WorldWideScience

Sample records for technology core competencies

  1. Science and Technology Text Mining: Mexico Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    government created a Researchers Fellowship ( Sistema Nacional de Investigadores-SNI). In this system, the government recognizes the research...Semantic Networks from Text using Leximancer. HLT-NAACL 2003 Human Language Technology Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics - Companion Volume. ACL, May 2003. Demo23-Demo24. 117

  2. Assessing Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  3. Adult educators' core competences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-01-01

    ” requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students’ prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator’s reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence......Abstract Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators’ required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural...... environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or “core...

  4. What Core Competencies Are Related to Teachers' Innovative Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chang; Wang, Di; Cai, Yonghong; Engels, Nadine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate teachers' core competencies in relation to their innovative teaching performance. Based on the literature and previous studies in this field, four competencies (learning competency, educational competency, social competency and technological competency) are theorised as core competencies for teachers'…

  5. Adult educators' core competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2016-06-01

    Which competences do professional adult educators need? This research note discusses the topic from a comparative perspective, finding that adult educators' required competences are wide-ranging, heterogeneous and complex. They are subject to context in terms of national and cultural environment as well as the kind of adult education concerned (e.g. basic education, work-related education etc.). However, it seems that it is possible to identify certain competence requirements which transcend national, cultural and functional boundaries. This research note summarises these common or "core" requirements, organising them into four thematic subcategories: (1) communicating subject knowledge; (2) taking students' prior learning into account; (3) supporting a learning environment; and (4) the adult educator's reflection on his or her own performance. At the end of his analysis of different competence profiles, the author notes that adult educators' ability to train adult learners in a way which then enables them to apply and use what they have learned in practice (thus performing knowledge transfer) still seems to be overlooked.

  6. Discovering the Army's Core Competencies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rudesheim, Frederick

    2001-01-01

    This paper seeks to answer the question, "Has the Army correctly identified its core competencies to ensure the Army can adequately respond to the national military strategy?" FM 1, The Army (Prototype Draft...

  7. One Health Core Competency Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah Frankson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting ‘One Health’ approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education as they describe the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  8. One Health Core Competency Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankson, Rebekah; Hueston, William; Christian, Kira; Olson, Debra; Lee, Mary; Valeri, Linda; Hyatt, Raymond; Annelli, Joseph; Rubin, Carol

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting "One Health" approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education, as they describe the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  9. Core competencies for nurses using technology as a way to provide healthcare to patients remotely

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwelingen, van C.T.M.; Moerman, A.H.; Kort, H.S.M.; Cate, ten Th.J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: eHealth, the use of IT to enhance patients’ health and well-being, is seen as a possible solution to meet the increasing demand for care1. Unfortunately, several barriers impede the full implementation and potential of this healthcare technology2. The current study focuses on one

  10. Teacher Educator Technology Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, Teresa S.; Graziano, Kevin J.; Schmidt-Crawford, Denise A.; Slykhuis, David A.

    2017-01-01

    The U.S. National Educational Technology Plan recommends the need to have a common set of technology competencies specifically for teacher educators who prepare teacher candidates to teach with technology (U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Technology, 2017). This study facilitated the co-creation of the Teacher Educator…

  11. Information professionals: core competencies and professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We discuss the concept of core competencies applied to policies for teaching and training information professionals, particularly librarians. Method. Sixty graduates of the Institute were employed as information professionals. These sixty were asked to attribute degrees of importance to specific items associated with knowledge and skills that, within the scope of this research, were considered core competencies for meeting the demands of their jobs. Participants were also asked to cite knowledge they acquired in school and knowledge they use in exercising their profession, the skills that they consider necessary but that they did not gain in school, and the difficulties they encounter in exercising their profession and for which they were not sufficiently well prepared. Analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative data analyses were performed. The data were tabulated using Access and several reports and cross-tabulations were generated. Results. The results suggest a gulf between knowledge and skills acquired in library school and those that are required by the job market. In particular, participants lacked the skills they needed to work with information and communication technologies. Conclusion. The concept of core competencies is increasingly taken into account by the productive sector of the economy. The educational system ought to keep up with this change. The empirical research described shows that there is a need to establish advanced and modern policies for the education of librarians, participants in the market for information professionals.

  12. Future Directions for Research on Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Guerra, Nancy G.

    2008-01-01

    This concluding commentary highlights common themes that emerged across the chapters in this volume. We identify strengths and limitations of the core competencies framework and discuss the importance of context, culture, and development for understanding the role of the core competencies in preventing risk behavior in adolescence. We also outline…

  13. Evaluating Community Health Advisor (CHA) Core Competencies: The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Lachel; To, Yen M

    2016-05-01

    Health care and academic systems are increasingly collaborating with community health advisors (CHAs) to provide culturally relevant health interventions that promote sustained community transformation. Little attention has been placed on CHA training evaluation, including core competency attainment. This study identified common CHA core competencies, generated a theoretically based measure of those competencies, and explored psychometric properties of that measure. A concept synthesis revealed five CHA core competencies (leadership, translation, guidance, advocacy, and caring). The CHA Core Competency Retrospective Pretest/Posttest (CCCRP) resulted from that synthesis, which was administered using multiple approaches to individuals who previously received CHA training (N= 142). Exploratory factor analyses revealed a two-factor structure underlying the posttraining data, and Cronbach's alpha indicated high internal consistency. This study suggested some CHA core competencies might be more interrelated than previously thought, and two major competencies exist rather than five and supported the CCCRP's use to evaluate core competency attainment resulting from training. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Competency Model 101. The Process of Developing Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, Lisa Wright; Hewlett, Peggy O'Neill

    1999-01-01

    The Mississippi Competency Model defines nurses' roles as provider (caregiver, teacher, counselor, advocate), professional (scholar, collaborator, ethicist, researcher), and manager (leader, facilitator, intrapreneur, decision maker, technology user) for four levels of nursing: licensed practical nurse, associate degree, bachelor's degree, and…

  15. Core Competencies for Injury and Violence Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens-Stidham, Shelli; Peek-Asa, Corinne; Bou-Saada, Ingrid; Hunter, Wanda; Lindemer, Kristen; Runyan, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Efforts to reduce the burden of injury and violence require a workforce that is knowledgeable and skilled in prevention. However, there has been no systematic process to ensure that professionals possess the necessary competencies. To address this deficiency, we developed a set of core competencies for public health practitioners in injury and violence prevention programs. The core competencies address domains including public health significance, data, the design and implementation of prevention activities, evaluation, program management, communication, stimulating change, and continuing education. Specific learning objectives establish goals for training in each domain. The competencies assist in efforts to reduce the burden of injury and violence and can provide benchmarks against which to assess progress in professional capacity for injury and violence prevention. PMID:19197083

  16. Competence and governance in strategic collaboration : The differential effect of network structure on the creation of core and non-core technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhaverbeke, W.P.M.; Gilsing, V.A.; Duijsters, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas most of the literature on the benefits of alliances for learning and innovation has taken on a competence perspective, this paper provides an alternative integrated framework based on both a competence and governance point of view. The former focuses on the role of knowledge flows as means

  17. Competence and governance in strategic collaboration : the differential effect of network structure on the creation of core and non-core technology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhaverbeke, W.P.M.; Gilsing, V.A.; Duysters, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Whereas most of the literature on the benefits of alliances for learning and innovation has taken on a competence perspective, this paper provides an alternative integrated framework based on both a competence and governance point of view. The former focuses on the role of knowledge flows as means

  18. The Core Competencies for General Orthopaedic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellam, James F; Archibald, Douglas; Barber, James W; Christian, Eugene P; D'Ascoli, Richard J; Haynes, Richard J; Hecht, Suzanne S; Hurwitz, Shepard R; Kellam, James F; McLaren, Alexander C; Peabody, Terrance D; Southworth, Stephen R; Strauss, Robert W; Wadey, Veronica M R

    2017-01-18

    With the changing delivery of orthopaedic surgical care, there is a need to define the knowledge and competencies that are expected of an orthopaedist providing general and/or acute orthopaedic care. This article provides a proposal for the knowledge and competencies needed for an orthopaedist to practice general and/or acute care orthopaedic surgery. Using the modified Delphi method, the General Orthopaedic Competency Task Force consisting of stakeholders associated with general orthopaedic practice has proposed the core knowledge and competencies that should be maintained by orthopaedists who practice emergency and general orthopaedic surgery. For relevancy to clinical practice, 2 basic sets of competencies were established. The assessment competencies pertain to the general knowledge needed to evaluate, investigate, and determine an overall management plan. The management competencies are generally procedural in nature and are divided into 2 groups. For the Management 1 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to provide definitive care including assessment, investigation, initial or emergency care, operative or nonoperative care, and follow-up. For the Management 2 group, the orthopaedist should be competent to assess, investigate, and commence timely non-emergency or emergency care and then either transfer the patient to the appropriate subspecialist's care or provide definitive care based on the urgency of care, exceptional practice circumstance, or individual's higher training. This may include some higher-level procedures usually performed by a subspecialist, but are consistent with one's practice based on experience, practice environment, and/or specialty interest. These competencies are the first step in defining the practice of general orthopaedic surgery including acute orthopaedic care. Further validation and discussion among educators, general orthopaedic surgeons, and subspecialists will ensure that these are relevant to clinical practice. These

  19. Modeling of Core Competencies in the Registrar's Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikowsky, Reta

    2009-01-01

    The Office of the Registrar at the Georgia Institute of Technology, in cooperation with the Office of Human Resources, has been engaged since February 2008 in a pilot project to model core competencies for the leadership team and the staff. It is the hope of the office of Human resources that this pilot will result in a model that can be used…

  20. Core Competencies for Training Effective School Consultants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhouse, Katie Lynn Sutton

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop and validate a set of core competencies of effective school-based consultants for preservice school psychology consultation training. With recent changes in service delivery models, psychologists are challenged to engage in more indirect, preventative practices (Reschly, 2008). Consultation emerges as…

  1. Technological competence and competitiveness of Korea industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Geun

    1997-06-01

    This book introduces technology and competitiveness and industrial policy of economics, technological competence and technological innovation system of Korea, a newly industrialized country, development of technological innovation and competence of semiconductor industry, development of technological innovation and competence of synthetic fiber industry, development of technological innovation and competence of machine tool industry, development of technological competence of automobile industry, improvement and delay of technological competence of computer industry, and development of technological innovation and competitiveness of appliance industry.

  2. Core competencies for natural resource negotiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillette, S.C.; Lamb, B.L.

    2005-01-01

    Natural resource negotiation often involves multiple parties with overlapping interests and issues that can provide opportunities for mutually beneficial solutions. These opportunities can be missed, however, if negotiators are unable to comprehend the facts of a negotiation, understand the interests of other parties, or accurately evaluate the options that increase the size of the negotiation pie. Through structured personal interviews with more than 60 representatives from seven different hydropower negotiations, respondents identified core competencies that help negotiators succeed at accurately comprehending the facts of a negotiation, comprehending the interests of other parties, and fully understanding the available options and alternatives. We categorized those core competencies into three dimensions of negotiation - interpersonal, organizational, and operational.

  3. Fostering Communicative Competence through Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Aslam Sipra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the use of technology in EFL classes to promote communicative competence. It elucidates communicative competence and explicates obstructions in communicative tasks. Moreover, it interprets the use of technology in fostering and supporting the development of communicative competence and explains how it is pragmatic in maintaining learners’ level of motivation and interest in learning a foreign language. The present article identifies the significance and use of mobile phone, camera, computer and internet, tape recorder, projector, and language labs in EFL classes. Besides, it discusses the use of technology as an educational tool in language teaching and learning.

  4. Discusses the core competence of professional information agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tao; Wang Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the connotation of core competence theory, Discusses the definition, composition and main aspects of the theory in professional information agency, And analyzes the core competence of an authoritative information agency-Energy Information Administration, discusses the main measures of improving core competencies in professional information agency. (authors)

  5. CORE COMPETENCIES AND PHASES OF THE ORGANIZATIONAL LIFE CYCLE

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Selma Zone Fekih; Koubaa, Manel Belguith

    2013-01-01

    Organizations evolve according to well-defined phases during which it must raise some competencies more than others. This study discusses the importance of core competencies according to the phases of the life cycle of the organization. In this research, we mobilize the core competencies approach to explore the competence required at each stage of the organizational life cycle. The quantitative study of 50 Tunisian companies operating in the food sector shows that the importance of core ...

  6. A Quantitative Assessment of the Research Chefs Association Core Competencies for the Practicing Culinologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissett, Rachel L.; Cheng, Michael S. H.; Brannan, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Professional organizations have linked core competency to professional success and competitive strategy. The Research Chefs Assn. (RCA) recently released 43 core competencies for practicing culinologists. Culinology[R] is a profession that links skills of culinary arts and food science and technology in the development of food products. An online…

  7. Examination of core competencies of agricultural development professionals in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvedi, Murari; Ghimire, Ramjee; Channa, Ty

    2018-04-01

    This cross-sectional study examined perceived level of importance, perceived level of competency in extension core competencies, and whether and how perceptions of competency vary by respondents' demographics; ascertained gaps in competency, if any; and identified ways for agricultural development professionals in Cambodia to acquire core competencies. Data were collected using a group-administered survey among 39 agricultural development professionals participating in a national workshop in December 2015. The survey consisted of 48 competencies representing eight core competencies, and each competency had level of importance and level of competency parts. The findings show that extension workers in Cambodia deemed all competencies highly or very highly important to their extension work; however, their perceived level of competency in those competencies appeared not to meet the expectations. The level of competency in all but communication skills and diversity significantly differed by gender but not by age and experience. Respondents indicated all four methods-preservice, in-service, basic induction training, and participation in seminars, workshops, and webinars-equally appropriate to acquire core competencies. The findings imply that the agricultural development authority in Cambodia should review, update, or design extension education curricula incorporating the competencies highlighted in this study and train its extension cadres on those competencies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Technological Competence: Training Educational Leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, William C.; Spuck, Dennis W.

    1991-01-01

    Discussion of the competence of school administrators in the use of technology focuses on the results of a survey of data processing specialists in 165 school districts that was conducted to determine the importance of various educational computer applications. It is recommended that educational applications of computers be included in preservice…

  9. Information Superiority: Outsourcing an Air Force Core Competency?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McTerman, Hugh

    1997-01-01

    .... This thesis explores the perceived relationship between the core competency requirements for information superiority and the tasks defined for the Air Force communication, computer, and information career field...

  10. Core skills assessment to improve mathematical competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Michael; Bowe, Brian; Fhloinn, Eabhnat Ní

    2013-12-01

    Many engineering undergraduates begin third-level education with significant deficiencies in their core mathematical skills. Every year, in the Dublin Institute of Technology, a diagnostic test is given to incoming first-year students, consistently revealing problems in basic mathematics. It is difficult to motivate students to address these problems; instead, they struggle through their degree, carrying a serious handicap of poor core mathematical skills, as confirmed by exploratory testing of final year students. In order to improve these skills, a pilot project was set up in which a 'module' in core mathematics was developed. The course material was basic, but 90% or higher was required to pass. Students were allowed to repeat this module throughout the year by completing an automated examination on WebCT populated by a question bank. Subsequent to the success of this pilot with third-year mechanical engineering students, the project was extended to five different engineering programmes, across three different year-groups. Full results and analysis of this project are presented, including responses to interviews carried out with a selection of the students involved.

  11. Update on the Health Services Research Doctoral Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, James F; Menachemi, Nir; Maciejewski, Matthew L

    2018-03-13

    To present revised core competencies for doctoral programs in health services research (HSR), modalities to deliver these competencies, and suggested methods for assessing mastery of these competencies. Core competencies were originally developed in 2005, updated (but unpublished) in 2008, modestly updated for a 2016 HSR workforce conference, and revised based on feedback from attendees. Additional feedback was obtained from doctoral program directors, employer/workforce experts and attendees of presentation on these competencies at the AcademyHealth's June 2017 Annual Research Meeting. The current version (V2.1) competencies include the ethical conduct of research, conceptual models, development of research questions, study designs, data measurement and collection methods, statistical methods for analyzing data, professional collaboration, and knowledge dissemination. These competencies represent a core that defines what HSR researchers should master in order to address the complexities of microsystem to macro-system research that HSR entails. There are opportunities to conduct formal evaluation of newer delivery modalities (e.g., flipped classrooms) and to integrate new Learning Health System Researcher Core Competencies, developed by AHRQ, into the HSR core competencies. Core competencies in HSR are a continually evolving work in progress because new research questions arise, new methods are developed, and the trans-disciplinary nature of the field leads to new multidisciplinary and team building needs. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  12. An Answer to the AICPA Core Competencies Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Deborah E.; Hocking, Ralph T.

    2009-01-01

    For many years the accounting profession has called for a change in the way accounting classes are taught. The AICPA in its Core Competency Framework (1999) has identified three core competency areas that are vital to future success. In this paper we present one successful way to meet this challenge by using a holistic approach to service learning…

  13. Core Competencies and the Prevention of Youth Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Terri N.; Farrell, Albert D.; Bettencourt, Amie F.; Helms, Sarah W.

    2008-01-01

    We discuss how the five core competencies for healthy adjustment in adolescence (a positive sense of self, self-control, decision-making skills, a moral system of belief, and prosocial connectedness) are represented in theories of aggression and youth violence. We then discuss research supporting the relation between these core competencies and…

  14. The Core Competencies for Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfers, John; Carlton, Lidia; Gibson, Paul; Puffer, Maryjane; Smith, Sharla; Todd, Kay

    2014-01-01

    The Adolescent Sexual Health Work Group commissioned the development of core competencies that define the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary for all providers of adolescent sexual and reproductive health. This article describes the background and rationale for this set of competencies, the history and use of competencies, and the process…

  15. Core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals: consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moher, David; Galipeau, James; Alam, Sabina; Barbour, Virginia; Bartolomeos, Kidist; Baskin, Patricia; Bell-Syer, Sally; Cobey, Kelly D; Chan, Leighton; Clark, Jocalyn; Deeks, Jonathan; Flanagin, Annette; Garner, Paul; Glenny, Anne-Marie; Groves, Trish; Gurusamy, Kurinchi; Habibzadeh, Farrokh; Jewell-Thomas, Stefanie; Kelsall, Diane; Lapeña, José Florencio; MacLehose, Harriet; Marusic, Ana; McKenzie, Joanne E; Shah, Jay; Shamseer, Larissa; Straus, Sharon; Tugwell, Peter; Wager, Elizabeth; Winker, Margaret; Zhaori, Getu

    2017-09-11

    Scientific editors are responsible for deciding which articles to publish in their journals. However, we have not found documentation of their required knowledge, skills, and characteristics, or the existence of any formal core competencies for this role. We describe the development of a minimum set of core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals. The 14 key core competencies are divided into three major areas, and each competency has a list of associated elements or descriptions of more specific knowledge, skills, and characteristics that contribute to its fulfillment. We believe that these core competencies are a baseline of the knowledge, skills, and characteristics needed to perform competently the duties of a scientific editor at a biomedical journal.

  16. AREVA Germany. International competence in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graeber, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    AREVA NP was created in 2001 by the merger of the French nuclear technology specialist Framatome with the nuclear sector of Siemens. The company is headquartered in Paris and has regional subsidiaries in Germany and the United States. The joint venture's strength lies in its all-round competence in nuclear power plants, from reactor development to power plant services and modernization of operating plants, design and production of fuel assemblies and turn-key construction of nuclear power reactors. Major core competences are located in Germany including the test facilities which are unique in the entire group as well as electrical engineering and instrumentation and control systems. AREVA NP is part of the globally acting AREVA group which pursues a unique integrated business model. The concept covers the entire nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mining to reprocessing used fuel assemblies. At present, AREVA has 48,000 employees worldwide, of which 5,700 are Germany-based. (orig.)

  17. Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Please cite as: Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Models in Technology-enhanced Competence-based Learning. In H. H. Adelsberger, Kinshuk, J. M. Pawlowski & D. Sampson (Eds.), International Handbook on Information Technologies for Education and Training, 2nd Edition, Springer, June 2008

  18. Core competencies of the entrepreneurial leader in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kristina L

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to discuss core competencies that entrepreneurial health care leaders should acquire to ensure the survival and growth of US health care organizations. Three overlapping areas of core competencies are described: (1) health care system and environment competencies, (2) organization competencies, and (3) interpersonal competencies. This study offers insight into the relationship between leaders and entrepreneurship in health care organizations and establishes the foundation for more in-depth studies on leadership competencies in health care settings. The approach for identifying core competencies and designing a competency model is useful for practitioners in leadership positions in complex health care organizations, so that through the understanding and practice of these 3 areas of core competencies, they can enhance their entrepreneurial leadership skills to become more effective health care entrepreneurial leaders. This study can also be used as a tool by health care organizations to better understand leadership performance, and competencies can be used to further the organization's strategic vision and for individual improvement purposes.

  19. Cultural Core Competencies: Perceptions of 4-H Youth Development Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Fox

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As society grows increasingly diverse, it is critical that youth development professionals are equipped with cultural core competencies. This descriptive study gauged the perceived level of cultural competence among 4-H Youth Development professionals from a Southern state in the United States. Based on the 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competency (PRKC Model (Stone & Rennekamp, 2004, youth development professionals rated their cultural competence (equity, access, and opportunity in eight core competency areas. Based on a five-point Likert scale ranging from 0 = No knowledge to 4 = Expert, youth development professionals evaluated their cultural competence ranging from 0.66 to 4.00. According to an interpretive scale, most youth development professionals rated their competence as intermediate. Participants reported the skills of active listening and an open attitude as areas in which they felt most competent. Areas of least competence were community outreach policies and procedures. No significant relationships existed between the demographic variables of gender, degree earned, and field of study when compared to perceived cultural competence. The findings will be used to detect deficiencies and create opportunities for professional training and development experiences in supporting the cultural competence and growth of youth professionals.

  20. Quality and Safety as a Core Leadership Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Michael R

    2018-05-01

    A leader's toolbox of competencies comprises knowledge, skills, and abilities in clinical care, finance, human resource management, and more. As essential as these are, a strong command of quality and safety competencies is sovereign in leading and managing, ensuring an optimal patient experience. Four core areas of quality and safety competencies are presented: systems science, knowledge workers, implementation science and big data, and quality safety tools and techniques. J Contin Educ Nurs. 2018;49(5):200-202. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Honorio; Stonier, Peter; Buhler, Fritz; Deslypere, Jean-Paul; Criscuolo, Domenico; Nell, Gerfried; Massud, Joao; Geary, Stewart; Schenk, Johanna; Kerpel-Fronius, Sandor; Koski, Greg; Clemens, Norbert; Klingmann, Ingrid; Kesselring, Gustavo; van Olden, Rudolf; Dubois, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine), are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes (LO) of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain LO anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide. PMID:23986704

  2. Core Competencies for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honorio eSilva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Professional groups, such as IFAPP (International Federation of Pharmaceutical Physicians and Pharmaceutical Medicine, are expected to produce the defined core competencies to orient the discipline and the academic programs for the development of future competent professionals and to advance the profession. On the other hand, PharmaTrain, an Innovative Medicines Initiative project, has become the largest public-private partnership in biomedicine in the European Continent and aims to provide postgraduate courses that are designed to meet the needs of professionals working in medicines development. A working group was formed within IFAPP including representatives from PharmaTrain, academic institutions and national member associations, with special interest and experience on Quality Improvement through education. The objectives were: to define a set of core competencies for pharmaceutical physicians and drug development scientists, to be summarized in a Statement of Competence and to benchmark and align these identified core competencies with the Learning Outcomes of the PharmaTrain Base Course. The objectives were successfully achieved. Seven domains and 60 core competencies were identified and aligned accordingly. The effective implementation of training programs using the competencies or the PharmaTrain Learning Outcomes anywhere in the world may transform the drug development process to an efficient and integrated process for better and safer medicines. The PharmaTrain Base Course might provide the cognitive framework to achieve the desired Statement of Competence for Pharmaceutical Physicians and Drug Development Scientists worldwide.

  3. Development of new core competencies for Taiwanese Emergency Medical Technicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Tung; Tsai, Kuang-Chau; Williams, Brett

    2018-01-01

    Core competencies are considered the foundation for establishing Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) and paramedic curricula, and for ensuring performance standards in the delivery of prehospital care. This study surveyed EMT instructors and medical directors to identify the most desirable core competencies for all levels of EMTs in Taiwan. A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted. An online questionnaire was distributed to obtain perspectives of EMT instructors and medical directors on the most desirable core competencies for EMTs. The target population was EMT training-course instructors and medical directors of fire departments in Taiwan. The questionnaire comprised 61 competency items, and multiple-choice and open-ended questions were used to obtain respondents' perspectives of the Taiwanese EMT training and education system. The results identified three factors at EMT-1 and EMT-2 levels and five factors at the EMT-Paramedic level. The factors for EMT-1 and EMT-2 were similar, and those for EMT-Paramedics identified further comprehensive competence perspectives. The key factors that appear to influence the development of the Taiwanese Emergency Medical Services (EMS) education system are the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation. The findings present new core competencies for the Taiwanese EMT system and provide capacity to redesign curricula and reconsider roles for EMT-1 and EMT-2 technicians. At the EMT-Paramedic level, the findings demonstrate the importance of incorporating competency standards in the current skills-based curriculum. Moreover, the core-competencies gap that exists between Taiwanese EMT-1s, EMT-2s, and EMT-Paramedics and internationally recognized core competencies needs to be addressed. By identifying the key factors that potentially impact the development of the EMS education system, such as the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation, these findings will inform

  4. Comparing Written Competency in Core French and French Immersion Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappin-Fortin, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have compared the written competency of French immersion students and their core French peers, and research on these learners at a postsecondary level is even scarcer. My corpus consists of writing samples from 255 students from both backgrounds beginning a university course in French language. The writing proficiency of core French…

  5. The Core Competencies of PhDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durette, Barthélémy; Fournier, Marina; Lafon, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    In our knowledge society and economy, doctoral education is increasingly considered as a means to produce knowledge workers to feed the needs of the global employment market. This raises concerns about the competencies developed through doctoral training. Surprisingly, only a few studies have addressed this question and most of them are restricted…

  6. CORE COMPETENCES OF PIRACY AND MARITIME TERRORISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Gawliczek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The intensity of the attacks, the level of violence, the scale of destruction in the maritime areas forces creation of certain security conditions. Recognizing the enemy - piracy and maritime terrorism - by identifying their resources, skills and competences is necessary action in building the safety of vessels and maritime infrastructure. Building competence of terrorist organization and maritime piracy requires the involvement of many interrelated resources and their proper coordination. It seems that, as in a business model, in these criminal organizations there are similar resources, skills and competences that determine the advantage and strategic value of the organization. However, the weight of each factor is different. The same assumption can be related to piracy and the activities of the terrorist organization at sea. The results of the study suggest that the main sources of success of analyzed criminal organizations generate harm for national security. In the case of piracy, they result from the following spheres: human capital, attributable to the skills capital; structural capital, belonging to innovation capital; relational capital, depending on customers' capital. As for terrorist activities, they stem from the spheres of: human capital, belonging to social capital; structural capital, attributable to the process capital; relational capital and determined by capital of standing out. In summary, this article is intended to show a terrorist organization and maritime piracy through the prism of resources theory, skills and competences of strategic management. As one of the first, it places many questions, formulate some theses in the area of competences of organizations. Answering the questions, verification of posed theses, requires also in-depth research that will be published in subsequent works.

  7. Influence Factors and Improvement Recommendations for Core Competency of Township Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chengjun

    2014-01-01

    Core competency of township enterprises may be influenced from the property right, technology, scale operation, financial management and talent. In view of these influence factors, township enterprises should conduct technological innovation, bring into full play functions of talents, promote corporate culture of township enterprises, attach great importance to development of core products and innovation of relevant systems, and establish market information platform for township enterprises.

  8. Pennsylvania State Core Competencies for Education on Opioids and Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburn, Michael A; Levine, Rachel L

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this project was to develop core competencies for education on opioids and addiction to be used in all Pennsylvania medical schools. The Pennsylvania Physician General created a task force that was responsible for the creation of the core competencies. A literature review was completed, and a survey of graduating medical students was conducted. The task force then developed, reviewed, and approved the core competencies. The competencies were grouped into nine domains: understanding core aspects of addiction; patient screening for substance use disorder; proper referral for specialty evaluation and treatment of substance use disorder; proper patient assessment when treating pain; proper use of multimodal treatment options when treating acute pain; proper use of opioids for the treatment of acute pain (after consideration of alternatives); the role of opioids in the treatment of chronic noncancer pain; patient risk assessment related to the use of opioids to treat chronic noncancer pain, including the assessment for substance use disorder or increased risk for aberrant drug-related behavior; and the process for patient education, initiation of treatment, careful patient monitoring, and discontinuation of therapy when using opioids to treat chronic noncancer pain. Specific competencies were developed for each domain. These competencies will be incorporated into the educational process at all Pennsylvania medical schools. It is hoped that these curriculum changes will improve student knowledge and attitudes in these areas, thus improving patient outcomes. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Development of the Learning Health System Researcher Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Christopher B; Chesley, Francis D; Tregear, Michelle L; Mistry, Kamila B

    2017-08-04

    To develop core competencies for learning health system (LHS) researchers to guide the development of training programs. Data were obtained from literature review, expert interviews, a modified Delphi process, and consensus development meetings. The competencies were developed from August to December 2016 using qualitative methods. The literature review formed the basis for the initial draft of a competency domain framework. Key informant semi-structured interviews, a modified Delphi survey, and three expert panel (n = 19 members) consensus development meetings produced the final set of competencies. The iterative development process yielded seven competency domains: (1) systems science; (2) research questions and standards of scientific evidence; (3) research methods; (4) informatics; (5) ethics of research and implementation in health systems; (6) improvement and implementation science; and (7) engagement, leadership, and research management. A total of 33 core competencies were prioritized across these seven domains. The real-world milieu of LHS research, the embeddedness of the researcher within the health system, and engagement of stakeholders are distinguishing characteristics of this emerging field. The LHS researcher core competencies can be used to guide the development of learning objectives, evaluation methods, and curricula for training programs. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  10. Core Competence, Distinctive Competence, and Competitive Advantage: What Is the Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Core competence, distinctive competence, and competitive advantage are 3 of the most important business concepts that managers, researchers, and educators rely on for decision making, pedagogy, and research. However, little attention has been paid to defining these concepts. As a result, they have become buzzwords that are used so frequently that…

  11. Development of new core competencies for Taiwanese Emergency Medical Technicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang YT

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Tung Chang,1,2 Kuang-Chau Tsai,2 Brett Williams1,3 1Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, Australia; 2Department of Emergency Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei City, Taiwan; 3Division of Paramedicine, University of Tasmania, Hobart, TAS, Australia Objectives: Core competencies are considered the foundation for establishing Emergency Medical Technician (EMT and paramedic curricula, and for ensuring performance standards in the delivery of prehospital care. This study surveyed EMT instructors and medical directors to identify the most desirable core competencies for all levels of EMTs in Taiwan. Methods: A principal components analysis with Varimax rotation was conducted. An online questionnaire was distributed to obtain perspectives of EMT instructors and medical directors on the most desirable core competencies for EMTs. The target population was EMT training-course instructors and medical directors of fire departments in Taiwan. The questionnaire comprised 61 competency items, and multiple-choice and open-ended questions were used to obtain respondents’ perspectives of the Taiwanese EMT training and education system. Results: The results identified three factors at EMT-1 and EMT-2 levels and five factors at the EMT-Paramedic level. The factors for EMT-1 and EMT-2 were similar, and those for EMT-Paramedics identified further comprehensive competence perspectives. The key factors that appear to influence the development of the Taiwanese Emergency Medical Services (EMS education system are the attitude of authorities, the licensure system, and legislation. Conclusion: The findings present new core competencies for the Taiwanese EMT system and provide capacity to redesign curricula and reconsider roles for EMT-1 and EMT-2 technicians. At the EMT-Paramedic level, the findings demonstrate the importance of

  12. International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis core curriculum project: core competencies in clinical thrombosis and hemostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLintock, C.; Pabinger, I.; Bauer, K. A.; Laffan, M.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Rezende, S. M.; Middeldorp, S.; Ross, M.

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The priority of ISTH was to establish a global core curriculum in thrombosis and hemostasis. International survey to determine competencies required for clinical specialists was carried out in the field. Competency framework provides a reference point for mapping and developing regional

  13. Perceived core competency achievements of fellowship and non-fellowship-trained early career pediatric hospitalists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Librizzi, Jamie; Winer, Jeffrey C; Banach, Laurie; Davis, Aisha

    2015-06-01

    The pediatric hospital medicine (PHM) core competencies were established in 2010 to identify the specific knowledge base and skill set needed to provide the highest quality of care for hospitalized children. The objectives of this study were to examine the perceived core competency achievements of fellowship-trained and non-fellowship-trained early career pediatric hospitalists and identify perceived gaps in our current training models. An anonymous Web-based survey was distributed in November 2013. Hospitalists within 5 years of their residency graduation reported their perceived competency in select PHM core competencies. χ(2) and multiprobit regression analyses were utilized. One hundred ninety-seven hospitalists completed the survey and were included; 147 were non-fellowship-trained and 50 were PHM fellowship graduates or current PHM fellows. Both groups reported feeling less than competent in sedation and aspects of business practice. Non-fellowship-trained hospitalists also reported mean scores in the less than competent range in intravenous access/phlebotomy, technology-dependent emergencies, performing Plan-Do-Study-Act process and root cause analysis, defining basic statistical terms, and identifying research resources. Non-fellowship-trained hospitalists reported mean competency scores greater than fellowship-trained hospitalists in pain management, newborn care, and transitions in care. Early career pediatric hospitalists report deficits in several of the PHM core competencies, which should be considered when designing PHM-specific training in the future. Fellowship-trained hospitalists report higher levels of perceived competency in many core areas. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Core competencies in clinical neuropsychology training across the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessen, Erik; Hokkanen, Laura; Ponsford, Jennie; van Zandvoort, Martine; Watts, Ann; Evans, Jonathan; Haaland, Kathleen Y

    2018-05-01

    This work aimed to review main competency requirements from training models in countries with well-established specialties in clinical neuropsychology and to extract core competencies that likely will apply to clinical neuropsychologists regardless of regional and cultural context. We reviewed standards for post-graduate training in clinical neuropsychology from countries in Europe, Australia, and North America based on existing literature, presentations at international conferences, and from description of the training models from national psychological or neuropsychological associations. Despite differences, the reviewed models share similar core competencies considered necessary for a specialty in clinical neuropsychology: (1) In-depth knowledge of general psychology including clinical psychology (post-graduate level), ethical, and legal standards. (2) Expert knowledge about clinically relevant brain-behavioral relationships. (3) Comprehensive knowledge about, and skills in, related clinical disciplines. (4) In-depth knowledge about and skills in neuropsychological assessment, including decision-making and diagnostic competency according to current classification of diseases. (5) Competencies in the area of diversity and culture in relation to clinical neuropsychology. (6) Communication competency of neuropsychological findings and test results to relevant and diverse audiences. (7) Knowledge about and skills in psychological and neuropsychological intervention, including treatment and rehabilitation. All the models have undergone years of development in accordance with requirements of national health care systems in different parts of the world. Despite differences, the common core competency requirements across different regions of the world suggest generalizability of these competencies. We hope this summary can be useful as countries with less established neuropsychology training programs develop their models.

  15. Factors influencing disaster nursing core competencies of emergency nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo

    2017-10-01

    Emergency nurses are expected to provide required nursing services by using their professional expertise to reduce the risk posed by disasters. Thus, emergency nurses' disaster nursing core competencies are essential for coping with disasters. The purpose of the study reported here was to identify factors influencing the disaster nursing core competencies of emergency nurses. A survey was conducted among 231 emergency nurses working in 12 hospitals in South Korea. Data were collected on disaster-related experience, attitude, knowledge, and disaster nursing core competencies by means of a questionnaire. In multiple regression analysis, disaster-related experience exerted the strongest influence on disaster nursing core competencies, followed by disaster-related knowledge. The explanatory power of these factors was 25.6%, which was statistically significant (F=12.189, pcompetencies of emergency nurses could be improved through education and training programs that enhance their disaster preparedness. The nursing profession needs to participate actively in the development of disaster nursing education and training programs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Minimum Requirements for Core Competency in Pediatric Pharmacy Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Elizabeth A; Burke, Margaret M; Johnson, Peter N; Klein, Kristin C; Miller, Jamie L

    2015-01-01

    Colleges of pharmacy provide varying amounts of didactic and clinical hours in pediatrics resulting in variability in the knowledge, skills, and perceptions of new graduates toward pediatric pharmaceutical care. The Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) endorses the application of a minimum set of core competencies for all pharmacists involved in the care of hospitalized children.

  17. Rheumatology training experience across Europe: analysis of core competences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivera, Francisca; Ramiro, Sofia; Cikes, Nada; Cutolo, Maurizio; Dougados, Maxime; Gossec, Laure; Kvien, Tore K; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Mandl, Peter; Moorthy, Arumugam; Panchal, Sonia; da Silva, José A P; Bijlsma, Johannes W

    2016-09-23

    The aim of this project was to analyze and compare the educational experience in rheumatology specialty training programs across European countries, with a focus on self-reported ability. An electronic survey was designed to assess the training experience in terms of self-reported ability, existence of formal education, number of patients managed and assessments performed during rheumatology training in 21 core competences including managing specific diseases, generic competences and procedures. The target population consisted of rheumatology trainees and recently certified rheumatologists across Europe. The relationship between the country of training and the self-reported ability or training methods for each competence was analyzed through linear or logistic regression, as appropriate. In total 1079 questionnaires from 41 countries were gathered. Self-reported ability was high for most competences, range 7.5-9.4 (0-10 scale) for clinical competences, 5.8-9.0 for technical procedures and 7.8-8.9 for generic competences. Competences with lower self-reported ability included managing patients with vasculitis, identifying crystals and performing an ultrasound. Between 53 and 91 % of the trainees received formal education and between 7 and 61 % of the trainees reported limited practical experience (managing ≤10 patients) in each competence. Evaluation of each competence was reported by 29-60 % of the respondents. In adjusted multivariable analysis, the country of training was associated with significant differences in self-reported ability for all individual competences. Even though self-reported ability is generally high, there are significant differences amongst European countries, including differences in the learning structure and assessment of competences. This suggests that educational outcomes may also differ. Efforts to promote European harmonization in rheumatology training should be encouraged and supported.

  18. Core competency model for the family planning public health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Caroline M; Roye, Carol; Gebbie, Kristine M

    2014-01-01

    A core competency model for family planning public health nurses has been developed, using a three stage Delphi Method with an expert panel of 40 family planning senior administrators, community/public health nursing faculty and seasoned family planning public health nurses. The initial survey was developed from the 2011 Title X Family Planning program priorities. The 32-item survey was distributed electronically via SurveyMonkey(®). Panelist attrition was low, and participation robust resulting in the final 28-item model, suggesting that the Delphi Method was a successful technique through which to achieve consensus. Competencies with at least 75% consensus were included in the model and those competencies were primarily related to education/counseling and administration of medications and contraceptives. The competencies identified have implications for education/training, certification and workplace performance. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A competency-based longitudinal core curriculum in medical neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlin, Lisa R; Horak, Holli A; Milligan, Tracey A; Kraakevik, Jeff A; Ali, Imran I

    2014-07-29

    Current medical educational theory encourages the development of competency-based curricula. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's 6 core competencies for resident education (medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, practice-based learning, and systems-based practice) have been embraced by medical schools as the building blocks necessary for becoming a competent licensed physician. Many medical schools are therefore changing their educational approach to an integrated model in which students demonstrate incremental acquisition and mastery of all competencies as they progress through medical school. Challenges to medical schools include integration of preclinical and clinical studies as well as development of learning objectives and assessment measures for each competency. The Undergraduate Education Subcommittee (UES) of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) assembled a group of neuroscience educators to outline a longitudinal competency-based curriculum in medical neuroscience encompassing both preclinical and clinical coursework. In development of this curriculum, the committee reviewed United States Medical Licensing Examination content outlines, Liaison Committee on Medical Education requirements, prior AAN-mandated core curricula for basic neuroscience and clinical neurology, and survey responses from educators in US medical schools. The newly recommended curriculum provides an outline of learning objectives for each of the 6 competencies, listing each learning objective in active terms. Documentation of experiences is emphasized, and assessment measures are suggested to demonstrate adequate achievement in each competency. These guidelines, widely vetted and approved by the UES membership, aspire to be both useful as a stand-alone curriculum and also provide a framework for neuroscience educators who wish to develop a more detailed focus in certain areas of study. © 2014 American Academy

  20. Competence at the core of performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stricker, L.

    2008-01-01

    This series of slides presents the viewpoint of EDF on the renaissance of nuclear power in the world. This presentation is divided into 5 main parts. Part 1: energy a necessity; huge investment for the production of electricity are expected throughout the world for instance 1300 GW in China or 660 GW in Europe by 2030. Because of its stable costs and weak environmental impact nuclear power will have to take its part. Part 2: Nuclear power throughout the world; today 439 reactors are operating in the world generating 17% of the amount of the whole electricity produced. Some exceptions France (80%), Belgium (55%), Japan, Sweden and finland (50%). EDF is the world leader in nuclear power production operating 58 reactors ( 34 * 900 MW + 20 * 1300 MW + 4 * 1450 MW). Part 3: the renaissance of nuclear power; in most countries new legislation favourable to nuclear power have been implemented. From now to 2030 about 300 GW of nuclear power will installed: 50% to replace today's operating reactors and 50% to create new units. In 2050 the world nuclear power capacity will have increased by a factor between 1.5 and 3.8. Part 4: new projects of nuclear power plants; EDF aspires to be co-owner and co-operator of 10 EPR in 10 years and international cooperation has been set up with China, United-Kingdom, Usa and South-Africa for new plants. The technological assets of the EPR are: -) an increase of 36% of the annual power output compared to existing reactors, -) a higher level of safety, -) occupational dosimetry lower by 40%, and -) a sharp reduction of gas and liquid waste releases. Part 5: Skills, The nuclear sector is expected to recruit very much in the years to come but is likely to face a shortage in skilled workers, engineers... A master dedicated to nuclear engineering and another to nuclear safety have been set. EDF has launched a program to promote nuclear sciences in the universities and in engineer curricula. (A.C.)

  1. From time-based to competency-based standards: core transitional competencies in plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Kristina; Yazdani, Arjang; Ross, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Competency-based medical education is becoming increasingly prevalent and is likely to be mandated by the Royal College in the near future. The objective of this study was to define the core technical competencies that should be possessed by plastic surgery residents as they transition into their senior (presently postgraduate year 3) years of training. A list of potential core competencies was generated using a modified Delphi method that included the investigators and 6 experienced, academic plastic surgeons from across Canada and the United States. Generated items were divided into 7 domains: basic surgical skills, anesthesia, hand surgery, cutaneous surgery, esthetic surgery, breast surgery, and craniofacial surgery. Members of the Delphi group were asked to rank particular skills on a 4-point scale with anchored descriptors. Item reduction resulted in a survey consisting of 48 skills grouped into the aforementioned domains. This self-administered survey was distributed to all Canadian program directors (n = 11) via e-mail for validation and further item reduction. The response rate was 100% (11/11). Using the average rankings of program directors, 26 "core" skills were identified. There was agreement of core skills across all domains except for breast surgery and esthetic surgery. Of them, 7 skills were determined to be above the level of a trainee at this stage; a further 15 skills were agreed to be important, but not core, competencies. Overall, 26 competencies have been identified as "core" for plastic surgery residents to possess as they begin their senior, on-service years. The nature of these skills makes them suitable for teaching in a formal, simulated environment, which would ensure that all plastic surgery trainees are competent in these tasks as they transition to their senior years of residency. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Core competency requirements among extension workers in peninsular Malaysia: Use of Borich's needs assessment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Sulaiman; Man, Norsida; Nawi, Nolila Mohd; Latif, Ismail Abd; Samah, Bahaman Abu

    2017-06-01

    The study described the perceived importance of, and proficiency in core agricultural extension competencies among extension workers in Peninsular Malaysia; and evaluating the resultant deficits in the competencies. The Borich's Needs Assessment Model was used to achieve the objectives of the study. A sample of 298 respondents was randomly selected and interviewed using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Thirty-three core competency items were assessed. Instrument validity and reliability were ensured. The cross-sectional data obtained was analysed using SPSS for descriptive statistics including mean weighted discrepancy score (MWDS). Results of the study showed that on a scale of 5, the most important core extension competency items according to respondents' perception were: "Making good use of information and communication technologies/access and use of web-based resources" (M=4.86, SD=0.23); "Conducting needs assessments" (M=4.84, SD=0.16); "organizing extension campaigns" (M=4.82, SD=0.47) and "Managing groups and teamwork" (M=4.81, SD=0.76). In terms of proficiency, the highest competency identified by the respondents was "Conducting farm and home visits (M=3.62, SD=0.82) followed by 'conducting meetings effectively' (M=3.19, SD=0.72); "Conducting focus group discussions" (M=3.16, SD=0.32) and "conducting community forums" (M=3.13, SD=0.64). The discrepancies implying competency deficits were widest in "Acquiring and allocating resources" (MWDS=12.67); use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and web-based resources in agricultural extension (MWDS=12.59); and report writing and sharing the results and impacts (MWDS=11.92). It is recommended that any intervention aimed at developing the capacity of extension workers in Peninsular Malaysia should prioritize these core competency items in accordance with the deficits established in this study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Identifying the core competencies of mental health telephone triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Natisha; Elsom, Stephen; Gerdtz, Marie; Henderson, Kathryn; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Droste, Nicolas; Prematunga, Roshani K; Wereta, Zewdu W

    2013-11-01

    The primary aim of this study was to identify the core competencies of mental health telephone triage, including key role tasks, skills, knowledge and responsibilities, in which clinicians are required to be competent to perform safe and effective triage. Recent global trends indicate an increased reliance on telephone-based health services to facilitate access to health care across large populations. The trend towards telephone-based health services has also extended to mental health settings, evidenced by the growing number of mental health telephone triage services providing 24-hour access to specialist mental health assessment and treatment. Mental health telephone triage services are critical to the early identification of mental health problems and the provision of timely, appropriate interventions. In spite of the rapid growth in mental health telephone triage and the important role these services play in the assessment and management of mental illness and related risks, there has been very little research investigating this area of practice. An observational design was employed to address the research aims. Structured observations (using dual wireless headphones) were undertaken on 197 occasions of mental health telephone triage over a three-month period from January to March 2011. The research identified seven core areas of mental health telephone triage practice in which clinicians are required to be competent in to perform effective mental health telephone triage, including opening the call; performing mental status examination; risk assessment; planning and action; termination of call; referral and reporting; and documentation. The findings of this research contribute to the evidence base for mental health telephone triage by articulating the core competencies for practice. The mental health telephone triage competencies identified in this research may be used to define an evidence-based framework for mental health telephone triage practice that aims to

  4. Pediatric hospital medicine core competencies: development and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Erin R; Ottolini, Mary C; Maniscalco, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric hospital medicine is the most rapidly growing site-based pediatric specialty. There are over 2500 unique members in the three core societies in which pediatric hospitalists are members: the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) and the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM). Pediatric hospitalists are fulfilling both clinical and system improvement roles within varied hospital systems. Defined expectations and competencies for pediatric hospitalists are needed. In 2005, SHM's Pediatric Core Curriculum Task Force initiated the project and formed the editorial board. Over the subsequent four years, multiple pediatric hospitalists belonging to the AAP, APA, or SHM contributed to the content of and guided the development of the project. Editors and collaborators created a framework for identifying appropriate competency content areas. Content experts from both within and outside of pediatric hospital medicine participated as contributors. A number of selected national organizations and societies provided valuable feedback on chapters. The final product was validated by formal review from the AAP, APA, and SHM. The Pediatric Hospital Medicine Core Competencies were created. They include 54 chapters divided into four sections: Common Clinical Diagnoses and Conditions, Core Skills, Specialized Clinical Services, and Healthcare Systems: Supporting and Advancing Child Health. Each chapter can be used independently of the others. Chapters follow the knowledge, skills, and attitudes educational curriculum format, and have an additional section on systems organization and improvement to reflect the pediatric hospitalist's responsibility to advance systems of care. These competencies provide a foundation for the creation of pediatric hospital medicine curricula and serve to standardize and improve inpatient training practices. (c) 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  5. Global and public health core competencies for nursing education: A systematic review of essential competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Megan; Raffray, Marie; Hendricks, Kristin; Gagnon, Anita J

    2016-05-01

    Nurses are learning and practicing in an increasingly global world. Both nursing schools and nursing students are seeking guidance as they integrate global health into their learning and teaching. This systematic review is intended to identify the most common global and public health core competencies found in the literature and better inform schools of nursing wishing to include global health content in their curricula. Systematic review. An online search of CINAHL and Medline databases, as well as, inclusion of pertinent gray literature was conducted for articles published before 2013. Relevant literature for global health (GH) and public and community health (PH/CH) competencies was reviewed to determine recommendations of both competencies using a combination of search terms. Studies must have addressed competencies as defined in the literature and must have been pertinent to GH or PH/CH. The databases were systematically searched and after reading the full content of the included studies, key concepts were extracted and synthesized. Twenty-five studies were identified and resulted in a list of 14 global health core competencies. These competencies are applicable to a variety of health disciplines, but particularly can inform the efforts of nursing schools to integrate global health concepts into their curricula. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Developing Core Competencies and Measures of Effectiveness for a Navy Medical Chief Information Officer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Moszkowicz, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    .... The purpose of this thesis is to use critical success factors to identify core competencies and skills essential for civilian medical CIOs and the core competencies and skills identified as essential...

  7. Proposed Core Competencies and Empirical Validation Procedure in Competency Modeling: Confirmation and Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baczyńska, Anna K; Rowiński, Tomasz; Cybis, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Competency models provide insight into key skills which are common to many positions in an organization. Moreover, there is a range of competencies that is used by many companies. Researchers have developed core competency terminology to underline their cross-organizational value. The article presents a theoretical model of core competencies consisting of two main higher-order competencies called performance and entrepreneurship. Each of them consists of three elements: the performance competency includes cooperation, organization of work and goal orientation, while entrepreneurship includes innovativeness, calculated risk-taking and pro-activeness. However, there is lack of empirical validation of competency concepts in organizations and this would seem crucial for obtaining reliable results from organizational research. We propose a two-step empirical validation procedure: (1) confirmation factor analysis, and (2) classification of employees. The sample consisted of 636 respondents (M = 44.5; SD = 15.1). Participants were administered a questionnaire developed for the study purpose. The reliability, measured by Cronbach's alpha, ranged from 0.60 to 0.83 for six scales. Next, we tested the model using a confirmatory factor analysis. The two separate, single models of performance and entrepreneurial orientations fit quite well to the data, while a complex model based on the two single concepts needs further research. In the classification of employees based on the two higher order competencies we obtained four main groups of employees. Their profiles relate to those found in the literature, including so-called niche finders and top performers. Some proposal for organizations is discussed.

  8. School Principals' Technology Leadership Competency and Technology Coordinatorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banoglu, Koksal

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the primary and high school principals' competency in technology leadership and so to define implications for advanced competency. The population of the study was formed by 134 school principals in Maltepe and Kadikoy districts in Istanbul. On account of the fact that population was reachable, no specific…

  9. Clinical Core Competency Training for NASA Flight Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, J. D.; Schmid, Josef; Hurst, Victor, IV; Doerr, Harold K.; Doerr, Harold K.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: The cohort of NASA flight surgeons (FS) is a very accomplished group with varied clinical backgrounds; however, the NASA Flight Surgeon Office has identified that the extremely demanding schedule of this cohort prevents many of these physicians from practicing clinical medicine on a regular basis. In an effort to improve clinical competency, the NASA FS Office has dedicated one day a week for the FS to receive clinical training. Each week, an FS is assigned to one of five clinical settings, one being medical patient simulation. The Medical Operations Support Team (MOST) was tasked to develop curricula using medical patient simulation that would meet the clinical and operational needs of the NASA FS Office. Methods: The MOST met with the Lead FS and Training Lead FS to identify those core competencies most important to the FS cohort. The MOST presented core competency standards from the American Colleges of Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine as a basis for developing the training. Results: The MOST identified those clinical areas that could be best demonstrated and taught using medical patient simulation, in particular, using high fidelity human patient simulators. Curricula are currently being developed and additional classes will be implemented to instruct the FS cohort. The curricula will incorporate several environments for instruction, including lab-based and simulated microgravity-based environments. Discussion: The response from the NASA FS cohort to the initial introductory class has been positive. As a result of this effort, the MOST has identified three types of training to meet the clinical needs of the FS Office; clinical core competency training, individual clinical refresher training, and just-in-time training (specific for post-ISS Expedition landings). The MOST is continuing to work with the FS Office to augment the clinical training for the FS cohort, including the integration of Web-based learning.

  10. Weaving latino cultural concepts into Preparedness Core Competency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley-Jacome, Mary; Parker, Blanca Angelica Gonzalez; Waltz, Edward C

    2014-01-01

    The New York • New Jersey Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center (NY•NJ PERLC) is one of 14 Centers funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention designed to address the preparedness and response training and education needs of the public health workforce. One of the important niches, or focus areas for the Center, is training to improve the capacity of public health workers to respond with competence to the needs of vulnerable populations. During every phase of a disaster, racial and ethnic minorities, including Latinos, suffer worse outcomes than the general population. Communities with diverse cultural origins and limited English speakers often present more complex issues during public health emergencies. Training that incorporates cultural concepts into the Preparedness Core Competencies may improve the ability of public health workers to engage the Latino community in preparedness activities and ultimately improve outcomes during disasters. This article describes initiatives undertaken by the NY•NJ PERLC to improve the capacity of the public health workforce to respond competently to the needs of Latino populations. In 2012, the Center collaborated with national, state, and local partners to develop a nationwide broadcast founded on the Preparedness Core Competencies, Latinos During Emergencies: Cultural Considerations Impacting Disaster Preparedness. The widely viewed broadcast (497 sites in 47 states and 13 nations) highlighted the commonalities and differences within Latino culture that can impact emergency preparedness and response and outlined practical strategies to enhance participation. The success of the broadcast spurred a number of partner requests for training and technical assistance. Lessons learned from these experiences, including our "undercover" work at local Points of Dispensing, are incorporated into subsequent interactive trainings to improve the competency of public health workers. Participants recommended

  11. Core Competencies of the Certified Pediatric Doctor of Chiropractic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hewitt, Elise; Hestbaek, Lise; Pohlman, Katherine A

    2016-01-01

    An outline of the minimum core competencies expected from a certified pediatric doctor of chiropractic was developed using a Delphi consensus process. The initial set of seed statements and substatements was modeled on competency documents used by organizations that oversee chiropractic and medical...... education. These statements were distributed to the Delphi panel, reaching consensus when 80% of the panelists approved each segment. The panel consisted of 23 specialists in chiropractic pediatrics (14 females) from across the broad spectrum of the chiropractic profession. Sixty-one percent of panelists...... had postgraduate pediatric certifications or degrees, 39% had additional graduate degrees, and 74% were faculty at a chiropractic institution and/or in a postgraduate pediatrics program. The panel were initially given 10 statements with related substatements formulated by the study's steering...

  12. Validation of core competencies during residency training in anaesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spies, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and goal: Curriculum development for residency training is increasingly challenging in times of financial restrictions and time limitations. Several countries have adopted the CanMEDS framework for medical education as a model into their curricula of specialty training. The purpose of the present study was to validate the competency goals, as derived from CanMEDS, of the Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine of the Berlin Charité University Medical Centre, by conducting a staff survey. These goals for the qualification of specialists stipulate demonstrable competencies in seven areas: expert medical action, efficient collaboration in a team, communications with patients and family, management and organisation, lifelong learning, professional behaviour, and advocacy of good health. We had previously developed a catalogue of curriculum items based on these seven core competencies. In order to evaluate the validity of this catalogue, we surveyed anaesthetists at our department in regard to their perception of the importance of each of these items. In addition to the descriptive acquisition of data, it was intended to assess the results of the survey to ascertain whether there were differences in the evaluation of these objectives by specialists and registrars. Methods: The questionnaire with the seven adapted CanMEDS Roles included items describing each of their underlying competencies. Each anaesthetist (registrars and specialists working at our institution in May of 2007 was asked to participate in the survey. Individual perception of relevance was rated for each item on a scale similar to the Likert system, ranging from 1 (highly relevant to 5 (not at all relevant, from which ratings means were calculated. For determination of reliability, we calculated Cronbach’s alpha. To assess differences between subgroups, we performed analysis of variance.Results: All seven roles were rated as relevant. Three of the seven

  13. Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The UCLA-DOE Biochemistry Instrumentation Core Facility provides the UCLA biochemistry community with easy access to sophisticated instrumentation for a wide variety...

  14. Consensus development of core competencies in intensive and critical care medicine training in China

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Xiuming; Ma, Penglin; Qiu, Haibo; Yu, Kaijiang; Tang, Yaoqing; Qian, Chuanyun; Fang, Qiang; Wang, Yushan; Yu, Xiangyou; Xu, Yuan; Du, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to develop consensus on core competencies required for postgraduate training in intensive care medicine. Methods We used a combination of a modified Delphi method and a nominal group technique to create and modify the list of core competencies to ensure maximum consensus. Ideas were generated modified from Competency Based Training in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe collaboration (CoBaTrICE) core competencies. An online survey invited healthcare professio...

  15. The C's of Our Sea Change: Plans for Training Staff, from Core Competencies to Learning 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blowers, Helene; Reed, Lori

    2007-01-01

    This article explains a two-part plan, created by the people at the Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County (PLCMC), to help staff members keep up with the sea change of technology. A core competencies training program was developed. This keeps workers afloat by providing them with the technology skills they need to support the change…

  16. Development of the Competency Assessment Tool-Mental Health, an instrument to assess core competencies for mental health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clasen, Carla; Meyer, Cheryl; Brun, Carl; Mase, William; Cauley, Kate

    2003-01-01

    As the focus on accountability in health care increases, there has been a corresponding emphasis on establishing core competencies for health care workers. This article discusses the development of an instrument to establish core competencies for workers in inpatient mental health settings. Twenty-six competencies were identified and rated by mental health care personnel on two subscales: the importance of the competency and how much behavioral health care workers could benefit from training on the competency. The reliability of the scale and its contributions to the training, retention and recruitment of direct care workers for behavioral health are discussed.

  17. Developing and implementing core competencies for integrative medicine fellowships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Melinda; Brodsky, Marc; Low Dog, Tieraona; Sierpina, Victor; Bailey, Michelle; Locke, Amy; Kogan, Mikhail; Rindfleisch, James A; Saper, Robert

    2014-03-01

    The Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine defines integrative medicine as "the practice of medicine that reaffirms the importance of the relationship between practitioner and patient, focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches, health care professionals, and disciplines to achieve optimal health and healing." Over the past three decades, the U.S. public increasingly has sought integrative medicine approaches. In an effort to train medical professionals to adequately counsel patients on the safe and appropriate use of these approaches, medical schools and residencies have developed curricula on integrative medicine for their trainees. In addition, integrative medicine clinical fellowships for postresidency physicians have emerged to provide training for practitioners interested in gaining greater expertise in this emerging field. Currently, 13 clinical fellowships in integrative medicine exist in the United States, and they are predominantly connected to academic medical centers or teaching affiliate hospitals. In 2010, the Consortium of Academic Health Centers for Integrative Medicine, represented by 56 member academic health care institutions with a shared commitment to advance the principles and practices of integrative medicine, convened a two-year task force to draft integrative medicine fellowship core competencies. These competencies would guide fellowship curriculum development and ensure that graduates possessed a common body of knowledge, skills, and attitudes. In this article, the authors discuss the competencies and the task force's process to develop them, as well as associated teaching and assessment methods, faculty development, potential barriers, and future directions.

  18. Core principles of assessment in competency-based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockyer, Jocelyn; Carraccio, Carol; Chan, Ming-Ka; Hart, Danielle; Smee, Sydney; Touchie, Claire; Holmboe, Eric S; Frank, Jason R

    2017-06-01

    The meaningful assessment of competence is critical for the implementation of effective competency-based medical education (CBME). Timely ongoing assessments are needed along with comprehensive periodic reviews to ensure that trainees continue to progress. New approaches are needed to optimize the use of multiple assessors and assessments; to synthesize the data collected from multiple assessors and multiple types of assessments; to develop faculty competence in assessment; and to ensure that relationships between the givers and receivers of feedback are appropriate. This paper describes the core principles of assessment for learning and assessment of learning. It addresses several ways to ensure the effectiveness of assessment programs, including using the right combination of assessment methods and conducting careful assessor selection and training. It provides a reconceptualization of the role of psychometrics and articulates the importance of a group process in determining trainees' progress. In addition, it notes that, to reach its potential as a driver in trainee development, quality care, and patient safety, CBME requires effective information management and documentation as well as ongoing consideration of ways to improve the assessment system.

  19. Principled, Transformational Leadership: Analyzing the Discourse of Leadership in the Development of Librarianship's Core Competences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Deborah; Given, Lisa M.

    2013-01-01

    Using discourse analysis, this article explores three questions: (a) Why was "principled, transformational leadership" the leadership style added to Core Competences? (b) What was the discourse of leadership in the profession surrounding the development of the Core Competences? (c) How might this competence affect LIS education? And what measures,…

  20. Family Skills for General Psychiatry Residents: Meeting ACGME Core Competency Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Ellen M.; Heru, Alison M.; Grunebaum, Henry; Rolland, John; Wood, Beatrice; Bruty, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The authors discuss the knowledge, attitudes, and skills needed for a resident to be competent in supporting and working with families, as mandated by the residency review committee (RRC) core competencies. Methods: The RRC core competencies, as they relate to patients and their families, are reviewed. The Group for Advancement of…

  1. The core competencies of James Marion Sims, MD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straughn, J Michael; Gandy, Roy E; Rodning, Charles B

    2012-07-01

    The concept of core competencies in graduate medical education was introduced by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education of the American Medical Association to semiquantitatively assess the professional performance of students, residents, practitioners, and faculty. Many aspects of the career of J. Marion Sims, MD, are exemplary of those core competencies: MEDICAL KNOWLEDGE: Author of the first American textbook related to gynecology. MEDICAL CARE: Innovator of the Sims' Vaginal Speculum, Sims' Position, Sims' Test, and vesico-/rectovaginal fistulorrhaphy; advocated abdominal exploration for penetrating wounds; performed the first cholecystostomy. PROFESSIONALISM: Served as President of the New York Academy of Medicine, the American Medical Association, and the American Gynecologic Society. INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS/COMMUNICATION: Cared for the indigent, hearthless, indentured, disenfranchised; served as consulting surgeon to the Empress Eugénie (France), the Duchess of Hamilton (Scotland), the Empress of Austria, and other royalty of the aristocratic Houses of Europe; accorded the National Order of the Legion of Honor. PRACTICE-BASED LEARNING: Introduction of silver wire sutures; adoption of the principles of asepsis/antisepsis; adoption of the principles of general anesthesia. SYSTEMS-BASED PRACTICE: Established the Woman's Hospital, New York City, New York, the predecessor of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Center for the Treatment of Cancer and Allied Diseases; organized the Anglo-American Ambulance Corps under the patronage of Napoleon III. What led him to a life of clinical and humanitarian service? First, he was determined to succeed. His formal medical/surgical education was perhaps the best available to North Americans during that era. Second, he was courageous in experimentation and innovation, applying new developments in operative technique, asepsis/antisepsis, and general anesthesia. Third, his curiosity was not burdened by rigid

  2. Developing engineering design core competences through analysis of industrial products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Claus Thorp; Lenau, Torben Anker

    2011-01-01

    Most product development work carried out in industrial practice is characterised by being incremental, i.e. the industrial company has had a product in production and on the market for some time, and now time has come to design a new and upgraded variant. This type of redesign project requires...... that the engineering designers have core design competences to carry through an analysis of the existing product encompassing both a user-oriented side and a technical side, as well as to synthesise solution proposals for the new and upgraded product. The authors of this paper see an educational challenge in staging...... a course module, in which students develop knowledge, understanding and skills, which will prepare them for being able to participate in and contribute to redesign projects in industrial practice. In the course module Product Analysis and Redesign that has run for 8 years we have developed and refined...

  3. Interrelationship between core interventions and core competencies of forensic psychiatric nursing in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenkanen, Helena; Tiihonen, Jari; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Kinnunen, Juha

    2011-03-01

    The importance of core competencies (CC) and their relationship to core interventions in clinical practice guidelines on schizophrenia (CPGS), and the abilities to master these competencies were studied among registered nurses (RN) and practical mental nurses (PMN) in a forensic psychiatric setting. Data were collected from RNs, PMNs, and managers of all five forensic psychiatric facilities in Finland. The research material was obtained by using a 360-degree feedback method. The response rate was 68% (N = 428). The differences between the nurse groups were statistically significant (p ≤ 0.05) regarding the importance of and ability to master the following CCs: (1) pharmacotherapy, (2) knowledge in forensic psychiatry and violent behavior, (3) the treatment of violent patients, (4) processing patient's and own emotion, and (5) need-adapted treatment of the patient. Overall, RNs exceeded PMNs in mastering the CCs, however the principles of the CPGS were not achieved within the current resources in Finland. In summary, RNs, rather than PMNs, should be recruited for work in forensic psychiatric nursing, although a considerable amount of specific training would still be required to achieve competence. Implications of our research indicate that all nurses working in this area need to receive further education in forensic psychiatry and in forensic psychiatric nursing. © 2011 International Association of Forensic Nurses.

  4. Geriatric core competencies for family medicine curriculum and enhanced skills: care of elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A C; Dobbs, Bonnie M; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-06-01

    There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents' clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Iterative expert panel process for the development of the core competencies, with a pre-defined process for implementation of the core competencies. Eighty-five core competencies were selected overall by the Working Group, with 57 core competencies selected for the PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and an additional 28 selected for the PGY-III COE residents. The core competencies follow the CanMEDS Family Medicine roles. Both sets of core competencies are based on consensus. Due to demographic changes, it is essential that Family Physicians have the required skills and knowledge to care for the frail elderly. The core competencies described were developed for PGY-I/II Family Medicine residents and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE, with a focus on the development of geriatric expertise for those patients that would most benefit.

  5. Towards an International Framework for Recommendations of Core Competencies in Nursing and Inter-Professional Informatics: The TIGER Competency Synthesis Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Ursula; Shaw, Toria; Thye, Johannes; Egbert, Nicole; Marin, Heimar; Ball, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Informatics competencies of the health care workforce must meet the requirements of inter-professional process and outcome oriented provision of care. In order to help nursing education transform accordingly, the TIGER Initiative deployed an international survey, with participation from 21 countries, to evaluate and prioritise a broad list of core competencies for nurses in five domains: 1) nursing management, 2) information technology (IT) management in nursing, 3) interprofessional coordination of care, 4) quality management, and 5) clinical nursing. Informatics core competencies were found highly important for all domains. In addition, this project compiled eight national cases studies from Austria, Finland, Germany, Ireland, New Zealand, the Philippines, Portugal, and Switzerland that reflected the country specific perspective. These findings will lead us to an international framework of informatics recommendations.

  6. [Construction of the addiction prevention core competency model for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Sook; Jung, Sun Young

    2013-12-01

    This study was done to provide fundamental data for the development of competency reinforcement programs to prevent addictive behavior in adolescents through the construction and examination of an addiction prevention core competency model. In this study core competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling were identified, and the addiction prevention core competency model was developed. It was validated methodologically. Competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents as defined by the addiction prevention core competency model are as follows: positive self-worth, self-control skill, time management skill, reality perception skill, risk coping skill, and positive communication with parents and with peers or social group. After construction, concurrent cross validation of the addiction prevention core competency model showed that this model was appropriate. The study results indicate that the addiction prevention core competency model for the prevention of addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling can be used as a foundation for an integral approach to enhance adolescent is used as an adjective and prevent addictive behavior. This approach can be a school-centered, cost-efficient strategy which not only reduces addictive behavior in adolescents, but also improves the quality of their resources.

  7. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uhmeyer, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  8. Core Competencies in Advanced Training: What Supervisors Say about Graduate Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Thorana S.; Graves, Todd

    2011-01-01

    In an attempt to identify needed mental health skills, many professional organizations have or are in the process of establishing core competency standards for their professions. The AAMFT identified 128 core competencies for the independent practice of MFT. The aim of this study was to learn the opinions of AAMFT Approved Supervisors as to how…

  9. Exploring Marriage and Family Therapy Supervisees' Perspectives about Postgraduate Supervision and the Acquisition of Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Stephanie J.

    2013-01-01

    The topic of core competencies has been a central focus in the marriage and family therapy field since 2003. There are currently no published studies from the supervisees' perspective about the role of supervision in the acquisition of core competencies. This qualitative study used transcendental phenomenology to explore supervisees' perspectives…

  10. Development of Core Competencies for Paraprofessional Nutrition Educators Who Deliver Food Stamp Nutrition Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Susan S.; Pearson, Meredith; Chipman, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to describe the process used for the development of core competencies for paraprofessional nutrition educators in Food Stamp Nutrition Education (FSNE). The development process included the efforts of an expert panel of state and multicounty FSNE leaders to draft the core competencies and the validation of those…

  11. Identification of Core Competencies for an Undergraduate Food Safety Curriculum Using a Modified Delphi Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Lynette M.; Wiedmann, Martin; Orta-Ramirez, Alicia; Oliver, Haley F.; Nightingale, Kendra K.; Moore, Christina M.; Stevenson, Clinton D.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Identification of core competencies for undergraduates in food safety is critical to assure courses and curricula are appropriate in maintaining a well-qualified food safety workforce. The purpose of this study was to identify and refine core competencies relevant to postsecondary food safety education using a modified Delphi method. Twenty-nine…

  12. The CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Margaret M.; Battel-Kirk, Barbara; Dempsey, Colette

    2012-01-01

    Background: The CompHP Project on Developing Competencies and Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe was developed in response to the need for new and changing health promotion competencies to address health challenges. This article presents the process of developing the CompHP Core Competencies Framework for Health Promotion across…

  13. Evolution dynamics modeling and simulation of logistics enterprise's core competence based on service innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Tong, Yuting

    2017-04-01

    With the rapid development of economy, the development of logistics enterprises in China is also facing a huge challenge, especially the logistics enterprises generally lack of core competitiveness, and service innovation awareness is not strong. Scholars in the process of studying the core competitiveness of logistics enterprises are mainly from the perspective of static stability, not from the perspective of dynamic evolution to explore. So the author analyzes the influencing factors and the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises, using the method of system dynamics to study the cause and effect of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, construct a system dynamics model of evolution of core competence logistics enterprises, which can be simulated by vensim PLE. The analysis for the effectiveness and sensitivity of simulation model indicates the model can be used as the fitting of the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises and reveal the process and mechanism of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, and provide management strategies for improving the core competence of logistics enterprises. The construction and operation of computer simulation model offers a kind of effective method for studying the evolution of logistics enterprise core competence.

  14. Gap analysis: a method to assess core competency development in the curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fater, Kerry H

    2013-01-01

    To determine the extent to which safety and quality improvement core competency development occurs in an undergraduate nursing program. Rapid change and increased complexity of health care environments demands that health care professionals are adequately prepared to provide high quality, safe care. A gap analysis compared the present state of competency development to a desirable (ideal) state. The core competencies, Nurse of the Future Nursing Core Competencies, reflect the ideal state and represent minimal expectations for entry into practice from pre-licensure programs. Findings from the gap analysis suggest significant strengths in numerous competency domains, deficiencies in two competency domains, and areas of redundancy in the curriculum. Gap analysis provides valuable data to direct curriculum revision. Opportunities for competency development were identified, and strategies were created jointly with the practice partner, thereby enhancing relevant knowledge, attitudes, and skills nurses need for clinical practice currently and in the future.

  15. The German competence network on nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuczera, B.; Fritz, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The present German energy policy is based on the phase-out of nuclear electricity generation, which means that the last of the currently operating eighteen German nuclear power plants will run until about 2022. While the plants will be shut down one after the other, decommissioning will start together with interim storage of the radioactive waste. The safe waste disposal in a final repository is planned to start around 2030 and may take another two decades, i.e., in Germany nuclear competence is further needed, at least until the mid of this century. Against this background, a high-ranking commission under the direction of the Federal Ministry of Economy and Technology evaluated the publicly funded nuclear safety related research and development (R and D) activities in Germany. One of the recommendations made by the commission was the foundation of a Competence Network on Nuclear Technology for an optimum coordination of the remaining nuclear activities including aspects of future human resources in this area. This Network was established in March 2000 with the following member institutions: Research Centre Juelich, Research Centre Karlsruhe, Research Centre Rossendorf and the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) in Munich and their neighbouring Technical Universities. The strategic objectives of the Competence Network include: Trend investigations on job development and on university education capacities in the nuclear technology sector; Enhanced cooperation of the Research Centres with universities in the nuclear field and support of international education initiatives (e.g. ENEN, WNU); Coordination and bundling of the activities in publicly funded reactor safety and waste management R and D programmes; Support of qualified young scientists and engineers (pre-doctoral students) - also by third-party funds; Participation in and collaboration with international projects and activities for advancements of international nuclear safety

  16. Factors Affecting Teachers' Competence in the Field of Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Hamonangan

    2014-01-01

    The development of learning technology today, have a direct impact on improving teachers' information technology competence. This paper is presented the results of research related to teachers' information technology competence. The study was conducted with a survey of some 245 vocational high school teachers. There are two types of instrument…

  17. Consensus development of core competencies in intensive and critical care medicine training in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoyun; Xi, Xiuming; Ma, Penglin; Qiu, Haibo; Yu, Kaijiang; Tang, Yaoqing; Qian, Chuanyun; Fang, Qiang; Wang, Yushan; Yu, Xiangyou; Xu, Yuan; Du, Bin

    2016-10-16

    The aim of this study is to develop consensus on core competencies required for postgraduate training in intensive care medicine. We used a combination of a modified Delphi method and a nominal group technique to create and modify the list of core competencies to ensure maximum consensus. Ideas were generated modified from Competency Based Training in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe collaboration (CoBaTrICE) core competencies. An online survey invited healthcare professionals, educators, and trainees to rate and comment on these competencies. The output from the online survey was edited and then reviewed by a nominal group of 13 intensive care professionals to identify each competence for importance. The resulting list was then recirculated in the nominal group for iterative rating. The online survey yielded a list of 199 competencies for nominal group reviewing. After five rounds of rating, 129 competencies entered the final set defined as core competencies. We have generated a set of core competencies using a consensus technique which can serve as an indicator for training program development.

  18. Identifying and Eliminating Deficiencies in the General Surgery Resident Core Competency Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Nicole M; Milewicz, Allen; Whitney, Stephen E; Liang, Michael K; Braxton, Carla C

    2014-06-01

    Although the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has defined 6 core competencies required of resident education, no consensus exists on best practices for reaching resident proficiency. Surgery programs must develop resourceful methods to incorporate learning. While patient care and medical knowledge are approached with formal didactics and traditional Halstedian educational formats, other core competencies are presumed to be learned on the job or emphasized in conferences. To test the hypothesis that our residents lack a foundation in several of the nonclinical core competencies and to seek to develop a formal curriculum that can be integrated into our current didactic time, with minimal effect on resident work hours and rest hours. Anonymous Likert-type scale needs assessment survey requesting residents within a large single general surgery residency program to rate their understanding, working knowledge, or level of comfort on the following 10 topics: negotiation and conflict resolution; leadership styles; health care legislation; principles of quality delivery of care, patient safety, and performance improvement; business of medicine; clinical practice models; role of advocacy in health care policy and government; personal finance management; team building; and roles of innovation and technology in health care delivery. Proportions of resident responses scored as positive (agree or strongly agree) or negative (disagree or strongly disagree). In total, 48 surgery residents (70%) responded to the survey. Only 3 topics (leadership styles, team building, and roles of innovation and technology in health care delivery) had greater than 70% positive responses, while 2 topics (negotiation and conflict resolution and principles of quality delivery of care, patient safety, and performance improvement) had greater than 60% positive responses. The remaining topics had less than 40% positive responses, with the least positive responses on the topics

  19. Development of Core Design Technology for LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeong Il; Hong, S. G.; Jang, J. W. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    This report describes the contents of core design technology and computer code system development performed during 2005 and 2006 on the objects of nuclear proliferation resistant core and nuclear fuel basic key technology development security. Also, it is including the future application plans for the results and the developed methodology, important information and the materials acquired in this period. Two core designs with single enrichment were considered for the KALIMER-600 during the first year : 1) the first core uses the non-fuel rods such as B4C, ZrH1.8, and dummy rods, 2) the core using different cladding thickness for each core region (inner, middle, and outer cores) without non-fuel rods to flatten the power distribution. In particular, the latter design was intended to simplify the fuel assembly design by eliminating the heterogeneity. It was found that the proposed design satisfy all of the Gen IV SFR design goals on the cycle length longer than 18 EFPM, fuel discharge burnup larger than 80GWd/t, sodium void worth, conversion ratio, reactivity burnup swing and so on. For this object reactor, the structure integrity outside of reactor is confirmed for the radiation exposure during the plant life according to the result of shielding design and evaluation. The transmutation capability and the core characteristics of sodium cooled fast reactor was also evaluated according to the change of MA amount. The reactivity coefficients for the BN-600 reactor with MA fueled are calculated and the results are compared and evaluated with other participants results. Even though the discrepancies between the results of participants are somewhat large but the K-CORE results are close to the average within a standard deviation. To have the capability of 3-dimensional core dynamic analysis such as analyzing power distribution and reactivity variations according to the asymmetric insertion/withdrawal of control rods, the calculation module for core dynamic parameters was

  20. Early psychosis workforce development: Core competencies for mental health professionals working in the early psychosis field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Helen; Jorm, Anthony F; Killackey, Eoin; Francey, Shona; Mulcahy, Dianne

    2017-08-09

    The aim of this study was to identify the core competencies required of mental health professionals working in the early psychosis field, which could function as an evidence-based tool to support the early psychosis workforce and in turn assist early psychosis service implementation and strengthen early psychosis model fidelity. The Delphi method was used to establish expert consensus on the core competencies. In the first stage, a systematic literature search was conducted to generate competency items. In the second stage, a panel consisting of expert early psychosis clinicians from around the world was formed. Panel members then rated each of the competency items on how essential they are to the clinical practice of all early psychosis clinicians. In total, 1023 pieces of literature including textbooks, journal articles and grey literature were reviewed. A final 542 competency items were identified for inclusion in the questionnaire. A total of 63 early psychosis experts participated in 3 rating rounds. Of the 542 competency items, 242 were endorsed as the required core competencies. There were 29 competency items that were endorsed by 62 or more experts, and these may be considered the foundational competencies for early psychosis practice. The study generated a set of core competencies that provide a common language for early psychosis clinicians across professional disciplines and country of practice, and potentially are a useful professional resource to support early psychosis workforce development and service reform. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  1. A goodness of fit and validity study of the Korean radiological technologists' core job competency model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Chang Seon; Cho, A Ra; Hur, Yera; Choi, Seong Youl

    2017-01-01

    Radiological Technologists deals with the life of a person which means professional competency is essential for the job. Nevertheless, there have been no studies in Korea that identified the job competence of radiologists. In order to define the core job competencies of Korean radiologists and to present the factor models, 147 questionnaires on job competency of radiology were analyzed using 'PASW Statistics Version 18.0' and 'AMOS Version 18.0'. The valid model consisted of five core job competencies ('Patient management', 'Health and safety', 'Operation of equipment', 'Procedures and management') and 17 sub – competencies. As a result of the factor analysis, the RMSEA value was 0.1 and the CFI, and TLI values were close to 0.9 in the measurement model of the five core job competencies. The validity analysis showed that the mean variance extraction was 0.5 or more and the conceptual reliability value was 0.7 or more , And there was a high correlation between subordinate competencies included in each subordinate competencies. The results of this study are expected to provide specific information necessary for the training and management of human resources centered on competence by clearly showing the job competence required for radiologists in Korea's health environment

  2. Developments in gaseous core reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz, N.J.; Dugan, E.T.

    1979-01-01

    An effort to characterize the most promising concepts for large, central-station electrical generation was done under the auspices of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP). The two leading candidates were identified from this effort: The Mixed-Flow Gaseous Core Reactor (MFGCR) and the Heterogeneous Gas Core Reactor (HGCR). Key advantages over other nuclear concepts are weighed against the disadvantages of an unproven technology and the cost-time for deployment to make a sound decision on RandD support for these promising reactor alternatives. 38 refs

  3. Industry-Oriented Competency Requirements for Mechatronics Technology in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyr, Wen-Jye

    2012-01-01

    This study employed a three-phase empirical method to identify competency indicators for mechatronics technology according to industry-oriented criteria. In Phase I, a list of required competencies was compiled using Behavioral Event Interviews (BEI) with three engineers specializing in the field of mechatronics technology. In Phase II, the Delphi…

  4. Redefining E-3 Core Competencies for Dominant Battlespace Knowledge in Future Combat Operations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirkendall, David A

    2005-01-01

    .... The study focuses on how E-3 training is driven by the maintenance of a set of battle management core competencies rooted in the basics of aircraft tactical fluid control force accountability and aerial refueling...

  5. Developing a Core Competency Model for Information Systems Management Officers in the United States Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunt, P

    2000-01-01

    ...) to implement that vision. The challenge then becomes, what exactly are the core competencies, or more plainly put, what knowledge, skills and attributes must these officers possess, in order to be successful in carrying...

  6. [Effects of core competency support program on depression and suicidal ideation for adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Sook

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a core competency support program on depression and suicidal ideation in adolescents. A quasi-experimental design was employed in this study. Participants for the study were high school students, 27 in the experimental group and 29 in the control group. Data were analyzed using the SPSS/WIN. 14.0 program with X(2) test, t-test, and ANCOVA. Participants in the core competency support program reported decreased depression scores significantly different from those in the control group. Participants in the core competency support program reported decreased suicidal ideation scores, also significantly different from those in the control group. The core competency support program was effective in decreasing depression and suicidal ideation for adolescents. Therefore, this approach is recommended as a suicide prevention strategy for adolescents.

  7. Otolaryngology Resident Education and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucett, Erynne A; Barry, Jonnae Y; McCrary, Hilary C; Saleh, Ahlam A; Erman, Audrey B; Ishman, Stacey L

    2018-04-01

    To date, there have been no reports in the current literature regarding the use of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in otolaryngology residency training. An evaluation may help educators address these core competencies in the training curriculum. To examine the quantity and nature of otolaryngology residency training literature through a systematic review and to evaluate whether this literature aligns with the 6 core competencies. A medical librarian assisted in a search of all indexed years of the PubMed, Embase, Education Resources Information Center (via EBSCOhost), Cochrane Library (Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane Methodology Register), Thomson Reuters Web of Science (Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index Expanded, Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science, and Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Social Science and Humanities), Elsevier Scopus, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases to identify relevant English-language studies. Included studies contained original human data and focused on otolaryngology resident education. Data regarding study design, setting, and ACGME core competencies addressed were extracted from each article. Initial searches were performed on May 20, 2015, and updated on October 4, 2016. In this systematic review of 104 unique studies, interpersonal communication skills were reported 15 times; medical knowledge, 48 times; patient care, 44 times; practice-based learning and improvement, 31 times; professionalism, 15 times; and systems-based practices, 10 times. Multiple studies addressed more than 1 core competency at once, and 6 addressed all 6 core competencies. Increased emphasis on nonclinical core competencies is needed, including professionalism, interpersonal and communication skills, and systems-based practices in the otolaryngology residency training curriculum. A formal curriculum

  8. Application of nursing core competency standard education in the training of nursing undergraduates

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Fang-qin; Wang, Yan-ling; Wu, Ying; Guo, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of nursing core competency standard education in undergraduate nursing training. Methods: Forty-two nursing undergraduates from the class of 2007 were recruited as the control group receiving conventional teaching methods, while 31 students from the class of 2008 were recruited as the experimental group receiving nursing core competency standard education. Teaching outcomes were evaluated using comprehensive theoretical knowledge examination and objec...

  9. A core competency-based objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) can predict future resident performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenstein, Joshua; Heron, Sheryl; Santen, Sally; Shayne, Philip; Ander, Douglas

    2010-10-01

    This study evaluated the ability of an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) administered in the first month of residency to predict future resident performance in the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies. Eighteen Postgraduate Year 1 (PGY-1) residents completed a five-station OSCE in the first month of postgraduate training. Performance was graded in each of the ACGME core competencies. At the end of 18 months of training, faculty evaluations of resident performance in the emergency department (ED) were used to calculate a cumulative clinical evaluation score for each core competency. The correlations between OSCE scores and clinical evaluation scores at 18 months were assessed on an overall level and in each core competency. There was a statistically significant correlation between overall OSCE scores and overall clinical evaluation scores (R = 0.48, p competencies of patient care (R = 0.49, p competencies. An early-residency OSCE has the ability to predict future postgraduate performance on a global level and in specific core competencies. Used appropriately, such information can be a valuable tool for program directors in monitoring residents' progress and providing more tailored guidance. © 2010 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  10. Exploring LIS Students' Beliefs in Importance and Self-Efficacy of Core Information Literacy Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Maria; Pascual, Rosaura Fernandez

    2016-01-01

    Understanding perceptions of Library and Information Science (LIS) students on two dimensions--belief in the importance (BIM) of a set of core information competencies, and Self-Efficacy (SE)--is pursued. Factor analysis implementation raises a clear distinction between BIM and SE results. This analysis points to two sets of competencies:…

  11. Measuring Students' Self-Perceived Competence in Home Economics Core Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Frances M.

    1990-01-01

    Using the self-efficacy concept from Bandura's social learning theory, researchers developed an instrument to measure students' self-perceived competence in home economics core areas. Administration to all graduate students at a midwestern university during 1982-88 verified eight original competence areas and added a ninth. (SK)

  12. Athletic Training Student Core Competency Implementation During Patient Encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallario, Julie M; Van Lunen, Bonnie L; Hoch, Johanna M; Hoch, Matthew; Manspeaker, Sarah A; Pribesh, Shana L

    2018-03-01

      Health care research evidence suggests that early patient encounters (PEs), as well as the purposeful implementation of professional core competencies (CCs), for athletic training students (ATSs) may be beneficial to their ability to provide care. However, no investigators have related facets of the clinical education experience with CC implementation as a form of summative assessment of the clinical experience.   To determine the relationship between the frequency and length of PEs, as well as the student's role and clinical site during PEs, and the students' perceived CC implementation during these encounters.   Cross-sectional study.   Professional athletic training program, National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I institution.   We purposefully recruited 1 athletic training program that used E*Value software; 40 participants (31 females, 9 males) enrolled in the professional phase (12 first year, 14 second year, 14 third year) participated.   Participants viewed a 20-minute recorded CC educational module followed by educational handouts, which were also posted online for reference throughout the semester. The E*Value software was used to track PEs, including the type of encounter (ie, actual patient, practice encounter, didactic practice scenario), the type of site where the encounter occurred (university, high school), and the participant's role (observed, assisted, performed), as well as responses to an added block of questions indicating which, if any, of the CCs were implemented during the PE.   Variables per patient were PE length (minutes), participant role, site at which the encounter occurred, and whether any of the 6 CCs were implemented ( yes/ no). Variables per participant were average encounter length (minutes), encounter frequency, modal role, clinical site assignment, and the number of times each CC was implemented. Separate 1-way analyses of variance were used to examine the relationships between role or clinical site

  13. Recommendations for Training in Pediatric Psychology: Defining Core Competencies Across Training Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicke, David M.; McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Mullins, Larry L.; Robins, Paul M.; Wu, Yelena P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective As a field, pediatric psychology has focused considerable efforts on the education and training of students and practitioners. Alongside a broader movement toward competency attainment in professional psychology and within the health professions, the Society of Pediatric Psychology commissioned a Task Force to establish core competencies in pediatric psychology and address the need for contemporary training recommendations. Methods The Task Force adapted the framework proposed by the Competency Benchmarks Work Group on preparing psychologists for health service practice and defined competencies applicable across training levels ranging from initial practicum training to entry into the professional workforce in pediatric psychology. Results Competencies within 6 cluster areas, including science, professionalism, interpersonal, application, education, and systems, and 1 crosscutting cluster, crosscutting knowledge competencies in pediatric psychology, are presented in this report. Conclusions Recommendations for the use of, and the further refinement of, these suggested competencies are discussed. PMID:24719239

  14. Multi-institutional validation of a web-based core competency assessment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuenca, Arnold; Welling, Richard; Sachdeva, Ajit K; Blair, Patrice G; Horvath, Karen; Tarpley, John; Savino, John A; Gray, Richard; Gulley, Julie; Arnold, Teresa; Wolfe, Kevin; Risucci, Donald A

    2007-01-01

    The Association of Program Directors in Surgery and the Division of Education of the American College of Surgeons developed and implemented a web-based system for end-of-rotation faculty assessment of ACGME core competencies of residents. This study assesses its reliability and validity across multiple programs. Each assessment included ratings (1-5 scale) on 23 items reflecting the 6 core competencies. A total of 4241 end-of-rotation assessments were completed for 332 general surgery residents (> or =5 evaluations each) at 5 sites during the 2004-2005 and 2005-2006 academic years. The mean rating for each resident on each item was computed for each academic year. The mean rating of items representing each competency was computed for each resident. Additional data included USMLE and ABSITE scores, PGY, and status in program (categorical, designated preliminary, and undesignated preliminary). Coefficient alpha was greater than 0.90 for each competency score. Mean ratings for each competency increased significantly (p competencies at all PGY levels. Competency ratings of PGY 1 residents correlated significantly with USMLE Step I, ranging from (r = 0.26, p competencies correlated significantly with the 2006 ABSITE Total Percentile Score (range: r = 0.20, p core competencies are internally consistent. The pattern of statistically significant correlations between competency ratings and USMLE and ABSITE scores supports the postdictive and concurrent validity, respectively, of faculty perceptions of resident knowledge. The pattern of increased ratings as a function of PGY supports the construct validity of faculty ratings of resident core competencies.

  15. Designing Class Activities to Meet Specific Core Training Competencies: A Developmental Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, Lorraine J.; McDonnell, Kelly A.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a developmental model for designing and utilizing class activities to meet specific Association for Specialists in Group Work (ASGW) core training competencies for group workers. A review of the relevant literature about teaching group work and meeting core training standards is provided. The authors suggest a process by…

  16. Identifying Core Mobile Learning Faculty Competencies Based Integrated Approach: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbarbary, Rafik Said

    2015-01-01

    This study is based on the integrated approach as a concept framework to identify, categorize, and rank a key component of mobile learning core competencies for Egyptian faculty members in higher education. The field investigation framework used four rounds Delphi technique to determine the importance rate of each component of core competencies…

  17. Information Superiority: Outsourcing an Air Force Core Competency?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McTerman, Hugh

    1997-01-01

    .... This reliance has caused most companies to take a closer look at what core business the firm is actually in, how information impacts those strategic areas, and how best to obtain the needed information...

  18. Creating value-focused healthcare delivery systems: Part three--Core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, R N

    1997-01-01

    Value is created through the delivery of high-quality, cost--effective healthcare services. The ability to create value from the providers' perspective is facilitated through the development and implementation of essential, customer-focused core competencies. These core competencies include customer relationship management, payer/provider relationship management, disease management, outcomes management, financial/cost management, and information management. Customer relationship management is the foundation upon which all core competencies must be built. All of the core competencies must focus on the needs of the customers, both internal and external. Structuring all processes involved in the core competencies from the perspective of the customer will ensure that value is created throughout the system. Payer/provider relationship management will become a crucial pillar for healthcare providers in the future. As more vertical integration among providers occurs, the management of the relationships among providers and with payers will become more important. Many of the integration strategies being implemented across the country involve the integration of hospitals, physicians, and payers to form accountable health plans. The relationships must be organized to form "win/win" situations, where all parties are focused on a shared vision of creating value and none of the parties benefits at the expense of the others. Disease management in creating value requires that we begin examining the disease process along the entire continuum. Not only must providers be able to provide high-quality acute and chronic care, but they must also begin to focus more heavily on programs of prevention. Value is created throughout the system through reducing the prevalence and incidence of disease. Only through managing the full continuum of health will value be created throughout the healthcare delivery system. Outcomes management ensures that the outcomes are the highest quality at a cost

  19. Factors Motivating and Hindering Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Adile Askim; Akbulut, Yavuz; Odabasi, H. Ferhan; Ceylan, Beril; Kuzu, Elif Bugra; Donmez, Onur; Izmirli, Ozden Sahin

    2013-01-01

    Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence (ICTAC) can be defined as "individuals' motivation and capacity to voluntarily employ their ICT skills for initiating or taking part in civic actions". Since academic staff and teachers in ICT related fields have crucial roles in training action-competent individuals, this…

  20. Charting a course to competency: an approach to mapping public health core competencies to existing trainings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiworth, Latrissa L; Allan, Susan; D'Ambrosio, Luann; Coplen-Abrahamson, Marlene

    2014-03-01

    Consistent with other professional fields, the goals of public health training have moved from a focus on knowledge transfer to the development of skills or competencies. At least six national competency sets have been developed in the past decade pertaining to public health professionals. State and local public health agencies are increasingly using competency sets as frameworks for staff development and assessment. Mapping competencies to training has potential for enhancing the value of public health training during resource-constrained times by directly linking training content to the desired skills. For existing public health trainings, the challenge is how to identify competencies addressed in those courses in a manner that is not burdensome and that produces valid results. This article describes a process for mapping competencies to the learning objectives, assignments, and assessments of existing trainings. The process presented could be used by any training center or organization that seeks to connect public health workforce competencies to previously developed instruction. Public health practice can be strengthened more effectively if trainings can be selected for the desired practice skills or competencies.

  1. Core competencies for pain management: results of an interprofessional consensus summit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Scott M; Young, Heather M; Lucas Arwood, Ellyn; Chou, Roger; Herr, Keela; Murinson, Beth B; Watt-Watson, Judy; Carr, Daniel B; Gordon, Debra B; Stevens, Bonnie J; Bakerjian, Debra; Ballantyne, Jane C; Courtenay, Molly; Djukic, Maja; Koebner, Ian J; Mongoven, Jennifer M; Paice, Judith A; Prasad, Ravi; Singh, Naileshni; Sluka, Kathleen A; St Marie, Barbara; Strassels, Scott A

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this project was to develop core competencies in pain assessment and management for prelicensure health professional education. Such core pain competencies common to all prelicensure health professionals have not been previously reported. An interprofessional executive committee led a consensus-building process to develop the core competencies. An in-depth literature review was conducted followed by engagement of an interprofessional Competency Advisory Committee to critique competencies through an iterative process. A 2-day summit was held so that consensus could be reached. The consensus-derived competencies were categorized within four domains: multidimensional nature of pain, pain assessment and measurement, management of pain, and context of pain management. These domains address the fundamental concepts and complexity of pain; how pain is observed and assessed; collaborative approaches to treatment options; and application of competencies across the life span in the context of various settings, populations, and care team models. A set of values and guiding principles are embedded within each domain. These competencies can serve as a foundation for developing, defining, and revising curricula and as a resource for the creation of learning activities across health professions designed to advance care that effectively responds to pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Core Competencies for Pain Management: Results of an Interprofessional Consensus Summit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Scott M; Young, Heather M; Lucas Arwood, Ellyn; Chou, Roger; Herr, Keela; Murinson, Beth B; Watt-Watson, Judy; Carr, Daniel B; Gordon, Debra B; Stevens, Bonnie J; Bakerjian, Debra; Ballantyne, Jane C; Courtenay, Molly; Djukic, Maja; Koebner, Ian J; Mongoven, Jennifer M; Paice, Judith A; Prasad, Ravi; Singh, Naileshni; Sluka, Kathleen A; St Marie, Barbara; Strassels, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this project was to develop core competencies in pain assessment and management for prelicensure health professional education. Such core pain competencies common to all prelicensure health professionals have not been previously reported. Methods An interprofessional executive committee led a consensus-building process to develop the core competencies. An in-depth literature review was conducted followed by engagement of an interprofessional Competency Advisory Committee to critique competencies through an iterative process. A 2-day summit was held so that consensus could be reached. Results The consensus-derived competencies were categorized within four domains: multidimensional nature of pain, pain assessment and measurement, management of pain, and context of pain management. These domains address the fundamental concepts and complexity of pain; how pain is observed and assessed; collaborative approaches to treatment options; and application of competencies across the life span in the context of various settings, populations, and care team models. A set of values and guiding principles are embedded within each domain. Conclusions These competencies can serve as a foundation for developing, defining, and revising curricula and as a resource for the creation of learning activities across health professions designed to advance care that effectively responds to pain. PMID:23577878

  3. Core competencies for emergency medicine clerkships: results of a Canadian consensus initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penciner, Rick; Woods, Robert A; McEwen, Jill; Lee, Richard; Langhan, Trevor; Bandiera, Glen

    2013-01-01

    There is no consensus on what constitutes the core competencies for emergency medicine (EM) clerkship rotations in Canada. Existing EM curricula have been developed through informal consensus and often focus on EM content to be known at the end of training rather than what is an appropriate focus for a time-limited rotation in EM. We sought to define the core competencies for EM clerkship in Canada through consensus among an expert panel of Canadian EM educators. We used a modified Delphi method and the CanMEDS 2005 Physician Competency Framework to develop a consensus among expert EM educators from across Canada. Thirty experts from nine different medical schools across Canada participated on the panel. The initial list consisted of 152 competencies organized in the seven domains of the CanMEDS 2005 Physician Competency Framework. After the second round of the Delphi process, the list of competencies was reduced to 62 (59% reduction). A complete list of competencies is provided. This study established a national consensus defining the core competencies for EM clerkship in Canada.

  4. Core competencies for shared decision making training programs: insights from an international, interdisciplinary working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, France; Moumjid-Ferdjaoui, Nora; Drolet, Renée; Stacey, Dawn; Härter, Martin; Bastian, Hilda; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Borduas, Francine; Charles, Cathy; Coulter, Angela; Desroches, Sophie; Friedrich, Gwendolyn; Gafni, Amiram; Graham, Ian D; Labrecque, Michel; LeBlanc, Annie; Légaré, Jean; Politi, Mary; Sargeant, Joan; Thomson, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Shared decision making is now making inroads in health care professionals' continuing education curriculum, but there is no consensus on what core competencies are required by clinicians for effectively involving patients in health-related decisions. Ready-made programs for training clinicians in shared decision making are in high demand, but existing programs vary widely in their theoretical foundations, length, and content. An international, interdisciplinary group of 25 individuals met in 2012 to discuss theoretical approaches to making health-related decisions, compare notes on existing programs, take stock of stakeholders concerns, and deliberate on core competencies. This article summarizes the results of those discussions. Some participants believed that existing models already provide a sufficient conceptual basis for developing and implementing shared decision making competency-based training programs on a wide scale. Others argued that this would be premature as there is still no consensus on the definition of shared decision making or sufficient evidence to recommend specific competencies for implementing shared decision making. However, all participants agreed that there were 2 broad types of competencies that clinicians need for implementing shared decision making: relational competencies and risk communication competencies. Further multidisciplinary research could broaden and deepen our understanding of core competencies for shared decision making training. Copyright © 2013 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  5. Identifying Core Competencies of Infection Control Nurse Specialists in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Wai Fong; Bond, Trevor G; Adamson, Bob; Chow, Meyrick

    2016-01-01

    To confirm a core competency scale for Hong Kong infection control nurses at the advanced nursing practice level from the core competency items proposed in a previous phase of this study. This would serve as the foundation of competency assurance in Hong Kong hospitals. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All public and private hospitals in Hong Kong. All infection control nurses in hospitals of Hong Kong. The 83-item proposed core competency list established in an earlier study was transformed into a questionnaire and sent to 112 infection control nurses in 48 hospitals in Hong Kong. They were asked to rate the importance of each infection prevention and control item using Likert-style response categories. Data were analyzed using the Rasch model. The response rate of 81.25% was achieved. Seven items were removed from the proposed core competency list, leaving a scale of 76 items that fit the measurement requirements of the unidimensional Rasch model. Essential core competency items of advanced practice for infection control nurses in Hong Kong were identified based on the measurement criteria of the Rasch model. Several items of the scale that reflect local Hong Kong contextual characteristics are distinguished from the overseas standards. This local-specific competency list could serve as the foundation for education and for certification of infection control nurse specialists in Hong Kong. Rasch measurement is an appropriate analytical tool for identifying core competencies of advanced practice nurses in other specialties and in other locations in a manner that incorporates practitioner judgment and expertise.

  6. Electronics Technology. Tech Prep Competency Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakeland Tech Prep Consortium, Kirtland, OH.

    This tech prep competency profile covers the occupation of electronics technician. Section 1 provides the occupation definition. Section 2 lists development committee members. Section 3 provides the leveling codes--abbreviations for grade level, (by the end of grade 12, by the end of associate degree), academic codes (communications, math, or…

  7. 75 FR 52596 - Financial Education Core Competencies; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-26

    ... impacts of your spending decisions. Saving Saved money grows... Start saving early. Pay yourself first... Subcommittee, identified five core concept areas: (1) Earning, (2) spending, (3) saving, (4) borrowing, and (5... financial system. Know about financial Comparison shop. assets (savings Balance risk and accounts, bonds...

  8. Regulatory body core competencies: when should a regulator contract a TSO?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieland, Patricia; Salati de Almeida, Ivan P.; Almeida, Claudio U.; Costa, Eduardo M.

    2008-01-01

    The main nuclear regulatory functions are authorization, safety review and assessment, inspection and enforcement and development of regulations and guides. Additionally, the following supplementary functions may be executed by the regulatory body: research and development, emergency response and international cooperation. In order to function properly, the regulatory body should also have the following support functions: general management, logistics, training, communication and information, information technology support, institutional relationship, internal controls and audits, ombudsman and legal support. Technical Support Organizations (TSOs) may assist the regulatory body in meeting the challenges in a rapid growing and changing environment. Specially when there is a temporary need for a wider technical expertise diversity, short time to finish a project or when the cost of developing and maintaining infrastructure of their own laboratories for analysis and research is too high and may deviate the focus on the regulator's mission. Decision on the 'size' of the regulatory body and on what can be contracted to a Technical Support Organization (TSO) depends on the resources and capabilities needed to fulfil the regulatory functions efficiently. It is important to establish the core competencies that must be at the regulatory body, keeping the focus on the regulatory goals and define the real need to contract a TSO, weighting the benefits and disadvantages. As a contribution to the definition of the regulatory core competencies, the paper discusses what is essential to be kept at the regulatory body and what can be delegated to a TSO; how to manage and control the work of the TSO; the cost effectiveness of contracting, sharing of tacit knowledge; how to handle eventual conflicts between the parties involved in the licensing process; contract types and risk evaluation, concerning the dependence on a TSO, eventual change of partners and the intellectual capital

  9. Core competencies in sexual and reproductive health for the interprofessional primary care team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappiello, Joyce; Levi, Amy; Nothnagle, Melissa

    2016-05-01

    A primary care workforce that is well prepared to provide high-quality sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care has the potential to enhance access to care and reduce health disparities. This project aimed to identify core competencies to guide SRH training across the primary care professions. A six-member interprofessional expert working group drafted SRH competencies for primary care team members. Primary care providers including family physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners and certified nurse midwives, physician assistants and pharmacists were invited to participate in a three-round electronic Delphi survey. In each round, participants voted by email to retain, eliminate or revise each competency, with their suggested edits to the competencies incorporated by the researchers after each round. Fifty providers from six professions participated. In Round 1, 17 of 33 draft competencies reached the 75% predetermined agreement level to be accepted as written. Five were combined, reducing the total number to 28. Based on Round 2 feedback, 21 competencies were reworded, and 2 were combined. In Round 3, all 26 competencies reached at least 83.7% agreement, with 9 achieving 100% agreement. The 33 core competencies encompass professional ethics and reproductive justice, collaboration, SRH services and conditions affecting SRH. These core competencies will be disseminated and adapted to each profession's scope of practice to inform required curricula. SRH competencies for primary care can inform the required curricula across professions, filling the gap between an established standard of care necessary to meet patient needs and the outcomes of that care. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Survey of the strategic competence needs regarding nuclear technology at present and in the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnik, Peter; Hammar, Lennart

    2001-12-01

    shutdown. By reviewing the collected data it seems that the industries and authorities are supplied with highly educated staff that can satisfy the need of strategic nuclear technical competence today. With respect to the presented results it is discussed how the requirements that the need of nuclear technical competence has on the education can be fulfilled. In order to do this it is necessary to analyse the demands that the need of nuclear technical competence puts on relevant educations, mainly those that contains reactor and core physics, reactor technology, nuclear safety and nuclear chemistry. It is also necessary to explore which educations should be offered in the future and how the industry can utilize the capacity of education in practice

  11. Nonclinical core competencies and effects of interprofessional teamwork in disaster and emergency response training and practice: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peller, Jennifer; Schwartz, Brian; Kitto, Simon

    2013-08-01

    To define and delineate the nontechnical core competencies required for disaster response, Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) members were interviewed regarding their perspectives and experiences in disaster management. Also explored was the relationship between nontechnical competencies and interprofessional collaboration. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 Canadian DMAT members to explore how they viewed nontechnical core competencies and how their experiences influenced their perceptions toward interprofessonalism in disaster response. Data were examined using thematic analysis. Nontechnical core competencies were categorized under austere skills, interpersonal skills, and cognitive skills. Research participants defined interprofessionalism and discussed the importance of specific nontechnical core competencies to interprofessional collaboration. The findings of this study established a connection between nontechnical core competencies and interprofessional collaboration in DMAT activities. It also provided preliminary insights into the importance of context in developing an evidence base for competency training in disaster response and management. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2013;0:1-8).

  12. An Interprofessional Consensus of Core Competencies for Prelicensure Education in Pain Management: Curriculum Application for Nursing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Keela; St. Marie, Barbara; Gordon, Debra B.; Paice, Judith A.; Watt-Watson, Judy; Stevens, Bonnie J.; Bakerjian, Debra; Young, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ineffective assessment and management of pain is a significant problem. A gap in prelicensure health science program pain content has been identified for the improvement of pain care in the United States. Method Through consensus processes, an expert panel of nurses, who participated in the interdisciplinary development of core competencies in pain management for prelicensure health professional education, developed recommendations to address the gap in nursing curricula. Results Challenges and incentives for implementation of pain competencies in nursing education are discussed, and specific recommendations for how to incorporate the competencies into entry-level nursing curricula are provided. Conclusion Embedding pain management core competencies into prelicensure nursing education is crucial to ensure that nurses have the essential knowledge and skills to effectively manage pain and to serve as a foundation on which clinical practice skills can be later honed. PMID:26057425

  13. An interprofessional consensus of core competencies for prelicensure education in pain management: curriculum application for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Keela; Marie, Barbara St; Gordon, Debra B; Paice, Judith A; Watt-Watson, Judy; Stevens, Bonnie J; Bakerjian, Debra; Young, Heather M

    2015-06-01

    Ineffective assessment and management of pain is a significant problem. A gap in prelicensure health science program pain content has been identified for the improvement of pain care in the United States. Through consensus processes, an expert panel of nurses, who participated in the interdisciplinary development of core competencies in pain management for prelicensure health professional education, developed recommendations to address the gap in nursing curricula. Challenges and incentives for implementation of pain competencies in nursing education are discussed, and specific recommendations for how to incorporate the competencies into entry-level nursing curricula are provided. Embedding pain management core competencies into prelicensure nursing education is crucial to ensure that nurses have the essential knowledge and skills to effectively manage pain and to serve as a foundation on which clinical practice skills can be later honed. [J Nurs Educ. 2015;54(6):317-327.]. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Core Competencies or a Competent Core? A Scoping Review and Realist Synthesis of Invasive Bedside Procedural Skills Training in Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydges, Ryan; Stroud, Lynfa; Wong, Brian M; Holmboe, Eric S; Imrie, Kevin; Hatala, Rose

    2017-11-01

    Invasive bedside procedures are core competencies for internal medicine, yet no formal training guidelines exist. The authors conducted a scoping review and realist synthesis to characterize current training for lumbar puncture, arthrocentesis, paracentesis, thoracentesis, and central venous catheterization. They aimed to collate how educators justify using specific interventions, establish which interventions have the best evidence, and offer directions for future research and training. The authors systematically searched Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and ERIC through April 2015. Studies were screened in three phases; all reviews were performed independently and in duplicate. The authors extracted information on learner and patient demographics, study design and methodological quality, and details of training interventions and measured outcomes. A three-step realist synthesis was performed to synthesize findings on each study's context, mechanism, and outcome, and to identify a foundational training model. From an initial 6,671 studies, 149 studies were further reduced to 67 (45%) reporting sufficient information for realist synthesis. Analysis yielded four types of procedural skills training interventions. There was relative consistency across contexts and significant differences in mechanisms and outcomes across the four intervention types. The medical procedural service was identified as an adaptable foundational training model. The observed heterogeneity in procedural skills training implies that programs are not consistently developing residents who are competent in core procedures. The findings suggest that researchers in education and quality improvement will need to collaborate to design training that develops a "competent core" of proceduralists using simulation and clinical rotations.

  15. The competence accumulation process in the technology transference strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, André Silva de; Segatto-Mendes, Andréa Paula

    2008-01-01

    The present article evaluates and measures the technological competence accumulation in an automation area enterprise to distribution centers, Knapp Sudamérica Logistic and Automation Ltd, in the interval of the technology transference process previous period (1998-2001) and during the technology transference process (2002-2005). Therefore, based on an individual case study, the study identified the technology transference strategy and mechanism accorded between the head office and the branch...

  16. Suicide Risk Assessment Training for Psychology Doctoral Programs: Core Competencies and a Framework for Training

    OpenAIRE

    Cramer, Robert J.; Johnson, Shara M.; McLaughlin, Jennifer; Rausch, Emilie M.; Conroy, Mary Alice

    2013-01-01

    Clinical and counseling psychology programs currently lack adequate evidence-based competency goals and training in suicide risk assessment. To begin to address this problem, this article proposes core competencies and an integrated training framework that can form the basis for training and research in this area. First, we evaluate the extent to which current training is effective in preparing trainees for suicide risk assessment. Within this discussion, sample and methodological issues are ...

  17. Geriatric Core Competencies for Family Medicine Curriculum and Enhanced Skills: Care of Elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean A.C.; Dobbs, Bonnie M.; McKay, Rhianne

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a growing mandate for Family Medicine residency programs to directly assess residents’ clinical competence in Care of the Elderly (COE). The objectives of this paper are to describe the development and implementation of incremental core competencies for Postgraduate Year (PGY)-I Integrated Geriatrics Family Medicine, PGY-II Geriatrics Rotation Family Medicine, and PGY-III Enhanced Skills COE for COE Diploma residents at a Canadian University. Methods Iterative expert panel...

  18. Facilitating creativity as a core competence in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, P.; Onarheim, Balder

    2015-01-01

    competences in EE [1]. Still it is well known that there is inertia in Engineering Education to develop new structures and traditions in teaching and learning [2]. In the whole education system there is a growing interest in creative engagement of pupils and students, and the body of research in the area...... of Denmark (DTU) a mandatory teacher training program for new faculty has in its present design been successfully held since 2004. Different approaches to fostering teachers? beliefs of creativity and innovation as teaching methods have been explored in the programme, based on approaches like the ones...... described in [4]. Based on qualitative surveys and interviews this paper will discuss how the programme influence teachers? beliefs about 1) creativity in teaching and learning, 2) view on creativity as an important engineering skill, and 3) desire to emphasise creativity in their own teaching. The results...

  19. Core entrepreneurial competencies and their interdependencies: insights from a study of Irish and Iranian entrepreneurs, university students and academics

    OpenAIRE

    RezaeiZadeh, Morteza; Hogan, Michael; O’Reilly, John; Cunningham, James; Murphy, Eamonn

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to advance our understanding of core entrepreneurial competencies and their interdependencies. Developing entrepreneurial competencies is increasingly seen as important to foster entrepreneurship. Studies to date have highlighted different entrepreneurial competencies in the context of different sectors, regions and countries. However, there has been a lack of consensus in relation to the perceived relative importance of core entrepreneurial competences and their ...

  20. Core Technology Development of Nuclear spin polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Byung Duk; Gwon, Sung Ok; Kwon, Duck Hee; Lee, Sung Man

    2009-12-01

    In order to study nuclear spin polarization, we need several core technologies such as laser beam source to polarize the nuclear spin, low pressured helium cell development whose surface is essential to maintain polarization otherwise most of the polarized helium relaxed in short time, development of uniform magnetic field system which is essential for reducing relaxation, efficient vacuum system, development of polarization measuring system, and development of pressure raising system about 1000 times. The purpose of this study is to develop resonable power of laser system, that is at least 5 watt, 1083 nm, 4GHz tuneable. But the limitation of this research fund enforce to develop amplifying system into 5 watt with 1 watt system utilizing laser-diod which is already we have in stock. We succeeded in getting excellent specification of fiber laser system with power of 5 watts, 2 GHz linewidth, more than 80 GHz tuneable

  1. Examining the importance of incorporating emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into allied health curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Tammy

    2015-01-01

    Preparation for responding to emergency events that does not warrant outside help beyond the local community resources or responding to disaster events that is beyond the capabilities of the local community both require first responders and healthcare professionals to have interdisciplinary skills needed to function as a team for saving lives. To date, there is no core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies that have been standardized at all levels across the various allied health curricula disciplines. To identify if emergency preparedness and disaster training content are currently being taught in allied health program courses, to identify possible gaps within allied health curricula, and to explore the perceptions of allied health college educators for implementing emergency preparedness and disaster training core competencies into their existing curricula, if not already included. A quantitative Internet-based survey was conducted in 2013. Convenient sample. Fifty-one allied health college educators completed the survey. Descriptive statistics indicated that the majority of allied health college instructors do not currently teach emergency preparedness and disaster training core competency content within their current allied health discipline; however, their perceived level of importance for inclusion of the competencies was high. The results of this study supported the need for developing and establishing a basic national set of standardized core emergency preparedness and disaster planning competencies at all levels across various allied health curricula disciplines to ensure victims receive the best patient care and have the best possible chance of survival.

  2. Learning theories and tools for the assessment of core nursing competencies in simulation: A theoretical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Patrick; Michaud, Cécile; Bélisle, Marilou; Boyer, Louise; Gosselin, Émilie; Grondin, Myrian; Larue, Caroline; Lavoie, Stéphan; Pepin, Jacinthe

    2018-02-01

    To identify the theories used to explain learning in simulation and to examine how these theories guided the assessment of learning outcomes related to core competencies in undergraduate nursing students. Nurse educators face the challenge of making explicit the outcomes of competency-based education, especially when competencies are conceptualized as holistic and context dependent. Theoretical review. Research papers (N = 182) published between 1999-2015 describing simulation in nursing education. Two members of the research team extracted data from the papers, including theories used to explain how simulation could engender learning and tools used to assess simulation outcomes. Contingency tables were created to examine the associations between theories, outcomes and tools. Some papers (N = 79) did not provide an explicit theory. The 103 remaining papers identified one or more learning or teaching theories; the most frequent were the National League for Nursing/Jeffries Simulation Framework, Kolb's theory of experiential learning and Bandura's social cognitive theory and concept of self-efficacy. Students' perceptions of simulation, knowledge and self-confidence were the most frequently assessed, mainly via scales designed for the study where they were used. Core competencies were mostly assessed with an observational approach. This review highlighted the fact that few studies examined the use of simulation in nursing education through learning theories and via assessment of core competencies. It also identified observational tools used to assess competencies in action, as holistic and context-dependent constructs. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Advanced core monitoring technology for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.Q.; Casadei, A.L.; Doshi, P.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Westinghouse BEACON online monitoring system has been developed to provide continuous core monitoring and operational support for pressurized water reactor using movable detectors (fission chamber) and core thermocouples. The basic BEACON core monitoring methodology is described. Traditional WWER reactors use rhodium fixed in-core detectors as the means to provide detailed core power distribution for surveillance purposes. An adapted version of the BEACON advanced core monitoring and support system is described which seems to be, due to the different demand/response requirements, the optimal solution (for routine surveillance and anomaly detection) for WWER reactors with existing fixed in-core detectors. (Z.S.) 4 refs

  4. 4-H Youth Development Professionals’ Perceptions of Youth Development Core Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E. Fox

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this descriptive study was to assess the perceived level of competence among 4-H Youth Development Agents from a Southern state in the United States. The findings will be used to identify gaps in and opportunities for professional training and development experiences in supporting the competence and growth of youth professionals. Based on the 4-H Professional Research, Knowledge, and Competency Model (Stone & Rennekamp, 2004, youth development professionals rated their youth development competence in nine youth development core competency areas. Utilizing a five-point Likert-type scale ranging from 1=no knowledge to 5=expert, youth development professionals rated their youth development competence ranging from 3.12 to 3.54. According to an interpretive scale, youth development professionals rated their competence as intermediate. Staff felt most competent in the areas of current youth issues, career opportunities for youth, and family structures/relationships. Staff felt least competent in the area of mental development of youth. No one identified themselves as an expert in the areas of psychological development, emotional development, and current youth issues.

  5. Comparative Analysis of Ukrainian and Foreign Scholars' Views on Interpretation of Such Terms as Competency, Professional Competency, Professional Competency of Technicians in Food Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovchuk, Olha

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with a comparative analysis of the content of such terms as competency, competence and professional competency of technicians in food technology. Special attention has been given to domestic and foreign scholars' research findings on the matter in order to consider the genesis of the term "competency" and its spreading…

  6. A core competency model for Chinese baccalaureate nursing graduates: a descriptive correlational study in Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang Yu; Zhao, Rong Rong; Liu, Yi Si; Wu, Ying; Jin, Ning Ning; Li, Rui Ying; Shi, Shu Ping; Shao, Yue Ying; Guo, Ming; Arthur, David; Elliott, Malcolm

    2013-12-01

    A review of the literature showed that the core competencies needed by newly graduated Chinese nurses were not as of yet undocumented. To develop a psychometrically sound instrument for identifying and measuring the core competencies needed by Chinese nursing baccalaureate graduates. Descriptive correlational and multicentre study. Seven major tertiary teaching hospitals and three major medical universities in Beijing. 790 subjects, including patients, nursing faculty members, doctors and nurses. A reliable and valid self-report instrument, consisting of 58 items, was developed using multiple methods. It was then distributed to 790 subjects to measure nursing competency in a broader Chinese context. The psychometric characteristics of reliability and validity were supported by descriptive and inferential analyses. The final instrument consists of six dimensions with 47 items. The content validity index was 0.90. The overall scale reliability was 0.97 with dimensions range from 0.87 to 0.94. Six domains of core competencies were identified: professionalism; direct care; support and communication; application of professional knowledge; personal traits; and critical thinking and innovation. The findings of this study provide valuable evidence for a psychometrically sound measurement tool, as well as for competency-based nursing curriculum reform. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The core competencies for mental, neurological, and substance use disorder care in sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Pamela Y.; Musisi, Seggane; Frehywot, Seble; Patel, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study points to a changing landscape in which non-communicable diseases, such as mental, neurological, and substance use (MNS) disorders, account for an increasing proportion of premature mortality and disability globally. Despite evidence of the need for care, a remarkable deficit of providers for MNS disorder service delivery persists in sub-Saharan Africa. This critical workforce can be developed from a range of non-specialist and specialist health workers who have access to evidence-based interventions, whose roles, and the associated tasks, are articulated and clearly delineated, and who are equipped to master and maintain the competencies associated with providing MNS disorder care. In 2012, the Neuroscience Forum of the Institute of Medicine convened a meeting of key stakeholders in Kampala, Uganda, to discuss a set of candidate core competencies for the delivery of mental health and neurological care, focusing specifically on depression, psychosis, epilepsy, and alcohol use disorders. This article discusses the candidate core competencies for non-specialist health workers and the complexities of implementing core competencies in low- and middle-income country settings. Sub-Saharan Africa, however, has the potential to implement novel training initiatives through university networks and through structured processes that engage ministries of health. Finally, we outline challenges associated with implementing competencies in order to sustain a workforce capable of delivering quality services for people with MNS disorders. PMID:25783229

  8. Core Competencies and the Prevention of High-Risk Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Vignetta Eugenia; Blum, Robert Wm.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescent sexual risk-taking behavior has numerous individual, family, community, and societal consequences. In an effort to contribute to the research and propose new directions, this chapter applies the core competencies framework to the prevention of high-risk sexual behavior. It describes the magnitude of the problem, summarizes explanatory…

  9. The Principalship: Essential Core Competencies for Instructional Leadership and Its Impact on School Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Dorrell J.; Cozzens, Jeffry A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate teachers' perceptions of principals' leadership behaviors influencing the schools' climate according to Green's (2010) ideologies of the 13 core competencies within the four dimensions of principal leadership. Data from the "Leadership Behavior Inventory" (Green, 2014) suggest 314…

  10. Digital Curation as a Core Competency in Current Learning and Literacy: A Higher Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungerer, Leona M.

    2016-01-01

    Digital curation may be regarded as a core competency in higher education since it contributes to establishing a sense of metaliteracy (an essential requirement for optimally functioning in a modern media environment) among students. Digital curation is gradually finding its way into higher education curricula aimed at fostering social media…

  11. A Practical Approach to Implementing the Core Competencies in a Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Arden D.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the development and implementation of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's core competencies in a child and adolescent psychiatry residency program. Method: The authors identify the program's organizational approach and participants and detail various strategies and methods of defining,…

  12. Study of Core Competency Elements and Factors Affecting Performance Efficiency of Government Teachers in Northeastern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chansirisira, Pacharawit

    2012-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate the core competency elements and the factors affecting the performance efficiency of the civil service teachers in the northeastern region, Thailand. The research procedure consisted of two steps. In the first step, the data were collected using a questionnaire with the reliability (Cronbach's Alpha) of 0.90. The…

  13. The Relationship between Leadership Behavior, the Thirteen Core Competencies, and Teacher Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Detris Nanette

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to determine if teacher job satisfaction is enhanced when principals value and exhibit behaviors informed by the 13 core competencies. Principals and teachers from 70 elementary, middle, and high schools in the southeast United States participated in the study. The "Leadership Behavior…

  14. Teaching through Research: Alignment of Core Chemistry Competencies and Skills within a Multidisciplinary Research Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Eman; Long, S. Reid; Rodenbusch, Stacia E.; Shear, Ruth I.; Beckham, Josh T.; Procko, Kristen; DePue, Lauren; Stevenson, Keith J.; Robertus, Jon D.; Martin, Stephen; Holliday, Bradley; Jones, Richard A.; Anslyn, Eric V.; Simmons, Sarah L.

    2018-01-01

    Innovative models of teaching through research have broken the long-held paradigm that core chemistry competencies must be taught with predictable, scripted experiments. We describe here five fundamentally different, course-based undergraduate research experiences that integrate faculty research projects, accomplish ACS accreditation objectives,…

  15. [Self-evaluation of core competencies and related factors among baccalaureate nursing students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Ting; Hsieh, Suh-Ing; Hsu, Li-Ling

    2013-02-01

    Evaluations of higher education programs are increasingly centered on the learner and designed to assess learning effectiveness and core competencies. Although the Taiwan Nursing Accreditation Council (TNAC) has established eight core competencies for college nursing departments, little research has been done to identify the most salient contributors to undergraduate nursing students' perceived competency levels. This paper investigates the influence of student demographic factors and learning experience on students' development in terms of a selected sample of core nursing competencies and then identifies factors that significantly predicts such development. This is a cross-sectional descriptive correlational study. We collected data from a sample of freshmen students currently enrolled in a two-year nursing bachelor degree program at a private vocational university in Taipei, Taiwan. Participants self-assessed abilities in designated core nursing competencies using the Competency Inventory of Nursing Students (CINS). A total of 279 of 290 distributed questionnaires were returned and used in data collection, giving this study a valid return rate of 96.2%. Participants earned a mean CINS score of 5.23 (SD = 0.49). Scale dimensions from highest to lowest mean score rank were: ethics, accountability, caring spirit, communication and cooperation, lifelong learning, general clinical nursing skills, critical thinking, and basic biomedical science. Differentiated analysis revealed that nursing students who expressed a strong interest in nursing, had a clear career plan, held aspirations to pursue higher nursing education, designated "major hospital" as their first workplace of choice, designated a post-college department / workplace preference, had participated in campus activities, were outspoken in classroom discussions and debates, made consistent effort to complete homework assignments and prepare for examinations, and performed relatively strong academically earned

  16. Training of adolescent multipliers from the perspective of health promotion core competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kely Vanessa Leite Gomes da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Recognize the domains of health promotion core competencies in the training process of adolescents carried out by nursing students. Method: Qualitative and descriptive study, which used the theoretical methodological contribution Developing Competencies and Professional Standards for Health Promotion Capacity Building in Europe (CompHP, carried out with 14 nursing students. Results: There were four domains: Enable Change; Mediate through Partnership; Communication; and Leadership. These domains came from the interest and commitment of adolescents in intersectoral partnership, the use of communication techniques, and the role of facilitator to catalyze learning and empowerment. Conclusion: There were some domains of core competency in the training of adolescents, suggesting that nursing students act as health promoters. Challenges for Nursing are the implementation of a theoretical contribution of CompHP in undergraduate and ongoing training to carry out health promotion action.

  17. Dementia skills for all: a core competency framework for the workforce in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaroucha, Anna; Benbow, Susan Mary; Kingston, Paul; Le Mesurier, Nick

    2013-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges facing health and social care in the United Kingdom is the projected increase in the number of older people who require dementia care. The National Dementia Strategy (Department of Health, 2009) emphasizes the critical need for a skilled workforce in all aspects of dementia care. In the West Midlands, the Strategic Health Authority commissioned a project to develop a set of generic core competencies that would guide a competency based curriculum to meet the demands for improved dementia training and education. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify relevant frameworks to assist with this work. The core competency framework produced and the methods used for the development of the framework are presented and discussed.

  18. Emergency Preparedness Education for Nurses: Core Competency Familiarity Measured Utilizing an Adapted Emergency Preparedness Information Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgino, Madeline M; Kress, Terri; Alexander, Sheila; Beach, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to measure trauma nurse improvement in familiarity with emergency preparedness and disaster response core competencies as originally defined by the Emergency Preparedness Information Questionnaire after a focused educational program. An adapted version of the Emergency Preparedness Information Questionnaire was utilized to measure familiarity of nurses with core competencies pertinent to first responder capabilities. This project utilized a pre- and postsurvey descriptive design and integrated education sessions into the preexisting, mandatory "Trauma Nurse Course" at large, level I trauma center. A total of 63 nurses completed the intervention during May and September 2014 sessions. Overall, all 8 competencies demonstrated significant (P < .001; 98% confidence interval) improvements in familiarity. In conclusion, this pilot quality improvement project demonstrated a unique approach to educating nurses to be more ready and comfortable when treating victims of a disaster.

  19. Business Students’ Attitudes Towards and Competency in Information Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Halil Seyrek

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of wide spread use of information technology (IT in businesses, the need for IT-competent workforce is escalating. This need is also becoming very important for business graduates who can work in many areas and in different positions. The purpose of this study is to determine the IT competency of undergraduate business students and find out their attitudes towards IT since attitude is an important factor for the acceptance of IT. For this purpose, the attitudes of business students towards and competence in IT have been studied using data gathered from 394 undergraduate business students. As a result of the study, it has been found that most of the students own computers and have a good level of access to IT resources but their perceived level of competency is low. Moreover, female students compared to male students, students who don’t own a computer compared to students owning a computer and students who have high levels of access to IT compared to those with lower access show higher anxiety about IT, feel they have less control when they face a problem related to IT and have lower perceived level of IT competence. Also, depending on which year they are in, students show different attitudes towards IT and their competence increases as they become more senior. Finally, it has been found that different dimensions of attitude have effects on IT competence

  20. What Is "Competence" and How Should Education Incorporate New Technology's Tools to Generate "Competent Civic Agents"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haste, Helen

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the competences needed in twenty-first-century life, especially in relation to civic participation, and the educational requirements to foster them in young people. New technologies are widely used by young people for informal social interaction, video game-playing and giving voice to their views. Incorporation of these…

  1. Identifying Core Competencies to Advance Female Professors' Careers: An Exploratory Study in United States Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ga-eun; Hedayati Mehdiabadi, Amir; Huang, Wenhao

    2017-01-01

    This exploratory study aims to identify the core competencies necessary to successfully advance the careers of female associate professors in higher education. To ascertain these core career competencies, a critical incident interview technique was employed. One-to-one semi-structured interviews with six female full professors at a major research…

  2. Recommendations for training in pediatric psychology: defining core competencies across training levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Tonya M; Janicke, David M; McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Mullins, Larry L; Robins, Paul M; Wu, Yelena P

    2014-10-01

    As a field, pediatric psychology has focused considerable efforts on the education and training of students and practitioners. Alongside a broader movement toward competency attainment in professional psychology and within the health professions, the Society of Pediatric Psychology commissioned a Task Force to establish core competencies in pediatric psychology and address the need for contemporary training recommendations.   The Task Force adapted the framework proposed by the Competency Benchmarks Work Group on preparing psychologists for health service practice and defined competencies applicable across training levels ranging from initial practicum training to entry into the professional workforce in pediatric psychology.   Competencies within 6 cluster areas, including science, professionalism, interpersonal, application, education, and systems, and 1 crosscutting cluster, crosscutting knowledge competencies in pediatric psychology, are presented in this report.   Recommendations for the use of, and the further refinement of, these suggested competencies are discussed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Quality and safety in graduate nursing education: Cross-mapping QSEN graduate competencies with NONPF's NP core and practice doctorate competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Joanne M; Savrin, Carol; Fiandt, Kathryn; Beauchesne, Michelle; Drayton-Brooks, Shirlee; Scheibmeir, Monica; Brackley, Margaret; Werner, Kathryn E

    2009-01-01

    To ensure that nurse practitioners are prepared to deliver safe, high-quality health care, the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) publishes documents that outline the expected competencies for nurse practitioner (NP) practice (Domains and Core Competencies of Nurse Practitioner Practice and Practice Doctorate Nurse Practitioner Entry-Level Competencies). Having participated in the development of the Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies for graduate education, NONPF convened a task force to compare NONPF competencies with QSEN competencies for graduate education. This paper reports the first step of that cross-mapping process, comparing NONPF competencies with the QSEN knowledge objectives. Overall findings indicate close congruence across the 2 sets of competencies; however there are areas in which gaps are noted or for which clarification is required.

  4. A Delphi approach to developing a core competency framework for family practice registered nurses in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moaveni, Azadeh; Gallinaro, Anna; Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Callahan, Sheilagh; Hammond, Melanie; Oandasan, Ivy

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the results of a Delphi panel process to gain consensus on a role description and competency framework for family practice registered nurses (FP-RNs) in Ontario. Based on the findings from interviews and focus groups with family practice registered nurses and their inter-professional colleagues throughout Ontario, a core competency framework for FP-RNs emerged consisting of six distinct roles - Professional, Expert, Communicator, Synergist, Health Educator and Lifelong Learner - with accompanying enabling competency statements. This framework was refined and validated by a panel of experts from various nursing and family medicine associations and organizations through a Delphi consensus process. This core competency framework for FP-RNs was developed as a stepping stone for clarifying this very important and poorly understood role in family practice. As a result of this research, we expect a greater acknowledgement of the contributions and expertise of the FP-RN as well as the need to celebrate and profile this role. This work has already led to the establishment of a network of stakeholders from nursing organizations in Ontario who are considering opportunities to move the development and use of the competency framework forward.

  5. Development of core design technology for LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; In, Kim Young; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Y G; Kim, S J; Song, H; Kim, T K; Kim, W S; Hwang, W; Lee, B O; Park, C K; Joo, H K; Yoo, J W; Kang, H Y; Park, W S

    2000-05-01

    For the development of KALIMER (150 MWe) core conceptual design, design evolution and optimization for improved economics and safety enhancement was performed in the uranium metallic fueled equilibrium core design which uses U-Zr binary fuel not in excess of 20 percent enrichment. Utilizing results of the uranium ,metallic fueled core design, the breeder equilibrium core design with breeding ratio being over 1.1 was developed. In addition, utilizing LMR's excellent neutron economy, various core concepts for minor actinide burnup, inherent safety, economics and non-proliferation were realized and its optimization studies were performed. A code system for the LMR core conceptual design has been established through the implementation of needed functions into the existing codes and development of codes. To improve the accuracy of the core design, a multi-dimensional nodal transport code SOLTRAN, a three-dimensional transient code analysis code STEP, MATRA-LMR and ASSY-P for T/H analysis are under development. Through the automation of design calculations for efficient core design, an input generator and several interface codes have been developed. (author)

  6. Development of core design technology for LMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Jin; Kim Young In; Kim, Young Il; Kim, Y. G.; Kim, S. J.; Song, H.; Kim, T. K.; Kim, W. S.; Hwang, W.; Lee, B. O.; Park, C. K.; Joo, H. K.; Yoo, J. W.; Kang, H. Y.; Park, W. S

    2000-05-01

    For the development of KALIMER (150 MWe) core conceptual design, design evolution and optimization for improved economics and safety enhancement was performed in the uranium metallic fueled equilibrium core design which uses U-Zr binary fuel not in excess of 20 percent enrichment. Utilizing results of the uranium ,metallic fueled core design, the breeder equilibrium core design with breeding ratio being over 1.1 was developed. In addition, utilizing LMR's excellent neutron economy, various core concepts for minor actinide burnup, inherent safety, economics and non-proliferation were realized and its optimization studies were performed. A code system for the LMR core conceptual design has been established through the implementation of needed functions into the existing codes and development of codes. To improve the accuracy of the core design, a multi-dimensional nodal transport code SOLTRAN, a three-dimensional transient code analysis code STEP, MATRA-LMR and ASSY-P for T/H analysis are under development. Through the automation of design calculations for efficient core design, an input generator and several interface codes have been developed. (author)

  7. The Competence Accumulation Process in the Technology Transference Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Silva de Souza

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The present article evaluates and measures the technological competence accumulation in an automation area enterprise to distribution centers, Knapp Sudamérica Logistic and Automation Ltd, in the interval of the technology transference process previous period (1998-2001 and during the technology transference process(2002-2005. Therefore, based on an individual case study, the study identified the technology transference strategy and mechanism accorded between the head office and the branch office, the technological functions and activities developed by the receiver and, at last, the critical factors present in this process. The echnological competences accumulation exam was accomplished based on an analytical structure existent in the literature that was adapted to the researched segment analysis. The obtained results showed that the planed, organized, controlled and continuous effort to generating and disseminating knowledge allowed the enterprise to speed up the accumulation process of technological competences promoting the converting of this process from individual level to the organizational one: besides, it also allowed the identification of barriers and facilitators involved in this process.

  8. AAVP Recommendations for Core Competency Standards Relating to Parasitological Knowledge and Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Karen F; Krecek, Rosina C; Bowman, Dwight D

    As part of the accreditation process, the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education has defined nine broad areas of core competencies that must be met by graduating students earning a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree. To define competencies in veterinary parasitology, the American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists (AAVP) has developed a detailed list of knowledge and skills that are recommended for inclusion in professional curricula. These recommendations were developed by instructors from colleges/schools of veterinary medicine in the US, Canada, and the Caribbean, and were reviewed and endorsed following AAVP guidelines.

  9. Core Competencies in Integrative Pain Care for Entry-Level Primary Care Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tick, Heather; Chauvin, Sheila W; Brown, Michael; Haramati, Aviad

    2015-11-01

    The objective was to develop a set of core competencies for graduating primary care physicians in integrative pain care (IPC), using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) domains. These competencies build on previous work in competencies for integrative medicine, interprofessional education, and pain medicine and are proposed for inclusion in residency training. A task force was formed to include representation from various professionals who are involved in education, research, and the practice of IPC and who represent broad areas of expertise. The task force convened during a 1.5-day face-to-face meeting, followed by a series of surveys and other vetting processes involving diverse interprofessional groups, which led to the consensus of a final set of competencies. The proposed competencies focus on interprofessional knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) and are in line with recommendations by the Institute of Medicine, military medicine, and professional pain societies advocating the need for coordination and integration of services for effective pain care with reduced risk and cost and improved outcomes. These ACGME domain compatible competencies for physicians reflect the contributions of several disciplines that will need to be included in evolving interprofessional settings and underscore the need for collaborative care. These core competencies can guide the incorporation of KSAs within curricula. The learning experiences should enable medical educators and graduating primary care physicians to focus more on integrative approaches, interprofessional team-based, patient-centered care that use evidence-based, traditional and complementary disciplines and therapeutics to provide safe and effective treatments for people in pain. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Development of Pre-Service Teachers' Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Education Competencies in a Mainland Chinese University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cher Ping; Yan, Hanbing; Xiong, Xibei

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how the design and implementation of a core teacher education course develops pre-service teachers' information communication technology (ICT) in education competencies in a mainland Chinese university. This course adopted a four-component instructional design system to develop its curriculum, incorporated an inquiry-based…

  11. Development of core design and analyses technology for integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C. C.; Song, J. S. and others

    1999-03-01

    Integral reactors are developed for the applications such as sea water desalination, heat energy for various industries, and power sources for large container ships. In order to enhance the inherent and passive safety features, low power density concept is chosen for the integral reactor SMART. Moreover, ultra-longer cycle and boron-free operation concepts are reviewed for better plant economy and simple design of reactor system. Especially, boron-free operation concept brings about large difference in core configurations and reactivity controls from those of the existing large size commercial nuclear power plants and also causes many differences in the safety aspects. The ultimate objectives of this study include detailed core design of a integral reactor, development of the core design system and technology, and finally acquisition of the system design certificate. The goal of the first stage is the conceptual core design, that is, to establish the design bases and requirements suitable for the boron-free concept, to develop a core loading pattern, to analyze the nuclear, thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the core and to perform the core shielding design. Interface data for safety and performance analyses including fuel design data are produced for the relevant design analysis groups. Nuclear, thermal and hydraulic, shielding design and analysis code systems necessary for the core conceptual design are established through modification of the existing design tools and newly developed methodology and code modules. Core safety and performance can be improved by the technology development such as boron-free core optimization, advaned core monitoring and operational aid system. Feasiblity study on the improvement of the core protection and monitoring system will also contribute toward core safety and performance. Both the conceptual core design study and the related technology will provide concrete basis for the next design phase. This study will also

  12. Development of core design and analyses technology for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C. C.; Song, J. S. and others

    1999-03-01

    Integral reactors are developed for the applications such as sea water desalination, heat energy for various industries, and power sources for large container ships. In order to enhance the inherent and passive safety features, low power density concept is chosen for the integral reactor SMART. Moreover, ultra-longer cycle and boron-free operation concepts are reviewed for better plant economy and simple design of reactor system. Especially, boron-free operation concept brings about large difference in core configurations and reactivity controls from those of the existing large size commercial nuclear power plants and also causes many differences in the safety aspects. The ultimate objectives of this study include detailed core design of a integral reactor, development of the core design system and technology, and finally acquisition of the system design certificate. The goal of the first stage is the conceptual core design, that is, to establish the design bases and requirements suitable for the boron-free concept, to develop a core loading pattern, to analyze the nuclear, thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the core and to perform the core shielding design. Interface data for safety and performance analyses including fuel design data are produced for the relevant design analysis groups. Nuclear, thermal and hydraulic, shielding design and analysis code systems necessary for the core conceptual design are established through modification of the existing design tools and newly developed methodology and code modules. Core safety and performance can be improved by the technology development such as boron-free core optimization, advaned core monitoring and operational aid system. Feasiblity study on the improvement of the core protection and monitoring system will also contribute toward core safety and performance. Both the conceptual core design study and the related technology will provide concrete basis for the next design phase. This study will also

  13. Bioinformatics and Computational Core Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE COMPUTER CORE FACILITYEvaluation, purchase, set up, and maintenance of the computer hardware and network for the 170 users in the research...

  14. Assessment of the competing technologies to fuel cells in the stationary power and CHP markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pears, T.J.

    1999-07-01

    This report summarises the results of a study assessing the commercial technologies that are likely to compete with fuel cells in the fields of stationary power and cogeneration markets. The competing technologies examined include clean coal technologies, reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines, and stirling engines. Energy and environmental legislation, and the ranking of the competing technologies are discussed. (UK)

  15. Core competencies for health professionals' training in pediatric behavioral sleep care: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerner, Katelynn E; Coulombe, J Aimée; Corkum, Penny

    2015-01-01

    The need to train non-sleep-specialist health professionals in evidence-based pediatric behavioral sleep care is well established. The objective of the present study was to develop a list of core competencies for training health professionals in assisting families of 1- to 10-year old children with behavioral insomnia of childhood. A modified Delphi methodology was employed, involving iterative rounds of surveys that were administered to 46 experts to obtain consensus on a core competency list. The final list captured areas relevant to the identification and treatment of pediatric behavioral sleep problems. This work has the potential to contribute to the development of training materials to prepare non-sleep-specialist health professionals to identify and treat pediatric behavioral sleep problems, ideally within stepped-care frameworks.

  16. Core competencies necessary for a managerial psycho-educational training programme for business team coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette E. Maritz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to explore and describe core competencies necessary for a managerial psycho-educational training programme for business team coaches. The total number of participants in this qualitative research was 30. A purposive and snowball sampling strategy was used. Triangulation was achieved through focus groups, in-depth individual interviews and naïve sketches. Data were analysed through an open inductive approach and descriptive analysis. The results describe core competencies of a business team coach as situated within an Outcomes Based Education framework and relate to the knowledge to be discovered, skills to be mastered and the attitudes to be formed during a managerial psycho-educational training programme.

  17. ACGME core competency training, mentorship, and research in surgical subspecialty fellowship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesca Monn, M; Wang, Ming-Hsien; Gilson, Marta M; Chen, Belinda; Kern, David; Gearhart, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    To determine the perceived effectiveness of surgical subspecialty training programs in teaching and assessing the 6 ACGME core competencies including research. Cross-sectional survey. ACGME approved training programs in pediatric urology and colorectal surgery. Program Directors and recent trainees (2007-2009). A total of 39 program directors (60%) and 57 trainees (64%) responded. Both program directors and recent trainees reported a higher degree of training and mentorship (75%) in patient care and medical knowledge than the other core competencies (pinterpersonal and communication, and professionalism training were perceived effective to a lesser degree. Specifically, in the areas of teaching residents and medical students and team building, program directors, compared with recent trainees, perceived training to be more effective, (p = 0.004, p = 0.04). Responses to questions assessing training in systems based practice ubiquitously identified a lack of training, particularly in financial matters of running a practice. Although effective training in research was perceived as lacking by recent trainees, 81% reported mentorship in this area. According to program directors and recent trainees, the most effective method of teaching was faculty supervision and feedback. Only 50% or less of the recent trainees reported mentorship in career planning, work-life balance, and job satisfaction. Not all 6 core competencies and research are effectively being taught in surgery subspecialty training programs and mentorship in areas outside of patient care and research is lacking. Emphasis should be placed on faculty supervision and feedback when designing methods to better incorporate all 6 core competencies, research, and mentorship. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A novel Internet-based blended learning programme providing core competency in clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsugihashi, Yukio; Kakudate, Naoki; Yokoyama, Yoko; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Mishina, Hiroki; Fukumori, Norio; Nakamura, Fumiaki; Takegami, Misa; Ohno, Shinya; Wakita, Takafumi; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2013-04-01

    We developed a novel Internet-based blended learning programme that allows busy health care professionals to attain core competency in clinical research. This study details the educational strategies and learning outcomes of the programme. This study was conducted at Kyoto University and seven satellite campuses from September 2009 to March 2010. A total of 176 health care professionals who had never attempted to attain core competency in clinical research were enrolled. The participants were supplied with a novel programme comprising the following four strategies: online live lectures at seven satellite campuses, short examinations after each lecture, an Internet-based feedback system and an end-of-course examination. We assessed the proportion of attendance at the lectures as the main outcome. In addition, we evaluated interaction via the feedback system and scores for end-of-course examination. Of the 176 participants, 134 (76%) reported working more than 40 hours per week. The mean proportion of attendance over all 23 lectures was 82%. A total of 156 (89%) participants attended more than 60% of all lectures and were eligible for the end-of-course examination. A total of the participants accessed the feedback system 3564 times and asked 284 questions. No statistically significant differences were noted in the end-of-course scores among medical doctors, pharmacists, registered nurses and other occupations. We developed an Internet-based blended learning programme providing core competency in clinical research. Most busy health care professionals completed the programme successfully. In addition, the participants could attain the core competency effectively, regardless of their occupation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Experience of Delphi technique in the process of establishing consensus on core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghav, Pankaja Ravi; Kumar, Dewesh; Bhardwaj, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    The Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine (CMFM) has been started as a new model for imparting the components of family medicine and delivering health-care services at primary and secondary levels in all six newly established All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), but there is no competency-based curriculum for it. The paper aims to share the experience of Delphi method in the process of developing consensus on core competencies of the new model of CMFM in AIIMS for undergraduate medical students in India. The study adopted different approaches and methods, but Delphi was the most critical method used in this research. In Delphi, the experts were contacted by e-mail and their feedback on the same was analyzed. Two rounds of Delphi were conducted in which 150 participants were contacted in Delphi-I but only 46 responded. In Delphi-II, 26 participants responded whose responses were finally considered for analysis. Three of the core competencies namely clinician, primary-care physician, and professionalism were agreed by all the participants, and the least agreement was observed in the competencies of epidemiologist and medical teacher. The experts having more experience were less consistent as responses were changed from agree to disagree in more than 15% of participants and 6% changed from disagree to agree. Within the given constraints, the final list of competencies and skills for the discipline of CMFM compiled after the Delphi process will provide a useful insight into the development of competency-based curriculum of the subject.

  20. Mediated Effects of Technology Competencies and Experiences on Relations among Attitudes Towards Technology Use, Technology Ownership, and Self Efficacy about Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerdelen-Damar, Sevda; Boz, Yezdan; Aydın-Günbatar, Sevgi

    2017-08-01

    This study examined the relations of preservice science teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology ownership, technology competencies, and experiences to their self-efficacy beliefs about technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK). The present study also investigated interrelations among preservice teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology ownership, technology competencies, and experiences. The participants of study were 665 elementary preservice science teachers (467 females, 198 males) from 7 colleges in Turkey. The proposed model based on educational technology literature was tested using structural equation modeling. The model testing results revealed that preservice teachers' technology competencies and experiences mediated the relation of technology ownership to their TPACK self efficacy beliefs. The direct relation of their possession of technology to their TPACK self efficacy beliefs was insignificant while the indirect relation through their technology competencies and experiences was significant. The results also indicated there were significant direct effects of preservice teachers' attitudes towards technology use, technology competencies, and experiences on their TPACK self efficacy beliefs.

  1. Developing Workforce Capacity in Public Health Informatics: Core Competencies and Curriculum Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas R. Wholey

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a master’s level public health informatics (PHI curriculum to support workforce development. Public health decision-making requires intensive information management to organize responses to health threats and develop effective health education and promotion. PHI competencies prepare the public health workforce to design and implement these information systems. The objective for a Master’s and Certificate in PHI is to prepare public health informaticians with the competencies to work collaboratively with colleagues in public health and other health professions to design and develop information systems that support population health improvement. The PHI competencies are drawn from computer, information, and organizational sciences. A curriculum is proposed to deliver the competencies and result of a pilot PHI program is presented. Since the public health workforce needs to use information technology effectively to improve population health, it is essential for public health academic institutions to develop and implement PHI workforce training programs.

  2. Developing Workforce Capacity in Public Health Informatics: Core Competencies and Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wholey, Douglas R.; LaVenture, Martin; Rajamani, Sripriya; Kreiger, Rob; Hedberg, Craig; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2018-01-01

    We describe a master’s level public health informatics (PHI) curriculum to support workforce development. Public health decision-making requires intensive information management to organize responses to health threats and develop effective health education and promotion. PHI competencies prepare the public health workforce to design and implement these information systems. The objective for a Master’s and Certificate in PHI is to prepare public health informaticians with the competencies to work collaboratively with colleagues in public health and other health professions to design and develop information systems that support population health improvement. The PHI competencies are drawn from computer, information, and organizational sciences. A curriculum is proposed to deliver the competencies and result of a pilot PHI program is presented. Since the public health workforce needs to use information technology effectively to improve population health, it is essential for public health academic institutions to develop and implement PHI workforce training programs. PMID:29770321

  3. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Core Competencies at a Community Teaching Hospital: Is There a Gap in Awareness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Temimi, Mohammed; Kidon, Michael; Johna, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Reports evaluating faculty knowledge of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies in community hospitals without a dedicated residency program are uncommon. Faculty evaluation regarding knowledge of ACGME core competencies before a residency program is started. Physicians at the Kaiser Permanente Fontana Medical Center (N = 480) were surveyed for their knowledge of ACGME core competencies before starting new residency programs. Knowledge of ACGME core competencies. Fifty percent of physicians responded to the survey, and 172 (71%) of respondents were involved in teaching residents. Of physicians who taught residents and had complete responses (N = 164), 65 (39.7%) were unsure of their knowledge of the core competencies. However, most stated that they provided direct teaching to residents related to the knowledge, skills, and attitudes stated in each of the 6 competencies as follows: medical knowledge (96.3%), patient care (95.7%), professionalism (90.7%), interpersonal and communication skills (86.3%), practice-based learning (85.9%), and system-based practice (79.6%). Physician specialty, years in practice (1-10 vs > 10), and number of rotations taught per year (1-6 vs 7-12) were not associated with knowledge of the competencies (p > 0.05); however, full-time faculty (teaching 10-12 rotations per year) were more likely to provide competency-based teaching. Objective assessment of faculty awareness of ACGME core competencies is essential when starting a residency program. Discrepancy between knowledge of the competencies and acclaimed provision of competency-based teaching emphasizes the need for standardized teaching methods that incorporate the values of these competencies.

  4. 2010 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Workshop on ''Preservation of competence in nuclear technology''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Within the two-day workshop on ''Preservation of Competence in Nuclear Technology'', 21 young scientists competed for the ''Competence Prize'' awarded by Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik for the twelfth time. They reported about their term papers, diploma or doctoral theses focusing on reactor technology and reactor safety, the development of innovative reactor systems, and waste management. For the first time, contributions this year were presented also from the field of radiation protection. The jury composed of Prof. T. Schulenberg (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), Prof. M.K. Koch (Ruhr University, Bochum), and Dr. W. Steinwarz (Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik) assessed the advance compacts as well as the oral presentations. The winner of the 2010 Competence Prize is Heiko Herbell of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Cornelia Heintze of the Dresden-Rossendorf Research Center, and Carola Hartel of the GSI Helmholtz Center for Heavy Ion Research won the second and third prizes. (orig.)

  5. A goodness of fit and validity study of the Korean radiological technologists' core job competency model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Chang Seon [Dept. of Radiological Science, Konyang University College of Medical Sciences, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, A Ra [Dept. of Medical Education, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Yera [Dept. of Medical Education, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seong Youl [Dept. of Occupational Therapy, Kwangju women’s University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Radiological Technologists deals with the life of a person which means professional competency is essential for the job. Nevertheless, there have been no studies in Korea that identified the job competence of radiologists. In order to define the core job competencies of Korean radiologists and to present the factor models, 147 questionnaires on job competency of radiology were analyzed using 'PASW Statistics Version 18.0' and 'AMOS Version 18.0'. The valid model consisted of five core job competencies ('Patient management', 'Health and safety', 'Operation of equipment', 'Procedures and management') and 17 sub – competencies. As a result of the factor analysis, the RMSEA value was 0.1 and the CFI, and TLI values were close to 0.9 in the measurement model of the five core job competencies. The validity analysis showed that the mean variance extraction was 0.5 or more and the conceptual reliability value was 0.7 or more , And there was a high correlation between subordinate competencies included in each subordinate competencies. The results of this study are expected to provide specific information necessary for the training and management of human resources centered on competence by clearly showing the job competence required for radiologists in Korea's health environment.

  6. Competency Standards for Bachelor of Industrial Technology Graduates for the Construction Industry in Region IV-A: Inputs For Curriculum Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P. Compasivo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to develop competency standards for Industrial Technology graduates for employment in the construction industry in Region IV-A, Philippines. It specifically identified the basic and core competency standards for industrial technology and determined the degree of importance of competencies needed in the construction industry sector. The study identified 28 common competencies for three areas of specializations in industrial technology namely: electrical, civil and drafting technology. There were 39 core competencies for electrical, 31 for drafting and 38 items for civil technology. A total of 50 panel of experts were carefully selected using the purposive sampling as respondents in the study. Experts are selected based on their technical know-how or proficiency and currently practicing their line of profession in the construction industry. The study used the descriptive-developmental method of research. The Delphi technique was applied to determine if the competency under investigation reached the general agreement of opinions by the panel of experts involved. The findings implied that the newly developed competency standards were good input for curriculum enhancement in the area of civil, drafting and electrical technology. The study recommended the newly developed competencies may be followed by the faculty in the course they teach and the new competency items suggested by the panel of experts for inclusion in the curriculum for the three areas of specializations may be considered during the curriculum revision.

  7. 48{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2017). Workshop: Preserving competence in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2017-10-15

    On the 19{sup th} workshop ''Preserving Competence in Nuclear Technology'' 17 young scientists presented the results from their thesis work for a diploma, mastership or a PhD covering a broad spectrum of technical areas. This demonstrated again the strong engagement of the younger generation for the nuclear technology and the significant support by the involved German institutions. The jury awarded Thomas Schaefer (Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden- Rossendorf) with the Siempelkamp Competence Price 2017.

  8. Core Ideas of Engineering and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneider, Cary

    2012-01-01

    Last month, Rodger Bybee's article, "Scientific and Engineering Practices in K-12 Classrooms," provided an overview of Chapter 3 in "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas" (NRC 2011). Chapter 3 describes the practices of science and engineering that students are expected to develop during 13 years…

  9. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Keung Koo; Noh, J.M.; Hwang, D.H.

    1999-03-01

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  10. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keung Koo; Noh, J.M.; Hwang, D.H. [and others

    1999-03-01

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  11. Internal medicine rounding practices and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeb, Marwa; Khanna, Raman; Fang, Margaret; Sharpe, Brad; Finn, Kathleen; Ranji, Sumant; Monash, Brad

    2014-04-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has established the requirement for residency programs to assess trainees' competencies in 6 core domains (patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning, interpersonal skills, professionalism, and systems-based practice). As attending rounds serve as a primary means for educating trainees at academic medical centers, our study aimed to identify current rounding practices and attending physician perceived capacity of different rounding models to promote teaching within the ACGME core competencies. We disseminated a 24-question survey electronically using educational and hospital medicine leadership mailing lists. We assessed attending physician demographics and the frequency with which they used various rounding models, as defined by the location of the discussion of the patient and care plan: bedside rounds (BR), hallway rounds (HR), and card-flipping rounds (CFR). Using the ACGME framework, we assessed the perceived educational value of each model. We received 153 completed surveys from attending physicians representing 34 institutions. HR was used most frequently for both new and established patients (61% and 43%), followed by CFR for established patients (36%) and BR for new patients (22%). Most attending physicians indicated that BR and HR were superior to CFR in promoting the following ACGME competencies: patient care, systems-based practice, professionalism, and interpersonal skills. HR is the most commonly employed rounding model. BR and HR are perceived to be valuable for teaching patient care, systems-based practice, professionalism, and interpersonal skills. CFR remains prevalent despite its perceived inferiority in promoting teaching across most of the ACGME core competencies. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  12. 2012 annual meeting on nuclear technology. Workshop on 'Preservation of competence in nuclear technology'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Within the 2-day workshop on 'Preservation of Competence in Nuclear Technology,' 31 young scientists competed for the 'Competence Prize' awarded by Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik for the 14th time. They reported about their papers focusing on nuclear technology, reactor technology, innovative reactor systems, radioactive waste management, radiological protection and energy supply systems. The jury composed of Prof. J. Starflinger (Universitaet Stuttgart, IKE), Prof. M.K. Koch (Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, LEE), and Dr. W. Steinwarz (Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik) assessed the advance compacts as well as the oral presentations. The winner of the 2012 Competence Prize is Dipl.-Ing.(M.S.) Thomas M. Fesich (University Stuttgart). Dr.-Ing. Oliver Czaikowski (Techn. University Clausthal) and Dipl.-Ing. Mario Kuschewski (Universitaet Stuttgart) won the second and third prizes. (orig.)

  13. Restructuring a basic science course for core competencies: an example from anatomy teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Jeremy K; Lachman, Nirusha; Camp, Christopher L; Chen, Laura P; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2009-09-01

    Medical schools revise their curricula in order to develop physicians best skilled to serve the public's needs. To ensure a smooth transition to residency programs, undergraduate medical education is often driven by the six core competencies endorsed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME): patient care, medical knowledge, practice-based learning, interpersonal skills, professionalism, and systems-based practice. Recent curricular redesign at Mayo Medical School provided an opportunity to restructure anatomy education and integrate radiology with first-year gross and developmental anatomy. The resulting 6-week (120-contact-hour) human structure block provides students with opportunities to learn gross anatomy through dissection, radiologic imaging, and embryologic correlation. We report more than 20 educational interventions from the human structure block that may serve as a model for incorporating the ACGME core competencies into basic science and early medical education. The block emphasizes clinically-oriented anatomy, invites self- and peer-evaluation, provides daily formative feedback through an audience response system, and employs team-based learning. The course includes didactic briefing sessions and roles for students as teachers, leaders, and collaborators. Third-year medical students serve as teaching assistants. With its clinical focus and competency-based design, the human structure block connects basic science with best-practice clinical medicine.

  14. Miller's Pyramid and Core Competency Assessment: A Study in Relationship Construct Validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Betsy White; Byrne, Phil D; Welindt, Dillon; Williams, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    Continuous professional development relies on the link between performance and an educational process aimed at improving knowledge and skill. One of the most broadly used frameworks for assessing skills is Miller's Pyramid. This Pyramid has a series of levels of achievement beginning with knowledge (at the base) and ending with routine application in the clinical setting. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of convergence of two measurement methods, one based on Miller's framework, the second using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/American Board of Medical Specialties (ACGME/ABMS) Core Competency framework. The data were gathered from the faculty of a large, Midwestern regional health care provider and hospital system. Data from 264 respondents were studied. The 360° data were from raters of physicians holding supervisory roles in the organization. The scale items were taken from an instrument that has been validated for both structure and known group prediction. The Miller scale was purposely built for this application. The questions were designed to describe each level of the model. The Miller scale was reduced to a single dimension. This result was then regressed on the items from the 360° item ratings. Results of a multivariate analysis of variance isolated a significant relationship between the Miller's Pyramid score and the competency items (P core competencies. Equally important is the finding that while they are related they are not identical. These findings have implications for continuous professional development programing design.

  15. The Seneca Babcock Business Plan: A Case Study in Using Service Learning to Meet the AICPA Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the author explains the trend toward service learning projects in higher education and justifies their use in the field of accounting. He describes a service learning project that was used to directly address the development of the competencies listed in the Core Competency Framework created by the American Institute of Certified…

  16. The Core Competencies and MFT Education: Practical Aspects of Transitioning to a Learning-Centered, Outcome-Based Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehart, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The MFT core competencies and latest COAMFTE accreditation standards usher in a new paradigm for MFT education. This transition necessitates not only measuring student mastery of competencies but also, more importantly, adopting a contemporary pedagogical model. This article provides an overview of the changes, a review of parallel trends in other…

  17. Effectiveness of a Core-Competency-based Program on Residents' Learning and Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Lesley; Triscott, Jean; Dobbs, Bonnie; Tian, Peter George; Babenko, Oksana

    2016-06-01

    The Care of the Elderly (COE) Diploma Program is a six-to-twelve-month enhanced skills program taken after two years of core residency training in Family Medicine. In 2010, we developed and implemented a core-competency-based COE Diploma program (CC), in lieu of one based on learning objectives (LO). This study assessed the effectiveness of the core-competency-based program on residents' learning and their training experience as compared to residents trained using learning objectives. The data from the 2007-2013 COE residents were used in the study, with nine and eight residents trained in the LO and CC programs, respectively. Residents' learning was measured using preceptors' evaluations of residents' skills/abilities throughout the program (118 evaluations in total). Residents' rating of training experience was measured using the Graduate's Questionnaire which residents completed after graduation. For residents' learning, overall, there was no significant difference between the two programs. However, when examined as a function of the four CanMEDS roles, there were significant increases in the CC residents' scores for two of the CanMEDS roles: Communicator/Collaborator/Manager and Scholar compared to residents in the LO program. With respect to residents' training experience, seven out of ten program components were rated by the CC residents higher than by the LO residents. The implementation of a COE CC program appears to facilitate resident learning and training experience.

  18. The development and application of bioinformatics core competencies to improve bioinformatics training and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Nicola; Schwartz, Russell; Brazas, Michelle D; Brooksbank, Cath; Gaeta, Bruno; Morgan, Sarah L; Pauley, Mark A; Rosenwald, Anne; Rustici, Gabriella; Sierk, Michael; Warnow, Tandy; Welch, Lonnie

    2018-02-01

    Bioinformatics is recognized as part of the essential knowledge base of numerous career paths in biomedical research and healthcare. However, there is little agreement in the field over what that knowledge entails or how best to provide it. These disagreements are compounded by the wide range of populations in need of bioinformatics training, with divergent prior backgrounds and intended application areas. The Curriculum Task Force of the International Society of Computational Biology (ISCB) Education Committee has sought to provide a framework for training needs and curricula in terms of a set of bioinformatics core competencies that cut across many user personas and training programs. The initial competencies developed based on surveys of employers and training programs have since been refined through a multiyear process of community engagement. This report describes the current status of the competencies and presents a series of use cases illustrating how they are being applied in diverse training contexts. These use cases are intended to demonstrate how others can make use of the competencies and engage in the process of their continuing refinement and application. The report concludes with a consideration of remaining challenges and future plans.

  19. The development and application of bioinformatics core competencies to improve bioinformatics training and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooksbank, Cath; Morgan, Sarah L.; Rosenwald, Anne; Warnow, Tandy; Welch, Lonnie

    2018-01-01

    Bioinformatics is recognized as part of the essential knowledge base of numerous career paths in biomedical research and healthcare. However, there is little agreement in the field over what that knowledge entails or how best to provide it. These disagreements are compounded by the wide range of populations in need of bioinformatics training, with divergent prior backgrounds and intended application areas. The Curriculum Task Force of the International Society of Computational Biology (ISCB) Education Committee has sought to provide a framework for training needs and curricula in terms of a set of bioinformatics core competencies that cut across many user personas and training programs. The initial competencies developed based on surveys of employers and training programs have since been refined through a multiyear process of community engagement. This report describes the current status of the competencies and presents a series of use cases illustrating how they are being applied in diverse training contexts. These use cases are intended to demonstrate how others can make use of the competencies and engage in the process of their continuing refinement and application. The report concludes with a consideration of remaining challenges and future plans. PMID:29390004

  20. The development and validation of the core competencies scale (CCS) for the college and university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Bin; Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching; Edginton, Christopher R; Chin, Ming Kai

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the development and validation of the Core Competencies Scale (CCS) using Bok's (2006) competency framework for undergraduate education. The framework included: communication, critical thinking, character development, citizenship, diversity, global understanding, widening of interest, and career and vocational development. The sample comprised 70 college and university students. Results of analysis using Rasch rating scale modelling showed that there was strong empirical evidence on the validity of the measures in contents, structure, interpretation, generalizability, and response options of the CCS scale. The implication of having developed Rasch-based valid and dependable measures in this study for gauging the value added of college and university education to their students is that the feedback generated from CCS will enable evidence-based decision and policy making to be implemented and strategized. Further, program effectiveness can be measured and thus accountability on the achievement of the program objectives.

  1. Core Competencies: The Challenge For Graduate Peace and Conflict Studies Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windmueller, John; Wayne, Ellen Kabcenell; Botes, Johannes (Jannie)

    2009-05-01

    This article uses a case study of the assessment of a graduate program in negotiations and conflict management as a springboard for discussing several critical, but unanswered questions in our field. It raises questions regarding the lack of clear core competencies and expectations regarding curricula at the graduate-level of peace and conflict studies programs, as well as concerns over how educators in this field can or should assess their own work and train students for practice. It also addresses, via a comparative case analysis in Tajikistan, the degree to which the competencies and pedagogical approaches in this field are culturally bound. The picture that emerges from these case studies suggests that there have been important omissions in the way that the varied educational programs and the larger peace and conflict studies field itself have developed thus far.

  2. Core Addiction Medicine Competencies for Doctors, An International Consultation on Training.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ayu, Astri Parawita

    2017-07-18

    Despite the high prevalence of substance use disorders, associated comorbidities and the evidence-base upon which to base clinical practice, most health systems have not invested in standardised training of healthcare providers in addiction medicine. As a result, people with substance use disorders often receive inadequate care, at the cost of quality of life and enormous direct health care costs and indirect societal costs. Therefore, we undertook this study to assess the views of international scholars, representing different countries, on the core set of addiction medicine competencies that need to be covered in medical education.

  3. Development of core design and analyses technology for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C. C.; Kim, K. Y.

    2002-03-01

    In general, small and medium-sized integral reactors adopt new technology such as passive and inherent safety concepts to minimize the necessity of power source and operator actions, and to provide the automatic measures to cope with any accidents. Specifically, such reactors are often designed with a lower core power density and with soluble boron free concept for system simplification. Those reactors require ultra long cycle operation for higher economical efficiency. This cycle length requirement is one of the important factors in the design of burnable absorbers as well as assurance of shutdown margin. Hence, both computer code system and design methodology based on the today's design technology for the current commercial reactor cores require intensive improvement for the small and medium-sized soluble boron free reactors. New database is also required for the development of this type of reactor core. Under these technical requirements, conceptual design of small integral reactor SMART has been performed since July 1997, and recently completed under the long term nuclear R and D program. Thus, the final objectives of this work is design and development of an integral reactor core and development of necessary indigenous design technology. To reach the goal of the 2nd stage R and D program for basic design of SMART, design bases and requirements adequate for ultra long cycle and soluble boron free concept are established. These bases and requirements are satisfied by the core loading pattern. Based on the core loading pattern, nuclear, and thermal and hydraulic characteristics are analyzed. Also included are fuel performance analysis and development of a core protection and monitoring system that is adequate for the soluble boron free core of an integral reactor. Core shielding design analysis is accomplished, too. Moreover, full scope interface data are produced for reactor safety and performance analyses and other design activities. Nuclear, thermal and

  4. Comparative Analysis of Ukrainian and Foreign Scholars′ Views On Interpretation of Such Terms as Competency, Professional Competency, Professional Competency of Technicians in Food Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Yakovchuk Olha

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with a comparative analysis of the content of such terms as competency, competence and professional competency of technicians in food technology. Special attention has been given to domestic and foreign scholars′ research findings on the matter in order to consider the genesis of the term “competency” and its spreading within Ukrainian and foreign pedagogy. Based on the comparison of European standards and the educational and qualification-based specification of technicians ...

  5. Core competencies for patient safety research: a cornerstone for global capacity strengthening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andermann, Anne; Ginsburg, Liane; Norton, Peter; Arora, Narendra; Bates, David; Wu, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Background Tens of millions of patients worldwide suffer disabling injuries or death every year due to unsafe medical care. Nonetheless, there is a scarcity of research evidence on how to tackle this global health priority. The shortage of trained researchers is a major limitation, particularly in developing and transitional countries. Objectives As a first step to strengthen capacity in this area, the authors developed a set of internationally agreed core competencies for patient safety research worldwide. Methods A multistage process involved developing an initial framework, reviewing the existing literature relating to competencies in patient safety research, conducting a series of consultations with potential end users and international experts in the field from over 35 countries and finally convening a global consensus conference. Results An initial draft list of competencies was grouped into three themes: patient safety, research methods and knowledge translation. The competencies were considered by the WHO Patient Safety task force, by potential end users in developing and transitional countries and by international experts in the field to be relevant, comprehensive, clear, easily adaptable to local contexts and useful for training patient safety researchers internationally. Conclusions Reducing patient harm worldwide will require long-term sustained efforts to build capacity to enable practical research that addresses local problems and improves patient safety. The first edition of Competencies for Patient Safety Researchers is proposed by WHO Patient Safety as a foundation for strengthening research capacity by guiding the development of training programmes for researchers in the area of patient safety, particularly in developing and transitional countries, where such research is urgently needed. PMID:21228081

  6. Nuclear technology centre. Preserving and developing competence and resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiren, I.

    1995-01-01

    The Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm provides one third of Sweden's capacity for engineering studies and technical research at the post-high-school level. Altogether, the institute includes about 8000 students and 900 active postgraduate students and has a staff of nearly 2500. The research activities cover a broad spectrum of the natural sciences and technology, as well as architecture, industrial economics, urban planning, work science and environmental technology. In 1993, a Nuclear Technology Centre was established at the institute. The purpose of this Centre is to stimulate education and research in nuclear technology in order to contribute to the preservation and development of competence in the nuclear field. The formation of the Centre should be regarded as one of several recent initiatives aimed at maintaining a high level of safety and reliability in the operation of nuclear power plants at a time when there are political manoeuvres to phase out nuclear energy in Sweden. The paper summarizes the motives that led to the formation of the Centre, its goals and organization, and its initial activities and results. The paper may be of interest to similar organizations in other countries which are also faced with uncertainties regarding the future of existing nuclear power plants or of current programmes, and which consider that co-operation between the industry and universities is an important factor in ensuring the quality of technological development. (author). 4 refs

  7. Competency Assessment in Senior Emergency Medicine Residents for Core Ultrasound Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jessica N; Kendall, John; Smalley, Courtney

    2015-11-01

    Quality resident education in point-of-care ultrasound (POC US) is becoming increasingly important in emergency medicine (EM); however, the best methods to evaluate competency in graduating residents has not been established. We sought to design and implement a rigorous assessment of image acquisition and interpretation in POC US in a cohort of graduating residents at our institution. We evaluated nine senior residents in both image acquisition and image interpretation for five core US skills (focused assessment with sonography for trauma (FAST), aorta, echocardiogram (ECHO), pelvic, central line placement). Image acquisition, using an observed clinical skills exam (OSCE) directed assessment with a standardized patient model. Image interpretation was measured with a multiple-choice exam including normal and pathologic images. Residents performed well on image acquisition for core skills with an average score of 85.7% for core skills and 74% including advanced skills (ovaries, advanced ECHO, advanced aorta). Residents scored well but slightly lower on image interpretation with an average score of 76%. Senior residents performed well on core POC US skills as evaluated with a rigorous assessment tool. This tool may be developed further for other EM programs to use for graduating resident evaluation.

  8. Functional Management Competence and Growth of Young Technology-Based Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomo, Søren; Brinckmann, Jan; Talke, Katrin

    2008-01-01

    . While technology management competence is positively driving development speed, the marketing management competence impact on speed is mediated by competitive advantage of the new products developed by young technology-based firms. Financial management competence has no significant link to firm...

  9. Identification of Pediatric Oral Health Core Competencies through Interprofessional Education and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Hallas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past seven years, the Department of Pediatric Dentistry at New York University College of Dentistry (NYUCD and the Advanced Practice: Pediatrics and the Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP program at New York University College of Nursing (NYUCN have engaged in a program of formal educational activities with the specific goals of advancing interprofessional education, evidence-based practice, and interprofessional strategies to improve the oral-systemic health of infants and young children. Mentoring interprofessional students in all health care professions to collaboratively assess, analyze, and care-manage patients demands that faculty reflect on current practices and determine ways to enhance the curriculum to include evidence-based scholarly activities, opportunities for interprofessional education and practice, and interprofessional socialization. Through the processes of interprofessional education and practice, the pediatric nursing and dental faculty identified interprofessional performance and affective oral health core competencies for all dental and pediatric primary care providers. Students demonstrated achievement of interprofessional core competencies, after completing the interprofessional educational clinical practice activities at Head Start programs that included interprofessional evidence-based collaborative practice, case analyses, and presentations with scholarly discussions that explored ways to improve the oral health of diverse pediatric populations. The goal of improving the oral health of all children begins with interprofessional education that lays the foundations for interprofessional practice.

  10. [Core competencies in public health: a regional framework for the Americas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conejero, Juana Suárez; Godue, Charles; Gutiérrez, José Francisco García; Valladares, Laura Magaña; Rabionet, Silvia; Concha, José; Valdés, Manuel Vázquez; Gómez, Rubén Darío; Mujica, Oscar J; Cabezas, César; Lucano, Lindaura Liendo; Castellanos, Jorge

    2013-07-01

    The response is described to the 2010 call from the Pan American Health Organization to develop a Regional Framework on Core Competencies in Public Health, with a view to supporting the efforts of the countries in the Americas to build public health systems capacity as a strategy for optimal performance of the Essential Public Health Functions. The methodological process for the response was divided into four phases. In the first, a team of experts was convened who defined the methodology to be used during a workshop at the National Institute of Public Health of Mexico in 2010. The second phase involved formation of the working groups, using two criteria: experience and multidisciplinary membership, which resulted in a regional team with 225 members from 12 countries. This team prepared an initial proposal with 88 competencies. In the third phase, the competencies were cross-validated and their number reduced to 64. During the fourth phase, which included two workshops, in March 2011 (Medellín, Colombia) and June 2011 (Lima, Peru), discussions centered on analyzing the association between the results and the methodology.

  11. Refractory metal component technology for in-core sensor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannon, C.P.

    1986-02-01

    Within recent years, an increasing concern over reactor safety has prompted tests that characterize reactor core environments during transient conditions. Such tests include the Loss-of-Fluid-Tests (Idaho National Engineering Lab (INEL)), Severe Fuel Damage Tests (INEL), Core Debris Rubble Tests (Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)), and similar tests performed by foreign nations. The in-core sensors for these tests require refractory metal components to be compatible with electrical insulator materials as well as materials comprising highly corrosive service mediums. This paper presents the refractory metal technology utilized to provide basic sensor designs in the above mentioned reactor tests

  12. Factors Motivating and Hindering Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adile Aşkım Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies Action Competence (ICTAC can be defined as “individuals’ motivation and capacity to voluntarily employ their ICT skills for initiating or taking part in civic actions”. Since academic staff and teachers in ICT related fields have crucial roles in training action-competent individuals, this study aimed to determine the views of preservice teachers and instructors in Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT departments about the motivating and hindering factors regarding ICTAC. Researchers used purposeful sampling technique and identified seven instructors and 16 students attending outlier CEIT departments from four different Turkish state universities. Since there is no contemporary framework on factors motivating or hindering ICTAC, the study was conducted with a qualitative approach and the data were collected through semi-structured interviews. Factors motivating and hindering ICTAC were identified through a content analysis. Findings of the study are believed to guide ICT and ICT education professionals in training students with higher levels of ICTAC and guide the course developers to focus on relevant social responsibility issues

  13. Exploring the Impact of Technological Competence Development on Speed and NPD Program Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Acur, Nuran; Kandemir, Destan; de Weerd-Nederhof, Petronella C.; Song, Michael; Song, Michael

    2010-01-01

    With growing levels of competition across industries, technological competence is increasingly viewed as crucial for businesses to maintain their long-term competitive advantage. Although there are many theoretical arguments about how firms' competences can yield competitive advantage and

  14. Building new competencies for new business creation based on breakthrough technological innovations

    OpenAIRE

    Vanhaverbeke, W.P.M.; Kirschbaum, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on the question how companies can build new capabilities or competencies based on discontinuous technological innovations? In particular, we analyze how corporate ventures are set up to develop and commercialize these radical innovations can play a crucial role in the process of building new competencies (not only technological capabilities). New competencies are in turn the basis to create a range of new businesses. Building and deploying competencies are intrinsically rel...

  15. Core addiction medicine competencies for doctors: An international consultation on training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayu, Astri Parawita; El-Guebaly, Nady; Schellekens, Arnt; De Jong, Cor; Welle-Strand, Gabrielle; Small, William; Wood, Evan; Cullen, Walter; Klimas, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of substance use disorders, associated comorbidities, and the evidence base upon which to base clinical practice, most health systems have not invested in standardized training of health care providers in addiction medicine. As a result, people with substance use disorders often receive inadequate care, at the cost of quality of life and enormous direct health care costs and indirect societal costs. Therefore, this study was undertaken to assess the views of international scholars, representing different countries, on the core set of addiction medicine competencies that need to be covered in medical education. A total of 13 members of the International Society of 20 Addiction Medicine (ISAM), from 12 different countries (37% response rate), were interviewed over Skype, e-mail survey, or in person at the annual conference. Content analysis was used to analyze interview transcripts, using constant comparison methodology. We identified recommendations related to the core set of the addiction medicine competencies at 3 educational levels: (i) undergraduate, (ii) postgraduate, and (iii) continued medical education (CME). The participants described broad ideas, such as knowledge/skills/attitudes towards addiction to be obtained at undergraduate level, or knowledge of addiction treatment to be acquired at graduate level, as well as specific recommendations, including the need to tailor curriculum to national settings and different specialties. Although it is unclear whether a global curriculum is needed, a consensus on a core set of principles for progression of knowledge, attitudes, and skills in addiction medicine to be developed at each educational level amongst medical graduates would likely have substantial value.

  16. The Health Information Technology Competencies Tool: Does It Translate for Nursing Informatics in the United States?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipes, Carolyn; Hunter, Kathleen; McGonigle, Dee; West, Karen; Hill, Taryn; Hebda, Toni

    2017-12-01

    Information technology use in healthcare delivery mandates a prepared workforce. The initial Health Information Technology Competencies tool resulted from a 2-year transatlantic effort by experts from the US and European Union to identify approaches to develop skills and knowledge needed by healthcare workers. It was determined that competencies must be identified before strategies are established, resulting in a searchable database of more than 1000 competencies representing five domains, five skill levels, and more than 250 roles. Health Information Technology Competencies is available at no cost and supports role- or competency-based queries. Health Information Technology Competencies developers suggest its use for curriculum planning, job descriptions, and professional development.The Chamberlain College of Nursing informatics research team examined Health Information Technology Competencies for its possible application to our research and our curricular development, comparing it originally with the TIGER-based Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies and Nursing Informatics Competency Assessment of Level 3 and Level 4 tools, which examine informatics competencies at four levels of nursing practice. Additional analysis involved the 2015 Nursing Informatics: Scope and Standards of Practice. Informatics is a Health Information Technology Competencies domain, so clear delineation of nursing-informatics competencies was expected. Researchers found TIGER-based Assessment of Nursing Informatics Competencies and Nursing Informatics Competency Assessment of Level 3 and Level 4 differed from Health Information Technology Competencies 2016 in focus, definitions, ascribed competencies, and defined levels of expertise. When Health Information Technology Competencies 2017 was compared against the nursing informatics scope and standards, researchers found an increase in the number of informatics competencies but not to a significant degree. This is not surprising

  17. Feasibility analysis of real-time physical modeling using WaveCore processor technology on FPGA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraelen, Martinus Johannes Wilhelmina; Pfeifle, Florian; Bader, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    WaveCore is a scalable many-core processor technology. This technology is specifically developed and optimized for real-time acoustical modeling applications. The programmable WaveCore soft-core processor is silicon-technology independent and hence can be targeted to ASIC or FPGA technologies. The

  18. TPACK Competencies and Technology Integration Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Hafize; Karaoglan Yilmaz, Fatma Gizem; Yilmaz, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) competency of pre-service teachers with their self-efficacy perception towards technology integration, based on various variables; and the correlation between their TPACK competencies and self-efficacy perceptions towards technology integration were examined. The study…

  19. Partnering to provide simulated learning to address Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Judy I; Nimmagadda, Jayashree

    2015-05-01

    Learning to effectively communicate and work with other professionals requires skill, yet interprofessional education is often not included in the undergraduate healthcare provider curriculum. Simulation is an effective pedagogy to bring students from multiple professions together for learning. This article describes a pilot study where nursing and social work students learned together in a simulated learning activity, which was evaluated to by the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS). The RIPLS was used before and after the simulated activity to determine if this form of education impacted students' perceptions of readiness to learn together. Students from both professions improved in their RIPLS scores. Students were also asked to identify their interprofessional strengths and challenges before and after the simulation. Changes were identified in qualitative data where reports of strengths and challenges indicated learning and growth had occurred. In conclusion, this pilot study suggests that interprofessional simulation can be an effective method to integrate Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies into the curriculum.

  20. Integrating Morbidity and Mortality Core Competencies and Quality Improvement in Otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laury, Adrienne M; Bowe, Sarah N; Lospinoso, Joshua

    2017-02-01

    To date, an otolaryngology-specific morbidity and mortality (M&M) conference has never been reported or evaluated. To propose a novel otolaryngology-specific M&M format and to assess its success using a validated assessment tool. Preintervention and postintervention cohort study spanning 14 months (September 2014 to November 2015), with 32 faculty, residents, and medical students attending the department of otolaryngology M&M conference, conducted at the the San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium. A novel quality assurance conference was implemented in the department of otolaryngology at the San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium. This conference incorporates patient safety reports, otolaryngology-specific quality metrics, and individual case presentations. The revised format integrates the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core competencies and Quality Improvement and Patient Safety (QI/PS) system. This format was evaluated by faculty, residents, and medical students every other month for 14 months to assess changes in attitudes regarding the M&M conference as well as changes in presentation quality. Overall, 13 faculty, 12 residents, and 7 medical students completed 232 evaluations. Summary statistics of both resident and faculty attitudes about the success of the M&M format seem to improve over the 14 months between the prequestionnaires and postquestionnaires. General attitudes for both residents and faculty significantly improved from the pretest to posttest (odds ratio, 0.32 per month; 95% CI, 0.29-0.35). In the pretest period, "established presentation format" was considered the most necessary improvement, whereas in the posttest period this changed to "incorporate more QI." For resident presentations evaluated using the situation, background, assessment, and review/recommendations (SBAR) tool, all evaluations, from all participants, improved over time. The M&M conference is an essential

  1. Evaluating the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education core clinical competencies: techniques and feasibility in a urology training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C; Montie, James E; Faerber, Gary J

    2003-10-01

    We describe several traditional and novel techniques for teaching and evaluating the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) core clinical competencies in a urology residency training program. The evolution and underpinnings of the ACGME Outcome Project were reviewed. Several publications related to the evaluation of clinical competencies as well as current assessment techniques at our institution were also analyzed. Several tools for the assessment of clinical competencies have been developed and refined in response to the ACGME Outcome project. Standardized patient encounters and expanded patient satisfaction surveys may prove useful with regard to assessing resident professionalism, patient care and communication skills. A feasible and possibly undervalued technique for evaluating a number of core competencies is the implementation of formal written appraisals of the nature and quality of resident performance at departmental conferences. The assessment of competency in practice based learning and systems based practice may be achieved through innovative exercises, such as practice guideline development, that assess the evidence for various urologic interventions as well as the financial and administrative aspects of such care. We describe several contemporary methods for teaching and evaluating the core clinical competencies in a urology training program. While the techniques described are neither comprehensive nor feasible for every program, they nevertheless provide an important starting point for a meaningful exchange of ideas in the urological graduate medical education community.

  2. [A Delphi Method Survey of the Core Competences of Post-Acute-Care Nurses in Caring for Acute Stroke Patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Shu-Ching; Yeh, Lily; Lu, Meei-Shiow; Lin, Pei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    Post-acute care (PAC) service is becoming increasingly important in Taiwan as a core focus of government policies that are designed to ensure continuity of care. In order to improve PAC nursing education and quality of care, the present study applies a modified Delphi method to identify the core competences of nurses who provide PAC services to acute stroke patients. We surveyed 18 experts in post-acute care and long-term care anonymously using a 29-question questionnaire in order to identify the essential professional skills that are required to perform PAC effectively. The results of this survey indicate that the core competences of PAC may be divided into two categories: Case Management and Care Management. Case Management includes Direct Care, Communication, Health Care Education, Nursing Consulting, and Family Assessment & Health Care. Care Management includes Interdisciplinary Teamwork, Patient Care Management, and Resource Integration. The importance and practicality of each item was evaluated using a 7-point Likert scale. The experts required 2 rounds to reach a consensus about the importance and 3 rounds to determine the practicality of PAC core competences. This process highlighted the differing points of view that are held by professionals in the realms of nursing, medicine, and national health policy. The PAC in-job training program in its current form inadequately cul-tivates core competence in Care Management. The results of the present study may be used to inform the development of PAC nurse orientation training programs and continuing education courses.

  3. Directions of innovative educational technologies implemented in formation of the students’ competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barabas Dmytro Oleksandrovych

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article summarizes important competences for the modern specialist. It characterises prior directions in introduction of innovative methods of training at universities. These directions are linked to the core competences of students each direction allows to form. The tools for implementing these directions are specified in the article.

  4. Applications of simulation experiments in LMFBR core materials technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleby, W.K.

    1976-01-01

    The development of charged particle bombardment experiments to simulate neutron irradiation induced swelling in austenitic alloys is briefly described. The applications of these techniques in LMFBR core materials technology are discussed. It is shown that use of the techniques to study the behavior of cold-worked Type-316 was instrumental in demonstrating at an early date the need for advanced materials. The simulation techniques then were used to identify alloying elements which can markedly decrease swelling and thus a focused reactor irradiation program is now in place to allow the future use of a lower swelling alloy for LMFBR core components

  5. Development of national standardized all-hazard disaster core competencies for acute care physicians, nurses, and EMS professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Carl H; Koenig, Kristi L; Whiteside, Mary; Murray, Rick

    2012-03-01

    The training of medical personnel to provide care for disaster victims is a priority for the physician community, the federal government, and society as a whole. Course development for such training guided by well-accepted standardized core competencies is lacking, however. This project identified a set of core competencies and performance objectives based on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required by the specific target audience (emergency department nurses, emergency physicians, and out-of-hospital emergency medical services personnel) to ensure they can treat the injuries and illnesses experienced by victims of disasters regardless of cause. The core competencies provide a blueprint for the development or refinement of disaster training courses. This expert consensus project, supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, incorporated an all-hazard, comprehensive emergency management approach addressing every type of disaster to minimize the effect on the public's health. An instructional systems design process was used to guide the development of audience-appropriate competencies and performance objectives. Participants, representing multiple academic and provider organizations, used a modified Delphi approach to achieve consensus on recommendations. A framework of 19 content categories (domains), 19 core competencies, and more than 90 performance objectives was developed for acute medical care personnel to address the requirements of effective all-hazards disaster response. Creating disaster curricula and training based on the core competencies and performance objectives identified in this article will ensure that acute medical care personnel are prepared to treat patients and address associated ramifications/consequences during any catastrophic event. Copyright © 2012 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Status of core nuclear design technology for future fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyung Kook; Jung, Hyung Guk; Noh, Jae Man; Kim, Yeong Il; Kim, Taek Kyum; Gil, Choong Sup; Kim, Jung Do; Kim, Young Jin; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1997-01-01

    The effective utilization of nuclear resource is more important factor to be considered in the design of next generation PWR in addition to the epochal consideration on economics and safety. Assuming that MOX fuel can be considered as one of the future fuel corresponding to the above request, the establishment of basic technology for the MOX core design has been performed : : the specification of the technical problem through the preliminary core design and nuclear characteristic analysis of MOX, the development and verification of the neutron library for lattice code, and the acquisition of data to be used for verification of lattice and core analysis codes. The following further studies will be done in future: detailed verification of library E63LIB/A, development of the spectral history effect treatment module, extension of decay chain, development of new homogenization for the MOX fuel assembly. (author). 6 refs., 7 tabs., 2 figs

  7. Information Technology as the Main Competence in the Design of the Strategic Planning of Logistics Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Varella

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The creation of logistical support structures aims to help improve the performance of logistics along supply chains, a context where the Logistics Platforms have been gaining increasing prominence. A frequent difficulty in these ventures is to align strategic planning with the flow of cargo and the ability of the adjacent port areas. Aiming to contribute to the understanding of the importance of Information Technology in a Logistics Platform, this article systematize some of the operational core competencies of Logistics Platforms, inter-relating them with the strategic planning of these projects and showing their convergence to a solid information management structure. This study indicates the importance of this essential skill in the operation of a logistics enterprise and the preparation of its strategic plan, shown to be fundamental in the design of its operations, the adequacy of the enterprise to the region and to supply chains integrated into this environment.

  8. QUALITATIVE INDICATORS OF EFFICIENCY OF TECHNOLOGIES DEVELOPING ESP COMPETENCE IN STUDENTS MAJORING IN SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Микитинко

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to identifying and diagnosing qualitative indicators of efficiency of technologies developing ESP competence in students majoring in Sciences, namely: indicators of objective and subjective assessment  of students’ ESP competence, students’ motivation regarding professional choice, organizational features of professional training, its contents, the most popular learning activities, use of active methods of study in educational process. The paradigm of experimental research of efficiency of technologies developing ESP competence in students majoring in Sciences has been defined. Based on the interpretation of the qualitative indicators the hypothesis of efficiency of technologies developing ESP competence in students majoring in Sciences has been proven.

  9. Predictability of Competing Measures of Core Inflation: An Application for Peru Predictability of Competing Measures of Core Inflation: An Application for Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Luis F. Zegarra; Eduardo Morón

    1999-01-01

    A central element of an inflation targeting approach to monetary policy is a proper measure of inflation. The international evidence suggests the use of core inflation measures. In this paper we claim that core inflation should be measured as the underlying trend of inflation that comes from nominal shocks that have no real effect in the long term. However, most of the time core inflation is computed zero weighting observations at the tail of the inflation distribution. Quah and Vahey (1996) ...

  10. Development of Enriched Core Competencies for Health Services and Policy Research: Training for Stronger Career Readiness and Greater Impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Stephen; Heritage, Melissa; Chudak, Amanda; Tamblyn, Robyn; McMahon, Meghan; Brown, Adalsteinn

    2018-03-11

    To develop an enriched set of core competencies for health services and policy research (HSPR) doctoral training that will help graduates maximize their impact across a range of academic and nonacademic work environments and roles. Data were obtained from multiple sources, including literature reviews, key informant interviews, stakeholder consultations, and Expert Working Group (EWG) meetings between January 2015 and March 2016. The study setting is Canada. The study used qualitative methods and an iterative development process with significant stakeholder engagement throughout. The literature reviews, key informant interviews, existing data on graduate career trajectories, and EWG deliberations informed the identification of career profiles for HSPR graduates and the competencies required to succeed in these roles. Stakeholder consultations were held to vet, refine, and validate the competencies. The EWG reached consensus on six sectors and eight primary roles in which HSPR doctoral graduates can bring value to employers and the health system. Additionally, 10 core competencies were identified that should be included or further emphasized in the training of HSPR doctoral students to increase their preparedness and potential for impact in a variety of roles within and outside of traditional academic workplaces. The results offer an expanded view of potential career paths for HSPR doctoral graduates and provide recommendations for an expanded set of core competencies that will better equip graduates to maximize their impact on the health system. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  11. Linking the Prevention of Problem Behaviors and Positive Youth Development: Core Competencies for Positive Youth Development and Risk Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Nancy G.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter, we present a brief review of the developmental literature linking healthy adjustment to five core competencies: (1) positive sense of self, (2) self-control, (3) decision-making skills, (4) a moral system of belief, and (5) prosocial connectedness. A central premise of this chapter and the rest of the volume is that promoting…

  12. Study of the Results in the Acquisition of Core Competencies in Schools That Integrate Primary Education and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu Duran, Maria; Godall Castell, Pere; Amador Guillem, Miquel; Castro Morera, Maria

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this research was to carry out an exploratory study on how music education integrated into primary schooling (children from 6 to 12 years old) can help in acquiring the core competencies characteristic of this stage. The study was conducted by developing a validated instrument, pilot-tested for reliability, to assess the eight core…

  13. Training infection control and hospital hygiene professionals in Europe, 2010: agreed core competencies among 33 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusaferro, S; Cookson, B; Kalenic, S; Cooper, T; Fabry, J; Gallagher, R; Hartemann, P; Mannerquist, K; Popp, W; Privitera, G; Ruef, C; Viale, P; Coiz, F; Fabbro, E; Suetens, C; Varela Santos, C

    2014-12-11

    The harmonisation of training programmes for infection control and hospital hygiene (IC/HH) professionals in Europe is a requirement of the Council recommendation on patient safety. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control commissioned the 'Training Infection Control in Europe' project to develop a consensus on core competencies for IC/HH professionals in the European Union (EU). Core competencies were drafted on the basis of the Improving Patient Safety in Europe (IPSE) project's core curriculum (CC), evaluated by questionnaire and approved by National Representatives (NRs) for IC/HH training. NRs also re-assessed the status of IC/HH training in European countries in 2010 in comparison with the situation before the IPSE CC in 2006. The IPSE CC had been used to develop or update 28 of 51 IC/HH courses. Only 10 of 33 countries offered training and qualification for IC/HH doctors and nurses. The proposed core competencies are structured in four areas and 16 professional tasks at junior and senior level. They form a reference for standardisation of IC/HH professional competencies and support recognition of training initiatives.

  14. A clinical clerkship collaborative program in Taiwan: Acquiring core clinical competencies through patient care responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong A. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: This pilot collaborative program presented a successful model for clinical education in the teaching of core clinical competencies through direct patient care responsibilities at the clerkship stage. It is hoped that the project will become a catalyst for medical education reform in Taiwan and regions with similar traditions.

  15. Examining the Effects of a National League for Nursing Core Competencies Workshop as an Intervention to Improve Nurse Faculty Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanBever Wilson, Robin R.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the complex challenges facing schools of nursing, a research study was implemented to introduce nurse faculty at one small rural northeastern Tennessee school of nursing to the NLN "Core Competencies for Nurse Educators". Utilizing Kalb's Nurse Faculty Self-Evaluation Tool as a pre- and post-intervention test, 30 nurse faculty…

  16. The Use of Cultural Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) within a Constructivist Learning Environment to Develop Core Competencies in Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fire, Nancy; Casstevens, W. J.

    2013-01-01

    Achieving foundation-level practice behaviors to develop social work core competencies involves integrating learning across a curriculum. This article focuses on two phases of foundation-level course redevelopment aimed to support graduate students in accomplishing this outcome. The first phase involved restructuring the course to become a…

  17. Meeting International Society for Technology in Education Competencies with a Problem-Based Learning Video Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoretz, Yvonne M.; Cottle, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Meeting International Society for Technology in Education competencies creates a challenge for teachers. The authors provide a problem-based video framework that guides teachers in enhancing 21st century skills to meet those competencies. To keep the focus on the content, the authors suggest teaching the technology skills only at the point the…

  18. Application of mathematical methods of analysis in selection of competing information technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, V. L.; Kadyshev, E. N.; Zakharova, A. N.; Patianova, A. O.; Dulina, G. S.

    2018-05-01

    The article discusses the use of qualimetry methods using the apparatus of mathematical analysis in the formation of the integral index that allows one to select the best option among competing information technology. The authors propose the use of affine space in the evaluation and selection of competing information technologies.

  19. Genetic education and the challenge of genomic medicine: development of core competences to support preparation of health professionals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skirton, Heather; Lewis, Celine; Kent, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    in professional education and regulation between European countries, setting curricula may not be practical. Core competences are used as a basis for health professional education in many fields and settings. An Expert Group working under the auspices of the EuroGentest project and European Society of Human...... Genetics Education Committee agreed that a pragmatic solution to the need to establish common standards for education and practice in genetic health care was to agree to a set of core competences that could apply across Europe. These were agreed through an exhaustive process of consultation with relevant......The use of genetics and genomics within a wide range of health-care settings requires health professionals to develop expertise to practise appropriately. There is a need for a common minimum standard of competence in genetics for health professionals in Europe but because of differences...

  20. Advanced practice nurses core competencies: a framework for developing and testing an advanced practice nurse discharge intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Liz; Gemmill, Robin; Grant, Marcia

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe evidenced-based interventions as implemented by advanced practice nurses (APNs) conducting intervention research with a vulnerable population of blood and marrow transplant patients. In addition, each of the 6 core competencies of the APN role identified by Hamric are outlined and applied using a patient case study. These competencies are the following: direct clinical practice, expert coaching and advice, consultation, research skills, clinical and professional leadership, collaboration, and ethical decision making. This article chronicles a typical patient's journey through a post-hospital discharge nursing research study involving APNs as "intervention nurses" and discusses the various aspects of the APN core competencies throughout the process.

  1. Re-Engineering Information Technology: Design Considerations for Competency Education. CompetencyWorks Issue Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowa, Liz

    2013-01-01

    Competency education is student-centric, personalizing student progress so that every child has adequate time and support to reach proficiency every step of the way. Competency education fundamentally changes the way the educational enterprise is organized around student needs, and thus must have a dynamic IT system to support it. Following an…

  2. Diagnostic Technology Development for Core Internal Structure in CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Hyun Kyu; Cheong, Y. M.; Lee, Y. S. and others

    2005-04-01

    Degradation of critical components of nuclear power plants has become important as the operating years of plants increase. The necessity of degradation study including measurement and monitoring technology has increased continuously. Because the fuel channels and the neighboring sensing tubes and control rods are particularly one of the critical components in CANDU nuclear plant, they are treated as a major research target in order to counteract the possible problems and establish the counterplan for the CANDU reactor safety improvement. To ensure the core structure integrity in CANDU nuclear plant, the following 2 research tasks were performed: Development of NDE technologies for the gap measurement between the fuel channels and LIN tubes. Development of vibration monitoring technology of the fuel channels and sensing tubes. The technologies developed in this study could contribute to the nuclear safety and estimation of the remaining life of operating CANDU nuclear power plants

  3. Professionalism: A Core Competency, but What Does it Mean? A Survey of Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilday, Joshua C; Miller, Elizabeth A; Schmitt, Kyle; Davis, Brian; Davis, Kurt G

    2017-10-27

    Professionalism is 1 of the 6 core competencies of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education. Despite its obvious importance, it is poorly defined in the literature and an understanding of its meaning has not been evaluated on surgical trainees. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) has previously published tenets of surgical professionalism. However, surgery residents may not share similar views on professionalism as those of the ACS. Surgical residents of all levels at 2 surgery residencies located in the same city were interviewed regarding their personal definitions, thoughts, and experiences regarding professionalism during their training. They were then queried regarding 20 points of professionalism as outlined by the ACS tenets of professionalism. The study utilized the surgery residencies at William Beaumont Army Medical Center and Texas Tech University Health Science Center in El Paso, Texas. All general surgery residents at each program were invited to participate in the study. Eighteen residents volunteered to take the survey and be interviewed. The definitions of professionalism centered on clinical competence. Surgery residents conveyed experiences with both professional and unprofessional behavior. Seven of the 20 ACS tenets of professionalism were unanimously agreed upon. There were key differences between resident definitions and those as outlined by the ACS. The least agreed upon ACS tenets of professionalism include professionalism education, public education, and public health. Surgical trainees express personal experiences in both professional and unprofessional behavior. Their definitions of professionalism are not as expansive as those of the ACS and seem to focus on patient and colleague interaction. Due to the lack of congruency, a tailored curriculum for professionalism based upon ACS tenets appears warranted. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Principlesand technology competence approach to formation of professional career students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Biskup

    2016-03-01

    In general, the article features acquired theoretical justification of career development of students in conjunction with practical mechanisms for achieving the appropriate level of career competence.

  5. Organizational Learning, Building and Sustaining Core Competencies: Knowledge Management Initiatives on Inspection and Regulatory Enforcement in BAPETEN Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daeng Beta, W. P.; Nurwidi Astuti, Y. H.; Hermawan, A. S.; Syaifulloh, S.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Regulatory inspection and law enforcement are among the core competencies of the Indonesia Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN). Knowledge management (KM) initiatives are based on strategic planning of BAPETEN. KM in BAPETEN is in its early stage, it is realized since 2015–2016, although its elements have stayed in service for 18 years. Its architecture and performance-information are: to conduct risk based inspection for medical, industrial and research facilities; to plan, monitor and evaluate of effective inspection, including standard operating procedures (SOPs); to utilize inspectors for safety security of radiation sources along with coordination with related stakeholders; to enforce the safety and security facilities report to users; to optimize reliable data communication, processing and information technology (B@LIS); to perform regulatory enforcement along with other related stakeholders. KM processes are performed through the “Socialization, Externalization, Combination, Internalization” (SECI) model. Technical knowledge for inspectors are based on the IAEA–TECDOC–1526 plus supporting knowledge. With KM, innovation products can easily be used, because they are documented, distributed in a KM portal, knowledge is shared through the BAPETEN website, B@LIS database and others. Our challenge is that KM initiatives still need a tremendous effort, not only internally, but also externally, especially in coordination and collaboration. Information access brings about not only positive but also negative impacts. Innovations in regulatory inspection and law enforcement in BAPETEN are planned innovations, sustained, and systematically performed. (author

  6. Scientific Skills as Core Competences in Medical Education: What do medical students think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Laura; Severo, Milton; Pereira, Margarida; Amélia Ferreira, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Background: Scientific excellence is one of the most fundamental underpinnings of medical education and its relevance is unquestionable. To be involved in research activities enhances students' critical thinking and problem-solving capacities, which are mandatory competences for new achievements in patient care and consequently to the improvement of clinical practice. Purposes: This work aimed to study the relevance given by Portuguese medical students to a core of scientific skills, and their judgment about their own ability to execute those skills. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on students attending the first, fourth and sixth years of medical course in the same period. An assessment istrument, exploring the importance given by Portuguese medical students to scientific skills in high school, to clinical practice and to their own ability to execute them, was designed, adapted and applied specifically to this study. Results: Students' perceptions were associated with gender, academic year, previous participation in research activities, positive and negative attitudes toward science, research integration into the curriculum and motivation to undertake research. The viewpoint of medical students about the relevance of scientific skills overall, and the ability to execute them, was independently associated with motivation to be enrolled in research. Conclusions: These findings have meaningful implications in medical education regarding the inclusion of a structural research program in the medical curriculum. Students should be aware that clinical practice would greatly benefit from the enrollment in research activities. By developing a solid scientific literacy future physicians will be able to apply new knowledge in patient care.

  7. The use of standardized patients in the plastic surgery residency curriculum: teaching core competencies with objective structured clinical examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Drew; Lee, Gordon

    2011-07-01

    As of 2006, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education had defined six "core competencies" of residency education: interpersonal communication skills, medical knowledge, patient care, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, and systems-based practice. Objective structured clinical examinations using standardized patients are becoming effective educational tools, and the authors developed a novel use of the examinations in plastic surgery residency education that assesses all six competencies. Six plastic surgery residents, two each from postgraduate years 4, 5, and 6, participated in the plastic surgery-specific objective structured clinical examination that focused on melanoma. The examination included a 30-minute videotaped encounter with a standardized patient actor and a postencounter written exercise. The residents were scored on their performance in all six core competencies by the standardized patients and faculty experts on a three-point scale (1 = novice, 2 = moderately skilled, and 3 = proficient). Resident performance was averaged for each postgraduate year, stratified according to core competency, and scored from a total of 100 percent. Residents overall scored well in interpersonal communications skills (84 percent), patient care (83 percent), professionalism (86 percent), and practice-based learning (84 percent). Scores in medical knowledge showed a positive correlation with level of training (86 percent). All residents scored comparatively lower in systems-based practice (65 percent). The residents reported unanimously that the objective structured clinical examination was realistic and educational. The objective structured clinical examination provided comprehensive and meaningful feedback and identified areas of strengths and weakness for the residents and for the teaching program. The examination is an effective assessment tool for the core competencies and a valuable adjunct to residency training.

  8. Financial Management Competence of Founding Teams and Growth of New Technology-Based Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinckmann, Jan; Gemuenden, Hans Georg; Salomo, Søren

    2009-01-01

    This article draws on the resource-based view to analyze the role founding teams' financial management competencies play for firm growth. Prior research stressed the importance of acquiring external financial resources. In this study, we broaden the understanding of financial management in new......-assessments of their financial management competencies at start-up. We apply the partial least squares approach to determine the effects of the different financial management competencies on firm growth....... firms. We explore the relevance of strategic financial planning competence, external financing competence, competence in financing from cash flow, and controlling competence of entrepreneurial teams for the growth of new technology-based firms. A total of 212 founding teams provided self...

  9. Experience in forming and core mixtures by Alphaset technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Vasková

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemically bound mixtures have had the evolution effect upon the economical and quality aspects of the foundry operations since they presentation at the market. The higher output and significantly increased production efficiency of moulds and cores has lead to the material increase in the quality and profit of the foundries. It can be seen that in last several years the knowledge of bounds based on the organic resins has made enormous advances. The higher strength, improved properties under elevated temperatures, the reduction of the environmental impacts of the organic bounds and at the same their highly improved regenerationability ensure that these systems will be still more significant binding system. The organic binding systems are predominantly being developed recemtly. The technology AlpHaset is ranked among the alkali binding systems. This technology has certain disadvantages – lower strength, speed of hardening- which have been gradually eliminated.

  10. Analyzing the Dependency Between National Logistics Performance and Competitiveness: Which Logistics Competence is Core for National Strategy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burmaoglu Serhat

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available With the advancements in the strategic management field, logistics management has changed considerably and logistics competency has emerged as a new and important area of research. In this regard, the purpose of this study is to find the core logistics abilities, which enable nations to achieve a competitive advantage in the logistics market. Two different data sets, one from World Economic Forum and the other from the World Bank were used. Cluster and discriminant analysis were used to answer the research questions. The results indicated that while the logistics infrastructure and the customs were absolute in determining a high-competitive country, the logistics competence and the tracking & tracing were the core logistics abilities needed to sustain the competitive advantage in long term. The implications of these results are also discussed.

  11. Competency-Based Curriculum Guide for Laser Technology. September 1980-June 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioroni, John J.

    This document contains materials developed by a project to provide a competency-based curriculum guide for laser technology at the community college level. An abstract of the final report is included. Next, the 17 job competencies determined as necessary to meet the job description of laser technician are listed. A career ladder and qualifications…

  12. Graduate students' self assessment of competency in grief education and training in core accredited rehabilitation counseling programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Richard Jude

    The study examined whether 93 master's level rehabilitation counselor trainees from select Midwestern CORE-accredited schools report having been adequately trained to identify and work with clients who are having grief-related issues from a loss or disability. Using the Grief Counseling Competency Scale (GCCS), participants showed a wide range of scores regarding personal competency related to grief; however, scores tended to be low when examining skills and knowledge relating to grief, with most respondents scoring between "this barely describes me" and "this somewhat describes me." Although presence or history of a disability was found to be related to personal competency, a number of variables were not related, including: gender, age, race/ethnicity, course work in grief theories and grief interventions, practica/internship setting, and attitudes toward people with disabilities. Implications for further research are discussed.

  13. Genetic education and the challenge of genomic medicine: development of core competences to support preparation of health professionals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skirton, Heather; Lewis, Celine; Kent, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    in professional education and regulation between European countries, setting curricula may not be practical. Core competences are used as a basis for health professional education in many fields and settings. An Expert Group working under the auspices of the EuroGentest project and European Society of Human...... and professions has resulted in an adaptable framework for both pre-registration and continuing professional education. This competence framework has the potential to improve the quality of genetic health care for patients globally.......The use of genetics and genomics within a wide range of health-care settings requires health professionals to develop expertise to practise appropriately. There is a need for a common minimum standard of competence in genetics for health professionals in Europe but because of differences...

  14. The core competency movement in marriage and family therapy: key considerations from other disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, John K; Todahl, Jeff L; Platt, Jason J

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing movement to define competency within the field of marriage and family therapy (MFT), particularly with respect to the training of practitioners and the evaluation of clinical practice. Efforts to define competency, however, transcend the practice of MFT and much can be learned from the experiences of other disciplines. Professions such as education, law, and medicine have made strides toward addressing the complex issue of competency standards in their respective fields. This article describes some ways in which the issue of competency has been approached in other professions, as well as some common dilemmas posed by adopting a competency-based orientation, to shed light on the process of defining competency in MFT. Moreover, this article identifies some of the more useful conceptualizations, modes of pedagogy, and evaluative practices found in other professions.

  15. Core Competence And Sustainable Competitive Adventage Of Small Silk Weaving Industries (SIs) In Wajo District, South Sulawesi

    OpenAIRE

    Mappigau, Palmarudi

    2008-01-01

    studi connectedness between the research and practical use within SIs, specially within the framework of the development of regional competitiveness. The aim of this study is to identify and determine core competence and sustainable competitive advantage (SCA) of the small silk weaving industries in Wajo District, and to formulate its road map development. Data and information are collected using several instruments : questionnaire, depth interview, and public consultation through...

  16. Core Competencies in Disaster Management and Humanitarian Assistance: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripoll Gallardo, Alba; Djalali, Ahmadreza; Foletti, Marco; Ragazzoni, Luca; Della Corte, Francesco; Lupescu, Olivera; Arculeo, Chris; von Arnim, Gotz; Friedl, Tom; Ashkenazi, Michael; Fisher, Philipp; Hreckovski, Boris; Khorram-Manesh, Amir; Komadina, Radko; Lechner, Konstanze; Stal, Marc; Patru, Cristina; Burkle, Frederick M; Ingrassia, Pier Luigi

    2015-08-01

    Disaster response demands a large workforce covering diverse professional sectors. Throughout this article, we illustrate the results of a systematic review of peer-reviewed studies to identify existing competency sets for disaster management and humanitarian assistance that would serve as guidance for the development of a common disaster curriculum. A systematic review of English-language articles was performed on PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, ERIC, and Cochrane Library. Studies were included if reporting competency domains, abilities, knowledge, skills, or attitudes for professionals involved disaster relief or humanitarian assistance. Exclusion criteria included abstracts, citations, case studies, and studies not dealing with disasters or humanitarian assistance. Thirty-eight papers were analyzed. Target audience was defined in all articles. Five references (13%) reported cross-sectorial competencies. Most of the articles (81.6%) were specific to health care. Eighteen (47%) papers included competencies for at least 2 different disciplines and 18 (47%) for different professional groups. Nursing was the most widely represented cadre. Eighteen papers (47%) defined competency domains and 36 (94%) reported list of competencies. Nineteen articles (50%) adopted consensus-building to define competencies, and 12 (31%) included competencies adapted to different professional responsibility levels. This systematic review revealed that the largest number of papers were mainly focused on the health care sector and presented a lack of agreement on the terminology used for competency-based definition.

  17. THE TECHNOLOGY OF FORMING THE PROSPECTIVE UKRAINIAN LANGUAGE TEACHERS’ LINGUOMETHODOLOGICAL COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Ishutina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article the author determines the concept of the technology of forming linguomethodological competence of prospective Ukrainian language teachers. The technology of forming the prospective Ukrainian language teachers’ linguomethodological competence in the process of their professional training is theoretically grounded: it consists of the targeted, content, technology and procedure, and effective stages. Experimental teaching was organized taking into account the pedagogical conditions and included the following forms and methods of work: problem lectures, discussions, round tables, simulation games, portfolio, project work, and testing. As a part of implementing the technology we have actively applied the specific methods of forming linguomethodological competence, such as the method of observing and analyzing linguomethodological activities, the method of modelling linguomethodological activities and training linguomethodological activities in the real conditions. The efficiency of the technology of forming linguomethodological competence of prospective Ukrainian language teachers in interrelation with monitoring of its quality was practically tested taking into account the specified criteria (cognitive, operational and activity, motivational and cultural and the indicators and levels of the concept. The developed technology of forming future Ukrainian language teachers’ linguomethodological competence allows to illustrate the progress of the process under study, demonstrates the functioning of all its components in close relationship. The proposed technology can be added and is not meant to finally solve the problem of forming linguomethodological competence of future Ukrainian language teachers; it can be improved theoretically and experimentally in the future and adapted and used by universities according to field of study.

  18. Core competencies for cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention professionals: 2010 update: position statement of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Larry F; Sanderson, Bonnie K; Ades, Philip A; Berra, Kathy; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Roitman, Jeffrey L; Williams, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation/secondary prevention (CR/SP) services are typically delivered by a multidisciplinary team of health care professionals. The American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR) recognizes that to provide high-quality services, it is important for these health care professionals to possess certain core competencies. This update to the previous statement identifies 10 areas of core competencies for CR/SP health care professionals and identifies specific knowledge and skills for each core competency. These core competency areas are consistent with the current list of core components for CR/SP programs published by the AACVPR and the American Heart Association and include comprehensive cardiovascular patient assessment; management of blood pressure, lipids, diabetes, tobacco cessation, weight, and psychological issues; exercise training; and counseling for psychosocial, nutritional, and physical activity issues.

  19. A study of professional competence for radiological technology department students in Taiwan area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Kai-Yuan; Hsieh Bor-Tsung; Huang W.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, so many medical institutions established and the increasing use of the high technological medical imaging equipment, it makes radiological technology become the main instrument for the medical diagnostic and radiation therapy. However, the medical radiological technologies play the important role to operate all the related radiological machines. If they do not use the machines adequately, it will increase the patients' radiation absorbed dose. Then, the whole society health may be influenced. Therefore, constructing the professional competence of the medical radiological technologists is an important course. The purpose of this research are: (1) to construct the index of professional competence with radiological technology students, (2) to discuss the professional competence for the graduates from the department of radiological technology to be the reference for the Ministry of Examination for the license test of radiological technologists, (3) to provide the direction of the radiological technology department development. (author)

  20. Core competencies in teaching and training for doctors in Scotland: a review of the literature and stakeholder survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Michael T; Macrae, Claire; Scott, Jayne; Renwick, Lynne; Moffat, Mandy; Needham, Gillian; Scott, Hazel; Shippey, Ben; Jackson, Catherine; Edgar, Simon; Aitken, Debbie; Evans, Phillip; Irvine, Stewart

    2014-06-01

    The UK General Medical Council requires all registered doctors to be competent in all areas of their work, including teaching and training. The current research sought consensus on core competencies for all consultants and GPs involved in teaching and training in Scotland. A draft list of 80 competencies was developed from the literature and made available as a survey to all consultants and GPs with teaching roles and all final year speciality trainees working in Scotland. Respondents rated the importance of each competency and provided free text comments. There were 1026 responses. Eighteen competencies were rated as "high priority", and are recommended as a baseline for all doctors involved in teaching and training; 55 were rated as "medium priority", and are recommended in relation to specific teaching and training roles; and 7 were rated as "low priority". Free text responses suggested the topic was controversial and emotive, and emphasised the importance of further work to engage trainers. The findings appeared to have face validity, and it was felt these could be used as the basis for developing a "Scottish Trainer Framework" for doctors and others involved in teaching and training in Scotland.

  1. Initial experiences in embedding core competency education in entry-level surgery residents through a nonclinical rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahol, Kanav; Huston, Carrie; Hamann, Jessica; Ferrara, John J

    2011-03-01

    Health care continues to expand in scope and in complexity. In this changing environment, residents are challenged with understanding its intricacies and the impact it will have on their professional activities and careers. Embedding each of the competency elements in residents in a meaningful way remains a challenge for many surgery residency program directors. We established a nonclinical rotation to provide surgery postgraduate year-1 (PGY-1) residents with a structured, multifaceted, largely self-directed curriculum into which each of the 6 core competencies are woven. Posttesting strategies were established for most curricular experiences to ensure to the greatest possible extent that each resident will have achieved an acceptable level of understanding of each of the competency areas before being given credit for the rotation. By uniformly exceeding satisfactory scores on respective objective analyses, residents demonstrated an increased (at least short-term) understanding of each of the assessed competency areas. Our project sought to address a prior lack of opportunity for our residents to develop a sound foundation for our residents in systems-based practice. Our new rotation addresses systems-based practice in several different learning environments, including emergency medical service ride-along, sentinel event participation, and hospice visits. Several research projects have enhanced the overall learning program. Our experience shows that a rotation dedicated to competency training can provide an innovative and engaging means of teaching residents the value of each element.

  2. Competency Based Modular Experiments in Polymer Science and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Eli M; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes a competency-based, modular laboratory course emphasizing the synthesis and characterization of polymers and directed toward senior undergraduate and/or first-year graduate students in science and engineering. One module, free-radical polymerization kinetics by dilatometry, is included as a sample. (CS)

  3. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Julie; O'Connor, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in…

  4. Learners’ perspective: where and when pre-residency trainees learn more to achieve their core clinical competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eusang Ahn

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose While it is known that effective clinical education requires active involvement of its participants, regular feedback, communication skills and interprofessional training, limited studies have been conducted in Korea that demonstrate how pre-residency trainees acquire their core clinical skills. This is a cross-sectional study of interns and students across a third-tier university hospital in Korea to examine where and when they acquire core clinical skills. Methods A total of 74 students and 91 interns were asked to participate in a closed-ended questionnaire, and 50 participants (20 students and 30 interns were involved in semistructured individual interviews. The questionnaire was based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Results The majority of core clinical skills were acquired during their rotations in emergency medicine, general surgery, and cardiothoracic surgery. The semistructured interviews revealed that these departments required their trainees to be highly involved and analytical, and participate in clinical discourse. Conclusion The common factor among the three departments is an environment in which trainees are highly involved in clinical duties, and are expected to make first-contact patient encounters, participate in clinical discourse, interpret investigative results and arrive at their own conclusions. Work-based learning appear to be key to the trends observed, and further study is warranted to determine whether these findings are indicative of true acquisition of clinical competence.

  5. Learners' perspective: where and when pre-residency trainees learn more to achieve their core clinical competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eusang; Ahn, Ducksun; Lee, Young-Mee

    2016-12-01

    While it is known that effective clinical education requires active involvement of its participants, regular feedback, communication skills and interprofessional training, limited studies have been conducted in Korea that demonstrate how pre-residency trainees acquire their core clinical skills. This is a cross-sectional study of interns and students across a third-tier university hospital in Korea to examine where and when they acquire core clinical skills. A total of 74 students and 91 interns were asked to participate in a closed-ended questionnaire, and 50 participants (20 students and 30 interns) were involved in semistructured individual interviews. The questionnaire was based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. The majority of core clinical skills were acquired during their rotations in emergency medicine, general surgery, and cardiothoracic surgery. The semistructured interviews revealed that these departments required their trainees to be highly involved and analytical, and participate in clinical discourse. The common factor among the three departments is an environment in which trainees are highly involved in clinical duties, and are expected to make first-contact patient encounters, participate in clinical discourse, interpret investigative results and arrive at their own conclusions. Work-based learning appear to be key to the trends observed, and further study is warranted to determine whether these findings are indicative of true acquisition of clinical competence.

  6. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Mai [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Tetsuya [Cell Signaling Group, Waseda Bioscience Research Institute in Singapore (WABOIS), Waseda University, 11 Biopolis Way, 05-01/02 Helios, Singapore 138667 (Singapore); Numano, Rika [The Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS), Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka, Tennpaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Ikematsu, Kazuya [Forensic Pathology and Science, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kakeyama, Masaki [Laboratory of Environmental Health Sciences, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Tsuboi, Takashi, E-mail: takatsuboi@bio.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Life Sciences, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan)

    2012-04-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  7. The small GTPase Cdc42 modulates the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Mai; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Numano, Rika; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Kakeyama, Masaki; Murata, Masayuki; Sato, Ken; Tsuboi, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Regulation of exocytosis by Rho GTPase Cdc42. ► Cdc42 increases the number of fusion events from newly recruited vesicles. ► Cdc42 increases the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles. -- Abstract: Although the small GTPase Rho family Cdc42 has been shown to facilitate exocytosis through increasing the amount of hormones released, the precise mechanisms regulating the quantity of hormones released on exocytosis are not well understood. Here we show by live cell imaging analysis under TIRF microscope and immunocytochemical analysis under confocal microscope that Cdc42 modulated the number of fusion events and the number of dense-core vesicles produced in the cells. Overexpression of a wild-type or constitutively-active form of Cdc42 strongly facilitated high-KCl-induced exocytosis from the newly recruited plasma membrane vesicles in PC12 cells. By contrast, a dominant-negative form of Cdc42 inhibited exocytosis from both the newly recruited and previously docked plasma membrane vesicles. The number of intracellular dense-core vesicles was increased by the overexpression of both a wild-type and constitutively-active form of Cdc42. Consistently, activation of Cdc42 by overexpression of Tuba, a Golgi-associated guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Cdc42 increased the number of intracellular dense-core vesicles, whereas inhibition of Cdc42 by overexpression of the Cdc42/Rac interactive binding domain of neuronal Wiskott–Aldrich syndrome protein decreased the number of them. These findings suggest that Cdc42 facilitates exocytosis by modulating both the number of exocytosis-competent dense-core vesicles and the production of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells.

  8. VG-400 atomic power and technological installation. Possible core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, E.V.; Laptev, F.V.; Lyubivyj, A.G.; Mitenkov, F.M.; Samojlov, O.B.; Sukhachevskij, Yu.B.

    1979-01-01

    The main characteristics, basic circuit and configuration of equipment of the VG-400 atomic power and technological installation are considered. This installation is intended for supplying with highly-potential heat of thermal electrochemical hydrogen production and for power generation in the steam-turbine cycle. The main installation characteristics: HTGR reactor heat power 1100 MW, electric power 300 MW, helium coolant pressure 50 atm, output temperature 950 deg C, steam pressure in the second contour 175 atm, temperature 535 deg C, core diameter and height 6.4 m and 4 m, respectively, number of spherical fuel elements 8.5x10 5 . The installation can ensure hydrogen production of 10 5 Nxm 3 /h. For the VG-400 reactor block the integral arrangement of the first circuit equipment in the reinforced concrete is chosen. Two versions of the reactor core with prismatic and spherical fuel elements are compared. It is shown that taking into account great potentialities of the spherical zone in a case of further temperature increase and its positive qualities with respect to construction and processing of fuel elements and graphite blocks, the utilization of simplier units and mechanisms in the overloading system and in the process of profiling of energy distribution the choice of the spherical configuration for the VG-400 pilot plant installation seems to be valid

  9. The Time Is Now! Creating Technology Competencies for Teacher Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, Teresa S.; Graziano, Kevin J.; Slykhuis, David; Schmidt-Crawford, Denise; Trust, Torrey

    2016-01-01

    The way preservice teachers learn to use technology within their practice varies widely depending on the learning opportunities available (e.g., technology-infused teacher preparation program vs. standalone education technology course), and the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of the teacher educators within their teacher preparation programs.…

  10. Improving Technological Competency in Nursing Students: The Passport Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Edwards

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Integration of informatics competency into a nursing curriculum is important to ensure success throughout the education and career of contemporary nursing students. As enrollment in nursing programs increases, the diverse population of students from many different cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds presents a challenge for faculty in addressing unique learning needs. Competency in informatics will allow the beginning nursing student to navigate the on-line teaching software used by colleges. With rigorous expectations in nursing programs, students may feel overwhelmed with assignments, organization, and time management. Frustration may build when students struggle with basic informatics competency, often leaving them unable to navigate instructional websites or work with necessary on-line learning content. The purpose of this project, Passport Project for Nursing Success, was to assess the skills, knowledge, and informatics comfort level of students, while providing computer training and teaching for beginning nursing students in an undergraduate nursing program in Central Illinois. The community college encompassed students from a ten county area, with 20 percent of the student population enrolled in the Applied Science curriculum. Initial implementation occurred prior to the students' first nursing course and emphasized basic skills necessary to navigate on-line learning software, library search engines, and electronic communication. The greatest barrier to successful implementation was faculty resistance and academic support during completion of the initial implementation of the Passport Project. Post- project surveys indicated overwhelming student support for the education received and improved retention rates of first semester nursing students.

  11. Developing medical students as teachers: an anatomy-based student-as-teacher program with emphasis on core teaching competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Jay, Erie; Starkman, Sidney J; Pawlina, Wojciech; Lachman, Nirusha

    2013-01-01

    Teaching is an increasingly recognized responsibility of the resident physician. Residents, however, often assume teaching responsibilities without adequate preparation. Consequently, many medical schools have implemented student-as-teacher (SAT) programs that provide near-peer teaching opportunities to senior medical students. Near-peer teaching is widely regarded as an effective teaching modality; however, whether near-peer teaching experiences in medical school prepare students for the teaching demands of residency is less understood. We explored whether the anatomy-based SAT program through the Human Structure didactic block at Mayo Medical School addressed the core teaching competencies of a medical educator and prepared its participants for further teaching roles in their medical careers. A web-based survey was sent to all teaching assistants in the anatomy-based SAT program over the past five years (2007-2011). Survey questions were constructed based on previously published competencies in seven teaching domains--course development, course organization, teaching execution, student coaching, student assessment, teacher evaluation, and scholarship. Results of the survey indicate that participants in the anatomy-based SAT program achieved core competencies of a medical educator and felt prepared for the teaching demands of residency. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Anatomists.

  12. Pre-service teachers' competencies for technology integration: Insights from a mathematics-specific instructional technology course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyei, D.D.; Voogt, Joke; Resta, P.

    2012-01-01

    A combination of various measures (self-report, learning outcomes and written reports) was employed to investigate 104 pre-service teachers’ competencies in spreadsheet integration after enrolling in an Instructional Technology course. The pre-service teachers engaged in a “learning technology by

  13. Basic Technology Competencies, Attitude towards Computer Assisted Education and Usage of Technologies in Turkish Lesson: A Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Serpil

    2017-01-01

    The present research was done to determine the basic technology competency of Turkish teachers, their attitude towards computer-assisted education, and their technology operation level in Turkish lessons, and to designate the relationship between them. 85 Turkish teachers studying in public schools in Bartin participated in the research. The…

  14. FORMING OF INFORMATION COMPETENCE OF STUDENTS IN THE PRCESS OF TEACHING ELECTIVE COURSES MEANS OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Liskovich

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The article considers approaches to the definition of information competence, investigated the possibility of elective courses in physics for the formation of information competence through the use of modern information and communication technologies.

  15. TECHNOLOGICAL COMPETENCE OF FUTURE ENGINEER: FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT IN COMPUTER INTEGRATED LABORATORY WORKSHOP ON PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihor S. Chernetskyi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the category «technological competence» and the definition of its components according to the educational process. A structural and functional model of technological competence of future engineers through forms, means, methods and technologies of computer oriented laboratory work. Selected blocks and elements of the model in the course of a typical student laboratory work on the course of general physics. We consider the possibility of using some type of digital labs «Phywe», «Fourier» and modern electronic media (flash books to optimize laboratory work at the Technical University. The analysis of the future research of structural elements model of technological competence.

  16. Integrating Information Technology's Competencies into Academic Nursing Education--An Action Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Ayala; Sharon, Dganit; Lev-Ari, Lilac

    2016-01-01

    Today, in the digital age, we are committed to prepare the future nurse for the information technology-rich workplace, and to help them reducing the "shock reality" upon arriving at the clinical setting. The main aim of the study is to promote the knowledge of Information Competencies Technology among nurses' educators and student. The…

  17. Competing recombinant technologies for environmental innovation: Extending Arthur's model of lock-in

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeppini, P.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a model of sequential decisions about investments in environmentally dirty and clean technologies, which extends the path-dependence framework of B. Arthur (1989, Competing technologies, increasing returns, and lock-in by historical events, The Economic Journal, 99, pp.

  18. Competing recombinant technologies for environmental innovation : extending Arthur's model of lock-in

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeppini, P.; Bergh, van den J.C.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a model of sequential decisions about investments in environmentally dirty and clean technologies, which extends the path-dependence framework of B. Arthur (1989, Competing technologies, increasing returns, and lock-in by historical events, The Economic Journal, 99, pp.

  19. Music Technology Competencies for Education: A Proposal for a Pedagogical Architecture for Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Fátima Weber; Rocha Machado, Leticia; Behar, Patricia Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a pedagogical architecture (PA) focused on the development of competencies for music technology in education. This PA used free Web 3.0 technologies, mainly those related to production and musical composition. The pedagogical architecture is geared for teachers and those pursing a teaching degree, working in distance…

  20. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olopade, Funmilayo Eniola; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle; Raji, Yinusa; Fasola, Abiodun Olubayo; Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi

    2016-01-01

    The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the "old" curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula successfully. The modifications to the teaching and assessment of the core basic medical science subjects have resulted in improved learning and performance at the final examinations.

  1. Scientific Skills as Core Competences in Medical Education: What Do Medical Students Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Laura; Severo, Milton; Pereira, Margarida; Ferreira, Maria Amélia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scientific excellence is one of the most fundamental underpinnings of medical education and its relevance is unquestionable. To be involved in research activities enhances students' critical thinking and problem-solving capacities, which are mandatory competences for new achievements in patient care and consequently to the improvement…

  2. 78 FR 43921 - Solicitation for a Cooperative Agreement-Core Competencies for Corrections Learning and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... development tool, and human resource management tool that will assist them with staff selection and retention, performance management, and succession management. This project will be a collaborative venture with the NIC... job and for the development of a competency model that will place learning professionals in a position...

  3. Meeting Tomorrow's Expectations: In Search of Core Competencies and Ways of Assessing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolskiy, O. A.; Pogozhina, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    Today, experts agree that the level of cognitive development of modern young people affects the long-term life goals and outcomes that they set for themselves. During the course of numerous studies experts have identified such key competencies as problem solving, information literacy, and critical thinking. However, there are still many unanswered…

  4. Core Competencies and the Prevention of School Failure and Early School Leaving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; McNeely, Clea A.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that school failure and early school leaving are processes, rather than discrete events, that often co-occur and can have lasting negative effects on children's development. Most of the literature has focused on risk factors for failure and dropout rather than on the promotion of competencies that can increase…

  5. Therapeutic risk management of clinical-legal dilemmas: should it be a core competency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Robert I; Shuman, Daniel W

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic risk management of clinical-legal dilemmas achieves an optimal alignment between clinical competence and an understanding of legal concerns applicable to psychiatric practice. Understanding how psychiatry and law interact in frequently occurring clinical situations is essential for effective patient care. Successful management of clinical-legal dilemmas also avoids unnecessary, counterproductive defensive practices.

  6. The Development of a Set of Core Communication Competencies for Introductory Communication Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engleberg, Isa N.; Ward, Susan M.; Disbrow, Lynn M.; Katt, James A.; Myers, Scott A.; O'Keefe, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    In most academic disciplines, there is "one" introductory course that presents an overview of the discipline and introduces fundamental, discipline-specific principles and competencies. However, in Communication Studies, the discipline recognizes and offers multiple course options that may serve as the introductory course. This project…

  7. PHILOSOPHICAL BASICS OF FORMATION OF FUTURE PHILOLOGISTS’ PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE BY MEANS OF INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhiy S. Danylyuk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The topicality of the article is in studying social-philosophic basics of computerization in the field of education and, consequently, Internet technologies usage in the process of formation of future philologists’ professional competence. The aim of this paper is defining of philosophical basics of formation of future philologists’ professional competence by means of Internet technologies. The article deals with highlighting of basic items of interaction “man-computer”, which helps to form future philologists’ professional competence in the aspect of humanization of the educational process. In particular, the essence of both learning-and-cognitive and learning-and-research activities in the aspect of usage of Internet technologies in teaching future linguists is described. Attention is also focused on the description of informational culture as one of the most important factors of informatization of the educational process.

  8. Content analysis of resident evaluations of faculty anesthesiologists: supervision encompasses some attributes of the professionalism core competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Szeluga, Debra; Hindman, Bradley J

    2017-05-01

    Anesthesiology departments need an instrument with which to assess practicing anesthesiologists' professionalism. The purpose of this retrospective analysis of the content of a cohort of resident evaluations of faculty anesthesiologists was to investigate the relationship between a clinical supervision scale and the multiple attributes of professionalism. From July 1, 2013 to the present, our department has utilized the de Oliveira Filho unidimensional nine-item supervision scale to assess the quality of clinical supervision of residents provided by our anesthesiologists. The "cohort" we examined included all 13,664 resident evaluations of all faculty anesthesiologists from July 1, 2013 through December 31, 2015, including 1,387 accompanying comments. Words and phrases associated with the core competency of professionalism were obtained from previous studies, and the supervision scale was analyzed for the presence of these words and phrases. The supervision scale assesses some attributes of anesthesiologists' professionalism as well as patient care and procedural skills and interpersonal and communication skills. The comments that residents provided with the below-average supervision scores included attributes of professionalism, although numerous words and phrases related to professionalism were not present in any of the residents' comments. The de Oliveira Filho clinical supervision scale includes some attributes of anesthesiologists' professionalism. The core competency of professionalism, however, is multidimensional, and the supervision scale and/or residents' comments did not address many of the other established attributes of professionalism.

  9. Internal Medicine Residency Program Directors' Views of the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency: An Opportunity to Enhance Communication of Competency Along the Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven V; Vu, T Robert; Willett, Lisa L; Call, Stephanie; Halvorsen, Andrew J; Chaudhry, Saima

    2017-06-01

    To examine internal medicine (IM) residency program directors' (PDs') perspectives on the Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency (Core EPAs)-introduced into undergraduate medical education to further competency-based assessment-and on communicating competency-based information during transitions. A spring 2015 Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine survey asked PDs of U.S. IM residency programs for their perspectives on which Core EPAs new interns must or should possess on day 1, which are most essential, and which have the largest gap between expected and observed performance. Their views and preferences were also requested regarding communicating competency-based information at transitions from medical school to residency and residency to fellowship/employment. The response rate was 57% (204/361 programs). The majority of PDs felt new interns must/should possess 12 of the 13 Core EPAs. PDs' rankings of Core EPAs by relative importance were more varied than their rankings by the largest gaps in performance. Although preferred timing varied, most PDs (82%) considered it important for medical schools to communicate Core EPA-based information to PDs; nearly three-quarters (71%) would prefer a checklist format. Many (60%) would be willing to provide competency-based evaluations to fellowship directors/employers. Most (> 80%) agreed that there should be a bidirectional communication mechanism for programs/employers to provide feedback on competency assessments. The gaps identified in Core EPA performance may help guide medical schools' curricular and assessment tool design. Sharing competency-based information at transitions along the medical education continuum could help ensure production of competent, practice-ready physicians.

  10. New Hybrid Multiple Attribute Decision-Making Model for Improving Competence Sets: Enhancing a Company’s Core Competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-Wei Huang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A company’s core competitiveness depends on the strategic allocation of its human resources in alignment with employee capabilities. Competency models can identify the range of capabilities at a company’s disposal, and this information can be used to develop internal or external education training policies for sustainable development. Such models can ensure the importation of a strategic orientation reflecting the growth of its employee competence set and enhancing human resource sustainably. This approach ensures that the most appropriate people are assigned to the most appropriate positions. In this study, we proposed a new hybrid multiple attributed decision-making model by using the Decision-making trial and Evaluation Laboratory Technique (DEMATEL to construct an influential network relation map (INRM and determined the influential weights by using the basic concept of the analytic network process (called DEMATEL-based ANP, DANP; the influential weights were then adopted with a modified Vise Kriterijumska Optimizacija I Kompromisno Resenje (VIKOR method. A simple forecasting technique as an iteration function was also proposed. The proposed model was effective. We expect that the proposed model can facilitate making timely revisions, reflecting the growth of employee competence sets, reducing the performance gap toward the aspiration level, and ensuring the sustainability of a company.

  11. Improving University Students' Science-Technology-Society-Environment Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalaki, Yalçin

    2016-01-01

    Science, Technology, Society, Environment (STSE) is an education movement that started and developed from 70s through early 2000s. Although this movement had lost emphasis in recent years, it is one of the most important educational reform attempts in science education history. Today, concepts like Socio Scientific Issues (SSI) or Science,…

  12. Developing a competency-based medical education curriculum for the core basic medical sciences in an African Medical School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olopade FE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Funmilayo Eniola Olopade,1 Oluwatosin Adekunle Adaramoye,2 Yinusa Raji,3 Abiodun Olubayo Fasola,4 Emiola Oluwabunmi Olapade-Olaopa5 1Department of Anatomy, 2Department of Biochemistry, 3Department of Physiology, 4Department of Oral Pathology, 5Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria Abstract: The College of Medicine of the University of Ibadan recently revised its MBBS and BDS curricula to a competency-based medical education method of instruction. This paper reports the process of revising the methods of instruction and assessment in the core basic medical sciences directed at producing medical and dental graduates with a sound knowledge of the subjects sufficient for medical and dental practice and for future postgraduate efforts in the field or related disciplines. The health needs of the community and views of stakeholders in the Ibadan medical and dental schools were determined, and the “old” curriculum was reviewed. This process was directed at identifying the strengths and weaknesses of the old curricula and the newer competences required for modern-day medical/dental practice. The admission criteria and processes and the learning methods of the students were also studied. At the end of the review, an integrated, system-based, community-oriented, person-centered, and competency-driven curriculum was produced and approved for implementation. Four sets of students have been admitted into the curriculum. There have been challenges to the implementation process, but these have been overcome by continuous faculty development and reorientation programs for the nonteaching staff and students. Two sets of students have crossed over to the clinical school, and the consensus among the clinical teachers is that their knowledge and application of the basic medical sciences are satisfactory. The Ibadan medical and dental schools are implementing their competency-based medical education curricula

  13. Constructing core competency indicators for clinical teachers in Taiwan: a qualitative analysis and an analytic hierarchy process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ai-Tzu; Lin, Jou-Wei

    2014-04-11

    The objective of this study was to construct a framework of core competency indicators of medical doctors who teach in the clinical setting in Taiwan and to evaluate the relative importance of the indicators among these clinical teachers. The preliminary framework of the indicators was developed from an in-depth interview conducted with 12 clinical teachers who had previously been recognized and awarded for their teaching excellence in university hospitals. The framework was categorized into 4 dimensions: 1) Expertise (i.e., professional knowledge and skill); 2) Teaching Ability; 3) Attitudes and Traits; and 4) Beliefs and Values. These areas were further divided into 11 sub-dimensions and 40 indicators. Subsequently, a questionnaire built upon this qualitative analysis was distributed to another group of 17 clinical teachers. Saaty's eigenvector approach, or the so-called analytic hierarchy process (AHP), was applied to perform the pairwise comparisons between indicators and to determine the ranking and relative importance of the indicators. Fourteen questionnaires were deemed valid for AHP assessment due to completeness of data input. The relative contribution of the four main dimensions was 31% for Attitudes and Traits, 30% for Beliefs and Values, 22% for Expertise, and 17% for Teaching Ability. Specifically, 9 out of the 10 top-ranked indicators belonged to the "Attitudes and Traits" or "Beliefs and Values" dimensions, indicating that inner characteristics (i.e., attitudes, traits, beliefs, and values) were perceived as more important than surface ones (i.e., professional knowledge, skills, and teaching competency). We performed a qualitative analysis and developed a questionnaire based upon an interview with experienced clinical teachers in Taiwan, and used this tool to construct the key features for the role model. The application has also demonstrated the relative importance in the dimensions of the core competencies for clinical teachers in Taiwan.

  14. Resident learning across the full range of core competencies through a transitions of care curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavon, Juliessa M; Pinheiro, Sandro O; Buhr, Gwendolen T

    2018-01-01

    The authors developed a Transitions of Care (TOC) curriculum to teach and measure learner competence in performing TOC tasks for older adults. Internal medicine interns at an academic residency program received the curriculum, which consisted of experiential learning, self-study, and small group discussion. Interns completed retrospective pre/post surveys rating their confidence in performing five TOC tasks, qualitative open-ended survey questions, and a self-reflection essay. A subset of interns also completed follow-up assessments. For all five TOC tasks, the interns' confidence improved following completion of the TOC curriculum. Self-confidence persisted for up to 3 months later for some but not all tasks. According to the qualitative responses, the TOC curriculum provided interns with learning experiences and skills integral to performing safe care transitions. The TOC curriculum and a mixed-method assessment approach effectively teaches and measures learner competency in TOC across all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competency domains.

  15. Hubungan antara Knowledge-Technology-Innovation (KTI, Commitment, Competence, Leadership, Government Policy, Human Capital, dan Competitive Advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darjat Sudrajat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In current tight competitive situation, companies always try to create differentiation anytime to achieve better and sustainable performance. Rapid and unpredictable changes insist the companies should always be innovative, so that aspects of globalization, e-business, technology innovation, creativity, global competition, knowledge creation, diffusion of new technologies and knowledge revolution should be sources of performance and competitiveness improvement. Therefore, tomaintain core competencies and competitive advantage, the companies should develop continuous innovation, technologylearning, and knowledge management. Knowledge-Technology-Innovation (KTI can be a driver for country’s development and growth. Japan, South Korea, and Singapore are the countries that have limited natural and human resources, but able to achieve sustainable economic development. KTI is not only to be practiced at individual and organizational level, but also can be implemented at the community, national, or state level. KTI, therefore, can encourage expected competitive advantage creation and become a decisive factor for a country to achieve stable and sustainable economic growth. This research intends to analyze relationships of KTI, competitive advantage, commitment, leadership, human capital, government policy,and competence. This research used correlational method and literature study approach. The result of this research is a relationship model of each of these aspects that can be used as a framework for further research. The relationships model isas follows: Leadership, competence, and human capital (as independent variables have direct relationship (influence oncompetitive advantage (dependent variable or indirectly (through KTI as an intervening variable; KTI has direct relationship (effect on competitive advantage; Government policy and commitment are moderator variables for relationshipof KTI and competitive advantage.

  16. Competencies Required for Healthcare Information Technology to Be an Effective Strategic Business Change Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davalos, Eugenia

    2013-01-01

    One of the core strategies to transform the United States national healthcare system is the implementation of key technologies such as the electronic patient medical record. Such key technologies improve patient care and help the organization gain competitive advantage. With a high demand for strategic and operational change, healthcare providers…

  17. Effects of Video Streaming Technology on Public Speaking Students' Communication Apprehension and Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupagne, Michel; Stacks, Don W.; Giroux, Valerie Manno

    2007-01-01

    This study examines whether video streaming can reduce trait and state communication apprehension, as well as improve communication competence, in public speaking classes. Video streaming technology has been touted as the next generation of video feedback for public speaking students because it is not limited by time or space and allows Internet…

  18. The Practical Aspects of Online Counseling: Ethics, Training, Technology, and Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallen, Michael J.; Vogel, David L.; Rochlen, Aaron B.

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses the practical aspects of online counseling, including ethics, training, supervision, technology, and competency issues. The authors discuss online counseling's strengths and limitations and present guidelines for what types of clients and counseling psychologists may be appropriate for online counseling. To illustrate the…

  19. Jordanian Social Studies Teachers' Perceptions of Competency Needed for Implementing Technology in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bataineh, Mohammad; Anderson, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    This study used a cross-sectional, ten-point Likert-type scale survey design, to examine the perception of Jordanian seventh to twelfth-grade social studies teachers of the competency needed for technology implementation in their classrooms. The instrument for this study was a modified version of a survey developed by Kelly (2003) called the…

  20. An Evaluative Case Study on Professional Competency of Preservice Information Technology Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabakci Yurdakul, Isil

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate preservice Information Technology (IT) teachers' professional competency in the teaching process. The study was designed on the basis of evaluative case study. The participants of the study consisted of seven preservice IT teachers attending the department of Computer Education and Instructional…

  1. Marketing Technology. FasTrak Specialization Integrated Technical and Academic Competency (ITAC). Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document presents the Ohio Integrated Technical and Academic Competency profile for marketing technology. The profile is to serve as the basis for curriculum development in Ohio's secondary, adult, and postsecondary programs. The profile includes a comprehensive listing of 580 specialty and foundation key indicators for evaluating mastery of…

  2. Building new competencies for new business creation based on breakthrough technological innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanhaverbeke, W.P.M.; Kirschbaum, R.

    2003-01-01

    This paper focuses on the question how companies can build new capabilities or competencies based on discontinuous technological innovations? In particular, we analyze how corporate ventures are set up to develop and commercialize these radical innovations can play a crucial role in the process of

  3. Teachers' Attitude and Competence in the Use of Assistive Technologies in Special Needs Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onivehu, Adams Ogirima; Ohawuiro, Onyiyeche Emilia; Oyeniran, Bunmi Juliana

    2017-01-01

    This study examined teachers' attitude and competence in the use of assistive technologies in special needs schools. The descriptive survey method was employed for the study among 100 teachers who were drawn using purposive sampling technique from special needs schools in Osun State, Nigeria. Six research questions were generated while four…

  4. Assistive Technology Competencies of Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments: A Comparison of Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Smith, Derrick W.; Parker, Amy T.; Griffin-Shirley, Nora

    2011-01-01

    This study surveyed teachers of students with visual impairments in Texas on their perceptions of a set of assistive technology competencies developed for teachers of students with visual impairments by Smith and colleagues (2009). Differences in opinion between practicing teachers of students with visual impairments and Smith's group of…

  5. Development of Articulated Competency-Based Curriculum in Automated Systems/Robotics Technology. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzerne County Community Coll., Nanticoke, PA.

    The project described in this report was conducted at the Community College of Luzerne County (Pennsylvania) to develop, in conjunction with area vocational-technical schools, the second year of a competency-based curriculum in automated systems/robotics technology. During the project, a task force of teachers from the area schools and the college…

  6. Development of Articulated Competency-Based Curriculum in Laser/Electro-Optics Technology. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzerne County Community Coll., Nanticoke, PA.

    A project was conducted at the Community College of Luzerne County (Pennsylvania) to develop, in cooperation with area vocational-technical schools, the first year of a competency-based curriculum in laser/electro-optics technology. Existing programs were reviewed and private sector input was sought in developing the curriculum and identifying…

  7. Digital competence of teachers in primary education: quantitative analysis of competence, use and attitudes towards new technologies in teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Janeth Romero Martínez

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to analyze the degree of digital competence (DC of primary teachers and its relationship with the use of new technologies for teaching purposes. We also study the relationship between DC and attitude towards information and communications technnology (ICT for the teaching process. To achieve this aims, the DC of 58 teachers of public and concerted schools were analyzed and comparisons according to age, gender, experience and type of school were performed. Also, a correlation between DC, use of ICT and attitude was made. Results show significant differences in DC according to age, gender, experience and type of school, but no differences according to attitudes towards ICT.

  8. Core personal competencies important to entering students' success in medical school: what are they and how could they be assessed early in the admission process?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Thomas W; Parrish, Samuel K; Terregino, Carol A; Williams, Joy P; Dunleavy, Dana M; Volsch, Joseph M

    2013-05-01

    Assessing applicants' personal competencies in the admission process has proven difficult because there is not an agreed-on set of personal competencies for entering medical students. In addition, there are questions about the measurement properties and costs of currently available assessment tools. The Association of American Medical College's Innovation Lab Working Group (ILWG) and Admissions Initiative therefore engaged in a multistep, multiyear process to identify personal competencies important to entering students' success in medical school as well as ways to measure them early in the admission process. To identify core personal competencies, they conducted literature reviews, surveyed U.S and Canadian medical school admission officers, and solicited input from the admission community. To identify tools with the potential to provide data in time for pre-interview screening, they reviewed the higher education and employment literature and evaluated tools' psychometric properties, group differences, risk of coaching/faking, likely applicant and admission officer reactions, costs, and scalability. This process resulted in a list of nine core personal competencies rated by stakeholders as very or extremely important for entering medical students: ethical responsibility to self and others; reliability and dependability; service orientation; social skills; capacity for improvement; resilience and adaptability; cultural competence; oral communication; and teamwork. The ILWG's research suggests that some tools hold promise for assessing personal competencies, but the authors caution that none are perfect for all situations. They recommend that multiple tools be used to evaluate information about applicants' personal competencies in deciding whom to interview.

  9. Establishing evidence-informed core intervention competencies in psychological first aid for public health personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Cindy L; Everly, George S; Barnett, Daniel J; Links, Jonathan M

    2006-01-01

    A full-scale public health response to disasters must attend to both the physical and mental health needs of affected communities. Public health preparedness efforts can be greatly expanded to address the latter set of needs, particularly in light of the high ratio of psychological to physical casualties that often rapidly overwhelms existing mental health response resources in a large-scale emergency. Psychological first aid--the provision of basic psychological care in the short term aftermath of a traumatic event--is a mental health response skill set that public health personnel can readily acquire with proper training. The application of psychological first aid by public health workers can significantly augment front-line community-based mental health responses during the crisis phase of an event. To help achieve this augmented response, we have developed a set of psychological first aid intervention competencies for public health personnel. These competencies, empirically grounded and based on best practice models and consensus statements from leading mental health organizations, represent a necessary step for developing a public health workforce that can better respond to the psychological needs of impacted populations in disasters.

  10. 76 FR 6839 - ActiveCore Technologies, Inc., Battery Technologies, Inc., China Media1 Corp., Dura Products...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] ActiveCore Technologies, Inc., Battery Technologies, Inc., China Media1 Corp., Dura Products International, Inc. (n/k/a Dexx Corp.), Global Mainframe Corp., GrandeTel Technologies, Inc., Magna Entertainment Corp. (n/k/a Reorganized Magna Entertainment...

  11. Core competencies in the science and practice of knowledge translation: description of a Canadian strategic training initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, Sharon E; Brouwers, Melissa; Johnson, David; Lavis, John N; Légaré, France; Majumdar, Sumit R; McKibbon, K Ann; Sales, Anne E; Stacey, Dawn; Klein, Gail; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2011-12-09

    Globally, healthcare systems are attempting to optimize quality of care. This challenge has resulted in the development of implementation science or knowledge translation (KT) and the resulting need to build capacity in both the science and practice of KT. We are attempting to meet these challenges through the creation of a national training initiative in KT. We have identified core competencies in this field and have developed a series of educational courses and materials for three training streams. We report the outline for this approach and the progress to date. We have prepared a strategy to develop, implement, and evaluate a national training initiative to build capacity in the science and practice of KT. Ultimately through this initiative, we hope to meet the capacity demand for KT researchers and practitioners in Canada that will lead to improved care and a strengthened healthcare system.

  12. Core competencies in the science and practice of knowledge translation: description of a Canadian strategic training initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Straus Sharon E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, healthcare systems are attempting to optimize quality of care. This challenge has resulted in the development of implementation science or knowledge translation (KT and the resulting need to build capacity in both the science and practice of KT. Findings We are attempting to meet these challenges through the creation of a national training initiative in KT. We have identified core competencies in this field and have developed a series of educational courses and materials for three training streams. We report the outline for this approach and the progress to date. Conclusions We have prepared a strategy to develop, implement, and evaluate a national training initiative to build capacity in the science and practice of KT. Ultimately through this initiative, we hope to meet the capacity demand for KT researchers and practitioners in Canada that will lead to improved care and a strengthened healthcare system.

  13. The concept of competence and its relevance for science, technology, and mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ropohl, Mathias; Nielsen, Jan Alexis; Olley, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    . In contrast to earlier ed-ucational goals that focused more on basic skills and knowledge expectations, competences are more functionally oriented. They involve the ability to solve complex problems in a particular context, e.g. in vocational or everyday situations. In science, technology, and mathematics...... education, the concept of competence is closely linked to the concept of literacy. Apart from these rather cognitive and af-fective perspectives influenced by the need to assess students’ achievement of de-sired learning goals in relation to their interest and motivation, the perspectives of the concept...

  14. Editorial: The War for Talent: Technologies and solutions toward competency and skills development and talent identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Klett (IEEE Fellow

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This special issue is dedicated to advanced technological solutions and novel methodical approaches toward human capital management in terms of career development, assessment and recruitment as a driver for innovation and sustainable competitive advantage for academia and business in the changing conditions of the global employment market, and the War for Talent. Latest competitiveness-driven developments in productivity and services move forward human capital management and assessment technology and services alongside with talent identification as a driver for innovation and key source of maximizing the Return-On-Investment in people and technology in academia and business. Governments and business start thinking about competency and skills development as the critical issue for the workforce, and the workplaces. Against this background, a complex interrelationship arises between strategic management, human capital management, and the overall quality management in every educational and enterprise setting. In addition, identifying highly competent human capital develops into a challenging issue of the recruitment process.

  15. Current Market Demand for Core Competencies of Librarianship—A Text Mining Study of American Library Association’s Advertisements from 2009 through 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghong Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available As librarianship evolves, it is important to examine the changes that have taken place in professional requirements. To provide an understanding of the current market demand for core competencies of librarianship, this article conducts a semi-automatic methodology to analyze job advertisements (ads posted on the American Library Association (ALA Joblist from 2009 through 2014. There is evidence that the ability to solve unexpected complex problems and to provide superior customer service gained increasing importance for librarians during those years. The authors contend that the findings in this report question the status quo of core competencies of librarianship in the US job market.

  16. AAOHN Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The AAOHN Competency document is one of the core documents that define occupational health nursing practice. This article provides a description of the process used to update the competencies, as well as a description of the new competencies. © 2015 The Author(s).

  17. Core Competencies for Medical Teachers (KLM) – A Position Paper of the GMA Committee on Personal and Organizational Development in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görlitz, Anja; Ebert, Thomas; Bauer, Daniel; Grasl, Matthäus; Hofer, Matthias; Lammerding-Köppel, Maria; Fabry, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in medical education have created increasing challenges for medical teachers which is why the majority of German medical schools already offer educational and instructional skills trainings for their teaching staff. However, to date no framework for educational core competencies for medical teachers exists that might serve as guidance for the qualification of the teaching faculty. Against the background of the discussion about competency based medical education and based upon the international literature, the GMA Committee for Faculty and Organizational Development in Teaching developed a model of core teaching competencies for medical teachers. This framework is designed not only to provide guidance with regard to individual qualification profiles but also to support further advancement of the content, training formats and evaluation of faculty development initiatives and thus, to establish uniform quality criteria for such initiatives in German-speaking medical schools. The model comprises a framework of six competency fields, subdivided into competency components and learning objectives. Additional examples of their use in medical teaching scenarios illustrate and clarify each specific teaching competency. The model has been designed for routine application in medical schools and is thought to be complemented consecutively by additional competencies for teachers with special duties and responsibilities in a future step. PMID:26038688

  18. Moving Spent Fuel and Wastes in the USA: Concentrating on Core Competencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, V. H.; Gallo, B.

    2003-01-01

    With the study progress toward a US national reporting at Yucca Mountain, organizing the transport system becomes a more pressing necessity. The present paper will try to provide operators whose core business is not transport a frame of reference through which a transport supplier/system can be selected, not only on the mere criterion of regulatory compliance, but also beyond, taking into account the resilience of the system, the ability for the operator to protect its image by fulfilling its general duty to society and sustainable development. For that purpose the paper will take us through the basics up to the ''post graduate level'' of what transport and associated services should look like, from a theoretical point of view and also from illustrations from the current European field will be presented, illustrating the evolution of practice and interfacing of the actors

  19. Information Literacy’ – a core competency for the 21st century library

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Terry

    2007-01-01

    Secretary of the LAI Working Group on Information Literacy (WGIL) delivered a presentation about the work of the Group to date. WGIL was established by the LAI to recommend strategies for the development of information skills education at both a theoretical and practical level in the Library and Information Services sector in Ireland. Terry is the Deputy Librarian at the Waterford Institute of Technology.

  20. A Study of Core Humanistic Competency for Developing Humanism Education for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Hee-Yeon; Kim, Jae-Won; Lee, Seunghee; Yoo, Seong Ho; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Kim, Tae-Woo; Park, Joong Shin; Jeong, Seung-Yong; Oh, Seo Jin; Kim, Eun Jung; Shin, Min-Sup

    2016-06-01

    The authors conducted a survey on essential humanistic competency that medical students should have, and on teaching methods that will effectively develop such attributes. The participants consisted of 154 medical school professors, 589 medical students at Seoul National University College of Medicine, 228 parents, and 161 medical school and university hospital staff. They answered nine questions that the authors created. According to the results, all groups chose "morality and a sense of ethics," a "sense of accountability," "communication skills," and "empathic ability" were selected as essential qualities. According to the evaluation on the extent to which students possess each quality, participants believed students had a high "sense of accountability" and "morality," whereas they thought students had low "empathic ability," "communicate," or "collaborate with others". In terms of effective teaching methods, all sub-groups preferred extracurricular activities including small group activities, debates, and volunteer services. With regard to the speculated effect of humanism education and the awareness of the need for colleges to offer it, all sub-groups had a positive response. However the professors and students expressed a relatively passive stance on introducing humanism education as a credited course. Most participants responded that they preferred a grading method based on their rate of participation, not a relative evaluation. In order to reap more comprehensive and lasting effects of humanism education courses in medical school, it is necessary to conduct faculty training, and continuously strive to develop new teaching methods.

  1. Perceptions of desirable graduate competencies for science and technology new graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Richard K.; Zegwaard, Karsten E.

    2006-05-01

    Work-integrated learning (WIL) programmes that combine on-campus classroom-based study with off-campus authentic work experience are a growing area of interest internationally. Despite widespread practice of WIL, there are few reports that shed light on appropriate pedagogies for the work experience in particular. As with any form of education, providers hold certain views as to desirable outcomes in terms of graduate profiles and of desirable graduate competencies. A complication for multi-party WIL programmes is that educational stakeholders (e.g., staff working in tertiary education provider institutions and employers) may hold different views as to desirable graduate competencies. Here we argue that an understanding of stakeholder views of desirable graduate competencies is an essential prerequisite of pedagogical design. The research reported here is an intrinsic case study and comprised an investigation of perceptions of 24 desirable graduate competencies for new science and technology graduates entering the workforce both today, and in ten years’ time. Stakeholders for four sector stakeholder groups (n = 458): undergraduate students (n = 71), recent graduates (n = 143), employers of graduates (n = 172), and faculty (n = 72), were surveyed using a previously reported and validated instrument. The research findings suggest that science and technology stakeholders see all 24 competencies as desirable, and see the importance of all skills and some skills in particular as likely to increase in ten years’ time. Despite emphasis on cognitive and technical skills (often termed ‘hard’ skills), the single most desirable skill is ability and willingness to learn, a behavioural skill (often termed ‘soft’ skills). It is proposed that classroom-based instruction is unlikely to produce graduates with the desired skills, and that work-integrated learning may have a role to play in the development of graduate competencies.

  2. Visualizing the future: technology competency development in clinical medicine, and implications for medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Keenan, Craig R; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors ask three questions. First, what will physicians need to know in order to be effective in the future? Second, what role will technology play in achieving that high level of effectiveness? Third, what specific skill sets will physicians need to master in order to become effective? Through three case vignettes describing past, present, and potential future medical practices, the authors identify trends in major medical, technological and cultural shifts that will shape medical education and practice. From these cases, the authors generate a series of technology-related competencies and skill sets that physicians will need to remain leaders in the delivery of medical care. Physicians will choose how they will be end-users of technology, technology developers, and/or the interface between users and developers. These choices will guide the types of skills each physician will need to acquire. Finally, the authors explore the implications of these trends for medical educators, including the competencies that will be required of educators as they develop the medical curriculum. Examining historical and social trends, including how users adopt current and emerging technologies, allows us to anticipate changes in the practice of medicine. By considering market pressures, global trends and emerging technologies, medical educators and practicing physicians may prepare themselves for the changes likely to occur in the medical curriculum and in the marketplace.

  3. Accelerating Atmospheric Modeling Through Emerging Multi-core Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Linford, John Christian

    2010-01-01

    The new generations of multi-core chipset architectures achieve unprecedented levels of computational power while respecting physical and economical constraints. The cost of this power is bewildering program complexity. Atmospheric modeling is a grand-challenge problem that could make good use of these architectures if they were more accessible to the average programmer. To that end, software tools and programming methodologies that greatly simplify the acceleration of atmospheric modeling...

  4. The NGWA Experience with Education and Core Competencies for Groundwater Scientists and Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, K. B.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1988, the National Ground Water Association has formally supported recognition, through certification or some other means, of the unique qualifications necessary to perform hydrogeologic investigations. NGWA has believed reliance on professional engineers or individuals certified in an allied field without a determination as to their knowledge of groundwater science is not a justified position. Observation today suggests a need remains for greater hydrogeologic awareness among those that may create infrastructure intrusions into the groundwater environment, such as those designing and installing large-scale installations of geothermal heating and cooling systems. NGWA has responded with development of hydrogeologic guidelines for such projects. Also in partial response to the above named circumstances, the Association has begun development of an ANSI/NGWA standard defining the skills and competencies of groundwater personnel - from the trades to the science, and has explored the potential value of creating a career pathways guidance document for groundwater science professionals. Historically, NGWA scientific members have resisted the idea of accreditation of academic geosciences programs, including those for hydrogeology, although such discussions continue to be raised from time to time by groups such as the Geological Society of America and the American Geosciences Institute. The resistance seems to have been born out of recognition of the multi-disciplinary reality of groundwater science. NGWA funded research found that more than half of the respondents to a study of the business development practices for consulting groundwater professionals had been involved with groundwater issues for more than 20 years, and less than one percent had worked in the field for fewer than two years, raising the question of whether too few young people are being attracted to hydrogeology. Some speculate the seemingly minor emphasis on Earth science education in the U.S. K-12

  5. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-first Century Core Curriculum-Part Two: Translation of MPH Core Competencies into an Integrated Theory-Based Core Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvin, Jaime A; DeBate, Rita; Wolfe-Quintero, Kate; Petersen, Donna J

    2017-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, the dynamics of health and health care are changing, necessitating a commitment to revising traditional public health curricula to better meet present day challenges. This article describes how the College of Public Health at the University of South Florida utilized the Intervention Mapping framework to translate revised core competencies into an integrated, theory-driven core curriculum to meet the training needs of the twenty-first century public health scholar and practitioner. This process resulted in the development of four sequenced courses: History and Systems of Public Health and Population Assessment I delivered in the first semester and Population Assessment II and Translation to Practice delivered in the second semester. While the transformation process, moving from traditional public health core content to an integrated and innovative curriculum, is a challenging and daunting task, Intervention Mapping provides the ideal framework for guiding this process. Intervention mapping walks the curriculum developers from the broad goals and objectives to the finite details of a lesson plan. Throughout this process, critical lessons were learned, including the importance of being open to new ideologies and frameworks and the critical need to involve key-stakeholders in every step of the decision-making process to ensure the sustainability of the resulting integrated and theory-based curriculum. Ultimately, as a stronger curriculum emerged, the developers and instructors themselves were changed, fostering a stronger public health workforce from within.

  6. Nursing Faculty Professional Development: A Study Using the National League for Nursing (NLN) Core Competencies for Nurse Educators for Development of Novice to Expert Nurse Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luoma, Kari L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to identify core competencies that are most significant for nursing faculty to develop as they transition from novice to expert faculty. Professional development in a systematic approach may guide faculty to learn what is significant as they progress in the nurse faculty role. A quantitative…

  7. Inquiring the Most Critical Teacher's Technology Education Competences in the Highest Efficient Technology Education Learning Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung-Kuan, Chan; Hsieh, Ming-Yuan; Lee, Chin-Feng; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Ho, Li-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Under the hyper-dynamic education situation, this research, in order to comprehensively explore the interplays between Teacher Competence Demands (TCD) and Learning Organization Requests (LOR), cross-employs the data refined method of Descriptive Statistics (DS) method and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Principal Components Analysis (PCA)…

  8. IMPaCT - Integration of Missions, Programs, and Core Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balacuit, Carlos P.; Cutts, James A.; Peterson, Craig E.; Beauchamp, Patricia M.; Jones, Susan K.; Hang, Winnie N.; Dastur, Shahin D.

    2013-01-01

    IMPaCT enables comprehensive information on current NASA missions, prospective future missions, and the technologies that NASA is investing in, or considering investing in, to be accessed from a common Web-based interface. It allows dependencies to be established between missions and technology, and from this, the benefits of investing in individual technologies can be determined. The software also allows various scenarios for future missions to be explored against resource constraints, and the nominal cost and schedule of each mission to be modified in an effort to fit within a prescribed budget.

  9. Large core plastic planar optical splitter fabricated by 3D printing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajzler, Václav; Kulha, Pavel; Knietel, Marian; Enser, Herbert

    2017-10-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and optical properties of large core multimode optical polymer splitter fabricated using fill up core polymer in substrate that was made by 3D printing technology. The splitter was designed by the beam propagation method intended for assembling large core waveguide fibers with 735 μm diameter. Waveguide core layers were made of optically clear liquid adhesive, and Veroclear polymer was used as substrate and cover layers. Measurement of optical losses proved that the insertion optical loss was lower than 6.8 dB in the visible spectrum.

  10. The role of personal and competent approach onto health-preserving technologies at the conditions of higher educational institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaiev O.I.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The impact of personal and competent approach onto effectiveness of health-forming and health-preserving technologies in higher educational institution conditions was demonstrated. The substance of personal and competent approaches was disclosed. 54 female students took part in the research, from them - 28 in experimental and 26 in control group. It was ascertained that personal oriented approach provide for change of teacher's role and technology of teaching within educational process. Competent approach enables to reorient the teaching technology from the process to the result of education. Educational process gains the active and creative nature by introduction of mentioned approaches.

  11. Risk communication as a core public health competence in infectious disease management: Development of the ECDC training curriculum and programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickmann, Petra; Abraham, Thomas; Sarkar, Satyajit; Wysocki, Piotr; Cecconi, Sabrina; Apfel, Franklin; Nurm, Ülla-Karin

    2016-01-01

    Risk communication has been identified as a core competence for guiding public health responses to infectious disease threats. The International Health Regulations (2005) call for all countries to build capacity and a comprehensive understanding of health risks before a public health emergency to allow systematic and coherent communication, response and management. Research studies indicate that while outbreak and crisis communication concepts and tools have long been on the agenda of public health officials, there is still a need to clarify and integrate risk communication concepts into more standardised practices and improve risk communication and health, particularly among disadvantaged populations. To address these challenges, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) convened a group of risk communication experts to review and integrate existing approaches and emerging concepts in the development of a training curriculum. This curriculum articulates a new approach in risk communication moving beyond information conveyance to knowledge- and relationship-building. In a pilot training this approach was reflected both in the topics addressed and in the methods applied. This article introduces the new conceptual approach to risk communication capacity building that emerged from this process, presents the pilot training approach developed, and shares the results of the course evaluation.

  12. Plastics in the Ocean: Engaging Students in Core Competencies Through Issues-Based Activities in the Science Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergusson-Kolmes, L. A.

    2016-02-01

    Plastic pollution in the ocean is a critical issue. The high profile of this issue in the popular media makes it an opportune vehicle for promoting deeper understanding of the topic while also advancing student learning in the core competency areas identified in the NSF's Vision and Change document: integration of the process of science, quantitative reasoning, modeling and simulation, and an understanding of the relationship between science and society. This is a challenging task in an introductory non-majors class where the students may have very limited math skills and no prior science background. In this case activities are described that ask students to use an understanding of density to make predictions and test them as they consider the fate of different kinds of plastics in the marine environment. A comparison of the results from different sampling regimes introduces students to the difficulties of carrying out scientific investigations in the complex marine environment as well as building quantitative literacy skills. Activities that call on students to make connections between global issues of plastic pollution and personal actions include extraction of microplastic from personal care products, inventories of local plastic-recycling options and estimations of contributions to the waste stream on an individual level. This combination of hands-on-activities in an accessible context serves to help students appreciate the immediacy of the threat of plastic pollution and calls them to reflect on possible solutions.

  13. Comparison of African American Children's Performances on a Minimal Competence Core for Morphosyntax and the Index of Productive Syntax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman, Ida J; Newkirk-Turner, Brandi L; Swartzlander, Elaina; Morris, Lekeitha R

    2016-02-01

    This study is a response to the need for evidence-based measures of spontaneous oral language to assess African American children under the age of 4 years. We determined if pass/fail status on a minimal competence core for morphosyntax (MCC-MS) was more highly related to scores on the Index of Productive Syntax (IPSyn)-the measure of convergent criterion validity-than to scores on 3 measures of divergent validity: number of different words (Watkins, Kelly, Harbers, & Hollis, 1995), Percentage of Consonants Correct-Revised (Shriberg, Austin, Lewis, McSweeney, & Wilson, 1997), and the Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised (Roid & Miller, 1997). Archival language samples for 68 African American 3-year-olds were analyzed to determine MCC-MS pass/fail status and the scores on measures of convergent and divergent validity. Higher IPSyn scores were observed for 60 children who passed the MCC-MS than for 8 children who did not. A significant positive correlation, rpb = .73, between MCC-MS pass/fail status and IPSyn scores was observed. This coefficient was higher than MCC-MS correlations with measures of divergent validity: rpb = .13 (Leiter International Performance Scale-Revised), rpb = .42 (number of different words in 100 utterances), and rpb = .46 (Percentage of Consonants Correct-Revised). The MCC-MS has convergent criterion validity with the IPSyn. Although more research is warranted, both measures can be potentially used in oral language assessments of African American 3-year-olds.

  14. Educating medical students as competent users of health information technologies: the MSOP data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Julie J; Passiment, Morgan; Hoffman, Helene M

    2007-01-01

    As more health information technologies become part of the health care environment, the need for physicians with medical informatics competencies is growing. In 2006, a survey was created to determine the degree to which the Association of American Medical College's Medical School Objectives Project (MSOP) medical informatics competencies had been incorporated into medical school curricula in the United States. a web-based tool was used to create the survey; medical education deans or their designees were requested to complete the survey. Analysis focused on the clinician, researcher, and manager roles of physicians. Seventy usable surveys were returned. Many of the objectives were stated in the schools' respective curricula and the competencies were being evaluated. However, only a few schools taught and assessed the medical informatics objectives that required interaction with health information. To insure that physicians have the knowledge, skills, and attitudes to effectively and efficiently interact with today's health information technologies, more medical informatics concepts need to be included and assessed in all undergraduate medical education curricula in the United States.

  15. Enhancing economic competiveness of dish Stirling technology through production volume and localization: Case study for Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larchet, Kevin; Guédez, Rafael; Topel, Monika; Gustavsson, Lars; Machirant, Andrew; Hedlund, Maria-Lina; Laumert, Björn

    2017-06-01

    The present study quantifies the reduction in the levelized cost of electricity (LCoE) and capital expenditure (CAPEX) of a dish Stirling power plant (DSPP) through an increase in localization and unit production volume. Furthermore, the localization value of the plant is examined to determine how much investment is brought into the local economy. Ouarzazate, Morocco, was chosen as the location of the study due to the country's favorable regulatory framework with regards to solar power technologies and its established industry in the concentrating solar power (CSP) field. A detailed techno-economic model of a DSPP was developed using KTH's in-house modelling tool DYESOPT, which allows power plant evaluation by means of technical and economic performance indicators. Results on the basis of LCoE and CAPEX were compared between two different cases of production volume, examining both a minimum and maximum level of localization. Thereafter, the DSPP LCoE and localization value were compared against competing solar technologies to evaluate its competitiveness. In addition, a sensitivity analysis was conducted around key design parameters. The study confirms that the LCoE of a DSPP can be reduced to values similar to solar photovoltaic (PV) and lower than other CSP technologies. Furthermore, the investment in the local economy is far greater when compared to PV and of the same magnitude to other CSP technologies. The competiveness of a DSPP has the potential to increase further when coupled with thermal energy storage (TES), which is currently under development.

  16. The approach to detection and application of the company’s technological competences to form a business-model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chursin, A. A.; Kashirin, A. I.; Strenalyuk, V. V.; Semenov, A. S.; Ostrovskaya, A. A.; Kokuytseva, T. V.

    2018-02-01

    The most important condition for increasing the competitiveness of business is the formation, retention, and development of key competences of the organization, which reflect the competitive advantage. This problem is especially urgent for high-tech industries, which are the most sensitive to all kinds of changes and innovations. The ways of applying the company’s technological competences to form a business model, the proper form of competence description and analysis on the example of the company “Teplolux” are considered. The following from is recommended to use in IT solutions for competence databases.

  17. Competencies and the Use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT by the Teaching Staff: Dimensional Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Almerich Cerveró

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of a study on the competencies possessed by the faculty of elementary-school and junior-high-school teachers (of compulsory and post-compulsory education in Valencia (Spain, as concerning the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT. We worked with a stratified random sample of 868 teachers, and analyzed their competencies in two areas: personal-professional use, and the use they make of ICT in the classroom. Although the study is based on various analyses, its contribution to Categorical Principal Components Analysis (CATPCA should be emphasized for the dimensional analysis and determination of the relationship of these dimensions with other variables of interest. The paper contributes results of interest as regards planning the integration of ICT into schools, as well as pertaining to teacher training for the pedagogical integration of ICT.

  18. Achieving generic competences through a cross-disciplinary research based course in Arctic Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie; Hansen, Claus Thorp; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2014-01-01

    In a research based course in Arctic Technology, different teaching activities were used to support learning of both technical and generic competences. The active learning was based around a 3-weeks field work period in Greenland in combination with lectures, assignments, project and peer group...... support the process of developing generic competences and are preparing the students to become professional engineers. For the future teaching of the course we have some suggestions for improvements: • Include peer-work as a learning objective and specify rubrics of how to give feedback to make it more...... work prior to and after the field work. The students represent a heterogeneous group of nationalities, previous experiences and scientific subjects. It was clearly seen by the learning outcome and assessment that students who used the offered feedback options during the course actively were more...

  19. Competing with the Soviets science, technology, and the state in Cold War America

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Audra J

    2013-01-01

    For most of the second half of the twentieth century, the United States and its allies competed with a hostile Soviet Union in almost every way imaginable except open military engagement. The Cold War placed two opposite conceptions of the good society before the uncommitted world and history itself, and science figured prominently in the picture. Competing with the Soviets offers a short, accessible introduction to the special role that science and technology played in maintaining state power during the Cold War, from the atomic bomb to the Human Genome Project. The high-tech machinery of nuclear physics and the space race are at the center of this story, but Audra J. Wolfe also examines the surrogate battlefield of scientific achievement in such diverse fields as urban planning, biology, and economics; explains how defense-driven federal investments created vast laboratories and research programs; and shows how unfamiliar worries about national security and corrosive questions of loyalty crept into the sup...

  20. Nuclear technology competence pool. An interim balance covering the period 2000 to 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritz, P.; Kuczera, B.

    2004-01-01

    One of the energy policy goals of the Red-Green federal government is opting out of the peaceful use of nuclear power. In line with the 'Act on the Regulated Termination of the Use of Nuclear Power for Electricity Generation' of July 25, 2002, nuclear power plants in Germany will be operated for electricity generation roughly up until 2022. For two more decades, competent personnel is required for the operation and government oversight of plants alone and, on top of that, for dismantling these nuclear power plants and for their safe disposal and final storage. Against this background, the federal government in the fall of 1999 appointed an Evaluation Committee which paid special attention to the preservation of functioning capabilities in research and to ensuring the protection of know-how in the fields of reactor safety and final storage. In its final report dated January 21, 2000, the Committee arrived at this conclusion: 'Irrespective of the conditions implied in the political decision to discontinue the use of nuclear power in Germany, competence in nuclear safety must be preserved over the next few decades. Only if this condition is met, the protective function of government provisions can be fulfilled and the safety of nuclear facilities and disposal pathways in accordance with the international state of the art guaranteed'. In the spirit of the recommendations by the Committee, the Nuclear Technology Competence Pool has been established; its members are the two research centers of the Helmholtz Association, i.e. FZJ and FZK; the FZR Center of the Leibniz Science Association; GRS as an expert consultant organization; and the respective neighboring universities. An account is presented of the strategic objectives of the Nuclear Technology Competence Pool as resulting from a detailed analysis of the situation, among other sources, and of the planned activities and the work and the projects completed to date. (orig.) [de

  1. FUNCTIONING FEATURES OF COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY WHILE FORMING PRIMARY SCHOOLCHILDREN’S COMMUNICATIVE COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Beskorsa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the problem of functioning features of computer technology while forming primary schoolchildren’s communicative competence whose relevance is proved by the increasing role of a foreign language as a means of communication and modernization of foreign language education. There is a great deal of publications devoted to the issue of foreign language learning at primary school by N. Biriukevych, O. Kolominova, O. Metolkina, O. Petrenko, V. Redko, S. Roman. Implementing of innovative technology as well as computer one is to intensify the language learning process and to improve young learners’ communicative skills. The aim of the article is to identify computer technology functioning features while forming primary schoolchildren communicative competence. In this study we follow the definition of the computer technology as an information technology whose implementation may be accompanied with a computer as one of the tools, excluding the use of audio and video equipment, projectors and other technical tools. Using computer technologies is realized due to a number of tools which are divided into two main groups: electronic learning materials; computer testing software. The analysis of current textbooks and learning and methodological complexes shows that teachers prefer authentic electronic materials to the national ones. The most available English learning materials are on the Internet and they are free. The author of the article discloses several on-line English learning tools and depict the opportunities to use them while forming primary schoolchildren’s communicative competence. Special attention is also paid to multimedia technology, its functioning features and multimedia lesson structure. Computer testing software provides tools for current and control assessing results of mastering language material, communicative skills, and self-assessing in an interactive way. For making tests for assessing English skill

  2. Competence formation of engineering directions students in the field of energy saving as a way to create new generation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmanshin, I. R.; Gilmanshina, S. I.

    2017-09-01

    The urgency of the formation of competence in the field of energy saving in the process of studying engineering and technical disciplines at the university is substantiated. The author’s definition of the competence in the field of energy saving is given, allowing to consider the necessity of its formation among students - future engineers as a way to create technologies of a new generation. The essence of this competence is revealed. The system of work, pedagogical conditions and technologies of its formation in the conditions of the federal university is substantiated.

  3. Application of Advanced Multi-Core Processor Technologies to Oceanographic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Application of Advanced Multi-Core Processor Technologies...STM32 NXP LPC series No Proprietary Microchip PIC32/DSPIC No > 500 mW; < 5 W ARM Cortex TI OMAP TI Sitara Broadcom BCM2835 Varies FPGA...state-of-the-art information processing architectures. OBJECTIVES Next-generation processor architectures (multi-core, multi-threaded) hold the

  4. Using the Case Study Technology in Developing the Students’ Environmental Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Ignatov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The case study technology is considered to be an effective tool for developing the students’ environmental competence. Numerous modern interactive techniques, facilitating the competence approach, can be fitted into its framework. The essence of the case-study is defined as the teaching method of problem-solving. The technology in question makes it possible to use the so called triad of «training – education – development», and provides such teaching opportunities as streaming the students according to their interests, skills, abilities and psychological peculiarities; and, therefore, assigning the relevant and motivating individual tasks.The paper traces the history of the case-study, as well as some theoretical and methodological aspects of its implementation in teaching process; the pedagogic goals fulfilled by means of the given technology are listed along with its advantages compared to other methods. The «case-study» term, its structure and working algorithms are defined. The application examples relating to environmental education at different levels are given. 

  5. Toward a Comprehensive Framework for Evaluating the Core Integration Features of Enterprise Integration Middleware Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Moradi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To achieve greater automation of their business processes, organizations face the challenge of integrating disparate systems. In attempting to overcome this problem, organizations are turning to different kinds of enterprise integration. Implementing enterprise integration is a complex task involving both technological and business challenges and requires appropriate middleware technologies. Different enterprise integration solutions provide various functions and features which lead to the complexity of their evaluation process. To overcome this complexity, appropriate tools for evaluating the core integration features of enterprise integration solutions is required. This paper proposes a new comprehensive framework for evaluating the core integration features of both intra-enterprise and inter-enterprise Integration's enabling technologies, which simplify the process of evaluating the requirements met by enterprise integration middleware technologies.The proposed framework for evaluating the core integration features of enterprise integration middleware technologies was enhanced using the structural and conceptual aspects of previous frameworks. It offers a new schema for which various enterprise integration middleware technologies are categorized in different classifications and are evaluated based on their supporting level for the core integration features' criteria. These criteria include the functional and supporting features. The proposed framework, which is a revised version of our previous framework in this area, has developed the scope, structure and content of the mentioned framework.

  6. Using the Tuning Methodology to design the founding benchmark competences for a new academic professional field: the case of Advanced Rehabilitation Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Marie Hughes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available    Designing innovative high quality educational programmes to meet the workforce needs in emerging interdisciplinary areas of practice can present challenges to academics, students, employers and industrial partners. This paper demonstrates how the Tuning Process successfully helped to construct benchmark learning outcomes and competences in the area of healthcare practice where advanced technologies are used to improve movement namely Rehabilitation Technologies (RTs. The paper also discusses the engagement of patients, carers and carer organisations within the development of competences.    Due to changing demographics, limited resources and the availability of technology, rehabilitation technologies are starting to be used for the assessment and treatment of patients. However there are currently no European transnational Bachelor or Master programmes targeted at educating people for the design, development, use and evaluation of these technologies. The contemporary field is predominantly staffed and resourced by engineering scientists and clinicians who were primarily educated in their primary discipline. The first generations of rehabilitation technologists have established this specialist field through invention, perseverance, and collaborative working. However, there is now a recognition that new and complementary skill sets are required by future graduates, whether engineering scientists or clinicians, so as to better meet the needs of clients and the employment market whether in the domains of industry, research, academia or clinical practice.   This project demonstrates how a group of European specialist rehabilitation technologists, supported by educationalists, collaborated to identify and develop the core competences and learning outcomes required by future Master’s (second cycle graduates in this new discipline. Building on the work of the Tuning Process and applying the principles embedded in the Bologna Process, future

  7. Plutonium stabilization and storage research in the DNFSB 94-1 core technology program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eller, P.G.; Avens, L.R.; Roberson, G.D.

    1998-04-01

    Recommendation 94-1 of the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) addresses legacy actinide materials left in the US nuclear defense program pipeline when the production mission ended in 1989. The Department of Energy (DOE) Implementation Plan responding to this recommendation instituted a Core Technology program to augment the knowledge base about general chemical and physical processing and storage behavior and to assure safe interim nuclear material storage, until disposition policies are formulated. The Core Technology program focuses on plutonium, in concert with a complex-wide applied R/D program administered by Los Alamos National Laboratory. This paper will summarize the Core Technology program's first two years, describe the research program for FY98, and project the overall direction of the program in the future

  8. IMPROVING TEACHING MATHEMATICS USING MODERN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN FORMATION MATHEMATICAL COMPETENCE REQUIRED FUTURE SKIPPERS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gudyreva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to consideration of issues related to identifying the potential for teaching mathematics using network (Internet technology and the introduction of elements of distance learning into educational process of higher educational establishments of the sea profile, as well as achievement of formation of mathematical competence of students of the University generally, and of the University's Maritime profile, in particular. Based on the analysis of psychological and pedagogical literature highlights the factors that influence the increase of efficiency of independent work of students of higher educational institutions and on the formation of steady skills of self-education that ultimately leads to quality of formation of mathematical competence of a student. Specific features of teaching mathematics at the University of the sea profile. The description of the project (complex sites "KSMA. Higher mathematics navigators", who developed and used in the Kherson state Maritime Academy in the teaching of mathematics and the organization of individual techniques of distance learning, shows the simplicity and accessibility of working with complex sites, as well as the simplicity and accessibility of design "personal website", but in fact complex sites, by a teacher of any discipline of higher education. Shown, also a training process with the use of the project "KSMA. Higher mathematics navigators", analyzes the experience of teaching the course "Higher mathematics" in a higher educational institution of the marine profile with the use of a personal website, a teacher and shown positive results in students mastery of basic mathematical competencies.

  9. CRITICAL THINKING TECHNOLOGY AS EFFECTIVE MEANS OF DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE MANAGERS’ LANGUAGE COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Masharova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to consider the problem of the improvement of the students-managers linguistic competence.Methods. The analysis of the features of the linguistic competence formation of the future managers with the help of critical thinking technology was used at the initial stage. The model of the organization of the effective foreign language practicals is developed by means of pedagogical simulation. The testing of the control and the experimental groups with the future statistical data processing is used to evaluate the developed model effectiveness.Results. Methods and teaching techniques are used in compliance with each stage of cognitive activity. The necessary requirements while the organization and the conducting of the foreign language practicals when critical thinking skills learning are stated. The role of the professionally-oriented foreign texts in the higher educational institutions for the critical thinking development and the improvement of the future managers’ linguistic competence is identified.Scientific novelty. A model of foreign language practicals for students of economics using the stages of cognitive activity and methods and techniques of critical thinking is developed. The dependence between the requirements for foreign language practicals and information mastery level is defined.Practical significance. The complex of foreign language practicals for students of economics increasing the level of language training is developed on the basis of theoretical survey and experimental data.

  10. Effects of duty hour restrictions on core competencies, education, quality of life, and burnout among general surgery interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiel, Ryan M; Reed, Darcy A; Van Arendonk, Kyle J; Wightman, Sean C; Hall, Daniel E; Porterfield, John R; Horvath, Karen D; Terhune, Kyla P; Tarpley, John L; Farley, David R

    2013-05-01

    To measure the implications of the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty hour regulations for education, well-being, and burnout. Longitudinal study. Eleven university-based general surgery residency programs from July 2011 to May 2012. Two hundred thirteen surgical interns. Perceptions of the impact of the new duty hours on various aspects of surgical training, including the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies, were measured on 3-point scales. Quality of life, burnout, balance between personal and professional life, and career satisfaction were measured using validated instruments. Half of all interns felt that the duty hour changes have decreased the coordination of patient care (53%), their ability to achieve continuity with hospitalized patients (70%), and their time spent in the operating room (57%). Less than half (44%) of interns believed that the new standards have decreased resident fatigue. In longitudinal analysis, residents' beliefs had significantly changed in 2 categories: less likely to believe that practice-based learning and improvement had improved and more likely to report no change to resident fatigue (P life. Compared with the normal US population, 50 interns (32%) were 0.5 SD less than the mean on the 8-item Short Form Health Survey mental quality of life score. Approximately one-third of interns demonstrated weekly symptoms of emotional exhaustion (28%) or depersonalization (28%) or reported that their personal-professional balance was either "very poor" or "not great" (32%). Although many interns (67%) reported that they daily or weekly reflect on their satisfaction from being a surgeon, 1 in 7 considered giving up their career as a surgeon on at least a weekly basis. The first cohort of surgical interns to train under the new regulations report decreased continuity with patients, coordination of patient care, and time spent in the operating room. Furthermore, suboptimal quality of

  11. Interactive educational technologies as a method of communicative competency development of optical and fiber optic communication systems specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, Tatiana U.; Osadchiy, Igor S.; Husnutdinova, Marina N.

    2017-04-01

    The article examines the process of formation of communicative competencies of optic and fiber optic communication systems specialists; the role of communicative competencies is examined in the structure of professionally important skills, together with the contents of professional activity. The stages of empirical research into formation of communicative competencies have been presented, and the values of statistical reliability of data have been provided. The model of formation of communicative competency using interactive technology has been developed based on the research done, and main stages of model implementation and motives of formation of communicative competency have been highlighted. A scheme of "Communicative competence as a base of future success" training session has been suggested as one of the basic interactive technologies. Main components of education that are used during the stages of the training cycle have been examined. The statistical data on the effectiveness of use of interactive educational technologies has been presented; it allowed development of communicative competency of specialists in the field of optical and fiber optic communication system.

  12. Lessons learned from a community-academic initiative: the development of a core competency-based training for community-academic initiative community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Yumary; Matos, Sergio; Kapadia, Smiti; Islam, Nadia; Cusack, Arthur; Kwong, Sylvia; Trinh-Shevrin, Chau

    2012-12-01

    Despite the importance of community health workers (CHWs) in strategies to reduce health disparities and the call to enhance their roles in research, little information exists on how to prepare CHWs involved in community-academic initiatives (CAIs). Therefore, the New York University Prevention Research Center piloted a CAI-CHW training program. We applied a core competency framework to an existing CHW curriculum and bolstered the curriculum to include research-specific sessions. We employed diverse training methods, guided by adult learning principles and popular education philosophy. Evaluation instruments assessed changes related to confidence, intention to use learned skills, usefulness of sessions, and satisfaction with the training. Results demonstrated that a core competency-based training can successfully affect CHWs' perceived confidence and intentions to apply learned content, and can provide a larger social justice context of their role and work. This program demonstrates that a core competency-based framework coupled with CAI-research-specific skill sessions (1) provides skills that CAI-CHWs intend to use, (2) builds confidence, and (3) provides participants with a more contextualized view of client needs and CHW roles.

  13. Simulation Technology for Skills Training and Competency Assessment in Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, Vivian T.; Issenberg, S. Barry

    2007-01-01

    Medical education during the past decade has witnessed a significant increase in the use of simulation technology for teaching and assessment. Contributing factors include: changes in health care delivery and academic environments that limit patient availability as educational opportunities; worldwide attention focused on the problem of medical errors and the need to improve patient safety; and the paradigm shift to outcomes-based education with its requirements for assessment and demonstration of competence. The use of simulators addresses many of these issues: they can be readily available at any time and can reproduce a wide variety of clinical conditions on demand. In lieu of the customary (and arguably unethical) system, whereby novices carry out the practice required to master various techniques—including invasive procedures—on real patients, simulation-based education allows trainees to hone their skills in a risk-free environment. Evaluators can also use simulators for reliable assessments of competence in multiple domains. For those readers less familiar with medical simulators, this article aims to provide a brief overview of these educational innovations and their uses; for decision makers in medical education, we hope to broaden awareness of the significant potential of these new technologies for improving physician training and assessment, with a resultant positive impact on patient safety and health care outcomes. PMID:18095044

  14. Development of the core safety regulation technology for the SMART-P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nam Zin; Kim, Do Sam; Lee, Kyeong Taek; Park, Young Ryoung; Lee, Gil Soo; Kim, Jong Woon; Yun, Sung Hwan; Lee, Jae Jun; Lee, Myung Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-06-15

    As the SMART-P is different from existing general reactors, new regulation technology is required to understand and assess the SMART-P for its regulatory reviews. One of the these technologies is related to the core design analysis. Because the SMART-P used metallic fuels, this study also collects general metallic nuclear fuel data and SMART-P's metallic fuel data from the materials studied by KAERI. The core design methodologies of KWU, ABB-CE, Westinghouse, Studsvik, Scandpower, US NRC and domestic research centers were investigated. Specially, The Hellios lattice core was studied for hexagonal nuclear fuel assembly calculation. Also, the VVER-1000 benchmark problem was analyzed by the PARCS code which has been developed by U.S. NRC. In this study, a AFEN-based computing code KORDAX os developed for the regulatory review of the SMART-P. KORDAX which is a nodal code using AFEN method dose not use transverse integration and this it can give higher accuracy results. Also, Because KORDAX is useful for hexagonal core and uses a method different with the core design code of the SMART-P developed by KAERI, it is judged that KORDAX can be an independent and reliable regulation verification code. In the next year study, HELIOS will be further studied as a core lattice code, and a hexagonal kinetics code which is based on AFEN method will be developed more systematically.

  15. Data on the relationships between financing strategies, entrepreneurial competencies and business growth of technology-based SMEs in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibidunni, Ayodotun Stephen; Kehinde, Oladele Joseph; Ibidunni, Oyebisi Mary; Olokundun, Maxwell Ayodele; Olubusayo, Falola Hezekiah; Salau, Odunayo Paul; Borishade, Taiye Tairat; Fred, Peter

    2018-06-01

    The article presents data on the relationship between financing strategies, entrepreneurial competencies and business growth of technology-based SMEs in Nigeria. Copies of structured questionnaire were administered to 233 SME owners and financial managers. Using descriptive and standard multiple regression statistical analysis, the data revealed that venture capital and business donations significantly influences profit growth of technology-based SMEs. Moreover, the data revealed that technology-`based firms can enhance their access to financing through capacity building in entrepreneurial competencies, such as acquiring the right skills and attitude.

  16. The Mobile Library and Staff Preparedness: Exploring Staff Competencies Using the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravani, Sarah-Jane; Haddow, Gaby

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary findings of a study investigating the current state of preparedness of staff at institutes of technology and TAFE libraries across Australia and New Zealand in relation to delivering services through mobile technologies. In particular, the skills, knowledge, and competencies of staff in relation to mobile…

  17. Decree No 81-723 of 28 July 1981 concerning the competence of the Minister of Research and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This Decree, which determines the competence of the Minister of Research and Technology, provides that the latter prepares the Governments' decisions on the distribution of funds for technological R and D for civilian uses. Therefore he is responsible for allocating funds for such activities to the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). (NEA) [fr

  18. Teacher educators' competences in fostering student teachers' proficiency in teaching and learning with technology : An overview of relevant research literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dana Uerz; Monique Volman; Marijke Kral

    2018-01-01

    Teacher educators play an important role in preparing student teachers to integrate technology into their classrooms. This article presents an overview of research literature on teacher educators' competences in preparing their students to teach with technology. A literature search yielded 26

  19. Identifying Multimedia Production Competencies and Skills of Instructional Design and Technology Professionals: An Analysis of Recent Job Postings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugar, William; Hoard, Brent; Brown, Abbie; Daniels, Lee

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to document necessary multimedia production competencies of Instructional Design and Technology graduates, a recent analysis of over 7 months' worth of Instructional Design and Technology job advertisements (n = 615) were conducted. Specific job skills from these postings were categorized and analyzed. The data set includes three job…

  20. Pre-Service Teachers' TPACK Competencies for Spreadsheet Integration: Insights from a Mathematics-Specific Instructional Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyei, Douglas D.; Voogt, Joke M.

    2015-01-01

    This article explored the impact of strategies applied in a mathematics instructional technology course for developing technology integration competencies, in particular in the use of spreadsheets, in pre-service teachers. In this respect, 104 pre-service mathematics teachers from a teacher training programme in Ghana enrolled in the mathematics…

  1. Pre-service teachers’ TPACK competencies for spreadsheet integration: insights from a mathematics-specific instructional technology course

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agyei, D.D.; Voogt, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    This article explored the impact of strategies applied in a mathematics instructional technology course for developing technology integration competencies, in particular in the use of spreadsheets, in pre-service teachers. In this respect, 104 pre-service mathematics teachers from a teacher training

  2. The HTA core model: a novel method for producing and reporting health technology assessments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lampe, Kristian; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Garrido, Marcial Velasco

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to develop and test a generic framework to enable international collaboration for producing and sharing results of health technology assessments (HTAs). METHODS: Ten international teams constructed the HTA Core Model, dividing information contained...... for diagnostic technologies. Two Core HTAs were produced in parallel with developing the model, providing the first real-life testing of the Model and input for further development. The results of formal validation and public feedback were primarily positive. Development needs were also identified and considered....... An online Handbook is available. CONCLUSIONS: The HTA Core Model is a novel approach to HTA. It enables effective international production and sharing of HTA results in a structured format. The face validity of the Model was confirmed during the project, but further testing and refining are needed to ensure...

  3. PENGARUH TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL DAN PENGEMBANGANNYA DALAM PERILAKU MENGGUNAKAN CORE BANKING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dessanti Putri Sekti Ari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the antecedents that affected the acceptance of individuals in using theCore Banking System through the constructs Technology Acceptance Model and its development. Constructsused in this study were perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, attitude, social influences, behavioral inten-tion, facilitating conditions, and behavior. Data were collected through survey methods. The samples of thisstudy were employees working in commercial banks in Malang Raya. This study used 136 respondents and wasanalyzed by smart PLS. The result of this study was that the construct of perceived usefulness and perceived easeof use in the Technology Acceptance Model affected attitude and behavior. Attitude and behavior in the Technol-ogy Acceptance Model and social influence which was the development of the Technology Acceptance Modelaffected behavioral intention to use the Core Banking System, as well as the construct of behavioral intention inTechnology Acceptance Model affected behavior, whereas construct of facilitating conditions which was thedevelopment of the Technology Acceptance Model did not affect the behavior on using the Core Banking System.

  4. Researcher readiness for participating in community-engaged dissemination and implementation research: a conceptual framework of core competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Christopher M; Young, Tiffany L; Powell, Byron J; Rohweder, Catherine; Enga, Zoe K; Scott, Jennifer E; Carter-Edwards, Lori; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2017-09-01

    Participating in community-engaged dissemination and implementation (CEDI) research is challenging for a variety of reasons. Currently, there is not specific guidance or a tool available for researchers to assess their readiness to conduct CEDI research. We propose a conceptual framework that identifies detailed competencies for researchers participating in CEDI and maps these competencies to domains. The framework is a necessary step toward developing a CEDI research readiness survey that measures a researcher's attitudes, willingness, and self-reported ability for acquiring the knowledge and performing the behaviors necessary for effective community engagement. The conceptual framework for CEDI competencies was developed by a team of eight faculty and staff affiliated with a university's Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA). The authors developed CEDI competencies by identifying the attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors necessary for carrying out commonly accepted CE principles. After collectively developing an initial list of competencies, team members individually mapped each competency to a single domain that provided the best fit. Following the individual mapping, the group held two sessions in which the sorting preferences were shared and discrepancies were discussed until consensus was reached. During this discussion, modifications to wording of competencies and domains were made as needed. The team then engaged five community stakeholders to review and modify the competencies and domains. The CEDI framework consists of 40 competencies organized into nine domains: perceived value of CE in D&I research, introspection and openness, knowledge of community characteristics, appreciation for stakeholder's experience with and attitudes toward research, preparing the partnership for collaborative decision-making, collaborative planning for the research design and goals, communication effectiveness, equitable distribution of resources and credit, and

  5. Peptide Microencapsulation by Core-Shell Printing Technology for Edible Film Application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanco-Pascual, N.; Koldeweij, R.B.J.; Stevens, R.S.A.; Montero, M.P.; Gómez-Guillén, M.C.; Cate, A.T.T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a new microencapsulation methodology for incorporation of functional ingredients in edible films. Core-shell microcapsules filled with demineralized water (C) or 1 % (w/v) peptide solution (Cp) were prepared using the microencapsulation printer technology. Shell material,

  6. 78 FR 22527 - Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... require both a CD and a hard copy of the response. The size of the CD submission will be limited to 20 MB. The hard copy format specifications include 12 point font, single-spaced, single-sided, 8.5 by 11... universities. Submission Instructions and Format: To respond to this request for information, interested...

  7. Development, validation, and utility of an instrument to assess core competencies in the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Stephen S; Baum, Katherine T; Bevans, Katherine B; Blum, Nathan J

    2015-02-01

    To describe the development and psychometric evaluation of the Core Competency Measure (CCM), an instrument designed to assess professional competencies as defined by the Maternal Child Health Bureau (MCHB) and targeted by Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities (LEND) programs. The CCM is a 44-item self-report measure comprised of six subscales to assess clinical, interdisciplinary, family-centered/cultural, community, research, and advocacy/policy competencies. The CCM was developed in an iterative fashion through participatory action research, and then nine cohorts of LEND trainees (N = 144) from 14 different disciplines completed the CCM during the first week of the training program. A 6-factor confirmatory factor analysis model was fit to data from the 44 original items. After three items were removed, the model adequately fit the data (comparative fit indices = .93, root mean error of approximation = .06) with all factor loadings exceeding .55. The measure was determined to be quite reliable as adequate internal consistency and test-retest reliability were found for each subscale. The instrument's construct validity was supported by expected differences in self-rated competencies among fellows representing various disciplines, and the convergent validity was supported by the pattern of inter-correlations between subscale scores. The CCM appears to be a reliable and valid measure of MCHB core competencies for our sample of LEND trainees. It provides an assessment of key training areas addressed by the LEND program. Although the measure was developed within only one LEND Program, with additional research it has the potential to serve as a standardized tool to evaluate the strengths and limitations of MCHB training, both within and between programs.

  8. The Medical Mission and Modern Core Competency Training: A 10-Year Follow-Up of Resident Experiences in Global Plastic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Caroline A; Swanson, Jordan; McCullough, Meghan; Taro, Trisa B; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Bradshaw, Allison; Campbell, Alex; Magee, William P; Magee, William P

    2016-09-01

    The emphasis on cultural competency for physicians and surgeons is increasingly important, as communication with both patients and other providers significantly affects individual and system-wide outcomes. International surgical training has been shown to improve leadership skills, cultural competency, and technical proficiency of participants in short-term follow-up. This study explores the long-term impact of international surgical mission experiences on developing participants' core competencies, professional outcomes, and commitment to global health. All 208 plastic and reconstructive surgeons who completed the Operation Smile Regan/Stryker fellowship programs between 2006 and 2015 were surveyed electronically. One hundred sixty-five surveys were returned, for an overall response rate of 79.3 percent. The majority of participants reported that the fellowship positively impacted all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. Most participants who were attending physicians at the time of the survey were practicing general plastic surgery, with 42 percent in an academic/teaching environment, 32 percent in assistant/associate professor positions, and 6 percent in either a program director or department chairman position. The majority currently volunteer on local or international missions, and all respondents would consider volunteering again. Carefully structured and rigorously proctored programs such as the Regan/Stryker Fellowship offer plastic surgery residents the opportunity to gain valuable professional and personal experiences that benefit them long after their service experience. Programs of this nature can not only effectively improve cultural competency of physicians, but also positively influence their attitudes toward leadership and direct that potential to meet the growing need for surgical care in low- and middle-income countries.

  9. Fused-core particle technology in high-performance liquid chromatography: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Kirkland

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The advent of superficially porous particles (SPPs for packed HPLC columns has changed the way that many practitioners have approached the problem of developing needed separations. The very high efficiency of such columns, combined with convenient operating conditions, modest back pressures and the ability to use conventional HPLC instruments has resulted in intense basic studies of SPP technology, and widespread applications in many sciences. This report contains an overview of the SPP technology first developed in 2006 by Advanced Materials Technology, Inc., for sub-3-μm particles, then expanded into a family of SPP products with different particle sizes, pore sizes and other physical parameters. This approach was designed so that each particle of the family could be optimized for separating a particular group of compounds, usually based on solute size. Keywords: Superficially porous particles, Fused-core particles, Core–shell particles, Peptides, Proteins, Drug separations

  10. Educational competencies and technologies for disaster preparedness in undergraduate nursing education: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Mini M; Dufrene, Claudine

    2014-04-01

    This integrative review of literature was conducted to determine (1) what are the suitable disaster preparedness competencies for undergraduate nursing curriculum? and (2) what are the suitable methods of instruction to deliver disaster preparedness content? A literature search was conducted on three major electronic databases: Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed and the Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) using the keywords; Disaster Preparedness, Disaster and nursing education; disaster response and nursing education. Limiters used were published within the last 10 years and in nursing field. Out of the 190 articles retrieved, eight were research articles that met the inclusion criteria. These articles were carefully reviewed and the results are summarized in two sections to answer the research questions. There was no uniformity of intended competencies among the studies, though all studies used resources from reputed national and international organizations. All the studies reviewed adhered to a systematic approach in delivering content and used eclectic methods including multiple technologies to enhance the educational outcomes. Most of the studies had incorporated simulation in different ways involving low to high fidelity simulators, virtual simulation and live actors. Content and length of the programs were greatly varied but stayed focused on the general principles of disaster management and appropriate for the level of the students within the programs. More rigorous research is needed in this area since all published articles had deficiencies in the methodologies, especially in data collection and analysis. Disaster preparedness education was found to be a suitable activity for interprofessional education. © 2013.

  11. Technology-Based Communication and the Development of Interpersonal Competencies Within Adolescent Romantic Relationships: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Jacqueline; Widman, Laura; Choukas-Bradley, Sophia; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated longitudinal associations between adolescents’ technology-based communication and the development of interpersonal competencies within romantic relationships. A school-based sample of 487 adolescents (58% girls; Mage = 14.1) participated at two time points, one year apart. Participants reported (1) proportions of daily communication with romantic partners via traditional modes (in person, on the phone) versus technological modes (text messaging, social networking sites) and (2) competence in the romantic relationship skill domains of negative assertion and conflict management. Results of cross-lagged panel models indicated that adolescents who engaged in greater proportions of technology-based communication with romantic partners reported lower levels of interpersonal competencies one year later, but not vice versa; associations were particularly strong for boys. PMID:28876524

  12. Technology-Based Communication and the Development of Interpersonal Competencies Within Adolescent Romantic Relationships: A Preliminary Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesi, Jacqueline; Widman, Laura; Choukas-Bradley, Sophia; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated longitudinal associations between adolescents' technology-based communication and the development of interpersonal competencies within romantic relationships. A school-based sample of 487 adolescents (58% girls; M age  = 14.1) participated at two time points, one year apart. Participants reported (1) proportions of daily communication with romantic partners via traditional modes (in person, on the phone) versus technological modes (text messaging, social networking sites) and (2) competence in the romantic relationship skill domains of negative assertion and conflict management. Results of cross-lagged panel models indicated that adolescents who engaged in greater proportions of technology-based communication with romantic partners reported lower levels of interpersonal competencies one year later, but not vice versa; associations were particularly strong for boys. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Research on Adolescence © 2016 Society for Research on Adolescence.

  13. Establishment of computer aided technology for operation, maintenance, and core management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Masaki; Isomura, Kazutoshi; Okawa, Tsuyoshi; Sakurai, Naoto

    2003-01-01

    In Fugen, the accumulated know-how of skilled operators, maintenance engineers, and core management engineers have been systematized by using the latest computer technology. These computerized systems have enhanced the technology of operating, maintenance and core management. This report describes the development of a reactor feed water control system with fuzzy logic, a refueling support system, and an automatic refueling planning system. Since operation of reactor feedwater control at low power requires a delicate operational technique and the knowledge and experience of operators, the application of a fuzzy algorithm was deemed effective in Fugen. Its good performance comparable to that of experienced operators can be realized. The fuel-handling operation takes proposed plans, fuel management and efficient operation by skilled operators. AI technology was applied to fuel-handling support system using past operation results and experience of skilled operators. This system is as capable of fuel-handling as skilled operators. Planning an adequate fuel loading pattern is time-consuming even for expert core management engineers. The Automatic Refueling Planning System (ARPS) was developed using Genetic Algorithms (GA) and a Simulated Annealing (SA). It has been verified that long-term fuel loading patterns of the Fugen NPS evaluated by ARPS are equivalent to that of an expert core management engineer. (author)

  14. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary S. Ferenchick

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student’s actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT, to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees’ observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student

  15. Using cloud-based mobile technology for assessment of competencies among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenchick, Gary S; Solomon, David

    2013-01-01

    Valid, direct observation of medical student competency in clinical settings remains challenging and limits the opportunity to promote performance-based student advancement. The rationale for direct observation is to ascertain that students have acquired the core clinical competencies needed to care for patients. Too often student observation results in highly variable evaluations which are skewed by factors other than the student's actual performance. Among the barriers to effective direct observation and assessment include the lack of effective tools and strategies for assuring that transparent standards are used for judging clinical competency in authentic clinical settings. We developed a web-based content management system under the name, Just in Time Medicine (JIT), to address many of these issues. The goals of JIT were fourfold: First, to create a self-service interface allowing faculty with average computing skills to author customizable content and criterion-based assessment tools displayable on internet enabled devices, including mobile devices; second, to create an assessment and feedback tool capable of capturing learner progress related to hundreds of clinical skills; third, to enable easy access and utilization of these tools by faculty for learner assessment in authentic clinical settings as a means of just in time faculty development; fourth, to create a permanent record of the trainees' observed skills useful for both learner and program evaluation. From July 2010 through October 2012, we implemented a JIT enabled clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) among 367 third year internal medicine students. Observers (attending physicians and residents) performed CEX assessments using JIT to guide and document their observations, record their time observing and providing feedback to the students, and their overall satisfaction. Inter-rater reliability and validity were assessed with 17 observers who viewed six videotaped student-patient encounters and by

  16. Assessment of Lumbar Lordosis and Lumbar Core Strength in Information Technology Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Roma Satish; Nagrale, Sanket; Dabadghav, Rachana; Rairikar, Savita; Shayam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2016-06-01

    Observational study. To correlate lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in information technology (IT) professionals. IT professionals have to work for long hours in a sitting position, which can affect lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength. Flexicurve was used to assess the lumbar lordosis, and pressure biofeedback was used to assess the lumbar core strength in the IT professionals. All subjects, both male and female, with and without complaint of low back pain and working for two or more years were included, and subjects with a history of spinal surgery or spinal deformity were excluded from the study. Analysis was done using Pearson's correlation. For the IT workers, no correlation was seen between lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength (r=-0.04); however, a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain (r=-0.12), while there was no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core in IT people who had no complains of pain (r=0.007). The study shows that there is no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in IT professionals, but a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain.

  17. Conceptualization and Pilot Testing of a Core Competency-Based Training Workshop in Suicide Risk Assessment and Management: Notes From the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Robert J; Bryson, Claire N; Eichorst, Morgam K; Keyes, Lee N; Ridge, Brittany E

    2017-03-01

    As professional psychology training programs and continuing education have moved toward competency based approaches, it has become equally important to develop uniform, evidence-based approaches for suicide risk assessment and management. The present article presents a workshop curriculum based on established core competencies in suicide risk assessment and management. Drawing on theories suicide risk formation, the workshop features an integration of didactic, process, and experiential components. We present pilot data from 2 small group workshops (n = 17): 1 from a clinical psychology doctoral program and 1 from a university counseling center. Workshop participation yielded increases in (a) the ability to recognize appropriate clinician responses to suicidal client statements, (b) self-perceptions of general capacity to interface with suicidal patients and mastery of the 10 core competencies, (c) factual knowledge concerning suicide risk assessment and management, and (d) the self-rated ability to assess and manage a suicidal patient. We discuss statistical and generalizability limitations as well as implications for future modification, implementation, and provision of this training method. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Application of the Intervention Mapping Framework to Develop an Integrated Twenty-First Century Core Curriculum-Part 1: Mobilizing the Community to Revise the Masters of Public Health Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBate, Rita; Corvin, Jaime A; Wolfe-Quintero, Kate; Petersen, Donna J

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-first century health challenges have significantly altered the expanding role and functions of public health professionals. Guided by a call from the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health's (ASPPH) and the Framing the Future: The Second 100 Years of Education for Public Health report to adopt new and innovative approaches to prepare public health leaders, the University of South Florida College of Public Health aimed to self-assess the current Masters of Public Health (MPH) core curriculum with regard to preparing students to meet twenty-first century public health challenges. This paper describes how Intervention Mapping was employed as a framework to increase readiness and mobilize the COPH community for curricular change. Intervention Mapping provides an ideal framework, allowing organizations to access capacity, specify goals, and guide the change process from curriculum development to implementation and evaluation of competency-driven programs. The steps outlined in this paper resulted in a final set of revised MPH core competencies that are interdisciplinary in nature and fulfill the emergent needs to address changing trends in both public health education and challenges in population health approaches. Ultimately, the competencies developed through this process were agreed upon by the entire College of Public Health faculty, signaling one college's readiness for change, while providing the impetus to revolutionize the delivery of public health education at the University of South Florida.

  19. Development of Comprehensive Competences with Information and Communication Technologies in Distance Learning Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Muñoz Vargas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify and implement educational strategies through the use of Information and Communication Technologies in order for students of distance learning (who belong to the academic degrees of Natural Sciences and Environmental Education at the University of Córdoba to develop comprehensive competences. We used the action research method divided in two cycles, with the participation of three teachers and 242 students. The data analysis of the first cycle established three analysis categories and designed four intervention strategies based on the scientific knowledge and the academic experience of the teachers. The results of the second cycle showed an improvement of the academic performance of the students in a comprehensive way.

  20. Transformation through expeditionary change using online learning and competence-building technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald M. Norris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a patterns-based model of the evolution of learning and competence-building technologies, grounded in examples of current practice. The model imagines five simple stages in how institutions use ‘expeditionary change' to innovate more nimbly. It builds upon three assertions. First, the pervasiveness of web-based knowledge-sharing in higher education's communities, observatories and social networks makes it easier to: introduce relevant technologies, find people doing similar things, learn from their experiences, find and collaborate with early adopters of learning technologies, hear about relevant innovations, and discover and exploit news of opportunities, threats and trends. Second, expeditionary change based on such knowledge-sharing facilitates transformations in: production functions for learning, roles of faculty and mentors, business models, patterns and cadences of interactivity, use of open resources, and the roles of learners. Third, those transformations make it easier for disruptive forms of higher education to emerge; for example, dynamically updated curricula that address emerging and important knowledge gaps, and thereby increase students' employability.

  1. Germline competence of mouse ES and iPS cell lines: Chimera technologies and genetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstea, Ana Claudia; Pirity, Melinda K; Dinnyes, Andras

    2009-12-31

    In mice, gene targeting by homologous recombination continues to play an essential role in the understanding of functional genomics. This strategy allows precise location of the site of transgene integration and is most commonly used to ablate gene expression ("knock-out"), or to introduce mutant or modified alleles at the locus of interest ("knock-in"). The efficacy of producing live, transgenic mice challenges our understanding of this complex process, and of the factors which influence germline competence of embryonic stem cell lines. Increasingly, evidence indicates that culture conditions and in vitro manipulation can affect the germline-competence of Embryonic Stem cell (ES cell) lines by accumulation of chromosome abnormalities and/or epigenetic alterations of the ES cell genome. The effectiveness of ES cell derivation is greatly strain-dependent and it may also influence the germline transmission capability. Recent technical improvements in the production of germline chimeras have been focused on means of generating ES cells lines with a higher germline potential. There are a number of options for generating chimeras from ES cells (ES chimera mice); however, each method has its advantages and disadvantages. Recent developments in induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell technology have opened new avenues for generation of animals from genetically modified somatic cells by means of chimera technologies. The aim of this review is to give a brief account of how the factors mentioned above are influencing the germline transmission capacity and the developmental potential of mouse pluripotent stem cell lines. The most recent methods for generating specifically ES and iPS chimera mice, including the advantages and disadvantages of each method are also discussed.

  2. Determinants and effects of medical students' core self-evaluation tendencies on clinical competence and workplace well-being in clerkship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung Kai Lin

    Full Text Available Core self-evaluation (CSE is a personality trait that involves a person's evaluation of his or her own worth, competence, and capability. The objective of this study was to determine whether medical students' CSEs exert beneficial effects on their adaptation to their clerkship in terms of their clinical competence and workplace well-being and whether their preclinical academic performance can be a trait-relevant situation that enhances their CSE expression. In total, 127 medical students from 2 cohorts were included as participants in this study. We analyzed complete measures of personal background, objective and subjective preclinical academic performance (course evaluation grades and self-reported efficacy, CSE tendencies, and clinical competence (as objective structured clinical examination scores and workplace well-being (as compassion satisfaction and burnout during their 2-year clerkship. Mixed linear models for repeated measures and multiple regressions were employed. Participants' CSE tendencies had positive effects on their workplace compassion satisfaction and burnout but not on their clinical competence during their clerkship. Additionally, using the objective and subjective preclinical academic performance of the medical students as indicators, we observed that neither could be trait-relevant situations to enhance their CSE expression. CSE personality tendencies might be key to medical students' ability to noncognitively adapt to clinical training during their clerkships. These tendencies should be identified earlier so that mentors can provide prompt care and support to mentees (medical students during clerkships.

  3. Incorporation of core competency questions into an annual national self-assessment examination for residents in physical medicine and rehabilitation: results and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joseph B

    2009-03-01

    To determine the performance and change over time when incorporating questions in the core competency domains of practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI), systems-based practice (SBP), and professionalism (PROF) into the national PM&R Self-Assessment Examination for Residents (SAER). Prospective, longitudinal analysis. The national Self-Assessment Examination for Residents (SAER) in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, which is administered annually. Approximately 1100 PM&R residents who take the examination annually. Inclusion of progressively more challenging questions in the core competency domains of PBLI, SBP, and PROF. Individual test item level of difficulty (P value) and discrimination (point biserial index). Compared with the overall test, questions in the subtopic areas of PBLI, SBP, and PROF were relatively easier and less discriminating (correlation of resident performance on these domains compared with that on the total test). These differences became smaller during the 3-year time period. The difficulty level of the questions in each of the subtopic domains was raised during the 3 year period to a level close to the overall exam. Discrimination of the test items improved or remained stable. This study demonstrates that, with careful item writing and review, multiple-choice items in the PBLI, SBP, and PROF domains can be successfully incorporated into an annual, national self-assessment examination for residents. The addition of these questions had value in assessing competency while not compromising the overall validity and reliability of the exam. It is yet to be determined if resident performance on these questions corresponds to performance on other measures of competency in the areas of PBLI, SBP, and PROF.

  4. Assessing medical students' performance in core competencies using multiple admission programs for colleges and universities: from the perspective of multi-source feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ji-Tseng; Ko, Yu-Shien; Chien, Chu-Chun; Yu, Kuang-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Since 1994, Taiwanese medical universities have employed the multiple application method comprising "recommendations and screening" and "admission application." The purpose of this study is to examine whether medical students admitted using different admission programs gave different performances. To evaluate the six core competencies for medical students proposed by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), this study employed various assessment tools, including student opinion feedback, multi-source feedback (MSF), course grades, and examination results.MSF contains self-assessment scale, peer assessment scale, nursing staff assessment scale, visiting staff assessment scale, and chief resident assessment scale. In the subscales, the CronbachÊs alpha were higher than 0.90, indicating good reliability. Research participants consisted of 182 students from the School of Medicine at Chang Gung University. Regarding studentsÊ average grade for the medical ethics course, the performance of students who were enrolled through school recommendations exceeded that of students who were enrolled through the National College University Entrance Examination (NCUEE) p = 0.011), and all considered "teamwork" as the most important. Different entry pipelines of students in the "communication," "work attitude," "medical knowledge," and "teamwork" assessment scales showed no significant difference. The improvement rate of the students who were enrolled through the school recommendations was better than that of the students who were enrolled through the N CUEE in the "professional skills," "medical core competencies," "communication," and "teamwork" projects of self-assessment and peer assessment scales. However, the students who were enrolled through the NCUEE were better in the "professional skills," "medical core competencies," "communication," and "teamwork" projects of the visiting staff assessment scale and the chief resident assessment scale. Collectively

  5. Assessing medical students' performance in core competencies using multiple admission programs for colleges and universities: From the perspective of multi-source feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Tseng Fang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since 1994, Taiwanese medical universities have employed the multiple application method comprising "recommendations and screening" and "admission application." The purpose of this study is to examine whether medical students admitted using different admission programs gave different performances. Methods: To evaluate the six core competencies for medical students proposed by Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME, this study employed various assessment tools, including student opinion feedback, multi-source feedback (MSF, course grades, and examination results.MSF contains self-assessment scale, peer assessment scale, nursing staff assessment scale, visiting staff assessment scale, and chief resident assessment scale. In the subscales, the CronbachÊs alpha were higher than 0.90, indicating good reliability. Research participants consisted of 182 students from the School of Medicine at Chang Gung University. Results: Regarding studentsÊ average grade for the medical ethics course, the performance of students who were enrolled through school recommendations exceeded that of students who were enrolled through the National College University Entrance Examination (NCUEE p = 0.011, and all considered "teamwork" as the most important. Different entry pipelines of students in the "communication," "work attitude," "medical knowledge," and "teamwork" assessment scales showed no significant difference. The improvement rate of the students who were enrolled through the school recommendations was better than that of the students who were enrolled through the N CUEE in the "professional skills," "medical core competencies," "communication," and "teamwork" projects of self-assessment and peer assessment scales. However, the students who were enrolled through the NCUEE were better in the "professional skills," "medical core competencies," "communication," and "teamwork" projects of the visiting staff assessment scale and the

  6. Influence of the Reclaim from the Cordis Technology on the Core Sand Strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dańko J.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The investigation results of the mechanical reclamation of spent moulding sands from the Cordis technology are presented in the paper. The quality assessment of the obtained reclaim and the influence of the reclaim fraction in a matrix on the core sand strength is given. The reclaim quality assessment was performed on the basis of the determination of losses on ignition, Na2O content on reclaim grains and pH values. The reclaim constituted 100%, 75% and 50% of the core sand matrix, for which the bending strength was determined. The matrix reclamation treatment was performed in the experimental rotor reclaimer RD-6. Spent sands were applied in as-delivered condition and after the heating to a temperature of 140 °C. Shaped samples for strength tests were made by shooting and hardening of sands in the warmbox technology.

  7. Evaluating core technology capacity based on an improved catastrophe progression method: the case of automotive industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shijia; Liu, Zongwei; Wang, Yue; Zhao, Fuquan

    2017-01-01

    Subjectivity usually causes large fluctuations in evaluation results. Many scholars attempt to establish new mathematical methods to make evaluation results consistent with actual objective situations. An improved catastrophe progression method (ICPM) is constructed to overcome the defects of the original method. The improved method combines the merits of the principal component analysis' information coherence and the catastrophe progression method's none index weight and has the advantage of highly objective comprehensive evaluation. Through the systematic analysis of the influencing factors of the automotive industry's core technology capacity, the comprehensive evaluation model is established according to the different roles that different indices play in evaluating the overall goal with a hierarchical structure. Moreover, ICPM is developed for evaluating the automotive industry's core technology capacity for the typical seven countries in the world, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the method.

  8. HRM, technology and innovation: new HRM competences for old business challenges?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondarouk, Tatiana; Marsman, Eline; Rekers, Marc; Bondarouk, Tanya; Olivas-Luján, Mguel R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this chapter is to explore the requirements modern companies expect of HR professionals’ competences. Design/Methodology/Approach: Departing from the widely acknowledged HR competence studies of Ulrich and associates, we extended them with the continuous learning competence

  9. TECHNOLOGY FOR INSTALLATION OF REINFORCED CONCRETE FLOOR SLABS LIGHTENED BY CORE DRIVERS WITH PRELIMINARY REINFORCEMENT STRESS

    OpenAIRE

    S. N. Leonovich; I. I. Peredkov

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents technology for installation of floor slabs lightened by plastic core drivers which are preliminary stressed under construction conditions.  Efficiency of such constructive solution is justified by the action of preliminary concrete compression in the tensile zone while reducing structure dead weight due to void arrangement.  The paper provides classification of systems for preliminary stress and contains recommendations on selection of the system depending on peculiariar fe...

  10. Early Student Support for Application of Advanced Multi-Core Processor Technologies to Oceanographic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-07

    REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE I . ... ... .. . ,...,.., ............. OMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting burden for this collection of...Student Support for Appl ication of Advanced Multi- Core Processor N00014-12-1-0298 Technologies to Oceanographic Research Sb. GRANT NUMBER Sc...communications protocols (i.e. UART, I2C, and SPI), through the , ’ . handing off of the data to the server APis. By providing a common set of tools

  11. Thermal treatment and competing technologies for remediation of MGP (manufactured gas plant) sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, T.F.; Greer, B.A.; Lawless, M.

    1995-01-01

    More than 1,500 MGP (manufactured gas plant) sites exist throughout the US. Many are contaminated with coal tar from coal-fueled gas works which produced ''town gas'' from the mid-1800s through the 1950s. Virtually all old US cities have such sites. Most are in downtown areas, as they were installed for central distribution of manufactured gas. While a few sites are CERCLA/Superfund, most are not. However, the contaminants and methods used for remediation are similar to those used for Superfund cleanups of coal tar contamination from wood-treating and coke oven facilities. Clean-up of sites is triggered by property transfers and re-development as well as releases to the environment--in particular, via ground water migration. This paper describes recent experience with high capacity/low cost thermal desorption process for this waste. It also reviews competing non-thermal technology, such as bio-treatment, capping, recycling, and dig and haul. Cost data are provided for all technologies, and a case study for thermal treatment is also presented

  12. Pre-Service Teachers' Perception of and Technology Competency at Creating and Using E-Picture Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong Joon; Yang, Youjin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated pre-service teachers' perception of and technology competency in creating and using e-picture books in their future classrooms. Participants were 114 pre-service teachers in a required Early Childhood Education undergraduate course at a mid-western university in the United States. As part of the course assignments,…

  13. Developing eLearning Technologies to Implement Competency Based Medical Education: Experiences from Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagunwa, Thomas; Lwoga, Edda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the practical experience of developing an eLearning technology as a tool to implement Competency-based Medical Education (CBME) in Tanzania medical universities, with a specific focus on Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences. The paper provides a background to eLearning and the early attempt to adopt it in 2006 at…

  14. Attitude in English and Competence of Students at Integrated Refinery Petro-Chemical Complex (IRPCT) Technological College, Rayong, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Chinebeth

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted at IRPC Technological College, Thailand. The objectives of this study were to investigate (1) The attitude of students towards English; (2) The attitude of students towards teaching English; (3) The competence level of their English. The participants were asked to answer and complete the survey questionnaires that would…

  15. Section 7033 of the America COMPETES Act: Hispanic-Serving Institutions and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    On March 1, 2009 from 2 pm to 5 pm at the Madison Hotel in Washington, DC, the National Science Foundation hosted a listening session, requesting input on Section 7033 of the America COMPETES (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science) Act regarding Hispanic-serving institutions and science,…

  16. Competing Core Processes in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Do Working Memory Deficiencies Underlie Behavioral Inhibition Deficits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, R. Matt; Rapport, Mark D.; Hudec, Kristen L.; Sarver, Dustin E.; Kofler, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The current study examined competing predictions of the working memory and behavioral inhibition models of ADHD. Behavioral inhibition was measured using a conventional stop-signal task, and central executive, phonological, and visuospatial working memory components (Baddeley 2007) were assessed in 14 children with ADHD and 13 typically developing…

  17. Simulation Based Optimization of Complex Monolithic Composite Structures Using Cellular Core Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickmott, Curtis W.

    Cellular core tooling is a new technology which has the capability to manufacture complex integrated monolithic composite structures. This novel tooling method utilizes thermoplastic cellular cores as inner tooling. The semi-rigid nature of the cellular cores makes them convenient for lay-up, and under autoclave temperature and pressure they soften and expand providing uniform compaction on all surfaces including internal features such as ribs and spar tubes. This process has the capability of developing fully optimized aerospace structures by reducing or eliminating assembly using fasteners or bonded joints. The technology is studied in the context of evaluating its capabilities, advantages, and limitations in developing high quality structures. The complex nature of these parts has led to development of a model using the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software Abaqus and the plug-in COMPRO Common Component Architecture (CCA) provided by Convergent Manufacturing Technologies. This model utilizes a "virtual autoclave" technique to simulate temperature profiles, resin flow paths, and ultimately deformation from residual stress. A model has been developed simulating the temperature profile during curing of composite parts made with the cellular core technology. While modeling of composites has been performed in the past, this project will look to take this existing knowledge and apply it to this new manufacturing method capable of building more complex parts and develop a model designed specifically for building large, complex components with a high degree of accuracy. The model development has been carried out in conjunction with experimental validation. A double box beam structure was chosen for analysis to determine the effects of the technology on internal ribs and joints. Double box beams were manufactured and sectioned into T-joints for characterization. Mechanical behavior of T-joints was performed using the T-joint pull-off test and compared to traditional

  18. An international survey and modified Delphi process revealed editors' perceptions, training needs, and ratings of competency-related statements for the development of core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, James; Cobey, Kelly D; Barbour, Virginia; Baskin, Patricia; Bell-Syer, Sally; Deeks, Jonathan; Garner, Paul; Shamseer, Larissa; Sharon, Straus; Tugwell, Peter; Winker, Margaret; Moher, David

    2017-01-01

    Background: Scientific editors (i.e., those who make decisions on the content and policies of a journal) have a central role in the editorial process at biomedical journals. However, very little is known about the training needs of these editors or what competencies are required to perform effectively in this role. Methods: We conducted a survey of perceptions and training needs among scientific editors from major editorial organizations around the world, followed by a modified Delphi process in which we invited the same scientific editors to rate the importance of competency-related statements obtained from a previous scoping review. Results: A total of 148 participants completed the survey of perceptions and training needs. At least 80% of participants agreed on six of the 38 skill and expertise-related statements presented to them as being important or very important to their role as scientific editors. At least 80% agreed on three of the 38 statements as necessary skills they perceived themselves as possessing (well or very well).  The top five items on participants' list of top training needs were training in statistics, research methods, publication ethics, recruiting and dealing with peer reviewers, and indexing of journals. The three rounds of the Delphi were completed by 83, 83, and 73 participants, respectively, which ultimately produced a list of 23 "highly rated" competency-related statements and another 86 "included" items. Conclusion: Both the survey and the modified Delphi process will be critical for understanding knowledge and training gaps among scientific editors when designing curriculum around core competencies in the future.

  19. An international survey and modified Delphi process revealed editors’ perceptions, training needs, and ratings of competency-related statements for the development of core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Galipeau

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Scientific editors (i.e., those who make decisions on the content and policies of a journal have a central role in the editorial process at biomedical journals. However, very little is known about the training needs of these editors or what competencies are required to perform effectively in this role. Methods: We conducted a survey of perceptions and training needs among scientific editors from major editorial organizations around the world, followed by a modified Delphi process in which we invited the same scientific editors to rate the importance of competency-related statements obtained from a previous scoping review. Results: A total of 148 participants completed the survey of perceptions and training needs. At least 80% of participants agreed on six of the 38 skill and expertise-related statements presented to them as being important or very important to their role as scientific editors. At least 80% agreed on three of the 38 statements as necessary skills they perceived themselves as possessing (well or very well.  The top five items on participants’ list of top training needs were training in statistics, research methods, publication ethics, recruiting and dealing with peer reviewers, and indexing of journals. The three rounds of the Delphi were completed by 83, 83, and 73 participants, respectively, which ultimately produced a list of 23 “highly rated” competency-related statements and another 86 “included” items. Conclusion: Both the survey and the modified Delphi process will be critical for understanding knowledge and training gaps among scientific editors when designing curriculum around core competencies in the future.

  20. An international survey and modified Delphi process revealed editors’ perceptions, training needs, and ratings of competency-related statements for the development of core competencies for scientific editors of biomedical journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, James; Cobey, Kelly D.; Barbour, Virginia; Baskin, Patricia; Bell-Syer, Sally; Deeks, Jonathan; Garner, Paul; Shamseer, Larissa; Sharon, Straus; Tugwell, Peter; Winker, Margaret; Moher, David

    2017-01-01

    Background: Scientific editors (i.e., those who make decisions on the content and policies of a journal) have a central role in the editorial process at biomedical journals. However, very little is known about the training needs of these editors or what competencies are required to perform effectively in this role. Methods: We conducted a survey of perceptions and training needs among scientific editors from major editorial organizations around the world, followed by a modified Delphi process in which we invited the same scientific editors to rate the importance of competency-related statements obtained from a previous scoping review. Results: A total of 148 participants completed the survey of perceptions and training needs. At least 80% of participants agreed on six of the 38 skill and expertise-related statements presented to them as being important or very important to their role as scientific editors. At least 80% agreed on three of the 38 statements as necessary skills they perceived themselves as possessing (well or very well).  The top five items on participants’ list of top training needs were training in statistics, research methods, publication ethics, recruiting and dealing with peer reviewers, and indexing of journals. The three rounds of the Delphi were completed by 83, 83, and 73 participants, respectively, which ultimately produced a list of 23 “highly rated” competency-related statements and another 86 “included” items. Conclusion: Both the survey and the modified Delphi process will be critical for understanding knowledge and training gaps among scientific editors when designing curriculum around core competencies in the future. PMID:28979768

  1. THE ISSUE OF FORMING FUTURE MUSIC TEACHERS’ PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCE BY COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY TOOLS IN THE THEORY OF NATIONAL ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila Gavrilova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with theoretical aspects of forming future music teachers’ professional competence by computer technology tools. The concept of professional competence has become a major criterion of preparing students for professional activities. The issue of the article is relevant as the competence approach has become a basis of implementing computer technologies into future music teachers’ training. The authors give a detailed analysis of implementing computer technologies into musical education. The special attention is paid to using a computer in musical education and making electronic pedagogical resources. The aim of the article is to outline the directions of national art research in the process of implementing computer tools that is one of the most efficient ways of updating process of future music teachers’ training. The article reveals theoretical aspects of forming future music teachers’ professional competence by computer technology tools. The authors point out that implementing musical and computer technologies into music art practice is realized in some directions: using a computer as a new musical instrument in composers, sound engineers, and arrangers’ activities; using a computer for studying the quality of music sound, analysing sounds and music compositions, spectral analysis of acoustic characteristics of singers’ voice; studying ancient music manuscripts due to digital technology; developing hardware and software for music education. A distinct direction of research is the pedagogical aspect of using a computer in music education (music and the use of special software for recording and editing music, the use of multimedia to enhance visibility in education, development of e-learning resources, etc.. The authors conclude that implementing computer technologies into future music teachers’ training makes this process more efficient. In the authors’ opinion the widespread introduction of distance learning

  2. Development of core technology for research reactors using plate type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Jae Joo; Lee, Doo Jeong; Park, Cheol

    2009-12-01

    Around 250 research reactors are under operation over the world. However, about 2/3 have been operated more than 30 years and demands for replacements are expected in the near future. The number of expected units is around 110, and around 55 units from 40 countries will be expected to be bid in the world market. In 2007, Netherlands started international bidding process to construct a new 80MW RR (named PALLAS) with the target of commercial operation in 2016, which will replace the existing HFR(45MW). KAERI consortium has been participated in that bid. Most of RRs use plate type fuels as a fuel assembly, Be and Graphite as a reflector. On the other hand, in Korea, the KAERI is operating the HANARO, which uses a rod type fuel assembly and heavy water as a reflector. Hence, core technologies for RRs using plate type fuels are in short. Therefore, core technologies should be secured for exporting a RR. In chapter 2, the conceptual design of PALLAS which use plate type fuels are described including core, cooling system and connected systems, layout of general components. Experimental verification tests for the plate type fuel and second shutdown system and the code verification for nuclear design are explained in Chapter 3 and 4, respectively

  3. What factors facilitate regulatory competence in supervising the safety of nuclear technology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishar, Marina

    2012-01-01

    The proposed utilization of nuclear energy for electricity generation as the alternative energy source requires Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB), the Malaysian nuclear regulatory body taking key role in supervising the safety of the program. This study looked into factors influencing the competency of current AELB human resource as technical competency has been identified as one of the main contributors to the success of a civil nuclear power program. The four quadrant competency model developed by International Atomic Energy Agency was utilized as the required competency. A comprehensive study on 81 personnel from five states in different geographic regions of the country were carried out to investigate the impact of six factors related to competency (educational level, years of working experience, trainings attended, participation in technical committees, numbers of technical papers written and number of technical presentation presented) on four dependent measures in the areas of regulatory competency (legal basis, technical disciplines, regulatory practices and personal and interpersonal effectiveness). Multiple regression (method enter) identified factors that had significant contribution to level of competency while stepwise regression resulted in identifying predictors to enhance competencies. Results were mixed but each of the independent factors is a predictor to different competencies. This study had identified the best predictors that could significantly contribute to the enhancement of regulatory. (author)

  4. Using principal components analysis to explore competence and confidence in student nurses as users of information and communication technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todhunter, Fern

    2015-07-01

    To report on the relationship between competence and confidence in nursing students as users of information and communication technologies, using principal components analysis. In nurse education, learning about and learning using information and communication technologies is well established. Nursing students are one of the undergraduate populations in higher education required to use these resources for academic work and practice learning. Previous studies showing mixed experiences influenced the choice of an exploratory study to find out about information and communication technologies competence and confidence. A 48-item survey questionnaire was administered to a volunteer sample of first- and second-year nursing students between July 2008-April 2009. The cohort ( N  =   375) represented 18·75% of first- and second-year undergraduates. A comparison between this work and subsequent studies reveal some similar ongoing issues and ways to address them. A principal components analysis (PCA) was carried out to determine the strength of the correlation between information and communication technologies competence and confidence. The aim was to show the presence of any underlying dimensions in the transformed data that would explain any variations in information and communication technologies competence and confidence. Cronbach's alpha values showed fair to good internal consistency. The five component structure gave medium to high results and explained 44·7% of the variance in the original data. Confidence had a high representation. The findings emphasized the shift towards social learning approaches for information and communication technologies. Informal social collaboration found favour with nursing students. Learning through talking, watching and listening all play a crucial role in the development of computing skills.

  5. Conceptual core design of Advanced Recycling Reactor based on mature technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, Kazumi, E-mail: kazumi_ikeda@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR systems, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan); Stein, Kim O., E-mail: Kim.Stein@areva.com [AREVA Federal Services, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Nakazato, Wataru, E-mail: wataru_nakazato@mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Kobe 652-8585 (Japan); Mito, Makoto, E-mail: makoto_mito@mfbr.mhi.co.jp [Mitsubishi FBR systems, Tokyo 150-0001 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Research highlights: > ARR is an oxide fueled sodium cooled reactor based on mature technologies to destruct TRU. > Flat core with thick wall cladding tubes are effective for ARR to reduce TRU CR and the void reactivity. > The ARR has TRU burning capability from 19 to 21 kg/TW{sub th}h and is sustainable in recycling. > The ARR can also accept TRU from LWR-MOX fuel and recycled TRU fuel, etc. > The ARR can transform from TRU conversion ratio of 0.56 to breeding ratio of 1.03 smoothly and safely. - Abstract: This paper presents about comprehensive investigations into Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) based on existing and/or mature technologies (called 'Early ARR'), aiming transuranics (TRU) burning and considering harmonization of TRU burning capability, technology readiness, economy and safety. The ARR is a 500 MW{sub e} (1180 MW{sub th}) oxide fueled sodium cooled fast reactor, which the low core height of 70 cm and the large structure volume fraction with 1.0 mm of cladding thickness to tube wall have been chosen among 14 candidate concepts to reduce the TRU conversion ratio (CR) and the void reactivity, taking technology readiness into account. As a result of nuclear calculation, the ARR has TRU burning capability from 19 to 21 kg/TW{sub th}h and is sustainable in recycling. And the ARR can accept several kinds of TRU; the LWR uranium oxide fuels, LWR-MOX used nuclear fuel, and TRU recycled in this fuel cycle and the ARR is also flexible in TRU management in ways that it can transform from TRU CR of 0.56 to breeding ratio (BR) of 1.03. In addition, it has been confirmed that the ARR core conforms to the set design requirements; the void reactivity, the maximum linear heat rate, and the shutdown margin of reactivity control system. It has been confirmed that the closed fuel cycle with the ARR plants of 180 GW{sub th} will not release TRU outside and generate more electricity by 65% compared with the present nuclear power system in the US, curbing the

  6. 47{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2016). Key Topic / Outstanding know-how and sustainable excellence. Workshop: Preserving competence in nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2016-10-15

    On the 18{sup th} workshop Preserving Competence in Nuclear Technology 24 young scientists presented the scientific results from their work covering a broad spectrum of technical areas. This demonstrated again the strong engagement of the younger generation as part of the German nuclear society. Prof.Dr.-Ing. Eckart Laurin, Prof.Dr.-Ing. Marco K. Koch, Dr. Katharina Stummeyer, and Dr.-Ing. Wolfgang Steinwarz as members of the jury assessed the written compacts and the oral presentations to award the Siempelkamp Competence Price 2016 to Andreas Wanninger from Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  7. 47th Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2016). Key Topic / Outstanding know-how and sustainable excellence. Workshop: Preserving competence in nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    On the 18 th workshop Preserving Competence in Nuclear Technology 24 young scientists presented the scientific results from their work covering a broad spectrum of technical areas. This demonstrated again the strong engagement of the younger generation as part of the German nuclear society. Prof.Dr.-Ing. Eckart Laurin, Prof.Dr.-Ing. Marco K. Koch, Dr. Katharina Stummeyer, and Dr.-Ing. Wolfgang Steinwarz as members of the jury assessed the written compacts and the oral presentations to award the Siempelkamp Competence Price 2016 to Andreas Wanninger from Technische Universitaet Muenchen.

  8. Assistência pré-natal: competências essenciais desempenhadas por enfermeiros Atención prenatal: competencias esenciales desempeñadas por enfermeros Prenatal care: core competencies performed by nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida de Aquino Cunha

    2009-03-01

    para mejorar la calidad de los servicios a fin de alcanzar un nivel óptimo de competencia en la atención prenatal.This research aimed to analyze the core competencies developed in practice by nurses working in prenatal care. This descriptive study with a quantitative approach was carried out at 16 basic health network units in Rio Branco-AC, Brazil, in 2006. Data were collected through systematic and non-participant observation. Only two (11.76% of the nurses working in prenatal consultations had taken a specialization course in obstetrics. Although the large majority of core competencies expected in prenatal care were developed, some were practiced with low frequency levels, that is, not in all consultations. The results revealed that, despite the nurses' good performance, the need for clarifications should be assessed, about the importance of incorporating care protocols to improve service quality, with a view to reach an excellent competency level in prenatal care.

  9. RAISING INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES COMPETENCE OF SCIENTIFIC AND PEDAGOGICAL EMPLOYEES - A KEY REQUIREMENT OF THE QUALITY OF EDUCATIONAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia V. Morze

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article it was analyzed one of the basic conditions of providing the quality of higher education according to the system of internal quality assurance standards ESG (European quality assurance standards and guidelines to increase the ICT competence of scientific-pedagogical staff of the University. It was described the modular system of training for scientific and pedagogical staff of the Borys Grinchenko Kyiv University. Special attention is paid to the description of the system of raising the level of formation the ICT competence as one of the key competences of the modern teacher. The system of professional development, which is based on creating mixed studying and technology of "flipped classroom", formative assessment, innovative educational and ICT technologies according to the specially designed informative module "Informational and communication technologies", which allows scientific-pedagogical staff to use modern ICT and educational technologies effectively for their further applying in the provision of educational services and the development of quality of open educational content and open educational e-environment available to the student at any convenient time, which will significantly improve the quality of the educational process.

  10. Building technology and information competences among university students through an academic contest and social networking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Eugenia Ruiz-Molina

    2013-08-01

    effectively make students aware of the existence of the informational video about technology and information competences and to watch it with full attention.

  11. Analysis of dermatology resident self-reported successful learning styles and implications for core competency curriculum development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratman, Erik J; Vogel, Curt A; Reck, Samuel J; Mukesh, Bickol N

    2008-01-01

    There are different teaching styles for delivering competency-based curricula. The education literature suggests that learning is maximized when teaching is delivered in a style preferred by learners. To determine if dermatology residents report learning style preferences aligned with adult learning. Dermatology residents attending an introductory cutaneous biology course completed a learning styles inventory assessing self-reported success in 35 active and passive learning activities. The 35 learning activities were ranked in order of preference by learners. Mean overall ratings for active learning activities were significantly higher than for passive learning activities (P = 0.002). Trends in dermatology resident learning style preferences should be considered during program curriculum development. Programs should integrate a variety of curriculum delivery methods to accommodate various learning styles, with an emphasis on the active learning styles preferred by residents.

  12. Survey of core medical trainees in the United Kingdom 2013 - inconsistencies in training experience and competing with service demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Fiona; Newbery, Nina; Burr, Bill; Goddard, Andrew F

    2014-04-01

    There is currently considerable concern about the attractiveness of hospital medicine as a career and experiences in core medical training (CMT) are a key determinant of whether trainees continue in the medical specialties. Little is understood about the quality and impact of the current CMT programme and this survey was designed to assess this. Three key themes emerged. Firstly, the demands of providing service have led to considerable loss of training opportunities, particularly in outpatients and formal teaching sessions. Trainees spend a lot of this service time doing menial tasks and over 90% report that service takes up 80-100% of their time. Secondly, clinical and educational supervision is variable, with trainees sometimes getting little consultant feedback on their clinical performance. Finally, 44% of trainees report that CMT has not prepared them to be a medical registrar and many trainees are put off acute medical specialties by their experiences in CMT.

  13. EVALUATION OF THE HTA CORE MODEL FOR NATIONAL HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT REPORTS: COMPARATIVE STUDY AND EXPERIENCES FROM EUROPEAN COUNTRIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kõrge, Kristina; Berndt, Nadine; Hohmann, Juergen; Romano, Florence; Hiligsmann, Mickael

    2017-01-01

    The health technology assessment (HTA) Core Model® is a tool for defining and standardizing the elements of HTA analyses within several domains for producing structured reports. This study explored the parallels between the Core Model and a national HTA report. Experiences from various European HTA agencies were also investigated to determine the Core Model's adaptability to national reports. A comparison between a national report on Genetic Counseling, produced by the Cellule d'expertise médicale Luxembourg, and the Core Model was performed to identify parallels in terms of relevant and comparable assessment elements (AEs). Semi-structured interviews with five representatives from European HTA agencies were performed to assess their user experiences with the Core Model. The comparative study revealed that 50 percent of the total number (n = 144) of AEs in the Core Model were relevant for the national report. Of these 144 AEs from the Core Model, 34 (24 percent) were covered in the national report. Some AEs were covered only partly. The interviewees emphasized flexibility in using the Core Model and stated that the most important aspects to be evaluated include characteristics of the disease and technology, clinical effectiveness, economic aspects, and safety. In the present study, the national report covered an acceptable number of AEs of the Core Model. These results need to be interpreted with caution because only one comparison was performed. The Core Model can be used in a flexible manner, applying only those elements that are relevant from the perspective of the technology assessment and specific country context.

  14. Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D. [eds.

    1995-12-01

    To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program.

  15. Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D.

    1995-12-01

    To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program

  16. Technology Assisted Language Learning is a silver bullet for enhancing Language competence and performance: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameel Ahmad

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Technology Assisted Language Learning (TALL is an infallible means to develop profound knowledge and wide range of language skills. It instills in EFL learners an illimitable passion for task-based and skills oriented learning rather than rote memorization. New technological gadgets have commoditized a broad-based learning and teaching avenues and brought the whole learning process to life. A vast variety of authentic online- learning resources, motivational visual prompts, exciting videos, web-based interactivity and customizable language software, email, discussion forums, Skype, Twitter, apps, Internet mobiles, Facebook and YouTube have become obtrusive tools to enhance competence and performance in EFL teaching and learning realms. Technology can also provide various types of scaffolding for students learning to read. Nevertheless, instructors can also enhance their pedagogical effectiveness. However, the main focus of interest in this study is to ascertain to what extent the modern technological devices augment learners’ competence and performance specifically in vocabulary learning, grammatical accuracy and listening/ speaking skills. The remarkable scores of empirical surveys conducted in the present study reveal that TALL does assist learners to improve listening / speaking skills, pronunciation, extensive vocabulary and grammatical accuracy. The findings also manifest that the hybridity, instantaneity and super-diversity of digital learning lay far-reaching impact on learners' motivation for learning and incredibly maneuver learners to immerse in the whole learning process.

  17. Implementing the South African additive manufacturing technology roadmap - the role of an additive manufacturing centre of competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Preez, Willie Bouwer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Rapid Product Development Association of South Africa (RAPDASA expressed the need for a national Additive Manufacturing Roadmap. Consequentially, the South African Department of Science and Technology commissioned the development of a South African Additive Manufacturing Technology Roadmap. This was intended to guide role-players in identifying business opportunities, addressing technology gaps, focusing development programmes, and informing investment decisions that would enable local companies and industry sectors to become global leaders in selected areas of additive manufacturing. The challenge remains now for South Africa to decide on an implementation approach that will maximize the impact in the shortest possible time. This article introduces the concept of a national Additive Manufacturing Centre of Competence (AMCoC as a primary implementation vehicle for the roadmap. The support of the current leading players in additive manufacturing in South Africa for such a centre of competence is shared and their key roles are indicated. A summary of the investments that the leading players have already made in the focus areas of the AMCoC over the past two decades is given as confirmation of their commitment towards the advancement of the additive manufacturing technology. An exposition is given of how the AMCoC could indeed become the primary initiative for achieving the agreed national goals on additive manufacturing. The conclusion is that investment by public and private institutions in an AMCoC would be the next step towards ensuring South Africa’s continued progress in the field.

  18. Engineering and technology talent for innovation and knowledge-based economies competencies, leadership, and a roadmap for implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Abdulwahed, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces and analyzes the models for engineering leadership and competency skills, as well as frameworks for industry-academia collaboration and is appropriate for students, researchers, and professionals interested in continuous professional development. The authors look at the organizational structures of engineering education in knowledge-based economies and examine the role of innovation and how it is encouraged in schools. It also provides a methodological framework and toolkit for investigating the needs of engineering and technology skills in national contexts. A detailed empirical case study is included that examines the leadership competencies that are needed in knowledge-based economies and how one university encourages these in their program. The book concludes with conceptual modeling and proposals of specific organizational structures for implementation in engineering schools, in order to enable the development of necessary skills for future engineering graduates.

  19. A national survey of program director opinions of core competencies and structure of hand surgery fellowship training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Erika Davis; Larson, Bradley P; Chung, Kevin C

    2012-10-01

    We assessed hand surgery program directors' opinions of essential components of hand surgery training and potential changes in the structure of hand surgery programs. We recruited all 74 program directors of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited hand surgery fellowship programs to participate. We designed a web-based survey to assess program directors' support for changes in the structure of training programs and to assess opinions of components that are essential for graduates to be proficient. Respondents were asked to rate 9 general areas of practice, 97 knowledge topics, and 172 procedures. Each component was considered essential if 50% or more of respondents thought that graduates must be fully knowledgeable of the topic and be able to perform the procedure at the end of training. The response rate was 84% (n = 62). A minority of program directors (n = 15; 24%) supported creation of additional pathways for hand surgery training, and nearly three-quarters (n = 46; 74%) preferred a fellowship model to an integrated residency model. Most program directors (n = 40; 65%) thought that a 1-year fellowship was sufficient to train a competent hand surgeon. Wrist, distal radius/ulna, forearm, and peripheral nerve conditions were rated as essential areas of practice. Of the detailed components, 76 of 97 knowledge topics and 98 of 172 procedures were rated as essential. Only 48% respondents (n = 30) rated microsurgery as it relates to free tissue transfer as essential. However, small and large vessel laceration repairs were rated as essential by 92% (n = 57) and 77% (n = 48) of respondents, respectively. This study found resistance to prolonging the length of fellowship training and introduction of an integrated residency pathway. To train all hand surgeons in essential components of hand surgery, programs must individually evaluate exposure provided and find innovative ways to augment training when necessary. Studies of curriculum content in hand

  20. Surgery and Medicine Residents' Perspectives of Morbidity and Mortality Conference: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Improve ACGME Core Competency Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn-O'Brien, Katherine T; Mandell, Samuel P; Eaton, Erik Van; Schleyer, Anneliese M; McIntyre, Lisa K

    2015-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality conferences (MMCs) are often used to fulfill the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education practice-based learning and improvement (PBLI) competency, but there is variation among institutions and disciplines in their approach to MMCs. The objective of this study is to examine the trainees' perspective and experience with MMCs and adverse patient event (APE) reporting across disciplines to help guide the future implementation of an institution-wide, workflow-embedded, quality improvement (QI) program for PBLI. Between April 1, 2013, and May 8, 2013, surgical and medical residents were given a confidential survey about APE reporting practices and experience with and attitudes toward MMCs and other QI/patient safety initiatives. Descriptive statistics and univariate analyses using the chi-square test for independence were calculated for all variables. Logistic regression and ordered logistic regression were used for nominal and ordinal categorical dependent variables, respectively, to calculate odds of reporting APEs. Qualitative content analysis was used to code free-text responses. A large, multihospital, tertiary academic training program in the Pacific Northwest. Residents in all years of training from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited programs in surgery and internal medicine. Survey response rate was 46.2% (126/273). Although most respondents agreed or strongly agreed that knowledge of and involvement in QI/patient safety activities was important to their training (88.1%) and future career (91.3%), only 10.3% regularly or frequently reported APEs to the institution's established electronic incident reporting system. Senior-level residents in both surgery and medicine were more likely to report APEs than more junior-level residents were (odds ratio = 4.8, 95% CI: 3.1-7.5). Surgery residents had a 4.9 (95% CI: 2.3-10.5) times higher odds than medicine residents had to have reported an APE to

  1. TECHNOLOGY FOR INSTALLATION OF REINFORCED CONCRETE FLOOR SLABS LIGHTENED BY CORE DRIVERS WITH PRELIMINARY REINFORCEMENT STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Leonovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents technology for installation of floor slabs lightened by plastic core drivers which are preliminary stressed under construction conditions.  Efficiency of such constructive solution is justified by the action of preliminary concrete compression in the tensile zone while reducing structure dead weight due to void arrangement.  The paper provides classification of systems for preliminary stress and contains recommendations on selection of the system depending on peculiariar features of the designed construction.  Main products and materials required for execution of works , requirements to stressed wire rope reinforcement, its main characteristics have been considered in the paper.Principal diagram of the lightened preliminary stressed slab stipulates arrangement of so called  dummy caisson. Strands of reinforcement ropes are located within the framework of bars passing over supporting structures (over vertical bearing structures of  the framework and voids are formed in the cells between bars by laying hollow plastic items joined together by a cage. The paper presents technological sequence of operations required for arrangement of the lightened preliminary stressed slab, schemes for equipment arrangement and characteristics of the applied devices and units (pushing device for reinforcement ropes, hydraulic jack with delivery hydraulic pump, mixing station, injection pump and others.  Recommendations have been given for execution of works in cold weather. The paper considers problems pertaining to control quality of the materials and items which are supplied to a construction site and directly execution of works on preliminary stress of a cellular slab.The executed analysis of technology permits to conclude that it is characterized by high level of applicability for import substitution. It is necessary to consider the possibility to apply the technology at objects of various application while comparing it with other

  2. Master's Degree and Post-Master's Certificate Preparation for the Academic Nurse Educator Role: The Use of the National League for Nursing Core Competencies of Nurse Educators as a Curriculum Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ann

    2017-01-01

    This study described the education courses in Master's Degree and Post-master's Certificate in nursing education programs and determined the extent to which the eight core competencies, used to certify nurse educator's, were included. The data regarding the required credit hours, practicum hours, distance accessibility, and preparation for the…

  3. Assuring Graduate Competency: A Technology Acceptance Model for Course Guide Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, Amara; Richards, Deborah; Busch, Peter; Bilgin, Ayse

    2015-01-01

    Higher education institutions typically express the quality of their degree programs by describing the qualities, skills, and understanding their students possess upon graduation. One promising instructional design approach to facilitate institutions' efforts to deliver graduates with the appropriate knowledge and competencies is curriculum…

  4. Therapist Adherence and Competence with Manualized Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PTSD Delivered via Videoconferencing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, B. Christopher; Monnier, Jeannine; Grubaugh, Anouk L.; Elhai, Jon D.; Yim, Eunsil; Knapp, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Using secondary analyses from a randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder, we compared ratings of therapist competency and adherence between two service delivery modes: telepsychiatry (TP) and same room (SR). Patients were 38 male treatment-seeking veterans recruited…

  5. Head-camera video recordings of trauma core competency procedures can evaluate surgical resident's technical performance as well as colocated evaluators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Pasley, Jason; Garofalo, Evan; Shackelford, Stacy; Chen, Hegang; Longinaker, Nyaradzo; Granite, Guinevere; Pugh, Kristy; Hagegeorge, George; Tisherman, Samuel A

    2017-07-01

    Unbiased evaluation of trauma core competency procedures is necessary to determine if residency and predeployment training courses are useful. We tested whether a previously validated individual procedure score (IPS) for individual procedure vascular exposure and fasciotomy (FAS) performance skills could discriminate training status by comparing IPS of evaluators colocated with surgeons to blind video evaluations. Performance of axillary artery (AA), brachial artery (BA), and femoral artery (FA) vascular exposures and lower extremity FAS on fresh cadavers by 40 PGY-2 to PGY-6 residents was video-recorded from head-mounted cameras. Two colocated trained evaluators assessed IPS before and after training. One surgeon in each pretraining tertile of IPS for each procedure was randomly identified for blind video review. The same 12 surgeons were video-recorded repeating the procedures less than 4 weeks after training. Five evaluators independently reviewed all 96 randomly arranged deidentified videos. Inter-rater reliability/consistency, intraclass correlation coefficients were compared by colocated versus video review of IPS, and errors. Study methodology and bias were judged by Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument and the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies criteria. There were no differences (p ≥ 0.5) in IPS for AA, FA, FAS, whether evaluators were colocated or reviewed video recordings. Evaluator consistency was 0.29 (BA) - 0.77 (FA). Video and colocated evaluators were in total agreement (p = 1.0) for error recognition. Intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.73 to 0.92, dependent on procedure. Correlations video versus colocated evaluations were 0.5 to 0.9. Except for BA, blinded video evaluators discriminated (p competency. Prognostic study, level II.

  6. EDUCATIONAL POTENTIAL OF THE “SOCIAL ACCELERATOR” TECHNOLOGY: DEVELOPING SOCIAL – ENTREPRENEURIAL COMPETENCE OF STUDENTS AT CLASSICAL UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Syryamkina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Modern trends in the development of education and society as a whole not only strengthen the role of modern universities in transformation of the social sphere, but also require a new approach to developing skills and over-professional competencies of university students, especially students of social and humanitarian specialties, who will live in conditions of a new technological paradigm. In this connection, classical universities have a special role because social and cultural development of society is their original mission. Therefore, development of social and entrepreneurial competence of students is an urgent educational task of modern classical universities. Education of social entrepreneurs is one of the relevant educational tasks which solution enables to provide additional resources for growth of welfare of fellow citizens. The work of social entrepreneurs is directed to the creative solution of social problems of the region, the help to its residents and positive changes in local society.The aim of the article is to demonstrate the experience of approbation of the educational technology for developing social and entrepreneurial competence of students in a classical university.Methodology and research methods. The methodological basis of the work is based on system-activity and competence approaches. The authors have used such methods as analysis of scientific literature; analysis of documents; desktop research; interviewing and questioning of participants in the educational process; educational experiment; reflection and generalisation of practical experience of implementing a program of accelerating business projects in a classical university (case study.Results and scientific novelty. The new approach to the development of social and entrepreneurial competence of students is proposed by the authors; that approach is based on the introduction of “Social Accelerator” technology into educational practice of higher

  7. Testing of Technology Acceptance Model on Core Banking System: A Perspective on Mandatory Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burhan Suryo Ambodo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the acceptance of Core Banking System (CBS which is mandatory use software. The objects of this research are teller, customer service, and back office Branch of Bank BPD DIY Wonosari. Data were measured using Likert scale in five range value. A number of 49 data were analyzed using Partial Least Square (PLS. The results showed that ease of use had no positive effect on symbolic adoption; attitudes toward usage and perceived conformance has a positive effect on symbolic adoption, ease of use and perceived compatibility has no effect on attitudes towards usage. Usability, satisfaction and compatibility that are felt to positively affect attitude toward usage. In the information technology model that is mandatory use, it is important to note the symbolic adoption of information technology therefore the performance of the user (employee/employee can remain good. In particular for banking institutions that using CBS, it is important to improve the use of CBS, user satisfaction and CBS conformity with business processes, given the current banking business processes that are constantly expanding, there is no possibility of adjusting CBS to business processes at later.

  8. Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells: Five Core Technologies for Their Commercialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongkyu; Kim, Geunjin; Kim, Junghwan; Kwon, Sooncheol; Kim, Heejoo; Lee, Kwanghee

    2016-09-01

    The past two decades of vigorous interdisciplinary approaches has seen tremendous breakthroughs in both scientific and technological developments of bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells (OSCs) based on nanocomposites of π-conjugated organic semiconductors. Because of their unique functionalities, the OSC field is expected to enable innovative photovoltaic applications that can be difficult to achieve using traditional inorganic solar cells: OSCs are printable, portable, wearable, disposable, biocompatible, and attachable to curved surfaces. The ultimate objective of this field is to develop cost-effective, stable, and high-performance photovoltaic modules fabricated on large-area flexible plastic substrates via high-volume/throughput roll-to-roll printing processing and thus achieve the practical implementation of OSCs. Recently, intensive research efforts into the development of organic materials, processing techniques, interface engineering, and device architectures have led to a remarkable improvement in power conversion efficiencies, exceeding 11%, which has finally brought OSCs close to commercialization. Current research interests are expanding from academic to industrial viewpoints to improve device stability and compatibility with large-scale printing processes, which must be addressed to realize viable applications. Here, both academic and industrial issues are reviewed by highlighting historically monumental research results and recent state-of-the-art progress in OSCs. Moreover, perspectives on five core technologies that affect the realization of the practical use of OSCs are presented, including device efficiency, device stability, flexible and transparent electrodes, module designs, and printing techniques. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The use of software agents and distributed objects to integrate enterprises: Compatible or competing technologies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pancerella, C.M.

    1998-04-01

    Distributed object and software agent technologies are two integration methods for connecting enterprises. The two technologies have overlapping goals--interoperability and architectural support for integrating software components--though to date little or no integration of the two technologies has been made at the enterprise level. The primary difference between these two technologies is that distributed object technologies focus on the problems inherent in connecting distributed heterogeneous systems whereas software agent technologies focus on the problems involved with coordination and knowledge exchange across domain boundaries. This paper addresses the integration of these technologies in support of enterprise integration across organizational and geographic boundaries. The authors discuss enterprise integration issues, review their experiences with both technologies, and make recommendations for future work. Neither technology is a panacea. Good software engineering techniques must be applied to integrate an enterprise because scalability and a distributed software development team are realities.

  10. Cognitive competencies - Products of genes, experience, and technology. [for training of primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Duane M.; Savage-Rumbaugh, E. S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper examines methods used in studying cognitive competency in primates. Citing experiments on teaching language skills to chimpanzees, it is shown that some methods used for inquiry might lead to the cultivation and generation of new competencies, and specifically to the development of observational and relational learning skills. It is noted that methods can also limit the generality of conclusions; erroneous conclusions may be made based on certain generally accepted methods, whereby the research might be treatments that profoundly determine the assessment of dependent variables. Particular attention is given to the role of age in learning, showing that young primates can be taught the meaning of lexigrams and many specific tasks in much shorter time than adults; on the basis of these experiments, it was concluded that cultural gains did evolve primarily as a consequence of context within which infants were growing.

  11. Competence is Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bramming, Pia

    2004-01-01

    The article will address competence, its' diffusion, application, and the consequence of this application within the field of Human Resource Management (HRM). The concept competence-in-practice will be presented and in conclusion the article will consider implications and possibilities...... of competence-in-practice as an alternative approach to Competence Development within Human Resource Management....

  12. Getting It Right the First Time: Defining Regionally Relevant Training Curricula and Provider Core Competencies for Point-of-Care Ultrasound Education on the African Continent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Margaret; Landes, Megan; Hunchak, Cheryl; Paluku, Justin; Malemo Kalisya, Luc; Salmon, Christian; Muller, Mundenga Mutendi; Wachira, Benjamin; Mangan, James; Chhaganlal, Kajal; Kalanzi, Joseph; Azazh, Aklilu; Berman, Sara; Zied, El-Sayed; Lamprecht, Hein

    2017-02-01

    Significant evidence identifies point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) as an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool in resource-limited settings. Despite this evidence, local health care providers on the African continent continue to have limited access to and use of ultrasound, even in potentially high-impact fields such as obstetrics and trauma. Dedicated postgraduate emergency medicine residency training programs now exist in 8 countries, yet no current consensus exists in regard to core PoCUS competencies. The current practice of transferring resource-rich PoCUS curricula and delivery methods to resource-limited health systems fails to acknowledge the unique challenges, needs, and disease burdens of recipient systems. As emergency medicine leaders from 8 African countries, we introduce a practical algorithmic approach, based on the local epidemiology and resource constraints, to curriculum development and implementation. We describe an organizational structure composed of nexus learning centers for PoCUS learners and champions on the continent to keep credentialing rigorous and standardized. Finally, we put forth 5 key strategic considerations: to link training programs to hospital systems, to prioritize longitudinal learning models, to share resources to promote health equity, to maximize access, and to develop a regional consensus on training standards and credentialing. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification and Assessment of Professional Competencies for Implementation of Nanotechnology in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Ming-Der; Jiang, Ji-Bin; Chien, Jia-Yi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct the indicators of professional competencies of the nanotechnology-based sputtering system industry based on industry requirements and analyse the core competencies of the industry for promoting the human resource of physical vapour deposition technology. The document analysis, expert interview, and Delphi…

  14. Digital Competence--An Emergent Boundary Concept for Policy and Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilomäki, Liisa; Paavola, Sami; Lakkala, Minna; Kantosalo, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Digital competence is an evolving concept related to the development of digital technology and the political aims and expectations of citizenship in a knowledge society. It is regarded as a core competence in policy papers; in educational research it is not yet a standardized concept. We suggest that it is a useful boundary concept, which can be…

  15. Use of internet technologies for students' communicative competence development in the process of professional foreign language study in technical universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanova, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    Problems of mature thinking formation and development of foreign-language professional communicative competence of competitive graduates of technical universities are considered in the article. The most important factors influencing the achievement of high standard of knowledge, students' abilities and skills and increase of their abilities to establish deep meta-subject connections due to Internet technologies in the course of professional foreign language training are analyzed. The article is written on the basis of project material "Network School of National Research Nuclear University MEPhI" aimed at optimization of technological aspect of training. The given academic on-line program assigns to the teacher a part of an organizer who only coordinates creative, academic students' activity.

  16. Particular Results of a Research Aimed at Curricula Design of Teacher Training in the Area of Didactic Technological Competences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Záhorec

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents particular results of the first phase of a research aimed at improving pre-graduate teacher training in the area of didactic technological competences. The main goal of the prepared research is to modernize and optimize relevant parts of study programs of teacher trainees at Slovak higher education institutions (inclusion and structure the relevant subjects in the study programs, their content and time assignment. The results are related to a questionnaire survey of the current state and perspectives of the continuing professional development of primary and secondary school teachers contributing to their didactic technological competences improvement and development. Main attention is paid to an analysis of the selected questionnaire items in which the respondents assessed significance of the use of various interactive educational activities and digital means in teaching process to inrease efficiency of selected specific aspects of education. The presented analysis is based on the segmentation of the respondents on the factor of the category and sub-category of the teaching staff the respondents belong to.

  17. Learning transfer of geospatial technologies in secondary science and mathematics core areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Curtis P.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the transfer of geospatial technology knowledge and skill presented in a social sciences course context to other core areas of the curriculum. Specifically, this study explored the transfer of geospatial technology knowledge and skill to the STEM-related core areas of science and mathematics among ninth-grade students. Haskell's (2001) research on "levels of transfer" provided the theoretical framework for this study, which sought to demonstrate the experimental group's higher ability to transfer geospatial skills, higher mean assignment scores, higher post-test scores, higher geospatial skill application and deeper levels of transfer application than the control group. The participants of the study consisted of thirty ninth-graders enrolled in U.S. History, Earth Science and Integrated Mathematics 1 courses. The primary investigator of this study had no previous classroom experiences with this group of students. The participants who were enrolled in the school's existing two-section class configuration were assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group had ready access to Macintosh MacBook laptop computers, and the control group had ready access to Macintosh iPads. All participants in U.S. History received instruction with and were required to use ArcGIS Explorer Online during a Westward Expansion project. All participants were given the ArcGIS Explorer Online content assessment following the completion of the U.S. History project. Once the project in U.S. History was completed, Earth Science and Integrated Mathematics 1 began units of instruction beginning with a multiple-choice content pre-test created by the classroom teachers. Experimental participants received the same unit of instruction without the use or influence of ArcGIS Explorer Online. At the end of the Earth Science and Integrated Math 1 units, the same multiple-choice test was administered as the content post-test. Following the

  18. Impact of information technology on vendor objectives, capabilities, and competences in contract electronic manufacturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perunovic, Zoran; Mefford, Robert; Christoffersen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    IT impacts vendor capabilities. The research framework integrates four concepts/theories: the resource-based view (RBV), the concept of manufacturing strategy, the concept of business performance, and the concept of IT impact on business performance. Two case companies are studied, one with a high level...... proposed. The method gives valuable insights into how IT enables competences, enhances capabilities, and contributes to the fulfillment of vendor objectives. A model of how IT affects a vendor's competitiveness is proposed. In addition, two initiatives for optimizing the utilization of IT are suggested....

  19. Prosumers and smart grid technologies in Denmark: developing user competences in smart grid households

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Meiken; Hauge, Bettina

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores and describes resident’s experiences from a smart grid project that involved 20 households in a rural area in Denmark and ran from 2014 to 2015. The study is based on qualitative data from the participating households, collected 6, 12 and 18 months after the start...... of the intervention. Drawing on theories of social practice and the three intertwined elements of a practice: competences, images and materials, the paper contributes with an in-depth analysis of a complex intervention, focusing on how the participants changed energy practices as a result of the installed smart grid...

  20. Competence and lastingness in specialized clinical laboratories: technical report about requirements concerning quality of users competence and used processes in immunochemical diagnostic procedures using isotopic and non-isotopic tracer technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegel, B.

    2005-01-01

    From the citizens view this technical report about immunochemical diagnostic procedures using radioactive and nonradioactive tracer technologies describes the requirements in special laboratory diagnostics concerning competency and process control. Governmental or administrational obligations of inspecting both skill and sites to guarantee patients security are pointed out. (orig.)

  1. Competing recombinant technologies for environmental innovation: extending Arthur’s model of lock-in

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeppini, P.; van den Bergh, J.C.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a model of sequential decisions about investments in environmentally dirty and clean technologies, which extends the path-dependence framework of Arthur (1989). This allows us to evaluate if and how an economy locked into a dirty technology can be unlocked and move towards the

  2. Senior Students' Experiences, Perspectives, and Attitudes of Technological Competencies in Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Patricia C.

    2017-01-01

    Technological standards appear to be needed in undergraduate nursing education, as existing research has yet to establish technological standards for undergraduate nursing students. The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the lived experiences of senior nursing students with respect to their perceptions regarding exposure to and…

  3. Integrative platform based on the mechatronics model for educational technologies focused on competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaşin, I.; Greta, S.; Dache, L.; Mătieş, V.

    2016-08-01

    Mechatronics is a model of transdisciplinary integration, entirely functional, with remarkable results for mankind. The incredible progress that the global economy has taken in the last decades is based on this new approach, the integrative type, which is present at the foundation of mechatronics. This kind of integrative approach is necessary for building a quality education focused on competence. The requirements from the social and economic environment, the needs of the young people who prepare themselves for an active life and the offers of the education providers are still not too interconnected to offer a satisfying education. This is the reason why the efforts to balance the demand, the needs and the offer are essential to ensure a better integration of students into society. Using a transcultural perspective, we can achieve a constructive approach. The education providers, together with the socio-economic environment, establish a clear structure of competence in multiple domains and of the instruments which can assure it. The scientific demarche, in the spirit of this paper approach the, answers the natural questions from the educational process: „Why, How and What do I learn?”.

  4. Conductive core of radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing, especially for nuclear technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zajic, V

    1981-09-01

    A radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing was developed featuring a conductive core consisting of a hollow moulding. At the point of attachment to the bushing insulator the core moulding is widened, thus forming a ring support of a diameter larger by at least 10% than the diameter of the conductive core cylindrical section. On the outer side of the pressure body the core cavity is narrowed and tightly closed with the conductor. On the side facing the medium of higher pressure, the conductive core is provided with a thread. Core manufacture and connection of the conductor to the bushing is very simple. The bushing can be used for an environment with pressures exceeding 10 MPa.

  5. Conductive core of radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing, especially for nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajic, V.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation-resistant high-pressure electric bushing was developed featuring a conductive core consisting of a hollow moulding. At the point of attachment to the bushing insulator the core moulding is widened, thus forming a ring support of a diameter larger by at least 10% than the diameter of the conductive core cylindrical section. On the outer side of the pressure body the core cavity is narrowed and tightly closed with the conductor. On the side facing the medium of higher pressure, the conductive core is provided with a thread. Core manufacture and connection of the conductor to the bushing is very simple. The bushing can be used for an environment with pressures exceeding 10 MPa. (J.B.)

  6. Future impact of new technologies: Three scenarios, their competence gab and research implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne; Sonne, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    2004-01-01

    What will the impact of science in the food industry be 10 years from now? Large or overwhelming most people will probably agree. But of we want to be more specific, we might start by defining, what type of technology we have in mind and secondly, what kind of impact we are talking about. Since......, who represents both "technology push" and "market pull", which we feel are both very important basic driving forces. The aim is to get an idea of the very different roles acience or technology can play in the near future for a specific industry, in this case the Danish food industry, and present...

  7. SIMULATIONS IN TECHNOLOGICAL ENVIRONMENTS AS A TOOL FOR TRAINING IN TRANSVERSAL COMPETENCES FOR UNIVERSITY STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercè Gisbert Cervera

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of a reflection on how the technological environments can play a key role in the current Higher Education scene. This reflection observes the structural configuration and the key agents of the educational process. The content is developed firstly locating the student in the University of the 21st century; the methodological renovation is analyzed from two perspectives: the development of the technologies and the new role of teacher and student in this new scene; finally the simulations in technological environments are proposed as a valuable strategy to give response to the formative needs of the student in the current society.

  8. Future impact of new technologies: Three scenarios, their competence gaps and research implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne; Sonne, Anne-Mette; Jensen, Birger Boutrup

    the 'technology push' and 'market pull representatives', whom we feel are both very important basic driving forces. The aim is to get an idea of the very different roles science or technology can take in the near future for a specific industry, in this case the Danish food industry and present a methodological......What will the impact of science be ten years from now in the food industry? Large or overwhelming most people will probably agree. But before we can be any more specific, we need to address the questions of what type or aspect of science or technology we have in mind and secondly, what kind...... in the future. Our approach is to construct a number of likely pictures of the future and then look at the role and impact of technology and science in each of the pictures. We do this by using an industry level scenario technique, in which we rely heavily on expert and industry inputs representing both...

  9. Attracting the Best. How the Military Competes for Information Technology Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hosek, James R; Mattock, Michael G; Fair, C. C; Kavanagh, Jennifer; Sharp, Jennifer; Totten, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The late-1990s peak in demand for information technology (IT) workers led private firms to respond by offering higher pay, enhanced on-the-job training opportunities, flexible work hours, and support for career development...

  10. Currency and Competence of Occupational Therapists and Consumers with Rapidly Changing Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Steel, Emily J.; Buchanan, Ricky; Layton, Natasha; Wilson, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Assistive technology was once a specialised field of practice, involving products designed for populations with specific impairments or functional goals. In Australia, occupational therapists have, at times, functioned as gatekeepers to public funding, prescribing products from a predefined list. An expanding range of accessible mainstream products available via international and online markets has changed the meaning and application of assistive technology for many people with disability. In...

  11. Surgical training, duty-hour restrictions, and implications for meeting the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies: views of surgical interns compared with program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiel, Ryan M; Van Arendonk, Kyle J; Reed, Darcy A; Terhune, Kyla P; Tarpley, John L; Porterfield, John R; Hall, Daniel E; Joyce, David L; Wightman, Sean C; Horvath, Karen D; Heller, Stephanie F; Farley, David R

    2012-06-01

    To describe the perspectives of surgical interns regarding the implications of the new Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) duty-hour regulations for their training. We compared responses of interns and surgery program directors on a survey about the proposed ACGME mandates. Eleven general surgery residency programs. Two hundred fifteen interns who were administered the survey during the summer of 2011 and a previously surveyed national sample of 134 surgery program directors. Perceptions of the implications of the new duty-hour restrictions on various aspects of surgical training, including the 6 ACGME core competencies of graduate medical education, measured using 3-point scales (increase, no change, or decrease). Of 215 eligible surgical interns, 179 (83.3%) completed the survey. Most interns believed that the new duty-hour regulations will decrease continuity with patients (80.3%), time spent operating (67.4%), and coordination of patient care (57.6%), while approximately half believed that the changes will decrease their acquisition of medical knowledge (48.0%), development of surgical skills (52.8%), and overall educational experience (51.1%). Most believed that the changes will improve or will not alter other aspects of training, and 61.5% believed that the new standards will decrease resident fatigue. Surgical interns were significantly less pessimistic than surgery program directors regarding the implications of the new duty-hour restrictions on all aspects of surgical training (P training under the new paradigm of duty-hour restrictions have significant concerns about the effect of these regulations on the quality of their training.

  12. Impact of an Event Reporting System on Resident Complication Reporting in Plastic Surgery Training: Addressing an ACGME and Plastic Surgery Milestone Project Core Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Rajiv P; Snyder-Warwick, Alison; Naidoo, Sybill; Skolnick, Gary B; Patel, Kamlesh B

    2017-11-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and Plastic Surgery Milestone Project has identified practice-based learning and improvement, which involves systematically analyzing current practices and implementing changes, as a core competency in residency education. In surgical care, complication reporting is an essential component of practice-based learning and improvement as complications are analyzed in morbidity and mortality conference for quality improvement. Unfortunately, current methods for capturing a comprehensive profile of complications may significantly underestimate the true occurrence of complications. Therefore, the objectives of this study are to evaluate an intervention for complication reporting and compare this to current practice, in a plastic surgery training program. This is a preintervention and postintervention study evaluating resident reporting of complications on a plastic surgery service. The intervention was an online event reporting system developed by department leadership and patient safety experts. The cohorts consisted of all patients undergoing surgery during two separate 3-month blocks bridged by an implementation period. A trained reviewer recorded complications, and this served as the reference standard. Fisher's exact test was used for binary comparisons. There were 32 complications detected in 219 patients from June to August of 2015 and 35 complications in 202 patients from October to December of 2015. The proportion of complications reported in the preintervention group was nine of 32 (28.1 percent). After the intervention, this significantly increased to 32 of 35 (91.4 percent) (p < 0.001). An intervention using an event reporting system, supported by departmental leadership, led to significant improvements in complication reporting by plastic surgery residents.

  13. A Technology Integration Education (TIE) Model: Millennial Preservice Teachers' Motivations about Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Denise D.; Piper, Randy T.

    2014-01-01

    Nobel laureates Schultz (1971) and Becker (1964, 1993) reinvigorated the analysis of education investments. Human capital investments that improve cognitive skills for elementary and secondary students have important economic implications. An interdisciplinary, 12-construct technology integration education (TIE) model was developed. The sample…

  14. Core discrete event simulation model for the evaluation of health care technologies in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vataire, Anne-Lise; Aballéa, Samuel; Antonanzas, Fernando; Roijen, Leona Hakkaart-van; Lam, Raymond W; McCrone, Paul; Persson, Ulf; Toumi, Mondher

    2014-03-01

    A review of existing economic models in major depressive disorder (MDD) highlighted the need for models with longer time horizons that also account for heterogeneity in treatment pathways between patients. A core discrete event simulation model was developed to estimate health and cost outcomes associated with alternative treatment strategies. This model simulated short- and long-term clinical events (partial response, remission, relapse, recovery, and recurrence), adverse events, and treatment changes (titration, switch, addition, and discontinuation) over up to 5 years. Several treatment pathways were defined on the basis of fictitious antidepressants with three levels of efficacy, tolerability, and price (low, medium, and high) from first line to third line. The model was populated with input data from the literature for the UK setting. Model outputs include time in different health states, quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), and costs from National Health Service and societal perspectives. The codes are open source. Predicted costs and QALYs from this model are within the range of results from previous economic evaluations. The largest cost components from the payer perspective were physician visits and hospitalizations. Key parameters driving the predicted costs and QALYs were utility values, effectiveness, and frequency of physician visits. Differences in QALYs and costs between two strategies with different effectiveness increased approximately twofold when the time horizon increased from 1 to 5 years. The discrete event simulation model can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of different therapeutic options in MDD, compared with existing Markov models, and can be used to compare a wide range of health care technologies in various groups of patients with MDD. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A study on the framework for selecting core R and D programmes in Energy Technology Roadmap by the DEA approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Kon; Mogi, Gento; Kim, Jong Wook

    2007-07-01

    South Korea is the 10th largest energy consumer in the world because of the poor country of natural resources such as petroleum, coal, and natural gas. It is essential to solve the energy difficulty of secure supply and demand of national energy. We established the energy technology roadmap to prepare for the next 10 years. We clustered 3 core technological sectors such as technology for high oil prices, the United nations framework for climate change, and the hydrogen economy. But we didn't prioritize the weights of energy technology development in energy technology roadmap. To allocate the finite resources efficiently, we cluster the preferred groups and non-preferred groups by the data envelopment analysis (DEA) approach. Through the scientific decision making approach, we can allocate R and D capacity, budget, and infrastructures efficiently to produce outstanding R and D outputs. (auth)

  16. Currency and Competence of Occupational Therapists and Consumers with Rapidly Changing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J. Steel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Assistive technology was once a specialised field of practice, involving products designed for populations with specific impairments or functional goals. In Australia, occupational therapists have, at times, functioned as gatekeepers to public funding, prescribing products from a predefined list. An expanding range of accessible mainstream products available via international and online markets has changed the meaning and application of assistive technology for many people with disability. In the policy context of consumer choice and cost-effectiveness, have occupational therapists been left behind? This paper describes the change in context for access to assistive technology resulting in expanded possibilities for participation and inclusion. A case study of environmental control systems is used to explore the overlap of mainstream and assistive products and the funding and services to support their uptake. The analysis describes a future policy and practice context in which assistive technology includes a spectrum of products decoupled from access to independent advice and support services. A broader scope of occupational therapy practice has potential to enhance the occupational rights of people with disability and the efficiency and effectiveness of assistive technology provision.

  17. Utilization of local area network technology and decentralized structure for nuclear reactor core temperature monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casella, M.; Peirano, F.

    1986-01-01

    The present system concerns Superphenix type reactors. It is a new version of system for monitoring the reactor core temperatures. It has been designed to minimize the cost and the wiring complexity because of the large number of channels (800). For this, equipments are arranged on the roof slab of the reactor with a single link to the control room; from which the name Integrated Treatment of Core Temperatures: TITC 1500 and the natural choice of a distributed system. This system monitors permanently the thermal state of the core a Superphenix type reactor. This monitoring system aims at detecting anomalies of core temperature rise, releasing automatic shutdown (safety), and providing to the monitoring systems not concerned safety the information concerning the core [fr

  18. Surgical competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nivritti G; Cheng, Stephen W K; Wong, John

    2003-08-01

    Recent high-profile cases have heightened the need for a formal structure to monitor achievement and maintenance of surgical competence. Logbooks, morbidity and mortality meetings, videos and direct observation of operations using a checklist, motion analysis devices, and virtual reality simulators are effective tools for teaching and evaluating surgical skills. As the operating theater is also a place for training, there must be protocols and guidelines, including mandatory standards for supervision, to ensure that patient care is not compromised. Patients appreciate frank communication and honesty from surgeons regarding their expertise and level of competence. To ensure that surgical competence is maintained and keeps pace with technologic advances, professional registration bodies have been promoting programs for recertification. They evaluate performance in practice, professional standing, and commitment to ongoing education.

  19. Preparing Accounting Graduates for Digital Revolution: A Critical Review of Information Technology Competencies and Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Gary; Seow, Poh-Sun

    2016-01-01

    The pervasiveness of information technology (IT) in businesses has altered the nature and economies of accounting activities. In particular, the emergence of cloud computing, eXtensible Business Reporting Language, and business analytics in recent years have transformed the way companies report financial performance and make business decisions. As…

  20. Employers' Perceptions of Information Technology Competency Requirements for Management Accounting Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spraakman, Gary; O'Grady, Winifred; Askarany, Davood; Akroyd, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Management accountants work in a computerized workplace with information technology (IT) for producing financial ledgers and for reporting. Thus, the role of the management accountant has shifted from capturing and recording transactions to analyzing business issues. The research question is: what IT knowledge and skills do employers require of…

  1. Correlational Study of Project Managers' Competence Experience, Education, and Technology Experience on Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosford, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    Organizations continue to rely on information technology (IT) as a foundational element, yet poor IT project success continues to impact growth and innovation. Research into IT project success is widespread yet has focused on high-level project management attributes, not specific IT solutions. A review of the research literature revealed that the…

  2. Competence and Usage of Web 2.0 Technologies by Higher Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Kamal Ahmed; Zai, Sajid Yousuf; Jafri, Iftikhar Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Literature on Web 2.0 experiences of higher education faculty in developing countries such as Pakistan is very limited. An insight on awareness and practices of higher education faculty with these tools can be helpful to map strategies and plan of action for adopting latest technologies to support teaching-learning processes in higher education of…

  3. Visualizing the Future: Technology Competency Development in Clinical Medicine, and Implications for Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Malathi; Keenan, Craig R.; Yager, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Objective: In this article, the authors ask three questions. First, what will physicians need to know in order to be effective in the future? Second, what role will technology play in achieving that high level of effectiveness? Third, what specific skill sets will physicians need to master in order to become effective? Method: Through three case…

  4. Strategies Information and Communication Technology Managers Use to Build Employee Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabogadi, Thulaganyo Arnold

    2017-01-01

    The World Economic Forum (WEF) found that Botswana's information and communication technology (ICT) networked readiness index (NRI) had declined from position 89 in 2012 to 104 in 2015. A decline in Botswana's ICT NRI resulted in a modest gross domestic product (GDP) growth increasing from 4.2% in 2012 to 5.0% in 2015. The purpose of this…

  5. Technology Confidence, Competence and Problem Solving Strategies: Differences within Online and Face-to-Face Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sharon L.; Palmer, Louann Bierlein

    2011-01-01

    This study identified the problem solving strategies used by students within a university course designed to teach pre-service teachers educational technology, and whether those strategies were influenced by the format of the course (i.e., face-to-face computer lab vs. online). It also examined to what extent the type of problem solving strategies…

  6. Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) Competencies of Preservice Teachers at a Small Rural University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Denise D.

    2014-01-01

    Some members of the Millennial generation entered postsecondary education at the end of the first decade of the 21st century. From 1980-2009, the importance of technology training for preservice teachers was increasingly recognized. During this same time period, administrators and educators of teacher education programs were urged to prepare…

  7. Preparing Teachers for Technology Integration: Programs, Competencies, and Factors from the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Kevin; Townsend, Latricia

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a review of recent literature about preparing teachers for technology integration. The review found six types of training programs are commonly implemented: pre-service training, long-term courses, short-term workshops and institutes, coaching/mentoring, learning communities, and product/assessment approaches. The review…

  8. Methods of Formation of Students Technological Competence in the Speciality "Garment Industry and Fashion Design"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zholdasbekova, S.; Karataev, G.; Yskak, A.; Zholdasbekov, A.; Nurzhanbaeva, J.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the major components of required technological skills (TS) for future designers taught during the academic process of a college. It considers the choices in terms of the various logical operations required by the fashion industry including fabric processing, assembly charts, performing work operations, etc. The article…

  9. How To Compete: The Impact Of Workplace Practices And Information Technology On Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra E. Black; Lisa M. Lynch

    2001-01-01

    Using data from a unique nationally representative sample of businesses, the Educational Quality of the Workforce National Employers Survey (EQW-NES), matched with the Bureau of the Census'' Longitudinal Research Database (LRD), we examine the impact of workplace practices, information technology and human capital investments on productivity. We estimate an augmented Cobb Douglas production function with both cross section and panel data covering the period of 1987 1993 using both within and ...

  10. Cobalt-60 Machines and Medical Linear Accelerators: Competing Technologies for External Beam Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, B J; van der Merwe, D; Christaki, K E; Meghzifene, A

    2017-02-01

    Medical linear accelerators (linacs) and cobalt-60 machines are both mature technologies for external beam radiotherapy. A comparison is made between these two technologies in terms of infrastructure and maintenance, dosimetry, shielding requirements, staffing, costs, security, patient throughput and clinical use. Infrastructure and maintenance are more demanding for linacs due to the complex electric componentry. In dosimetry, a higher beam energy, modulated dose rate and smaller focal spot size mean that it is easier to create an optimised treatment with a linac for conformal dose coverage of the tumour while sparing healthy organs at risk. In shielding, the requirements for a concrete bunker are similar for cobalt-60 machines and linacs but extra shielding and protection from neutrons are required for linacs. Staffing levels can be higher for linacs and more staff training is required for linacs. Life cycle costs are higher for linacs, especially multi-energy linacs. Security is more complex for cobalt-60 machines because of the high activity radioactive source. Patient throughput can be affected by source decay for cobalt-60 machines but poor maintenance and breakdowns can severely affect patient throughput for linacs. In clinical use, more complex treatment techniques are easier to achieve with linacs, and the availability of electron beams on high-energy linacs can be useful for certain treatments. In summary, there is no simple answer to the question of the choice of either cobalt-60 machines or linacs for radiotherapy in low- and middle-income countries. In fact a radiotherapy department with a combination of technologies, including orthovoltage X-ray units, may be an option. Local needs, conditions and resources will have to be factored into any decision on technology taking into account the characteristics of both forms of teletherapy, with the primary goal being the sustainability of the radiotherapy service over the useful lifetime of the equipment

  11. Assessing environmental impacts of storage technologies and competing options for balancing demand and supply in 2050

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droste-Franke, Bert [Europaeische Akademie Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler GmbH, Bad Neuenahr-Ahrweiler (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The major aim of using renewable energies for electricity production is to realise a sustainable and environmental friendly energy system which can be operated viably in the long term. One major indicator to reach this aim is the overall emission of CO2 resulting from the use of a certain technology. However, further environmental aspects have to be taken into account for an adequate evaluation of technologies. With respect to preserving the environmental basis for future generations several environmental pressures have to be considered which can either lead to small and substitutable, marginal environmental damages or to environmental impacts which contribute to burdens which could become critical, i.e., jeopardising important environmental functions. Thus, it should be accounted for the societal acceptability of their (potential) environmental impacts. The analysis presented here deals with the assessment of environmental effects of both types, marginal and potentially critical, for current and advanced technologies which can be used for balancing fluctuations in the electricity production from renewable sources in an economic environment of 2050. The basic results used were derived in a study carried out by the Europaeische Akademie GmbH (Droste-Franke et al. 2012).

  12. Development of the core-model implementation technology for YGN1 simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J. H.; Lee, M. S.; Lee, Y. K.; Su, I. Y.

    2004-01-01

    The existing core models for the domestic nuclear power plant simulators for PWRs are entirely imported from the foreign simulator vendor. To solve the time-accuracy problem in the poor capabilities in the computer in the early 1990s, several simplifications and assumptions for the neutronics governing equations were indispensible for the realtime calculations of nuclear phenomena in the core region. To overcome the shortages, a new core model based on the MASTER code certified by the domestic regulatory body (KINS) instead of the existing core models is now being developed especially for the realtime core solver for the YGN-1 simulator. This code is named R-MASTER (Realtime MASTER code). Due to the deficiency of the host computer, it is quitely required to run the R-MASTER code on the separate computer with high performance from the host computer on which all the other models than the core model are running. This paper deals with the applied protocols and procedures to guarantee the realtime communication and calculation of the R-MASTER code

  13. Methods and Tools to Align Curriculum to the Skills and Competencies Needed by the Workforce - an Example from Geospatial Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A. B.

    2012-12-01

    Geospatial science and technology (GST) including geographic information systems, remote sensing, global positioning systems and mobile applications, are valuable tools for geoscientists and students learning to become geoscientists. GST allows the user to analyze data spatially and temporarily and then visualize the data and outcomes in multiple formats (digital, web and paper). GST has evolved rapidly and it has been difficult to create effective curriculum as few guidelines existed to help educators. In 2010, the US Department of Labor (DoL), in collaboration with the National Geospatial Center of Excellence (GeoTech Center), a National Science Foundation supported grant, approved the Geospatial Technology Competency Mode (GTCM). The GTCM was developed and vetted with industry experts and provided the structure and example competencies needed across the industry. While the GTCM was helpful, a more detailed list of skills and competencies needed to be identified in order to build appropriate curriculum. The GeoTech Center carried out multiple DACUM events to identify the skills and competencies needed by entry-level workers. DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) is a job analysis process whereby expert workers are convened to describe what they do for a specific occupation. The outcomes from multiple DACUMs were combined into a MetaDACUM and reviewed by hundreds of GST professionals. This provided a list of more than 320 skills and competencies needed by the workforce. The GeoTech Center then held multiple workshops across the U.S. where more than 100 educators knowledgeable in teaching GST parsed the list into Model Courses and a Model Certificate Program. During this process, tools were developed that helped educators define which competency should be included in a specific course and the depth of instruction for that competency. This presentation will provide details about the process, methodology and tools used to create the Models and suggest how they can be used

  14. CATHEDRAL BASIC EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS AS A BASIS FOR FORMING TECHNOLOGY TEACHER COMPETENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. М. Жураковская

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article offers a review of the activities of the cathedral basic educational institutions (KBOU - Lyceum Istra, Moscow region, which implements one of the scientific and methodological areas of activity - the introduction of new educational technologies and principles of the organization of the educational process to ensure effective implementation of key provisions of the federal state educational standards basic general education. The paper proposed a structure of didactic games and one of its examples, focused on becoming a high school student individuality.Purchase on Elibrary.ru > Buy now

  15. Current Status of the Transmutation Reactor Technology and Preliminary Evaluation of Transmutation Performance of the KALIMER Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Ser Gi; Sim, Yoon Sub; Kim, Yeong Il; Kim, Young Gyum; Lee, Byung Woon; Song, Hoon; Lee, Ki Bog; Jang, Jin Wook; Lee, Dong Uk

    2005-08-15

    Recently the most countries using the nuclear power plants for electricity generation have been faced with the problem of the preparation of the repository for the disposition of the nuclear waste generated from LWR. It was well-known that the issues related with long term risk of the radioactive wastes for the future generations are due only to 1% of the total waste. This small fraction of 1% consists of transuranic (TRU) nuclides such as Pu, Np, Am, Cm and the long lived fission products such as Tc and I. For the transuranic (TRU) nuclides, their half lives range from several years to several hundred thousands years and hence their radioactive toxicity can be lasted over very long time period. This has made the change of the rule of the fast spectrum reactor from the economical use of uranium resource through breeding to the reduction of the nuclear waste through the transmutation. The purpose of this study is to obtain the basic knowledge on the nuclear transmutation technology and to suggest the technical solution ways for the future technology development and enhancement through a survey of the state-of-art of the international research on the nuclear transmutation. The increase of the transmutation rate requires the reduction of the breeding ratio. In fact, the transmutation rate is determined by the breeding ratio. The reduction of the breeding ratio can be achieved by reducing the U-238 content in fuel or increasing the neutron leakage through core boundary or absorbing the neutrons by using some absorbers. However, the reduction of the U-238 content results in the degradation of the fuel Doppler coefficient that is one of the most important safety-related parameters and the reduction of the effective delayed neutron fraction that is related with the controllability of the reactor core. Also, the increase of the transmutation rate can lead to the increase of the coolant void reactivity worth unless some ways to reduce the coolant void reactivity are not

  16. eHealth Technology Competencies for Health Professionals Working in Home Care to Support Older Adults to Age in Place: Outcomes of a Two-Day Collaborative Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakat, Ansam; Woolrych, Ryan D; Sixsmith, Andrew; Kearns, William D; Kort, Helianthe S M

    2013-01-01

    The demand for care is increasing, whereas in the near future the number of people working in professional care will not match with the demand for care. eHealth technology can help to meet the growing demand for care. Despite the apparent positive effects of eHealth technology, there are still barriers to technology adoption related to the absence of a composite set of knowledge and skills among health care professionals regarding the use of eHealth technology. The objective of this paper is to discuss the competencies required by health care professionals working in home care, with eHealth technologies such as remote telecare and ambient assisted living (AAL), mobile health, and fall detection systems. A two-day collaborative workshop was undertaken with academics across multiple disciplines with experience in working on funded research regarding the application and development of technologies to support older people. The findings revealed that health care professionals working in home care require a subset of composite skills as well as technology-specific competencies to develop the necessary aptitude in eHealth care. This paper argues that eHealth care technology skills must be instilled in health care professionals to ensure that technologies become integral components of future care delivery, especially to support older adults to age in place. Educating health care professionals with the necessary skill training in eHealth care will improve service delivery and optimise the eHealth care potential to reduce costs by improving efficiency. Moreover, embedding eHealth care competencies within training and education for health care professionals ensures that the benefits of new technologies are realized by casting them in the context of the larger system of care. These care improvements will potentially support the independent living of older persons at home. This paper describes the health care professionals' competencies and requirements needed for the use of e

  17. Perceptions of Blended Learning Competencies and Obstacles among Educational Technology Students in Light of Different Anxiety Levels and Locus of Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldalalah, Osamah Ahmad; Gasaymeh, Al-Mothana M.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of locus of control and anxiety level on the Jordanian educational technology students' perceived blended learning competencies and obstacles. The independent variables were the locus of control (Internal, External) and anxiety level (Low, Moderate, High). The dependent variables were the…

  18. Bifurcation structures of a cobweb model with memory and competing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliari, Anna; Naimzada, Ahmad; Pecora, Nicolò

    2018-05-01

    In this paper we study a simple model based on the cobweb demand-supply framework with costly innovators and free imitators. The evolutionary selection between technologies depends on a performance measure which is related to the degree of memory. The resulting dynamics is described by a two-dimensional map. The map has a fixed point which may lose stability either via supercritical Neimark-Sacker bifurcation or flip bifurcation and several multistability situations exist. We describe some sequences of global bifurcations involving attracting and repelling closed invariant curves. These bifurcations, characterized by the creation of homoclinic connections or homoclinic tangles, are described through several numerical simulations. Particular bifurcation phenomena are also observed when the parameters are selected inside a periodicity region.

  19. Improvements in Sand Mold/Core Technology: Effects on Casting Finish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prof. John J. Lannutti; Prof. Carroll E. Mobley

    2005-08-30

    In this study, the development and impact of density gradients on metal castings were investigated using sand molds/cores from both industry and from in-house production. In spite of the size of the castings market, almost no quantitative information about density variation within the molds/cores themselves is available. In particular, a predictive understanding of how structure and binder content/chemistry/mixing contribute to the final surface finish of these products does not exist. In this program we attempted to bridge this gap by working directly with domestic companies in examining the issues of surface finish and thermal reclamation costs resulting from the use of sand molds/cores. We show that these can be substantially reduced by the development of an in-depth understanding of density variations that correlate to surface finish. Our experimental tools and our experience with them made us uniquely qualified to achieve technical progress.

  20. Lean VOC-Air Mixtures Catalytic Treatment: Cost-Benefit Analysis of Competing Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Baldissone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Various processing routes are available for the treatment of lean VOC-air mixtures, and a cost-benefit analysis is the tool we propose to identify the most suitable technology. Two systems have been compared in this paper, namely a “traditional” plant, with a catalytic fixed-bed reactor with a heat exchanger for heat recovery purposes, and a “non-traditional” plant, with a catalytic reverse-flow reactor, where regenerative heat recovery may be achieved thanks to the periodical reversal of the flow direction. To be useful for decisions-making, the cost-benefit analysis must be coupled to the reliability, or availability, analysis of the plant. Integrated Dynamic Decision Analysis is used for this purpose as it allows obtaining the full set of possible sequences of events that could result in plant unavailability, and, for each of them, the probability of occurrence is calculated. Benefits are thus expressed in terms of out-of-services times, that have to be minimized, while the costs are expressed in terms of extra-cost for maintenance activities and recovery actions. These variable costs must be considered together with the capital (fixed cost required for building the plant. Results evidenced the pros and cons of the two plants. The “traditional” plant ensures a higher continuity of services, but also higher operational costs. The reverse-flow reactor-based plant exhibits lower operational costs, but a higher number of protection levels are needed to obtain a similar level of out-of-service. The quantification of risks and benefits allows the stakeholders to deal with a complete picture of the behavior of the plants, fostering a more effective decision-making process. With reference to the case under study and the relevant operational conditions, the regenerative system was demonstrated to be more suitable to treat lean mixtures: in terms of time losses following potential failures the two technologies are comparable (Fixed bed

  1. The Role of Engineering Design in Technological and 21st Century Competencies Capacity Building: Comparative Case Study in the Middle East, Asia, and Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Abdulwahed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Engineering design is considered an effective means for developing engineering technical skills. Normally, engineering design is conducted in teams and is a collaborative open-ended approach under constraints. This nature of engineering design involves engagement of several interpersonal, cognitive, and management skills or competencies such as teamwork, communications, decision making, problem solving, etc. While modern engineers are supposed to be technically competent, they need to posses a wide set of interpersonal, cognitive, and management competencies to function effectively in the workplace. Increasingly there has been more deployment of engineering design competitions (EDCs in engineering education to address some gaps in current curricula system. In this study, the impact of a complex engineering design competition on developing 21st century competencies of engineering and technology talent is investigated. A mix of quantitative and qualitative methods in the approach to self-reporting perceptions were utilized. Data was collected through interviews from students and faculty, and through surveys from students. Triangulating quantitative and qualitative data from students and faculty indicate that the investigated EDC have positive impact on a large set of 21st century engineering and technology competencies, this has been consistent across groups of students from the EU, Middle East, and Asia, as well as across genders. This is one of the few available investigations that sheds light in further depth on the impact of engineering design on non-technical skills.

  2. The Role of Information Systems and Technology Competencies for Accounting Education from the Gender Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liege Moraes do Carmo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to examine the importance of obtaining skills in Information Systems (IS and Information Technology (IT for undergraduate students in Accounting from the gender perspective. The sample consisted of undergraduate students in Accounting of six Higher Education Institutions (HEIs located in the state of Rio de Janeiro, divided by gender (male and female. The data collection instrument chosen was the questionnaire, which was distributed between November and December 2014 and was based on the Model Accounting Curriculum Revised (MACR proposed for accountants UN / UNCTAD / ISAR. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney test. It has been found that the students from the HEIs surveyed realize the high importance that the possession of skills related to SI and IT has to his academic training regardless of gender issues. In contrast, it appears that female respondents attributed higher levels of importance to obtain knowledge about communications softwares and about softwares that are for generally use while the males turn to more specific softwares applied to business solutions.

  3. Implementing new technologies for public safety communication: competing frequency demands and standardization issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Kathryn J.

    1997-01-01

    Attempting to incorporate new technology into an existing environment is often very difficult. The problems are lengthy to resolve, wrought with confusion and seldom turn out like anyone expected. This document represents an overview of one such attempt. It outlines the general areas of concern which could be affected by a transition, and potential problems that may be encountered as a result of the effort. Over the past several decades, many local, state and federal agencies are pressing for more efficient use of frequency spectrums. The urgency of this issue has grown due to the demands of several groups wanting access to these channels for commercial use. Pager systems, cellular telephones, radio systems for private businesses all demand more space. Public safety agencies are starting to fear their needs will diminish in importance as the available channel spectrums are consumed by commercial ventures. How to share these channels, purchase appropriate equipment to meet your needs, and stay within a reasonable budget are not easy tasks. Public safety agencies who rely on communication networks in the performance of their jobs also know why encryption is important. Protecting the rights of citizens as police exchange information over the air, maintaining the integrity of an investigation and officer safety are all concerns police must address each time they use a radio.

  4. Dynamic effects of memory in a cobweb model with competing technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agliari, Anna; Naimzada, Ahmad; Pecora, Nicolò

    2017-02-01

    We analyze a simple model based on the cobweb demand-supply framework with costly innovators and free imitators and study the endogenous dynamics of price and firms' fractions in a homogeneous good market. The evolutionary selection between technologies depends on a performance measure in which a memory parameter is introduced. The resulting dynamics is then described by a two-dimensional map. In addition to the locally stabilizing effect due to the presence of memory, we show the existence of a double stability threshold which entails for different dynamic scenarios occurring when the memory parameter takes extreme values (i.e. when consideration of the last profit realization prevails or it is too much neglected). The eventuality of different coexisting attractors as well as the structure of the basins of attraction that characterizes the path dependence property of the model with memory is shown. In particular, through global analysis we also illustrate particular bifurcations sequences that may increase the complexity of the related basins of attraction.

  5. Narrative Competence and the Enhancement of Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Dobson

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay argues for narrative competence as an underlying skill neglected in educational policy makers’ calls for enhanced literacy through improved reading, writing, numeracy and working with digital technology. This argument is presented in three parts. First, a genealogy of the narrative is presented by looking at understandings of narratives with respect to changes in technology and socio-cultural relations. Three technological forms of the narrative are examined: the oral, written and image based narrative. Second, revisiting Bernstein, narrative competency is connected to pedagogic practice. The focus is upon code recognition and the rhythm of narrative in a classroom context. Third, a proposal is made to develop narrative competence as a research programme capable of exploring literacy in an age of open learning. The core assertion of this essay is that when narrative is understood in a multi-directional, multi-voiced and multi-punctual sense, opportunities are created for a pedagogic practice that is in tune with the demands placed upon youth and their relationship to changing technologies. This makes the exploration of connections between narrative competence, pedagogic practice and technology the central focus of this essay.

  6. Identification and assessment of professional competencies for implementation of nanotechnology in engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Ming-Der; Jiang, Ji-Bin; Chien, Jia-Yi

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to construct the indicators of professional competencies of the nanotechnology-based sputtering system industry based on industry requirements and analyse the core competencies of the industry for promoting the human resource of physical vapour deposition technology. The document analysis, expert interview, and Delphi technique surveys were considered and the survey items with 32 items divided into 7 domains were selected according to consensus opinions of 10 experts by the Delphi survey technique. Through three questionnaire surveys' analysis, the professional competence scales for the K-S tests showed a good internal consistency. The findings of this study provide guidelines for professional competence for nanotechnology-based sputtering technology by applying surface heat-treatment industry. These guidelines can also reveal the practical competency requirements of nanotechnology-based sputtering technology to deal with any subsequent challenges, future developments, and invisible services for students in a technology institute programme.

  7. Research Commentary: Educational Technology--An Equity Challenge to the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Richard; Berk, Sarabeth

    2016-01-01

    The implementation of the Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (National Governors Association Center for Best Practices & Council of Chief State School Officers, 2010) has the potential to move forward key features of standards-based reforms in mathematics that have been promoted in the United States for more than 2 decades (e.g.,…

  8. Electrically Heated Testing of the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling Technology (KRUSTY) Experiment Using a Depleted Uranium Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Maxwell H.; Gibson, Marc A.; Sanzi, James

    2017-01-01

    The Kilopower project aims to develop and demonstrate scalable fission-based power technology for systems capable of delivering 110 kW of electric power with a specific power ranging from 2.5 - 6.5 Wkg. This technology could enable high power science missions or could be used to provide surface power for manned missions to the Moon or Mars. NASA has partnered with the Department of Energys National Nuclear Security Administration, Los Alamos National Labs, and Y-12 National Security Complex to develop and test a prototypic reactor and power system using existing facilities and infrastructure. This technology demonstration, referred to as the Kilowatt Reactor Using Stirling TechnologY (KRUSTY), will undergo nuclear ground testing in the summer of 2017 at the Nevada Test Site. The 1 kWe variation of the Kilopower system was chosen for the KRUSTY demonstration. The concept for the 1 kWe flight system consist of a 4 kWt highly enriched Uranium-Molybdenum reactor operating at 800 degrees Celsius coupled to sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes deliver heat to the hot ends of eight 125 W Stirling convertors producing a net electrical output of 1 kW. Waste heat is rejected using titanium-water heat pipes coupled to carbon composite radiator panels. The KRUSTY test, based on this design, uses a prototypic highly enriched uranium-molybdenum core coupled to prototypic sodium heat pipes. The heat pipes transfer heat to two Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC-E2s) and six thermal simulators, which simulate the thermal draw of full scale power conversion units. Thermal simulators and Stirling engines are gas cooled. The most recent project milestone was the completion of non-nuclear system level testing using an electrically heated depleted uranium (non-fissioning) reactor core simulator. System level testing at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) has validated performance predictions and has demonstrated system level operation and control in a test configuration that replicates the one

  9. Exploring the information and communication technology competence and confidence of nursing students and their perception of its relevance to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett-Jones, Tracy; Kenny, Raelene; Van der Riet, Pamela; Hazelton, Michael; Kable, Ashley; Bourgeois, Sharon; Luxford, Yoni

    2009-08-01

    This paper profiles a study that explored nursing students' information and communication technology competence and confidence. It presents selected findings that focus on students' attitudes towards information and communication technology as an educational methodology and their perceptions of its relevance to clinical practice. Information and communication technology is integral to contemporary nursing practice. Development of these skills is important to ensure that graduates are 'work ready' and adequately prepared to practice in increasingly technological healthcare environments. This was a mixed methods study. Students (n=971) from three Australian universities were surveyed using an instrument designed specifically for the study, and 24 students participated in focus groups. The focus group data revealed that a number of students were resistant to the use of information and communication technology as an educational methodology and lacked the requisite skills and confidence to engage successfully with this educational approach. Survey results indicated that 26 per cent of students were unsure about the relevance of information and communication technology to clinical practice and only 50 per cent felt 'very confident' using a computer. While the importance of information and communication technology to student's learning and to their preparedness for practice has been established, it is evident that students' motivation is influenced by their level of confidence and competence, and their understanding of the relevance of information and communication technology to their future careers.

  10. Development of visual inspection technology for HTTR core support graphite structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, So; Iyoku, Tatsuo; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Shiozawa, Shusaku; Masuma, Yoshitaka; Miki, Toshiya.

    1996-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is now constructing the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), which employs a visual inspection of core support graphite structure, as an inservice inspection (ISI). In this inspection, TV camera will be used to investigate the alignment and integrity of the structure. Therefore, the ISI system, a combination of radiation tolerant TV camera and graphic processing system, is developed and examined its detectability and viewing angles using a simulated hot plenum of HTTR, which has artificial defects. As a result of a series of tests, it was confirmed that this system satisfied the requirements and was quite applicable for the ISI system of HTTR core support graphite structure. In addition, further improvement of the system, like a remote control procedure, will be investigated. (author)

  11. A study of ECC water bypass reduction technology for an improvement of core cooling capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, C. G.; Kwon, T. S.; Yun, B. J.

    2006-02-01

    The research for the reduction of ECC water bypass fraction was mainly performed to develop the flow mechanisms that ECC water can penetrate more effectively into a lower downcomer. Evaluation were carried out for the effect of major parameters on the bypass of ECC water in the downcomer with DVI. The following various physical models were derived for the reduction of the bypass fraction of ECC water: models of changing DVI injection angle, models of rearranging relative angles of DVI nozzles, model of grooved-and-subchannel type core barrel, model of dual core barrel. CFD analysis and MARS design verification were performed for the derived models as a first step performance estimation. Through out air-water verification experiments, quantitative evaluation were performed for each model, and three most efficient models were suggested. Examination were carried out for the requirement of structural modification and the change in structural integrity due to the adoption of one of the schemes

  12. Proceedings of JSPS-CAS core university program seminar on PWI/PFC and fusion technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Tomoaki; Chen Junling

    2009-01-01

    The present symposium has the topics on plasma wall interaction, plasma facing materials and components, core plasma behavior, blanket, tritium, superconductor, ITER related R and D and theory. The number of the presented papers was 39, and the participants were 45, 18 from Japan and 27 from China. Very aggressive discussions were conducted in this symposium, and the understanding for important issues toward to ITER and Demonstration Reactor was deepened. The 29 of the papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. Planning of the development of the MMIS core technology based on nuclear-IT convergence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Kim, Chang Hwoi; Hwang, In Koo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-01-15

    - Drive nuclear-IT convergence technologies such as middleware applied new concept nuclear instrumentation and control architecture, automated operation of future nuclear power plant, virtual reality/augmented reality, design and verification technology of a nuclear power plant main control room, software dependability, and cyber security technology - Write state-of-the-art report for the nuclear instrumentation and control based on IT convergence - A prototype which implemented related equipment and software subject to nuclear reactor operator that reside in the main control room (Reactor Operator, RO) order to a on-site operator (Local Operator, LO) and confirm the task performance matches the RO's intention - 'IT Convergence intelligent instrumentation and control technology' project planning for the Fourth Nuclear Power Research and Development in the long-term plan.

  14. Planning of the development of the MMIS core technology based on nuclear-IT convergence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Kim, Chang Hwoi; Hwang, In Koo

    2012-01-01

    - Drive nuclear-IT convergence technologies such as middleware applied new concept nuclear instrumentation and control architecture, automated operation of future nuclear power plant, virtual reality/augmented reality, design and verification technology of a nuclear power plant main control room, software dependability, and cyber security technology - Write state-of-the-art report for the nuclear instrumentation and control based on IT convergence - A prototype which implemented related equipment and software subject to nuclear reactor operator that reside in the main control room (Reactor Operator, RO) order to a on-site operator (Local Operator, LO) and confirm the task performance matches the RO's intention - 'IT Convergence intelligent instrumentation and control technology' project planning for the Fourth Nuclear Power Research and Development in the long-term plan

  15. Free-space optics technology employed in an UMTS release 4 bearer independent core network access part

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibac, Ionut

    2005-08-01

    The UMTS Bearer Independent Core Network program introduced the 3rd Generation Partnership Program Release 4 BICN architecture into the legacy UMTS TDM-switched network. BICN is the application of calI server archltecture for voice and circuit switched data, enabling the provisioning of traditional circuit-switched services using a packet-switched transport network. Today"s business climate has made it essential for service providers to develop a comprehensive networking strategy that means introduction of RCBICN networks. The R4-BICN solution to the evolution of the Core Network in UMTS will enable operators to significantly reduce the capital and operational costs of delivering both traditional voice sewices and new multimedia services. To build the optical backbone, which can support the third generation (3G) packetized infrastructure, the operators could choose a fibre connection, or they could retain the benefits of a wireless connectivity by using a FSO - Free Space Optical lmk, the only wireless technology available that is capable of achieving data rates up to 2.4 Gbit/s. FSO offers viable alternatives for both core transmission networks and for replacing microwaves links in NodeB - RNC access networks. The paper and presentation aim to demonstrate the manner in which FSO products and networks are employed into R4-BICN design solutions.

  16. Teaching a Second Core Course in Information Technology: A West Point Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Wolfe

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The United States Military Academy (USMA at West Point has the mission to produce officers for the U.S. Army. As part of the curriculum, the Academy requires all non-ABET major cadets (students to take two courses on information technology (IT with both courses focused on problem solving with technology. The first course is an introductory course offered in the freshman year while the second course is a more detailed course offered in the junior year. The Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Department uses an expanded definition of information technology; that is, any technology that acquires, transmits, processes, or displays information. Information technology is becoming increasingly important in the Army with the development and use of sensors, command and control systems, and other technologies to achieve information dominance. The course is divided into six modules: acquisition of data and sensors, transmission of data and networks, processing of data into information, display of information, legal and ethical issues of IT, and information dominance and operations. Cadets use a four-step problem solving methodology to develop and implement the components of an Information System to solve a real-world problem. The short-term impact of the course on the cadets has been very positive, and we are confident that the long-term impact will be substantial on the cadets and the Army. Cadets are exposed to a number of different technologies, gaining an understanding of how these technologies are used to acquire data, transmit data, process data into information, and display information to support decision making. In addition, the course projects help enforce the problem solving methodology where cadets analyze, design, implement, and test their solutions.

  17. Many-core technologies: The move to energy-efficient, high-throughput x86 computing (TFLOPS on a chip)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    With Moore's Law alive and well, more and more parallelism is introduced into all computing platforms at all levels of integration and programming to achieve higher performance and energy efficiency. Especially in the area of High-Performance Computing (HPC) users can entertain a combination of different hardware and software parallel architectures and programming environments. Those technologies range from vectorization and SIMD computation over shared memory multi-threading (e.g. OpenMP) to distributed memory message passing (e.g. MPI) on cluster systems. We will discuss HPC industry trends and Intel's approach to it from processor/system architectures and research activities to hardware and software tools technologies. This includes the recently announced new Intel(r) Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture for highly-parallel workloads and general purpose, energy efficient TFLOPS performance, some of its architectural features and its programming environment. At the end we will have a br...

  18. Strategic plan for the development of core technologies for the Korean advanced nuclear power reactor for export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joo Hyun; Cho, Young Ho

    2010-01-01

    With the soaring oil price and worsening global warming, nuclear power has attracted considerable attention on a global scale and a new large market of nuclear power plants (NPPs) is expected. The Korean government aims to export up to 10 NPPs by 2012, based on the successful export of 2 NPPs to the UAE in 2009. It is also going to develop a follow-up model of the Advanced Power Reactor (APR) 1400, and join the world's NPP market under the banner of Korea's original reactor type. For this, it promulgated the strategic plan, NuTech 2012, a technology development plan intended for the early acquisition of core technologies for the Korean advanced NPP design and domestic production of the main components in NPP. This paper introduces the strategic plan of NuTech 2012. (orig.)

  19. Knowledge flows : analyzing the core literature of innovation, entrepreneurship and science and technology studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhupatiraju, S.; Nomaler, Z.O.; Triulzi, G.; Verspagen, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper applies network analysis to a citation database that combines the key references in the fields of Entrepreneurship (ENT), Innovation Studies (INN) and Science and Technology Studies (STS). We find that citations between the three fields are relatively scarce, as compared to citations

  20. Can Technology Improve Large Class Learning? The Case of an Upper-Division Business Core Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Denise

    2013-01-01

    Larger classes are often associated with lower student achievement. The author tested the hypothesis that the introduction of personal response systems significantly improves scores in a 250-seat classroom, through the channels of improved attendance and engagement. She focused on how continuous participation with the technology could change…