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Sample records for technology center illinois

  1. Illinois trauma centers and community violence resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bennet Butler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Elder abuse and neglect (EAN, intimate partner violence (IPV, and street-based community violence (SBCV are significant public health problems, which frequently lead to traumatic injury. Trauma centers can provide an effective setting for intervention and referral, potentially interrupting the cycle of violence. Aims: To assess existing institutional resources for the identification and treatment of violence victims among patients presenting with acute injury to statewide trauma centers. Settings and Design: We used a prospective, web-based survey of trauma medical directors at 62 Illinois trauma centers. Nonresponders were contacted via telephone to complete the survey. Materials and Methods: This survey was based on a survey conducted in 2004 assessing trauma centers and IPV resources. We modified this survey to collect data on IPV, EAN, and SBCV. Statistical Analysis: Univariate and bivariate statistics were performed using STATA statistical software. Results: We found that 100% of trauma centers now screen for IPV, an improvement from 2004 (P = 0.007. Screening for EAN (70% and SBCV (61% was less common (P < 0.001, and hospitals thought that resources for SBCV in particular were inadequate (P < 0.001 and fewer resources were available for these patients (P = 0.02. However, there was lack of uniformity of screening, tracking, and referral practices for victims of violence throughout the state. Conclusion: The multiplicity of strategies for tracking and referring victims of violence in Illinois makes it difficult to assess screening and tracking or form generalized policy recommendations. This presents an opportunity to improve care delivered to victims of violence by standardizing care and referral protocols.

  2. Teen Center: Schaumburg Township District Library, Schaumburg, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessio, Amy

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Teen Center at the Schaumburg Township District Library (Illinois) that was built with a sports theme. Highlights include the physical environment; the library collection, mainly recreational, that includes music CDs; the young adult population and community; hours of operation; staffing; youth participation and programs; and the…

  3. University of Illinois FRIENDS Children’s Environmental Health Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The FRIENDS Children's Environmental Health Center at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, was established in 2001 to investigate the interactive effects of...

  4. Perfect Power Prototype for Illinois Institute of Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad [Illinois Inst. Of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Starting in October 2008, Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), in collaboration with over 20 participating members, led an extensive effort to develop, demonstrate, promote, and commercialize a microgrid system and offer supporting technologies that will achieve Perfect Power at the main campus of IIT. A Perfect Power system, as defined by the Galvin Electricity Initiative (GEI), is a system that cannot fail to meet the electric needs of the individual end-user. The Principle Investigator of this Perfect Power project was Dr. Mohammad Shahidehpour, Director of the Robert W. Galvin Center for Electricity Innovation at IIT. There were six overall objectives of the Perfect Power project: (1) Demonstrate the higher reliability introduced by the microgrid system at IIT; (2) Demonstrate the economics of microgrid operations; (3) Allow for a decrease of fifty percent (50%) of grid electricity load; (4) Create a permanent twenty percent (20%) decrease in peak load from 2007 level; (5) Defer planned substation through load reduction; (6) Offer a distribution system design that can be replicated in urban communities.

  5. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  6. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Retail Garden Center Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These skill standards, developed through a consortium of educational and industry partners in Illinois, serve as guides to workforce preparation program providers to define content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition and performance. The skill standards include the following…

  7. Energy Utilization Technology Curriculum Materials FY 91. Illinois Plan for Industrial Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Dennis; Welty, Kenneth

    This document contains technology-based learning activities for the Illinois energy utilization technology course at the orientation level (grades 9 and 10). This packet includes a course rationale, course mission statement, course description, course outline, suggested learning objectives for each of the energy utilization areas, and suggested…

  8. Energy Utilization Technology Curriculum Materials FY 91. Illinois Plan for Industrial Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Dennis; Welty, Kenneth

    This document contains technology-based learning activities for the Illinois energy utilization technology course at the orientation level (grades 9 and 10). This packet includes a course rationale, course mission statement, course description, course outline, suggested learning objectives for each of the energy utilization areas, and suggested…

  9. Illinois Trauma Centers and Intimate Partner Violence: Are We Doing Our Share?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Marie; Schwab, Jennifer; Sheehan, Karen; Esposito, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a major source of morbidity and mortality nationally. Trauma Centers can be very helpful for victims of IPV but there may be variability in IPV resource provision. A survey was mailed to each of the 65 Trauma Centers in Illinois. Stata and EZ-Text statistical software were used for analysis. Eighty-three percent…

  10. 76 FR 56194 - CenterPoint Energy-Illinois Gas Transmission Company; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission CenterPoint Energy--Illinois Gas Transmission Company; Notice of Petition for Rate Approval Take notice that on September 1, 2011, pursuant to section 284.224 of the Commission's regulations, 18 CFR 284.224, CenterPoint Energy- Illinois Gas Transmission Company (``IGTC''),...

  11. Building "Bob": A Project Exploring the Human Body at Western Illinois University Preschool Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouette, Scott

    2008-01-01

    When the children at Western Illinois University Preschool Center embarked on a study of human bodies, they decided to build a life-size model of a body, organ by organ from the inside out, to represent some of the things they were learning. This article describes the building of "Bob," the human body model, highlighting the children's…

  12. Utilization of a Marketing Strategy at Naval Regional Medical Center Great Lakes, Great Lakes, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    UTILIZATION OF A MARKETING STRATEGY AToNAVAL REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER GREAT LAKES NGREAT LAKES, ILLINOIS I DTIC S1 ELECTE I A Graduate Research...IWORK UNIT ELEMENT NO. NO. NO. rCCESSION NO. 11. TITLE (bw* u S.wufty asification) Utilization of A Marketing Strategy At Naval Regional Medical Center...Applied Research Question. ........ 37 Summary of the Steps of a Marketing Strategy .. ..... 38 Applicability to the Military Health Care System

  13. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzemeier, L. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Boysel, M. B. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States); Smith, D. R. [Infotonics Technology Center Inc., Canandaigua, NY (United States)

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  14. University of Illinois at Chicago Health Policy Center - Funding

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1991-2014. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Funding Data, Appropriations...

  15. University of Illinois at Chicago Health Policy Center - Funding

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1991-2014. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Funding Data, Appropriations...

  16. Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Manufacturing Technology Center (EMTC), established in 1994 by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Manufacturing Technology (ManTech) Program, is Navy...

  17. Technological Change and Rural Development: A Case Example from Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoke, Gordon

    In 1980, the Office of Continuing Education and Public Service at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign acquired a W. K. Kellogg Foundation grant to establish a 4-year model Community Information and Education Service (CIES). Working with the university's Cooperative Extension Service and five community colleges, CIES initially focused on…

  18. Collaborative Management of Technological Resources at Northern Illinois University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misic, Mark

    1995-01-01

    Describes the management of computer resources at Northern Illinois University's College of Business through collaboration with university organizations, including the computer network department, academic computing, office machine repair department, and media services department, as well as organizations and individuals outside the university.…

  19. Solar Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  20. Technological Literacy and Political Participation in McLean County, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 266 residents of McLean County, Illinois, found that 91 percent believe technology makes life easier; 70 percent believe people are too technologically dependent; those with a history of political participation felt confident engaging in political activities regarding nuclear power, automation, and genetic engineering; and the public…

  1. Technological Literacy and Political Participation in McLean County, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Kenneth

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 266 residents of McLean County, Illinois, found that 91 percent believe technology makes life easier; 70 percent believe people are too technologically dependent; those with a history of political participation felt confident engaging in political activities regarding nuclear power, automation, and genetic engineering; and the public…

  2. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

  3. A comparison study of column flotation technologies for cleaning Illinois coal. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honaker, R.Q.; Paul, B.C. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    1993-12-31

    The objectives of this research project are to optimize the performance of six commercially available column technologies for the treatment of Illinois Basin coal fines and to compare their performance on the basis of the recovery-grade curve and column throughput capacity. A statistically-designed experimental program will be conducted to optimize the critical operating performance values of each flotation column. The operating values suggested by the vendor will be used as the center point of the design. The ultimate recovery-grade curve and-the maximum throughput capacity for each column will be determined by conducting further tests using the optimum operating parameter values. During this reporting period, the flotation columns that were not already present were purchased and received. Installation of all the flotation columns was completed with the exception of the Packed-Column which is presently being mounted. A total of 25 fifty-five gallon drums of Illinois No. 5 flotation feed coal ({minus}100 mesh) was collected at a local preparation plant to be used as the feed for the comparison tests. A complete characterization of this coal sample will be conducted during the next reporting period.

  4. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-10-31

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology Assessment Program (TAP) was developed to provide detailed, comparable data for environmental technologies and to disseminate this data to D&D professionals in a manner that will facilitate the review and selection of technologies to perform decontamination and decommissioning. The objectives for this project include the following: Determine technology needs through review of the Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) information and other applicable websites and needs databases; Perform a detailed review of industries that perform similar activities as those required in D&D operations to identify additional technologies; Define the technology assessment program for characterization and waste management problem sets; Define the data management program for characterization, dismantlement, and waste management problem sets; Evaluate baseline and innovative technologies under standard test conditions at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and other locations and collect data in the areas of performance, cost, health and safety, operations and maintenance, and primary and secondary waste generation; Continue to locate, verify, and incorporate technology performance data from other sources into the multimedia information system; and Develop the conceptual design for a dismantlement technology decision analysis tool for dismantlement technologies.

  5. An International Development Technology Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Robert P.

    1969-01-01

    Main focus of the Center is "the application of science and technology to the solution of problems faced by people in less-developed areas of the world. Adapted from paper presented at ASEE Annual Meeting, The Pennsylvania State University, June, 1969. (Author/WM)

  6. Implementing the ASAM Criteria in community treatment centers in Illinois: opportunities and challenges. American Society of Addiction Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heatherton, B

    2000-01-01

    The incorporation of the ASAM Criteria into addiction treatment centers procedure has afforded us an enormous opportunity to add credibility to our treatment. Herein lies perhaps the strongest argument for these criteria. The ASAM Criteria encourage addiction treatment centers to establish themselves as healthcare providers in their own right. The task is now for Illinois addiction treatment providers; particularly community based providers, to prove our credibility through the legitimate use of the criteria. Since most, if not all, of our patients are without means and without knowledge on quality treatment, they become easy targets for substandard or at least unimaginative and uninspired treatment. It is not that community based treatment centers are, by nature, unprincipled treatment warehouses. But it certainly can be said that our centers are frequently the last to change our treatment practices. Certainly we have become "the last resort" for the courts, overburdened mental health centers and overpopulated homeless shelters with little emphasis on clinical quality of care. Overcoming such programmed ways of viewing treatment was difficult specifically for Triangle Center and generally for community treatment providers throughout Illinois. In fact, I dare say that this transition has not occurred in total as many still passively resist this opportunity. Yet others have viewed this change as the breath of fresh air that our profession has long sought. Such variance in opinion ultimately proves that implementation of the ASAM Criteria, in a community based system, is dependent on the clinician and administrators willingness to understand, recognize and apply the Criteria.

  7. NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners. With specialized teams, TTC guides the interactions of our partners from the point of discovery to patenting, from invention development to licensing. We play a key role in helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class researchers, facilities, and knowledge.

  8. An Archeological Overview and Management Plan for the St. Louis Area Support Center, Madison County, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-04-01

    archival research; administration; museology ; teaching; and historical archeology. He has held administrative positions since 1951 with federal, state...investigations of Mississippian sites are critical in the understanding of a large socio-policito-religious unit and interactions with smaller...River Terrace. Illinois State Museum Reports of Investigations 21. Nassany, Michael S., Neal H. Lopinot, Brian M. Butler, and Richard W. Jeffries. 1983

  9. Center for Advanced Separation Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honaker, Rick

    2013-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, CAST is now a five-university consortium – Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah and Montana Tech, - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FE0000699, Center for Advanced Separation Technology. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in two broad areas: Advanced Pre-Combustion Clean Coal Technologies and Gas-Gas Separations. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the five member universities. These were reviewed and the selected proposals were forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed below by category, along with abstracts from their final reports.

  10. Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (Program website, free access)   Currently there is no database matching your keyword search, but the NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology website may be of interest. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology enables science and industry by providing essential measurement methods, instrumentation, and standards to support all phases of nanotechnology development, from discovery to production.

  11. Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Building Technologies Research and Integration Center (BTRIC), in the Energy and Transportation Science Division (ETSD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL),...

  12. Search Technologies | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  13. Available Technologies | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our team of technology transfer specialists has specialized training in invention reporting, patenting, patent strategy, executing technology transfer agreements and marketing. TTC is comprised of professionals with diverse legal, scientific, and business/marketing expertise. Most of our staff hold doctorate-level technical and/or legal training.

  14. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-04-30

    The final data package has been completed for the Mississippi State University, DIAL FTP Wall Depth Removal Characterization Technology. The package has been sent to DIAL for comments. Work is progressing on completing the transfer of glove boxes and tanks from Rocky Flats to FIU-HCET for the purpose of performing size reduction technology assessments. Vendors are being identified and security measures are being put in place to meet the High Risk Property criteria required by Rocky Flats. The FIU-HCET Technology Assessment Program has been included as one of 11 verification programs across the US and Canada described in the Interstate Technology Regulatory Cooperation (ITRC) document, ''Multi-state Evaluation of Elements Important to the Verification of Remediation Technologies'', dated January 1999. FIU-HCET will also participate in a panel discussion on technology verification programs at the International Environmental Technology Expo '99.

  15. CAD/BIM Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Supporting Better Decisions in Facility, Infrastructure, and Environment Management Access to technology tools to model structures before they are built can provide...

  16. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-05-31

    The programming and website for the advanced Technology Information System (TIS) have been completed. Over and above the LSDDP-TIS, the new system provides information on DOE's baseline technologies, technology data contained in DOE's databases, technologies assessed at FIU-HCET Technology Assessment Program (TAP), as well as links to other selected D&D sites with valuable technology information. The new name for the website is Gateway for Environmental Technology (GET). A super-vacuum type blasting system was tested for decontamination of 12-in pipe internal surfaces. The system operates on compressed air and propels grit media at high speed at wall surfaces. It is equipped with a vacuum system for collecting grit, dust, and debris. This technology was selected for further development. The electret ion chamber (EIC) system for measurement of alpha contamination on surfaces has been calibrated and is ready for demonstration and deployment. FIU-HCET is working with representatives from Fernald, Oak Ridge, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River to procure a demonstration and deployment site. Final arrangements are ongoing for the mock-up design for the glove box and tank size reduction technology assessments, including designing of support bases for tanks, a piping support system, and a mobilization plan for glove boxes and tanks from storage site to the PermaCon.

  17. CAD/BIM Technology Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Supporting Better Decisions in Facility, Infrastructure, and Environment ManagementAccess to technology tools to model structures before they are built can provide...

  18. Martin Luther King Family Center, Chicago, Illinois: Model Programs. Childhood Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Institutes for Research in the Behavioral Sciences, Palo Alto, CA.

    Prepared for the White House Conference on Children (December 1970), this booklet reports on the Martin Luther King Family Center, one of 34 promising programs on childhood education. The Martin Luther King Family Center is now a privately funded, community-controlled demonstration service center with an all black staff. All of its programs are…

  19. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-01-31

    FIU-HCET participated in an ICT meeting at Mound during the second week of December and presented a brief videotape of the testing of the Robotic Climber technology. During this meeting, FIU-HCET proposed the TechXtract technology for possible testing at Mound and agreed to develop a five-page proposal for review by team members. FIU-HCET provided assistance to Bartlett Inc. and General Lasertronics Corporation in developing a proposal for a Program Opportunity Notice (PON). The proposal was submitted by these companies on January 5, 1999. The search for new equipment dismantlement technologies is continuing. The following vendors have responded to requests for demonstration: LUMONICS, Laser Solutions technology; CRYO-BEAM, Cryogenic cutting technology; Waterjet Technology Association, Waterjet Cutting technology; and DIAJET, Waterjet Cutting technology. Based on the tasks done in FY98, FIU-HCET is working closely with Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to revise the plan and scope of work of the pipeline plugging project in FY99, which involves activities of lab-scale flow loop experiments and a large-scale demonstration test bed.

  20. A comparison study of column flotation technologies for cleaning Illinois coal. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honaker, R.Q.; Paul, B.C. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    1994-06-01

    The objectives of this research project are to optimize the performance of six commercially available column technologies for the treatment of Illinois Basin coal fines and to compare their performance on the basis of the recovery-grade curve and column throughput capacity. A statistically-designed, experimental program will be conducted to optimize the critical operating performance values of each flotation column. During the previous reporting period, construction and installation of the six flotation columns were completed. The flotation feed sample that will be used for the tests in this investigation was collected from a coal preparation plant treating the Illinois No. 5 seam coal. During this reporting period, the flotation feed sample was characterized on a size-by-size basis for its ash, total sulfur, and BTU content. A release analysis was also conducted to obtain the best possible recovery versus product grade curve that can be achieved by a froth flotation process for the treatment of the Illinois No. 5 flotation feed sample. Experiments were initiated on the Jameson Cell. The preliminary results indicate that the Jameson Cell achieves a separation performance that is close to the release data. The experimental program on the Jameson Cell and the other flotation technologies will be performed during the next reporting period.

  1. Advanced technologies for Mission Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, John T.; Hughes, Peter M.

    1991-01-01

    Advance technologies for Mission Control Centers are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: technology needs; current technology efforts at GSFC (human-machine interface development, object oriented software development, expert systems, knowledge-based software engineering environments, and high performance VLSI telemetry systems); and test beds.

  2. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-07-31

    FIU-HCET personnel visited the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) for discussions with the Principal Investigator (PI) of Laser Induced Fluorescence Imaging (LIFI) and for training in LIFI. Mr. Peter Gibbons, Tanks Retrieval Technology Integration Manager, visited FIU-HCET on July 20, 1999. Mr. Gibbons inspected the pipeline unplugging experimental facility at the HCET testing field. The detailed test bed construction, testing plan, and plugging material specifications were discussed.

  3. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-03-30

    A vendor was selected for the diamond wire technology demonstration scheduled for this summer at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). A team consisting of personnel from FIU-HCET, PPPL, and AEA Technology reviewed the submitted bids. FIU-HCET will contract this vendor. At the SRS Ninth ICT teleconference, the ICT team discussed the status of the following demonstrations: LRAD; x-ray, K-edge; Strippable Coatings; Thermal Spray Vitrification; Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction; and Electrets. The LRAD demo is complete, and the x-ray/K-edge, Strippable Coatings, and Electrets demos are ongoing. The Asbestos and Thermal Spray Vitrification demos require more laboratory testing. The Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction demo is undergoing procurement. Five FIU-HCET staff members took the 1S0 14000 environmental auditor training course February 22-26, 1999, given by ASC. The test plan for the Facility Dismantlement Technology Assessment is finished and ready for internal review.

  4. Savannah River Technology Center, monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This is the monthly report to detail the research currently being conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center. The areas of research are in Tritium, Seperation processes, Environmental Engineering, and Waste Management.

  5. Savannah River Technology Center monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-10-01

    This document contains many small reports from personnel at the technology center under the umbrella topics of reactors, tritium, separations, environment, waste management, and general engineering. Progress and accomplishments are given.

  6. NASA(Field Center Based) Technology Commercialization Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Under the direction of the IC(sup 2) Institute, the Johnson Technology Commercialization Center has met or exceeded all planned milestones and metrics during the first two and a half years of the NTCC program. The Center has established itself as an agent for technology transfer and economic development in- the Clear Lake community, and is positioned to continue as a stand-alone operation. This report presents data on the experimental JTCC program, including all objective measures tracked over its duration. While the metrics are all positive, the data indicates a shortage of NASA technologies with strong commercial potential, barriers to the identification and transfer of technologies which may have potential, and small financial return to NASA via royalty-bearing licenses. The Center has not yet reached the goal of self-sufficiency based on rental income, and remains dependent on NASA funding. The most important issues raised by the report are the need for broader and deeper community participation in the Center, technology sourcing beyond JSC, and the form of future funding which will be appropriate.

  7. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A.Ebadian

    1999-02-28

    Search for decontamination technologies to be assessed at FIU-HCET continues. Bartlett Nuclear Inc. returned to FIU-HCET on February 15-19, 1999, to complete the demonstration of coating removal from concrete ceiling and aggressive contamination removal on uncoated concrete wall using their Robotic Climber. The design of test beds for large-scale technology demonstration of blockage locating and pipe unplugging has undergone major revision. The lab-scale test loop is also under modification. A new sampling system using isokinetic principles and consisting of thermistors, flow controller, and Wheatstone bridge will be installed on the flow loop. FIU-HCET International Coordinator attended the VII Steering Committee meeting in Lima, Peru, on February 11-12, 1999, and successfully introduced the Interactive Communication Website. Additional agenda items on the Website were proposed by the Steering Committee for upcoming committee meetings and working groups.

  8. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-06-30

    To enhance the measurement capability of EICs to alpha spectrometry, measurements at FIU-HCET were performed on different energy alpha sources, and response factors of ST electrets in 960-mL chamber were determined. Earlier, EIC was considered as only a charge-integrating device without spectrometric capability. This is a potentially significant development accomplished by FIU-HCET. It could appreciably lower the current cost of spectral characterization. FIU-HCET has been invited to participate in the Operating Engineers' National Hazmat program's assessment of the Mini Mitter, commercially known as the VitalSense{trademark} Telemetric Monitoring System. This evaluation is scheduled for early July 1999. Additional health and safety technology evaluations, in which FIU-HCET will also participate, are also scheduled for later in the summer. The Technology Information System (TIS), MISD, and DASD are now complete and accessible through the Internet website http://www.DandD.org/tis.

  9. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-09-30

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) demonstration of the diamond wire cutting technology on the surrogate of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Figure 1, was performed from August 23-September 3, 1999. The plated diamond wire, Figure 2, was successful in cutting through all components of the TFTR surrogate including stainless steel, inconel and graphite. The demonstration tested three different void fill materials (mortar with sand, Rheocell-15, and foam) and three cooling systems (water, air, and liquid nitrogen). The optimum combination was determined to be the use of the low-density concrete void fill, Rheocell-15 with an average density of 52 lbs/ft{sup 3}, using a water coolant. However, the liquid nitrogen performed better than expected with only minor problems and was considered to be a successful demonstration of the Bluegrass Concrete Cutting, Inc. proprietary liquid-nitrogen coolant system. Data from the demonstration is being calculated and a summary of the technology demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. An ITSR will be written comparing the diamond wire saw to the plasma arc (baseline) technology. The MTR Chemical Protective Suit, a proprietary new suit from Kimberly Clark, was evaluated from 8/9/99 to 8/12/99 at Beaver, WV. This particular suit was tested on subjects performing three different tasks: climbing through a horizontal confined space, vertical confined space (pit), and loading and unloading material using a wheel barrow. Multiple test subjects performed each task for 20 minutes each. Performance of the innovative suit was compared to two commonly used types of protective clothing. Vital statistics, including body temperature and heart rate, were continuously monitored and recorded by an authorized physician. A summary of the demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. Along with the MTR Chemical Protective Suit, the VitalSense{trademark} Telemetric Monitoring System from Mini Mitter

  10. Hazardous waste in Illinois: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heavisides, T.K.; LaScala, R.; Reddy, K.R.; Warren, T.J.; Zyznieuski, W.

    1983-12-01

    Hazardous waste management is recognized as one of the most critical human health and environmental issues of the decade. The State of Illinois, as a major center of industry and agriculture, has been ranked as the second largest generator of hazardous waste in the nation. This report provides a comprehensive review of the hazardous waste issue in Illinois, including how wastes are generated and managed, the environmental and health risks associated with improper management practices, and a discussion of legislative and governmental policies which effect hazardous waste. The report also contains two appendices, the first which provides a discussion of alternative technologies for hazardous waste disposal, the second which contains the full text of a supplementary report on hazardous waste management in Illinois, developed by Patterson Associates, Inc.

  11. Technologies for Learner-Centered Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, Jane; Crane, Daph

    2013-01-01

    As the number, type, and use of technologies to support learning increases, so do the opportunities for using these technologies for feedback. Learner-centered feedback is a core to the teaching-learning process. It is related to assessment in describing how learners perform in their learning, their gain in knowledge, skills, and attitudes.…

  12. Center for Assistive Technology & Environmental Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... new address and college name * The Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access Georgia Institute of Technology (GT) College of Design 512 Means St., Suite 300, Atlanta, GA 30332-0156 (for shipping, please use 30318) U.S.A. Phone: 404-894-4960 (v/tty) ... | Privacy Agreement

  13. Join TTC! | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) offers a unique opportunity for training through the NCI TTC Fellowship program. TTC also has a unit dedicated to marketing these research opportunities and their underlying technologies to potential collaborators and licensees. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  14. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Ebadian

    2000-01-31

    The Online Measurement of Decontamination project team received a commitment for a demonstration in May from the Sacramento (California) Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Rancho Seco site. Since this site is a member of the DOE Commercial Utilities Consortium, the demonstration will fulfill the DOE and commercial technology demonstration requirements. Discussion on deployment of the Integrated Vertical and Overhead Decontamination (IVOD) System at Rancho Seco was conducted; date for deployment tentatively scheduled for early spring. Based upon fictional requirements from SRS for a shiny monitor in a high-level waste tank, FIU-HCET developed and delivered a draft slurry monitor design and draft test plan. Experiments measuring slurry settling time for SRS slurry simulant at 10 wt% have been completed on FIU-HCET'S flow loop with SRS dip. The completed design package of the test mockup for evaluating Non-Intrusive Location of Buried Items Technologies was sent to Fluor Fernald and the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program for review. Comments are due at the end of January. Preliminary experiments to determine size distribution of aerosols generated during metal cutting were performed. A 1/4-inch-thick iron plate was cut using a plasma arc torch, and the size distribution of airborne particles was measured using a multistage impactor. Per request of DOE-Ohio, FIU-HCET participated in a weeklong value engineering study for the characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement of their critical path facility.

  15. Satisloh centering technology developments past to present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitz, Ernst Michael; Moos, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    The centering of an optical lens is the grinding of its edge profile or contour in relationship to its optical axis. This is required to ensure that the lens vertex and radial centers are accurately positioned within an optical system. Centering influences the imaging performance and contrast of an optical system. Historically, lens centering has been a purely manual process. Along its 62 years of assembling centering machines, Satisloh introduced several technological milestones to improve the accuracy and quality of this process. During this time more than 2.500 centering machines were assembled. The development went from bell clamping and diamond grinding to Laser alignment, exchange chuckor -spindle systems, to multi axis CNC machines with integrated metrology and automatic loading systems. With the new centering machine C300, several improvements for the clamping and grinding process were introduced. These improvements include a user friendly software to support the operator, a coolant manifold and "force grinding" technology to ensure excellent grinding quality and process stability. They also include an air bearing directly driven centering spindle to provide a large working range of lenses made of all optical materials and diameters from below 10 mm to 300 mm. The clamping force can be programmed between 7 N and 1200 N to safely center lenses made of delicate materials. The smaller C50 centering machine for lenses below 50 mm diameter is available with an optional CNC loading system for automated production.

  16. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-05-15

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  17. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher E. Hull

    2005-11-04

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  18. Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-09-30

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  19. Center for Coastline Security Technology, Year 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Figure 2.6.8: Close-Up Photograph of RPUUV Tail Section. Figure 2.6.9: Force and moments applied on a hydrofoil . Figure 2.6.10: The NACA 21016... hydrofoil profile. Florida Atlantic University 4/28/08 Page 10 Center for Coastline Security Technology Year Three-Final Report Figure...as a 3D wing with a NACA 21016 hydrofoil profile (Figure 2.6.10) held by 3 cylinders (Figure 2.6.8). Center for Coastline Security Technology Year

  20. 2017 Technology Showcase | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 2017 Technology Showcase is an inaugural, half-day event that will showcase technologies developed by the National Cancer Institute's Center for Cancer Research (CCR) and the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research (FNLCR). The goal of the Showcase is to encourage startup company formation, technology licensing, and public-private collaborations. It will introduce the Frederick community to the regional technology development stakeholders, as well as highlight available resources. WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Prospective investors, established companies, educators, those looking to commercialize technologies, and all interested stakeholders. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  1. Technologies for learner-centered feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Costello

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As the number, type, and use of technologies to support learning increases, so do the opportunities for using these technologies for feedback. Learner-centered feedback is a core to the teaching-learning process. It is related to assessment in describing how learners perform in their learning, their gain in knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Feedback, types of feedback, guidelines for effective learner-centered feedback, and feedback’s relationship to assessment are presented. Methods of providing feedback, for example, automated, audio scribe pens, digital audio, etc., and the related technologies are described. Technologies that allow instructors to make informed decisions about the use of various methods for feedback are discussed.

  2. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Hodgson; David Irick

    2005-09-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its sixth year of operation. During this period the Center has involved thirteen GATE Fellows and ten GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center's focus area: hybrid drive trains and control systems. Eighteen GATE students have graduated, and three have completed their course work requirements. Nine faculty members from three departments in the College of Engineering have been involved in the GATE Center. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as internships, equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $4,000,000. Problem areas are discussed in the hope that future activities may benefit from the operation of the current program.

  3. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since the government cannot engage in the development, manufacture, and sale of products, the NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) makes its discoveries (and discoveries from nine other NIH Institutes) available to organizations that can assist in the further development and commercialization of these basic science discoveries, to convert them into public health benefits. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  4. About TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners, and helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class facilities, resources, and discoveries. Contact us to learn more. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  5. Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Investments Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, Mike

    2014-01-01

    NASA is moving forward with prioritized technology investments that will support NASA's exploration and science missions, while benefiting other Government agencies and the U.S. aerospace enterprise. center dotThe plan provides the guidance for NASA's space technology investments during the next four years, within the context of a 20-year horizon center dotThis plan will help ensure that NASA develops technologies that enable its 4 goals to: 1.Sustain and extend human activities in space, 2.Explore the structure, origin, and evolution of the solar system, and search for life past and present, 3.Expand our understanding of the Earth and the universe and have a direct and measurable impact on how we work and live, and 4.Energize domestic space enterprise and extend benefits of space for the Nation.

  6. The Hydrogen Technology Center at Wyle Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, H.; Smith, D.; Frazier, J.

    1990-10-01

    A deactivated storable propellant test area with numerous test cells, large open concrete pads of up to 65-ft length, and two enclosed metal storage buildings, has been converted into a Hydrogen Technology Center. The conversion strategy involved extensive use of modified surplus equipment, well established testing technologies, and innovative engineering to obviate long-delivery time items. Simple, high heat flux water-to-cryogen heat exchangers are used to generate ambient temperature H2 and N gas. Hydrogen-fueled combustors were designed and fabricated to power the specialized heat exchangers required to support high-temperature hydrogen experiments. The facility has operated productively and safely since October, 1988.

  7. A comparison study of column flotation technologies for cleaning Illinois coal. Final technical report, September 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honaker, R.Q.; Paul, B.C.

    1994-12-31

    Six commercially-available column technologies were compared on the basis of their separation performance, throughput capacity and operational characteristics for treating Illinois Basin coal fines. The flotation column technologies included in this study were the Jameson Cell, Flotaire, Turboair, Packed-Column, Microcel and the Canadian Column. The coal samples treated in this study were a {minus}100 mesh flotation feed slurry, a {minus}40 mesh coal, and a refuse pond coal sample. This investigation found that the Packed Column, Jameson Cell, and Microcel are the best flotation columns for cleaning the Illinois Basin coals treated in this study. The Packed-Column was found to provide superior selectivity, although requiring the highest amount of air and frother concentration. The superior performance is believed to be related to the extensive reflux action and selective detachment mechanism that are more prevalent in the Packed-Column due to its unique ability to support a full froth column. Among the conventional open columns, the Microcel provided the best selectivity, most likely due to its lower aeration requirement which results in a more plug-flow environment within the cell. Both the Packed-Column and the Microcel appeared to have nearly equal throughput capacities. The Jameson Cell, which also has a relatively high throughput capacity, was found to require the least amount of frother while supplying a self-inducing air system. Another important finding of this investigation is that the traditional release analysis procedure is inadequate for predicting the optimum performance of advanced froth flotation processes and, thus, requires further investigation.

  8. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry. The TTC supports technology development activities for the National Cancer Institute and nine other NIH Institutes and Centers. TTC staff negotiate co-development agreements and licenses with universities, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to ensure compliance with Federal statutes, regulations and the policies of the National Institutes of Health. TTC also reviews employee invention reports and makes recommendations concerning filing of domestic and foreign patent applications. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  9. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2004-05-12

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the seventeen subprojects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of project activity only. The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium--Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno--that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation (2) Solid-liquid separation (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction (4) Modeling and Control, and (5) Environmental Control.

  10. User-centered Technologies For Blind Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Sánchez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review, summarize, and illustrate research work involving four audio-based games created within a user-centered design methodology through successive usability tasks and evaluations. These games were designed by considering the mental model of blind children and their styles of interaction to perceive and process data and information. The goal of these games was to enhance the cognitive development of spatial structures, memory, haptic perception, mathematical skills, navigation and orientation, and problem solving of blind children. Findings indicate significant improvements in learning and cognition from using audio-based tools specially tailored for the blind. That is, technologies for blind children, carefully tailored through user-centered design approaches, can make a significant contribution to cognitive development of these children. This paper contributes new insight into the design and implementation of audio-based virtual environments to facilitate learning and cognition in blind children.

  11. CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGY (CAST) PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Hull, Christopher

    2014-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations.

  12. Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies.

  13. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher E. Hull

    2005-01-20

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2003, U.S. mining operations produced $57 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $564 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation; (2) Solid-liquid separation; (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction; (4) Modeling and Control; and (5) Environmental Control.

  14. Scientific Data Management Center for Enabling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vouk, Mladen A.

    2013-01-15

    Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Fortunately, the data management problems encountered by most scientific domains are common enough to be addressed through shared technology solutions. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation, analysis, or visualization engine. These processes are complicated by the fact that scientific data are structured differently for specific application domains, and are stored in specialized file formats. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Specialized feature discovery and statistical analysis techniques are needed before the data can be understood or visualized. Furthermore, interactive analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Finally, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration. The SDM center was established under the SciDAC program to address these issues. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced

  15. Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher Hull

    2009-10-31

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2003, U.S. mining operations produced $57 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $564 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium -- Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation; (2) Solid-liquid separation; (3) Chemical/biological extraction; (4) Modeling and control; and (5) Environmental control. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the seven member universities. These were first reviewed and ranked by a group of technical reviewers (selected primarily from industry). Based on these reviews, and an assessment of overall program requirements, the CAST Technical Committee made an initial selection/ranking of proposals and forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed by category, along with brief abstracts of their aims and objectives.

  16. Center for Global Health announces grants to support portable technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI's Center for Global Health announced grants that will support the development and validation of low-cost, portable technologies. These technologies have the potential to improve early detection, diagnosis, and non-invasive or minimally invasive treatm

  17. Illinois River NWFR HMP

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Illinois River National Wildlife and Fish Refuges Complex stretches along 124 miles of the Illinois River in west central Illinois. The Complex includes three...

  18. Success Continues: NASA-Developed Plant Health Measurement Technology is Becoming Big Business for Illinois Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Originally produced in 2001, sales of Spectrum Technologies' CM 1000 chlorophyll meter have now topped $290,000 on 140 units. Up-to-date sales figures for 2003 have shown an almost 50% increase over the combined sales totals of 2001 and 2002. The CM 1000 chlorophyll meter identifies the failing health of a plant based on the chlorophyll content of the plant up to 16 days before it is physically detectable by the human eye. Poor health, 'stress' in a plant, is a result of unfavorable growing conditions; lack of nutrients, insufficient water, disease or insect damage.

  19. Applied technology center business plan and market survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgin, Robert F.; Marchesini, Roberto

    1990-01-01

    Business plan and market survey for the Applied Technology Center (ATC), computer technology transfer and development non-profit corporation, is presented. The mission of the ATC is to stimulate innovation in state-of-the-art and leading edge computer based technology. The ATC encourages the practical utilization of late-breaking computer technologies by firms of all variety.

  20. Illinois: Library Automation and Connectivity Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Bridget L.; Bloomberg, Kathleen L.

    1996-01-01

    Discussion of library automation in Illinois focuses on ILLINET, the Illinois Library and Information Network. Topics include automated resource sharing; ILLINET's online catalog; regional library system automation; community networking and public library technology development; telecommunications initiatives; electronic access to state government…

  1. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2003-11-15

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (a) Solid-solid separation (b) Solid-liquid separation (c) Chemical/Biological Extraction (d) Modeling and Control, and (e) Environmental Control. Distribution of funds is being handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the seven member universities. The first of these solicitations, referred to as the CAST II-Round 1 RFP, was issued on October 28, 2002. Thirty-eight proposals were received by the December 10, 2002 deadline for this RFP-eleven (11) Solid-Solid Separation, seven (7) Solid-Liquid Separation, ten (10) Chemical/Biological Extraction, six (6) Modeling & Control and four (4) Environmental Control. These were first reviewed and ranked by a group of technical reviewers (selected primarily from industry). Based on these reviews, and an assessment of overall program requirements, the CAST Technical Committee made an initial selection/ranking of proposals and forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. This process took some 7 months to complete but 17 projects (one joint) were in place at the constituent universities (three at Virginia Tech, two at West Virginia University, three at University of

  2. Emerging Technologies: Applications and Implications for School Library Media Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    This paper examines emerging information technologies and their implications for school library media centers. Because of the fluctuating situation regarding new innovations, only emerging technologies that specialists believe will occur within the next 5 to 10 years are discussed. For each technology mentioned, a brief description is given…

  3. Inauguration of the Stoll Fashion & Technology Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ On April 1st 2009 the new Stoll Fashion & Technology showroom will be opened in New York.The new showroom is situated in the heart of the Garment District of Manhattan,New York and will present the opportunity to gain hands-on experience to the services of the Stoll Fashion & Technology world.The highlight of the inauguration at the 15.000 square feet showroom will be the introduction to the reinvented service approach as well as innovative projects under the Stoll Fashion & Technology Company.

  4. Marshall Space Flight Center ECLSS technology activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Paul

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) technology activities are presented. Topics covered include: analytical development; ECLSS modeling approach; example of water reclamation modeling needs; and hardware development and testing.

  5. Biological Semiconductors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Cancer Diagnostic Program and the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological semiconductors as diagnostic sensors.

  6. Second leader named at Center for Geospatial Information Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Stephen Prisley of Blacksburg, associate professor of forestry in the College of Natural Resources at Virginia Tech, will become the director of the university's Center for Geospatial Information Technology (CGIT) as of May 15.

  7. A feasibility study for a manufacturing technology deployment center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-10-31

    The Automation & Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) and the Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the feasibility of a regional industrial technology institute to be located at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Facility in Waxahachie, Texas. In response to this opportunity, ARRI and TEEX teamed with the DOE Kansas City Plant (managed by Allied Signal, Inc.), Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California), Vought Aircraft Company, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), SSC Laboratory, KPMG Peat Marwick, Dallas County Community College, Navarro Community College, Texas Department of Commerce (TDOC), Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC), Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Arkansas Science and Technology Authority, Louisiana Productivity Center, and the NASA Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) to develop a series of options, perform the feasibility analysis and secure industrial reviews of the selected concepts. The final report for this study is presented in three sections: Executive Summary, Business Plan, and Technical Plan. The results from the analysis of the proposed concept support the recommendation of creating a regional technology alliance formed by the states of Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana through the conversion of the SSC Central facility into a Manufacturing Technology Deployment Center (MTDC).

  8. 2017 Technology Showcase Presentations | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentations from the 2017 Technology Showcase by NIH Intramural Research Program scientists held at Frederick National Laboratories for Cancer Research on June 7, 2017. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  9. Marshall Space Flight Center Research and Technology Report 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinker, M. L.; Abney, M. B. (Compiler); Reynolds, D. W. (Compiler); Morris, H. C. (Compiler)

    2017-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center is essential to human space exploration and our work is a catalyst for ongoing technological development. As we address the challenges facing human deep space exploration, we advance new technologies and applications here on Earth, expand scientific knowledge and discovery, create new economic opportunities, and continue to lead global space exploration.

  10. Evaluating an Assistive Technology Resource Center in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hua-Kuo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is intended to present the procedure and outcomes of an evaluation of the Assistive Technology Resource Center in a city of Taiwan. The evaluation was initiated by Chiayi City Government through inviting three professionals in the field of assistive technology as evaluators. For the purpose of evaluation, the Executive…

  11. The Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center Summer Fellows Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depken, Diane E.; Zeman, Catherine L.; Lensch, Ellen Kabat; Brown, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the background, activities, and outcomes of the Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center (ATEEC) and its Summer Fellows Institutes as a model for disciplinary and cross-disciplinary infusion of environmental science and technology content, curriculum, and methods into the classroom. Presents experiences, themes, and activities…

  12. SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy, Kenneth I. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-09-14

    This project focuses on leveraging scientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technology have resulted in an "information big bang," which in turn has created a significant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporary science. The vision for our Center is to respond directly to that challenge by adapting, extending, creating when necessary and deploying visualization and data understanding technologies for our science stakeholders. Using an organizational model as a Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET), we are well positioned to be responsive to the needs of a diverse set of scientific stakeholders in a coordinated fashion using a range of visualization, mathematics, statistics, computer and computational science and data management technologies.

  13. Technology Transfer Center to Assume Patenting and Licensing Responsibilities | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) is undergoing a reorganization that will bring patenting and licensing responsibilities to the Shady Grove and Frederick offices by October 2015. The reorganization is a result of an effort begun in 2014 by NIH to improve the organizational structure of technology transfer at NIH to meet the rapid rate of change within science, technology, and industry, and to better align the science and laboratory goals with the licensing and patenting process.

  14. Technology Transfer Center to Assume Patenting and Licensing Responsibilities | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) is undergoing a reorganization that will bring patenting and licensing responsibilities to the Shady Grove and Frederick offices by October 2015. The reorganization is a result of an effort begun in 2014 by NIH to improve the organizational structure of technology transfer at NIH to meet the rapid rate of change within science, technology, and industry, and to better align the science and laboratory goals with the licensing and patenting process.

  15. 77 FR 43131 - Designation of the Center for Innovation and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... Designation of the Center for Innovation and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry Industries (PCI... of the Center for Innovation and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry Industries (PCI... determined that the Center for Innovation and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry Industries...

  16. 77 FR 43368 - Navistar Truck Development and Technology Center, a Subsidiary of Navistar International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-24

    ... Employment and Training Administration Navistar Truck Development and Technology Center, a Subsidiary of... October 20, 2011, applicable to workers of Navistar International Truck Development and Technology Center... Truck Development and Technology Center, a Subsidiary of Navistar International Corporation,...

  17. The potential of RFID technology in Blood Center processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebo, V; Klement, P; Cermáková, Z; Gottfried, J; Sommerová, M; Palecek, A

    2010-01-01

    Current RFID technology deployment is limited by safety, procedural and physical limitations in healthcare field. It is important to define and ensure safe operation of technologies without actual deployment in real operation. Potential problems could arise due to the consequences of technical and physical characteristics of RFID technology and its improper location. This article deals with manipulation of blood products and the definition of suitable places for radio identification. Each suitable place must undergo laboratory experiments and tests. The results can provide a convenient base for defining efficient and safe deployment of RFID technology in Blood Centers with substantial financial savings for Czech healthcare.

  18. Sustainable Technology Research and Demonstration Center for Earth Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Ueda

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This is a discussion paper that the authors presented at the International Workshop on Rammed Earth Materials and Sustainable Structures and Hakka Tulou Forum 2011: Structures of Sustainability, 28–31 October 2011, Xiamen University, China. A Sustainable Technology Research and Demonstration Center for Earth Structures is proposed to study, preserve, advance, promote, and implement rammed earth structures. The Center concept including the objectives, scope of activities and benefits of the proposed center are outlined. The Center for Alternative Technology in Wales, UK has been examined as a good base model along with a few successful environmental sustainability initiatives in China. The funding options to establish the proposed center have been discussed. The breadth of activities ultimately depends on funding capability. It is believed that the proposed center development will require significant government support at the initial stage but once corporate sponsorships are in place, the proposed center will potentially become self-supporting. The strategies, for the establishment of the proposed center are also addressed.

  19. Overview of Stirling Technology Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Williams, Zachary D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) are under development to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, fly by, land, or rove using less than a quarter of the plutonium the currently available RPS uses to produce about the same power. NASA Glenn Research Center's newly formulated Stirling Cycle Technology Development Project (SCTDP) continues development of Stirling-based systems and subsystems, which include a flight-like generator and related housing assembly, controller, and convertors. The project also develops less mature technologies under Stirling Technology Research, with a focus on demonstration in representative environments to increase the technology readiness level (TRL). Matured technologies are evaluated for selection in future generator designs. Stirling Technology Research tasks focus on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, reducing generator mass and/or size, improving reliability and system fault tolerance, and developing alternative designs. The task objectives and status are summarized.

  20. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  1. SAVANNAH RIVER TECHNOLOGY CENTER MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1999-06-21

    'This monthly report summarizes Programs and Accomplishments of the Savannah River Technology Center in support of activities at the Savannah River Site. The following categories are addressed: Reactor, Tritium, Separations, Environmental, Waste Management, General, and Items of Interest.'

  2. Centers for manufacturing technology: Industrial Advisory Committee Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    An advisory committee, composed of senior managers form industrial- sector companies and major manufacturing trade associations and representatives from appropriate educational institutions, meets semi-annually to review and advise the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT) on its economic security program. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

  3. Sino-Swiss center for cassava technology launched in Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Under the joint sponsorship of the Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences (SIBS) and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), the Shanghai Center for Cassava Biotechnology (SCCB) has been established at the Shanghai Institute of Plant Physiology and Ecology(SIPE), SIBS.

  4. User-centered design and interactive health technologies for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vito Dabbs, Annette; Myers, Brad A; Mc Curry, Kenneth R; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Hawkins, Robert P; Begey, Alex; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Despite recommendations that patients be involved in the design and testing of health technologies, few reports describe how to involve patients in systematic and meaningful ways to ensure that applications are customized to meet their needs. User-centered design is an approach that involves end users throughout the development process so that technologies support tasks, are easy to operate, and are of value to users. In this article, we provide an overview of user-centered design and use the development of Pocket Personal Assistant for Tracking Health (Pocket PATH) to illustrate how these principles and techniques were applied to involve patients in the development of this interactive health technology. Involving patient-users in the design and testing ensured functionality and usability, therefore increasing the likelihood of promoting the intended health outcomes.

  5. Development and Implementation of the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium CO2-Technology Transfer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, Sallie E. [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-06-30

    In 2009, the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS), in collaboration with the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), created a regional technology training center to disseminate carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technology gained through leadership and participation in regional carbon sequestration projects. This technology training center was titled and branded as the Sequestration Training and Education Program (STEP). Over the last six years STEP has provided local, regional, national, and international education and training opportunities for engineers, geologists, service providers, regulators, executives, K-12 students, K-12 educators, undergraduate students, graduate students, university and community college faculty members, and participants of community programs and functions, community organizations, and others. The goal for STEP educational programs has been on knowledge sharing and capacity building to stimulate economic recovery and development by training personnel for commercial CCS projects. STEP has worked with local, national and international professional organizations and regional experts to leverage existing training opportunities and provide stand-alone training. This report gives detailed information on STEP activities during the grant period (2009-2015).

  6. 76 FR 11498 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI) SUMMARY: Under... control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC... collaborations and alliances with the NIH. The needs of external technology transfer customers and stakeholders...

  7. SciDAC visualization and analytics center for enabling technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E Wes [Computing Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, The University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-8139 (United States); Johnson, Chris [Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah, 72 S. Central Campus Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Joy, Ken [Institute for Data Analysis and Visualization, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-8562 (United States); Ahern, Sean [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, PO Box 2008 MS-6016, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Pascucci, Valerio [Center for Applied Scientific Computing, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-561, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Childs, Hank [Center for Applied Scientific Computing, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-561, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Cohen, Jonathan; Duchaineau, Mark [Center for Applied Scientific Computing, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-561, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Hamann, Bernd [Institute for Data Analysis and Visualization, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616-8562 (United States); Hansen, Charles; Parker, Steven; Silva, Claudio; Sanderson, Allen; Tricoche, Xavier [Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah, 72 S. Central Campus Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Laney, Dan [Center for Applied Scientific Computing, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-561, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Lindstrom, Peter [Center for Applied Scientific Computing, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-561, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Meredith, Jeremy; Ostrouchov, George [National Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, PO Box 2008 MS-6016, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    The Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) focuses on leveraging scientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technology have resulted in an 'information big bang,' which in turn has created a significant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporary science. The vision of VACET is to adapt, extend, create when necessary, and deploy visual data analysis solutions that are responsive to the needs of DOE's computational and experimental scientists. Our center is engineered to be directly responsive to those needs and to deliver solutions for use in DOE's large open computing facilities. The research and development directly target data understanding problems provided by our scientific application stakeholders. VACET draws from a diverse set of visualization technology ranging from production quality applications and application frameworks to state-of-the-art algorithms for visualization, analysis, analytics, data manipulation, and data management.

  8. Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackin, Thomas

    2012-06-30

    The Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT) was established to advance the state of the art in knowledge and education on critical technologies that support a renewable energy future. Our research and education efforts have focused on alternative energy systems, energy storage systems, and research on battery and hybrid energy storage systems.This report details the Center's progress in the following specific areas: Development of a battery laboratory; Development of a demonstration system for compressed air energy storage; Development of electric propulsion test systems; Battery storage systems; Thermal management of battery packs; and Construction of a micro-grid to support real-world performance monitoring of a renewable energy system.

  9. Establishment of the Center for Biomedical Technology Innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-15

    The report discussed the following topics: (1) Orthopedic Devices; (2) Hybrid Vector and Method Resulting in Protein Overproduction by Eukaryotic Cells; (3) Surgical Simulator; (4) CBTI (Center for Biomedical Technology Innovation) as an Incubator for Start-up Companies; (5) Voice-activated, computer-assisted surgical robotics; (6) Through transmission ultrasonic 3-D holography for diagnostic imaging; (7) CBTI's Scibermed{trademark} Virtual Institute (SVI); and (8) Laser Oxygenation Tomography.

  10. Career and Technology Center Honors Julie Hartman | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On May 7, Julie Hartman was honored by the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC) for her support of the CTC’s Biomedical Sciences Program. As an education program specialist for Outreach and Special Programs at NCI at Frederick, Hartman is responsible for NCI at Frederick’s participation in the program, which is designed to offer Frederick County high school students hands-on, practical laboratory experience beyond the typical classroom setting. 

  11. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2003-07-01

    Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the eight sub-projects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41091: Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of activity only.

  12. Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-09-30

    This Final Technical Report covers the eight sub-projects awarded in the first year and the five projects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41091: Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  13. Center for BioBased Binders and Pollution Reduction Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiel, Jerry [Univ. of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, IA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Funding will support the continuation of the Center for Advanced Bio-based Binders and Pollution Reduction Technology Center (CABB) in the development of bio-based polymers and emission reduction technologies for the metal casting industry. Since the formation of the center several new polymers based on agricultural materials have been developed. These new materials have show decreases in hazardous air pollutants, phenol and formaldehyde as much as 50 to 80% respectively. The polymers termed bio-polymers show a great potential to utilize current renewable agricultural resources to replace petroleum based products and reduce our dependence on importing of foreign oil. The agricultural technology has shown drastic reductions in the emission of hazardous air pollutants and volatile organic compounds and requires further development to maintain competitive costs and productivity. The project will also research new and improved inorganic binders that promise to eliminate hazardous emissions from foundry casting operations and allow for the beneficial reuse of the materials and avoiding the burdening of overcrowded landfills.

  14. Hispanic Superintendents in Illinois: Current Trends and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The trends and challenges faced by Hispanic superintendents in Illinois are stated and analyzed throughout the study in both literature and practice. The examined items centered on the issues of hiring experiences and other barriers associated with the acquisition and longevity of the superintendency in Illinois. Data for the study were collected…

  15. Armstrong Flight Research Center Research Technology and Engineering Report 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, David F.

    2016-01-01

    I am honored to endorse the 2015 Neil A. Armstrong Flight Research Center’s Research, Technology, and Engineering Report. The talented researchers, engineers, and scientists at Armstrong are continuing a long, rich legacy of creating innovative approaches to solving some of the difficult problems and challenges facing NASA and the aerospace community.Projects at NASA Armstrong advance technologies that will improve aerodynamic efficiency, increase fuel economy, reduce emissions and aircraft noise, and enable the integration of unmanned aircraft into the national airspace. The work represented in this report highlights the Center’s agility to develop technologies supporting each of NASA’s core missions and, more importantly, technologies that are preparing us for the future of aviation and space exploration.We are excited about our role in NASA’s mission to develop transformative aviation capabilities and open new markets for industry. One of our key strengths is the ability to rapidly move emerging techniques and technologies into flight evaluation so that we can quickly identify their strengths, shortcomings, and potential applications.This report presents a brief summary of the technology work of the Center. It also contains contact information for the associated technologists responsible for the work. Don’t hesitate to contact them for more information or for collaboration ideas.

  16. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed.

  17. Robotic Technology Efforts at the NASA/Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diftler, Ron

    2017-01-01

    The NASA/Johnson Space Center has been developing robotic systems in support of space exploration for more than two decades. The goal of the Center's Robotic Systems Technology Branch is to design and build hardware and software to assist astronauts in performing their mission. These systems include: rovers, humanoid robots, inspection devices and wearable robotics. Inspection systems provide external views of space vehicles to search for surface damage and also maneuver inside restricted areas to verify proper connections. New concepts in human and robotic rovers offer solutions for navigating difficult terrain expected in future planetary missions. An important objective for humanoid robots is to relieve the crew of "dull, dirty or dangerous" tasks allowing them more time to perform their important science and exploration missions. Wearable robotics one of the Center's newest development areas can provide crew with low mass exercise capability and also augment an astronaut's strength while wearing a space suit. This presentation will describe the robotic technology and prototypes developed at the Johnson Space Center that are the basis for future flight systems. An overview of inspection robots will show their operation on the ground and in-orbit. Rovers with independent wheel modules, crab steering, and active suspension are able to climb over large obstacles, and nimbly maneuver around others. Humanoid robots, including the First Humanoid Robot in Space: Robonaut 2, demonstrate capabilities that will lead to robotic caretakers for human habitats in space, and on Mars. The Center's Wearable Robotics Lab supports work in assistive and sensing devices, including exoskeletons, force measuring shoes, and grasp assist gloves.

  18. Proceedings: USA-CERL Technology Transfer (T2) Workshop Held in Urbana, Illinois on December 15-16 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    forth in Army Regulation (AR) 70-57 and the Stevenson -Wydler Act of 1980. Publication of these proceedings was an initiative of the USA-CERL Commander and...Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1979. U.S. Congress, House of Representatives, Committee on Science and Technology, Stevenson -Wydler Technology...Composting latrines are large chambers in which wastes and organic bulking agents are "’’ i placed for biological and physical breakdown into humus -like

  19. NASA Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program Technology Innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishen, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program increases opportunities for small businesses to participate in research and development (R&D), increases employment, and improves U.S. competitiveness. Specifically the program stimulates U.S. technological innovation by using small businesses to meet federal R&D needs, increasing private-sector commercialization of innovations derived from federal R&D, and fostering and encouraging the participation of socially disadvantaged businesses. In 2000, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program extended and strengthened the SBIR Program, increasing its emphasis on pursuing commercial applications by awarding contracts to small business concerns for cooperative R&D with a nonprofit research institution. Modeled after the SBIR Program, STTR is nevertheless a separately funded activity. Technologies that have resulted from the Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program include: a device for regenerating iodinated resin beds; laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis or LASIK; a miniature physiological monitoring device capable of collecting and analyzing a multitude of real-time signals to transmit medical data from remote locations to medical centers for diagnosis and intervention; a new thermal management system for fibers and fabrics giving rise to new line of garments and thermal-enhancing environments; and a highly electropositive material that attracts and retains electronegative particles in water.

  20. Illinois State Library Strategic Plan: 2008-2011. Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jesse

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the progress made by the Illinois State Library for 2008-2011. The library's achievements are presented according to the following goals: (1) Promote the use of technology to improve library services; (2) Provide leadership to the Illinois Library community to enhance library service; (3) Increase access to library services for…

  1. Alternative treatment technology information center computer database system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Edison, NJ (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Alternative Treatment Technology Information Center (ATTIC) computer database system was developed pursuant to the 1986 Superfund law amendments. It provides up-to-date information on innovative treatment technologies to clean up hazardous waste sites. ATTIC v2.0 provides access to several independent databases as well as a mechanism for retrieving full-text documents of key literature. It can be accessed with a personal computer and modem 24 hours a day, and there are no user fees. ATTIC provides {open_quotes}one-stop shopping{close_quotes} for information on alternative treatment options by accessing several databases: (1) treatment technology database; this contains abstracts from the literature on all types of treatment technologies, including biological, chemical, physical, and thermal methods. The best literature as viewed by experts is highlighted. (2) treatability study database; this provides performance information on technologies to remove contaminants from wastewaters and soils. It is derived from treatability studies. This database is available through ATTIC or separately as a disk that can be mailed to you. (3) underground storage tank database; this presents information on underground storage tank corrective actions, surface spills, emergency response, and remedial actions. (4) oil/chemical spill database; this provides abstracts on treatment and disposal of spilled oil and chemicals. In addition to these separate databases, ATTIC allows immediate access to other disk-based systems such as the Vendor Information System for Innovative Treatment Technologies (VISITT) and the Bioremediation in the Field Search System (BFSS). The user may download these programs to their own PC via a high-speed modem. Also via modem, users are able to download entire documents through the ATTIC system. Currently, about fifty publications are available, including Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program documents.

  2. The 1991 research and technology report, Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Montgomery, Harry (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Boyle, Charles (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The 1991 Research and Technology Report for Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. Research covered areas such as (1) earth sciences including upper atmosphere, lower atmosphere, oceans, hydrology, and global studies; (2) space sciences including solar studies, planetary studies, Astro-1, gamma ray investigations, and astrophysics; (3) flight projects; (4) engineering including robotics, mechanical engineering, electronics, imaging and optics, thermal and cryogenic studies, and balloons; and (5) ground systems, networks, and communications including data and networks, TDRSS, mission planning and scheduling, and software development and test.

  3. National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation`s primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate.

  4. The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J.

    1993-03-05

    Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques.

  5. Scientific and educational center "space systems and technology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, I. V.; Loginov, Y. Y.; Zelenkov, P. V.

    2015-10-01

    The issues of engineers training in the aerospace university on the base of Scientific and Educational Center "Space Systems and Technology" are discussed. In order to improve the quality of education in the Siberian State Aerospace University the research work of students, as well as the practice- oriented training of engineers are introduced in the educational process. It was made possible as a result of joint efforts of university with research institutes of the Russian Academy of Science and industrial enterprises. The university experience in this area promotes the development of a new methods and forms of educational activities, including the project-oriented learning technologies, identifying promising areas of specialization and training of highly skilled engineers for aerospace industry and other institutions. It also allows you to coordinate the work of departments and other units of the university to provide the educational process in workshops and departments of the industrial enterprises in accordance with the needs of the target training. Within the framework of scientific and education center the students perform researches, diploma works and master's theses; the postgraduates are trained in advanced scientific and technical areas of enterprise development.

  6. Research and technology, fiscal year 1986, Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is continuing its vigorous efforts in space-related research and technology. Extensive activities in advanced studies have led to the approval of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle as a new start. Significant progress was made in definition studies of liquid rocket engine systems for future space transportation needs and the conceptualization of advanced laucnch vehicles. The space systems definition studies have brought the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and Gravity Probe-B to a high degree of maturity. Both are ready for project implementation. Also discussed include significant advances in low gravity sciences, solar terrestrial physics, high energy astrophysics, atmospheric sciences, propulsion systems, and on the critical element of the Space Shuttle Main Engine in particular. The goals of improving the productivity of high-cost repetitive operations on reusable transportation systems, and extending the useful life of such systems are examined. The research and technology highlighted provides a foundation for progress on the Hubble Space Telescope, the Space Station, all elements of the Space Transportation System, and the many other projects assigned to this Center.

  7. Science: issues in Illinois (reprints of science columns from Illinois Issues, February 1980-May 1981)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-01

    This report consists of reprints on current public policy issues involving science and technology (S and T) in the State of Illinois. The reprints include monthly science columns from February 1980 - May 1981 Illinois Issues, a magazine of state public affairs. The magazine is an outgrowth of a legislative science research annual --a compilation of S and T-related reports prepared for the Illinois General Assembly. Topics include waste oil recovery, nuclear safety, decontamination of nuclear reactors, sulfur dioxide levels, acid rain, radioactive waste disposal problems, Illinois' legislature's record on S and T, paternity blood testing, DMSO, science issues of the 80's, European solutions to nuclear wastes, Scientific Creationism versus the theory of evolution, drug paraphernalia definition, Reye's Syndrome, and Agent Orange.

  8. Advanced Stirling Technology Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been developing advanced energy-conversion technologies for use with both radioisotope power systems and fission surface power systems for many decades. Under NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Science Theme, Technology Program, Glenn is developing the next generation of advanced Stirling convertors (ASCs) for use in the Department of Energy/Lockheed Martin Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). The next-generation power-conversion technologies require high efficiency and high specific power (watts electric per kilogram) to meet future mission requirements to use less of the Department of Energy's plutonium-fueled general-purpose heat source modules and reduce system mass. Important goals include long-life (greater than 14-yr) reliability and scalability so that these systems can be considered for a variety of future applications and missions including outer-planet missions and continual operation on the surface of Mars. This paper provides an update of the history and status of the ASC being developed for Glenn by Sunpower Inc. of Athens, Ohio.

  9. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  10. An organizational survey of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, D.A.; Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-09-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administrated at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture''; that is, the values attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization.

  11. An organizational survey of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, D.A.; Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-09-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administrated at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of ``culture``; that is, the values attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization.

  12. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damevski, Kostadin [Virginia State Univ., Petersburg, VA (United States)

    2009-03-30

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discover through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedened computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative hig-performance scientific computing.

  13. 76 FR 35474 - UAW-Chrysler Technical Training Center, Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Including On...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    ..., Detroit, MI; UAW-Chrysler Technical Training Center, Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Including... Center, Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Detroit, Michigan (TA-W-71,047) and Warren, Michigan..., Technology Training Joint Programs Staff. The Department has determined that these workers were...

  14. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  15. Health Information Technology Adoption in California Community Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Katherine K.; Rudin, Robert S.; Wilson, Machelle D.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives National and state initiatives to spur adoption of electronic health record (EHR) use and health information exchange (HIE) among providers in rural and underserved communities have been in place for 15 years. Our goal was to systematically assess the impact of these initiatives by quantifying the level of adoption and key factors associated with adoption among community health centers (CHCs) in California. Study Design Cross-sectional statewide survey. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of all California primary care CHCs from August to September 2013. Multiple logistic regressions were fit to test for associations between various practice characteristics and adoption of EHRs, Meaningful Use (MU)–certified EHRs, and HIE. For the multivariable model, we included those variables which were significant at the P = .10 level in the univariate tests. Results We received responses from 194 CHCs (73.5% response rate). Adoption of any EHRs (80.3%) and MU–certified EHRs (94.6% of those with an EHR) was very high. Adoption of HIE is substantial (48.7%) and took place within a few years (mean = 2.61 years; SD = 2.01). More than half (54.7%) of CHCs are able to receive data into the EHR, indicating some level of interoperability. Patient engagement capacity is moderate, with 21.6% offering a personal health record, and 55.2% electronic visit summaries. Rural location and belonging to a multi-site clinic organization both increase the odds of adoption of EHRs, HIE, and electronic visit summary, with odds ratios ranging from 0.63 to 3.28 (all P values <.05). Conclusions Greater adoption of health information technology (IT) in rural areas may be the result of both federal and state investments. As CHCs lack access to capital for investments, continued support of technology infrastructure may be needed for them to further leverage health IT to improve healthcare. PMID:26760431

  16. Technology Transfer from University-Based Research Centers: The University of New Mexico Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Everett M.; Hall, Brad; Hashimoto, Michio; Steffensen, Morten; Speakman, Kristen L.; Timko, Molly K.

    1999-01-01

    A study of 55 research centers at the University of New Mexico investigated the nature of the typical center, why funding has risen during the 1990s, reasons for founding the centers, the director's role, how university-based research centers transfer technology to private companies and other organizations, and what determines program…

  17. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) conducted December 7--11, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with PETC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at PETC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site Survey activities at PETC. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the Plan's results will be incorporated into the PETC Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 64 refs., 23 figs., 29 tabs.

  18. Technology evaluation center assessment synopsis: full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Barbara M; Ziegler, Kathleen M; Aronson, Naomi

    2006-08-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is proposed as an alternative to screen-film mammography (SFM). The ability to separate and optimize the acquisition, storage, and display of images may allow greater visualization of breast cancers at equal or lower radiation doses, especially in younger women and those with denser breasts. This is a synopsis of a systematic review by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center. This updated systematic review primarily incorporated the results of the ACR Imaging Network(R) Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST), which provided results on 42,760 asymptomatic women who underwent both FFDM and SFM and showed with reasonable certainty that there was no difference in the accuracy of the 2 modalities for asymptomatic women in general, with some advantages of FFDM in certain subgroups. There were no strong, new studies on the use of digital mammography compared with film mammography in a diagnostic population. However, the DMIST results indicated that tumors detected by FFDM, but not by SFM, were likely to be invasive carcinomas or medium-grade to high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. On the basis of the suppositions that these are the cancers of greatest interest and the ones more likely to be found in a diagnostic population and that the diagnostic population may be younger on average than the screening population, it was concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the use of FFDM for diagnostic purposes.

  19. Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J.

    2012-01-01

    Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results shown that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

  20. Technology utilization in a non-urban region: Further impact and technique of the Technology Use Studies Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    Updated information is given pertaining to Technology Use Studies Center (TUSC) clients who are those that receive/use information as disseminated by the center. The client information is presented as a continuation of client data as set forth in the center's previous annual report.

  1. 75 FR 14436 - Ameren Corporation, Illinois Power Company, Central Illinois Light Company, Central Illinois...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Ameren Corporation, Illinois Power Company, Central Illinois Light Company, Central Illinois Public Service Company, Ameren Energy Resources Company, LLC, AmerenEnergy Resources Generating Company; Notice of Filing March 18, 2010. Take notice that on March 15, 2010, Ameren...

  2. Insolation at Carterville, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Y. S. Chen

    1981-01-01

    Insolation measured with a precision spectral pyranometer, was recorded near Carterville, Illinois, for 1 year. the pyranometer was tilted at an angle of 25 degrees in summer, 50 degrees in winter, and 37.5 degrees in spring and fall. the insolation measured in winter was found to be significantly larger than the insolation estimated on a horizontal surface.

  3. Illinois' forest resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard K. Raile; Earl C. Leatherberry

    1988-01-01

    The third inventory of forest resources in Illinois shows a 1.2% increase in timberland and a 40.5% gain in growing stock volume between 1962 and 1985. Text and statistics are presented on area, volume, growth, mortality, removals, utilization, biomass, and future timber supply.

  4. Electric utilities in Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    Although the conference dealt specifically with concerns of the electric utilities in Illinois, the issues were dealt with in the national context as well. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 5 sections of this proceeding. A total of 25 papers were presented. Section titles are: Forecasting, Planning and Siting, Reliability, Rates and Financing, and Future Developments.

  5. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center Research and Technology Report 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, A. S. (Compiler); Tinker, M. L. (Compiler); Sivak, A. D. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    Many of NASA's missions would not be possible if it were not for the investments made in research advancements and technology development efforts. The technologies developed at Marshall Space Flight Center contribute to NASA's strategic array of missions through technology development and accomplishments. The scientists, researchers, and technologists of Marshall Space Flight Center who are working these enabling technology efforts are facilitating NASA's ability to fulfill the ambitious goals of innovation, exploration, and discovery.

  6. Planning nuclear energy centers under technological and demand uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, P.M.; Palmedo, P.F.

    1976-01-01

    The question considered is whether new nuclear power plants should be located in nuclear energy centers, or ''power parks'' with co-located fabrication and reprocessing facilities. That issue has been addressed in a recent study by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and remains under investigation at Brookhaven and elsewhere. So far, however, the advisability of this policy has been analyzed primarily within the framework of a single view of the future. Suggestions of the types of questions that should be asked regarding this policy if it is properly to be viewed as an example of decision making under uncertainty are made. It is concluded that ''A consideration of the various uncertainties involved in the question of dispersed vs. remote siting of energy facilities introduces a number of new elements into the analysis. On balance those considerations provide somewhat greater support for the clustered concept. The NEC approach seems to provide somewhat greater flexibility in accomodating possible future electricity generating technologies. Increased regulatory and construction efficiencies possible in an NEC reduces the impact of demand uncertainty as does the lower costs associated with construction acceleration or deceleration.'' It is also noted that, in the final analysis, ''it is the public's perception of the relative costs and benefits of a measure that determine the acceptability or unacceptability of a particular innovation,'' not the engineer's cost/benefit analysis. It is further noted that if the analysis can identify limits on analytical methods and models, it will not make the job of energy decision-making any easier, but it may make the process more responsive to its impact on society. (MCW)

  7. Coal and nuclear power: Illinois' energy future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    This conference was sponsored by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago; the US Department of Energy; the Illinois Energy Resources Commission; and the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources. The theme for the conference, Coal and Nuclear Power: Illinois' Energy Future, was based on two major observations: (1) Illinois has the largest reserves of bituminous coal of any state and is surpassed in total reserves only by North Dakota, and Montana; and (2) Illinois has made a heavy commitment to the use of nuclear power as a source of electrical power generation. Currently, nuclear power represents 30% of the electrical energy produced in the State. The primary objective of the 1982 conference was to review these two energy sources in view of the current energy policy of the Reagan Administration, and to examine the impact these policies have on the Midwest energy scene. The conference dealt with issues unique to Illinois as well as those facing the entire nation. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 30 individual presentations.

  8. Delivering health information services and technologies to urban community health centers: the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E R; McDaniels, C; Crespo, J; Lanier, D

    1997-10-01

    Health professionals cannot address public health issues effectively unless they have immediate access to current biomedical information. This paper reports on one mode of access, the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project, which was supported by the National Library of Medicine through outreach awards in 1995 and 1996. The three-year project is an effort to link the programs and services of the University of Illinois at Chicago Library of the Health Sciences and the Midwest AIDS Training and Education Center with the clinic services of community-based organizations in Chicago. The project was designed to provide electronic access to AIDS-related information for AIDS patients, the affected community, and their care givers. The project also provided Internet access and training and continued access to library resources. The successful initiative suggests a working model for outreach to health professionals in an urban setting.

  9. Public Understanding of and Attitudes towards Science & Technology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Daguang

    2005-01-01

    @@ China Association for Science and Technology (CAST) began the research and survey of the Chinese Public Understanding of Science and Technology at the beginning of the 1990s with the help of Prof. Jon D. Miller, then Director of US National Public Opinion Research Center and Longitudinal Studies of the Youth at the Illinois University.

  10. Assessing Community Informatics: A Review of Methodological Approaches for Evaluating Community Networks and Community Technology Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Dara

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the emerging community informatics evaluation literature to develop an understanding of the indicators used to gauge project impacts in community networks and community technology centers. The study finds that community networks and community technology center assessments fall into five key areas: strong democracy; social capital;…

  11. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program: Center of Automotive Technology Excellence in Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology at West Virginia University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigle N. Clark

    2006-12-31

    This report summarizes the technical and educational achievements of the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at West Virginia University (WVU), which was created to emphasize Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology. The Center has supported the graduate studies of 17 students in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering. These students have addressed topics such as hybrid modeling, construction of a hybrid sport utility vehicle (in conjunction with the FutureTruck program), a MEMS-based sensor, on-board data acquisition for hybrid design optimization, linear engine design and engine emissions. Courses have been developed in Hybrid Vehicle Design, Mobile Source Powerplants, Advanced Vehicle Propulsion, Power Electronics for Automotive Applications and Sensors for Automotive Applications, and have been responsible for 396 hours of graduate student coursework. The GATE program also enhanced the WVU participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Student Design Competitions, in particular FutureTruck and Challenge X. The GATE support for hybrid vehicle technology enhanced understanding of hybrid vehicle design and testing at WVU and encouraged the development of a research agenda in heavy-duty hybrid vehicles. As a result, WVU has now completed three programs in hybrid transit bus emissions characterization, and WVU faculty are leading the Transportation Research Board effort to define life cycle costs for hybrid transit buses. Research and enrollment records show that approximately 100 graduate students have benefited substantially from the hybrid vehicle GATE program at WVU.

  12. Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery -- Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. First quarterly technical progress report, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, M.R.

    1993-05-24

    For work during the first quarter of 1993, American Oil Recovery, Inc. targeted completion of the following specific objectives: Convene meetings of Mattoon Project subcontractors in order to plan and coordinate Project activities. Confirm organizational arrangements and plans for implementation of Mattoon Project. Complete most work on detailed analysis of reservoir geology of productive leases in the Mattoon Project. Identify first Facies Defined Subunit for initial injectivity testing to be commenced near the beginning of the second quarter. Identify additional Facies Defined Subunits for injectivity testing and characterization during the second and third quarters. Award subcontract to the Illinois State Geological Survey and commence work on preparation of a geostatistical model (STRATAMODEL) of more than 100 wells on 1,000 acres within the Mattoon Project Area. Obtain oil samples from wells in the identified Facies Subunit for reservoir rock, fluid, and CO{sub 2} compatibility testing by the Illinois State Geological Survey. Design CO{sub 2} injection pumps and injection monitoring equipment configuration. Obtain bids for required pumps and diesel motor. Accomplishments for this quarter are reported.

  13. Libraries in Illinois: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library → Libraries in Illinois URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/illinois.html Libraries in Illinois ... ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, IL 60005-2392 847-618-5180 http://www.nch.org Chicago ALZHEIMER'S ASSOCIATION GREEN-FIELD ...

  14. The Center for Research and Evaluation in the Application of Technology to Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David P.; Weisgerber, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    The Center for Research and Development in the Application of Technology to Education project identifies effective uses of new technologies for the learning disabled. Areas investigated include effective instructional design principles, program design strategies, adjusting technology for individual learners, software development, and use of…

  15. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  16. Information for Our Partners | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI TTC CRADA PAYMENT OPTIONS: Electronic Payments by Wire Transfer via Fedwire, Mail a check to the Institute or Center, or Automated Clearing House (ACH)/Electronic Funds Transfer (ETF) payments via Pay.gov (NCI ONLY). | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  17. Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery - Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, M. [American Oil Recovery, Inc., Decatur, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Phase I results of a C0{sub 2}-assisted oil recovery demonstration project in selected Cypress Sandstone reservoirs at Mattoon Field, Illinois are reported. The design and scope of this project included C0{sub 2} injectvity testing in the Pinnell and Sawyer units, well stimulaton treatments with C0{sub 2} in the Strong unit and infill well drilling, completion and oil production. The field activities were supported by extensive C0{sub 2}-oil-water coreflood experiments, CO{sub 2} oil-phase interaction experiments, and integrated geologic modeling and reservoir simulations. The progress of the project was made public through presentations at an industry meeting and a DOEs contractors` symposium, through quarterly reports and one-to-one consultations with interested operators. Phase II of this project was not implemented. It would have been a water-alternating-gas (WAG) project of longer duration.

  18. Marshall Space Flight Center Research and Technology Report 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keys, A. S. (Compiler); Tinker, M. L. (Compiler); Sivak, A. D. (Compiler); Morris, H. C. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The investments in technology development we made in 2015 not only support the Agency's current missions, but they will also enable new missions. Some of these projects will allow us to develop an in-space architecture for human space exploration; Marshall employees are developing and testing cutting-edge propulsion solutions that will propel humans in-space and land them on Mars. Others are working on technologies that could support a deep space habitat, which will be critical to enable humans to live and work in deep space and on other worlds. Still others are maturing technologies that will help new scientific instruments study the outer edge of the universe-instruments that will provide valuable information as we seek to explore the outer planets and search for life.

  19. Factors predicting the use of technology: findings from the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaja, Sara J; Charness, Neil; Fisk, Arthur D; Hertzog, Christopher; Nair, Sankaran N; Rogers, Wendy A; Sharit, Joseph

    2006-06-01

    The successful adoption of technology is becoming increasingly important to functional independence. The present article reports findings from the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE) on the use of technology among community-dwelling adults. The sample included 1,204 individuals ranging in age from 18-91 years. All participants completed a battery that included measures of demographic characteristics, self-rated health, experience with technology, attitudes toward computers, and component cognitive abilities. Findings indicate that the older adults were less likely than younger adults to use technology in general, computers, and the World Wide Web. The results also indicate that computer anxiety, fluid intelligence, and crystallized intelligence were important predictors of the use of technology. The relationship between age and adoption of technology was mediated by cognitive abilities, computer self-efficacy, and computer anxiety. These findings are discussed in terms of training strategies to promote technology adoption.

  20. The Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    After making a unique, non-obvious, and useful discovery, NIH researchers must immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention, and then consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Manager about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  1. Managing Information Technology in Academic Medical Centers: A "Multicultural" Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Charles P.; Corn, Milton; Krumrey, Arthur; Perry, David R.; Stevens, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how beliefs and concerns of academic medicine's diverse professional cultures affect management of information technology. Two scenarios, one dealing with standardization of desktop personal computers and the other with publication of syllabi on an institutional intranet, form the basis for an exercise in which four prototypical members…

  2. Water Reclamation Technology Development at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Pickering, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Who We Are: A staff of approximately 14 BS, MS, and PhD-Level Engineers and Scientists with experience in Aerospace, Civil, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering, Chemistry, Physical Science and Water Pollution Microbiology. Our Primary Objective: To develop the next generation water recovery system technologies that will support NASA's long duration missions beyond low-earth orbit.

  3. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  4. Co-Development Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's TTC uses three different co-development agreements to help industry and academia interact and partner with National Institutes of Health laboratories and scientists to support technology development activities. | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  5. Project of space research and technology center in Engelhardt astronomical observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedyev, Y.; Gusev, A.; Sherstukov, O.; Kascheev, R.; Zagretdinov, R.

    2012-09-01

    Today on the basis of Engelhardt astronomical observatory (EAO) is created Space research and technology center as consistent with Program for expansion of the Kazan University. The Centre has the following missions: • EDUCATION • SCIENCE • ASTRONOMICAL TOURISM

  6. National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC); (NREL) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer; Sprik, Sam

    2014-03-11

    This presentation gives an overview of the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC), describes how NFCTEC benefits the hydrogen and fuel cell community, and introduces a new fuel cell cost/price aggregation project.

  7. Chinese Telephone Number-Input Technology and Its Applications in a Customer Service Call Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗仁; 许晓革; 兰德品; 郭盛芳

    2002-01-01

    The Chinese intelligence input technology, its applications, and a customer serv ice call center system are developed. This technology can be used both in stan dard English telephone number-input keyboard and in Chinese telephone number- input keyboard .And authors develop sophisticated technologies including "Pinyi n" (the Chinese p honetic alphabet ) encoding technology of phonetic symbol code and formal symbo l code of Chinese character structure, phrase encoding technology, input technol ogy of whole sentence intelligence encoding and input technology of Chinese tele phone number encoding.

  8. 76 FR 39811 - International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed Status of Kentucky Bluegrass Genetically Engineered... engineered for tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate should not be listed as a Federal noxious weed and... noxious weeds. Our decision is based on our analysis of available scientific data, our weed risk...

  9. BEHAVIOUR OF STONE FACADES IN URBAN CENTERS INNOVATIVE BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Monaco

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available An innovative technology using stone and granite as exterior sheeting of modern steel and concrete tall buildings is presented, Granites are chosen for the indubitable superior durability in any wheather and polluted atmosfere condition. But to guarantee durability stone sheets have to be mounted in such a way as to avoid any inner irregular stress. In particular stresses from deformation of the main structure must not be trasmitted to the exterior sheeting. Moreover an all-proof wheather barrier has to be incorporated in the factory builded sheeting panel. The innovative technology allowing use of granite and stone in facing of tall buildings is here presented along with two very important realisations: The North Tower in Genoa and the Canary Wharf in London.

  10. Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    anastomoses sites. This completes this project. Minimally Invasive Surgery - Craniofacial Surgery Planning – Leonard Kaban, MD, MGH The CIMIT...illness. These developing technologies lessen: the time required for recovery, the pain and suffering associated with therapy, and the overall...The engineering of craniofacial tissues in the laboratory: a review of biomaterials for scaffolds and implant coatings. Dent Clin North Am. 2006;50

  11. Joint research center activity in thermonuclear fusion technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.; Rocco, P. (Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre)

    1984-04-01

    A review of the activities in progress in the field of thermonuclear fusion technology at the Joint Research Centre of the European Communities is presented. The research areas are: (I) reactor studies, including conceptual design studies of experimental Tokamak reactors (INTOR/NET) and safety analyses; (II) experimental investigation on first wall and blanket materials and components. Emphasis has been given to those topics which are not reported in detail in the following articles of the issue.

  12. Hypermedia Laboratory, Defense Applied Information Technology Center; Review for 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    des images. La proliferation des reseatix publics et prives et des services de messagerie oti courrier electronique utilisant de larges bandes et des...technologies tres fiables permer de transporter du texte integral et de proceder a des transferts eLectroniques de documents la oti pour l’instant on...des reseaux de coumrer electronique (comme Infotap et Geomail), et des possibilites de transferts rapides entre collections archivees sur disques et

  13. Technology-Based Biliteracy Centers for the 21st Century Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, Sandra; Ramos, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this reflective article is to present an alternative that incorporates the four language skills in all content areas through technology-based dual-language centers for emergent bilinguals at the elementary level. The authors propose a matrix to plan the centers and include three examples to facilitate language transfer in English…

  14. Between Technological Endorsement and Resistance: The State of Online Writing Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neaderhiser, Stephen; Wolfe, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Over the past two decades, writing centers have steadily been expanding services and materials they offer online. The way students write and communicate about their writing continues to change, and the writing center has increasingly been looked upon as a site through which technology and writing have the ability to converge in the form of…

  15. Personalized Integrated Educational System: Technology Functions for the Learner- Centered Paradigm of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigeluth, Charles M.; Aslan, Sinem; Chen, Zengguan; Dutta, Pratima; Huh, Yeol; Lee, Dabae; Lin, Chun-Yi; Lu, Ya-Huei; Min, Mina; Tan, Verily; Watson, Sunnie Lee; Watson, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The learner-centered paradigm of instruction differs in such fundamental ways from the teacher-centered paradigm that it requires technology to serve very different functions. In 2006, a research team at Indiana University began to work on identifying those functions and published their results in 2008. Subsequently, the team elaborated and…

  16. The Efficiency and Effectiveness of the K-12 Energy Technology Education Promotion Centers in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lung-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In order to promote energy literacy for graders K-12, the Ministry of Education (MOE) in Taiwan initiated a K-12 Energy Technology Education Project in September 2010. This 40-month project has one project office affiliated to a university, and 18 promotion centers affiliated to 18 schools--including 5 regional centers for upper-secondary schools…

  17. 78 FR 65300 - Notice of Availability (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ...: Federal Docket Management System Office, 4800 Mark Center Drive, East Tower, 2nd floor, Suite 02G09... of the Secretary Notice of Availability (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information... Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center at Defense Distribution Depot San Joaquin,...

  18. CD-ROM technology at the EROS data center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Michael E.; Weinheimer, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    The vast amount of digital spatial data often required by a single user has created a demand for media alternatives to 1/2" magnetic tape. One such medium that has been recently adopted at the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center is the compact disc (CD). CD's are a versatile, dynamic, and low-cost method for providing a variety of data on a single media device and are compatible with various computer platforms. CD drives are available for personal computers, UNIX workstations, and mainframe systems, either directly connected, or through a network. This medium furnishes a quick method of reproducing and distributing large amounts of data on a single CD. Several data sets are already available on CD's, including collections of historical Landsat multispectral scanner data and biweekly composites of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data for the conterminous United States. The EROS Data Center intends to provide even more data sets on CD's. Plans include specific data sets on a customized disc to fulfill individual requests, and mass production of unique data sets for large-scale distribution. Requests for a single compact disc-read only memory (CD-ROM) containing a large volume of data either for archiving or for one-time distribution can be addressed with a CD-write once (CD-WO) unit. Mass production and large-scale distribution will require CD-ROM replication and mastering.

  19. Vaccines for HIV | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of an effective HIV vaccine has been an ongoing area of research. The high variability in HIV-1 virus strains has represented a major challenge in successful development. Ideally, an effective candidate vaccine would provide protection against the majority of clades of HIV. Two major hurdles to overcome are immunodominance and sequence diversity. This vaccine utilizes a strategy for overcoming these two issues by identifying the conserved regions of the virus and exploiting them for use in a targeted therapy. NCI seeks licensees and/or research collaborators to commercialize this technology, which has been validated in macaque models.

  20. Center for Alternative Energy Storage Research and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    and civilian markets . Research at CAESRT has been directed primarily at Defense Department (Army) applications to provide effective technology...system-level operational strategies . Specifically, CAESRT has conducted interrelated research on: nanostructured battery and capacitor...applications are sensitive to the characteristics of the applications. Often it takes more than 3nS 2pS 4pS 1pS 3pS 2nS 4nS 1Li 3Li 1C 2C 3C 4C 5C 2Li

  1. A User Centered Approach to Developing Emergent Technology Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Restrepo-Giraldo, John Dairo; McAloone, Timothy Charles; Schlegel, Tanja

    2008-01-01

    be used too early in the design process, given that users respond best to issues they know or can relate to. This paper presents a case study where a user-centred approach was used to determine when and how to involve users in the design of a TV-enabled mobile telephone. The aim of the study......Current participatory design methods do not allow designers to gain the insight required to develop products with emerging technologies, that is, products that do not have any precedents in the users’ knowledge base and experience. This poses challenges to the designers, as input from users cannot...

  2. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay C. Almlie; Bruce Wood; Rich Schlupp

    2007-03-01

    In November 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), ePowerSynergies, Inc. (ePSI), and Resurfice Corporation teamed to develop, produce, and demonstrate the world's first and only fuel cell-powered ice resurfacer. The goals of this project were: {sm_bullet} To educate the public on the readiness, practicality, and safety of fuel cells powered by hydrogen fuel and {sm_bullet} To establish a commercialization pathway in an early-adopter, niche market. The vehicle was developed and produced in a short 3-month span. The vehicle made its world debut at U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan's (D-ND) 2005 Hydrogen Energy Action Summit. Subsequently, the vehicle toured North America appearing at numerous public events and conferences, receiving much attention from international media outlets.

  3. Why NIH Scientists Need to Report an Invention | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    As an NIH scientist, you must report new inventions, including improvements of previously reported inventions, to the Technology Transfer Manager assigned to your Laboratory. If you do not know the name of your TTM, please call or email the Technology Transfer Center.  | [google6f4cd5334ac394ab.html

  4. Investigating "The Coolest School in America": How Technology Is Used in a Learner-Centered School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Sinem; Reigeluth, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Reigeluth et al. ("Educ Technol" 48(6):32-39, 2008) proposed major and secondary functions for educational technology systems for the learner-centered paradigm of education. However, the functions proposed should be formatively evaluated and revised using a variety of cases to develop a better understanding of how technology can support…

  5. Using a Student-Centered Model for Assessing Preservice Teachers' Use of Technology in Student Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, David; Stevenson, Heidi J.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a student-centered assessment model used at a large university to encourage preservice teachers' use of technology in the K-12 classroom. This model allows preservice teachers to have discretion over the content, form, and time period in which they complete technology proficiencies. More specifically, this article describes…

  6. Two-Phase Technology at NASA/Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Eugene K.; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Since the baseline International Space Station (ISS) External Active Thermal Control System (EATCS) was changed from a two-phase mechanically pumped system to a single phase cascade system in the fall of 1993, two-phase EATCS research has continued at a low level at JSC. One of-the lessons of the ISS EATCS selection was that two-phase thermal control systems must have significantly lower power than comparable single phase systems to overcome their larger radiator area, larger line and fluid mass, and perceived higher technical risk. Therefore, research at JSC has concentrated on low power mechanically pumped two-phase EATCSs. In the presentation, the results of a study investigating the trade of single and two-phase mechanically pumped EATCSs for space vehicles will be summarized. The low power two-phase mechanically pumped EATCS system under development at JSC will be described in detail and the current design status of the subscale test unit will be reviewed. Also, performance predictions for a full size EATCS will be presented. In addition to the discussion of two-phase mechanically pumped EATCS development at JSC, two-phase technologies under development for biological water processing will be discussed. These biological water processor technologies are being prepared for a 2001 flight experiment and subsequent usage on the TransHab module on the International Space Station.

  7. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to talk to one of the vendors at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. With him at the far left is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG, and Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair; at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  8. Technology complementing military behavioral health efforts at tripler army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetz, Melba C; Folen, Raymond A; Yamanuha, Bronson K

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a short narrative on the ways that behavioral health professionals and their patients are currently benefitting from the use of technology. Examples stem from applications of technology to patients/research participants at the Tripler Army Medical Center. The paper also discusses how current use of this technology has made it possible to serve individuals in their own cultural environment, providing a cost-effective means of providing mental health services.

  9. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, Key Tech Center Advanced Communications Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    information society . Today, information telecommunication systems are being networked through interconnections, and it is expected that such systems will play a leading role in the future flow of advanced information. Therefore in order to predict future technological developments, it is necessary to elucidate the themes of the development of communication technologies related both to network construction and administration, and to analyze user needs sufficiently. From this perspective, the Key Technology Center initiated its ’Research in Advanced Communications

  10. 78 FR 42994 - Illinois Disaster Number IL-00041

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Illinois Disaster Number IL-00041 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 4... loan applications to: U.S. Small Business Administration, Processing and Disbursement Center, 14925... Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409 3rd Street SW., Suite 6050, Washington, DC...

  11. The Scientific Data Management Center: Available Technologies and Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shoshani, Arie; Altintas, Ilkay; Chen, Jin; Chin, George; Choudhary, Alok; Crawl, Daniel; Critchlow, Terence J.; Gao, K.; Grimm, B.; Iyer, H.; Kamath, Chandrika; Khan, Ayla; Klasky, S.; Koehler, Sven; Lang, Rob; Latham, Robert J.; Li, J. W.; Liao, Wei-keng; Ligon, J.; Liu, Q.; Ludaescher, Bertram T.; Mouallem, Pierre; Nagappan, Mie; Podhorszki, Norbert; Ross, Rob; Rotem, Doron; Samatova, Nagiza F.; Silva, C.; Sim, A.; Tchoua, Roselynne; Thakur, R.; Vouk, M.; Wu, J.; Yu, Weikuan

    2011-09-30

    Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Furthermore, exploratory analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Third, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration.

  12. VACET: Proposed SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center forEnabling Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, W.; Johnson, Chris; Hansen, Charles; Parker, Steve; Sanderson, Allen; Silva, Claudio; Tricoche, Xavier; Pascucci, Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathon; Duchaineau, Mark; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom,Peter; Ahern, Sean; Meredith, Jeremy; Ostrouchov, George; Joy, Ken; Hamann, Bernd

    2006-06-19

    This paper accompanies a poster that is being presented atthe SciDAC 2006 meeting in Denver, CO. This project focuses on leveragingscientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enablingtechnology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advancesincomputational technology have resultedin an "information big bang,"which in turn has createda significant data understanding challenge. Thischallenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks incontemporary science. The vision for our Center is to respond directly tothat challenge by adapting, extending, creating when necessary anddeploying visualization and data understanding technologies for ourscience stakeholders. Using an organizational model as a Visualizationand Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET), we are wellpositioned to be responsive to the needs of a diverse set of scientificstakeholders in a coordinated fashion using a range of visualization,mathematics, statistics, computer and computational science and datamanagement technologies.

  13. Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance Provisions for the Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This Handbook establishes general safety, reliability, and quality assurance (SR&QA) guidelines for use on flight and ground-based projects conducted at the Ames, Langley, and Lewis Research Centers, hereafter identified as the Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) Centers. This document is applicable to all projects and operations conducted at these Centers except for those projects covered by more restrictive provisions such as the Space Shuttle, Space Station, and unmanned spacecraft programs. This Handbook is divided into two parts. The first (Chapters 1 and 2) establishes the SR&QA guidelines applicable to the OAET Centers, and the second (Appendices A, B, C, and D) provides examples and definitions for the total SR&QA program. Each center should implement SR&QA programs using these guidelines with tailoring appropriate to the special projects conducted by each Center. This Handbook is issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes.

  14. The feasibility of a unified role for NASA regional dissemination centers and technology application teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    Insights and recommendations arising from a study of the feasibility of combining the NASA Regional Dissemination Center (RDC) and Technology Application Team (Tateam) roles to form Regional Application Centers (RADC's) are presented. The apparent convergence of the functions of RDC's and Tateams is demonstrated and strongly supportive of the primary recommendation that an applications function be added to those already being performed by the RDC's. The basis of a national network for technology transfer and public and private sector problem solving is shown to exist, the skeleton of which is an interactive network of Regional Application Centers and NASA Field Centers. The feasibility of developing and extending this network is considered and the detailed ramifications of so doing are discussed and the imperatives emphasized. It is hypothesized that such a national network could become relatively independent of NASA funding within five years.

  15. SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E. Wes; Johnson, Chris; Joy, Ken; Ahern, Sean; Pascucci,Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathan; Duchaineau, Mark; Hamann, Bernd; Hansen, Charles; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom, Peter; Meredith, Jeremy; Ostrouchov, George; Parker, Steven; Silva, Claudio; Sanderson, Allen; Tricoche, Xavier

    2006-11-28

    The SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) began operation on 10/1/2006. This document, dated11/27/2006, is the first version of the VACET project management plan. Itwas requested by and delivered to ASCR/DOE. It outlines the Center'saccomplishments in the first six weeks of operation along with broadobjectives for the upcoming future (12-24 months).

  16. SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E. Wes; Johnson, Chris; Joy, Ken; Ahern, Sean; Pascucci,Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathan; Duchaineau, Mark; Hamann, Bernd; Hansen, Charles; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom, Peter; Meredith, Jeremy; Ostrouchov, George; Parker, Steven; Silva, Claudio; Sanderson, Allen; Tricoche, Xavier

    2006-11-28

    The SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) began operation on 10/1/2006. This document, dated11/27/2006, is the first version of the VACET project management plan. Itwas requested by and delivered to ASCR/DOE. It outlines the Center'saccomplishments in the first six weeks of operation along with broadobjectives for the upcoming future (12-24 months).

  17. Introducing Nagasaki Coal Mining Technology Training Center owned by the Mitsui Matsushima Resources Co., Ltd.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumakawa, K. [Mitsui Matsushima Resources Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    The Nagasaki Coal Mine Technology Training Center was established as a facility for 'The Training Project' on coal mine technology following the purchase of part of the mining area owned by the Matsushima Coal Mine which was closed in November 2001. The Training Center is located seaward at Ikeshima approximately 7 km west of the Nishisonogi Peninsula's western coast. Training is provided to personnel from Vietnam and Indonesia in subjects ranging from underground mining safety, exploration surveying and rock drivage, to electrical engineering. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E. Wes; Johnson, Chris; Joy, Ken; Ahern, Sean; Pascucci,Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathan; Duchaineau, Mark; Hamann, Bernd; Hansen, Charles; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom, Peter; Meredith, Jermey; Ostrouchov, George; Parker, Steven; Silva, Claudio; Sanderson, Allen; Tricoche, Xavier.

    2007-06-30

    The Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) focuses on leveraging scientific visualization andanalytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasingscientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technologyhave resulted in an 'information big bang,' which in turn has created asignificant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widelyacknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporaryscience. The vision of VACET is to adapt, extend, create when necessary,and deploy visual data analysis solutions that are responsive to theneeds of DOE'scomputational and experimental scientists. Our center isengineered to be directly responsive to those needs and to deliversolutions for use in DOE's large open computing facilities. The researchand development directly target data understanding problems provided byour scientific application stakeholders. VACET draws from a diverse setof visualization technology ranging from production quality applicationsand application frameworks to state-of-the-art algorithms forvisualization, analysis, analytics, data manipulation, and datamanagement.

  19. The development and technology transfer of software engineering technology at NASA. Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitman, C. L.; Erb, D. M.; Izygon, M. E.; Fridge, E. M., III; Roush, G. B.; Braley, D. M.; Savely, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    The United State's big space projects of the next decades, such as Space Station and the Human Exploration Initiative, will need the development of many millions of lines of mission critical software. NASA-Johnson (JSC) is identifying and developing some of the Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) technology that NASA will need to build these future software systems. The goal is to improve the quality and the productivity of large software development projects. New trends are outlined in CASE technology and how the Software Technology Branch (STB) at JSC is endeavoring to provide some of these CASE solutions for NASA is described. Key software technology components include knowledge-based systems, software reusability, user interface technology, reengineering environments, management systems for the software development process, software cost models, repository technology, and open, integrated CASE environment frameworks. The paper presents the status and long-term expectations for CASE products. The STB's Reengineering Application Project (REAP), Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) project, and software development cost model (COSTMODL) project are then discussed. Some of the general difficulties of technology transfer are introduced, and a process developed by STB for CASE technology insertion is described.

  20. 76 FR 2147 - UAW-Chrysler National Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Detroit, MI; UAW...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Programs Staff, Detroit, MI; UAW-Chrysler Technical Training Center Technology Training Joint Programs... Technology Training Joint Programs Staff; and the criteria set forth in Section 222(a) has been met. During...-Chrysler National Training Center, Technology Training Joint Programs Staff, Detroit, Michigan, and...

  1. Final Report for "Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svetlana Shasharina

    2010-12-01

    The goal of the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software is to fundamentally changing the way scientific software is developed and used by bringing component-based software development technologies to high-performance scientific and engineering computing. The role of Tech-X work in TASCS project is to provide an outreach to accelerator physics and fusion applications by introducing TASCS tools into applications, testing tools in the applications and modifying the tools to be more usable.

  2. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology. A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Michael [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology (NCHT) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program's nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  3. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Rogers, Adam Zachary; Simmons, R. F.; Palethorpe, S. J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  4. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program, FY-98 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; Rogers, A.Z.; McCray, J.A.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethorpe, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  5. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    1999-10-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  6. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. K. Herbst; J. A. McCray; R. J. Kirkham; J. Pao; S. H. Hinckley

    1999-09-30

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  7. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Argyle, Mark Don; Lauerhass, Lance; Bendixsen, Carl Lee; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    2000-11-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  8. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Kirkham, R.J.; Pao, J.; Argyle, M.D.; Lauerhass, L.; Bendixsen, C.L.; Hinckley, S.H.

    2000-10-31

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  9. Technology utilization in a non-urban region: Further impact and technique of the Technology Use Studies Center, 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, H. C. (Editor); Moore, A. M.; Dodd, B.; Dittmar, V.

    1971-01-01

    The clientele served by the Technology Use Studies Center (TUSC) is updated. Manufacturing leads the list of client firms. The standard industrial classification (SIC) range of these firms is broad. Substantial numbers of college and university faculties are using TUSC services. Field operations inherent in the functions of dissemination and assistance are reviewed. Increasing emphasis among clientele is on environmental concerns and management. A record is provided of the institutions contacted and the extent of TUSC involvement with them, as well as TUSC's cooperation with agencies and organizations. The impact of TUSC and the NASA-sponsored Technology Utilization Program on other public agencies is discussed.

  10. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program, FY-98 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; Rogers, A.Z.; McCray, J.A.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethorpe, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  11. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Rogers, A.Z.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethrope, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  12. Military aircraft and missile technology at the Langley Research Center: A selected bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1980-01-01

    A compilation of reference material is presented on the Langley Research Center's efforts in developing advanced military aircraft and missile technology over the past twenty years. Reference material includes research made in aerodynamics, performance, stability, control, stall-spin, propulsion integration, flutter, materials, and structures.

  13. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  14. The Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC): Providing Analysis and Insights on Clean Technology Manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Nicholi S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-28

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Energy Manufacturing Analysis Center (CEMAC) provides objective analysis and up-to-date data on global supply chains and manufacturing of clean energy technologies. Policymakers and industry leaders seek CEMAC insights to inform choices to promote economic growth and the transition to a clean energy economy.

  15. Technology Can Help Young Children Succeed. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets: PHP-c70

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Parents of young children with disabilities are discovering that carefully selected computer software and mobile apps can provide many benefits such as improved self-esteem, a longer attention span, and inclusion among family and other children that help their children succeed at home and in school. PACER's Simon Technology Center (STC) can help…

  16. NASA Lewis Research Center low-gravity fluid management technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Carney, M. J.; Hochstein, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    A history of the Lewis Research Center in space fluid management technology program is presented. Current programs which include numerical modeling of fluid systems, heat exchanger/radiator concept studies, and the design of the Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility are discussed. Recent analytical and experimental activities performed to support the Shuttle/Centaur development activity are highlighted.

  17. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Staiger

    2007-06-01

    This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

  18. Technology Can Help Young Children Succeed. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets: PHP-c70

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Parents of young children with disabilities are discovering that carefully selected computer software and mobile apps can provide many benefits such as improved self-esteem, a longer attention span, and inclusion among family and other children that help their children succeed at home and in school. PACER's Simon Technology Center (STC) can help…

  19. Mode 2 in action. Working across sectors to create a Center for Humanities and Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyatt, S.M.E.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines recent developments in Amsterdam to establish a Center for Humanities and Technology (CHAT). The project is a collaboration between public research institutions and a private partner. To date, a White Paper has been produced that sets out a shared research agenda addressing bot

  20. Technology and Student Learning: Toward a Learner-Centered Teaching Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Onchwari, Grace; Onchwari, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    There is need to reform teacher education programs through the creation of active learning environments that support and improve the depth and scope of student learning. Specifically, teachers should provide intellectually powerful, learner-centered, and technology-rich environments for students without undermining sound pedagogical practices.…

  1. Development of a national center for hydrogen technology. A summary report of activities completed at the national center hydrogen technology from 2005 to 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Michael J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT project's 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  2. Review of ultra-high density optical storage technologies for big data center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Ruan; Liu, Jie

    2016-10-01

    In big data center, optical storage technologies have many advantages, such as energy saving and long lifetime. However, how to improve the storage density of optical storage is still a huge challenge. Maybe the multilayer optical storage technology is the good candidate for big data center in the years to come. Due to the number of layers is primarily limited by transmission of each layer, the largest capacities of the multilayer disc are around 1 TB/disc and 10 TB/ cartridge. Holographic data storage (HDS) is a volumetric approach, but its storage capacity is also strictly limited by the diffractive nature of light. For a holographic disc with total thickness of 1.5mm, its potential capacities are not more than 4TB/disc and 40TB/ cartridge. In recent years, the development of super resolution optical storage technology has attracted more attentions. Super-resolution photoinduction-inhibition nanolithography (SPIN) technology with 9 nm feature size and 52nm two-line resolution was reported 3 years ago. However, turning this exciting principle into a real storage system is a huge challenge. It can be expected that in the future, the capacities of 10TB/disc and 100TB/cartridge can be achieved. More importantly, due to breaking the diffraction limit of light, SPIN technology will open the door to improve the optical storage capacity steadily to meet the need of the developing big data center.

  3. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Occupational Therapy Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in jobs in occupational therapy. Agency partners involved in this project include: the Illinois State board of Education, Illinois Community College…

  4. The Early Years of Condensed Matter Physics at Illinois -- in Celebration of the 80th Birth Year of Charles P. Slichter -- Charlie Slichter & the gang at Urbana

    CERN Document Server

    Kadanoff, Leo P

    2014-01-01

    The 1950s-- and perhaps also the 1960s-- were very special times for the development of solid-state/condensed-matter physics. The University of Illinois at Urbana was at the center of these activities. In areas like NMR and superconductivity, methods were developed which would form the basis for the next half century of science and technology. Experimentalists, including Charlie and John Wheatley, worked hand in hand with theorists, including the incomparable John Bardeen. They worked cooperatively to develop ideas, often born in Urbana, but with godparents at Harvard and Moscow and Paris. A characteristic style of broad collaboration and spirited exchange developed and spread from Illinois. This development was not an accident but the result of the vision of leaders like Wheeler Loomis, Fred Seitz, and later Gerald Almy1. The strong leadership saved the other scientists from expending their time on departmental decision-making. The style of the scientific activity was set by Fred, who strongly encouraged joi...

  5. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to pet one of the dogs that serves with Canine Companions for Independence, a vendor displaying its capabilities at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) 1999 Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. Standing at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services; behind Bridges is Nancie Strott (left), a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair, and Sterling Walker (right), director of Engineering Development and chairman of DAAWG. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the other vendors participating are Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  6. Completion of Green Building by Korea Institute of Energy Research - Energy{center_dot}Conservation{center_dot}Environmental Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sang Dong [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Taejon (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER), which was fully aware that the effective utilization of energy could not only save energy but also reduce the environmental pollution due to a combustion exhaust gas, has built and operated 'the Ultra Energy Saving Building' whose energy consumption was only a fifth of general buildings as a example. KIER has started to research the project for the technology development and spread of Green Building in 'Enertech 21' - the most important research program of 1994 year - and has constructed the central building of the Institute with only the current available technology since the early of 1997 year, via researches by a step. Finally, KIER held the ceremony for the completion of Green Building in March sixth. This building is not just the first green building in Korea but also the representative building of energy environment research center, which will be marked out for a model for the domestic construction and construction industry in future. Therefore, this building has functions of exhibition, publicity, education, and experimentation for the building researchers as well as the office and researching place that is original function of this building. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. SLJ's Technology Survey 2006: New Technologies--Like Blogs and Wikis--Are Taking Their Place in the School Media Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Sally; Milam, Peggy

    2006-01-01

    This article presents findings from the School Library Journal's 2006 national technology survey that investigated the trend in today's library media centers. As this study demonstrates, technology continues to be a significant aspect of K-12 media centers. Despite restricted funding and schedules stretched to the limit, media specialists have…

  8. Accelerated Adoption of Advanced Health Information Technology in Beacon Community Health Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily; Wittie, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To complement national and state-level HITECH Act programs, 17 Beacon communities were funded to fuel community-wide use of health information technology to improve quality. Health centers in Beacon communities received supplemental funding. This article explores the association between participation in the Beacon program and the adoption of electronic health records. Using the 2010-2012 Uniform Data System, trends in health information technology adoption among health centers located within and outside of Beacon communities were explored using differences in mean t tests and multivariate logistic regression. Electronic health record adoption was widespread and rapidly growing in all health centers, especially quality improvement functionalities: structured data capture, order and results management, and clinical decision support. Adoption lagged for functionalities supporting patient engagement, performance measurement, care coordination, and public health. The use of advanced functionalities such as care coordination grew faster in Beacon health centers, and Beacon health centers had 1.7 times higher odds of adopting health records with basic safety and quality functionalities in 2010-2012. Three factors likely underlie these findings: technical assistance, community-wide activation supporting health information exchange, and the layering of financial incentives. Additional technical assistance and community-wide activation is needed to support the use of functionalities that are currently lagging. © Copyright 2015 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  9. Implementation of efficient technologies application center; Implantacao de um centro de aplicacao de tecnologias eficientes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Reynaldo S. da; Aguiar, Joao C.R.; Pinto Junior, Ary V.; Souza, Hamilton M. [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Sistemas de Distribuicao e Uso Eficiente de Energia Eletrica

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the basic concept and the main activities at the Electric Technology Application Center (ETAC) placed at CEPEL. The aim of the center is presented, regarding issues such as: energy waste preventing, energy-efficient production processes and environmental protection. This work also presents the initial partnerships and the first ETAC products, according to three main areas: Industrial Commercial and Residential. (author) 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.; e-mail: cref at fund.cepel.br; sigiliao at fund.cepel.br

  10. A review of user-centered design for diabetes-related consumer health informatics technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeRouge, Cynthia; Wickramasinghe, Nilmini

    2013-07-01

    User-centered design (UCD) is well recognized as an effective human factor engineering strategy for designing ease of use in the total customer experience with products and information technology that has been applied specifically to health care information technology systems. We conducted a literature review to analyze the current research regarding the use of UCD methods and principles to support the development or evaluation of diabetes-related consumer health informatics technology (CHIT) initiatives. Findings indicate that (1) UCD activities have been applied across the technology development life cycle stages, (2) there are benefits to incorporating UCD to better inform CHIT development in this area, and (3) the degree of adoption of the UCD process is quite uneven across diabetes CHIT studies. In addition, few to no studies report on methods used across all phases of the life cycle with process detail. To address that void, the Appendix provides an illustrative case study example of UCD techniques across development stages.

  11. The Use of DOE Technologies at The World Trade Center Incident: Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, B.; Kovach, J.; Carpenter, C.; Blair, D.

    2003-02-25

    In response to the attack of the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) National Hazmat Program (OENHP) assembled and deployed a HAZMAT Emergency Management Team (Team) to the disaster site (Site). The response team consisted of a Certified Industrial Hygienist and a rotating team of industrial hygienists, safety professionals, and certified HAZMAT instructors. Through research funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the IUOE conducted human factors assessments on baseline and innovative technologies during real-world conditions and served as an advocate at the WTC disaster site to identify opportunities for the use and evaluation of DOE technologies. From this work, it is clear that opportunities exist for more DOE technologies to be made readily available for use in future emergencies.

  12. Career and Technology Center Guides Students in Real-Life Careers | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Frederick County Public School students have a unique opportunity—a chance to get a real-world, hands-on experience in biomedical science and biotechnology before they even graduate from high school, thanks to the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC). Several years ago, the CTC established its biomedical sciences program with a curriculum from Project Lead the Way (PLTW), a nonprofit, nationwide developer of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in elementary, middle, and high schools.

  13. Final Report of the Center of Excellence in Rotary Technology at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-15

    amplitudes, and that external vibration dampers may be necessary to limit vibration levels. An *nx’ament of the literatue on composite shafting...Processing Univ. of Illinois, Urbana - Champa ign 11/11/86 "Great Mysteries of Helicopter Mr. R. W. ProuLy Aerodynamics" McDonnell Douglas

  14. BioServe space technologies: A NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    BioServe Space Technologies, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), was established in 1987. As is characteristic of each CCDS designated by NASA, the goals of this commercial center are aimed at stimulating high technology research that takes advantage of the space environment and at leading in the development of new products and services which have commercial potential or that contribute to possible new commercial ventures. BioServe's efforts in these areas focus upon space life science studies and the development of enabling devices that will facilitate ground-based experiments as well as the conversion of such to the microgravity environment. A direct result of BioServe's hardware development and life sciences studies is the training of the next generation of bioengineers who will be knowledgeable and comfortable working with the challenges of the space frontier.

  15. Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staiger, Merle Daniel; M. C. Swenson

    2005-01-01

    This report documents an inventory of calcined waste produced at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center during the period from December 1963 to May 2000. The report was prepared based on calciner runs, operation of the calcined solids storage facilities, and miscellaneous operational information that establishes the range of chemical compositions of calcined waste stored at Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The report will be used to support obtaining permits for the calcined solids storage facilities, possible treatment of the calcined waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and to ship the waste to an off-site facility including a geologic repository. The information in this report was compiled from calciner operating data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, calcine temperature monitoring records, and facility design of the calcined solids storage facilities. A compact disk copy of this report is provided to facilitate future data manipulations and analysis.

  16. Thermal Technology Development Activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center - 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Dan

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of thermal technology development activities carried out at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center during 2001. Specific topics covered include: two-phase systems (heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, vapor compression systems and phase change materials), variable emittance systems, advanced coatings, high conductivity materials and electrohydrodynamic (EHD) thermal coatings. The application of these activities to specific space missions is also discussed.

  17. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, Alan [University of Maryland

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  18. Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery: Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. Third quarterly report, [July--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, M.R.

    1993-12-21

    The objectives of this project are to continue reservoir characterization of the Cypress Sandstone; to identify and map facies-defined waterflood units (FDWS); and to design and implement water-alternating-gas (WAG) oil recovery utilizing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) The producibility problems are permeability variation and poor sweep efficiency. Part 1 of the project focuses on the development of computer-generated geological and reservoir simulation models that will be used to select sites for the demonstration and implementation of CO{sub 2} displacement programs in Part 2. Included in Part 1 is the site selection and drilling of an infill well, coring of the Cypress interval, and injectivity testing to gather information used to update the reservoir simulation model. Part 2 involves field implementation of WAG. Technology Transfer includes outreach activity such as seminars, workshops, and field trips.

  19. Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery: Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. Fourth quarterly report, [October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, M.

    1994-01-25

    The objectives of this project are to continue reservoir characterization of the Cypress Sandstone; to identify and map fades-defined waterflood units (FDWS); and to design and Implement water-alternating-gas (WAG) oil recovery utilizing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The producibility problems are permeability variation and poor sweep efficiency. Phase 1 of the project focuses on the development of computer-generated geological and reservoir simulation models that will be used to select sites for the demonstration and implementation of CO{sub 2} displacement programs in Phase 2. Included in Phase 1 is the site selection and drilling of an infill well, coring of the Cypress interval, and injectivity testing to gather information used to update the reservoir simulation model. Phase 2 involves field implementation of WAG. Technology Transfer includes outreach activity such as seminars, workshops, and field trips. Technical progress for this quarter is described.

  20. Applications of advanced petroleum production technology and water alternating gas injection for enhanced oil recovery: Mattoon Oil Field, Illinois. [Quarterly report], January--March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baroni, M.R.

    1994-04-30

    The objectives of this project are to continue reservoir characterization of the Cypress Sandstone; to identify and map facies-defined waterflood units (FDWS); and to design and implement water-alternating-gas (WAG) oil recovery utilizing carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The producibility problems are permeability variation and poor sweep efficiency. Phase 1 of the project focuses on the development of computer-generated geological and reservoir simulation models that will be used to select sites for the demonstration and implementation of CO{sub 2} displacement programs in Phase 2. Included in Phase 1 is the site selection and drilling of an infill well, coring of the Cypress internal and injectivity testing to gather information used to update the reservoir simulation model. Phase 2 involves field implementation of WAG. Technology Transfer includes outreach activity such as seminars, workshops, and field trips. Accomplishments for the past quarter are described.

  1. The National Energy Strategy: A balanced program?. Proceedings of the nineteenth annual Illinois energy conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    The Nineteenth Annual Illinois Energy Conference was held in Chicago, Illinois November 1991. It was organized by the Energy Resources Center, University of Illinois at Chicago with major support provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Department of Energy, the Illinois Commerce Commission, the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources, and the Citizens Council on Energy Resources. The conference program was developed by a planning committee who drew upon Illinois energy and environmental specialists from the major sectors including energy industries, environmental organizations, research universities, utility companies, federal, state and local government agencies, and public interest groups. The members of the planning committee were brought together for a full-day session where they were asked to assess the political, economic, and social impacts of the proposed National Energy Strategy as it relates to Illinois and the Midwest region. Within this context, the planning committee identified several major issues including: (1) Is the proposed plan a balanced strategy; (2) What are the NES impacts on the transportation sector; (3) What are the opportunities for improved efficiency in the Electric Utility Sector; and (4) What is the role of advanced research and development.

  2. Audio networking at the Center for Art and Media Technology Karlsruhe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutilleux, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    The Center for Art and Media Technology is dedicated to art and its relationship to new media. The Center supports music as well as graphic art. It also will house museums. The Center will be fully operational by the middle of 1996. The audio network will interconnect five recording studios and a large theater with three control rooms. With the additional facilities, the number of 40 interconnected rooms is reached. As to the quality and the versatility, the network can be compared, to some extent, to that of a broadcast-building. Traditional networking techniques involve many kilometers of high quality audio-cables and bulky automated patch-bays. Still, we wish even more freedom in the way the rooms are interconnected. Digital audio and computer network technology are promising. Although digital audio technology is spreading, the size of the totally digital systems is still limited. Fiber optic and large capacity optical disks offer attractive alternatives to traditional techniques (cabling, multitrack recorders, sound archives, routing). The digital audio standards are evolving from point to point communication to network communication. A 1 Gbit/s network could be the backbone of a solution.

  3. The Assimilation of Assistive Technology in Residential Care Centers for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Carmeli

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available People with intellectual disability (ID require special support in order to achieve independence in their daily life. Persons with ID are less exposed to assistive technology, although studies have shown that the availability of aids afford an opportunity to reach independence and cooperation. The aim of this study was to examine the nature of the relationship between involvement of the physiotherapy (PT team and the degree to which assistive technology was used. A questionnaire was sent to all PTs employed at all 54 residential care centers for persons with ID of the Division for Mental Retardation at the Ministry of Social Affairs in Israel. A significantly positive correlation was found between the degree of involvement of the PT and the utilization of assistive technology. The study results may be summarized by stating that PTs demonstrated a great deal of involvement, particularly in relation to the extent of their work in the residential care centers. PT's awareness of the importance was indicated as the major reason to use assistive technology.

  4. Activities of the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center pump stage technology team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R.; Mcconnaughey, P.; Eastland, A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to advance rocket propulsion technology, the Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology has been formed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Consortium consists of three Teams: the turbine stage team, the pump stage team (PST), and the combustion devices team. The PST has formulated and is implementing a plan for pump technology development whose end product will be validated CFD codes suitable for application to pump components, test data suitable for validating CFD codes, and advanced pump components optimized using CFD codes. The PST's work during the fall of 1991 and the winter and spring of 1992 is discussed in this paper. This work is highlighted by CFD analyses of an advanced impeller design and collection of laser two-focus velocimeter data for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Pump impeller.

  5. The World Wide Web and Technology Transfer at NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bianco, David J.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) began using the World Wide Web (WWW) in the summer of 1993, becoming the first NASA installation to provide a Center-wide home page. This coincided with a reorganization of LaRC to provide a more concentrated focus on technology transfer to both aerospace and non-aerospace industry. Use of the WWW and NCSA Mosaic not only provides automated information dissemination, but also allows for the implementation, evolution and integration of many technology transfer applications. This paper describes several of these innovative applications, including the on-line presentation of the entire Technology Opportunities Showcase (TOPS), an industrial partnering showcase that exists on the Web long after the actual 3-day event ended. During its first year on the Web, LaRC also developed several WWW-based information repositories. The Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS), a technical paper delivery system with integrated searching and retrieval, has proved to be quite popular. The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), an outgrowth of LTRS, provides uniform access to many logically similar, yet physically distributed NASA report servers. WWW is also the foundation of the Langley Software Server (LSS), an experimental software distribution system which will distribute LaRC-developed software with the possible phase-out of NASA's COSMIC program. In addition to the more formal technology distribution projects, WWW has been successful in connecting people with technologies and people with other people. With the completion of the LaRC reorganization, the Technology Applications Group, charged with interfacing with non-aerospace companies, opened for business with a popular home page.

  6. Technology Transfer Challenges: A Case Study of User-Centered Design in NASA's Systems Engineering Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Stage (US) section of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ares I rocket will require internal access platforms for maintenance tasks performed by humans inside the vehicle. Tasks will occur during expensive critical path operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) including vehicle stacking and launch preparation activities. Platforms must be translated through a small human access hatch, installed in an enclosed worksite environment, support the weight of ground operators and be removed before flight - and their design must minimize additional vehicle mass at attachment points. This paper describes the application of a user-centered conceptual design process and the unique challenges encountered within NASA's systems engineering culture focused on requirements and "heritage hardware". The NASA design team at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) initiated the user-centered design process by studying heritage internal access kits and proposing new design concepts during brainstorming sessions. Simultaneously, they partnered with the Technology Transfer/Innovative Partnerships Program to research inflatable structures and dynamic scaffolding solutions that could enable ground operator access. While this creative, technology-oriented exploration was encouraged by upper management, some design stakeholders consistently opposed ideas utilizing novel, untested equipment. Subsequent collaboration with an engineering consulting firm improved the technical credibility of several options, however, there was continued resistance from team members focused on meeting system requirements with pre-certified hardware. After a six-month idea-generating phase, an intensive six-week effort produced viable design concepts that justified additional vehicle mass while optimizing the human factors of platform installation and use. Although these selected final concepts closely resemble heritage internal access platforms, challenges from the application of the

  7. Using the NIATx Model to Implement User-Centered Design of Technology for Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, David H; Maus, Adam; Judkins, Julianne; Dinauer, Susan; Isham, Andrew; Johnson, Roberta; Landucci, Gina; Atwood, Amy K

    2016-01-14

    What models can effectively guide the creation of eHealth and mHealth technologies? This paper describes the use of the NIATx model as a framework for the user-centered design of a new technology for older adults. The NIATx model is a simple framework of process improvement based on the following principles derived from an analysis of decades of research from various industries about why some projects fail and others succeed: (1) Understand and involve the customer; (2) fix key problems; (3) pick an influential change leader; (4) get ideas from outside the field; (5) use rapid-cycle testing. This paper describes the use of these principles in technology development, the strengths and challenges of using this approach in this context, and lessons learned from the process. Overall, the NIATx model enabled us to produce a user-focused technology that the anecdotal evidence available so far suggests is engaging and useful to older adults. The first and fourth principles were especially important in developing the technology; the fourth proved the most challenging to use.

  8. Petroleum and natural gas in Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    Presentations made at the 7th Annual Illinois Energy Conference are compiled and reported. Specific topics include: Illinois petroleum and natural gas supply; energy use patterns for Illinois and the nation; impacts of the National Energy Act on the natural gas industry; natural gas for North America; natural gas supply under the Natural Gas Policy; US access to international oil; deregulation and its impact on the US petroleum supply; the US Energy Policy; petroleum pricing and taxation policies in Illinois; the high cost of energy and its impact on the poor; impact of increased fuel prices on Illinois' industrial future; energy prices and inflation; opportunities for energy conservation in transportaton; overview of energy and synfuels from biomass and wastes; an inventory of energy potential from biomass in Illinois; problems and potential of alcohol from agriculture; liquid and gaseous fuels from coal; and alternatives to liquid and gaseous fuels.

  9. The centering and leveling adjustment and control technology for the ultra-precision turntable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yanrong; Wang, Yun; Wang, Longxiao; Zhao, Weirui

    2015-08-01

    In order to realize the centering and leveling adjustment in large aperture spherical and aspheric surface shape measurement, by combining with the aerostatic bearing rotary shaft, working platform, high performance servo motor, photoelectric encoder, the micro displacement actuator of XYZ axis, sensor and Renishaw circular grating ,a set of fast and ultra-precision centering and leveling adjustment system is developed .The system is based on large range of air lubrication technology for high precision aerostatic bearing turntable, using the principle of three point supporting method, and the driving of tens nanometer resolution are provided by a piezoelectric micro displacement actuator. To realize the automatical centering and leveling adjustment in the large aperture spherical and aspheric surface shape measurement system, a software control program is designed with VC++. Through experimental test: centering adjusting operation can eventually converges to 0.5μm, leveling adjusting operation can eventually converges to 0.2 ", the time of adjusting can be less than 120 s. The experimental results shows that, compared with the previous system, the structure of the developed measurement and control system is more simple, more flexible, it can meet the demands of high precision, high resolution, large adjusting range, no friction, easy to drive, and high bearing stiffness etc in eccentric adjusting operation of optical precision measurement well.

  10. Economic Development Activities at the Young - Rainey Science, Technology, & Research (STAR) Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul S. Sacco; Carl Smeigh; John Caponiti, Jr.

    2008-06-30

    Project mission was to mitigate the adverse economic effects of closing the U.S. Department of Energy's Pinellas Plant in Largo, Florida. This project was to facilitate the physical renovation of the plant and to help maintain and create jobs for the employees that worked at the plant when DOE terminated its operations. It also included finding and attracting high technology, industrial manufacturing and related firms to utilize the space and high tech equipment to remain at the plant. Stakeholders included the affected plant employees, local government and related public organizations, and businesses and universities in the Tampa Bay Florida area. The $17.6 million funded for this project helped produce 2,780 jobs at the Young - Rainey STAR Center at an average cost of $6,328. Rental income from STAR Center tenants and third party cash input amounted to approximately $66 million over the project period of 13.3 years.

  11. 75 FR 9276 - Harvard Illinois Bancorp, Inc., Harvard, Illinois; Approval of Conversion Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision Harvard Illinois Bancorp, Inc., Harvard, Illinois; Approval of Conversion... application of Harvard Savings Bank, Harvard, Illinois, to convert to the stock form of organization....

  12. The Use of Assessment Center Technology for the Prevention and Reduction of Professional Burnout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stalnova I.A.,

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dynamism of professional activity, increasing workload and working time shortage, high social responsibility for results and other factors increase the probability of formation of burnout in government employees. This actualizes the search for new forms and methods of professional qualification of government employees based on an assessment of their psychological qualities. We discuss the problem of professional and personal burnout in Rosreestr employees, reveal the symptoms of this syndrome. As a tool for preventing and reducing the negative impact of professional deformation in Rosreestr workers, we propose the use of assessment center technology successfully tested in the international practice and requiring adaptation to Russian realities.

  13. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Newly Generated Liquid Waste Demonstration Project Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbst, A.K.

    2000-02-01

    A research, development, and demonstration project for the grouting of newly generated liquid waste (NGLW) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center is considered feasible. NGLW is expected from process equipment waste, decontamination waste, analytical laboratory waste, fuel storage basin waste water, and high-level liquid waste evaporator condensate. The potential grouted waste would be classed as mixed low-level waste, stabilized and immobilized to meet RCRA LDR disposal in a grouting process in the CPP-604 facility, and then transported to the state.

  14. Electric Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-01-12

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the Dry Sorbent Injection (DSI) test block with the Carbon Injection System. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified.

  15. NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) Advanced Technology AT5 Virtualized Infiniband Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John H.; Bledsoe, Benjamin C.; Wagner, Mark; Shakshober, John; Fromkin, Russ

    2013-01-01

    The NCCS is part of the Computational and Information Sciences and Technology Office (CISTO) of Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Sciences and Exploration Directorate. The NCCS's mission is to enable scientists to increase their understanding of the Earth, the solar system, and the universe by supplying state-of-the-art high performance computing (HPC) solutions. To accomplish this mission, the NCCS (https://www.nccs.nasa.gov) provides high performance compute engines, mass storage, and network solutions to meet the specialized needs of the Earth and space science user communities

  16. Proceedings of the Illinois Mining Institute 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damberger, H.H.; Godwin, P. [eds.

    1999-05-01

    Papers presented at the meeting discussed: improved profitability using advanced fine coal processing for Illinois coal mines; fine coal dewatering using a briquetting machine for Illinois Basin coal; applying variable frequency conveyor drives at the Galatia mine; the extensible conveyor system; improvement of longwall safety and productivity with real-time shield pressure monitoring using LoSCoMS software; the effects and economics of dehumidifying mine air at the Riola Mine; Illinois coal infrastructure grants programs; and Arch Coal`s perspective on Illinois coal. A list of members, as well as information about the Institute, is included.

  17. The National Space Science and Technology Center's Education and Public Outreach Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, G. N.; Denson, R. L.

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the National Space Science and Technology Center's (NSSTC) Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is to support K-20 education by coalescing academic, government, and business constituents awareness, implementing best business/education practices, and providing stewardship over funds and programs that promote a symbiotic relationship among these entities, specifically in the area of K-20 Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education. NSSTC EPO Program's long-term objective is to showcase its effective community-based integrated stakeholder model in support of STEM education and to expand its influence across the Southeast region for scaling ultimately across the United States. The Education and Public Outreach program (EPO) is coordinated by a supporting arm of the NSSTC Administrative Council called the EPO Council (EPOC). The EPOC is funded through federal, state, and private grants, donations, and in-kind contributions. It is comprised of representatives of NSSTC Research Centers, both educators and scientists from the Alabama Space Science and Technology Alliance (SSTA) member institutions, the Alabama Space Grant Consortium and the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Education Office. Through its affiliation with MSFC and the SSTA - a consortium of Alabama's research universities that comprise the NSSTC, EPO fosters the education and development of the next generation of Alabama scientists and engineers by coordinating activities at the K-20 level in cooperation with the Alabama Department of Education, the Alabama Commission on Higher Education, and Alabama's businesses and industries. The EPO program's primary objective is to be Alabama's premiere organization in uniting academia, government, and private industry by way of providing its support to the State and Federal Departments of Education involved in systemic STEM education reform, workforce development, and innovative uses of technology. The NSSTC EPO

  18. PERSON-CENTERED AND PERSON-ACTIVITY APPROACH AS A BASIS OF INTEGRATIVE LANGUAGE TEACHING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia N. KARPOVA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article touches upon one of the most acute and complex problems of the modern Russian society the problem of reforming the current system of professional education. The author emphasizes the fact that person – centered and person-activity approach should be the key elements in higher education system modernization as a student personality and his future professional activity should be highlighted in the process of education and upbringing. The author has developed and successfully implemented the integrative language teaching technology, which unites both linguistic and religious knowledge. The article provides a detailed description of the main stages of the process of the technology introduction, the literature and the video materials that were used in the course of the technology implementation in the educational process, as well as formulates conclusions at each stage of its implementation. The effectiveness of the integrative language teaching technology has been proven and is defined by the author as the effect of pedagogical synergy of mutual interaction of several disciplines, characterized by the fact that the influence of the tech nology use exceeds the influence exerted by each discipline as the component of the educational process taken separately.

  19. Information technology leadership in academic medical centers: a tale of four cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, C P

    1999-07-01

    Persons and groups within academic medical centers bring consistent and predictable viewpoints to planning and decision making. The varied professional and academic cultures of these individuals appear to account primarily for the diversity of their viewpoints. Understanding these professional cultures can help leaders achieve some predictability in the complex environments for which they are responsible. Leaders in information technology in particular, in order to be successful, must become part-time anthropologists, immersing themselves in the varied workplaces of their constituents to understand the work they do and the cultures that have grown up around this work. Only in this way will they be able to manage the challenges that arise continuously as the technology and the needs it can address change over time. In this article, the author briefly describes the concept of culture, portrays four specific professional cultures that typically coexist in academic medical centers, and argues that understanding these cultures is absolutely critical to effective management and use of information resources.

  20. Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Capabilities for Use in Space Situational Awareness Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, Larry; McLeod, Todd; Hovater, Mary A.

    2017-01-01

    Marshall performs research, integrates information, matures technologies, and enhances science to bring together a diverse portfolio of products and services of interest for Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and Space Asset Management (SAM), all of which can be accessed through partnerships with Marshall. Integrated Space Situational Awareness and Asset Management (ISSAAM) is an initiative of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to improve space situational awareness and space asset management through technical innovation, collaboration, and cooperation with U.S. Government agencies and the global space community. Marshall Space Flight Center provides solutions for complex issues with in-depth capabilities, a broad range of experience, and expertise unique in the world, and all available in one convenient location. NASA has longstanding guidelines that are used to assess space objects. Specifically, Marshall Space Flight Center has the capabilities, facilities and expertise to address the challenges that space objects, such as near-Earth objects (NEO) or Orbital Debris pose. ISSAAM's three pronged approach brings together vital information and in-depth tools working simultaneously toward examining the complex problems encountered in space situational awareness. Marshall's role in managing, understanding and planning includes many projects grouped under each prong area: Database/Analyses/Visualization; Detection/Tracking/ Mitigation/Removal. These are not limited to those listed below.

  1. An evaluation of the role played by remote sensing technology following the World Trade Center attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Remote sensing technology has been widely recognized for contributing to emergency response efforts after the World Trade Center attack on September 11th, 2001. The need to coordinate activities in the midst of a dense, yet relatively small area, made the combination of imagery and mapped data strategically useful. This paper reviews the role played by aerial photography, satellite imagery, and LIDAR data at Ground Zero. It examines how emergency managers utilized these datasets, and identifies significant problems that were encountered. It goes on to explore additional ways in which imagery could have been used, while presenting recommendations for more effective use in future disasters and Homeland Security applications. To plan adequately for future events, it was important to capture knowledge from individuals who responded to the World Trade Center attack. In recognition, interviews with key emergency management and geographic information system (GIS) personnel provide the basis of this paper. Successful techniques should not be forgotten, or serious problems dismissed. Although widely used after September 11th, it is important to recognize that with better planning, remote sensing and GIS could have played an even greater role. Together with a data acquisition timeline, an expanded discussion of these issues is available in the MCEER/NSF report "Emergency Response in the Wake of the World Trade Center Attack: The Remote Sensing Perspective" (Huyck and Adams, 2002).

  2. Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Building a Global Infrastructure for Climate Change Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ahrens, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ananthakrishnan, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bell, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bharathi, S. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Brown, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Chen, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chervenak, A. L. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Cinquini, L. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Pasadena, CA (United States); Drach, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Fox, P. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hankin, S. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Harper, D. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Hook, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Jones, P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Middleton, D. E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Miller, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nienhouse, E. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Schweitzer, R. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (PMEL), Seattle, WA (United States); Schuler, R. [Univ. of Southern California, Marina del Ray, CA (United States). Information Science Institute; Shipman, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Siebenlist, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Strand, W. G. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wang, F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilcox, H. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States); Wilhelmi, N. [National Center for Atmospheric Reserch, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2010-08-16

    Established within DOE’s Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC-) 2 program, with support from ASCR and BER, the Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) is a consortium of seven laboratories (Argonne National Laboratory [ANL], Los Alamos National Laboratory [LANL], Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory [LBNL], Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory [LLNL], National Center for Atmospheric Research [NCAR], Oak Ridge National Laboratory [ORNL], and Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory [PMEL]), and two institutes (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute [RPI] and the University of Southern California, Information Sciences Institute [USC/ISI]). The consortium’s mission is to provide climate researchers worldwide with a science gateway to access data, information, models, analysis tools, and computational capabilities required to evaluate extreme-scale data sets. Its stated goals are to (1) make data more useful to climate researchers by developing collaborative technology that enhances data usability; (2) meet the specific needs that national and international climate projects have for distributed databases, data access, and data movement; (3) provide a universal and secure web-based data access portal for broad-based multi-model data collections; and (4) provide a wide range of climate data-analysis tools and diagnostic methods to international climate centers and U.S. government agencies. To this end, the ESG-CET is working to integrate all highly publicized climate data sets—from climate simulations to observations—using distributed storage management, remote high-performance units, high-bandwidth wide-area networks, and user desktop platforms in a collaborative problem-solving environment.

  3. Radiation technology facilities operating at the italian ENEA-Casaccia research center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tata, A.; Festinesi, A.; Rosa, R. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1998-04-01

    The ENEA Casaccia Research Center, 20 km far from Rome, is the main Italian technological research Center, with more than 2000 scientists involved in several advanced research fields (materials, energy, environment, etc.). Within the frame of radiation technology, three main facilities are in service at full power at the Casaccia research Center: a 1 MW TRIGA Mark II reactor (RC-1); a 5 kW fast source reactor (TAPIRO); a 3.7 x 10{sup 15} Bq Cobalt-60 irradiation plant (CALLIOPE). Main R-D programmes carried out regard medical radioisotopes and radio trackers production, neutron radiography, neutron activation analysis, radiation damage analysis, neutron diffractometry, foodstuffs treatment, crosslinking processes, wastes (hazardous, chemical, hospital) processing. The paper provides a features description of utilized facilities and reports main present carried out projects. [Italiano] Il Centro Ricerca ENEA della casaccia, situato a 20 km circa da Roma, e` il maggiore centro di ricerca tecnologica italiano, con oltre 2000 ricercatori impegnati in numerosi campi di ricerca avanzata (materiali, energia, ambiente, etc.). Nell`ambito delle tecnologie di irraggiamento, sono presenti e pienamente funzionanti presso il C.R. Casaccia tre principali impianti: un reattore termico TRIGA mark II da 1 MW (RC-1); un reattore-sorgente veloce da 5 kW (TAPIRO); un impianto di irraggiamento a Cobalto-60 da 3.7. x 10{sup 15} Bq (CALLIOPE). I principali programmi R-D condotti riguardano la produzione di radioisotopi e radiotraccianti di utilizzo in campo medico, la radiografia neutronica, l`analisi per attivazione neutronica, l`analisi del danno da radiazioni, la diffrattometria neutronica, il trattamento di derrate alimentari, i processi di reticolazione polimerica, il trattamento di rifiuti (tossico-nocivi, chimici, ospedaliri). Il presente lavoro fornisce una descrizione tecnica degli impianti, nonche` indicazioni sui principali programmo condotti attualmente presso tali impienti.

  4. Research Center for Optical Physics: Education and Technology for the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    During the past eleven years since its inception, RCOP has excelled in its two primary goals: 1) training of the scientists and engineers needed for the twenty-first century with special emphasis on underrepresented citizens and 2) research and technological development in areas of relevance to NASA. In the category of research training, as of May 2003, RCOP produced 36 Bachelors degrees, 25 Masters degrees, and 13 Doctoral degrees. Of these, all 36 Bachelors degrees, 16 of the Masters degrees and 9 of the Doctoral degrees were awarded to African Americans. Four of the Doctoral graduates and one of the Masters graduates are working at NASA Field Centers. RCOP has also provided research experiences to 130 undergraduate students and 22 high school students through a number of outreach programs held during the summer and the academic year. RCOP has also been crucial to the development of the Ph.D. program in physics at Hampton University by providing high quality research training and technical electives required for a Doctoral degree in physics. RCOP has also excelled in research and technological development. Since 1992, RCOP researchers have leveraged over 8 million dollars in additional research funding, published 152 papers in refereed journals and proceedings, and given 125 presentations at refereed international conferences in the United States and eight other countries. RCOP also developed numerous collaborations with other research centers, universities and industries. In recognition of this outstanding work, RCOP is the first research center in the United States invited to join the Joint Open Laboratory for Laser Crystals and Precise Laser Systems headed by Dr. Alexander Kaminiskii of the Russian Academy of Sciences.

  5. Update and Expansion of the Center of Automotive Technology Excellence Under the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irick, David

    2012-08-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its seventh year of operation under this agreement, its thirteenth year in total. During this period the Center has involved eleven GATE Fellows and three GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center’s focus area: Advanced Hybrid Propulsion and Control Systems. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $2,000,000.

  6. Student Use of Communication Technologies--Parent/Guardian Survey Report. Survey Research Center Report 2010/8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julka, Ashley; Stehr, Grady; Parks, Denise; Trechter, David

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of how middle school students and their parents are using technologies and what programs citizens of Wisconsin might need with respect to these technologies. During the month of February 2010, staff from the Survey Research Center (SRC) at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, Lori…

  7. 76 FR 77578 - In the Matter of: Brendan Technologies, Inc., CenterStaging Corp., PGMI, Inc., Thermal Energy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of: Brendan Technologies, Inc., CenterStaging Corp., PGMI, Inc., Thermal Energy... concerning the securities of Brendan Technologies, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since... information concerning the securities of Thermal Energy Storage, Inc. because it has not filed any...

  8. 76 FR 35260 - Illinois Disaster # IL-00030

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... ADMINISTRATION Illinois Disaster IL-00030 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Illinois (FEMA..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  9. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards. Beef Production Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for workforce preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the beef production cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and…

  10. Groundwater: Illinois' Buried Treasure. Education Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Education Association of Illinois, Chicago.

    Groundwater is an extremely valuable resource that many feel has been too long neglected and taken for granted. There is growing recognition in Illinois and throughout the United States that comprehensive groundwater protection measures are vital. Illinois embarked on a course in protecting groundwater resources with the passage of the Illinois…

  11. Groundwater: Illinois' Buried Treasure. Education Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Education Association of Illinois, Chicago.

    Groundwater is an extremely valuable resource that many feel has been too long neglected and taken for granted. There is growing recognition in Illinois and throughout the United States that comprehensive groundwater protection measures are vital. Illinois embarked on a course in protecting groundwater resources with the passage of the Illinois…

  12. Nutrition Education Needs of Elders in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Karen; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The dietary patterns and nutrition education needs of 472 Illinois adults over 64 were identified. Many were at nutritional risk, having high cholesterol, overall poor diet, and low intake of fruits, vegetables, and dairy products. The project was a collaboration between Cooperative Extension and the Illinois Department of Public Health. (SK)

  13. A Measurement Management Technology for Improving Energy Efficiency in Data Centers and Telecommunication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrik Hamann, Levente Klein

    2012-06-28

    Data center (DC) electricity use is increasing at an annual rate of over 20% and presents a concern for the Information Technology (IT) industry, governments, and the society. A large fraction of the energy use is consumed by the compressor cooling to maintain the recommended operating conditions for IT equipment. The most common way to improve the DC efficiency is achieved by optimally provisioning the cooling power to match the global heat dissipation in the DC. However, at a more granular level, the large range of heat densities of today's IT equipment makes the task of provisioning cooling power optimized to the level of individual computer room air conditioning (CRAC) units much more challenging. Distributed sensing within a DC enables the development of new strategies to improve energy efficiency, such as hot spot elimination through targeted cooling, matching power consumption at rack level with workload schedule, and minimizing power losses. The scope of Measurement and Management Technologies (MMT) is to develop a software tool and the underlying sensing technology to provide critical decision support and control for DC and telecommunication facilities (TF) operations. A key aspect of MMT technology is integration of modeling tools to understand how changes in one operational parameter affect the overall DC response. It is demonstrated that reduced ordered models for DC can generate, in less than 2 seconds computational time, a three dimensional thermal model in a 50 kft{sup 2} DC. This rapid modeling enables real time visualization of the DC conditions and enables 'what if' scenarios simulations to characterize response to 'disturbances'. One such example is thermal zone modeling that matches the cooling power to the heat generated at a local level by identifying DC zones cooled by a specific CRAC. Turning off a CRAC unit can be simulated to understand how the other CRAC utilization changes and how server temperature responds

  14. Integrating Balloon and Satellite Operation Data Centers for Technology Readiness Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattiello-Francisco, Fátima; Fernandes, Jose Oscar

    2016-07-01

    Stratospheric balloon-borne experiments have been one of the most effective ways to validate innovative space technology, taking the advantage of reduced development cycles and low cost in launching and operation. In Brazil, the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) has balloon and satellite ground infrastructures since the 1970´s and the 1990´s, respectively. In the recent past, a strategic approach was adopted on the modernization of balloon ground operation facilities for supporting the protoMIRAX experiment, an X-ray imaging telescope under development at INPE as a pathfinder for the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de Raios X) satellite mission. The strategic target was to reuse the SATellite Control System (SATCS), a software framework developed to control and monitor INPÉs satellites, for balloon operation. This paper presents the results of that effort and the new ongoing project, a computer-based framework named I2Bso, which strategic target is to Integrate INPÉs Balloon and Satellite Operation data centers. The I2Bso major purpose is to support the continuous assessment of an innovative technology after different qualification flights either on board balloons or satellites in order to acquire growing evidence for the technology maturity.

  15. University of Illinois Temperature Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, K. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Knudson, D. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rempe, J. L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chase, B. M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-18

    This document summarizes background information and presents results related to temperature measurements in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) University of Illinois Project 29609 irradiation. The objective of this test was to assess the radiation performance of ferritic alloys for advanced reactor applications. The FeCr-based alloy system is considered the lead alloy system for a variety of advanced reactor components and applications. Irradiations of FeCr alloy samples were performed using the Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) in the B-7 position and in a static capsule in the A-11 position of the ATR.

  16. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Holloway

    2005-09-30

    Beginning the fall semester of 1999, The University of Maryland, Departments of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering and the Institute for Systems Research served as a U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center for Hybrid Electric Drivetrains and Control Strategies. A key goal was to produce a graduate level education program that educated and prepared students to address the technical challenges of designing and developing hybrid electric vehicles, as they progressed into the workforce. A second goal was to produce research that fostered the advancement of hybrid electric vehicles, their controls, and other related automotive technologies. Participation ended at the University of Maryland after the 2004 fall semester. Four graduate courses were developed and taught during the course of this time, two of which evolved into annually-taught undergraduate courses, namely Vehicle Dynamics and Control Systems Laboratory. Five faculty members from Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and the Institute for Systems Research participated. Four Ph.D. degrees (two directly supported and two indirectly supported) and seven Master's degrees in Mechanical Engineering resulted from the research conducted. Research topics included thermoelectric waste heat recovery, fuel cell modeling, pre- and post-transmission hybrid powertrain control and integration, hybrid transmission design, H{sub 2}-doped combustion, and vehicle dynamics. Many of the participating students accepted positions in the automotive industry or government laboratories involved in automotive technology work after graduation. This report discusses the participating faculty, the courses developed and taught, research conducted, the students directly and indirectly supported, and the publication list. Based on this collection of information, the University of Maryland firmly believes that the key goal of the program was met and that the majority of the

  17. A new concept for medical imaging centered on cellular phone technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yair Granot

    Full Text Available According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a a data acquisition device (DAD at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site. The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode.

  18. A new concept for medical imaging centered on cellular phone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Yair; Ivorra, Antoni; Rubinsky, Boris

    2008-04-30

    According to World Health Organization reports, some three quarters of the world population does not have access to medical imaging. In addition, in developing countries over 50% of medical equipment that is available is not being used because it is too sophisticated or in disrepair or because the health personnel are not trained to use it. The goal of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility of a new concept in medical imaging that is centered on cellular phone technology and which may provide a solution to medical imaging in underserved areas. The new system replaces the conventional stand-alone medical imaging device with a new medical imaging system made of two independent components connected through cellular phone technology. The independent units are: a) a data acquisition device (DAD) at a remote patient site that is simple, with limited controls and no image display capability and b) an advanced image reconstruction and hardware control multiserver unit at a central site. The cellular phone technology transmits unprocessed raw data from the patient site DAD and receives and displays the processed image from the central site. (This is different from conventional telemedicine where the image reconstruction and control is at the patient site and telecommunication is used to transmit processed images from the patient site). The primary goal of this study is to demonstrate that the cellular phone technology can function in the proposed mode. The feasibility of the concept is demonstrated using a new frequency division multiplexing electrical impedance tomography system, which we have developed for dynamic medical imaging, as the medical imaging modality. The system is used to image through a cellular phone a simulation of breast cancer tumors in a medical imaging diagnostic mode and to image minimally invasive tissue ablation with irreversible electroporation in a medical imaging interventional mode.

  19. A review of the design and development processes of simulation for training in healthcare - A technology-centered versus a human-centered perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews literature about simulation systems for training in healthcare regarding the prevalence of human-centered approaches in the design and development of these systems, motivated by a tradition in this field of working technology-centered. The results show that the focus on human needs and context of use is limited. It is argued that a reduction of the focus on technical advancements in favor of the needs of the users and the healthcare community, underpinned by human factors and ergonomics theory, is favorable. Due to the low number of identified articles describing or discussing human-centered approaches it is furthermore concluded that the publication culture promotes technical descriptions and summative evaluations rather than descriptions and reflections regarding the design and development processes. Shifting the focus from a technology-centered approach to a human-centered one can aid in the process of creating simulation systems for training in healthcare that are: 1) relevant to the learning objectives, 2) adapted to the needs of users, context and task, and 3) not selected based on technical or fidelity criteria.

  20. The 1994 research and technology report at the Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Halem, Milton (Editor); Green, James (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Maran, Stephen (Editor); Boyle, Charles (Editor); Truszlowski, Walter (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The breadth of subject material in this 1994 edition of the Research and Technology Report illustrates the broad scope of activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The numerous entries dealing with data processing and visualization show the strong emphasis on data and its interpretation. Reports are presented in the following sections: data processing and visualization; space sciences - high energy astronomy, solar system, and new techniques; earth system science - atmospheres, oceans and ice, solid earth, and soils and vegetation; networks, planning, and information systems - mission scheduling and operations, spacecraft operation and status, software engineering, and infrastructure support; engineering and materials - spacecraft subsystems, launch vehicles, thermal control, new mechanisms, and testing and evaluation; and flight projects.

  1. Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    This report documents the result of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Progress Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. METC is currently a research and development facility, managed by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy. Its goal is to focus energy research and development to develop engineered fossil fuel systems, that are economically viable and environmentally sound, for commercial application. There is clear evidence that, since the 1991 Tiger Team Assessment, substantial progress has been made by both FE and METC in most aspects of their ES&H program. The array of new and restructured organizations, systems, and programs at FE and METC; increased assignments of staff to support these initiatives; extensive training activities; and the maturing planning processes, all reflect a discernable, continuous improvement in the quality of the ES&H performance.

  2. Electric Power Research Institute, Environmental Control Technology Center monthly report to the Steering Committee, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-02

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot FGD unit continued this month with High Velocity Scrubbing and the Tampa Electric Company (TECO) Tailored Collaboration test block. Additionally, Phase III of the Toxics Removal/Carbon Injection test block was conducted concurrently with FGD testing. At the beginning of the month, a second phase of third-party testing began for Suncor, Inc. The Suncor Gypsum Sample Collection test block (MSUN) began on June 5 on the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet FGD unit. Testing was completed on June 13. On the Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, testing continued this month as ammonia slip measurements were conducted under low catalyst inlet temperatures and at baseline conditions.

  3. Technology Development for Hydrogen Propellant Storage and Transfer at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley; Krenn, Angela; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a major user of liquid hydrogen. In particular, NASA's John F. Kennedy (KSC) Space Center has operated facilities for handling and storing very large quantities of liquid hydrogen (LH2) since the early 1960s. Safe operations pose unique challenges and as a result NASA has invested in technology development to improve operational efficiency and safety. This paper reviews recent innovations including methods of leak and fire detection and aspects of large storage tank health and integrity. We also discuss the use of liquid hydrogen in space and issues we are addressing to ensure safe and efficient operations should hydrogen be used as a propellant derived from in-situ volatiles.

  4. Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Staiger

    1999-06-01

    A potential option in the program for long-term management of high-level wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, calls for retrieving calcine waste and converting it to a more stable and less dispersible form. An inventory of calcine produced during the period December 1963 to May 1999 has been prepared based on calciner run, solids storage facilities operating, and miscellaneous operational information, which gives the range of chemical compositions of calcine waste stored at INTEC. Information researched includes calciner startup data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, solids storage bin capacities, calcine storage bin distributor systems, and solids storage bin design and temperature monitoring records. Unique information on calcine solids storage facilities design of potential interest to remote retrieval operators is given.

  5. Current Development of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion technologies at the Center for Space Nuclear Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert C. O' Brien; Steven K. Cook; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe; Ronald Samborsky; Daniel Brasuell

    2012-09-01

    Nuclear power and propulsion has been considered for space applications since the 1950s. Between 1955 and 1972 the US built and tested over twenty nuclear reactors / rocket engines in the Rover/NERVA programs1. The Aerojet Corporation was the prime contractor for the NERVA program. Modern changes in environmental laws present challenges for the redevelopment of the nuclear rocket. Recent advances in fuel fabrication and testing options indicate that a nuclear rocket with a fuel composition that is significantly different from those of the NERVA project can be engineered; this may be needed to ensure public support and compliance with safety requirements. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is pursuing a number of technologies, modeling and testing processes to further the development of safe, practical and affordable nuclear thermal propulsion systems.

  6. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Consolidated Progress Report July 2006 - March 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernholdt, D E; McInnes, L C; Govindaraju, M; Bramley, R; Epperly, T; Kohl, J A; Nieplocha, J; Armstrong, R; Shasharina, S; Sussman, A L; Sottile, M; Damevski, K

    2009-04-14

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  7. NASA Education and Educational Technologies Exemplified by the Space Weather Action Center Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Norma Teresinha Oliveira; André, Claudio; Cline, Troy D.; Eastman, Timothy E.; Maher, Margaret J.; Mayo, Louis A.; Lewis, Elaine M.

    We explore here the Space Weather Action Center (SWAC) Program, as an example of NASA initiatives in education. Many human activities in space can be disrupted by space weather. The main objective of this program is to enable students to produce space weather forecasts by accessing current NASA data. Implementation of the SWAC Program requires: technological resources, online materials, and systematic work. Instructional guides, materials and methods are explained on the Space Weather Action Center Web site (http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/swac). Ultimately, students’ forecasts can be presented through a variety of accessible media including inexpensive video editing software and/or already existing school-based broadcast studios. This cross-curricular program is targeted to middle and high school and can be applied in almost all educational contexts as the number of schools with computer and internet access increases worldwide. SWAC is a pioneer initiative that contributes to fostering student interest in STEM and promotes their intellectual autonomy. Through SWAC, they get to act like real scientists by accessing, analyzing, recording, and communicating space weather forecasts in a professional approach.

  8. Technical cooperation front line. JICA technology cooperation project in Indonesia and Vietnam (Coal mining technology enhancement project in Indonesia); (Coal Mine Firedamp Gas Management Center in Vietnam)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inami, K. [Japan Coal Energy Center (Japan). Technical Service Group, Engineering Dept.

    2002-09-01

    In April 2001, two coal mining technical cooperation projects of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) started. The first project is 'Coal Mining Technology Enhancement Project in Indonesia'. The second project is 'Coal Mine Firedamp Gas Management Center in Vietnam'. Both are project-type technical cooperation for the technology transfer centering in advanced Japanese underground coal mine technologies for a five years project period from April 1 2001 to 31 March 2006. Japan Coal Energy Center (JCOAL) have carried out indirect supporting function for the planning and the execution of the project from the preparation phase of the project start-up as a supporting agency based on the business agreement with JICA. This paper reports the projects development. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM APPROACH FOR PLAY PORTFOLIOS TO IMPROVE OIL PRODUCTION IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beverly Seyler; John Grube

    2004-12-10

    Oil and gas have been commercially produced in Illinois for over 100 years. Existing commercial production is from more than fifty-two named pay horizons in Paleozoic rocks ranging in age from Middle Ordovician to Pennsylvanian. Over 3.2 billion barrels of oil have been produced. Recent calculations indicate that remaining mobile resources in the Illinois Basin may be on the order of several billion barrels. Thus, large quantities of oil, potentially recoverable using current technology, remain in Illinois oil fields despite a century of development. Many opportunities for increased production may have been missed due to complex development histories, multiple stacked pays, and commingled production which makes thorough exploitation of pays and the application of secondary or improved/enhanced recovery strategies difficult. Access to data, and the techniques required to evaluate and manage large amounts of diverse data are major barriers to increased production of critical reserves in the Illinois Basin. These constraints are being alleviated by the development of a database access system using a Geographic Information System (GIS) approach for evaluation and identification of underdeveloped pays. The Illinois State Geological Survey has developed a methodology that is being used by industry to identify underdeveloped areas (UDAs) in and around petroleum reservoirs in Illinois using a GIS approach. This project utilizes a statewide oil and gas Oracle{reg_sign} database to develop a series of Oil and Gas Base Maps with well location symbols that are color-coded by producing horizon. Producing horizons are displayed as layers and can be selected as separate or combined layers that can be turned on and off. Map views can be customized to serve individual needs and page size maps can be printed. A core analysis database with over 168,000 entries has been compiled and assimilated into the ISGS Enterprise Oracle database. Maps of wells with core data have been generated

  10. Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) proposed dual-use technology investment program in intelligent robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, Jon D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the proposed Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) precompetitive, dual-use technology investment project in robotics. New robotic technology in advanced robots, which can recognize and respond to their environments and to spoken human supervision so as to perform a variety of combined mobility and manipulation tasks in various sectors, is an obejective of this work. In the U.S. economy, such robots offer the benefits of improved global competitiveness in a critical industrial sector; improved productivity by the end users of these robots; a growing robotics industry that produces jobs and profits; lower cost health care delivery with quality improvements; and, as these 'intelligent' robots become acceptable throughout society, an increase in the standard of living for everyone. In space, such robots will provide improved safety, reliability, and productivity as Space Station evolves, and will enable human space exploration (by human/robot teams). The proposed effort consists of partnerships between manufacturers, universities, and JSC to develop working production prototypes of these robots by leveraging current development by both sides. Currently targeted applications are in the manufacturing, health care, services, and construction sectors of the U.S. economy and in the inspection, servicing, maintenance, and repair aspects of space exploration. But the focus is on the generic software architecture and standardized interfaces for custom modules tailored for the various applications allowing end users to customize a robot as PC users customize PC's. Production prototypes would be completed in 5 years under this proposal.

  11. Impelementation of Information Technology Service Management at Data And Information System Center of XYZ University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornelius Irfandhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Information Technology (IT is increasingly progressing. Nowadays, the success of a business of the organization/company is highly dependent on the IT infrastructure used. Therefore, organizations/companies have to manage their IT service to be optimal to their customers. Looking at this matter and the increasing dynamics of XYZ University, then Data and Information System Center (Pusdatin - an IT provider of XYZ University began implementing IT Service Management (ITSM from 2013 using the latest version of Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL, namely ITIL v3 as a framework for implementing ITSM in its business processes. However, along the way, there are still some problems happen in Pusdatin in order that ITSM can actually support and align with the objectives of XYZ University. Through this paper, the authors want to explain how the implementation of ITSM at Pusdatin, identify the problems related to the implementation of ITSM, and provide the solutions for each problem. The methods used are direct observation to Pusdatin, conductan interview with the Head of Pusdatin and Staff of Pusdatin, and also perform a literature review of books and papers that discuss about ITIL. The result of this research is that ITSM process of Pusdatin generally works quite well but there are still some shortcomings because ITSM is not 100% implemented in all areas.

  12. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) (formerly ICPP) ash reutilization study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langenwalter, T.; Pettet, M.; Ochoa, R.; Jensen, S.

    1998-05-01

    Since 1984, the coal-fired plant at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC, formerly Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been generating fly ash at a rate of approximately 1,000 tons per year. This ash is hydrated and placed in an ash bury pit near the coal-fired plant. The existing ash bury pit will be full in less than 1 year at its present rate of use. A conceptual design to build a new ash bury pit was completed, and the new pit is estimated to cost $1.7 million. This report evaluates ash reutilization alternatives that propose to eliminate this waste stream and save the $1.7 million required to build a new pit. The alternatives include using ash for landfill day cover, concrete admixture, flowable fill, soil stabilization, waste remediation, and carbon recovery technology. Both physical and chemical testing, under the guidance of the American Society for Testing and Materials, have been performed on ash from the existing pit and from different steps within the facility`s processes. The test results have been evaluated, compared to commercial ash, and are discussed as they relate to reutilization alternatives. This study recommends that the ash be used in flowable fill concrete for Deactivation and Demolition work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory.

  13. Recent Stirling Conversion Technology Developments and Operational Measurements at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriti, Salvatore M.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2010-01-01

    In support of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) project and other potential applications, NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has initiated convertor technology development efforts in the areas of acoustic emission, electromagnetic field mitigation, thermoacoustic Stirling conversion, and multiple-cylinder alpha arrangements of Stirling machines. The acoustic emission measurement effort was developed as a health monitoring metric for several Stirling convertors undergoing life testing. While accelerometers have been used in the past to monitor dynamic signature, the acoustic sensors were chosen to monitor cycle events, such gas bearing operation. Several electromagnetic interference (EMI) experiments were performed on a pair of Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASC). These tests demonstrated that a simple bucking coil was capable of reducing the alternating current (ac) magnetic field below the ASRG system specification. The thermoacoustic Stirling concept eliminates the displacer typically found in Stirling machines by making use of the pressure oscillations of a traveling acoustic wave. A 100 W-class thermoacoustic Stirling prototype manufactured by Northrop Grumman Space and Technology was received and tested. Another thermoacoustic prototype designed and fabricated by Sunpower, Inc., will be tested in the near future. A four cylinder free piston alpha prototype convertor was received from Sunpower, Inc. and has been tested at GRC. This hardware was used as a proof of concept to validate thermodynamic models and demonstrate stable operation of multiple-cylinder free-piston Stirling conversion. This paper will discuss each of these activities and the results they produced.

  14. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2015-01-01

    The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in North America. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the highly corrosive hydrochloric acid (HCl) generated by the solid rocket boosters (SRBs). Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion. The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. NASA has over fifty years of experience dealing with unexpected failures caused by corrosion and has developed expertise in corrosion control in the launch and other environments. The Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC evolved, from what started as an atmospheric exposure test site near NASAs launch pads, into a capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA, external partners, and customers.This paper provides a chronological overview of NASAs role in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion in highly corrosive environments. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  15. NASA's Corrosion Technology Laboratory at the Kennedy Space Center: Anticipating, Managing, and Preventing Corrosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Luz Marina

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion is the degradation of a material that results from its interaction with the environment. The marine environment at NASAs Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been documented by ASM International (formerly American Society for Metals) as the most corrosive in the United States. With the introduction of the Space Shuttle in 1981, the already highly corrosive conditions at the launch pads were rendered even more severe by the 70 tons of highly corrosive hydrochloric acid that were generated by the solid rocket boosters. Numerous failures at the launch pads are caused by corrosion.The structural integrity of ground infrastructure and flight hardware is critical to the success, safety, cost, and sustainability of space missions. As a result of fifty years of experience with launch and ground operations in a natural marine environment that is highly corrosive, NASAs Corrosion Technology Laboratory at KSC is a major source of corrosion control expertise in the launch and other environments. Throughout its history, the Laboratory has evolved from what started as an atmospheric exposure facility near NASAs launch pads into a world-wide recognized capability that provides technical innovations and engineering services in all areas of corrosion for NASA and external customers.This presentation will provide a historical overview of the role of NASAs Corrosion Technology in anticipating, managing, and preventing corrosion. One important challenge in managing and preventing corrosion involves the detrimental impact on humans and the environment of what have been very effective corrosion control strategies. This challenge has motivated the development of new corrosion control technologies that are more effective and environmentally friendly. Strategies for improved corrosion protection and durability can have a huge impact on the economic sustainability of human spaceflight operations.

  16. Distribution of male infertility specialists in relation to the male population and assisted reproductive technology centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangia, Ajay K; Likosky, Donald S; Wang, Dongmei

    2010-07-01

    To describe the spatial distribution of assisted reproductive technology (ART) centers and male infertility specialists by location, driving distance from ART center, and potential male population in need of these resources. Cross-sectional study. Male population in the reproductive years (20-49 years old) based on U.S. Census Bureau data in 2000. Urology male infertility specialists as defined by 2005 specialty society membership directories. ART centers registered with the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology in 2005. Male population and male infertility specialists within the service area served by in-state and neighboring-state ART centers, as defined by a 60-minute travel time. One hundred ninety-seven male infertility specialists and 390 ART centers were identified. On a state level, the highest male population in the reproductive years was seen in California, Texas, and Florida. The highest male populations per male specialist were found in Oregon, Tennessee, and Oklahoma. The highest number of ART centers per male specialist was found in Tennessee. The highest proximities of male specialists within the 60-minute driving service area of different ART centers were found in the North East and Southern California. The Midwest to Northwest had the least. A disparity of urology male infertility specialists exists in the United States, with large areas of the country being underserved and overserved based on the location of ART centers. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Application of the Study Model of \\\\\\"Knowledge Management Infrastructure in Organizations\\\\\\" in Information Centers: The case of the Regional Information Center for Science and Technology (RICeST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolhossein Farajpahlou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Information centers are duly obliged to move in line with their parent organizations’ goals and missions in creating knowledge. In the age of information and communication revolution, and in a knowledge-based economy, organizations that are involved in creation of knowledge have an important role in communication and diffusion of knowledge. In the mean time, libraries and information centers change from being mere depository sources to knowledge institutions. The current research aimed to study the present state of knowledge management infrastructures of the Regional Information Center for Science and Technology (RICeST as a national and regional information center. The statistic population of this study was consisted of 87 staff. Data was collected by means of questionnaires, observation and interviews. The results showed the required infrastructure for KM activities were almost there, among different aspects of which, budgeting had a better situation in the institution under study. In regards with establishment of knowledge management, RICeST was paying more attention to information and communication technology and knowledge network via applications such as the Internet and extranets. Another fact was that in the RICeST, emphasis was on learning and on human resources as the substantial sources in creation of knowledge. Among other aspects, “organizational culture” was in a lower state compared with other aspects in the RICeST.

  18. Patterns in Illinois Educational School Data

    CERN Document Server

    Stevens, Cacey S; Nagel, Sidney R

    2015-01-01

    We examine Illinois educational data from standardized exams and analyze primary factors affecting the achievement of public school students. We focus on the simplest possible models: representation of data through visualizations and regressions on single variables. Exam scores are shown to depend on school type, location, and poverty concentration. For most schools in Illinois, student test scores decline linearly with poverty concentration. However Chicago must be treated separately. Selective schools in Chicago, as well as some traditional and charter schools, deviate from this pattern based on poverty. For any poverty level, Chicago schools perform better than those in the rest of Illinois. Selective programs for gifted students show high performance at each grade level, most notably at the high school level, when compared to other Illinois school types. The case of Chicago charter schools is more complex. In the last six years, their students' scores overtook those of students in traditional Chicago high...

  19. Technology utilization in a non-urban region: Further impact and technique of the Technology Use Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, C. H.; Moore, A. M.; Dodd, B.; Marshall, R.; West, S. G.

    1978-01-01

    Performance information for the center is reported. The search production during the reporting period exceeds the production record of the center during any period in its 14 year history. A performance average of 30 searches per month, which represents an increase of 45%, is reported. Numerical listings of the searches processed are given. A section of transfer and impact report is included.

  20. Flooding in Illinois, April-June 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Charles; Smith, D.F.

    2002-01-01

    Widespread flooding occurred throughout most of Illinois in spring 2002 as a result of multiple intense rainstorms that moved through the State during an extended 2-month period from the third week in April through the month of May in central and southern Illinois, the first week in June in northern Illinois, and the second week in June in west-central Illinois. The scale of flooding was highly variable in time and intensity throughout the State. A Federal disaster was declared for central and southern Illinois to deal with the extensive damage incurred during the severe weather, and to provide emergency aid relief. Discharge and stage records for the flood periods described above are presented for 193 streamflow-gaging stations throughout Illinois and in drainages just upstream of the State. New maximum instantaneous discharge was recorded at 12 stations during this flood period, and new maximum stage was recorded at 15 stations. Flood stage was exceeded for at least 1 day during this 2-month period at 67 of the 82 stations with established flood-stage elevations given by the National Weather Service. Of the 162 streamflowgaging stations with an established flood-frequency distribution, a 5-year or greater flood discharge was recorded at 87 stations, and a 100-year or greater flood discharge occurred at six stations.

  1. C-130 Advanced Technology Center wing box conceptual design/cost study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, R. S.; Foreman, C. R.; Silva, K.

    1992-01-01

    A conceptual design was developed by Northrop/LTV for an advanced C-130 Center Wing Box (CWB) which could meet the severe mission requirements of the SOF C-130 aircraft. The goals for the advanced technology CWB relative to the current C-130H CWB were: (1) the same acquisition cost; (2) lower operating support costs; (3) equal or lower weight; (4) a 30,000 hour service life for the SOF mission; and (5) minimum impact on the current maintenance concept. Initially, the structural arrangement, weight, external and internal loads, fatigue spectrum, flutter envelope and design criteria for the SOF C-130 aircraft CWB were developed. An advanced materials assessment was then conducted to determine the suitability of advanced materials for a 1994 production availability and detailed trade studies were performed on candidate CWB conceptual designs. Finally, a life-cycle cost analysis was performed on the advanced CWB. The study results showed that a hybrid composite/metallic CWB could meet the severe SOF design requirements, reduce the CWB weight by 14 pct., and was cost effective relative to an all metal beefed up C-130H CWB.

  2. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, West Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) conducted November 30 through December 4, 1987. In addition, the preliminary findings of the Laramie Project Office (LPO) Survey, which was conducted as part of the METC Survey on January 25 through 29, 1988, are presented in Appendices E and F. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with METC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. The on-site phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at METC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site activities at METC. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the results will be incorporated into the METC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the Survey METC. 60 refs., 28 figs., 43 tabs.

  3. The Chicago Center for Green Technology: life-cycle assessment of a brownfield redevelopment project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecheisen, Thomas; Theis, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    The sustainable development of brownfields reflects a fundamental, yet logical, shift in thinking and policymaking regarding pollution prevention. Life-cycle assessment (LCA) is a tool that can be used to assist in determining the conformity of brownfield development projects to the sustainability paradigm. LCA was applied to the process of a real brownfield redevelopment project, now known as the Chicago Center for Green Technology, to determine the cumulative energy required to complete the following redevelopment stages: (1) brownfield assessment and remediation, (2) building rehabilitation and site development and (3) ten years of operation. The results of the LCA have shown that operational energy is the dominant life-cycle stage after ten years of operation. The preservation and rehabilitation of the existing building, the installation of renewable energy systems (geothermal and photovoltaic) on-site and the use of more sustainable building products resulted in 72 terajoules (TJ) of avoided energy impacts, which would provide 14 years of operational energy for the site. Methodological note: data for this life-cycle assessment were obtained from project reports, construction blueprints and utility bills.

  4. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staiger, M. Daniel, Swenson, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

  5. The OCHIN community information network: bringing together community health centers, information technology, and data to support a patient-centered medical village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoe, Jennifer E; Sears, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Creating integrated, comprehensive care practices requires access to data and informatics expertise. Information technology (IT) resources are not readily available to individual practices. One model of shared IT resources and learning is a "patient-centered medical village." We describe the OCHIN Community Health Information Network as an example of this model; community practices have come together collectively to form an organization that leverages shared IT expertise, resources, and data, providing members with the means to fully capitalize on new technologies that support improved care. This collaborative facilitates the identification of "problem sheds" through surveillance of network-wide data, enables shared learning regarding best practices, and provides a "community laboratory" for practice-based research. As an example of a community of solution, OCHIN uses health IT and data-sharing innovations to enhance partnerships between public health leaders, clinicians in community health centers, informatics experts, and policy makers. OCHIN community partners benefit from the shared IT resource (eg, a linked electronic health record, centralized data warehouse, informatics, and improvement expertise). This patient-centered medical village provides (1) the collective mechanism to build community-tailored IT solutions, (2) "neighbors" to share data and improvement strategies, and (3) infrastructure to support innovations based on electronic health records across communities, using experimental approaches.

  6. Mobile STEMship Discovery Center: K-12 Aerospace-Based Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Mobile Teaching Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-03

    AND SUBTITLE Mobile STEMship Discovery Center: K-12 Aerospace-Based Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Mobile Teaching Vehicle...college. Three students have gone through the NRL internships and now are full time employees at NRL. This pattern of direct corporate, government and

  7. Technology utilization in a non-urban region: Further impact and technique of the Technology Use Studies Center (6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, H. C.; Moore, A. M.; Dodd, B.; West, S. G.

    1976-01-01

    The activities of the TU Center are reported. Areas reported include: TUSC clientele informaton, dissemination and assistance, faculty information service, and cooperation with other agencies. The general aviation news letter is included along with transfer and impact reports.

  8. Use of qualitative methods and user-centered design to develop customized health information technology tools within federally qualified health centers to keep children insured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVoe, Jennifer; Angier, Heather; Likumahuwa, Sonja; Hall, Jennifer; Nelson, Christine; Dickerson, Kay; Keller, Sara; Burdick, Tim; Cohen, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Lack of health insurance negatively impacts children's health. Despite federal initiatives to expand children's coverage and accelerate state outreach efforts, millions of US children remain uninsured or experience frequent gaps in coverage. Most current efforts to enroll and retain eligible children in public insurance programs take place outside of the health care system. This study is a partnership between patients' families, medical informaticists, federally qualified health center (FQHC) staff, and researchers to build and test information technology tools to help FQHCs reach uninsured children and those at risk for losing coverage.

  9. The Software Technology Center at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Software engineering technology transfer in a scientific R&D laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zucconi, L.

    1993-12-01

    Software engineering technology transfer for productivity and quality improvement can be difficult to initiate and sustain in a non-profit research laboratory where the concepts of profit and loss do not exist. In this experience report, the author discusses the approach taken to establish and maintain a software engineering technology transfer organization at a large R&D laboratory.

  10. Status of teaching elementary science for English learners in science, mathematics and technology centered magnet schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Alyson Kim

    According to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing (2001), one in three students speaks a language other than English. Additionally, the Commission stated that a student is considered to be an English learner if the second language acquisition is English. In California more than 1.4 million English learners enter school speaking a variety of languages, and this number continues to rise. There is an imminent need to promote instructional strategies that support this group of diverse learners. Although this was not a California study, the results derived from the nationwide participants' responses provided a congruent assessment of the basic need to provide effective science teaching strategies to all English learners. The purpose of this study was to examine the status of elementary science teaching practices used with English learners in kindergarten through fifth grade in public mathematics, science, and technology-centered elementary magnet schools throughout the country. This descriptive research was designed to provide current information and to identify trends in the areas of curriculum and instruction for English learners in science themed magnet schools. This report described the status of elementary (grades K-5) school science instruction for English learners based on the responses of 116 elementary school teachers: 59 grade K-2, and 57 grade 3-5 teachers. Current research-based approaches support incorporating self-directed learning strategy, expository teaching strategy, active listening strategies, questioning strategies, wait time strategy, small group strategy, peer tutoring strategy, large group learning strategy, demonstrations strategy, formal debates strategy, review sessions strategy, mediated conversation strategy, cooperative learning strategy, and theme-based instruction into the curriculum to assist English learners in science education. Science Technology Society (STS) strategy, problem-based learning strategy, discovery learning

  11. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-09-27

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate

  12. The Terascale Simulation Tools and Technologies Center Annual Report August 15, 2001-September 30, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, J; Brown, D L; Freitag, L

    2002-09-30

    The overall goal of the TSTT Center is to enable the scientific community to more easily use modern high-order, adaptive, parallel mesh and discretization tools. To achieve this goal, we are following three distinct but related paths. The first is to work directly with a number of lead application teams (for the most part SciDAC-funded) to use such technologies in their application domains. The second is to create new technology that eases the use of such tools, not only for our designated application partners, but across a broad range of application areas that require mesh and discretization tools for scientific simulation. The main technology thrust is not to create new tools (although some of this will occur), but to create new capabilities that will allow the use of these tools interoperably. This very profound step can be compared to the shift from hand craftmanship to manufactured products with interchangable components which revolutionized the world economy one to two centuries ago. The third component of our efforts is to embed this work in a larger framework of related activities, each seeking a similar, and profound, change in the practice of computational science. To ensure the relevance of our work to the SciDAC program goals, we originally selected six application areas, and in each, one or more application projects and teams with which to work directly. One application collaboration which targeted the development of an adaptive mesh refinement capability for the oceanographic code POP was postponed and may be dropped due to unanticipated technical obstacles in the specific goal selected. One new application involving jet breakup for spray combustion was added. The initial job of establishing good working relations, agreement on a plan of action, and obtaining initial results was accomplished in all cases. In general, our work with the applications has been more difficult than anticipated, in spite of the experience of the TSTT team members in similar

  13. The Terascale Simulation Tools and Technologies Center Annual Report August 15, 2001-September 30, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, J; Brown, D L; Freitag, L

    2002-09-30

    The overall goal of the TSTT Center is to enable the scientific community to more easily use modern high-order, adaptive, parallel mesh and discretization tools. To achieve this goal, we are following three distinct but related paths. The first is to work directly with a number of lead application teams (for the most part SciDAC-funded) to use such technologies in their application domains. The second is to create new technology that eases the use of such tools, not only for our designated application partners, but across a broad range of application areas that require mesh and discretization tools for scientific simulation. The main technology thrust is not to create new tools (although some of this will occur), but to create new capabilities that will allow the use of these tools interoperably. This very profound step can be compared to the shift from hand craftmanship to manufactured products with interchangable components which revolutionized the world economy one to two centuries ago. The third component of our efforts is to embed this work in a larger framework of related activities, each seeking a similar, and profound, change in the practice of computational science. To ensure the relevance of our work to the SciDAC program goals, we originally selected six application areas, and in each, one or more application projects and teams with which to work directly. One application collaboration which targeted the development of an adaptive mesh refinement capability for the oceanographic code POP was postponed and may be dropped due to unanticipated technical obstacles in the specific goal selected. One new application involving jet breakup for spray combustion was added. The initial job of establishing good working relations, agreement on a plan of action, and obtaining initial results was accomplished in all cases. In general, our work with the applications has been more difficult than anticipated, in spite of the experience of the TSTT team members in similar

  14. Carbon Dioxide Capture and Transportation Options in the Illinois Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Rostam-Abadi; S. S. Chen; Y. Lu

    2004-09-30

    This report describes carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture options from large stationary emission sources in the Illinois Basin, primarily focusing on coal-fired utility power plants. The CO{sub 2} emissions data were collected for utility power plants and industrial facilities over most of Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and western Kentucky. Coal-fired power plants are by far the largest CO{sub 2} emission sources in the Illinois Basin. The data revealed that sources within the Illinois Basin emit about 276 million tonnes of CO2 annually from 122 utility power plants and industrial facilities. Industrial facilities include 48 emission sources and contribute about 10% of total emissions. A process analysis study was conducted to review the suitability of various CO{sub 2} capture technologies for large stationary sources. The advantages and disadvantages of each class of technology were investigated. Based on these analyses, a suitable CO{sub 2} capture technology was assigned to each type of emission source in the Illinois Basin. Techno-economic studies were then conducted to evaluate the energy and economic performances of three coal-based power generation plants with CO{sub 2} capture facilities. The three plants considered were (1) pulverized coal (PC) + post combustion chemical absorption (monoethanolamine, or MEA), (2) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) + pre-combustion physical absorption (Selexol), and (3) oxygen-enriched coal combustion plants. A conventional PC power plant without CO2 capture was also investigated as a baseline plant for comparison. Gross capacities of 266, 533, and 1,054 MW were investigated at each power plant. The economic study considered the burning of both Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The cost estimation included the cost for compressing the CO{sub 2} stream to pipeline pressure. A process simulation software, CHEMCAD, was employed to perform steady-state simulations of power generation systems

  15. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansley, Shannon L.

    2002-02-20

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

  16. Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Waste Disposal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansley, Shannon Leigh

    2002-02-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

  17. Establishing and evaluating bar-code technology in blood sampling system: a model based on human centered human-centered design method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shin-Shang; Yan, Hsiu-Fang; Huang, Hsiu-Ya; Tseng, Kuan-Jui; Kuo, Shu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    This study intended to use a human-centered design study method to develop a bar-code technology in blood sampling process. By using the multilevel analysis to gather the information, the bar-code technology has been constructed to identify the patient's identification, simplify the work process, and prevent medical error rates. A Technology Acceptance Model questionnaire was developed to assess the effectiveness of system and the data of patient's identification and sample errors were collected daily. The average scores of 8 items users' perceived ease of use was 25.21(3.72), 9 items users' perceived usefulness was 28.53(5.00), and 14 items task-technology fit was 52.24(7.09), the rate of patient identification error and samples with order cancelled were down to zero, however, new errors were generated after the new system deployed; which were the position of barcode stickers on the sample tubes. Overall, more than half of nurses (62.5%) were willing to use the new system.

  18. A Study to Increase the Quality of Financial and Operational Performances of Call Centers using Speech Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Manoharan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Everyone knows technology and automation are not the solutions to every business problem. But when used for the right reasons-and deployed and maintained wisely-speech based contact center applications can be good for the customers as well as business, if the money and time spent to implement and maintain contact center business. Speech based application is an experimental conversational speech system. Experience with redesigning the system based on user feedback indicates the importance of adhering to conversational conventions when designing speech interfaces, particularly in the face of speech recognition errors. Study results also suggest that speech-only interfaces should be designed from scratch rather than directly translated from their graphical counterparts. This paper examines a set of challenging issues facing speech interface designers and describes approaches to address some of these challenges. Let us highlight some of the specific constrains involved in this process of using speech technology in the main stream of business in general and of a Call Center specific and being resolved through the Industrial process. So the real challenge is “Developing a new Business Process Model for an Industry application, for a Call Center specific. And that paves the way to design and analyze the “Financial and Operational performance of call centers through the business process model using speech technology”.

  19. Pharmacy practice in small and rural hospitals in Illinois--2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumock, Glen T; Ursan, Iulia D; Crawford, Stephanie Y; Walton, Surrey M; Donnelly, Andrew J

    2013-07-01

    The results of a 2011 survey evaluating pharmacy services at small and rural Illinois hospitals are presented and compared with data from similar surveys in 2001 and 1991. A questionnaire modeled on the previous survey instruments but updated to reflect contemporary pharmacy practice was mailed to pharmacy directors at 86 small hospitals (i.e., hospitals (i.e., located outside metropolitan areas). The response rate was 46.5%. The survey data indicated that 57.5% of hospitals represented in the 2011 survey had a centralized drug distribution system, 35.0% had a hybrid system, and 7.5% had a decentralized system. The most commonly reported form of technology was automated dispensing cabinets, which were in use at 75.0% of hospitals in 2011, compared with 34.8% of hospitals represented in the 2001 survey. Barcode verification of medication doses before dispensing and at the time of administration was performed at 50% and 70% of hospitals, respectively. While the provision of clinical pharmacy services has risen sharply since 1991, substantial changes were not observed between 2001 and 2011 except in the provision of compliance and drug histories (67.6% of hospitals in 2011 versus 46.8% in 2001) and pharmacist participation in medical emergency responses (54.0% versus 34.0%). A 2011 survey of pharmacy departments in small and rural Illinois hospitals provided information on the use of automation and health information technologies and showed changes in the provision of many clinical pharmacy services since 1991.

  20. K-8 Teachers Using Mobile Technology as a Student Centered Instructional Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durbin, Annette L.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technology is increasing its presence in the educational environment. The public school district in this study has made great strides improving technology usage in schools with updated hardware, extensive district-wide infrastructure, a technology plan, and professional development. While the district has been successful in some areas, like…

  1. Technical Information Centers: Specialized Services to Science and Technology. An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douville, Judith A.

    1972-01-01

    This study attempts to describe the purposes, establishment, practices, and problems of a technical information center, and to focus attention on the unique relationships that do or could exist between the traditional special or company library and the modern information center. (74 references) (Author/SJ)

  2. 76 FR 8371 - Notice Correction; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI) The Federal Register notice published on... Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI)'' was submitted with errors. The submission ] is now being presented as a generic submission which will include multiple customer satisfaction...

  3. The Impact of Wireless Technology on Order Selection Audits at an Auto Parts Distribution Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goomas, David T.

    2012-01-01

    Audits of store order pallets or totes performed by auditors at five distribution centers (two experimental and three comparison distribution centers) were used to check for picking accuracy prior to being loaded onto a truck for store delivery. Replacing the paper audits with wireless handheld computers that included immediate auditory and visual…

  4. Implementing PDA technology in a medical library: experiences in a hospital library and an academic medical center library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgen, Evelyn Breck

    2003-01-01

    Personal digital assistants (PDAs) have grown from being a novelty in the late 1990s to an essential tool for healthcare professionals in the 2000s. This paper describes the experiences of a librarian who implemented PDA technology first in a hospital library, and then at an academic medical center library. It focuses on the role of the library in supporting PDA technology and resources. Included are programmatic issues such as training for library staff and clinicians, and technical issues such as Palm and Windows operating systems. This model could be used in either a hospital or academic health sciences library.

  5. Assessing controls on perched saturated zones beneath the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, Benjamin B.; Perkins, Kim S.; Nimmo, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Waste byproducts associated with operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) have the potential to contaminate the eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP) aquifer. Recharge to the ESRP aquifer is controlled largely by the alternating stratigraphy of fractured volcanic rocks and sedimentary interbeds within the overlying vadose zone and by the availability of water at the surface. Beneath the INTEC facilities, localized zones of saturation perched on the sedimentary interbeds are of particular concern because they may facilitate accelerated transport of contaminants. The sources and timing of natural and anthropogenic recharge to the perched zones are poorly understood. Simple approaches for quantitative characterization of this complex, variably saturated flow system are needed to assess potential scenarios for contaminant transport under alternative remediation strategies. During 2009-2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, employed data analysis and numerical simulations with a recently developed model of preferential flow to evaluate the sources and quantity of recharge to the perched zones. Piezometer, tensiometer, temperature, precipitation, and stream-discharge data were analyzed, with particular focus on the possibility of contributions to the perched zones from snowmelt and flow in the neighboring Big Lost River (BLR). Analysis of the timing and magnitude of subsurface dynamics indicate that streamflow provides local recharge to the shallow, intermediate, and deep perched saturated zones within 150 m of the BLR; at greater distances from the BLR the influence of streamflow on recharge is unclear. Perched water-level dynamics in most wells analyzed are consistent with findings from previous geochemical analyses, which suggest that a combination of annual snowmelt and anthropogenic sources (for example, leaky pipes and drainage ditches) contribute to recharge of shallow and

  6. National Center of Excellence for Energy Storage Technology 168.10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guezennec, Yann

    2011-12-31

    This report documents the performance of the Ohio State University (OSU) and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) in the period from 10/1/2010 to 12/31/2012. The objective of the project is to establish a Center of Excellence that leverages the strengths of the partners to establish a unique capability to develop and transfer energy storage industries to establish a unique capability in the development and transfer of energy storage system technology through a fundamental understanding of battery electrical and thermal performance, damage and aging mechanisms, and through the development of reliable, high-speed processes for joining substrates in battery cell, module and pack assemblies with low manufacturing variability. During this period, the OSU activity focused on procuring the equipment, materials and supplies necessary to conduct the experiments planned in the statement of project objectives. In detail, multiple laboratory setups were developed to enable for characterizing the open-circuit potential of cathode and anode materials for Li-ion batteries, perform experiments on calorimetry, and finally built multiple cell and module battery cyclers to be able to perform aging campaign on a wide variety of automotive grade battery cells and small modules. This suite of equipment feeds directly into the development, calibration of battery models ranging from first principle electrochemical models to electro-thermal equivalent circuit models suitable for use in control and xEV vehicle simulations. In addition, it allows to develop and calibrate ‘aging’ models for Li-ion batteries that enable the development of diagnostics and prognostics tools to characterize and predict battery degradation from automotive usage under a wide array of environmental and usage scenarios. The objective of the EWI work scope is to develop improved processes for making metal-tometal joints in advanced battery cells and packs. It will focus on developing generic techniques for making

  7. Dynamics of center-periphery patterns in knowledge networks - the case of China's biotech science and technology system

    CERN Document Server

    Hennemann, Stefan; Liefner, Ingo

    2011-01-01

    Science and technology systems - and their epistemic communities - are usually hierarchical and composed of a number of strong, large, leading organizations, along with a number of smaller and less influential ones. Moreover, these hierarchical patterns have a spatial structure: the leading organizations are concentrated in a few places, creating a science and technology center, whereas the majority of locations are peripheral. In the example of biotech research in China, we found dynamic changes in center-periphery patterns. These results are based on a network analysis of evolving co-authorship networks from 2001 to 2009 that were built combining national and international databases. Therefore, our results are not only relevant for evaluating the spatial structure and dynamics in the Chinese biotech system and its integration into the global knowledge network, but also revive a discussion on persistence and processes of change in the systems theory for sciencebased industries.

  8. Coverage of Team Science by Public Information Officers: Content Analysis of Press Releases about the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graube, Marita; Clark, Fiona; Illman, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the content of press releases from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Centers (STCs) to determine how public information officers (PIOs) presented the outcomes of centers to journalists and the public. A total of 68 press releases were analyzed for type of news covered, visibility of centers and their…

  9. Measuring Music Education: Music Education Assessment in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangro, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    There are many assessment initiatives and policy changes happening in Illinois concerning learning and teaching expectations that involve K-12 students, teacher candidates, and current teachers. The Illinois State Board of Education has adopted new Math and English Language Arts standards for K-12 education known as the "New Illinois State…

  10. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Agricultural Sales and Marketing Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in jobs in agricultural sales and marketing. Agency partners involved in this project include: the Illinois State Board of Education, Illinois Community…

  11. Informing Science (IS and Science and Technology Studies (STS: The University as Decision Center (DC for Teaching Interdisciplinary Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Castelao-Lawless

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Students of history and philosophy of science courses at my University are either naïve robust realists or naïve relativists in relation to science and technology. The first group absorbs from culture stereotypical conceptions, such as the value-free character of the scientific method, that science and technology are impervious to history or ideology, and that science and religion are always at odds. The second believes science and technology were selected arbitrarily by ideologues to have privileged world views of reality to the detriment of other interpretations. These deterministic outlooks must be challenged to make students aware of the social importance of their future roles, be they as scientists and engineers or as science and technology policy decision makers. The University as Decision Center (DC not only reproduces the social by teaching standard solutions to well-defined problems but also provides information regarding conflict resolution and the epistemological, individual, historical, social, and political mechanisms that help create new science and technology. Interdisciplinary research prepares students for roles that require science and technology literacy, but raises methodological issues in the context of the classroom as it increases uncertainty with respect to apparently self-evident beliefs about scientific and technological practices.

  12. Construction of Blaze at the University of Illinois at Chicago: A Shared, High-Performance, Visual Computer for Next-Generation Cyberinfrastructure-Accelerated Scientific, Engineering, Medical and Public Policy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Maxine D. [Acting Director, EVL; Leigh, Jason [PI

    2014-02-17

    The Blaze high-performance visual computing system serves the high-performance computing research and education needs of University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Blaze consists of a state-of-the-art, networked, computer cluster and ultra-high-resolution visualization system called CAVE2(TM) that is currently not available anywhere in Illinois. This system is connected via a high-speed 100-Gigabit network to the State of Illinois' I-WIRE optical network, as well as to national and international high speed networks, such as the Internet2, and the Global Lambda Integrated Facility. This enables Blaze to serve as an on-ramp to national cyberinfrastructure, such as the National Science Foundation’s Blue Waters petascale computer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Chicago and the Department of Energy’s Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) at Argonne National Laboratory. DOE award # DE-SC005067, leveraged with NSF award #CNS-0959053 for “Development of the Next-Generation CAVE Virtual Environment (NG-CAVE),” enabled us to create a first-of-its-kind high-performance visual computing system. The UIC Electronic Visualization Laboratory (EVL) worked with two U.S. companies to advance their commercial products and maintain U.S. leadership in the global information technology economy. New applications are being enabled with the CAVE2/Blaze visual computing system that is advancing scientific research and education in the U.S. and globally, and help train the next-generation workforce.

  13. DOE SciDAC's Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-09-27

    The mission of the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) is to provide the worldwide climate-research community with access to the data, information, model codes, analysis tools, and intercomparison capabilities required to make sense of enormous climate data sets. Its specific goals are to (1) provide an easy-to-use and secure web-based data access environment for data sets; (2) add value to individual data sets by presenting them in the context of other data sets and tools for comparative analysis; (3) address the specific requirements of participating organizations with respect to bandwidth, access restrictions, and replication; (4) ensure that the data are readily accessible through the analysis and visualization tools used by the climate research community; and (5) transfer infrastructure advances to other domain areas. For the ESGF, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies (ESG-CET) team has led international development and delivered a production environment for managing and accessing ultra-scale climate data. This production environment includes multiple national and international climate projects (such as the Community Earth System Model and the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project), ocean model data (such as the Parallel Ocean Program), observation data (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Best Estimate, Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center, Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, etc.), and analysis and visualization tools, all serving a diverse user community. These data holdings and services are distributed across multiple ESG-CET sites (such as ANL, LANL, LBNL/NERSC, LLNL/PCMDI, NCAR, and ORNL) and at unfunded partner sites, such as the Australian National University National Computational Infrastructure, the British Atmospheric Data Centre, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, the German Climate

  14. Hardware-in-the-loop simulation technology of wide-band radar targets based on scattering center model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Hao; Pan Minghai; Lu Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) simulation technology can verify and evaluate the radar by simulating the radio frequency environment in an anechoic chamber. The HWIL simulation technology of wide-band radar targets can accurately generate wide-band radar target echo which stands for the radar target scattering characteristics and pulse modulation of radar transmitting sig-nal. This paper analyzes the wide-band radar target scattering properties first. Since the responses of target are composed of many separate scattering centers, the target scattering characteristic is restructured by scattering centers model. Based on the scattering centers model of wide-band radar target, the wide-band radar target echo modeling and the simulation method are discussed. The wide-band radar target echo is reconstructed in real-time by convoluting the transmitting signal to the target scattering parameters. Using the digital radio frequency memory (DRFM) system, the HWIL simulation of wide-band radar target echo with high accuracy can be actualized. A typical wide-band radar target simulation is taken to demonstrate the preferable simulation effect of the reconstruction method of wide-band radar target echo. Finally, the radar target time-domain echo and high-resolution range profile (HRRP) are given. The results show that the HWIL simulation gives a high-resolution range distribution of wide-band radar target scattering centers.

  15. Which nurseries currently care for ventilated neonates in Illinois and Wisconsin? Implications for the next generation of perinatal regionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadow, William; Kim, Mijung; Mendez, David; Bell, Anthony; Gray, Cathy; Corpuz, Maria; Lantos, John

    2002-05-01

    We were interested in the extent to which advances in the availability of neonatalogy expertise have provided a centrifugal impetus to perinatal care. Specifically, we wondered where infants who were sick enough to require mechanical ventilation were currently being managed. We surveyed 116 of 140 hospitals in Illinois and Wisconsin that offered obstetric/newborn services in 1998-1999. The 23 Level I nurseries were consistently small, and offered virtually no "advanced" neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) technology. The 16 Level III NICUs were consistently large, offered advanced technology and personnel, and received sick infants from many hospitals in their regional network. The 77 Level II nurseries (two thirds of all hospitals with newborn services) were less consistently characterized. In general, Level II nurseries were a "spoke" (not a hub), and did not offer extracorporeal-membrane oxygenation (ECMO), nitric oxide (NO), or cardiovascular (CV) surgery. However, 19 (25%) of 77 Level II centers self-designated as "Level II+". These were significantly more likely to offer ventilators, percutaneous central venous catheters (PCVCs), total parenteral nutrition (TPN), and surgery. Fifty-three percent (18/34) of all nurseries offering mechanical ventilation self-designated as a Level II or II+, as opposed to Level III. Facile inferences about the appropriate role of Level II centers derived from decades-old data are probably unsupportable. It is time to acknowledge the distinction between the Level II nursery of the past and the newly evolving Level II+ NICUs.

  16. Examination of Illinois Superintendents' Perceptions of the Illinois School Superintendent Content-Area Standards and Performance Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demory, Christine E.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines Illinois school superintendents' perceived importance of the Illinois school superintendent content area standards and performance indicators. This study is significant because it provides an opportunity for rigorous reflection in identifying Illinois school superintendents' perceived importance of superintendent behaviors that…

  17. Technology Assessment: Strategic Energy Analysis Center (SEAC) 2012 Highlights (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-02-01

    This fact sheet lists key analysis products produced by NREL in 2012. Like all NREL analysis products, these aim to increase the understanding of the current and future interactions and roles of energy policies, markets, resources, technologies, environmental impacts, and infrastructure. NREL analysis, data, and tools inform decisions as energy-efficient and renewable energy technologies advance from concept to commercial application.

  18. Keeping Classrooms Christ-Centered in One-to-One Technology Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Carol

    2017-01-01

    This article describes a one-to-one technology initiative in a Catholic high school, highlighting the advantages and challenges encountered in the first year of the program. The article offers recommendations and reflections for other schools intending to implement one-to-one programs, including an emphasis on the intentional use technology for…

  19. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory - Site Status Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epperly, T W

    2008-12-03

    This report summarizes LLNL's progress for the period April through September of 2008 for the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) SciDAC. The TASCS project is organized into four major thrust areas: CCA Environment (72%), Component Technology Initiatives (16%), CCA Toolkit (8%), and User and Application Outreach & Support (4%). The percentage of LLNL's effort allocation is shown in parenthesis for each thrust area. Major thrust areas are further broken down into activity areas, LLNL's effort directed to each activity is shown in Figure 1. Enhancements, Core Tools, and Usability are all part of CCA Environment, and Software Quality is part of Component Technology Initiatives. The balance of this report will cover our accomplishments in each of these activity areas.

  20. A status of the activities of the NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center Combustion Devices Technology Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Kevin

    1992-01-01

    The Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Applications in Propulsion Technology was established to focus on computational fluid dynamics applications in propulsion. Specific areas of effort include developing the CFD technology required to address rocket propulsion issues, validating the technology, and applying the validated technology to design problems. The Combustion Devices Technology Team was formed to implement the above objectives in the broad area of combustion driven flows. In an effort to bring CFD to bear in the design environment, the team has focused its efforts on the Space Transportation Main Engine nozzle. The main emphasis has been on the film cooling scheme used to cool the nozzle wall. Benchmark problems have been chosen to validate CFD film cooling capabilities. CFD simulations of the subscale nozzle have been made. Also, CFD predictions of the base flow resulting from this type of nozzle have been made. The status of these calculations is presented along with future plans. Information is given in viewgraph form.

  1. Tiger team assessment of the Argonne Illinois site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-10-19

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Tiger Team Assessment of the Argonne Illinois Site (AIS) (including the DOE Chicago Operations Office, DOE Argonne Area Office, Argonne National Laboratory-East, and New Brunswick Laboratory) and Site A and Plot M, Argonne, Illinois, conducted from September 17 through October 19, 1990. The Tiger Team Assessment was conducted by a team comprised of professionals from DOE, contractors, consultants. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES H) Programs at AIS. Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL-E) is the principal tenant at AIS. ANL-E is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the University of Chicago for DOE. The mission of ANL-E is to perform basic and applied research that supports the development of energy-related technologies. There are a significant number of ES H findings and concerns identified in the report that require prompt management attention. A significant change in culture is required before ANL-E can attain consistent and verifiable compliance with statutes, regulations and DOE Orders. ES H activities are informal, fragmented, and inconsistently implemented. Communication is seriously lacking, both vertically and horizontally. Management expectations are not known or commondated adequately, support is not consistent, and oversight is not effective.

  2. Mathematics Placement at the University of Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren Reddy, Alison; Harper, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Data from the ALEKS-based placement program at the University of Illinois is presented visually in several ways. The placement exam (an ALEKS assessment) contains precise item-specific information and the data show many interesting properties of the student populations of the placement courses, which include Precalculus, Calculus, and Business…

  3. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Welding Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These Illinois skill standards for the welding cluster are intended to serve as a guide to workforce preparation program providers as they define content for their programs and to employers as they establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. They could also serve as a mechanism for communication among education, business,…

  4. Art Appreciation Courses in Illinois Community Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Lenetta K.; Keim, Marybelle C.

    1997-01-01

    Reviews literature on the characteristics of community college art appreciation courses and instructors. Presents findings from a survey of Illinois community colleges regarding the characteristics of art appreciation instructors and the institutions offering such programs and course content and methodology. Reports results and discusses…

  5. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Accounting Services Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These Illinois skill standards for the accounting services cluster are intended to serve as a guide to workforce preparation program providers as they define content for their programs and to employers as they establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. They could also serve as a mechanism for communication among education,…

  6. Consumer Education in Illinois Schools, 1986.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    Intended to assist Illinois teachers in planning an instructional program in consumer education that meets state requirements, this consumer education curriculum is designed to help students in grades 9 through 12: (1) become informed consumers; (2) understand the rights and responsibilities of consumers in society; (3) develop responsible…

  7. Mathematics Placement at the University of Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlgren Reddy, Alison; Harper, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Data from the ALEKS-based placement program at the University of Illinois is presented visually in several ways. The placement exam (an ALEKS assessment) contains precise item-specific information and the data show many interesting properties of the student populations of the placement courses, which include Precalculus, Calculus, and Business…

  8. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Medical Office Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These skill standards, developed through a consortium of educational and industry partners in Illinois, serve as guides to workforce preparation program providers to define content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition and performance. The skill standards include the following…

  9. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Nursing Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These skill standards, developed through a consortium of educational and industry partners in Illinois, serve as guides to workforce preparation program providers to define content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition and performance. The skill standards include the following…

  10. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Press Operations Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These skill standards, developed through a consortium of educational and industry partners in Illinois, serve as guides to workforce preparation program providers to define content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition and performance. The skill standards include the following…

  11. Predicting School Referenda Outcomes: Answers from Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Corliss

    1999-01-01

    Uses ordinary least-squares multivariate regression analysis to determine if jurisdictional types vary in their willingness to increase taxation for schools, employing 892 education fund referenda conducted in Illinois from 1981 to 1989. Outcomes do differ by jurisdiction type. The strongest predictor is willingness to pay for higher taxes. (29…

  12. Transformation of Scientific and Technological Achievements of the University Technology Transfer Centers and Technology Transfer Analysis%高校技术转移中心科技成果转化及技术转移现状分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔岩; 郑帆帆; 朱继国

    2012-01-01

    Transformation of scientific and technological achievements and technology transfer in university technology transfer center is an important part of the field of technology transfer. However, conversion rate of scientific and technological achievements of our colleges and universities is low, and service capacity of technology transfer centers is not strong. Based on this, we will study and analyze the status of scientific and technological achievements transformation and technology transfer in domestic universities to provide reference for its future development and research.%高校技术转移中心的科技成果转化及技术转移是技术转移领域的重要组成部分.但是,我国高校的科技成果转化率很低,技术转移中心的服务能力不强.基于此,本文将研究分析国内高校科技成果转化及技术转移的现状,为其今后的发展和研究提供参考.

  13. Veterinary Curriculum Transformation at the University of Illinois, 2006-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Jonathan H; Morin, Dawn E; Graves, Thomas K; Mitchell, Mark A; Zuckermann, Federico A; Whiteley, Herbert E

    2017-01-01

    The organization and delivery of a curriculum is the responsibility of the faculty in educational institutions. Curricular revision is often a hotly debated topic in any college faculty. At the University of Illinois, a 2006 mandate for curriculum modernization from the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education provided impetus for a long-discussed curricular revision. After two iterations and a lengthy development process, a new curriculum was gradually implemented at Illinois with the August 2009 matriculation of the Class of 2013. The goals of the revision included earlier clinical exposure for veterinary students through introductions to clinical rotations in years 1 to 3 and an integrated body systems approach in lecture/laboratory courses. A new Clinical Skills Learning Center facilitates development of clinical skills earlier in the curriculum and promotes the development of those skills throughout all 4 years of the curriculum. New outcomes assessments include comprehensive written examinations and Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs) in years 2 and 3. Curriculum management, including grading of clinical rotations in all 4 years, is achieved through a commercially available software package. For the past 5 years, when candidates were asked why they chose to apply to Illinois, the new curriculum (27.4%) was the most common answer given during interviews. The Illinois revision has resulted in measurably increased veterinary student self-confidence (p<.001) at graduation.

  14. Gardasil® and Cervarix® | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine for human papilloma virus (HPV) to protect from cancers Key elements of the technology for Gardasil® and Cervarix originated from the HPV research of the laboratory of Drs. Douglas Lowy and John Schiller of the NCI.

  15. Ratio Based Biomarkers for the Prediction of Cancer Survival | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI seeks licensees or co-development partners for this technology, which describes compositions, methods and kits for identifying, characterizing biomolecules expressed in a sample that are associated with the presence, the development, or progression of cancer.

  16. Naval Surface Weapons Center Technology Transfer Biennial Report (Fiscal Year 1983/1984),

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Catholic University of America by providing Van de Graff accelerator and computer assistance for the development of an improved data base and...1980 (Public Law 96-480). The objectives of Navy technology transfer are (1) to disseminate non-critical technology, originally developed in support of...A-4 10. HIGH ALTITUDE PARACHUTE DEPLOYMENT ... ........... .A-5 11. UNIVERSITY RESEARCH ASSIST ..... ............... A-6 12. GULF STREAM

  17. NASA's Suborbital Missions Teach Engineering and Technology: Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterton, Joyce L.

    2016-01-01

    A 50 minute-workshop based on NASA publicly available information will be conducted at the International Technology and Engineering Educator Association annual conference. Attendees will include middle and high school teachers and university teacher educators. Engineering and technology are essential to NASA's suborbital missions including sounding rockets, scientific balloon and airborne science. The attendees will learn how to include NASA information on these missions in their teaching.

  18. Naval Surface Warfare Center Technical Digest. Research and Technology - Shaping Future Naval Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    on the three-trillion- and to foster cooperation. dollar national debt, it is very likely that the 0 There will be an increased requirement todefense...sophisticated multimode guidance, and "smart" countermeasures are but a few of the weapon features which technology advances are already foster - ing...meet costo . sthedule, and rapid obsolescence due to technological ad- c ho i:al perto~rnman2e objectives. ’ vances. All these factors, along with

  19. Impact of Information Technology, Clinical Resource Constraints, and Patient-Centered Practice Characteristics on Quality of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JongDeuk Baek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Factors in the practice environment, such as health information technology (IT infrastructure, availability of other clinical resources, and financial incentives, may influence whether practices are able to successfully implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH model and realize its benefits. This study investigates the impacts of those PCMH-related elements on primary care physicians’ perception of quality of care. Methods: A multiple logistic regression model was estimated using the 2004 to 2005 CTS Physician Survey, a national sample of salaried primary care physicians (n = 1733. Results: The patient-centered practice environment and availability of clinical resources increased physicians’ perceived quality of care. Although IT use for clinical information access did enhance physicians’ ability to provide high quality of care, a similar positive impact of IT use was not found for e-prescribing or the exchange of clinical patient information. Lack of resources was negatively associated with physician perception of quality of care. Conclusion: Since health IT is an important foundation of PCMH, patient-centered practices are more likely to have health IT in place to support care delivery. However, despite its potential to enhance delivery of primary care, simply making health IT available does not necessarily translate into physicians’ perceptions that it enhances the quality of care they provide. It is critical for health-care managers and policy makers to ensure that primary care physicians fully recognize and embrace the use of new technology to improve both the quality of care provided and the patient outcomes.

  20. Antenna Technology and other Radio Frequency (RF) Communications Activities at the Glenn Research Center in Support of NASA's Exploration Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA s Vision for Space Exploration outlines a very ambitious program for the next several decades of the Space Agency endeavors. Ahead is the completion of the International Space Station (ISS); safely flight the shuttle (STS) until 2010; develop and fly the Crew Exploration Vehicle (Orion) by no later than 2014; return to the moon by no later than 2020; extend human presence across the solar system and beyond; implement a sustainable and affordable human and robotic program; develop supporting innovative technologies, knowledge and infrastructure; and promote international and commercial participation in exploration. To achieve these goals, a series of enabling technologies must be developed or matured in a timely manner. Some of these technologies are: spacecraft RF technology (e.g., high power sources and large antennas which using surface receive arrays can get up to 1 Gbps from Mars), uplink arraying (reduce reliance on large ground-based antennas and high operation costs; single point of failure; enable greater data-rates or greater effective distance; scalable, evolvable, flexible scheduling), software define radio (i.e., reconfigurable, flexible interoperability allows for in flight updates open architecture; reduces mass, power, volume), and optical communications (high capacity communications with low mass/power required; significantly increases data rates for deep space). This presentation will discuss some of the work being performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio, in antenna technology as well as other on-going RF communications efforts.

  1. The Role of Digital Technologies in Deeper Learning. Students at the Center: Deeper Learning Research Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dede, Chris

    2014-01-01

    To compete in today's global, knowledge-based, innovation-centered economy, young people must go beyond a high school diploma and acquire not just academic knowledge, but interpersonal and interpersonal capacities. That is, they must engage in deeper learning. As schools shift away from traditional education models in favor or providing deeper…

  2. In-Space Manufacturing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center: Enabling Technologies for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Quincy; Johnston, Mallory; Ordonez, Erick; Ryan, Rick; Prater, Tracie; Werkeiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is currently engaged in a number of in-space manufacturing(ISM)activities that have the potential to reduce launch costs, enhance crew safety, and provide the capabilities needed to undertake long duration spaceflight safely and sustainably.

  3. 75 FR 80830 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Technology Transfer Center External Customer Satisfaction...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Center External Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section... Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI). Type of Information Collection Request: New. Need and Use of... satisfaction of TTC's external customers with TTC customer services; collect information of preferred...

  4. A Qualitative Study of Information Technology Managers' Experiences and Perceptions Regarding Outsourced Data Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Eric Justin

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the perceptions and experiences of IT Managers in publicly traded companies within the San Antonio, Texas area about outsourced data centers. Narrative data was collected using open-ended questions and face-to-face interviews within semi-structured environments. The research questions guided the study: (1)…

  5. Geothermal Research at the Geo-Heat Center Oregon Institute of Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    1997-01-01

    The Geo-Heat Center was established in 1975 to provide information and technical services for geothermal energy direct-use and development--mainly utilizing low- and moderate-temperature resources (<150oC). The Center is funded by the Geothermal Division of the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE). Our main functions are (1) technical assistance, (2) resource information, (3) advising and referrals, (4) speaker’s bureau, (5) tours of geothermal systems, (6) publications, (7) research, and (8) stocking a geothermal library. During 1997, the Geo-Heat Center staff provided assistance to 761 individuals, companies and municipalities--up to eight hours of technical assistance can be provided free of charge. Staff members have also participated in numerous international geothermal direct-use projects. The Center has developed a “Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook” and publishes a free “Quarterly Bulletin” on geothermal direct-use projects and research. The Geo-Heat Center also has a website (http://www.oit.edu/~geoheat). Several of these direct-use research projects are discussed in the paper, including: a) Downhole Heat Exchangers, b) A Cost Comparison of Commercial Ground- Source Heat Pump Systems, c) A Spreadsheet for Geothermal Energy Cost Evaluation, d) Utilization of Silica Waste from Geothermal Power Production, e) Fossil Fuel-Fired Peak Heating for Geothermal Greenhouses, f) Selected Cost Considerations for the Geothermal District Heating in Existing Single-Family Residential Areas, and g) Collocated Resources Inventory of Wells and Hot Springs in the Western U.S.

  6. An Analysis of Information Technology Adoption by IRBs of Large Academic Medical Centers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Botkin, Jeffrey R; Hurdle, John F

    2015-02-01

    The clinical research landscape has changed dramatically in recent years in terms of both volume and complexity. This poses new challenges for Institutional Review Boards' (IRBs) review efficiency and quality, especially at large academic medical centers. This article discusses the technical facets of IRB modernization. We analyzed the information technology used by IRBs in large academic institutions across the United States. We found that large academic medical centers have a high electronic IRB adoption rate; however, the capabilities of electronic IRB systems vary greatly. We discuss potential use-cases of a fully exploited electronic IRB system that promise to streamline the clinical research work flow. The key to that approach utilizes a structured and standardized information model for the IRB application.

  7. Detecting Falls at Home: User-Centered Design of a Pervasive Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc-Eric Bobillier Chaumon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Falling is the main cause of domestic accidents and fatal injuries to seniors at home. In this paper, we describe the design process for a new pervasive technology (CIRDO. The aim of this technology is to detect falls (via audio and video sensors and to alert the elderly's family or caregivers. Two complementary studies were performed. Firstly, the actual risk situations of older adults were analyzed. Secondly, social acceptance was investigated for the different homecare field stakeholders. Our results highlight the tensions among social actors towards the tool and their impacts on technology acceptance by the elderly. Also, we show a significant change in the fall process due to the device. In actuality, the social functions associated with CIRDO implementation and the necessity of iterative design processes suggest that the CIRDO system should be more flexible and versatile to better fit the risk behaviors of seniors that evolve using this device.

  8. THE RETRIEVAL KNOWLEDGE CENTER EVALUATION OF LOW TANK LEVEL MIXING TECHNOLOGIES FOR DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANK RETRIEVAL 10516

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellinger, A.

    2009-12-08

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Complex has over two-hundred underground storage tanks containing over 80-million gallons of legacy waste from the production of nuclear weapons. The majority of the waste is located at four major sites across the nation and is planned for treatment over a period of almost forty years. The DOE Office of Technology Innovation & Development within the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) sponsors technology research and development programs to support processing advancements and technology maturation designed to improve the costs and schedule for disposal of the waste and closure of the tanks. Within the waste processing focus area are numerous technical initiatives which included the development of a suite of waste removal technologies to address the need for proven equipment and techniques to remove high level radioactive wastes from the waste tanks that are now over fifty years old. In an effort to enhance the efficiency of waste retrieval operations, the DOE-EM Office of Technology Innovation & Development funded an effort to improve communications and information sharing between the DOE's major waste tank locations as it relates to retrieval. The task, dubbed the Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) was co-lead by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) with core team members representing the Oak Ridge and Idaho sites, as well as, site contractors responsible for waste tank operations. One of the greatest challenges to the processing and closure of many of the tanks is complete removal of all tank contents. Sizeable challenges exist for retrieving waste from High Level Waste (HLW) tanks; with complications that are not normally found with tank retrieval in commercial applications. Technologies currently in use for waste retrieval are generally adequate for bulk removal; however, removal of tank heels, the materials settled in the bottom of the tank, using the same

  9. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Lancaster County Career and Technology Center Green Home 3 - Mount Joy, Pennsylvania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-12-01

    This case study describes a unique vocational program at Lancaster County Career Technology Center in Mount Joy, PA, where high school students are gaining hands-on construction experience in building high performance homes with help from Building America team, Home Innovation Research Labs. This collaboration resulted in the Green Home 3, the third in a series of high performance homes for Apprentice Green. As one of LCCTC’s key educational strategies for gaining practical experience, students are involved in building real houses that incorporate state-of-the-art energy efficiency and green technologies. With two homes already completed, the Green Home 3 achieved a 44% whole-house energy savings over the Building America New Construction B10 Benchmark, DOE Zero Energy Ready Home (formerly Challenge Home) certification, and National Green Building Standard Gold-level certification.

  10. Practical Education Support to Foster Engineers at Manufacturing and Engineering Design Center in Muroran Institute of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazama, Toshiharu; Hanajima, Naohiko; Shimizu, Kazumichi; Satoh, Kohki

    To foster engineers with creative power, Muroran Institute of Technology established Manufacturing and Engineering Design Center (MEDeC) that concentrates on Monozukuri. MEDeC consists of three project groups : i) Education Support Group provides educational support for practical training classes on and off campus and PDCA (plan-do-check-action) -conscious engineering design education related to Monozukuri ; ii) Fundamental Manufacturing Research Group carries out nurture research into fundamental and innovative technology of machining and manufacturing, and iii) Regional Cooperation Group coordinates the activities in cooperation with bureau, schools and industries in and around Muroran City. MEDeC has a fully integrated collection of machine tools and hand tools for manufacturing, an atelier, a tatara workplace, implements for measurement and related equipment designed for practically teaching state-of-the-practice manufacturing methods.

  11. Information Technology Cost Center Employee Perception of Their Contribution Value in a For Profit Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    A literature review revealed a lack of academic research related to cultural dynamics within organizations that influence information technology investments. The goal of this single descriptive case study of a for profit international company was to examine one area of cultural influence on investments. The aim was to gain an understanding of…

  12. Cancer Inhibitors Isolated from an African Plant | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Development Program is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize cancer inhibitors isolated from the African plant Phyllanthus englerii. The technology is also available for exclusive or non-exclusive licensing.

  13. Method for Targeted Therapeutic Delivery of Proteins into Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Protein Expression Laboratory at the National Cancer Institute in Frederick, MD is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop a platform technology for the targeted intra-cellular delivery of proteins using virus-like particles (VLPs).

  14. Information Technology Cost Center Employee Perception of Their Contribution Value in a For Profit Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilstrap, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    A literature review revealed a lack of academic research related to cultural dynamics within organizations that influence information technology investments. The goal of this single descriptive case study of a for profit international company was to examine one area of cultural influence on investments. The aim was to gain an understanding of…

  15. Final Report of the Center of Excellence in Rotary Wing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    drive shaft systems technology. More specifically, the rotordynamic behavior of supercritical, composite driveshaft systems for helicopter applications...Long Beach, CA. 4/1-4 Int’l Conf. on Rotordynamics & M. Darlow Transport Phenomena, Honolulu, HA 5/21-23 46th Annual AHS Forum, Washington, DC R. Loewy

  16. The working out of architectural concept for a new type public building — multi-information and education center by using information technologies and mathematical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Михаил Владимирович Боровиков

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Architectural concept of multifunctional information and educational center and its implementation is given in the author's project. Advanced information technology and mathematical models used in the development of the author project.

  17. Midwest Clean Energy Application Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuttica, John; Haefke, Cliff

    2013-12-31

    The Midwest Clean Energy Application Center (CEAC) was one of eight regional centers that promoted and assisted in transforming the market for combined heat and power (CHP), waste heat to power (WHP), and district energy (DE) technologies and concepts throughout the United States between October 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. The key services the CEACs provided included: Market Opportunity Analyses – Supporting analyses of CHP market opportunities in diverse markets including industrial, federal, institutional, and commercial sectors. Education and Outreach – Providing information on the energy and non-energy benefits and applications of CHP to state and local policy makers, regulators, energy end-users, trade associations and others. Information was shared on the Midwest CEAC website: www.midwestcleanergy.org. Technical Assistance – Providing technical assistance to end-users and stakeholders to help them consider CHP, waste heat to power, and/or district energy with CHP in their facility and to help them through the project development process from initial CHP screening to installation. The Midwest CEAC provided services to the Midwest Region that included the states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, South Dakota, and Wisconsin.

  18. Controlled release/removal technology; Seigyo hoshutsu {center_dot} jokyo gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tojo, K. [Kyushu Inst. of Tech., Fukuoka (Japan)

    2000-02-05

    The controlled release is to control optimally releasing velocity of active ingredient in medication or agricultural chemicals for therapy or vermin control. The novel transdermal therapeutic system can be developed considering diapause term of medication setting type or time pharmacology by storing information of time lag for medication permeability in medication keeping layer. Furthermore by resent iontophoresis technology using electric fields for controlling drug permeability through the skin, migration volume of active ingredient to blood can be controlled pulsed shape by On- Off of electric fields. In another hand, it comes to be clarified that drugs in the body can be extracted by contrarotating operation of electrodes. From now, effective removal system of barren materials from organism or time controlling therapeutic system with feed buck function can be realized by being optimal novel technology of medical engineering therapy. (NEDO)

  19. An Overview of the Data Products and Technologies Provided by the Global Hydrology Resource Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, D.; Conover, H.; Graves, S.; Goodman, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC) is one of twelve data centers that make up the Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAAC) Alliance. The GHRC collects and distributes climate research quality data and associated products from satellite, aircraft and in-situ instruments, primarily in the fields of lightning detection, microwave imaging, and convective moisture. In addition the researchers at the GHRC working with atmospheric scientists have developed robust advanced information systems applications that enable the use of NASA and other data by scientists and the broader user community. The primary data of the GHRC is lightning data. Raw instrument data from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and its precursor the Optical Transient detector (OTD) along with derived products, validation data, and ancillary in-situ lightning data (like that from the National Lightning Detection Network) make up the suite of lightning data sets. This is due in part because the LIS science computing facility is co-located with the GHRC and the LIS team utilizes GHRC services to acquire, process, and archive new and updated lightning datasets and products for their research. In this role, the GHRC serves the global lightning research community and is responsible for the sole archive of lightning data from NASA's LIS and OTD instruments. The GHRC has contributed to numerous NASA field campaigns in various roles dating back to the mid 1990s. During the series of Convection and Moisture experiments (CAMEX) beginning with CAMEX-3 in 1998, the GHRC provided mission support data to the science teams during the experiment, then archived and distributed the experiment data post mission. In 2001, during the CAMEX-4 mission, field experiment operations were revolutionized when project and mission scientists used the GHRC-developed on-line collaboration system for mission planning and execution, and to perform post-experiment analysis. Using web-based forms, flight and science reports were

  20. REVIEW OF SOFT SKILLS AMONG TRAINERS FROM ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY TRAINING CENTER (ADTEC)

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Hasril Amiruddin; Norhayati Ngadiman; Romy Abdul Kadir; Sukartini Saidy

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Training Centre (ADTEC) institutions under the Ministry of Human Resource are major players for skilled human resource development in Malaysia. In preparing for the competent workforce, ADTECs are taking active measures to ensure that their trainees are equipped with the necessary soft skills –in addition to technical skill - that are much needed to deal with the complex and challenging workplace. However, integrating soft skills into the training that has traditionall...

  1. Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) Overview: Research Shaped to Meet Military Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Technology BHSAI Medical Modeling & Simulation JPC Program Execution National ProgramsLogistics Security, Plans, Training, Travel Innovative and...SBIR CSI 400 450 Demonstrations & Field T-Med (P8) JPC -1 Other JPC Execution 5 6 & 8 300 350 Demonstrations , , , 200 250 & Field T-Med (P8...Other JPC Execution 100 150 Congressional Special Appropriations – RDT&E 0 50 SBIR JPC1 UNCLASSIFIED June 2011 Key Sources: CSI, AAMTI(P8), SBIR/STTR

  2. Report on enhancing young scholars in science and technology the Center for Excellence in Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-30

    The present stock and flow of highly talented young persons engaged in the global discovery and application of science and technology are critical to the future pace of innovation. Historically, the world`s largest reservoirs of scientists and engineers have been in the Western economies. Overtime, however, Asia has begun to build equivalent pools of scientists and engineers among their university graduates. According to 1993 data from the National Science Foundation and the UNESCO World Science Report, Germany leads all economies with a 67% ratio of science and engineering degrees to total first university degrees compared to the United States with a distant fifth place at 32% behind Italy, Mexico and Poland. If the nation is to keep its scientific and technological prowess, it must capture its very best talent in the science and technology fields. The question is then raised as to the source within the United States of the science and technology talent pool. While between 1978 and 1991 there was an overall decline in male participation in undergraduate (-9%) and graduate degrees (-12%), the number of women receiving undergraduate (+8%) and graduate degrees (+34%) rose dramatically. These numbers are encouraging for women`s participation overall, however, women earn only a small percentage of physical science and engineering degrees. Why are there so few women in mathematics, engineering, and the physical sciences? The answers are complex and begin early in a woman`s exposure to science and mathematics. This report presents results on a study of careers of alumni from the Research Science Institute. Investigations were concerned with the timing of decision processes concerned with the sciences and math and factors that influenced people to turn away from or proceed with careers in science and math.

  3. Hygienic aspects of new technologies using of the fuel cycle center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simakov А.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim: justification of criteria for making decision on possibility of the regenerated fuel use in operating productions. Hygienic criteria have been formulated to be guided in order to make a decision on possibility and suitability to carry out planned change of technology at the enterprises of the nuclear fuel circle, its reconstruction, change the line of business, as well as usage of raw materials with worse characteristics.

  4. WSTIAC: Weapon Systems Technology Information Analysis Center. Volume 6, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Computational Neuroscience Program 2004. Associate Editor; Journal of Counter Ordinance Technology. Joel L EDavis, Program Manager, Cognitive and Neural...tests were against unitary (nonseparating) targets representative of the Journal of the Optical Society of America A, involves of SCUD-type ballistic...Agent ( CSEA ) and prime contractor for the Aegis Weapon System agencies. A single query searches across 30 databases and and Vertical Launch System

  5. Illinois task force on global climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, B.S. [Illinois Dept. of Natural Resources, Springfield, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document progress in the areas of national policy development, emissions reduction, research and education, and adaptation, and to identify specific actions that will be undertaken to implement the Illinois state action plan. The task force has been tracking national and international climate change policy, and helping shape national policy agenda. Identification and implementation of cost-effective mitigation measures has been performed for emissions reduction. In the area of research and education, the task force is developing the capacity to measure climate change indicators, maintaining and enhancing Illinois relevant research, and strengthening climate change education. Activities relevant to adaptation to new policy include strengthening water laws and planning for adaptation. 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. A Qualitative Study of the Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs): An Assessment of the Use of TIPs by Individuals Affiliated with the Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Susan W.; Suzuki, Marcia; Hubbard, Susan M.; Huang, Judy Y.; Cobb, Anita M.

    2003-01-01

    Evaluated the Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTCs) of the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT) as a means of diffusion of innovations, focusing on use of the Treatment Improvement Protocols (TIPs). Qualitative studies at 6 ATTCs that included 57 interviews show that the CSAT is at the forefront of providing resources to the…

  7. Bridging the digital divide by increasing computer and cancer literacy: community technology centers for head-start parents and families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salovey, Peter; Williams-Piehota, Pamela; Mowad, Linda; Moret, Marta Elisa; Edlund, Denielle; Andersen, Judith

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the establishment of two community technology centers affiliated with Head Start early childhood education programs focused especially on Latino and African American parents of children enrolled in Head Start. A 6-hour course concerned with computer and cancer literacy was presented to 120 parents and other community residents who earned a free, refurbished, Internet-ready computer after completing the program. Focus groups provided the basis for designing the structure and content of the course and modifying it during the project period. An outcomes-based assessment comparing program participants with 70 nonparticipants at baseline, immediately after the course ended, and 3 months later suggested that the program increased knowledge about computers and their use, knowledge about cancer and its prevention, and computer use including health information-seeking via the Internet. The creation of community computer technology centers requires the availability of secure space, capacity of a community partner to oversee project implementation, and resources of this partner to ensure sustainability beyond core funding.

  8. Mobile 3D television: development of core technological elements and user-centered evaluation methods toward an optimized system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotchev, Atanas; Smolic, Aljoscha; Jumisko-Pyykkö, Satu; Strohmeier, Dominik; Bozdagi Akar, Gozde; Merkle, Philipp; Daskalov, Nikolai

    2009-02-01

    A European consortium of six partners has been developing core technological components of a mobile 3D television system over DVB-H channel. In this overview paper, we present our current results on developing optimal methods for stereo-video content creation, coding and transmission and emphasize their significance for the power-constrained mobile platform, equipped with auto-stereoscopic display. We address the user requirements by applying modern usercentered approaches taking into account different user groups and usage contexts in contrast to the laboratory assessment methods which, though standardized, offer limited applicability to real applications. To this end, we have been aiming at developing a methodological framework for the whole system development process. One of our goals has been to further develop the user-centered approach towards experienced quality of critical system components. In this paper, we classify different research methods and technological solutions analyzing their pros and constraints. Based on this analysis we present the user-centered methodological framework being used throughout the whole development process of the system and aimed at achieving the best performance and quality appealing to the end user.

  9. Regional cross section program for Illinois basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treworgy, J.D.; Whitaker, S.T. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

    1989-08-01

    For the first time, the Illinois State Geological Survey will publish a network of regional cross sections portraying the structural and stratigraphic framework of the entire Illinois basin. The network of 16 structural cross sections radiating outward from the Union Oil 1 Cisne Community well (Sec. 3, T1N, 7E, Wayne County, Illinois) will consist of wireline logs showing formation boundaries and gross lithofacies of the entire stratigraphic column for over 140 wells. Indiana and Kentucky portions of the network will be prepared in conjunction with their respective state geological surveys. Wireline logs are being digitized and stored to allow reproduction of log curves at different scales and in various combinations. Initial cross sections will be published at a vertical scale of 1 in. = 400 ft and a horizontal scale of 1 in. = 8 mi (1:500,000). To assure the most accurate structural and lithologic portrayals possible, numerous wireline logs are being examined in addition to the 140 illustrated on the sections. Available seismic data, sample and core descriptions, and existing structure, isopach, and facies maps are also being used. Text describing the sections will be included on each sheet. Topics will cover a brief history of deposition and structural evolution, distribution of source rocks, reservoir rocks and seals, and significant fields and plays.

  10. Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Technology Project and Renewable Energy Center of Excellence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Bruce [Cloud County Community College, Concordia, KS (United States)

    2016-02-26

    Cloud County Community College's (CCCC) Wind Energy Technology (WET) program is a leader in the renewable energy movement across Kansas and the USA. The field of renewable energy is a growing industry which continues to experience high demand for career opportunities. This CCCC/DOE project entailed two phases: 1) the installation of two Northwind 100 wind turbines, and 2) the continued development of the WET program curriculum, including enhancement of the CCCC Blade Repair Certificate program. This report provides a technical account of the total work performed, and is a comprehensive description of the results achieved.

  11. The Processing of Parts with Group Technology in Individual CNC Machining Center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a new machining method for part s using group technology suitable for workshop condition in China. The method divi des the parts of each product into similar kinds according to their features, an d installs each kind of parts on different working platforms. The working platfo rm, as a unit, is designed to be flexible and is interchangeable. It can be hung and fitted to the CNC working table. By changing the platforms in turn, nearly all the parts of one product can be processed with o...

  12. Joint Logistics Systems Center Information Technology Budget FY 1995 Budget Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    methods, communication backbone and standardized record formats, supporting Electronic Data Interchange, application of artificial intelligence ...standardized record formats, supporting Electronic Data Interchange, application of artificial intelligence technologies to tactical logistics planning...6.044 6,52 4,94 7,393 7,124 1-18cIP10 Cap hift Mgmt (COM Wholesale siuofaw I’m4 7,006 6,35 7.W5 6,006 6,102 30 wodlyoam 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Detense Busines

  13. Compliance with infection-control procedures among Illinois orthodontists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D; BeGole, E A

    1998-06-01

    The authors of previous studies have reported an increasing percentage of orthodontists complying with infection-control procedures in their offices, yet compliance was found to be less than ideal. In this study we surveyed Illinois orthodontists to evaluate their compliance with the infection-control guidelines established by the American Dental Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This study is an addition to a small number of studies in the field of orthodontics on infection-control procedures. The study population was taken from the World Directory of Orthodontists, which contains 374 listings for the state of Illinois. Responses were received from 140 orthodontists, for a response rate of 37%. Thirty-two percent of the responding orthodontists stated that they always wear masks; 13% said they never do. Almost 97% of the orthodontists said they always wear gloves, and no orthodontist reported never wearing gloves. Nearly 64% of the orthodontists reported always using eyewear, and 34% said they wear gowns, whereas only 5% do not wear eye protection and 35% never wear gowns. With regard to instruments and pliers, most of the orthodontists reported using dry-heat ovens (72% and 80%, respectively), whereas nearly 58% said they use chemical disinfection to some extent on instruments and 39% said they use chemical disinfection on pliers. Only 51% of the orthodontists surveyed in our study reported using a steam autoclave to sterilize handpieces, whereas 27% said they use dry-heat ovens, 11% reported using chemical vapor, and 37% said they use chemical disinfection. In conclusion, compliance with infection control procedures among orthodontists has improved from recent studies but is still less than full compliance.

  14. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Science Mission Directorate Projects at Glenn Research Center for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Glenn ResearchCenter Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR)/(STTR)technologies into NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) programs/projects. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this useful.

  15. Persons with Mild or Moderate Alzheimer's Disease Use a Basic Orientation Technology to Travel to Different Rooms within a Day Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Perilli, Viviana; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Bosco, Andrea; De Caro, Maria Fara; Cassano, Germana; Pinto, Katia; Minervini, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed whether three patients with Alzheimer's disease could learn to use a basic orientation technology to reach different rooms within a day center. At each travel instance, the technology provided verbal messages (cues) from the room to reach. For the first two patients, the messages were presented at intervals of about 15 s. For…

  16. Persons with Mild or Moderate Alzheimer's Disease Use a Basic Orientation Technology to Travel to Different Rooms within a Day Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Perilli, Viviana; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Bosco, Andrea; De Caro, Maria Fara; Cassano, Germana; Pinto, Katia; Minervini, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed whether three patients with Alzheimer's disease could learn to use a basic orientation technology to reach different rooms within a day center. At each travel instance, the technology provided verbal messages (cues) from the room to reach. For the first two patients, the messages were presented at intervals of about 15 s. For…

  17. User-centered applications: Use of mobile information technologies to promote sustainable school healthcare services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida Veldsman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The youth, especially school going children, are the future of any society. It is therefore important that children should receive adequate healthcare support at an early age in order to strive to preserve and ensure better education and welfare of the children and continuity in societal success. Despite the strategic initiatives that aim at improving the general health of school going children, such as South Africa’s Integrated School Health Policy, there still exist challenges in support programmes meant to alleviate the barriers to effective healthcare towards improved education for the school children. Advances in ICT enable a fundamental redesign of healthcare processes based on the use and integration of electronic communication at all levels. New communication technologies can support a transition from institution centric to user-centric applications. This paper defines key principles and challenges for designers, policy makers, and evaluators of user-centred technologies for healthcare in schools. The paper employs the User Experience Management Model (UXM2 to review the current and emerging trends, and highlights challenges related to the design of a typical m-ICT application that supports delivery of healthcare in schools. The paper reaches conclusions for next steps that will advance the domain.

  18. Recent Efforts in Communications Research and Technology at the Glenn Research Center in Support of NASA's Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    As it has done in the past, NASA is currently engaged in furthering the frontiers of space and planetary exploration. The effectiveness in gathering the desired science data in the amount and quality required to perform this pioneering work relies heavily on the communications capabilities of the spacecraft and space platforms being considered to enable future missions. Accordingly, the continuous improvement and development of radiofrequency and optical communications systems are fundamental to prevent communications to become the limiting factor for space explorations. This presentation will discuss some of the research and technology development efforts currently underway at the NASA Glenn Research Center in the radio frequency (RF) and Optical Communications. Examples of work conducted in-house and also in collaboration with academia, industry, and other government agencies (OGA) in areas such as antenna technology, power amplifiers, radio frequency (RF) wave propagation through Earths atmosphere, ultra-sensitive receivers, thin films ferroelectric-based tunable components, among others, will be presented. In addition, the role of these and other related RF technologies in enabling the NASA next generation space communications architecture will be also discussed.

  19. Public Communication of Science and Technology in Museums and Interactive Centers in MedellÍn (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Inés Jiménez-G.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the simple and complex deficit and democratic model approaches, this paper analyses the communication strategies applied in several museums and interactive centers —Parque Explora, Museo Interactivo Empresas Públicas de Medellín, Planetario Jesús Emilio Ramírez and Museo Universitario from the University of Antioquia in the city of Medellín—. We argue that communicating scientific and technological developments at a conjunctural moment —because of the pressure exerted by the demand side to bring knowledge within the reach of the man in the street— involves recognizing science and technology issues should not be conveyed in a language increasingly distanced from layman’s understanding and should allow for citizens’ critical thinking formation face to techno-scientific developments. By analysing the communication approaches mentioned above, we found significant obstacles to be overcome in the communication strategies applied by museum staff in order to come to an understanding of science and technology.

  20. Accuracy of patient's turnover time prediction using RFID technology in an academic ambulatory surgery center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand-Maillet, Florence; Debes, Claire; Garnier, Fanny; Dufeu, Nicolas; Sciard, Didier; Beaussier, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Patients flow in outpatient surgical unit is a major issue with regards to resource utilization, overall case load and patient satisfaction. An electronic Radio Frequency Identification Device (RFID) was used to document the overall time spent by the patients between their admission and discharge from the unit. The objective of this study was to evaluate how a RFID-based data collection system could provide an accurate prediction of the actual time for the patient to be discharged from the ambulatory surgical unit after surgery. This is an observational prospective evaluation carried out in an academic ambulatory surgery center (ASC). Data on length of stay at each step of the patient care, from admission to discharge, were recorded by a RFID device and analyzed according to the type of surgical procedure, the surgeon and the anesthetic technique. Based on these initial data (n = 1520), patients were scheduled in a sequential manner according to the expected duration of the previous case. The primary endpoint was the difference between actual and predicted time of discharge from the unit. A total of 414 consecutive patients were prospectively evaluated. One hundred seventy four patients (42%) were discharged at the predicted time ± 30 min. Only 24% were discharged behind predicted schedule. Using an automatic record of patient's length of stay would allow an accurate prediction of the discharge time according to the type of surgery, the surgeon and the anesthetic procedure.

  1. Heat pump centered integrated community energy systems: system development. Georgia Institute of Technology final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, D.W.; Trammell, B.C.; Dixit, B.S.; McCurry, D.C.; Rindt, B.A.

    1979-12-01

    Heat Pump Centered-Integrated Community Energy Systems (HP-ICES) show the promise of utilizing low-grade thermal energy for low-quality energy requirements such as space heating and cooling. The Heat Pump - Wastewater Heat Recovery (HP-WHR) scheme is one approach to an HP-ICES that proposes to reclaim low-grade thermal energy from a community's wastewater effluent. This report develops the concept of an HP-WHR system, evaluates the potential performance and economics of such a system, and examines the potential for application. A thermodynamic performance analysis of a hypothetical system projects an overall system Coefficient of Performance (C.O.P.) of from 2.181 to 2.264 for waste-water temperatures varying from 50/sup 0/F to 80/sup 0/F. Primary energy source savings from the nationwide implementation of this system is projected to be 6.0 QUADS-fuel oil, or 8.5 QUADS - natural gas, or 29.7 QUADS - coal for the period 1980 to 2000, depending upon the type and mix of conventional space conditioning systems which could be displaced with the HP-WHR system. Site-specific HP-WHR system designs are presented for two application communities in Georgia. Performance analyses for these systems project annual cycle system C.O.P.'s of 2.049 and 2.519. Economic analysis on the basis of a life cycle cost comparison shows one site-specific system design to be cost competitive in the immediate market with conventional residential and light commercial HVAC systems. The second site-specific system design is shown through a similar economic analysis to be more costly than conventional systems due mainly to the current low energy costs for natural gas. It is anticipated that, as energy costs escalate, this HP-WHR system will also approach the threshold of economic viability.

  2. Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center for Enabling Technologies. 2007-2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludascher, Bertram [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Altintas, Ilkay [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-09-06

    Over the past five years, our activities have both established Kepler as a viable scientific workflow environment and demonstrated its value across multiple science applications. We have published numerous peer-reviewed papers on the technologies highlighted in this short paper and have given Kepler tutorials at SC06,SC07,SC08,and SciDAC 2007. Our outreach activities have allowed scientists to learn best practices and better utilize Kepler to address their individual workflow problems. Our contributions to advancing the state-of-the-art in scientific workflows have focused on the following areas. Progress in each of these areas is described in subsequent sections. Workflow development. The development of a deeper understanding of scientific workflows "in the wild" and of the requirements for support tools that allow easy construction of complex scientific workflows; Generic workflow components and templates. The development of generic actors (i.e.workflow components and processes) which can be broadly applied to scientific problems; Provenance collection and analysis. The design of a flexible provenance collection and analysis infrastructure within the workflow environment; and, Workflow reliability and fault tolerance. The improvement of the reliability and fault-tolerance of workflow environments.

  3. Perspectives on Genetic and Genomic Technologies in an Academic Medical Center: The Duke Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Huston Katsanis

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this age of personalized medicine, genetic and genomic testing is expected to become instrumental in health care delivery, but little is known about its actual implementation in clinical practice. Methods. We surveyed Duke faculty and healthcare providers to examine the extent of genetic and genomic testing adoption. We assessed providers’ use of genetic and genomic testing options and indications in clinical practice, providers’ awareness of pharmacogenetic applications, and providers’ opinions on returning research-generated genetic test results to participants. Most clinician respondents currently use family history routinely in their clinical practice, but only 18 percent of clinicians use pharmacogenetics. Only two respondents correctly identified the number of drug package inserts with pharmacogenetic indications. We also found strong support for the return of genetic research results to participants. Our results demonstrate that while Duke healthcare providers are enthusiastic about genomic technologies, use of genomic tools outside of research has been limited. Respondents favor return of research-based genetic results to participants, but clinicians lack knowledge about pharmacogenetic applications. We identified challenges faced by this institution when implementing genetic and genomic testing into patient care that should inform a policy and education agenda to improve provider support and clinician-researcher partnerships.

  4. Technology Evaluations Related to Mercury, Technetium, and Chloride in Treatment of Wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Barnes; D. D. Taylor; S. C. Ashworth; J. B. Bosley; D. R. Haefner

    1999-10-01

    The Idaho High-Level Waste and Facility Disposition Environmental Impact Statement defines alternative for treating and disposing of wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Development is required for several technologies under consideration for treatment of these wastes. This report contains evaluations of whether specific treatment is needed and if so, by what methods, to remove mercury, technetium, and chlorides in proposed Environmental Impact Statement treatment processes. The evaluations of mercury include a review of regulatory requirements that would apply to mercury wastes in separations processes, an evaluation of the sensitivity of mercury flowrates and concentrations to changes in separations processing schemes and conditions, test results from laboratory-scale experiments of precipitation of mercury by sulfide precipitation agents from the TRUEX carbonate wash effluent, and evaluations of methods to remove mercury from New Waste Calcining Facility liquid and gaseous streams. The evaluation of technetium relates to the need for technetium removal and alternative methods to remove technetium from streams in separations processes. The need for removal of chlorides from New Waste Calcining Facility scrub solution is also evaluated.

  5. The interests and preferences of Delaware science and technology teachers in grades three through eight for the Innovation Technology Exploration Center (ITEC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Anne B.

    This exploratory research inquiry gave insight into the academic community's interests and needs in order to support the new Innovation Exploration Technology Center (ITEC) facility. The participants for this study included 257 conveniently available full-time science and technology teachers in grades three through eight (236 public, 7 parochial and 6 charter) who returned surveys from 2004 through may 2005. The researcher used her own non-published survey, which was piloted during the summer of 2004. The survey consisted of 4 duplicate count questions, 3 Likert questions and 2 open-ended questions. The survey also had a check box area for participants if they consented to a follow-up interview. This data showed teacher in-service for teaching training options ranked the highest among all three-grade levels at 70.2% middle school and 62.9% for grades K-5. Among the three grade groups, Delaware Aerospace Education Foundation (DASEF) ranked the highest among middle school teachers for having heard of the program. Among activities, field trips ranked highest for all three grade groups and Interactive exhibits ranked the highest for services and speakers ranked the highest for level of interest in resources. The motivating factor that inspired teachers the most to utilize the facility was student's exhibits. The data gathered by surveys was further supported by the follow-up interviews.

  6. Broadening opportunities for job seekers with disabilities: strategies to effectively provide assistive technology in One-Stop centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Jaimie Ciulla; Boeltzig, Heike; Fesko, Sheila Lynch; Cohen, Allison; Hamner, Doris

    2007-01-01

    The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) of 1998 mandates that partners in the One-Stop Career Center (One-Stop) system be prepared to serve a diverse customer base, including job seekers with disabilities. For many such individuals, effective service delivery depends in part on the existence of appropriate and efficient assistive technology (AT) options. This article presents challenges experienced by One-Stop partners related to AT provision as well as strategies for providing effective AT support. Findings from case study research conducted in several One-Stops across the country revealed three strategies that have enhanced employment services and addressed barriers. These are (a) an accurate assessment of AT needs, (b) staff training and practice using the equipment, and (c) the ability to make the most of limited financial resources. Implications for the most efficient ways to provide AT options are discussed.

  7. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center. Report to the Steering Committee, February 1996. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Carbon Injection System and the Trace Element Removal test blocks. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued with impinger capture solutions. The 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber System (Carbon Injection System) was utilized in the TER test configuration this month. The B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger unit is being installed utilizing the Mini Pilot Flue Gas System. The 1.0 MW Cold- Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. Monthly inspections were conducted for all equipment in cold-standby, as well as for the fire safety systems, and will continue to be conducted by the ECTC Operations and Maintenance staff.

  8. Guide for Migrants in the State of Illinois = Guia para Migrantes en el Estado de Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langemach, Sharon; Koepplinger, Jessica

    Prepared for migrant farmworkers traveling in the State of Illinois, the booklet, written in English and Spanish, provides basic information on (1) employment conditions--requirements of crew leaders and employers, deductions from wages, and laws regulating child labor; (2) housing--conditions of the camp grounds and of living units; (3)…

  9. Comprehensive Career Development for Illinois: Findings and Recommendations of the Illinois Career Development Task Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. Mark; Bragg, Debra D.; Makela, Julia Panke

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes major findings and recommendations of the Illinois Career Development Task Force. The first section provides background information on Task Force formation, membership, meetings, and discussion topics. The second section defines career development, based on the consensus-building process employed by the Task Force, and…

  10. Guide for Migrants in the State of Illinois = Guia para Migrantes en el Estado de Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langemach, Sharon; Koepplinger, Jessica

    Prepared for migrant farmworkers traveling in the State of Illinois, the booklet, written in English and Spanish, provides basic information on (1) employment conditions--requirements of crew leaders and employers, deductions from wages, and laws regulating child labor; (2) housing--conditions of the camp grounds and of living units; (3)…

  11. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Row Crop Production Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in occupations in the row crop production cluster. The document begins with a brief overview of the Illinois perspective on occupational skill standards and…

  12. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Industrial Maintenance General Maintenance Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These skill standards for the industrial maintenance general maintenance cluster are intended to be a guide to workforce preparation program providers in defining content for their programs and to employers to establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. An introduction provides the Illinois perspective; Illinois Occupational…

  13. Patterns of Local Intergovernmental Cooperation in Illinois School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkey, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    This study identified the use of intergovernmental cooperatives in Illinois school districts as a resource to improve the budget process. More specifically, the study focused on the types of intergovernmental cooperatives in Illinois school districts and the reason for entering into the cooperatives. The results of this research suggest that…

  14. The Relationship between Educational Resources and Student Achievement in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examined the relationship between educational resources and student achievement in Illinois public schools. Illinois school districts were compared by type, size, and location. This study built on the premise that disparities exist in educational resources because of the state's reliance on property taxes to fund education.…

  15. Characteristics of Illinois School Districts That Employ School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searing, Lisabeth M.; Guenette, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates that school nursing services are cost-effective, but the National Association of School Nurses estimates that 25% of schools do not have a school nurse (SN). The purpose of this study was to identify the characteristics of Illinois school districts that employed SNs. This was a secondary data analysis of Illinois School Report…

  16. 75 FR 40816 - Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Meeting July 7, 2010. a. Date and Time of Meeting: Thursday, July 22, 2010 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. CDT. b. Place: Illinois Historic...

  17. The Relationship between Educational Resources and Student Achievement in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvey, Barbara E.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examined the relationship between educational resources and student achievement in Illinois public schools. Illinois school districts were compared by type, size, and location. This study built on the premise that disparities exist in educational resources because of the state's reliance on property taxes to fund education.…

  18. Teacher Education Packet for Illinois Core Curriculum in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemp, Paul; Pepple, Jerry

    Developed for use by teacher educators or state staff, this teaching packet provides preservice or inservice training to teachers and prospective teachers on how to use the Illinois Core Curriculum in Agriculture. (It is recommended that copies of the Illinois core materials be available to the students.) Three problem areas are included:…

  19. Patterns of Local Intergovernmental Cooperation in Illinois School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkey, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    This study identified the use of intergovernmental cooperatives in Illinois school districts as a resource to improve the budget process. More specifically, the study focused on the types of intergovernmental cooperatives in Illinois school districts and the reason for entering into the cooperatives. The results of this research suggest that…

  20. Alternative Evaluation Designs for Data-Centered Technology-Based Geoscience Education Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalles, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    This paper will present different strategies for how to evaluate contrasting K-12 geoscience classroom-based interventions with different goals, leveraging the first author's experiences as principal investigator of four NSF and NASA-funded geoscience education projects. Results will also be reported. Each project had its own distinctive features but all had in common the broad goal of bringing to high school classrooms uses of real place-based geospatial data to study the relationships of Earth system phenomena to climate change and sustainability. The first project's goal was to produce templates and exemplars for curriculum and assessment designs around studying contrasting geoscience topics with different data sets and forms of data representation. The project produced a near transfer performance assessment task in which students who studied climate trends in Phoenix turned their attention to climate in Chicago. The evaluation looked at the technical quality of the assessment instrument as measured by inter-rater reliability. It then analyzed the assessment results against student responses to the instructional tasks about Phoenix. The evaluation proved useful in pinpointing areas of student strength and weakness on different inquiry tasks, from simple map interpretation to analysis of contrasting claims about what the data indicate. The goal of the second project was to produce an exemplar curriculum unit that bridges Western science and traditional American Indian ecological knowledge for student learning and skill building about local environmental sustainability issues. The evaluation looked at the extent to which Western and traditional perspectives were incorporated into the design of the curriculum. The curriculum was not constructed with a separate assessment, yet evidence centered design was utilized to extrapolate from the exemplar unit templates for future instructional and assessment tasks around other places, other sustainability problems, and

  1. Organic desulfurization of Illinois No. 6 coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Chatterjee, K.

    1993-09-01

    First, lithium aluminum hydride cleanly removes pyrite from the Illinois No. 6 coal to leave the original organosulfur compounds. Second, the SET reagent selectively removes sulfur from heterocyclic sulfur compounds and aromatic sulfides. Lochmann`s base does not remove the sulfur from the heterocycles, but does react with sulfidic sulfur compounds such as alkyl aromatic sulfides that are susceptible to base catalyzed elimination reactions. Third, the organic sulfur compounds that remain after the dual SET and BASE treatment are dominantly aliphatic substances including alkyl and allylic thiols and fourth the sulfur compounds that remain are susceptible to thermal decomposition and acid hydrolysis.

  2. Illinois wetlands: their value and management. [Monograph

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, H.E. III

    1981-01-01

    Wetlands are now valued as an important habitat, for their moderation of flooding, and as free polutant filters. This report documents, with the aid of aerial photographs, the impact of drainage activities for development purposes over the past century, and illustrates the environmental significance of wetlands. There are various techniques available for protecting wetlands, including the use of permits, the Endangered Species Act, floodplain zoning, acquisition, management and restoration, and legislation at all levels of government. The preservation of wetlands is shown to contribute to the well-being of all Illinois citizens. 168 references, 17 tables.

  3. Illinois energy conservation plan report: 1979 revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-02-01

    In response to Energy Policy and this Conservation Act (PL 94-163) and Energy Conservation and Production Act (PL 94-385), this paper describes the activities to be undertaken by Illinois to meet the mandatory requirements of the Acts and to carry out other activities to encourage energy conservation by energy-consuming sectors in the state. Programs reach the residential, commercial/industrial, agricultural, educational, transportation, and government sectors. The overall goal of the program is to reduce projected energy consumption in 1980 by 5% through information and educational activities.

  4. 数据中心空调节能技术的应用实例%Application of air conditioning energy saving technology for data center

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段轶伊; 姜俊海; 李瑞雅; 严冬

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the development of air condition mode , and introduces the common air conditioning energy saving technology used in data center. As a example of a center in Beijing, the text analyses the impact of water Free-cooling technology to the data center from energy efficiency and operation cost in a data center in Beijing for example.%本文简述了数据中心空调制冷方式的发展,介绍了目前常用的数据中心空调节能技术,并以北京某数据中心为例,从能效和运行费用等方面分析了水冷Free-Cooling技术对数据中心的影响。

  5. Introduction to the Illinois Deep Hole Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, M. S.; Haimson, B. C.; Hinze, W. J.; van Schmus, W. R.

    1983-09-01

    Commonwealth Edison recently drilled three engineering test holes in northwestern Illinois. The three holes (UPH 1, 2, and 3) were 0.6, 1.6, and 1.6 km deep, respectively, and the latter two penetrated nearly 1 km of Precambrian granitic basement. In 1980, continuous core from all three holes and access to UPH 3 were made available for scientific investigations through the Illinois Deep Hole Project. The drill hole and cores provided an excellent opportunity for "piggyback" scientific investigations because (1) the basement geology of the region was poorly known, (2) a large vertical depth of continuous core was available, and (3) one of the holes was available for testing where corresponding core is available. The principal study of these holes was an integrated investigation of surface and in-hole experiments, plus detailed petrologic, geochemical, and physical property studies of the core samples. The combined results of these studies contributed significatnly to our understanding of the regional geology of the Precambrian basement, the regional geophysics and tectonics, and the correlation between geophysical well logging and the true character of the rocks penetrated. Furthermore, this project has shown that substantial scientific benefit can be obtained from continental drilling "holes of opportunity" if members of the scientific community are able to respond in a timely and coordinated fashion.

  6. Electrochemical sensors for volatile nitrogen compounds in air. Final report to J&N Associates, Inc. from Illinois Institute of Technology, Re: Department of Energy Phase I STTR Project DOE No. DE-FG02-99ER86090

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stetter, Joseph R.; Penrose, William R.; Roh, Sae-Won

    2000-09-07

    Air pollutant gases such as nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrous acid, and peroxyacetyl nitrate are commonly encountered in urban atmospheres. They constitute a nuisance to some, and a positive danger to others with such respiratory conditions as asthma and emphysema. It is known that exposure to these gases is a function of microenvironment, but monitoring of microenvironments is presently too uneconomical to be used except in rare cases, such as ''sick buildings''. Gas sensors that are small, sensitive, selective, and inexpensive are needed to make such monitoring practical. Many sensor types have apparently reached their technological development limit, but porous-electrode amperometric gas sensors have not been thoroughly explored for low-concentration applications. We have explored amperometric gas sensors of several types for lower detection limits to a series of nitrogen gases. Evidence gathered in this study indicates that greater sensitivity will be achieved by reducing the noise level of the working electrode, rather than increasing the output signal.

  7. DOE's SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies -- Strategy for Petascale Visual Data Analysis Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E Wes; Johnson, Chris; Aragon, Cecilia; Rubel, Oliver; Weber, Gunther; Pascucci, Valerio; Childs, Hank; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Whitlock, Brad; Ahern, Sean; Meredith, Jeremey; Ostrouchov, George; Joy, Ken; Hamann, Bernd; Garth, Christoph; Cole, Martin; Hansen, Charles; Parker, Steven; Sanderson, Allen; Silva, Claudio; Tricoche, Xavier

    2007-10-01

    The focus of this article is on how one group of researchersthe DOE SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) is tackling the daunting task of enabling knowledgediscovery through visualization and analytics on some of the world slargest and most complex datasets and on some of the world's largestcomputational platforms. As a Center for Enabling Technology, VACET smission is the creation of usable, production-quality visualization andknowledge discovery software infrastructure that runs on large, parallelcomputer systems at DOE's Open Computing facilities and that providessolutions to challenging visual data exploration and knowledge discoveryneeds of modern science, particularly the DOE sciencecommunity.

  8. Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

  9. Human Factors Process Task Analysis Liquid Oxygen Pump Acceptance Test Procedure for the Advanced Technology Development Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diorio, Kimberly A.

    2002-01-01

    A process task analysis effort was undertaken by Dynacs Inc. commencing in June 2002 under contract from NASA YA-D6. Funding was provided through NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC), Code M/HQ, and Industrial Engineering and Safety (IES). The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Engineering Development Contract (EDC) Task Order was 5SMA768. The scope of the effort was to conduct a Human Factors Process Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (HF PFMEA) of a hazardous activity and provide recommendations to eliminate or reduce the effects of errors caused by human factors. The Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Pump Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was selected for this analysis. The HF PFMEA table (see appendix A) provides an analysis of six major categories evaluated for this study. These categories include Personnel Certification, Test Procedure Format, Test Procedure Safety Controls, Test Article Data, Instrumentation, and Voice Communication. For each specific requirement listed in appendix A, the following topics were addressed: Requirement, Potential Human Error, Performance-Shaping Factors, Potential Effects of the Error, Barriers and Controls, Risk Priority Numbers, and Recommended Actions. This report summarizes findings and gives recommendations as determined by the data contained in appendix A. It also includes a discussion of technology barriers and challenges to performing task analyses, as well as lessons learned. The HF PFMEA table in appendix A recommends the use of accepted and required safety criteria in order to reduce the risk of human error. The items with the highest risk priority numbers should receive the greatest amount of consideration. Implementation of the recommendations will result in a safer operation for all personnel.

  10. 75 FR 73962 - Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition; Illinois River, Seneca, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Bridge Demolition; Illinois River, Seneca... temporary safety zone on the Illinois River near Seneca, Illinois. This zone is intended to restrict vessels from a portion of the Illinois River due to the demolition of the Seneca Highway Bridge. This...

  11. Preparing Principals for Success with English Language Learners: Challenges and Opportunities in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Alison; Van Tuyle, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the challenges and opportunities of the English Language Learner (ELL) components of Illinois' new principal preparation legislation [Illinois Public Act 96-0903]. In 2011, Illinois passed Illinois Public Act 96-0903 creating new rules for principal preparation programs requiring institutions or organizations certifying…

  12. Outline in 1997 Japan compound material academic meeting technological prize winning technology; Kenchiku, doboku kozobutsu no hoshu{center_dot}hokyo yo forukatousito no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iba, Yoshitomo.; Uemura, Masahiko.; Murakami, Shinkichi.; Saito, Makoto.; Kobayashi, Akira. [Nittetsu Composite Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-03-15

    That function declines in the sutra time target, and it is finally destroyed, or a construction structure thing bears putting off that life by managing efficient maintenance it is possible. The factor of the function decline of the structure thing, the degree of the decline, and so on are grasped quantitatively, and efficient repair reinforcement time and a method of construction are chosen, and you must carry it out for that. It is paying attention to the development of the method of construction to reinforce the maintenance repair of the construction structure thing by using the tip compound factor from such a viewpoint. In the beginning, a material cost was very expensive, and the recognition not to use it was very general in such a construction field. In such recognition, in Tonen Corp. incorporated company, it has paid attention to the use possibility in the construction field of the tip compound factor since early, research and development have been done continuously from 1980, that It succeeds in, and it is the method of construction that a repair reinforces a concrete structure thing by the tip material that the method of construction which got the technological prize of the Japan compound material academic meeting in 1997 moved carbon fiber to the center. (NEDO)

  13. Outline in 1997 Japan compound material academic meeting technological prize winning technology. Kenchiku, doboku kozobutsu no hoshu[center dot]hokyo yo forukatousito no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iba, Yoshitomo.; Uemura, Masahiko.; Murakami, Shinkichi.; Saito, Makoto.; Kobayashi, Akira. (Nittetsu Composite Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1999-03-15

    That function declines in the sutra time target, and it is finally destroyed, or a construction structure thing bears putting off that life by managing efficient maintenance it is possible. The factor of the function decline of the structure thing, the degree of the decline, and so on are grasped quantitatively, and efficient repair reinforcement time and a method of construction are chosen, and you must carry it out for that. It is paying attention to the development of the method of construction to reinforce the maintenance repair of the construction structure thing by using the tip compound factor from such a viewpoint. In the beginning, a material cost was very expensive, and the recognition not to use it was very general in such a construction field. In such recognition, in Tonen Corp. incorporated company, it has paid attention to the use possibility in the construction field of the tip compound factor since early, research and development have been done continuously from 1980, that It succeeds in, and it is the method of construction that a repair reinforces a concrete structure thing by the tip material that the method of construction which got the technological prize of the Japan compound material academic meeting in 1997 moved carbon fiber to the center. (NEDO)

  14. An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Finley

    2005-09-30

    reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

  15. Inter-institutional decision making in the technology transfer process: Some preliminary issues in the evaluation of ORNL's High-Temperature Superconductivity Pilot Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, D.L.

    1989-09-01

    This report illuminates the decision-making processes affecting technology transfer at ORNL as they potentially impact upon development of high-temperature superconductors. The methodology of this report consists of an analysis of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) documents laws, and regulations; a review of relevant literature on licensing, patents, and user center decision making; and interviews with persons directly involved in technology development and transfer at the laboratory. The process of technology development at ORNL encompasses, among other things, activities aimed at research and development (R D), technology transfer, and technology utilization. Each of these activities has officially become part of an overall laboratory mission referred to as technology development. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  16. Infertility practice management. I. Leadership and management style: results from the 2002 survey of 374 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology member centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Steven C; Kemp, Denise E; Balser, David P; Masler, Steve N; Hart, Brad; Bubka, Andrea; Bonato, Frederick

    2004-10-01

    To identify current trends in management and leadership styles in Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) member infertility centers; and to understand the similarities and disparities that exist in physicians', administrators', and staff perceptions of management and leadership styles in these centers. Questionnaires were developed to collect information on the leadership and management styles in place in SART member infertility centers. Survey instruments were distributed to the 374 SART centers. Survey instruments for one physician, the center administrator, and six staff members (two each in nursing, laboratory, and administration) were issued to the SART liaison in each of the SART member centers. Respondents included physicians, practice administrators, nurses, technicians, patient services, billing, and support staff. Analysis of respondents' answers revealed that surveyed staff members reported a fairly high degree of job satisfaction. Physician and administrator management styles seemed to fall between interactive and directive styles; however, physicians and administrators perceived themselves as being more interactive than other staff members viewed them. Overall, extreme differences were unlikely, given the reported high degree of job satisfaction. Finally, survey outcome data were compared with responding centers' ART outcome rates as published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Overall, although employee job satisfaction seemed to be high, there were statistical differences between groups for several questions; the disparities in responses for these questions are indicators for potential management and leadership consideration. In addition, statistical correlations were found between the responses for several questions and the centers' respective CDC-published ART outcome rates.

  17. Playing the Metadata Game: Technologies and Strategies Used by Climate Diagnostics Center for Cataloging and Distributing Climate Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweitzer, R. H.

    2001-05-01

    The Climate Diagnostics Center maintains a collection of gridded climate data primarily for use by local researchers. Because this data is available on fast digital storage and because it has been converted to netCDF using a standard metadata convention (called COARDS), we recognize that this data collection is also useful to the community at large. At CDC we try to use technology and metadata standards to reduce our costs associated with making these data available to the public. The World Wide Web has been an excellent technology platform for meeting that goal. Specifically we have developed Web-based user interfaces that allow users to search, plot and download subsets from the data collection. We have also been exploring use of the Pacific Marine Environment Laboratory's Live Access Server (LAS) as an engine for this task. This would result in further savings by allowing us to concentrate on customizing the LAS where needed, rather that developing and maintaining our own system. One such customization currently under development is the use of Java Servlets and JavaServer pages in conjunction with a metadata database to produce a hierarchical user interface to LAS. In addition to these Web-based user interfaces all of our data are available via the Distributed Oceanographic Data System (DODS). This allows other sites using LAS and individuals using DODS-enabled clients to use our data as if it were a local file. All of these technology systems are driven by metadata. When we began to create netCDF files, we collaborated with several other agencies to develop a netCDF convention (COARDS) for metadata. At CDC we have extended that convention to incorporate additional metadata elements to make the netCDF files as self-describing as possible. Part of the local metadata is a set of controlled names for the variable, level in the atmosphere and ocean, statistic and data set for each netCDF file. To allow searching and easy reorganization of these metadata, we loaded

  18. Production of a pellet fuel from Illinois coal fines. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, D.; Lytle, J.; Berger, R.

    1994-12-31

    The primary goal of this research is to produce a pellet fuel from low-sulfur Illinois coal fines which could burn with emissions of less than 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu in stoker-fired boilers. The significance of 1.8 lbs SO{sub 2}/10{sup 6} Btu is that in the Chicago (9 counties) and St. Louis (2 counties) metropolitan areas, industrial users of coal currently must comply with this level of emissions. Stokers are an attractive market for pellets because pellets are well-suited for this application and because western coal is not a competitor in the stoker market. Compliance stoker fuels come from locations such as Kentucky and West Virginia and the price for fuels from these locations is high relative to the current price of Illinois coal. This market offers the most attractive near-term economic environment for commercialization of pelletization technology. For this effort, the authors will be investigating the use of fines from two Illinois mines which currently mine relatively low-sulfur reserves and that discard their fines fraction (minus 100 mesh). The research will involve investigation of multiple unit operations including column flotation, filtration and pellet production. The end result of the effort will allow for an evaluation of the commercial viability of the approach. This quarter pellet production work commenced and planning for collection and processing of a preparation plant fines fraction is underway.

  19. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible

  20. Ohio Advanced Energy Manufacturing Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberly Gibson; Mark Norfolk

    2012-07-30

    overall industry health. To aid the overall advanced energy industry, EWI developed and launched an Ohio chapter of the non-profit Advanced Energy Economy. In this venture, Ohio joins with six other states including Colorado, Connecticut, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont to help promote technologies that deliver energy that is affordable, abundant and secure. In a more specific arena, EWI's advanced energy group collaborated with the EWI-run Nuclear Fabrication Consortium to promote the nuclear supply chain. Through this project EWI has helped bring the supply chain up to date for the upcoming period of construction, and assisted them in understanding the demands for the next generation of facilities now being designed. In a more targeted manner, EWI worked with 115 individual advanced energy companies that are attempting to bring new technology to market. First, these interactions helped EWI develop an awareness of issues common to companies in different advanced energy sectors. By identifying and addressing common issues, EWI helps companies bring technology to market sooner and at a lower cost. These visits also helped EWI develop a picture of industry capability. This helped EWI provide companies with contacts that can supply commercial solutions to their new product development challenges. By providing assistance in developing supply chain partnerships, EWI helped companies bring their technology to market faster and at a lower cost than they might have been able to do by themselves. Finally, at the most granular level EWI performed dedicated research and development on new manufacturing processes for advanced energy. During discussions with companies participating in advanced energy markets, several technology issues that cut across market segments were identified. To address some of these issues, three crosscutting technology development projects were initiated and completed with Center support. This included reversible

  1. Assistance Technology Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-02-01

    remotely position the camera ( pan -tilt) and capture video segments. The system can be rolled to any environment where the clinician wants to record...Specifically, this group is interested in exploring cerebro -cerebellar circuitry as it relates to concussion symptomology. This year, Dr. Bleiberg visited...mobile unit (with a 15" flat panel video monitor, an electronic Pan - Tilt-Zoom camera, and a rechargeable power supply with over hours of run-time

  2. Construction Technology Transfer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    44 USACERL TR 99/11 References Arditi , D., "Construction Productivity Improvement," Journal of Construction Engi- neering and Management, American...8. 12 Ichinowski, T. and Setzer, S. "Corps seeks plans to boost productivity." Engineering News Record, February 9, 1989, p. 11-12. 13 Arditi , D

  3. Comparison of pharmacy services at critical access hospitals and other rural and small hospitals in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Stephanie Y; Schumock, Glen T; Ursan, Iulia D; Ursan, Julia D; Walton, Surrey M; Donnelly, Andrew J

    2013-08-01

    The results of a survey evaluating pharmacy services and technology use at critical access hospitals (CAHs) and other small and rural hospitals in Illinois are reported. A mail survey was sent to pharmacy directors at 86 CAHs and other rural and small hospitals in Illinois not designated as CAHs. Independent sample t tests and chi-square statistics were used to compare CAHs and non-CAHs in areas such as pharmacy services, staffing, use of technology, and sterile compounding practices. The survey response rate was 46.5%, with usable data received from 40 hospitals. Analysis of the survey data indicated that hospitals designated as CAHs were significantly less likely than non-CAHs to have automatic therapeutic interchange policies (p = 0.012) and more likely to conduct pharmacist-provided educational programs on medication costs for physicians and other health care personnel (p = 0.037). Relative to non-CAHs, CAHs were significantly less likely to have automated dispensing cabinets (p = 0.016) and to out-source the preparation of sterile products to offsite vendors (p = 0.012); pharmacy directors at CAHs were less likely to report the use of technology for remote medication order entry or review (p = 0.038). At both types of facilities, pharmacists typically have both distributive and clinical responsibilities, and patient-specific clinical pharmacy services (e.g., patient education or counseling, other drug therapy monitoring, medication reconciliation, pharmacokinetic consultations) are offered at similar frequencies. A survey of pharmacy departments at small and rural hospitals in Illinois determined that there were more similarities than differences between CAHs and non-CAHs. The survey indicated significant differences in dispensing processes, the use of technology and drug policy tools, and outsourcing of sterile product preparation.

  4. Oncotyrol--Center for Personalized Cancer Medicine: Methods and Applications of Health Technology Assessment and Outcomes Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebert, Uwe; Jahn, Beate; Rochau, Ursula; Schnell-Inderst, Petra; Kisser, Agnes; Hunger, Theresa; Sroczynski, Gaby; Mühlberger, Nikolai; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Schnaiter, Simon; Endel, Gottfried; Huber, Lukas; Gastl, Guenther

    2015-01-01

    The Oncotyrol - Center for Personalized Cancer Medicine is an international and interdisciplinary alliance combining research and commercial competencies to accelerate the development, evaluation and translation of personalized healthcare strategies in cancer. The philosophy of Oncotyrol is to collaborate with relevant stakeholders and advance knowledge "from bench to bedside to population and back". Oncotyrol is funded through the COMET Excellence Program by the Austrian government via the national Austrian Research Promotion Agency (FFG). This article focuses on the role of health technology assessment (HTA) and outcomes research in personalized cancer medicine in the context of Oncotyrol. Oncotyrol, which currently comprises approximately 20 individual projects, has four research areas: Area 1: Biomarker and Drug Target Identification; Area 2: Assay Development and Drug Screening; Area 3: Innovative Therapies; Area 4: Health Technology Assessment and Bioinformatics. Area 4 translates the results from Areas 1 to 3 to populations and society and reports them back to Area 3 to inform clinical studies and guidelines, and to Areas 1 and 2 to guide further research and development. In a series of international expert workshops, the Oncotyrol International Expert Task Force for Personalized Cancer Medicine developed the Methodological Framework for Early Health Technology Assessment and Decision Modeling in Cancer and practical guidelines in this field. Further projects included applications in the fields of sequential treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), benefit-harm and cost-effectiveness evaluation of prostate cancer screening, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of multiple cervical cancer screening strategies, and benefits and cost-effectiveness of genomic test-based treatment strategies in breast cancer. An interdisciplinary setting as generated in Oncotyrol provides unique opportunities such as systematically coordinating lab and bench

  5. Hypocentral Relocations of the 2008 Mt. Carmel, Illinois Aftershock Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, K.; Hamburger, M. W.; Pavlis, G. L.; Horton, S. P.; Withers, M. M.

    2009-12-01

    On April 18, 2008, a moderate sized earthquake (Mw 5.2, hypocentral depth of 16 km) occurred near the Indiana-Illinois state border within 3 km of the Mt. Carmel-New Harmony fault at the northern termination of the Wabash Valley Fault System. A total of 257 aftershocks were recorded over the next month by a fourteen-station temporary network deployed by Indiana University and University of Memphis/Center of Earthquake Research and Information (CERI). The number of recorded aftershocks is greater than aftershocks recorded from previous earthquakes in the WVFS of similar magnitude within the last 50 years. The number and density of local stations allowed the generation of precise hypocentral relocations with the combination of waveform cross-correlation and joint hypocentral techniques. The relocated hypocenters indicate a well-defined near-vertical fault plane striking east-west. The fault orientation is consistent with the focal mechanism of the main shock and nearly orthogonal with respect to the trace of the neighboring Mt. Carmel-New Harmony fault. The interpreted ruptured fault orientation suggests the aftershock sequence occurred on a transfer structure at the fault termination. The structure may be related to the change in deformation styles suggested by the transition from the northeast-trending WVFS to the northwest-trending La Salle anticlinorium.

  6. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center report to the Steering Committee. Final technical monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s Environmental Control Technology Center. Testing on the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet FGD unit continued this month with the Trace Element Removal test block (TER) as the Pilot was operated under forced oxidation conditions. With this testing, the mercury measurement (Method 29) studies also continued as investigations into various activated carbons, metal amalgams, and impinger capture solutions were conducted. Following these studies, a brief test of the Pilot High Velocity FGD configuration (PHV) was conducted. This test block will be continued at the end of the month after the Fall outage is completed. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode. During this month`s outage, the inlet and outlet damper plates were sealed to isolate the SCR system from flue gas. Also, the internals of the heat pipe heat exchanger (HPHE) and catalyst reactor tower were inspected and cleaned so that the system could be available for future test activities. Monthly inspections of all SCR system equipment placed in this cold-standby mode, as well as the fire safety systems in the SCR building, will continue to be conducted by the ECTC maintenance department and will include manual rotation of the booster fan.

  7. Purgeable organic compounds at or near the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maimer, Neil V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2016-05-25

    During 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, collected groundwater samples from 31 wells at or near the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Laboratory for purgeable organic compounds (POCs). The samples were collected and analyzed for the purpose of evaluating whether purge water from wells located inside an areal polygon established downgradient of the INTEC must be treated as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act listed waste.POC concentrations in water samples from 29 of 31 wells completed in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer were greater than their detection limit, determined from detection and quantitation calculation software, for at least one to four POCs. Of the 29 wells with concentrations greater than their detection limits, only 20 had concentrations greater than the laboratory reporting limit as calculated with detection and quantitation calculation software. None of the concentrations exceeded any maximum contaminant levels established for public drinking water supplies. Most commonly detected compounds were 1,1,1-trichoroethane, 1,1-dichloroethene, and trichloroethene.

  8. Tritium determination in aqueous samples by using LSC Quantulus in CDTN - Brazilian Development Center for Nuclear Technology, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temba, Eliane S.C.; Moreira, Rubens M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Meio Ambiente e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mails: esct@cdtn.br; rubens@cdtn.br; Mingote, Raquel M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Quimica e Radioquimica]. E-mail: mingote@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Tritium is the radioisotope of hydrogen which disintegrates by emission of beta particle to {sup 3}He. Its determination is important in several applications such as in oil recovery, where tritiated tracers are added to injection fluids, or in groundwater surveys, to estimate the recharging of aquifers, among others applications. Liquid scintillation spectrometry is an appropriate method for determining low-level contents of tritium in aqueous samples. We used a low background liquid scintillation system detector, Perkin Elmer - Wallac QuantulusTM 1220, recently acquired by Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN). The purpose of this work is the optimization of the counting performance for tritium determination in water samples by direct counting. For definition of optimum parameters we compare two cocktails, Instagel Plus{sup TM} and Optiphase Hisafe{sup TM} 3. The ratios of sample/cocktail studied were 8/10, 10/10 and 10/12. The stability of the sample/cocktail mixture was also analysed by the loss of mass and by the luminescence spectrum. The counting conditions were 60 minutes counts for each vial, in the selected counting windows 50-200 and 1-200 channels. The vial used was 20 mL polyethylene. For background estimation we used a very old water (dead water) from Thermas Antonio Carlos, Pocos de Caldas, Brazil. The good results obtained in national and international laboratory intercomparison programs indicate the excellence of the tritium analysis at CDTN. (author)

  9. Developing and Sustaining a Science and Technology Center Education Program: "Inquiry" as a Means for Organizational Change and Institutional Legitimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, T.; Hunter, L.

    2010-12-01

    Formal organizations have become ubiquitous in contemporary society and since so many of us spend so much of our daily lives working, learning, and socializing in them it is important to understand not only how they govern our interactions but also how we can incite (and sustain) organizational change. This is especially true for STEM education; learning about science, technology, engineering or mathematics rarely occurs outside of formal settings and educators need to be aware of how learning goals, priorities and practices are permeable to the institutional processes that structure sponsoring organizations. Adopting a historical perspective, this paper reports on organizational changes at the Center for Adaptive Optics in relation to an emerging emphasis on inquiry learning. The results of our analysis show how the inquiry model functioned as a boundary object and was instrumental in transforming members' expectations and assumptions about educational practice in STEM while securing the institutional legitimacy of the CfAO as a whole. Our findings can inform the advancement of educational initiatives within the STEM research community and are particularly useful in relation to concerns around accommodating and integrating individuals from non-dominant backgrounds.

  10. The Marketing Performance of Illinois and Kansas Wheat Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Sarah N.; Nicole M. Aulerich; Irwin,Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the aver...

  11. The Marketing Performance of Illinois and Kansas Wheat Farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Dietz, Sarah N.; Aulerich, Nicole M.; Irwin, Scott H.; Good, Darrel L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the marketing performance of wheat farmers in Illinois and Kansas over 1982-2004. The results show that farmer benchmark prices for wheat in Illinois and Kansas fall in the middle-third of the price range about half to three-quarters of the time. Consistent with previous studies, this refutes the contention that Illinois and Kansas wheat farmers routinely market the bulk of their wheat crop in the bottom portion of the price range. Tests of the aver...

  12. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Projects at NASA Glenn Research Center for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.; Morris, Jessica R.

    2015-01-01

    This document is intended to enable the more effective transition of NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) SBIR technologies funded by the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program as well as its companion, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program into NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) projects. Primarily, it is intended to help NASA program and project managers find useful technologies that have undergone extensive research and development (RRD), through Phase II of the SBIR program; however, it can also assist non-NASA agencies and commercial companies in this process. aviation safety, unmanned aircraft, ground and flight test technique, low emissions, quiet performance, rotorcraft

  13. Patient-centered applications: use of information technology to promote disease management and wellness. A white paper by the AMIA knowledge in motion working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, George; Afrin, Lawrence B; Speedie, Stuart; Courtney, Karen L; Sondhi, Manu; Vimarlund, Vivian; Lovis, Christian; Goossen, William; Lynch, Cecil

    2008-01-01

    Advances in information technology (IT) enable a fundamental redesign of health care processes based on the use and integration of electronic communication at all levels. New communication technologies can support a transition from institution centric to patient-centric applications. This white paper defines key principles and challenges for designers, policy makers, and evaluators of patient-centered technologies for disease management and prevention. It reviews current and emerging trends; highlights challenges related to design, evaluation, reimbursement and usability; and reaches conclusions for next steps that will advance the domain.

  14. An Analysis of Programmatic Variables Relating to the Pass Rates on the Licensure Examination by Practical Nurses in Tennessee Technology Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Janis Lee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative research study was to determine the degree to which Licensed Practical Nursing programmatic variables positively correlate with select Tennessee Technology Center institution pass rates on the licensure examination--NCLEX-PNRTM. This study investigated the relationship between the dependent variable of NCLEX-PNRTM…

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A TECHNIQUE OF DETERMINATION OF ECONOMIC BENEFIT OF ACTIVITY OF A CONGLOMERATE «THE INNOVATIVE-TECHNOLOGICAL CENTER OF DEVELOPMENT OF TRANSPORT SYSTEM OF UKRAINE»

    OpenAIRE

    Tolstova, A.

    2010-01-01

    In the clause the basic advantages of creation of an innovative conglomerate «The is innovative-technological center of development of transport system of Ukraine» are considered, the technique of determination of economic benefit of its activity is developed.

  16. Investigating "The Coolest School in America": A Study of a Learner-Centered School and Educational Technology in the Information Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Sinem

    2012-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to improve existing design theories for characteristics of an information-age school and roles that educational technology should serve for key stakeholders in such schools. In addition to this primary purpose, this study explored how learner-centered instruction and assessment were implemented in an…

  17. 78 FR 57921 - A.G. Volney Center, Inc. (f/k/a Buddha Steel, Inc.), China Green Material Technologies, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION A.G. Volney Center, Inc. (f/k/a Buddha Steel, Inc.), China Green Material Technologies, Inc., China Tractor Holdings, Inc., and Franklin Towers Enterprises, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading September 18, 2013. It appears to the...

  18. A soil moisture climatology of Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollinger, S.E.; Isard, S.A. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States) Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Ten years of soil moisture measurements (biweekly from March through September and monthly during winter) within the top 1 m of soil at 17 grass-covered sites across Illinois are analyzed to provide a climatology of soil moisture for this important Midwest agricultural region. Soil moisture measurements were obtained with neutron probes that were calibrated for each site. Measurement errors are dependent upon the volumetric water content with errors less than 20 percent when soil moisture is above 0 percent of soil volume. Single point errors in moisture measurements from the top 1 m of soil range from 6 percent to 13 percent when volumetric soil moisture is 30 percent of soil volume. The average depletion in moisture between winter and summer over the 10-year period for the top 2 m of soil in Illinois was 72.3 mm. Three-quarters of this decrease occurred above 0.5 m and only 5 percent occurred between the 1.0-m and 2.0-m depths. The average moisture decrease between winter and summer during a wet year (1985) and a drought year (1988) in the top 2 m of soil was 64 percent and 204 percent of the average for the 10-year period, respectively. Seasonal means in soil moisture averaged for the state show the effects of different seasons and soil types on soil moisture. In the winter and spring a latitudinal gradient exists with the wetter soils in the southern part of the state. During summer and autumn there is a longitudinal gradient with the wetter soils in the eastern half of the state. The longitudinal gradient is closely associated with the depth of loess deposits.

  19. Development of a use for Illinois coal concentrates for slurry fed gasifiers; Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, L.A.; Lytle, J.M.; Khan, S.; At-Taras, M.; Ehrlinger, H.P. [Illinois Dept. of Energy and Natural Resources, Springfield, IL (United States). Geological Survey

    1993-12-31

    The primary purpose of this project is to identify and test concentrates made from preparation plant fines as to their amenability as fee for slurry-fed, slagging, entrained-flow gasifiers. The high sulfur content and high BTU value of Illinois coals are particularly advantageous in such a gasifier. Elemental sulfur is recovered as a revenue-producing product in gasifier technologies, and the higher BTU Illinois coal concentrate requires less water to produce a pumpable slurry than western coal (30--35% vs 45%) thereby reducing the amount of heat lost in vaporization of entrained water. This means that 66 tons of Illinois coal concentrate, containing 13,000 BTU per pound, at 70% solids would provide as much net heat as 100 tons of 9500 BTU coal pumped at 54% solids. During the current reporting period twelve 55-gallon drums of preparation plant fines were obtained from a mine in Illinois. Part of the slurry was screened on 60 mesh to remove coarse material (about 9.57%) and the fines were used for preliminary flotation tests in a subaeration cell. Fifteen batch tests were conducted to establish flotation conditions for operation of the continuous flow column flotation unit. Varying the type and quantities of reagents, grades were recorded over 12,000 BTU and the recovery of combustible matter or BTU varied from 41.6% to 88.2%.

  20. A preliminary contaminant and toxicological survey of Illinois River sediments

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediments from 6 sites on the Illinois River adn its tributaries were analyzed for organic and inorganic contaminants. Relative toxicity of sediments was determined...

  1. Franchise Agreements and Clean Energy: Issues in Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project evaluates the impact on energy efficiency of municipal franchise agreements that supply electricity or gas service without a direct charge (unbilled energy) for certain municipal government facilities in Illinois.)

  2. Status of Older Adult Physical Activity Programs in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmann, Helen M.

    1984-01-01

    Physical fitness and recreation programs can be a deterrent to premature aging. State-funded physical activity programs for older adults in Illinois offer minimal benefits due to volunteer and untrained personnel. Results of this study are presented. (DF)

  3. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology Into Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate Projects at Glenn Research Center for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Glenn Research Center Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR)/(STTR) technologies into NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD) programs and projects. Other Government and commercial project managers can also find this useful. Introduction Incorporating Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR)-developed technology into NASA projects is important, especially given the Agency's limited resources for technology development. The SBIR program's original intention was for technologies that had completed Phase II to be ready for integration into NASA programs, however, in many cases there is a gap between Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) 5 and 6 that needs to be closed. After SBIR Phase II projects are completed, the technology is evaluated against various parameters and a TRL rating is assigned. Most programs tend to adopt more mature technologies-at least TRL 6 to reduce the risk to the mission rather than adopt TRLs between 3 and 5 because those technologies are perceived as too risky. The gap between TRLs 5 and 6 is often called the "Valley of Death" (Figure 1), and historically it has been difficult to close because of a lack of funding support from programs. Several papers have already suggested remedies on how to close the gap (Refs. 1 to 4).

  4. NETL to establish Dynamic Simulation Research and Training Center to promote IGCC technology with CO2 cpture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provost, G.; Zitney, S.; Turton, R.; Erbes, M.; Stone, H.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Liese, E.; McClintock, M.; Quintrell, M.

    2009-01-01

    To meet increasing demand for education and experience with commercial-scale, coal-fired, integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants with CO2 capture, the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is leading a project to deploy a generic, full-scope, real-time IGCC dynamic plant simulator for use in establishing a world-class research and training center, and to promote and demonstrate IGCC technology to power industry personnel. The simulator, being built by Invensys Process Systems (IPS), will be installed at two separate sites, at NETL and West Virginia University (WVU), and will combine a process/gasification simulator with a power/combined-cycle simulator together in a single dynamic simulation framework for use in engineering research studies and training applications. The simulator, scheduled to be launched in mid-year 2010, will have the following capabilities: High-fidelity, dynamic model of process-side (gasification and gas cleaning with CO2 capture) and power-block-side (combined cycle) for a generic IGCC plant fueled by coal and/or petroleum coke. Highly flexible configuration that allows concurrent training on separate gasification and combined cycle simulators, or up to two IGCC simulators. Ability to enhance and modify the plant model to facilitate studies of changes in plant configuration, equipment, and control strategies to support future R&D efforts. Training capabilities including startup, shutdown, load following and shedding, response to fuel and ambient condition variations, control strategy analysis (turbine vs. gasifier lead, etc.), representative malfunctions/trips, alarms, scenarios, trending, snapshots, data historian, etc. To support this effort, process descriptions and control strategies were developed for key sections of the plant as part of the detailed functional specification, which is serving as the basis of the simulator development. In this paper, we highlight the contents of the

  5. Energy policy options for Illinois. Proceedings. [26 papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-six papers presented at the Fifth Annual Oil Illinois Energy Conference are categorized into five sections, namely: An overview of U.S. and Illinois Energy Policy; Energy Policy; Conservation--Solar--Biomass and Solid Wastes; Energy Policy; Petroleum and Natural Gas; Energy Policy; Coal and Electric Utilities; and Economic and Consumer Concerns. One paper, A Perspective on Long-Range Nuclear Energy Options, by William O. Harms has previously appeared in EAPA 4: 1364. (MCW)

  6. Reticle decision center: a novel applications platform for enhancing reticle yield and productivity at 10nm technology and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, George; Bugata, Raj; Chiang, Kaiming; Lakkapragada, Suresh; Tolani, Vikram; Gopalakrishnan, Sandhya; Chen, Chun-Jen; Yang, Chin-Ting; Hsu, Sheng-Chang; Tuo, Laurent

    2016-10-01

    In the semiconductor IC manufacturing industry, challenges associated with producing defect-free photomasks have been dramatically increasing. At the 10nm technology node, since the 193nm immersion scanner numerical aperture has remained the same 1.35 as in previous nodes, more multi-patterning and aggressive SMO illumination sources are being used to effectively print smaller feature CDs and pitches. To accommodate such specialized sources, more model-based mask OPC and ILT have been used making mask designs very complicated. This in turn makes mask manufacturing very challenging especially for the defect inspection, repair, and metrology processes that need to guarantee defect-free masks. Over the past few years, considerable innovation have been made in the areas of defect inspection and disposition that has ensured continued predictability of mask quality to wafer and final chip yields. The accurate disposition of each mask defect before and after repair has been facilitated by a suite of automated applications such as ADC, LPR, RPG, AIA, etc. that work together with the inspection, repair, and metrology tools and effectively also provide the best possible utilization of the tool capability, capacity and operator resources. In this paper we introduce a new consolidated applications platform called the Reticle Decision Center (RDC) which hosts all these supporting software applications on a centralized server with direct connectivity to mask inspection, repair, metrology tools and more. The paper details how the RDC server is architected to host any application in its native operating system environment and provides for high availability with automatic failover and redundancy. The server along with its host of applications has been tightly integrated with KLA-Tencor's Teron mask inspectors. The paper concludes with showing benefits realized in mask cycle-time and yield as a result of implementing RDC into a high-volume 10nm mask-shop production line.

  7. User-Centered Design Groups to Engage Patients and Caregivers with a Personalized Health Information Technology Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Molly; Kaziunas, Elizabeth; Ackerman, Mark; Derry, Holly; Forringer, Rachel; Miller, Kristen; O'Reilly, Dennis; An, Larry C; Tewari, Muneesh; Hanauer, David A; Choi, Sung Won

    2016-02-01

    Health information technology (IT) has opened exciting avenues for capturing, delivering and sharing data, and offers the potential to develop cost-effective, patient-focused applications. In recent years, there has been a proliferation of health IT applications such as outpatient portals. Rigorous evaluation is fundamental to ensure effectiveness and sustainability, as resistance to more widespread adoption of outpatient portals may be due to lack of user friendliness. Health IT applications that integrate with the existing electronic health record and present information in a condensed, user-friendly format could improve coordination of care and communication. Importantly, these applications should be developed systematically with appropriate methodological design and testing to ensure usefulness, adoption, and sustainability. Based on our prior work that identified numerous information needs and challenges of HCT, we developed an experimental prototype of a health IT tool, the BMT Roadmap. Our goal was to develop a tool that could be used in the real-world, daily practice of HCT patients and caregivers (users) in the inpatient setting. Herein, we examined the views, needs, and wants of users in the design and development process of the BMT Roadmap through user-centered Design Groups. Three important themes emerged: 1) perception of core features as beneficial (views), 2) alerting the design team to potential issues with the user interface (needs); and 3) providing a deeper understanding of the user experience in terms of wider psychosocial requirements (wants). These findings resulted in changes that led to an improved, functional BMT Roadmap product, which will be tested as an intervention in the pediatric HCT population in the fall of 2015 (ClinicalTrials.govNCT02409121).

  8. Information and communication technology-enabled person-centered care for the "big five" chronic conditions: scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildevuur, Sabine E; Simonse, Lianne W L

    2015-03-27

    Person-centered information and communication technology (ICT) could encourage patients to take an active part in their health care and decision-making process, and make it possible for patients to interact directly with health care providers and services about their personal health concerns. Yet, little is known about which ICT interventions dedicated to person-centered care (PCC) and connected-care interactions have been studied, especially for shared care management of chronic diseases. The aim of this research is to investigate the extent, range, and nature of these research activities and identify research gaps in the evidence base of health studies regarding the "big 5" chronic diseases: diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, chronic respiratory disease, cancer, and stroke. The objective of this paper was to review the literature and to scope the field with respect to 2 questions: (1) which ICT interventions have been used to support patients and health care professionals in PCC management of the big 5 chronic diseases? and (2) what is the impact of these interventions, such as on health-related quality of life and cost efficiency? This research adopted a scoping review method. Three electronic medical databases were accessed: PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library. The research reviewed studies published between January 1989 and December 2013. In 5 stages of systematic scanning and reviewing, relevant studies were identified, selected, and charted. Then we collated, summarized, and reported the results. From the initial 9380 search results, we identified 350 studies that qualified for inclusion: diabetes mellitus (n=103), cardiovascular disease (n=89), chronic respiratory disease (n=73), cancer (n=67), and stroke (n=18). Persons with one of these chronic conditions used ICT primarily for self-measurement of the body, when interacting with health care providers, with the highest rates of use seen in chronic respiratory (63%, 46/73) and cardiovascular (53

  9. Illinois Energy Conservation Plan: documentation of DOE-U535-O-A calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-11-06

    This report presents data compiled on the estimated energy conservation achieved by programs included in the Illinois Energy Conservation Plan. Summaries are given for the following areas: thermal and lighting standards; state and local procurement standards; carpooling, vanpooling, and public transit; right turn on red; energy data information system; Homeowner's Extension Program; agricultural resource applications; Farm Energy Conservation Program; Commercial Industrial Program; Public Utilities Program; School Energy Management Program; energy management assistance to local government; Administration of State Plan; energy conservation information; energy management for state buildings; solar energy; waste to energy and resource recovery; intergovernmental coordination; community technology assistance.

  10. National Center for Engineering and Technology Education: The Overall Impact of the NCETE Is to Strengthen the Nation's Capacity to Deliver Effective Engineering and Technology Education in the K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailey, Christine E.; Erekson, Thomas; Becker, Kurt; Thomas, Maurice

    2005-01-01

    The National Science Foundation established the Centers for Learning and Teaching (CLT) program to address national needs in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) workforce. NSF recognized two problems, the large number of educators expected to retire over the next decade, and the growing number of educators inadequately…

  11. The Development of a Suburban Junior High School Learning Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Janet W.

    The purpose of the study is to present a descriptive report of the difficulties and successes in the first eight months of the development of a Learning Center in Northwood Junior High School in Highland Park, Illinois. The report is intended to contribute information which will be helpful to others whose task it is to develop Learning Centers.…

  12. Technological Innovation Relay Center Architecture Based on Grid Service%基于网格服务的科技创新驿站架构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付国亮; 潘郁

    2011-01-01

    In the development of innovation relay center, some problems such as "information island" , "barriers between the departments and regions" have been emerged, which blocked the function of technology information sharing and information transmitting of the network platform, not to mention the collaborative innovation of technology between production, teaching and research. The method of grid service has been adopted in this paper to set up the innovation relay center architecture in order to realize the sharing of technology information and the seamless combination of each regional innovation relay center. In this virtual grid environment, the technology solutions were provided to the user of the innovation relay in the form of service, the collaborative technology innovation by the government, enterprise, university, research center, intermediary agent and financial organ was completed either.%在创新驿站发展的过程中,暴露出“信息孤岛”,“条块分割”等问题,影响网络平台实现技术信息传播和共享的功能的发挥,更不利于产学研协同创新的实现.拟采用网格服务方式,搭建科技创新驿站技术信息资源共享的架构模型,实现网络内部信息的共享,实现各创新驿站资源的无缝衔接,在虚拟的网格环境下,以服务的方式向创新驿站用户提供技术解决方案,完成官产学研中金协同创新的全过程.

  13. NICADD scientists develop detector technology for International Linear Collider

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "Scientist at the Northern Illinois Center for Accelerator and Detector Development (NICADD) are celebrating the successful run of a prototype subdetector for the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC)." (1 page)

  14. Scenario-Based Performance Observation Tool for Learning in Team Environments Aerospace Crew-Centered Technologies (SPOTLITE-ACT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The insertion of new technology in the cockpit, especially "smart" technology designed to become an additional crewmember, will necessarily impact flight-related...

  15. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-02-01

    Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

  16. Energy Impact Illinois - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Daniel [Senior Energy Efficiency Planner; Plagman, Emily [Senior Energy Planner; Silberhorn, Joey-Lin [Energy Efficiency Program Assistant

    2014-02-18

    Energy Impact Illinois (EI2) is an alliance of government organizations, nonprofits, and regional utility companies led by the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) that is dedicated to helping communities in the Chicago metropolitan area become more energy efficient. Originally organized as the Chicago Region Retrofit Ramp-Up (CR3), EI2 became part of the nationwide Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) in May 2010 after receiving a $25 million award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) authorized through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The program’s primary goal was to fund initiatives that mitigate barriers to energy efficiency retrofitting activities across residential, multifamily, and commercial building sectors in the seven-county CMAP region and to help to build a sustainable energy efficiency marketplace. The EI2 Final Technical Report provides a detailed review of the strategies, implementation methods, challenges, lessons learned, and final results of the EI2 program during the initial grant period from 2010-2013. During the program period, EI2 successfully increased direct retrofit activity in the region and was able to make a broader impact on the energy efficiency market in the Chicago region. As the period of performance for the initial grant comes to an end, EI2’s legacy raises the bar for the region in terms of helping homeowners and building owners to take action on the continually complex issue of energy efficiency.

  17. Families in the Field: exploring northeastern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Kelda

    2017-04-01

    Northeastern Illinois topography is dominated by evidence of the Pleistocene: glacial moraines, kettle lakes, bogs, and of course, Lake Michigan - the fifth largest freshwater lake in the world. My high school students have grown up within this landscape and their familiarity provides a springboard for us to dive deeper into their understanding of continental glaciers and Ice Ages. However, these features have merely functioned as a background to their lives. My goal is to inspire, by having them stand in the field and imagine how it all would have appeared 11,000 years ago. For the past five years, the Geology teachers at Warren Township High School have been leading voluntary weekend hikes with our students and their families. The Geology teachers guide the hike with a more technical explanation of the landscape, and our students rise to the occasion as they share what they know with their parents, siblings, and peers. This opens lines of communication, increases student motivation, enhances the course material, and allows us to see on our landscape within the context of dynamic Earth systems.

  18. Data Center Energy Efficiency Technologies and Methodologies: A Review of Commercial Technologies and Recommendations for Application to Department of Defense Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    on the current IT demands , minimizing unnecessary idle server power consumption.  Replace traditional Hard Disk data storage for mobile and...prohibitive and still carry accuracy concerns if used to calculate quantitative metrics. 14 2.2 Right-Sizing throughout Data Center Lifetime When...Green Grid, " Quantitative Efficiency Analysis of Power Distribution Configurations for Data Centers," 2008. [142] T. Evans, "Humidification Strategies

  19. Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Tolbert, Scott; Curran, Tyler; Swanson, Michael

    2012-04-30

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has continued the work of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) Program Year 6 Task 1.12 project to expose hydrogen separation membranes to coal-derived syngas. In this follow-on project, the EERC has exposed two membranes to coal-derived syngas produced in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU). Western Research Institute (WRI), with funding from the State of Wyoming Clean Coal Technology Program and the North Dakota Industrial Commission, contracted with the EERC to conduct testing of WRI’s coal-upgrading/gasification technology for subbituminous and lignite coals in the EERC’s TRDU. This gasifier fires nominally 200–500 lb/hour of fuel and is the pilot-scale version of the full-scale gasifier currently being constructed in Kemper County, Mississippi. A slipstream of the syngas was used to demonstrate warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation using membrane technology. Two membranes were exposed to coal-derived syngas, and the impact of coal-derived impurities was evaluated. This report summarizes the performance of WRI’s patent-pending coalupgrading/ gasification technology in the EERC’s TRDU and presents the results of the warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation tests. Overall, the WRI coal-upgrading/gasification technology was shown to produce a syngas significantly lower in CO2 content and significantly higher in CO content than syngas produced from the raw fuels. Warm-gas cleanup technologies were shown to be capable of reducing sulfur in the syngas to 1 ppm. Each of the membranes tested was able to produce at least 2 lb/day of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas.

  20. Data center cooling method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  1. BMT Roadmap: A User-Centered Design Health Information Technology Tool to Promote Patient-Centered Care in Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runaas, Lyndsey; Hanauer, David; Maher, Molly; Bischoff, Evan; Fauer, Alex; Hoang, Tiffany; Munaco, Anna; Sankaran, Roshun; Gupta, Rahael; Seyedsalehi, Sajjad; Cohn, Amy; An, Larry; Tewari, Muneesh; Choi, Sung Won

    2017-05-01

    Health information technology (HIT) has great potential for increasing patient engagement. Pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a setting ripe for using HIT but in which little research exists. "BMT Roadmap" is a web-based application that integrates patient-specific information and includes several domains: laboratory results, medications, clinical trial details, photos of the healthcare team, trajectory of transplant process, and discharge checklist. BMT Roadmap was provided to 10 caregivers of patients undergoing first-time HCT. Research assistants performed weekly qualitative interviews throughout the patient's hospitalization and at discharge and day 100 to assess the impact of BMT Roadmap. Rigorous thematic analysis revealed 5 recurrent themes: emotional impact of the HCT process itself; critical importance of communication among patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers; ways in which BMT Roadmap was helpful during inpatient setting; suggestions for improving BMT Roadmap; and other strategies for organization and management of complex healthcare needs that could be incorporated into BMT Roadmap. Caregivers found the tool useful and easy to use, leading them to want even greater access to information. BMT Roadmap was feasible, with no disruption to inpatient care. Although this initial study is limited by the small sample size and single-institution experience, these initial findings are encouraging and support further investigation.

  2. 77 FR 33659 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Illinois; Consumer Products and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... more stringent than, EPA's national consumer products and architectural and industrial maintenance (AIM... products and architectural and industrial maintenance coatings at Part 223 of Title 35 of the Illinois... architectural and industrial maintenance coatings. (i) Incorporation by reference. (A) Illinois...

  3. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Illinois. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2012 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Illinois.

  4. 77 FR 8865 - Public Water System Supervision Program Approval for the State of Illinois; Tentative Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Public Water System Supervision Program Approval for the State of Illinois; Tentative Approval... State of Illinois submitted a primacy application for its approved Public Water System...

  5. Test and approval center for fuel cell and hydrogen technologies: Phase I. Initiation. Final report; Test- og godkendelsescenter for braendselscelle- og brintteknologier. Fase 1. Opstart. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, A. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Energy Conversion, DTU Risoe Campus, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of the present project was to initialize a Test and Approval Center for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies at the sites of the project partners Risoe DTU (Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Division), and DGC (work package 1). The project furthermore included start-up of first activities with focus on the development of accelerated life-time tests of fuel cell systems, preparations for standardization of these methods, and advising in relation to certification and approval of fuel cell systems (work package 2). The main achievements of the project were: Work package 1: 1) A large national and international network was established comprising of important commercial players, research institutions, and other test centers; 2) The test center is known in large part of the international Fuel Cell and Hydrogen community due to substantial efforts in 'marketing'; 3) New national and international projects have been successfully applied for, with significant roles of the test center, which secure the further establishment and development of the center. Work package 2: 1) Testing equipment was installed and commissioned at DTU (Risoe Campus); 2) A comprehensive survey among international players regarding activities on accelerated SOFC testing was carried out; 3) A test procedure for 'compressed' testing of SOFC in relation to {mu} CHP application was developed and used for one-cell stack and 50-cell-stack testing; 4) Guidelines for Danish authority handling were formulated. (Author)

  6. 7. Annual seminar of the scientific initiation of the Center for Development of Nuclear Technology. Abstracts; 7. Seminario anual de iniciacao cientifica do Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear. Resumos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    This seminar presents the Scientific Initiation Program developed at the CDTN - Brazilian Center for the Development of Nuclear Technology and focuses on activities of the sectors of: radiopharmaceutical production; radiation applied to health; waste management; structural integrity; environment; nanotechnology and nuclear materials; reactor technology; mineral technology; reactor and analytical techniques.

  7. 75 FR 18193 - Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...: Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC. e. Name of Project: Dresden Island Project. f. Location: U.S. Army Corps... Zdunich, Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC, 801 Oakland Avenue, Joliet, IL 60435, (312) 320-1610. i. FERC...

  8. 75 FR 62518 - Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Ready for Environmental Analysis and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Ready for....: 12717-002. c. Date filed: May 27, 2009. d. Applicant: Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC. e. Name of...). h. Applicant Contact: Damon Zdunich, Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC, 801 Oakland Avenue, Joliet...

  9. 75 FR 24937 - Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...: Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC. e. Name of Project: Brandon Road Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: U.S... Zdunich, Northern Illinois Hydropower, LLC, 801 Oakland Avenue, Joliet, IL 60435, (312) 320-1610. i. FERC...

  10. 78 FR 2436 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Illinois State Museum, Springfield, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Illinois State Museum, Springfield, IL AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Illinois State Museum has completed an... contact the Illinois State Museum. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below...

  11. 77 FR 23504 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Illinois State Museum, Springfield, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Illinois State Museum, Springfield, IL AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Illinois State Museum has completed an... contact the Illinois State Museum. Repatriation of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below...

  12. 77 FR 19937 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Mile 21.6, Illinois Waterway, Hardin, IL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-03

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Mile 21.6, Illinois Waterway, Hardin... Coast Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the Hardin Drawbridge across the Illinois Waterway, mile 21.6, at Hardin, Illinois. The deviation is necessary...

  13. First conference on ground control problems in the Illinois Coal Basin: proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugh, Y. P.; Van Besien, A. [eds.

    1980-06-01

    The first conference on ground control problems in the Illinois Coal Basin was held at the Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Illinois, August 22-24, 1979. Twenty-one papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB; one had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  14. Automating the Media Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  15. Symbol RFID Technology to be Deployed at United States Defense Logistics Agency’s Distribution Centers Worldwide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Symbol Technologies, Inc., The Enterprise Mobility Company, today announced that it had been selected by ODIN technologies, the leader in the physics of RFID testing, software and deployment, to support its recent contract win with the United States Defense Logistics Agency (DLA), the United States Department of Defense’s (DoD) logistics combat support agency that provides supplies and services to America’s military forces worldwide.

  16. The ConocoPhillips Center for a Sustainable WE2ST (Water-Energy Education, Science, and Technology): Lessons Learned from an Innovative Research-Education-Outreach Center at Colorado School of Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, T. S.; Blaine, A. C.; Martin, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    The ConocoPhillips Center for a Sustainable WE2ST (Water-Energy Education, Science, and Technology) is a testament to the power of collaboration and innovation. WE2ST began as a partnership between ConocoPhillips (foundation gift) and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) with the goal of fostering solutions to water-energy challenges via education, research and outreach. The WE2ST center is a training ground for the next generation of water-energy-social scientists and engineers and is a natural fit for CSM, which is known for its expertise in water resources, water treatment technologies, petroleum engineering, geosciences, and hydrology. WE2ST has nine contributing faculty researchers that combine to create a web of expertise on sustainable energy and water resources. This research benefits unconventional energy producers, water-reliant stakeholders and the general public. Areas of focus for research include water sources (quality and quantity), integrated water-energy solution viability and risk, and social-corporate responsibility. The WE2ST Center currently provides annual support for 8-9 Graduate Fellows and 13 Undergraduate Scholars. Top-tier graduate students are recruited nationally and funded similar to an NSF Graduate Research Fellowship (GRF). Undergraduate Scholars are also recruited from across the CSM campus to gain experience in faculty laboratories and on research teams. All WE2ST students receive extensive professional skills training, leadership development, communication skills training, networking opportunities in the water-energy industries, and outreach opportunities in the community. The corner stone of the WE2ST Center is a focus on communication with the public. Both in social science research teams and in general interactions with the public, WE2ST seeks to be "an honest broker" amidst a very passionate and complex topic. WE2ST research is communicated by presentations at technical conferences, talking with people at public gatherings

  17. Low Cost Propulsion Technology Testing at the Stennis Space Center: Propulsion Test Article and the Horizontal Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Mark F.; King, Richard F.; Chenevert, Donald J.

    1998-01-01

    The need for low cost access to space has initiated the development of low cost liquid rocket engine and propulsion system hardware at the Marshall Space Flight Center. This hardware will be tested at the Stennis Space Center's B-2 test stand. This stand has been reactivated for the testing of the Marshall designed Fastrac engine and the Propulsion Test Article. The RP-1 and LOX engine is a turbopump fed gas generator rocket with an ablative nozzle which has a thrust of 60,000 lbf. The Propulsion Test Article (PTA) is a test bed for low cost propulsion system hardware including a composite RP-I tank, flight feedlines and pressurization system, stacked in a booster configuration. The PTA is located near the center line of the B-2 test stand, firing vertically into the water cooled flame deflector. A new second position on the B-2 test stand has been designed and built for the horizontal testing of the Fastrac engine in direct support of the X-34 launch vehicle. The design and integration of these test facilities as well as the coordination which was required between the two Centers is described and lessons learned are provided. The construction of the horizontal test position is discussed in detail. The activation of these facilities is examined and the major test milestones are described.

  18. Immediate Feedback on Accuracy and Performance: The Effects of Wireless Technology on Food Safety Tracking at a Distribution Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goomas, David T.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of wireless ring scanners, which provided immediate auditory and visual feedback, were evaluated to increase the performance and accuracy of order selectors at a meat distribution center. The scanners not only increased performance and accuracy compared to paper pick sheets, but were also instrumental in immediate and accurate data…

  19. A study on organizational culture, structure and information technology as three KM enablers: A case study in five Iranian medical and healthcare research centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Iran-nejad-parizi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates organizational structure, culture, and information technology as knowledge management (KM infrastructural capabilities, and compares their significance and status quo in five medical research centers in Tehran, Iran. Objectives of this research were pursued by employing two statistical methods, regression analysis and Friedman test. Included in the study were 135 people (researchers and support staff from five medical and healthcare research centers of Tehran. A survey questionnaire including 23 questions was utilized to examine organizational structure, culture and information technology indicators. And another 12 questions examined KM effectiveness. The Friedman test indicated that in terms of their status quo, the three studied KM enablers are at different conditions, with organizational culture having the best (mean rank=1.79 and IT the worst (mean rank=2.14 status. Moreover, it was revealed by regression analysis that organizational structure is believed to have the most significant impact (Beta= 0.397 on the effectiveness of knowledge management initiatives, while information technology gained the least perceived impact (Beta= 0.176.

  20. From Ship-To-Shore In Real Time: Data Transmission, Distribution, Management, Processing, And Archiving Using Telepresence Technologies And The Inner Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, D. F.

    2012-12-01

    Most research vessels are equipped with satellite Internet services with bandwidths capable of being upgraded to support telepresence technologies and live shore-based participation. This capability can be used for real-time data transmission to shore, where it can be distributed, managed, processed, and archived. The University of Rhode Island Inner Space Center utilizes telepresence technologies and a growing network of command centers on Internet2 to participate live with a variety of research vessels and their ocean observing and sampling systems. High-bandwidth video streaming, voice-over-IP telecommunications, and real-time data feeds and file transfers enable users on shore to take part in the oceanographic expeditions as if they were present on the ship, working in the lab. Telepresence-enabled systematic ocean exploration and similar programs represent a significant and growing paradigm shift that can change the future of seagoing ocean observations using research vessels. The required platform is the ship itself, and users of the technology rely on the ship-based technical teams, but remote and distributed shore-based science users, students, educators, and the general public can now take part by being aboard virtually.