaú, Ceará, Brazil. Focal group was performed. The empirical material was analysed based on the content analysis. Results: there is evidence of a proposal for production of integral care based on the use of technologies as host, bond, autonomy and accountability. The user approach is based on the principles of the extended clinic. However, there are difficulties related to the regulation of access, the construction of bonds, the construction of therapeutic projects and intersectional articulation. Final thoughts: it appears necessary to overcome the challenges, strengthen mechanisms for coordination and for negotiation of labour, as well as rethinking the NASF linking logic to a seemingly high number of FHS teams complicates the organization of work processes, building of agendas, weakens the bonds with the users and even the solvency.

  7. The Information Technology Infrastructure for the Translational Genomics Core and the Partners Biobank at Partners Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Natalie; Holzbach, Ana; Mahanta, Lisa; Aldama, Jackie; Cerretani, Xander; Embree, Kevin; Leon, Irene; Rathi, Neeta; Vickers, Matilde

    2016-01-21

    The Biobank and Translational Genomics core at Partners Personalized Medicine requires robust software and hardware. This Information Technology (IT) infrastructure enables the storage and transfer of large amounts of data, drives efficiencies in the laboratory, maintains data integrity from the time of consent to the time that genomic data is distributed for research, and enables the management of complex genetic data. Here, we describe the functional components of the research IT infrastructure at Partners Personalized Medicine and how they integrate with existing clinical and research systems, review some of the ways in which this IT infrastructure maintains data integrity and security, and discuss some of the challenges inherent to building and maintaining such infrastructure.

  8. Competencies required for nursing telehealth activities: A Delphi-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Houwelingen, Cornelis T M; Moerman, Anna H; Ettema, Roelof G A; Kort, Helianthe S M; Ten Cate, Olle

    2016-04-01

    Telehealth is viewed as a major strategy to address the increasing demand for care and a shrinking care professional population. However, most nurses are not trained or are insufficiently trained to use these technologies effectively. Therefore, the potential of telehealth fails to reach full utilization. A better understanding of nursing telehealth entrustable professional activities (NT-EPAs) and the required competencies can contribute to the development of nursing telehealth education. In a four-round Delphi-study, a panel of experts discussed which NT-EPAs are relevant for nurses and which competencies nurses need to possess to execute these activities effectively. The 51 experts, including nurses, nursing faculty, clients and technicians all familiar with telehealth, were asked to select items from a list of 52 competencies based on the literature and on a previous study. Additionally, the panelists could add competencies based on their experience in practice. The threshold used for consensus was set at 80%. Consensus was achieved on the importance of fourteen NT-EPAs, requiring one or more of the following core competencies; coaching skills, the ability to combine clinical experience with telehealth, communication skills, clinical knowledge, ethical awareness, and a supportive attitude. Each NT-EPA requires a specific set of competencies (at least ten). In total, 52 competencies were identified as essential in telehealth. Many competencies for telehealth, including clinical knowledge and communication skills, are not novel competencies. They are fundamental to nursing care as a whole and therefore are also indispensable for telehealth. Additionally, the fourteen NT-EPAs appeared to require additional subject specific competencies, such as the ability to put patients at ease when they feel insecure about using technology. The NT-EPAs and related competencies presented in this study can be used by nursing schools that are considering including or expanding

  9. Engaging Middle School Students with Google Earth Technology to Analyze Ocean Cores as Evidence for Sea Floor Spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouhet, T.; Cook, J.

    2006-12-01

    Google Earth's ability to captivate students' attention, its ease of use, and its high quality images give it the potential to be an extremely effective tool for earth science educators. The unique properties of Google Earth satisfy a growing demand to incorporate technology in science instruction. Google Earth is free and relatively easy to use unlike some other visualization software. Students often have difficulty conceptualizing and visualizing earth systems, such as deep-ocean basins, because of the complexity and dynamic nature of the processes associated with them (e.g. plate tectonics). Google Earth's combination of aerial photography, satellite images and remote sensing data brings a sense of realism to science concepts. The unobstructed view of the ocean floor provided by this technology illustrates three-dimensional subsurface features such as rift valleys, subduction zones, and sea-mounts enabling students to better understand the seafloor's dynamic nature. Students will use Google Earth to navigate the sea floor, and examine Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) core locations the from the Glomar Challenger Leg 3 expedition. The lesson to be implemented was expanded upon and derived from the Joint Oceanographic Insitute (JOI) Learning exercise, Nannofossils Reveal Seafloor Spreading. In addition, students take on the role of scientists as they graph and analyze paleontological data against the distance from the Mid Ocean Ridge. The integration of ocean core data in this three-dimensional view aids students' ability to draw and communicate valid conclusions about their scientific observations. A pre and post survey will be given to examine attitudes, self-efficacy, achievement and content mastery to a sample of approximately 300 eighth grade science students. The hypothesis is that the integration of Google Earth will significantly improve all areas of focus as mentioned above.

  10. ACCP Clinical Pharmacist Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saseen, Joseph J; Ripley, Toni L; Bondi, Deborah; Burke, John M; Cohen, Lawrence J; McBane, Sarah; McConnell, Karen J; Sackey, Bryan; Sanoski, Cynthia; Simonyan, Anahit; Taylor, Jodi; Vande Griend, Joseph P

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) is to advance human health by extending the frontiers of clinical pharmacy. Consistent with this mission and its core values, ACCP is committed to ensuring that clinical pharmacists possess the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and behaviors necessary to deliver comprehensive medication management (CMM) in team-based, direct patient care environments. These components form the basis for the core competencies of a clinical pharmacist and reflect the competencies of other direct patient care providers. This paper is an update to a previous ACCP document and includes the expectation that clinical pharmacists be competent in six essential domains: direct patient care, pharmacotherapy knowledge, systems-based care and population health, communication, professionalism, and continuing professional development. Although these domains align with the competencies of physician providers, they are specifically designed to better reflect the clinical pharmacy expertise required to provide CMM in patient-centered, team-based settings. Clinical pharmacists must be prepared to complete the education and training needed to achieve these competencies and must commit to ongoing efforts to maintain competence through ongoing professional development. Collaboration among stakeholders will be needed to ensure that these competencies guide clinical pharmacists' professional development and evaluation by educational institutions, postgraduate training programs, professional societies, and employers. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  11. CORE annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gut, A.

    2007-04-01

    This annual report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) summarises the activities of the Swiss Federal Commission on Energy Research CORE in 2006. The six main areas of work during the period 2004 - 2007 are examined, including a review of the SFOE's energy research programme, a road-map for the way towards the realisation of a 2000-watt society, the formulation of an energy research concept for 2008 - 2011, international co-operation, the dissemination of information and the assessment of existing and new instruments. International activities and Switzerland's involvement in energy research within the framework of the International Energy Agency IEA are discussed. New and existing projects are listed and the work done at the Competence Centre for Energy and Mobility noted. The Swiss Technology Award 2007 is presented. Information supplied to interested bodies to help improve knowledge on research work being done and to help make discussions on future energy supply more objective is discussed

  12. A Comprehensive Analysis on Technopedagogical Education Competency and Technology Perception of Pre-Service Teachers: Relation, Levels and Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incik, Eylem Yalcin; Akay, Cenk

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to identify the competency and the perceptions of pre-service teachers on technopedagogical education. While study group of quantitative dimension is composed of 626 pre-service teachers; study group of qualitative extent is composed of 67 pre-service teachers. The sample represents 35% of the population of…

  13. Further development of the cleanable steel HEPA filter, cost/benefit analysis, and comparison with competing technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; Wilson, K.; Witherell, C.; McGregor, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have made further progress in developing a cleanable steel fiber HEPA filter. We fabricated a pleated cylindrical cartridge using commercially available steel fiber media that is made with 1 μm stainless steel fibers and sintered into a sheet form. Test results at the Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Station at Oak Ridge show the prototype filter cartridge has 99.99% efficiency for 0.3 μm dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols and a pressure drop of 1.5 inches. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned using reverse air pulses. Our analysis of commercially optimized filters suggest that cleanable steel HEPA filters need to be made from steel fibers less than 1 μm, and preferably 0.5 μm, to meet the standard HEPA filter requirements in production units. We have demonstrated that 0.5 μm steel fibers can be produced using the fiber bundling and drawing process. The 0.5 μm steel fibers are then sintered into small filter samples and tested for efficiency and pressure drop. Test results on the sample showed a penetration of 0.0015% at 0.3 μm and a pressure drop of 1.15 inches at 6.9 ft/min (3.5 cm/s) velocity. Based on these results, steel fiber media can easily meet the requirements of 0.03% penetration and 1.0 inch of pressure drop by using less fibers in the media. A cost analysis of the cleanable steel HEPA filter shows that, although the steel HEPA filter costs much more than the standard glass fiber HEPA filter, it has the potential to be very cost effective because of the high disposal costs of contaminated HEPA filters. We estimate that the steel HEPA filter will save an average of $16,000 over its 30 year life. The additional savings from the clean-up costs resulting from ruptured glass HEPA filters during accidents was not included but makes the steel HEPA filter even more cost effective. We also present the results of our evaluation of competing technologies with metallic and ceramic powder

  14. Further development of the cleanable steel HEPA filter, cost/benefit analysis, and comparison with competing technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Lopez, R.; Wilson, K.; Witherell, C.; McGregor, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have made further progress in developing a cleanable steel fiber HEPA filter. We fabricated a pleated cylindrical cartridge using commercially available steel fiber media that is made with 1 {mu}m stainless steel fibers and sintered into a sheet form. Test results at the Department of Energy (DOE) Filter Test Station at Oak Ridge show the prototype filter cartridge has 99.99% efficiency for 0.3 {mu}m dioctyl phthalate (DOP) aerosols and a pressure drop of 1.5 inches. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned using reverse air pulses. Our analysis of commercially optimized filters suggest that cleanable steel HEPA filters need to be made from steel fibers less than 1 {mu}m, and preferably 0.5 {mu}m, to meet the standard HEPA filter requirements in production units. We have demonstrated that 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers can be produced using the fiber bundling and drawing process. The 0.5 {mu}m steel fibers are then sintered into small filter samples and tested for efficiency and pressure drop. Test results on the sample showed a penetration of 0.0015% at 0.3 {mu}m and a pressure drop of 1.15 inches at 6.9 ft/min (3.5 cm/s) velocity. Based on these results, steel fiber media can easily meet the requirements of 0.03% penetration and 1.0 inch of pressure drop by using less fibers in the media. A cost analysis of the cleanable steel HEPA filter shows that, although the steel HEPA filter costs much more than the standard glass fiber HEPA filter, it has the potential to be very cost effective because of the high disposal costs of contaminated HEPA filters. We estimate that the steel HEPA filter will save an average of $16,000 over its 30 year life. The additional savings from the clean-up costs resulting from ruptured glass HEPA filters during accidents was not included but makes the steel HEPA filter even more cost effective. We also present the results of our evaluation of competing technologies with metallic and

  15. Nursing Informatics Competencies Among Nursing Students and Their Relationship to Patient Safety Competencies: Knowledge, Attitude, and Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdrbo, Amany Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    With implementation of information technology in healthcare settings to promote safety and evidence-based nursing care, a growing emphasis on the importance of nursing informatics competencies has emerged. This study assessed the relationship between nursing informatics and patient safety competencies among nursing students and nursing interns. A descriptive, cross-sectional correlational design with a convenience sample of 154 participants (99 nursing students and 55 interns) completed the Self-assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies and Patient Safety Competencies. The nursing students and interns were similar in age and years of computer experience, and more than half of the participants in both groups had taken a nursing informatics course. There were no significant differences between competencies in nursing informatics and patient safety except for clinical informatics role and applied computer skills in the two groups of participants. Nursing informatics competencies and patient safety competencies were significantly correlated except for clinical informatics role both with patient safety knowledge and attitude. These results provided feedback to adjust and incorporate informatics competencies in the baccalaureate program and to recommend embracing the nursing informatics course as one of the core courses, not as an elective course, in the curriculum.

  16. Conversational Competence in Academic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Conversational competence is a process, not a state. Ithaca does not exist, only the voyage to Ithaca. Vibrant campuses are a series of productive conversations. At its core, communicative competence in academic settings mirrors a collective search for meaning regarding the purpose and direction of a campus community. Communicative competence…

  17. The emergence of two competing philosophies on climate policy: the implications for the application of technology solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the two competing philosophies on Climate Policy the emerged as a result of the Rio Earth Summit and the Kyoto Protocol. The UN Framework Convention on Climate Change was signed by 154 nations at the Rio Earth Summit and was centred around its 'ultimate objective' - 'the stabilization of greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system'. Because the parties to the Convention would not be able to achieve the stabilization goal, negotiations that included binding emission reduction commitments were begun and culminated in the Kyoto Protocol. Taken together, the three primary objectives are to achieve maximum reductions at the least possible cost, while contributing to sustainable development. This has resulted in distinct positions being staked out by various parties. This paper details the two competing philosophies

  18. Three-dimensional gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation of plasmas on a massively parallel computer: Final report on LDRD Core Competency Project, FY 1991--FY 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, J.A.; Williams, T.J.; Cohen, B.I.; Dimits, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the programs of the Magnetic fusion Energy (MFE) Theory and computations Program is studying the anomalous transport of thermal energy across the field lines in the core of a tokamak. We use the method of gyrokinetic particle-in-cell simulation in this study. For this LDRD project we employed massively parallel processing, new algorithms, and new algorithms, and new formal techniques to improve this research. Specifically, we sought to take steps toward: researching experimentally-relevant parameters in our simulations, learning parallel computing to have as a resource for our group, and achieving a 100 x speedup over our starting-point Cray2 simulation code's performance

  19. Modeling on the Criteria of Chinese Business English Majors’ Business Communication Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yonghou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With increasing globalization in the business arena, the phenomenal growth of international business has created a heavy demand for intellectuals with international business communication competence. Business communication competence, as one of the paramount competences business English majors should acquire and the particular embodiment of competitiveness, is of vital significance not only in personal development, but also in enterprises management, just as Liu (2012 claims “[e]ffective business communication is the lifeblood of every organization, and a key to success in one’s career”. There is, nevertheless, no universally accepted model for what excellent business communication competence should consist of up to now. Hence, the overriding aim of the present study is to identify Chinese business English majors’ communication competence relevant to the contemporary communication environment. Identification of these skills should aid business communication educators and students in addressing practical concerns in their teaching and learning. The unified model to be put forward covers four kinds of core competence, i.e. English competence, fundamental business knowledge and skills, excellent intercultural communication competence, and luxuriant humanistic quality, together with three other skills, which are also indispensable, including scenario analysis competence, outstanding technology-mediated communication competence, and non-verbal communication competence.

  20. Mathematical Competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westphael, Henning; Mogensen, Arne

    2013-01-01

    In this article we present the notion of Mathematical competences as a tool to describe the mathematically gifted students.......In this article we present the notion of Mathematical competences as a tool to describe the mathematically gifted students....

  1. Teacher competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Svatošová, Kateřina

    2012-01-01

    This diploma thesis deals with adult teacher competencies. It describes current situation in adult education and it focuses on measuring quality level of teacher competencies. There is given the main overview of adult education specifics. These are the prerequisites for defining adult teacher competencies. There is given specific adult teacher competencies and related roles which are generally based on teacher's activities during educational courses. Next part describes present conception of ...

  2. Constructing Memory: Competence Maintenance, Education and Training Working Group on the Implementation of Geological Disposal of the Radioactive Waste Technology Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmu, Marjatta

    2015-01-01

    The Implementing Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste Technology Platform (IGD-TP) community, with over 115 participants in 2014, according to its Vision 2025 (IGD-TP, 2009) aims to proceed to obtaining licences to construct and to safely operate deep geological repositories for spent fuel, high-level waste, and other long-lived radioactive waste in their respective countries. The commitment to Vision 2025 includes developing joint means to facilitate access to expertise and technology, and maintain competencies in the field of geological disposal in Europe. In 2012, IGD-TP launched a Working Group on Competence Maintenance, Education and Training (CMET), as one of its permanent joint activities for addressing its commitment to maintain competencies. In 2013, this permanent organisational working group convened for its first meeting and started working with the support of the IGD-TP Secretariat. The work on competence maintenance within this IGD-TP's working group is first of all focusing on benefiting from and promoting the ECVET approach's application in geological disposal and in future competence building of the community. ECVET approach identifies the LOs that need to be mastered by professionals to carry out their work - starting from the early stages of a waste management programme to running the nuclear waste facilities safely and efficiently. LOs are defined in terms of knowledge, skills and competence (KSC) in ECVET ('attitude' is the corresponding term used by the International Atomic Energy Agency). In their different job functions or tasks the professionals carrying out their work need to master these KSCs at specified European Qualification Framework qualification levels (European Qualification Framework or International Standard Classification for Education according to the job's requirements. The ECVET approach is useful for higher education and continuous professional development, too, not just for vocational education

  3. An Investigation into the Secondary Schools In-Service Teachers' Selected Variables on Interactive Computer Technology (ICT) Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adodo, S. O.

    2012-01-01

    The use of computer technologies has come to stay, an individual, group of individual and society who is yet to recognize this fact is merely living. The introduction of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) into the education industry has caused transformation in instructional process. The study investigated the in-service teachers…

  4. Exploring a categorization of main competencies for digital librarians

    OpenAIRE

    Machin-Mastromatteo, Juan-Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This brief essay is concerned with the main topic “Job Analysis in a Digital Library Context” and its purpose is to explore some of the competencies that digital librarians must have to successfully work in a digital library context. The competencies explored are categorized under the headings of information management competencies, technological competencies, information literacy related competencies, and interpersonal competencies.

  5. Competencies for disaster mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Richard V; Burkle, Frederick M; Walsh, Lauren E; North, Carol S

    2015-03-01

    Competencies for disaster mental health are essential to domestic and international disaster response capabilities. Numerous consensus-based competency sets for disaster health workers exist, but no prior study identifies and discusses competency sets pertaining specifically to disaster mental health. Relevant competency sets were identified via MEDLINE, PsycINFO, EBSCO, and Google Scholar searches. Sixteen competency sets are discussed, some providing core competencies for all disaster responders and others for specific responder groups within particular professions or specialties. Competency sets specifically for disaster mental health professionals are lacking, with the exception of one set that focused only on cultural competence. The identified competency sets provide guidance for educators in developing disaster mental health curricula and for disaster health workers seeking education and training in disaster mental health. Valid, criterion-based competencies are required to guide selection and training of mental health professionals for the disaster mental health workforce. In developing these competencies, consideration should be given to the requirements of both domestic and international disaster response efforts.

  6. Development of the Japan Science and Technology Agency Index of Competence to Assess Functional Capacity in Older Adults: Conceptual Definitions and Preliminary Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasa, Hajime; Masui, Yukie; Inagaki, Hiroki; Yoshida, Yuko; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Otsuka, Rika; Kikuchi, Kazunori; Nonaka, Kumiko; Yoshida, Hiroto; Yoshida, Hideyo; Suzuki, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Improvement in the health of older people and changes in their lifestyles necessitate a scale that can better measure their competence at a higher level. This study describes the development process of the Japan Science and Technology Agency Index of Competence (JST-IC) by (a) refining conceptual definitions and developing preliminary items and (b) examining the basic properties of the items. Participants were 1,253 septuagenarians (539 men and 714 women) living in communities, who were asked to judge whether they were independent via 88 items. To examine the basic properties of the preliminary items, five different analyses were conducted. Thirty-four items were considered as inappropriate (6 overlapped between the analyses): (a) 9 due to very high or low ratios of responders who answered "yes," (b) 4 due to gender or regional differences, (c) 5 due to their weak association with health status, (d) 9 due to low communalities in factor analysis, and (e) 13 due to redundancy of meaning with other items. Conceptual definitions and preliminary items were developed, and the basic properties of the items were examined to create the JST-IC. The next step would be to screen the remaining 54 items to create the final version of the scale.

  7. Assessment of the compliance of osh competences with student expectations in the post-graduate programs offered by the poznań university of technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Górny Adam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to fulfill the duties associated with ensuring occupational safety at work, a broad range of competences are required that are critical to perform work and comply with relevant laws. One way to obtain such competences is to complete a post-graduate program of studies. The Poznań University of Technology offers precisely such an opportunity. Its post-graduate OHS program provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to work in the field while satisfying their expectations. Student expectations are ascertained in surveys designed to assess the extent to which the knowledge and skills taught meet the needs they have indicated. The findings of such surveys are used to improve course design with a view to enabling the graduates to conduct OHS work in both the manufacturing and service sectors. However, to ensure that the courses designed to satisfy student expectations do not fail to teach the skills necessary in real life, criteria other than the survey results alone need to be adopted in defining program content.

  8. Competence articulation:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo; Bardram, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    Many studies and concepts within CSCW deal with the temporal, spatial, social, and computational aspects of supporting collaborative work. In this paper we want to pay attention to another central aspect to the achievement of collaborative work, namely the competence of the people involved....... In particular, we want to look at the dynamic quality of competences, and investigate how competence is mutually developed in coordinated work. We have termed this process competence articulation, a concept which tries to emphasize competence as well as social development of competence as part of cooperation....... The concept has emerged out of a longitudinal participatory design process investigating telemedical treatment of diabetic foot ulcers using video phones. We analyze the transitions occurring with the introduction of synchronous telemedical consultations and detail how the online video facilitates...

  9. THE FORMATION OF LANGUAGE AND COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE OF STUDENTS BASED ON STUDY OF THE PROFESSIONAL TERMINOLOGY OF FORESTRY AND WOOD TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Оксана Гриджук

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the necessity for the students of higher technical educational institutions to study professional lexicon in order to form a terminological competence is stressed. The two types of paradigmatic relations such as synonymic and antonymic in modern forestry and wood technology terms are considered. The main types of terminological synonymous associations are also identified. Some reasons of the development of terminological doublets are explained. Some peculiarities of the functioning of antonymy in these vocabulary groups are defined. The groups of antonyms according to the semantic criterion are described. Some types of exercises for studying the terminological synonyms and antonyms in the courses “The Ukrainian Language for Proficiency” and “The Professional Terminology” are proposed.

  10. The Skills, Competences, and Attitude toward Information and Communications Technology Recommender System: an online support program for teachers with personalized recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla Muñoz, Olga; Alpiste Penalba, Francisco; Fernández Sánchez, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    Teachers deal with Information and Communications Technology (ICT) every day and they often have to solve problems by themselves. To help them in coping with this issue, an online support program has been created, where teachers can pose their problems on ICT and they can receive solutions from other teachers. A Recommender System has been defined and implemented into the support program to suggest to each teacher the most suitable solution based on her Skills, Competences, and Attitude toward ICT (SCAT-ICT). The support program has initially been populated with 70 problems from 86 teachers. 30 teachers grouped these problems into six categories with the card-sorting technique. Real solutions to these problems have been proposed by 25 trained teachers. Finally, 17 teachers evaluated the usability of the support program and the Recommender System, where results showed a high score on the standardized System Usability Scale.

  11. Competence centre for energy and information technology 1999 -2008 - Supervisory report; Betreuung des Kompetenzzentrums Energie und Informationstechnik 1999-2008 - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aebischer, B.

    2008-07-01

    This final report for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) reports on work done concerning the supervision of the competence centre for energy and information technology. The potential for increasing the rational use of electrical energy in the ICT domain and in other areas such as consumer electronics are investigated. In the past, Switzerland has played a leading role in investigating and promoting a more rational use of energy in ICT and influenced the design of energy declarations and labels on the global level. The report includes a number of annual reports for the years 1999 to 2008 which also cover not only the electricity consumption of computer centres and communication systems, but also the rational use of electricity in consumer electronics.

  12. International Evolution of TIGER Informatics Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensmeier, Joyce; Anderson, Christel; Shaw, Toria

    2017-01-01

    The TIGER Initiative aims to explain how to equip practicing nurses with informatics competencies. This chapter describes a collaborative effort to identify global informatics requirements in relation to core competencies and to match them with national and regional needs. Recommendations from the TIGER Informatics Competency Synthesis Project, described here, have implications for an international framework of informatics competencies for all types of health care professionals including nurses.

  13. The Education and Training of Learning Technologists: A Competences Approach (Report to IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technologies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Roger; Kinshuk; Koper, Rob; Okamoto, Toshio; Spector, J. Michael

    2010-01-01

    The educational and training requirements of Advanced Learning Technology (ALT) need to engage with curricula that reflect the varied requirements of the workplace and of society. Students have a range of interests and ambitions in ALT which the instructional process has to accommodate and support. With these considerations in mind the IEEE…

  14. The Case Study Technologies as the Means of Competency Building Approach Realization in Higher Education of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdrafikova, Albina R.; Konopatskaya, Ekaterina A.

    2014-01-01

    The problem of increasing education efficiency in Russian high school under the condition of well-organized educational process with using "Case-study" technology is considered in the article. The article is devoted to the methodology of case study, and especially its implementation in Kazan Federal University, the Institute of Philology…

  15. Competencies, skills and assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højgaard, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an analysis of the challenge of assessing student learning and how that is affected by using descriptions of competencies as a core element when describing the aims of the learning process. Assessment is modelled as a three step process; characterising, identifying and judging, to a...... the characterisation part of an assessment process. From a teaching and teachers' perspective, the latter is far more important than the former.......This paper is an analysis of the challenge of assessing student learning and how that is affected by using descriptions of competencies as a core element when describing the aims of the learning process. Assessment is modelled as a three step process; characterising, identifying and judging......, to allow for the following argument: Working with competency descriptions is rightly said to make judging more difficult. This potentially lowers the reliability of the assessment. But competency descriptions also carry a great potential of raising the validity of the assessment by focusing...

  16. Competence Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edquist, Charles

    on the one hand, and the real world of innovation policy-making on the other, typically not speaking to each other. With this purpose in mind, this paper discusses the role of competences and competence-building in the innovation process from a perspective of innovation systems; it examines how governments...

  17. Outsourcing competence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.; Delen, G.; van Vlijmen, B.

    2011-01-01

    The topic of this paper, competences needed for outsourcing, is organized by first providing a generic competence scheme, which is subsequently instantiated to the area of sourcing and outsourcing. Sourcing and outsourcing are positioned as different areas of activity, neither one of which is

  18. Technologically Enhanced Language Learning in Primary Schools in England, France and Spain: Developing Linguistic Competence in a Technologically Enhanced Classroom Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrory, Gee; Chretien, Lucette; Ortega-Martin, Jose Luis

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on an EU-funded project (Ref: 134244-2007-UK-COMENIUS-CMP) that explored the impact of technology, notably video-conferencing, on primary school children's language learning in England, France and Spain. Data were gathered from the children in the project, their teachers and also from trainee teachers placed in the schools. The…

  19. Assessing Performance and Consequence Competence in a Technology-Based Professional Development for Agricultural Science Teachers: An Evaluation of the Lincoln Electric Welding Technology Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saucier, P. Ryan; McKim, Billy R.; Muller, Joe E.; Kingman, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Professional development education for teachers is essential to improving teacher retention, program relevance and effectiveness, and the preparation of fully qualified and highly motivated career and technology educators at all career stages (Doerfert, 2011; Lambeth, Elliot, & Joerger, 2008). Furthermore, it is necessary to link industry…

  20. Timespacing competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Helle Pia; Mogensen, Naja Dahlstrup

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on Kramsch’s (2009) conceptualization of the multilingual subject and the symbolic self, in this paper, we explore how multilingual children re-signify three intertwined myths about the bilingual student, linguistic diversity and language competence, when, in the researcher......-generated activity My linguistic world 2014, they are invited to map and talk about their lived experiences as multiple language users seen in the light of place and movement. By demythifying themselves and their linguistic worlds, the children also raise important questions about the notion of linguistic competence....... By perceiving competences from a subjective child perspective, we learn how children do what we call timespacing competence. On that basis, we suggest paying attention to how children themselves timespace competence by focusing (more consistently) on the subjective, social, spatial and temporal dimensions...

  1. Competence Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edquist, Charles

    The main question that guides this paper is how governments are focusing (and must focus) on competence building (education and training) when designing and implementing innovation policies. With this approach, the paper aims at filling the gap between the existing literature on competences...... on the one hand, and the real world of innovation policy-making on the other, typically not speaking to each other. With this purpose in mind, this paper discusses the role of competences and competence-building in the innovation process from a perspective of innovation systems; it examines how governments...... and public agencies in different countries and different times have actually approached the issue of building, maintaining and using competences in their innovation systems; it examines what are the critical and most important issues at stake from the point of view of innovation policy, looking particularly...

  2. Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes. In P. Diaz, Kinshuk, I. Aedo & E. Mora (Eds.), Proceedings of the 8th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2008), pp. 288-292. July,

  3. Defining Tobacco Regulatory Science Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfli, Heather L; Berman, Micah; Hanson, Kacey; Kelder, Steven; Solis, Amy; Villanti, Andrea C; Ribeiro, Carla M P; Meissner, Helen I; Anderson, Roger

    2017-02-01

    In 2013, the National Institutes of Health and the Food and Drug Administration funded a network of 14 Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science (TCORS) with a mission that included research and training. A cross-TCORS Panel was established to define tobacco regulatory science (TRS) competencies to help harmonize and guide their emerging educational programs. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Panel's work to develop core TRS domains and competencies. The Panel developed the list of domains and competencies using a semistructured Delphi method divided into four phases occurring between November 2013 and August 2015. The final proposed list included a total of 51 competencies across six core domains and 28 competencies across five specialized domains. There is a need for continued discussion to establish the utility of the proposed set of competencies for emerging TRS curricula and to identify the best strategies for incorporating these competencies into TRS training programs. Given the field's broad multidisciplinary nature, further experience is needed to refine the core domains that should be covered in TRS training programs versus knowledge obtained in more specialized programs. Regulatory science to inform the regulation of tobacco products is an emerging field. The paper provides an initial list of core and specialized domains and competencies to be used in developing curricula for new and emerging training programs aimed at preparing a new cohort of scientists to conduct critical TRS research. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. The MUPPLE competence continuum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, Joanna; Wild, Fridolin; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus; Hofer, Margit

    2009-01-01

    Wild, J., Wild, F., Kalz, M., Specht, M., & Hofer, M. (2009). The MUPPLE competence continuum. In F. Wild, M. Kalz, M. Palmér & D. Müller (Eds.), Proceedings of 2nd Workshop Mash-Up Personal Learning Envrionments (MUPPLE'09). Workshop in conjunction with 4th European Conference on Technology

  5. Collaborative models for the joint production of core health technology assessments: negative and positive aspects for the joint work of different European agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Scalzo, Alessandra; Vicari, Nicola; Corio, Mirella; Perrini, Maria Rosaria; Jefferson, Tom; Gillespie, Francesca; Cerbo, Marina

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of the European network for Health Technology Assessment (EUnetHTA) is to make HTA agencies collaborate sharing methods and tools thus avoiding duplication of evaluative efforts and allowing resource savings. From 2010 to 2012, the activities of the network were carried out through EUnetHTA Joint Action 1 and Work Package 4 Strand B aimed at producing two Core HTAs with two main objectives: to test the Web based Core model and the collaborative working models. Our objective in this article is to give an historical record of the Work Package activities highlighting what worked and what did not in the collaboration of researchers' groups coming from different agencies. A retrospective description of all the steps for the joint production of the two Core HTAs is provided starting from the first step of selecting technologies of common interest. Primary researchers' views on the whole process have been collected through a semi-structured telephonic interview supported by a questionnaire. Coordinators views were gathered during internal meetings and validated. Majority of respondents thought topic selection procedure was not clear and well managed. About collaborative models, small groups were seen to enable more exchange, whatever the model. According to coordinators, loss of expertise and experience during the production process, different languages, and novelty of the Online Tool were main barriers. Lessons learned from this first experience in Joint Action 1 paved the path for the collaboration in Joint Action 2, as it allowed enhancements and changes in models of collaborations and coordination.

  6. Literacy, Numeracy, and Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments among U.S. Adults: Results from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies 2012. Appendix D: Standard Error Tables. First Look. NCES 2014-008

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Education Statistics, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides Appendix D, Standard Error tables, for the full report, entitled. "Literacy, Numeracy, and Problem Solving in Technology-Rich Environments among U.S. Adults: Results from the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies 2012. First Look. NCES 2014-008." The full report presents results of the Program…

  7. The TENCompetence Personal Competence Manager

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kew, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The European Network for Lifelong Competence Development is an Integrated Project funded by the EU. Its goal is to establish an innovative technical and organizational infrastructure using open-source, standards-based technology to support lifelong competence development. In this paper

  8. Acquiring Sediment and Element Compositional Changes Based on a Diffuse Reflectance Spectrophotometry Technology from Cores Offshore Southwestern Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, H. J.; Chen, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Heavy summer monsoon rainfall along with typhoon-induced extreme precipitation cause frequent geological hazards that often threaten the human's safety and property in Taiwan. These geological hazards can be triggered by both natural factors, and/or have become deteriorated by perturbations from more and more human activities ever since few thousand years ago. However, due to the limit of instrumental records for observing long-term environmental changes in Taiwan, few evidence exist for distinguishing the human-induced impacts from natural climate change. Here we report a study on a high quality marine sediment core (MD103264) which were retrieved from the high sedimentation rate area from offshore southwestern Taiwan and present evidence for the long-term climate and possibly human-induced environmental changes since the last glacial. We are using the VIS-NIR Diffuse Reflectance Spectrophotometry (DRS) methods to study the cores. Interpreting the VIS-NIR reflectance spectra through the VARIMAX-rotation, principle component analysis (VPCA) helps conducting rapid and inexpensive measurements for acquiring high-resolution biogenic component, clay, and iron oxide mineral compositional data from the cores. We are also using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis, which is also useful in determining the element compositional changes in the core. Our studies aim toward understanding the sediment and element compositional changes that reflect the patterns of changes in precipitation and soil erosion on land since the last glacial to the Holocene, during which the human activities (deforestation, agriculture, and land uses change) may have increased drastically. We will report and interpret the preliminary results of the optical analyses of the core.

  9. Rochester Focuses: A Community's Core Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, Andrea

    1991-01-01

    Rochester, New York, is globally competitive in optics manufacturing because of cooperative, strategic use of community resources: (1) collaboration of the University of Rochester and industry in the Center for Optics Manufacturing; (2) business cooperation in reform of the schools system; and (3) emphasis on total quality. (SK)

  10. The innovation of composite core dual coil coronary guide-wire technology: A didactic coronary chronic total occlusion revascularization case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasello, Salvatore Davide; Giudice, Pietro; Attisano, Tiziana; Boukhris, Marouane; Galassi, Alfredo R

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of coronary chronic total occlusions (CTO) continues to solicit technical innovations. As success primarily depends on crossing the lesion with a wire, all aspects regarding tip shape retention, torque precision, and penetration ability of the guide-wire have greatly influenced new techniques and strategies. The world of interventional cardiology has to look carefully at these developments, and to use them accordingly to improve the success rate in ordinary percutaneous coronary interventions. We present a didactical case report of a CTO revascularization treated with a new 'dual core' technology guide-wire.

  11. USING THE EDUCATIONAL WEB SITE «MULTIMEDIA TECHNOLOGIES IN MUSIC EDUCATION» IN FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE MUSIC TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmyla H. Havrilova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the actual problems of the modern higher education. They are updating of the training aids and the creation of a single informational educational space. The author defines the notions of «educational web resources», «educational site». She also differentiates sites for their use in the various fields of education. There also have been analyzed the structure and the content of the personal website «Multimedia technology in music education», which the author uses as educational. Methodical approaches to the use of the website in the course of studying music-historical disciplines in pedagogical high school have been analyzed too («History of Musical Art», «History of Ukrainian music», etc.. There has been given the examples of the some methodological techniques about the using of teaching materials of the site in the process of the formation the professional competence of future teachers of music. The offered examples of tasks for student’s independent work have been tested in the process of teaching these courses.

  12. Mediational Competencies for Online Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Chan Núñez

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Addressed in the article is a position taken within and in favor of education and virtuality, considering the importance of training constructors of the digital environment. The competencies needed by actors of educational processes, the same which are necessary for their construction, are conceptualized as mediational. Because these are not usually the competencies most visibly when teachers and students are trained for online education, we found it of interest to present part of a research project on this type of competencies. The work starts out from an axiological position on virtual education, the recognition of the way the technologies model educational interactions on line. It follows with the notion of mediation and meditational competency, and comes to a design model that would consider these competencies in the development of learning environments. The article closes with reflections about the interdisciplinary integration necessary for a technological and educational development based on a communicative paradigm.

  13. Digital immigrants teaching digital natives: A phenomenological study of higher education faculty perspectives on technology integration with English core content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Robert C.

    In the last two decades, technology use has escalated and educators grapple with its advances and integration into the classroom. Issues surrounding what constitutes a literate society, the clarion calls for educational reform emanating from US presidents to parent teacher organizations, and educators' ability to cope with advances in technology in the classroom demand attention. Therefore, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and understand the professional and educational experiences of six English faculty members teaching undergraduate courses at Midwest universities. Using the framework of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge -- TPACK (Koehler and Mishra 2008), the major focus of the study was to determine how faculty members understood what characterized the nature of teaching with technology in undergraduate classrooms. Results of this study revealed five themes showing how the participants were introduced to technology, how they assimilated it into their pedagogy, and how they integrated it into teaching practice. This study has the potential to impact the nature of illustrating the methods and techniques used by the six participants as they merge technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge and set in motion classroom practices that assist faculty at all levels to develop and teach technology skills necessary for the 21st century and to better prepare students for thinking critically about how to use digital advances.

  14. Acquiring New Competencies Through Continuing Library ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , specify core competencies to be acquired by all practicing librarians, that the Nigerian Library Association must take the issue of library continuing education seriously to enable librarians to retain their jobs and global job mobility and that ...

  15. Influence of Educational Technology Centres on Students' Skill Acquisition for Self Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, P. I.

    2016-01-01

    Educational technology is a core course of study in Nigerian teacher education institutions, such as Colleges of Education, Institutes of Education and Facilities of Education. The aim of educational technology is to improve the competence of teachers by producing teachers that can back theory with practice in teaching-learning situation. The…

  16. Teacher Education Program Learning Technologies and Knowledge (Tac at the Pedagogical University Experimental Libertador Core Barinas (Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Antonio Martínez Molina

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to propose a teacher training program of Learning Technologies and Knowledge (TAC at the Pedagogic University Libertador Barinas centre (Venezuela. This work is framed as a feasible project, supported by a descriptive field research. It was determined that teacher training programs Learning Technologies and Communication require an organizational structure, which should be under the figure of a coordination that is responsible for organizing everything related to the development of these projects.

  17. Cultural competency training in psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, A; Collazos, F; Ramos, M; Casas, M

    2008-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that the quality of care provided to immigrant and ethnic minority patients is not at the same level as that provided to majority group patients. Although the European Board of Medical Specialists recognizes awareness of cultural issues as a core component of the psychiatry specialization, few medical schools provide training in cultural issues. Cultural competence represents a comprehensive response to the mental health care needs of immigrant and ethnic minority patients. Cultural competence training involves the development of knowledge, skills, and attitudes that can improve the effectiveness of psychiatric treatment. Cognitive cultural competence involves awareness of the various ways in which culture, immigration status, and race impact psychosocial development, psychopathology, and therapeutic transactions. Technical cultural competence involves the application of cognitive cultural competence, and requires proficiency in intercultural communication, the capacity to develop a therapeutic relationship with a culturally different patient, and the ability to adapt diagnosis and treatment in response to cultural difference. Perhaps the greatest challenge in cultural competence training involves the development of attitudinal competence inasmuch as it requires exploration of cultural and racial preconceptions. Although research is in its infancy, there are increasing indications that cultural competence can improve key aspects of the psychiatric treatment of immigrant and minority group patients.

  18. Stability of canola oil encapsulated by co-extrusion technology: effect of quercetin addition to alginate shell or oil core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Wang, Wei; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the co-extrusion encapsulation of canola oil by alginate, with an antioxidant (quercetin) incorporated either in the oil core or alginate shell. Optical and environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed spherical beads of diameter ∼350μm and wall thickness ∼65μm. Bead appearance, size, wall thickness and surface characteristics did not change appreciably after treatments at pH 3 for 2h, pH 6.5 for 2h or pH 6.5 for 1min then pH 3 for 2h, although the amounts of phenolics released from beads differed depending on the conditions. The quercetin addition approach strongly influenced the stability of canola oil during storage at 20 and 38°C. Quercetin in the core more effectively suppressed oil deterioration. Quercetin in shell caused a higher phenolic content after storage. FTIR and HPLC analyses were used to track changes in the chemical composition of the encapsulated oil beads during storage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Development of Stacked Core Technology for the Fabrication of Deep Lightweight UV-quality Space Mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kirk, Charles S.; Maffett, Steven P.; Abplanalp, Calvin E.; Stahl, H. Philip; Effinger, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The Decadal Survey stated that an advanced large-aperture ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared (UVOIR) telescope is required to enable the next generation of compelling astrophysics and exoplanet science; and, that present technology is not mature enough to affordably build and launch any potential UVOIR mission concept. Under Science and Technology funding, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Exelis have developed a more cost effective process to make up to 4m monolithic spaceflight UV quality, low areal density, thermally and dynamically stable primary mirrors. A proof of concept mirror was completed at Exelis and tested down to 250K at MSFC which would allow imaging out to 2.5 microns. The parameters and test results of this concept mirror will be shown. The scale-up process will be discussed and the technology development path to a 4m mirror system by 2018 will also be outlined.

  20. Technology and Curriculum Standards: How Well Do Internet-Based Learning Games Support Common Core Standards for Mathematics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Teri; Ray, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to keep up with the new generation of digital learners, educators are integrating multiple forms of technology into their teaching, including online learning game applications. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree to which internet-based learning game applications selected by preservice teachers were aligned with the…

  1. FIRST robots compete

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    FIRST teams and their robots work to go through the right motions at the FIRST competition. Students from all over the country are at the KSC Visitor Complex for the FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) Southeast Regional competition March 9-11 in the Rocket Garden. Teams of high school students are testing the limits of their imagination using robots they have designed, with the support of business and engineering professionals and corporate sponsors, to compete in a technological battle against other schools' robots. Of the 30 high school teams competing, 16 are Florida teams co-sponsored by NASA and KSC contractors. Local high schools participating are Astronaut, Bayside, Cocoa Beach, Eau Gallie, Melbourne, Melbourne Central Catholic, Palm Bay, Rockledge, Satellite, and Titusville.

  2. Development and validation of health service management competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhanming; Howard, Peter F; Leggat, Sandra; Bartram, Timothy

    2018-04-09

    Purpose The importance of managerial competencies in monitoring and improving the performance of organisational leaders and managers is well accepted. Different processes have been used to identify and develop competency frameworks or models for healthcare managers around the world to meet different contextual needs. The purpose of the paper is to introduce a validated process in management competency identification and development applied in Australia - a process leading to a management competency framework with associated behavioural items that can be used to measure core management competencies of health service managers. Design/methodology/approach The management competency framework development study incorporated both qualitative and quantitative methods, implemented in four stages, including job description analysis, focus group discussions and online surveys. Findings The study confirmed that the four-stage process could identify management competencies and the framework developed is considered reliable and valid for developing a management competency assessment tool that can measure management competence amongst managers in health organisations. In addition, supervisors of health service managers could use the framework to distinguish perceived superior and average performers among managers in health organisations. Practical implications Developing the core competencies of health service managers is important for management performance improvement and talent management. The six core management competencies identified can be used to guide the design professional development activities for health service managers. Originality/value The validated management competency identification and development process can be applied in other countries and different industrial contexts to identify core management competency requirements.

  3. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  4. Assessing a Methodological Proposal for the Design, Creation and Evaluation of Learning Objects Oriented to Educators with Diverse Educational and Technological Competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge J. Maldonado

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a methodological proposal for the design, creation and evaluation of Learning Objects (LOs. This study arises from the compilation and analysis of several LO design methodologies currently used in Ibero-America. This proposal, which has been named DICREVOA, defines five different phases: analysis, design (instructional and multimedia, implementation (LO and metadata, evaluation (from the perspective of both the producer and the consumer of the LO, and publishing. The methodology focuses not only on the teaching inexperienced, but also on those having a basic understanding of the technological and educational aspects related to LO design; therefore, the study emphasizes LO design activities centered around the Kolb cycle and the use of the ExeLearning tool in order to implement the LO core. Additionally, DICREVOA was used in a case study, which demonstrates how it provides a feasible mechanism for LO design and implementation withindifferent contexts. Finally, DICREVOA, the case study to which it was applied, and the results obtained are presented.

  5. Incorporation of medical informatics and information technology as core components of undergraduate medical education - time for change!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Anthony; Kushniruk, Andre

    2009-01-01

    It is generally accepted that Information Technology (IT) is a highly desirable and a very necessary ingredient of modern health care. Review of available literature reveals a paucity of medical informatics and information technology courses in undergraduate medical curricula and a lack of research to assess the effectiveness of medical informatics in undergraduate medical education. The need for such initiatives is discussed and a pilot project is described that evaluated the effectiveness of education in the use of Electronic Medical Record (EMR) applications. Educational activities, for example, could be medical students conducting virtual medical encounters or interacting with EMR applications. An EMR application, which was used in several related projects, has been adapted to the educational environment: standardized patient records can be created and cloned so that individual students can interact with a "standard" patient and alter the patient's data.

  6. Optoelectronics-related competence building in Japanese and Western firms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kumiko

    1992-05-01

    In this paper, an analysis is made of how different firms in Japan and the West have developed competence related to optoelectronics on the basis of their previous experience and corporate strategies. The sample consists of a set of seven Japanese and four Western firms in the industrial, consumer electronics and materials sectors. Optoelectronics is divided into subfields including optical communications systems, optical fibers, optoelectronic key components, liquid crystal displays, optical disks, and others. The relative strengths and weaknesses of companies in the various subfields are determined using the INSPEC database, from 1976 to 1989. Parallel data are analyzed using OTAF U.S. patent statistics and the two sets of data are compared. The statistical analysis from the database is summarized for firms in each subfield in the form of an intra-firm technology index (IFTI), a new technique introduced to assess the revealed technology advantage of firms. The quantitative evaluation is complemented by results from intensive interviews with the management and scientists of the firms involved. The findings show that there is a marked variation in the way firms' technological trajectories have evolved giving rise to strength in some and weakness in other subfields for the different companies, which are related to their accumulated core competencies, previous core business activities, organizational, marketing, and competitive factors.

  7. Towards a synergic innovation management model: the interplay of market, technology, and management innovations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Tchuta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines a model of firm innovation management known as the synergic innovation management model. Building on the theory of dynamic capabilities and core competence, the paper suggest three capabilities of firms namely market, technology, management capabilities that drive firms’ innovations. The combination of these three capabilities creates a unique configuration for a firm known as the firm’s core competence that informs the firm's strategic decisions. The synergic innovation management model guides firm in the simultaneous exploration of market, technology, and management innovations required for sustainable business. The paper concludes with limitations of the model and suggestions for further research.

  8. Evaluating the Intellectual Capital of Technology Transfer and Learning Public Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Grimaldi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the rise of the knowledge‐based economy, many worldwide companies have begun to deal with different frameworks to manage and evaluate the performance of intellectual capital, especially in the area of knowledge management services. This paper presents a novel conceptual model aiming to support management in evaluating and prioritizing their intellectual capital competitive core competences. Based on the analytic hierarchy process, the model analyses interdependences among intellectual capital elements and determines the impacts of core competences on organizational performance. To validate the model, it is empirically applied in the Technology Transfer Unit of the Italian national agency for new technologies, energy and economic development.

  9. Intercultural competence

    OpenAIRE

    Barrett, MD

    2011-01-01

    Intercultural competence is the set of attitudes, skills, knowledge and behaviours which are required for appropriate and effective interaction and communication with people who are perceived to be from a different cultural background from oneself. The term ‘appropriate’ means that the interactions do not violate the cultural rules and norms which are valued by one’s interlocutors, while the term ‘effective’ means that one is able to achieve one’s objectives in the interactions. Intercultural...

  10. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION AND INFORMATIC COMPETENCES AS KOMPONENTS OF THE SYSTEM OF PROFESSIONAL-SPECIALIZED COMPETENCES OF INFORMATICS TEACHER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg M. Spirin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the article on the basis of analysis of such concepts as information, informative and informatics processes, system and technology, and competences, the definitions of "information and communication competence" and "informatics competence " are specified. It is determined the structure and place of such competences in the system of professional- specialized competence of informatics teacher. New determination of concept "information and communication technologies" is offered.

  11. [Competence based medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabó, Jorge G; Buraschi, Jorge; Olcese, Juan; Buraschi, María; Duro, Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    The strategy of curriculum planning in the majority of the Schools of Medicine has shifted, in the past years, from curriculum models based in contents to outcome oriented curricula. Coincidently the interest in defining and evaluating the clinical competences that a graduate must have has grown. In our country, and particularly in the Associated Hospitals belonging to the Unidad Regional de Enseñanza IV of the UBA School of Medicine, evidence has been gathered showing that the acquisition of clinical competences during the grade is in general insufficient. The foundations and characteristics of PREM (Programa de Requisitos Esenciales Mínimos) are described. PREM is a tool to promote the apprenticeship of abilities and necessary skills for the practice of medicine. The objective of the program is to promote the apprenticeship of a well defined list of core competences considered indispensable for a general practitioner. An outcome oriented curriculum with a clear definition of the expected knowledge, skills and attitudes of a graduate of the programme, the promotion of learning experiences centered in the practice and evaluation tools based in direct observation of the student's performance should contribute to close the gap between what the Medicine Schools traditionally teach and evaluate, and what the doctor needs to know and needs to do to perform correctly its profession.

  12. The Use of Technology in Teaching and Learning of Mathematics in the Experimental University of the Armed Forces, Core Sucre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odiber Zudegsa Olivier-Rodríguez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of updating and training of teachers in the use of information technology and communications (ICT as a teaching and learning of mathematics, have limited its methodological work, causing poor performance in the integral learning students and ability to solve practical problems they face in society. That is why this paper aims to consider the more specific contradictions that occur in the teaching and learning of mathematics based on the use of ICT. In this context, it is concluded that recognizes the mathematical task computerized (TMI as a means to contribute to the improvement of student learning, taking into account the contradiction occurs between the comprehensive nature of the student's education to society and the diverse nature of the ownership of the contents taught in the course.

  13. Competencies - a roadmap for CERN Staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Back in November, the new CERN Competency Model (CCM), a framework defining the competencies that “ drive performance and lead to excellence”, was introduced by Anne-Sylvie Catherin, Head of the Human Resources (HR) Department, in a special edition of the "Spotlight on CERN" interviews.   What are competencies? Competencies are the characteristics that allow you to do the job you have been assigned. In more precise terms, competencies may be described as the knowledge, skills and types of behaviour that individuals demonstrate in carrying out a given task. Listing all the competencies that make CERN work is an impossible task but one can identify the two main types: technical and behavioural. Both are needed to work effectively in this Organization. While technical competencies are simply the domains of expertise that CERN needs – examples include physics, mechanical engineering and information technology – behavioural competencies are th...

  14. Digital Competence: general problems and experimental practices concerning highschools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Gris

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current social context Information and Communication Technologies (ICT are more and more present and pervasive and the European institutions enter the Digital Competence in the Key Competences for Lifelong Learning. In this focus we are deepened the general problems of Digital Competence and competence-based education and to describe experimental practices concerning highschools.

  15. Accelerator-driven subcritical fission in molten salt core: Closing the nuclear fuel cycle for green nuclear energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Peter; Assadi, Saeed; Badgley, Karie; Baker, William; Comeaux, Justin; Gerity, James; Kellams, Joshua; McInturff, Al; Pogue, Nathaniel; Phongikaroon, Supathorn; Sattarov, Akhdiyor; Simpson, Michael; Sooby, Elizabeth; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2013-04-01

    A technology for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS) is being developed as a basis for the destruction of the transuranics in used nuclear fuel. The molten salt fuel is a eutectic mixture of NaCl and the chlorides of the transuranics and fission products. The core is driven by proton beams from a strong-focusing cyclotron stack. This approach uniquely provides an intrinsically safe means to drive a core fueled only with transuranics, thereby eliminating competing breeding terms.

  16. Fast data reconstructed method of Fourier transform imaging spectrometer based on multi-core CPU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunchao; Du, Debiao; Xia, Zongze; Song, Li; Zheng, Weijian; Yan, Min; Lei, Zhenggang

    2017-10-01

    Imaging spectrometer can gain two-dimensional space image and one-dimensional spectrum at the same time, which shows high utility in color and spectral measurements, the true color image synthesis, military reconnaissance and so on. In order to realize the fast reconstructed processing of the Fourier transform imaging spectrometer data, the paper designed the optimization reconstructed algorithm with OpenMP parallel calculating technology, which was further used for the optimization process for the HyperSpectral Imager of `HJ-1' Chinese satellite. The results show that the method based on multi-core parallel computing technology can control the multi-core CPU hardware resources competently and significantly enhance the calculation of the spectrum reconstruction processing efficiency. If the technology is applied to more cores workstation in parallel computing, it will be possible to complete Fourier transform imaging spectrometer real-time data processing with a single computer.

  17. La formación de equipos directivos e-competentes y el fomento de las nuevas tecnologías en la universidad Training e-competent managerial teams and fostering the use of new technology at the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orosmán Vladimir Estevez Arias

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The research aims at assessing a strategy devised to enhance "e-competent" team managers’ training for introducing virtual learning environments techniques into the process of professional education at the faculties of Sports and Agricultural Sciences at the University of Camagüey. The use of empirical methods reveals managers and professors’ viewpoints on ICT-supported learning strategies, together with a study of the state of the art. The devised strategy includes three stage and five areas (technological, pedagogical, organizational, teacher developmental and student developmental. The strategy yields positive outcomes at the Faculty of Sport but fails at the other faculty. This paper describes such outcomes in each faculty. The study confirms that the successful outcomes of ICT-supported learning are directly related to team managers’ pedagogical, organizational, and technological competence. Likewise, the university staff pedagogical, technological, and organizational shortcomings in integrating ICT into the substantive process might significantly be reduced by developing managers’ pedagogical, organizational and technological leadership. Keywords: ICT, ,, ,

  18. The assessment of medical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda-Demeulemeester, E; Ramis-Palmer, C; Sesé-Abad, A

    2017-12-01

    To describe the most widely used tools in the assessment of medical competencies, analyse their prevalence of use, their advantages and disadvantages and propose an appropriate model for our context. We conducted a narrative review of articles from MEDLINE, following the PRISM protocol, and analysed a total of 62 articles. The assessment of competencies is heterogeneous, especially in the educational and professional settings. The specific and technical competencies acquired during university education are mainly assessed using the objective structured clinical assessment. In the professional setting, core competencies are assessed using the 360° technique. We need a rigorous empiric comparison of the efficiency of the tools according to the type of competency. We propose a competency management model for the «undergraduate/graduate/active professional» continuum, whose goal is to improve training and professional practice and thereby increase the quality of patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. Modern educational information technologies in formation of communicative competency in a foreign language in the process of training postgraduates at the aerospace university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyeva, M. V.; Shumakova, N. A.

    2016-04-01

    The research analyses the issues of competency-based approach implementation in connection with practical experience gained in SibSAU in teaching English for scientific purposes to postgraduate students. The article focuses on IT application for the objectives of both class room and independent work of post graduates organization.

  20. Linking Project-Based Interdisciplinary Learning and Recommended Professional Competencies with Business Management, Digital Media, Distance Learning, Engineering Technology, and English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Melinda; Fulwider, Miles; Stemkoski, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper encourages the investigation of real world problems by students and faculty and links recommended student competencies with project based learning. In addition to the traditional course objectives, project-based learning (PBL) uses real world problems for classroom instruction and fieldwork to connect students, instructors, and industry…

  1. The Use of Online Technology to Facilitate Pre-Service Teachers' Engagement and Cultural Competency Development during an International Field Placement: Reflections from Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boury, Tiffany T.; Hineman, John M.; Klentzin, Jacqueline Courtney; Semich, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Student teaching abroad is becoming increasingly popular in many colleges and universities in the United States. This experience can be highly rewarding in terms of developing pre-service teachers' culture competency, yet can pose challenges for faculty monitoring such placements. Stewart and Kagan (2005) suggest a framework for teacher…

  2. An Ontology-centered Approach for Designing an Interactive Competence Management System for IT Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan TRAUSAN-MATU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a generic framework for an intelligent information system of competence management based on ontologies for information technology companies. In a first step it will be applied in an information technology (IT small enterprise and then its applicability will be verified for other organizations of the same type. The work presented in the paper is performed under the project "CONTO – Ontology-based Competencies Management in Information Technology" funded by the Romanian Ministry of Education and Research, involving two universities, a research institute and an IT private company. A competence management system (CMS, in our vision has to achieve three functions: (a to support the complete and systematic acquisition of knowledge about the competence of the members of an enterprise; (b to provide the knowledge about competences and their owners; (c to apply the available knowledge to serve a purpose. The core of the competence management information system is an ontology that plays the role of the declarative knowledge repository containing the basic concepts (such as: company-job, competence, domain, group, person etc. and their relationships with other concepts, instances and properties. The Protégé environment was used for the development of this ontology. The structure of the ontology is conceived so that description logics can be used to represent the concept definitions of the application domain in a structured and formally well-understood way. Knowledge acquisition is performed in our approach by enriching the ontology, according to the requirements of the IT company. An advantage of using an ontology-based system is the possibility of the identification of new relations among concepts based on inferences starting from the existing knowledge. The user can choose to query instances of one type of concept. The paper also presents some use-cases.

  3. The America COMPETES Act and the FY2009 Budget

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stine, Deborah D

    2008-01-01

    The America COMPETES Act (P.L. 110-69) responds to concerns that the United States may not be able to compete economically with other nations in the future due to insufficient investment today in science and technology research...

  4. Competências essenciais como fator determinante de competitividade em ambientes hipercompetitivos: um estudo do setor de telefonia celular de Minas Gerais Competencias esenciales como elemento determinante de la competitividad en ambientes hiper-competitivos: un estudio en el sector de telefonía móvil de Minas Gerais Core competencies as a determinant in highly competitive environments: the mobile telephone sector in Minas Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane de Almeida Ribeiro

    2009-03-01

    ón consigue implementar. En contextos hipercompetitivos, existen evidencias de que un liderazgo efectivo estratégico por medio de las CE vuelve las empresas más dinámicas y capaces de obtener un desempeño más elevado (BARNEY; MUHANNA, 2004; PENG, 2008. El artículo describe los resultados de una investigación en empresas del sector de telefonía móvil del estado de Minas Gerais, realizando un estudio de los procesos de formulación y gestión de Competencias Esenciales como elementos determinantes de la competencia y de la obtención del liderazgo en ese sector. Se ha adoptado el método de análisis de casos múltiplos y han sido realizadas encuestas semiestructuradas con los gerentes de las empresas. Ha sido posible constatar que las CE son blancos de grande atención y preocupación del cuadro directivo de las organizaciones, aunque no existan metodologías formales que promuevan su desarrollo.In competitive environments it is essential that companies continuously innovate resources, capabilities and skills to quickly face demands from external sources. Some authors such as Hitt, Ireland and Hoskinsson, 200 and Hamel e Prahalad, 1995, state that core competencies promote competitive advantages and above average returns that persist until competition imitates or surpasses them. Others, Barney and Muhanna, 2004 and Peng, 2008, understand them as a set of capabilities that are valuable, rare, difficult to imitate and ones that the organization succeeds in implementing. In highly competitive environments there is evidence that effective strategic leadership by means of core competencies makes companies more agile and capable of superior performance (BARNEY; MUHANNA, 2004; PENG, 2008. This article describes the results of a survey of companies of the mobile telephone sector in Minas Gerais that investigated processes for formulation and management of core competencies as determinants in sector competition and achievement of leadership. A multi-case study was made with

  5. Development of the prediction technology of cable disconnection of in-core neutron detector for the future high-temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazaki, Yosuke; Sawahata, Hiroaki; Kawamoto, Taiki; Suzuki, Hisashi; Shinohara, Masanori; Honda, Yuki; Katsuyama, Kozo; Takada, Shoji; Sawa, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance technologies for the reactor system have been developed by using the high-temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR). One of the important purposes of development is to accumulate the experiences and data to satisfy the availability of operation up to 90% by shortening the duration of the periodical maintenance for the future HTGRs by shifting from the time-based maintenance to condition-based maintenance. The technical issue of the maintenance of in-core neutron detector, wide range monitor (WRM), is to predict the malfunction caused by cable disconnection to plan the replacement schedule. This is because that it is difficult to observe directly inside of the WRM in detail. The electrical inspection method was proposed to detect and predict the cable disconnection of the WRM by remote monitoring from outside of the reactor by using the time domain reflectometry and so on. The disconnection position, which was specified by the electrical method, was identified by non-destructive and destructive inspection. The accumulated data is expected to be contributed for advanced maintenance of future HTGRs. (author)

  6. The Myth about Student Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, Diana G.; Hawkins, Brian L.

    2006-01-01

    Students appear to be highly technologically competent yet their information literacy skills are in question. College and university executives should consider how to equip their students with information literacy -- not just IT skills -- for a lifelong ability to evaluate and address information needs since part of a college or university's…

  7. Moral competency: meta-competence of nursing care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafarnia, Niloofar; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Borhani, Fariba; Ebadi, Abbas; Nakhaee, Nouzar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction To follow the progress of technology and increasing domain of nurses’ duties, ethical challenges can be observed more than ever. Therefore, the growing and dynamic system of nursing requires nurses with professional and ethical competence who can provide optimal care. The aim of the present study was to define and explain dimensions of moral competency among the clinical nurses of Iran. Methods This qualitative content analysis study was carried out in the years 2014 and 2015 in Iran. Data were collected through in-depth semistructured interviews and field notes. The resulting data were analyzed by Graneheim and Lundman’s method of conventional content analysis. The participants were 12 clinical nurses who were selected using purposive convenient sampling and continued interviews until data saturation. Results Themes obtained in the present study were posited in three main categories of “moral character,” with subcategories of altruism, search for meaning, be pioneering, perfectionism, self-control, honesty, and forgiveness; “moral care” with subcategories of dignified care, safe care, fair care, and holistic care; and “moral decision-making” with subcategories of moral sensitivity, moral thinking, moral reasoning, and moral courage. Conclusions Findings of the present study suggest that nurses’ moral competency is an adorable character with a wide range that includes moral virtues and character, moral decision-making, and ultimately providing moral care; therefore, moral competency is a meta-competence in the field of nursing. Because there are many competencies in different fields. PMID:28848630

  8. Competing on talent analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Thomas H; Harris, Jeanne; Shapiro, Jeremy

    2010-10-01

    Do investments in your employees actually affect workforce performance? Who are your top performers? How can you empower and motivate other employees to excel? Leading-edge companies such as Google, Best Buy, Procter & Gamble, and Sysco use sophisticated data-collection technology and analysis to answer these questions, leveraging a range of analytics to improve the way they attract and retain talent, connect their employee data to business performance, differentiate themselves from competitors, and more. The authors present the six key ways in which companies track, analyze, and use data about their people-ranging from a simple baseline of metrics to monitor the organization's overall health to custom modeling for predicting future head count depending on various "what if" scenarios. They go on to show that companies competing on talent analytics manage data and technology at an enterprise level, support what analytical leaders do, choose realistic targets for analysis, and hire analysts with strong interpersonal skills as well as broad expertise.

  9. Improving Representational Competence with Concrete Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieff, Mike; Scopelitis, Stephanie; Lira, Matthew E.; DeSutter, Dane

    2016-01-01

    Representational competence is a primary contributor to student learning in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines and an optimal target for instruction at all educational levels. We describe the design and implementation of a learning activity that uses concrete models to improve students' representational competence and…

  10. Enhancing cultural competence in medical education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Janne; Norredam, Marie; Dogra, Nisha

    2017-01-01

    the project Culturally Competent in Medical Education involving 13 partners from 11 countries.4 The project aimed to support the implementation of CC in medical curricula. First, a Delphi Study involving 34 experts was conducted to develop a framework of core cultural competencies for medical school teachers...... The proposed guidelines were presented in September 2015 in Amsterdam at a workshop entitled: “How to integrate cultural competence in medical education”. A range of participants attended the workshop, including the project partners, deans and faculty members of Dutch medical schools, physicians, and students...

  11. Gelcasting Alumina Cores for Investment Casting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, M A; Klug, F J

    2001-01-01

    General Electric currently uses silica investment casting cores for making superalloy turbine blades. The silica core technology does not provide the degree of dimensional control needed for advanced turbine system manufacture. The sum of the various process variables in silica core manufacturing produces cores that have more variability than is allowed for in advanced, power-generation gas turbine airfoils.

  12. Cultural competencies for graduate nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lauren; Calvillo, Evelyn; Dela Cruz, Felicitas; Fongwa, Marie; Kools, Susan; Lowe, John; Mastel-Smith, Beth

    2011-01-01

    Nursing is challenged to meet the health needs of ethnic and socioculturally diverse populations. To this end, American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) charged an expert nursing faculty advisory group to formulate competencies for graduate nursing education, expanding them to integrate leadership and scholarship. The Cultural Competency in Baccalaureate Nursing Education served as the springboard for the initiative. In formulating the graduate cultural competencies and the toolkit, the advisory group reviewed all AACN Essentials documents and the cultural competency literature, drew upon their collective experiences with cultural diversity, and used cultural humility as the supporting framework. Six core competencies were formulated and endorsed by the AACN board of directors and key professional nursing organizations. A companion toolkit was compiled to provide resources for the implementation of the competencies. A 1-day conference was held in California to launch the cultural competencies and toolkit. Dissemination to graduate nursing programs is in process, with emphasis on faculty readiness to undertake this graduate educational transformation. The AACN Cultural Competencies for Graduate Nursing Education set national standards to prepare culturally competent nurses at the graduate level who will contribute to the elimination of health disparities through education, clinical practice, research, scholarship, and policy. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  14. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  15. Extension contact and professional competencies needed by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extension contact and professional competencies needed by extension agents in the Central Region of Ghana for effective transfer of fish-processing technologies to small-scale women in fish processing - Provisional Communication.

  16. The Confidence and Competence in Information and Communication Technologies of Practitioners, Parents and Young Children in the Early Years Foundation Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrey, Carol; Dahl, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    A review of evidence on the use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in the early years was commissioned by the British Educational Communications and Technology Agency. Views of practitioners, parents and children were obtained and practitioner ICT audits completed. Most young children grow up in media-rich digital environments in…

  17. Annual meeting on nuclear technology 2011. Documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The program of annual meeting on nuclear technology 2011 included plenary sessions, topical sessions, a workshop and technical sessions. The topical sessions covered the following topics: the final waste disposal, from scientific basis to application; nuclear competence in Germany and Europe; sodium cooled fast reactors; characteristics of a high reliability organization (HRO) considering experience gained from events at nuclear power stations; CFD simulations for safety related tasks. The workshop concerned the issue preserving competence in nuclear technology. The technical sessions covered the following issues: reactor physics and methods of calculations; Thermo- and fluid dynamics; radioactive waste management - storage; fusion technology; safety of nuclear installations - methods, analyses, results; operation of nuclear installations; decommissioning of nuclear installations; education, expert knowledge, know-how transfer; new build and innovations; front end of the fuel cycle, fuel elements and core components, radiation protection; energy industry and economics.

  18. Development of e-Learning Courses for Promoting Student's Global Competency-Basic Courses as a Guide to ESP Education in Advanced Science and Technology-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Mikako; Nakajima, Mikio; Iwai, Chiharu; Ogasawara, Fumie; Kishino, Fumio; Fukui, Kiichi

    Osaka University has been chosen for the FY2005's “Selected Efforts of the Distinctive University Education Support Program (Gendai GP/Good Practice) ”by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) . The aim of this project is to improve English proficiency of undergraduate students with scientific backgrounds. Under this strategic fund, e-Learning course contents were developed for instructing basic, yet practical English for Biotechnology during FY2005. Throughout the project, e-Learning contents will be developed for five other selected subjects of science i.e., 1) biotechnology, 2) information technology, 3) nano-technology, 4) environmental technology and 5) robotics technology, for undergraduate students as guiding courses to ESP education in graduate (higher) level.

  19. Human Spaceflight Technology Needs - A Foundation for JSC's Technology Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecklein, Jonette M.

    2013-01-01

    disciplines. The TechNeeds Database greatly clarifies understanding of the complex relationships of critical technologies to mission and architecture element needs. Extensions to the core TechNeeds Database allow JSC to factor in and appropriately weight JSC Center Core Technology Competencies, and considerations of Commercialization Potential and Partnership Potential. The inherent coupling among these, along with an appropriate importance weighting, has provided an initial prioritization for allocation of technology development research funding for JSC. The HAT Technology Needs Database, with a core of built-in reports, clarifies and communicates complex technology needs for cost effective human space exploration such that an organization seeking to assure that research prioritization supports human spaceflight of the future can be successful.

  20. Optimized Cellular Core for Rotorcraft, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Patz Materials and Technologies has developed, produced and tested, as part of the Phase-I SBIR, a new form of composite cellular core material, named Interply Core,...