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  1. Probabilistic earthquake hazard analysis for Cairo, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Korrat, Ibrahim; El-Hadidy, Mahmoud; Gaber, Hanan

    2016-04-01

    Cairo is the capital of Egypt and the largest city in the Arab world and Africa, and the sixteenth largest metropolitan area in the world. It was founded in the tenth century (969 ad) and is 1046 years old. It has long been a center of the region's political and cultural life. Therefore, the earthquake risk assessment for Cairo has a great importance. The present work aims to analysis the earthquake hazard of Cairo as a key input's element for the risk assessment. The regional seismotectonics setting shows that Cairo could be affected by both far- and near-field seismic sources. The seismic hazard of Cairo has been estimated using the probabilistic seismic hazard approach. The logic tree frame work was used during the calculations. Epistemic uncertainties were considered into account by using alternative seismotectonics models and alternative ground motion prediction equations. Seismic hazard values have been estimated within a grid of 0.1° × 0.1 ° spacing for all of Cairo's districts at different spectral periods and four return periods (224, 615, 1230, and 4745 years). Moreover, the uniform hazard spectra have been calculated at the same return periods. The pattern of the contour maps show that the highest values of the peak ground acceleration is concentrated in the eastern zone's districts (e.g., El Nozha) and the lowest values at the northern and western zone's districts (e.g., El Sharabiya and El Khalifa).

  2. Seismic hazard assessments at Islamic Cairo, Egypt

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    Khalil, A. E.; Deif, A.; Abdel Hafiez, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Islamic Cairo is one of the important Islamic monumental complexes in Egypt, near the center of present-day metropolitan Cairo. The age of these buildings is up to one thousand years. Unfortunately, many of the buildings are suffering from huge mishandling that may lead to mass damage. Many buildings and masjids were partially and totally collapsed because of 12th October 1992 Cairo earthquake that took place at some 25 km from the study area with a magnitude Mw = 5.8. Henceforth, potential damage assessments there are compulsory. The deterministic and probabilistic techniques were used to predict the expected future large earthquakes' strong-motion characteristics in the study area. The current study started with compiling the available studies concerned with the distribution of the seismogenic sources and earthquake catalogs. The deterministic method is used to provide a description of the largest earthquake effect on the area of interest, while the probabilistic method, on the other hand, is used to define the uniform hazard curves at three time periods 475, 950, 2475 years. Both deterministic and probabilistic results were obtained for bedrock conditions and the resulted hazard levels were deaggregated to identify the contribution of each seismic source to the total hazard. Moreover, the results obtained show that the expected seismic activities combined with the present situation of the buildings pose high alert to rescue both the cultural heritage and expected human losses.

  3. Update earthquake risk assessment in Cairo, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Korrat, Ibrahim; El-Hadidy, Mahmoud; Gaber, Hanan

    2016-12-01

    The Cairo earthquake (12 October 1992; m b = 5.8) is still and after 25 years one of the most painful events and is dug into the Egyptians memory. This is not due to the strength of the earthquake but due to the accompanied losses and damages (561 dead; 10,000 injured and 3000 families lost their homes). Nowadays, the most frequent and important question that should rise is "what if this earthquake is repeated today." In this study, we simulate the same size earthquake (12 October 1992) ground motion shaking and the consequent social-economic impacts in terms of losses and damages. Seismic hazard, earthquake catalogs, soil types, demographics, and building inventories were integrated into HAZUS-MH to produce a sound earthquake risk assessment for Cairo including economic and social losses. Generally, the earthquake risk assessment clearly indicates that "the losses and damages may be increased twice or three times" in Cairo compared to the 1992 earthquake. The earthquake risk profile reveals that five districts (Al-Sahel, El Basateen, Dar El-Salam, Gharb, and Madinat Nasr sharq) lie in high seismic risks, and three districts (Manshiyat Naser, El-Waily, and Wassat (center)) are in low seismic risk level. Moreover, the building damage estimations reflect that Gharb is the highest vulnerable district. The analysis shows that the Cairo urban area faces high risk. Deteriorating buildings and infrastructure make the city particularly vulnerable to earthquake risks. For instance, more than 90 % of the estimated buildings damages are concentrated within the most densely populated (El Basateen, Dar El-Salam, Gharb, and Madinat Nasr Gharb) districts. Moreover, about 75 % of casualties are in the same districts. Actually, an earthquake risk assessment for Cairo represents a crucial application of the HAZUS earthquake loss estimation model for risk management. Finally, for mitigation, risk reduction, and to improve the seismic performance of structures and assure life safety

  4. Update earthquake risk assessment in Cairo, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Korrat, Ibrahim; El-Hadidy, Mahmoud; Gaber, Hanan

    2017-07-01

    The Cairo earthquake (12 October 1992; m b = 5.8) is still and after 25 years one of the most painful events and is dug into the Egyptians memory. This is not due to the strength of the earthquake but due to the accompanied losses and damages (561 dead; 10,000 injured and 3000 families lost their homes). Nowadays, the most frequent and important question that should rise is "what if this earthquake is repeated today." In this study, we simulate the same size earthquake (12 October 1992) ground motion shaking and the consequent social-economic impacts in terms of losses and damages. Seismic hazard, earthquake catalogs, soil types, demographics, and building inventories were integrated into HAZUS-MH to produce a sound earthquake risk assessment for Cairo including economic and social losses. Generally, the earthquake risk assessment clearly indicates that "the losses and damages may be increased twice or three times" in Cairo compared to the 1992 earthquake. The earthquake risk profile reveals that five districts (Al-Sahel, El Basateen, Dar El-Salam, Gharb, and Madinat Nasr sharq) lie in high seismic risks, and three districts (Manshiyat Naser, El-Waily, and Wassat (center)) are in low seismic risk level. Moreover, the building damage estimations reflect that Gharb is the highest vulnerable district. The analysis shows that the Cairo urban area faces high risk. Deteriorating buildings and infrastructure make the city particularly vulnerable to earthquake risks. For instance, more than 90 % of the estimated buildings damages are concentrated within the most densely populated (El Basateen, Dar El-Salam, Gharb, and Madinat Nasr Gharb) districts. Moreover, about 75 % of casualties are in the same districts. Actually, an earthquake risk assessment for Cairo represents a crucial application of the HAZUS earthquake loss estimation model for risk management. Finally, for mitigation, risk reduction, and to improve the seismic performance of structures and assure life safety

  5. Seroprevalence of HCV among Cairo University students in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmat, Gamal; Raziky, Maissa El; Nabeel, Mohammed M; Maher, Rabab; Zakaria, Zeinab

    2016-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly prevalent in Egypt. This work aimed at determining the seroprevalence of HCV among Cairo University students. The present study included 3,000 students from Cairo University, Egypt. Blood sample was obtained from each participant to be tested for HCV seromarker. HCV RNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out for those with positive anti-HCV. Overall prevalence rate of HCV antibody (anti-HCV) was 4.6%. It showed that the prevalence was relatively higher among females (86/1660; 5.2%) while males (51/1340; 3.8%) with no significant difference. PCR for HCV RNA was detected in 31.4% of the HCV antibody positive subjects (43/137). Which showed statistical significant difference between males (29/51) and females (14/86) at P = 0.001. Despite the prevalence rate reported in the present study was similar to anti-HCV prevalence among persons in the same age group, confirmed that HCV infection is detected among Cairo University students. J. Med. Virol. 88:1384-1387, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Human hydatidosis granulosus in greater Cairo, Egypt: with general review.

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    Ibrahim, Badawyia B; Haridy, Fouad M; Hegazi, Mamdoud M; Morsy, Tosson A

    2007-08-01

    In this study, human cases (41) of proved hydatidosis granulosus were obtained from Al Kasr Al Aini University Hospitals from 2000-2006. They were 22 females with ages from 8 to 70 years and 19 males with ages from 5 to 75 years. The highly infected organ was the liver. Infection in other organs as lung, spleen, brain, eye, pelvic and bones of upper and lower limbs were reported. Most of the hydatidosis patients were from governorates of Giza (24 cases), Qalyobia (7 cases), Cairo (5 cases), Bani-Swef (3 cases), Sharkia (1 case) and Demiatta (1 case). Biopsies of infected liver and lung were processed for the histopathological studies and photographed. The results were discussed on the light of work done before Egypt.

  7. Mucormycosis in Cairo, Egypt: review of 10 reported cases.

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    Zaki, Sherif M; Elkholy, Iman M; Elkady, Nadia A; Abdel-Ghany, Khayria

    2014-01-01

    We report on 10 cases of mucormycosis, as defined by The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer and Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) standards of invasive fungal diseases, among patients with a recent history of neutropenia, prolonged use of corticosteroids and treatment with immunosuppressants. They were all observed at the Ain Shams University Specialized Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, during the year 2010. These cases were categorized as 50% proven and 50% probable, with none considered to be possible mucormycosis. The median age of the patients discussed in this report was 50 years (range 22-68 years), of which 80% were male and 20% were female. Uncontrolled diabetes with ketoacidosis was noted in 60% of cases, while 40% of the patients had undergone liver transplantations. Pulmonary mucormycosis was the predominant presentation as it was noted in 80% of cases, but there was only 20% sinus involvement. Members of the genus Lichtheimia were the most common etiologic agents (40% of all cases), whereas Rhizopus ssp. were recovered from 30% of cases, Syncephalastrum spp. in 20%, and 10% of patients were infected with Rhizomucor. Liposomal formulation of amphotericin B (LAMB) was successfully used to treat all the cases described in this report. We concluded that the incidence of mucormycosis was relatively high during the study period in this one-center study and that additional studies looking into the diagnosis and the control of mucormycosis in Egypt are required.

  8. Acanthamoeba species in Swimming Pools of Cairo, Egypt.

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    Ahmad Al-Herrawy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The free-living amoebae Acanthamoeba spp. have been recognized as etiologic agents of amoebic encephalitis, keratitis, otitis, lung lesions and other skin infections mainly in immuno-compromised individuals. The purpose of this study is to detect the presence of Acanthamoeba in swimming pools in Egypt using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR method.Water samples were collected from 10 different swimming pools in Cairo, Egypt. Samples were cultured on non-nutrient agar for the detection of Acanthamoeba isolates that were confirmed by PCR amplification using genus specific primers. The molecularly confirmed Acanthamoeba isolates were morphologically identified to the species level.Members of genus Acanthamoeba were detected in 49.2% of the examined swimming-pool water samples. Morphologically, six Acanthamoeba species were isolated from the examined swimming pool water namely A. polyphaga, A.castellanii, A. rhysodes, A. mauritaniensis, A. royreba and A. triangularis. All the identified species of Acanthamoeba were molecularly confirmed to be related to the genus Acanthamoeba.The isolated species of Acanthamoeba could provoke variable degrees of infections to the swimmers. The culture method is cheaper and easier than PCR techniques that are faster for the detection of free-living amoebae.

  9. Screening for hypertension among adults: community outreach in Cairo, Egypt.

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    Abd Elaziz, Khaled M; Dewedar, Sahar A; Sabbour, Sahar; El Gafaary, Maha M; Marzouk, Diaa M; Aboul Fotouh, Aisha; Allam, Mohamed Farouk

    2015-12-01

    Studies have shown alarming levels of hypertension among adults in the Middle East. The aim of our study is to measure the prevalence rate of hypertension among adults in Cairo (Egypt), identify possible risk factors for the development of hypertension and assess the rates of undiagnosed and uncontrolled hypertension. Cluster sampling was utilized and the fieldwork was conducted by 12 teams; each team consisted of a house officer, community worker and senior epidemiologist. A formulated questionnaire that addresses risk factors for hypertension was filled by all participants. Also, weight and height measurements were done to calculate the body mass index. Blood pressure measurement was done by calibrated sphygmomanometers. Blood pressure measurement was done twice, and a mean recording was calculated. A case which recorded both systolic blood pressure of ≥140 and diastolic blood pressure of ≥90 was considered hypertensive. The study included 774 adult residents of Al-Waily District (Western Zone of Cairo) in late 2011 and early 2012. The mean age of the study participants was 46.5 (SD 17.9) years. Female subjects constituted 67.1% of the studied sample. The prevalence rate of hypertension in our study was 16.5% (95% confidence interval (CI): 13.9-19.3). The rate of hypertension was higher among females and three times higher among obese compared with normal or overweight adults. The prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension was 11% (95% CI: 8.4-13.9), and uncontrolled hypertension was 30% (95% CI: 24.2-37). Community outreach campaigns should be conducted regularly in the future for early detection of hypertension cases and proper health education about hypertension and its dangerous consequences. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Analytical Characterization of Rococo Paintings in Egypt: Preliminary Results from El-Gawhara Palace at Cairo

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma REFAAT; Hussein MAREY MAHMOUD; Atef A. BRANIA

    2012-01-01

    El-Gawhara palace (1813–1814 AD) is situated south of the Mosque of Muhammad Ali in the Cairo Citadel. This palace is an important example of the best early 19th century rococo decorations in Egypt. The present study reports some of the results obtained from the application of different analytical techniques to characterize some rococo paintings at El-Gawhara palace at Cairo, Egypt. The characterization of the studied paintings was carried out by means of optical microscopy (OM), scanning ele...

  11. Analytical Characterization of Rococo Paintings in Egypt: Preliminary Results from El-Gawhara Palace at Cairo

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    Fatma REFAAT

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available El-Gawhara palace (1813–1814 AD is situated south of the Mosque of Muhammad Ali in the Cairo Citadel. This palace is an important example of the best early 19th century rococo decorations in Egypt. The present study reports some of the results obtained from the application of different analytical techniques to characterize some rococo paintings at El-Gawhara palace at Cairo, Egypt. The characterization of the studied paintings was carried out by means of optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDS and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT−IR. The obtained results allowed the identification of the chemical composition, structure and the painting technique employed in these paintings. This methodology reveals some useful information on some rococo paintings dating back to the 19th century in Egypt.

  12. Annual Patterns of Atmospheric Pollutions and Episodes over Cairo Egypt

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    Y. Aboel Fetouh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nile Delta major cities, particularly Cairo, experienced stagnant air pollution episodes, known as Black Cloud, every year over the past decade during autumn. Low-elevated thermal inversion layers play a crucial role in intensifying pollution impacts. Carbon monoxide, ozone, atmospheric temperature, water vapor, and methane measurements from the tropospheric emission spectrometer (TES on board the Aura have been used to assess the dominant component below the inversion layer. In this study, time series analysis, autocorrelations, and cross correlations are performed to gain a better understanding of the connections between those parameters and their local effect. Satellite-based data were obtained for the years 2005–2010. The parameters mentioned were investigated throughout the whole year in order to study the possible episodes that take place in addition to their change from year to year. Ozone and carbon monoxide were the two major indicators to the most basic episodes that occur over Cairo and the Delta region.

  13. Detection of enteropathogens in fatal and potentially fatal diarrhea in Cairo, Egypt.

    OpenAIRE

    Shukry, S; Zaki, A. M.; DuPont, H L; Shoukry, I; el Tagi, M; Hamed, Z

    1986-01-01

    A 1-year study of the etiology of acute diarrhea complicated by severe (10%) dehydration, active bleeding, shock and cardiovascular collapse, pneumonia, acute renal failure, or seizures in infants under 18 months of age was performed in Cairo, Egypt. Of 145 infants, 19 (13%) died or left the hospital moribund; the remaining 126 patients were classified as having potentially fatal illness. A variety of enteropathogens were identified with approximately equal frequency in the fatal and nonfatal...

  14. Aerosol properties and associated radiative effects over Cairo (Egypt)

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    El-Metwally, M.; Alfaro, S. C.; Wahab, M. M. Abdel; Favez, O.; Mohamed, Z.; Chatenet, B.

    2011-02-01

    Cairo is one of the largest megacities in the World and the particle load of its atmosphere is known to be particularly important. In this work we aim at assessing the temporal variability of the aerosol's characteristics and the magnitude of its impacts on the transfer of solar radiation. For this we use the level 2 quality assured products obtained by inversion of the instantaneous AERONET sunphotometer measurements performed in Cairo during the Cairo Aerosol CHaracterization Experiment (CACHE), which lasted from the end of October 2004 to the end of March 2006. The analysis of the temporal variation of the aerosol's optical depth (AOD) and spectral dependence suggests that the aerosol is generally a mixture of at least 3 main components differing in composition and size. This is confirmed by the detailed analysis of the monthly-averaged size distributions and associated optical properties (single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter). The components of the aerosol are found to be 1) a highly absorbing background aerosol produced by daily activities (traffic, industry), 2) an additional, 'pollution' component produced by the burning of agricultural wastes in the Nile delta, and 3) a coarse desert dust component. In July, an enhancement of the accumulation mode is observed due to the atmospheric stability favoring its building up and possibly to secondary aerosols being produced by active photochemistry. More generally, the time variability of the aerosol's characteristics is due to the combined effects of meteorological factors and seasonal production processes. Because of the large values of the AOD achieved during the desert dust and biomass burning episodes, the instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF) at both the top (TOA) and bottom (BOA) of the atmosphere is maximal during these events. For instance, during the desert dust storm of April 8, 2005 RF BOA, RF TOA, and the corresponding atmospheric heating rate peaked at - 161.7 W/m 2, - 65.8 W/m 2

  15. Knowledge of periconceptional folic acid use among pregnant women at Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo, Egypt.

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    Al-Darzi, W; Al-Mudares, F; Farah, A; Ali, A; Marzouk, D

    2014-10-12

    Egypt has a high incidence of neural tube defects. Folic acid supplementation in the periconceptional period is known to lower the risk of such defects. This cross-sectional study aimed to measure the level of knowledge about periconceptional folic acid use among pregnant women attending for antenatal care at Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo, Egypt in 2012. Questionnaires were filled through personal interviews with 660 pregnant women. Of the respondents, 62.4% had heard of folic acid and 39.2% knew about the role of folic acid supplementation in prevention of congenital anomalies. Knowledge about using folic acid before and in the first trimester of pregnancy was highest among university-educated women and those working in professional occupations. Only 18.8% of women reported taking folic acid, and 8.8% had used it before conception. Awareness campaigns are suggested to improve knowledge about folic acid among women in the childbearing period in Egypt.

  16. Epidemiology of nosocomial infections and mortality following congenital cardiac surgery in Cairo University, Egypt.

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    El Tantawy, Amira Esmat; Seliem, Zeinab Salah; Agha, Hala Monir; El-Kholy, Amany Ali; Abdelaziz, Doaa Mohamed

    2012-08-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) have been associated with significant morbidity and attributed mortality, as well as increased healthcare costs. Relatively few data on congenital cardiac surgical ICU NI have been reported from developing countries. Little is known about the epidemiology of NI following congenital cardiac surgery in Egypt. The aims of the present study were: (a) to estimate the incidence rate and types of NI among children admitted to Pediatric Surgical Cardiac ICU in Cairo University Children's Hospital (Egypt) and (b) to estimate the mortality rate related to congenital cardiac surgery and identify its contributing risk factors. A follow-up study in the period between 1 January 2009 and 1 January 2010 included all patients admitted to the Pediatric Surgical Cardiac ICU in Cairo University, Abo El Reesh Children's Specialized Hospital (Egypt). Data were collected for each patient during the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative periods. Certain infection control procedures were carried out in certain months. Of 175 patients, NI were identified in 119 (68%). Poor hand hygiene was associated with increased NI in certain months of the study duration. NI were significantly higher at a younger age [median 9 (5-30) months, Plesions, prolonged cardiopulmonary bypass and ischemic times, NI, prolonged mechanical ventilation, prolonged central line insertion, and the use of total parenteral nutrition. Mortality among the NI patients was found in 44 of 119 (37%). On carrying out a multivariate analysis, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [PUniversity Children's Hospital (Cairo, Egypt). Early surgical interference, enforcement of proper infection control practices, especially hand hygiene, can reduce NI and trials for early extubation from mechanical ventilation might improve outcome following congenital cardiac surgery in pediatrics.

  17. Wireless mobile field-based GIS science and technology for crisis management process: A case study of a fire event, Cairo, Egypt

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    I.H. EL-Gamily

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless GIS services have been evolving from scientific and technological perspectives through the last two decades. These services include both the location-based services (LBS and the mobile field-based GIS. Whereas the former provides the user with the capability to access and query the already established enterprise geo-database, the latter enables the end user not only to access and query but also to update the geo-database by a near real-time spatial and non-spatial data. However, to establish a mobile field-based GIS facility, a concise system architecture should be designed. This architecture includes client-side components, wireless communication facility, and server components. The integration and automation of these components can provide the capability to collect, update, validate, and query the enterprise geo-database remotely in a near real-time mode. One of the potential fields of applications for the mobile field-based GIS is the crisis management process. A prescribed system has been previously defined as emergency response cycle for managing both the natural and the man-made crises. Three phases of the emergency response cycle are outlined which are the response and rescue phase, the recovery and reconstruction phase, and mitigation and preparedness phase. In each phase, various tasks are undertaken based on the type of the event. Selective tasks of the response and the rescue phase of the fire event occurred in the Sheraton Exchange Center have been chosen to check the validity of using the mobile field-based GIS for enhancing the performance of these tasks. These tasks are path selection and quick damage estimates.

  18. Antioxidant status in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) living in Cairo, Egypt.

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    Ashour, M; Salem, S; Hassaneen, H; el-Gadban, H; Elwan, N; Awad, A; Basu, T K

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant status in a select group of children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA), living in Cairo, Egypt. The plasma concentrations of albumin, ceruloplasmin, vitamin C, vitamin E as well as erythrocyte superoxide dismutase and whole blood glutathione peroxidase activities were all significantly decreased in the presence of JRA compared to those without JRA. Unlike these antioxidant factors, vitamin A and its carrier (e.g. retinol binding protein), which have very little or no antioxidant property, remained unaffected by JRA. These results suggest that the children with JRA are subject to oxidative stress.

  19. Prevalence of injuries among high school students in Eastern and Western parts of Cairo, Egypt.

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    Wahdan, Maha M; Sayed, Amany M; Abd Elaziz, Khaled M; El-Hoseiny, Mostafa M; Al-Gwaily, Mohamed M

    2016-12-01

    Injury is the leading cause of death and long term disability and a significant contributor to healthcare costs among children worldwide especially those aged 15-19 years. To determine the prevalence of injuries among secondary school students in Cairo, Egypt and to explore the associated risk factors for sustaining injury. A Cross-sectional study was conducted on secondary school students in eastern and western part of Cairo; self-administered questionnaire was used for assessing injuries sustained in previous 12 months and the associated risk factors for injury. The overall prevalence of injuries was 68.5%. Unintentional injuries were the most common injuries falls (50%) and burns (38.6%). Significant factors associated with sustaining injury were truancy, smoking, alcohol use, quarreling behavior, carrying weapon, threatened by weapon and verbal bullying. This study showed a high prevalence of injuries among high school students in Egypt which necessitates raising public awareness about the magnitude and burden of injuries among adolescents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Frequent transient hepatitis C viremia without seroconversion among healthcare workers in Cairo, Egypt.

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    Aline Munier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS: With 10% of the general population aged 15-59 years chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV, Egypt is the country with the highest HCV prevalence worldwide. Healthcare workers (HCWs are therefore at particularly high risk of HCV infection. Our aim was to study HCV infection risk after occupational blood exposure among HCWs in Cairo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was conducted in 2008-2010 at Ain Shams University Hospital, Cairo. HCWs reporting an occupational blood exposure at screening, having neither anti-HCV antibodies (anti-HCV nor HCV RNA, and exposed to a HCV RNA positive patient, were enrolled in a 6-month prospective cohort with follow-up visits at weeks 2, 4, 8, 12 and 24. During follow-up, anti-HCV, HCV RNA and ALT were tested. Among 597 HCWs who reported a blood exposure, anti-HCV prevalence at screening was 7.2%, not different from that of the general population of Cairo after age-standardization (11.6% and 10.4% respectively, p = 0.62. The proportion of HCV viremia among index patients was 37%. Of 73 HCWs exposed to HCV RNA from index patients, nine (12.3%; 95%CI, 5.8-22.1% presented transient viremia, the majority of which occurred within the first two weeks after exposure. None of the workers presented seroconversion or elevation of ALT. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: HCWs of a general University hospital in Cairo were exposed to a highly viremic patient population. They experienced frequent occupational blood exposures, particularly in early stages of training. These exposures resulted in transient viremic episodes without established infection. These findings call for further investigation of potential immune protection against HCV persistence in this high risk group.

  1. Dewatering using groundwater modelling in Al-Fustat area, Old Cairo, Egypt

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    Nagy A.A. Hassan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to find a solution for the groundwater uprising in Al-Fustat area – Old Cairo, Egypt. A 3-D finite Difference Model (Visual MODFLOW-Ver. 3.1 has been used to simulate the impact of different alternative solutions in order to select the best suitable one. The result of geophysical survey, twenty bore holes data, hydro-geological data and satellite images were used to construct and calibrate the numerical model of Al-Fustat city. Finally, the recommended solution is a combination of pumping wells and tile drains. The results of this solution indicate that using pumping rate of 200 m3/day achieves 2–3 m drawdown which meets the target.

  2. Assessment of patient safety culture among healthcare providers at a teaching hospital in Cairo, Egypt.

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    Aboul-Fotouh, A M; Ismail, N A; Ez Elarab, H S; Wassif, G O

    2012-04-01

    A previous study in Cairo, Egypt highlighted the need to improve the patient safety culture among health-care providers at Ain Shams University hospitals. This descriptive cross-sectional study assessed healthcare providers' perceptions of patient safety culture within the organization and determined factors that played a role in patient safety culture. A representative sample of 510 physicians, nurses, pharmacists, technicians and labourers in different departments answered an Arabic version of the Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality hospital survey for patient safety culture. The highest mean composite positive score among the 12 dimensions was for the organizational learning for continuous improvement (78.2%), followed by teamwork (58.1%). The lowest mean score was for the dimension of non-punitive response to error (19.5%). Patient safety culture still has many areas for improvement that need continuous evaluation and monitoring to attain a safe environment both for patients and health-care providers.

  3. A five-year analysis of the incidence of glomerulonephritis at Cairo University Hospital-Egypt.

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    Ibrahim, Salwa; Fayed, Ahmed; Fadda, Sawsan; Belal, Dawlet

    2012-07-01

    Our study aimed to obtain a comprehensive review of the incidence of biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis (GN) at the Cairo University Hospitals, Egypt, over the last five years. We analyzed the clinical and pathological data of all renal biopsy samples that were performed during the period from July 2003 to July 2008. Renal biopsy samples of 924 patients were referred for pathological assessment during the period of the study [437 male and 487 female patients; their mean age was 26.5 ± 14.6 years (range: 2.5-71 years)]. Focal segmental glomerulo-nephritis was the most frequent cause of primary GN (21.21%), followed by mesangial proliferative GN (18.93%), diffuse proliferative GN (13.96%), focal proliferative GN (12.77%) and membranous GN (10.93%). The results could be explained by the high incidence of lupus nephritis among the study subjects as well as the relatively young age of the study group.

  4. Road risk-perception and pedestrian injuries among students at Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt.

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    Ibrahim, Jehan M; Day, Hannah; Hirshon, Jon Mark; El-Setouhy, Maged

    2012-07-01

    Road traffic injuries (RTIs) constitute 45% of injury mortality in Egypt; 75% of these injuries are pedestrians related. Traditionally, research on road traffic safety has focused on the traffic environment and the vehicles. However, little attention has been given to road risky behaviors and perceptions of road safety by pedestrians as risk factors associated with high pedestrian injury rates. This study aimed to examine the relationship between road risk- perception, specific road behaviors, and self-reported pedestrian injuries among university students in Cairo, Egypt. A cross sectional survey was conducted among university students aged 18 to 24 years old at Ain Shams University in Cairo. Questions covered socio-demographic variables, injury episodes, road behaviors, road risk-perceptions, attitudes towards injury prevention, and road safety education. The survey was completed by 1,324 students. Two hundred ninety (21.9%) of the participants suffered from pedestrian injury during the past 6 months; of these, 28.9% were admitted to hospital or clinic as a result of the injury, 39.3% were unable to go to university or leave home because of the injury for a period ranging from one day up to one week. Participants were more likely to suffer from pedestrian injury when they did not always "look both ways to cross the road", whereas always "waiting for a green light" was protective. Students who "perceived it safe to cross the road from any point" or "did not perceive it to be safer to cross at a zebra crossing" were less likely to "look both ways" before crossing the road. Similarly, there was a positive association between road safety education and participants' road crossing behaviors. Inappropriate youths' road behaviors were significantly associated with pedestrian injury. There was also a positive association between road risk perception and road behaviors. This suggests that a behavioral approach together with modification of the traffic environment (such as

  5. Road risk-perception and pedestrian injuries among students at Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt

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    Maged El-Setouhy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Road traffic injuries (RTIs constitute 45% of injury mortality in Egypt; 75% of these injuries are pedestrians related. Traditionally, research on road traffic safety has focused on the traffic environment and the vehicles. However, little attention has been given to road risky behaviors and perceptions of road safety by pedestrians as risk factors associated with high pedestrian injury rates. This study aimed to examine the relationship between road risk- perception, specific road behaviors, and self-reported pedestrian injuries among university students in Cairo, Egypt. METHODS: A cross sectional survey was conducted among university students aged 18 to 24 years old at Ain Shams University in Cairo. Questions covered socio-demographic variables, injury episodes, road behaviors, road risk-perceptions, attitudes towards injury prevention, and road safety education. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 1,324 students. Two hundred ninety (21.9% of the participants suffered from pedestrian injury during the past 6 months; of these, 28.9% were admitted to hospital or clinic as a result of the injury, 39.3% were unable to go to university or leave home because of the injury for a period ranging from one day up to one week. Participants were more likely to suffer from pedestrian injury when they did not always "look both ways to cross the road", whereas always “waiting for a green light” was protective. Students who "perceived it safe to cross the road from any point" or "did not perceive it to be safer to cross at a zebra crossing" were less likely to "look both ways" before crossing the road. Similarly, there was a positive association between road safety education and participants’ road crossing behaviors. CONCLUSION: Inappropriate youths' road behaviors were significantly associated with pedestrian injury. There was also a positive association between road risk perception and road behaviors. This suggests that a behavioral

  6. GROUND PENETRATING RADAR INVESTIGATIONS FOR ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE PRESERVATION OF THE HABIB SAKAKINI PALACE, CAIRO, EGYPT

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    Sayed HEMEDA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The modern architectural heritage of Egypt is both varied and vast. It covers all nonecclesiastical buildings, important monumental structures (mansions, municipal buildings in the history of architecture, as well as more common buildings. They include houses (from mansions to simple dwellings, public buildings (schools, administrative buildings, hospitals, industrial buildings (factories, warehouses, mills, bridges, monastic dependencies (drinking foundations, gardens and any other modern structures that fall within the category of monuments and comprise the Egyptian cultural heritage. We present herein a comprehensive Ground Penetration Radar (GPR investigation and hazard assessment for the rehabilitation and strengthening of Habib Sakakini’s Palace, in Cairo, considered one of the most significant architectural heritage sites in Egypt. The palace is located on an ancient water pond at the eastern side of the Egyptian gulf, beside the Sultan Bebris Al-Bondoqdary mosque, a place also called “Prince Qraja al-Turkumany pond”. That pond was drained by Habib Sakakini in 1892, to construct his famous palace in 1897. Eight hundred meters of Ground Penetration Radar (GPR profiling were conducted, to monitor the subsurface conditions. 600 meters were made in the surrounding area of the Palace and 200 m at the basement. The aim was to monitor the soil conditions beneath and around the Palace and to identify potential geological discontinuities, or the presence of faults and cavities. A suitable single and dual antenna were used (500-100 MHZ to penetrate to the desired depth of 7 meters (ASTM D6432. The GPR was also used to detect the underground water. At the building basement the GPR was used to identify the foundation thickness and the soil - basement interface, as well as for the inspection of cracks in some supporting columns, piers and masonry walls. All the results, together with the seismic hazard analysis, will be used for a complete

  7. Indoor environmental corrosion of Ag-based alloys in the Egyptian Museum (Cairo, Egypt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingo, G. M.; Angelini, E.; Riccucci, C.; de Caro, T.; Mezzi, A.; Faraldi, F.; Caschera, D.; Giuliani, C.; Di Carlo, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the indoor environmental corrosion of Ag-based alloys after long-term exposure in a showcase of an exhibition room and in the open atmosphere at the Egyptian Museum of Cairo (Egypt). In order to simulate the corrosion processes that occur at the surface of archaeological artefacts, Ag-based alloys with chemical composition, metallurgical features and micro-chemical structure similar to those of ancient alloys have been purposely produced as sacrificial reference samples. Our findings show that corrosion phenomena on alloy surface are mainly caused by environmental sulphur and chlorine containing species that react in different ways depending on the exhibition conditions and on the alloy composition. This approach allows to identify the degradation agents and mechanisms that really take place at the surface of objects similar to ancient artefacts without the necessity of sampling them. Moreover, it is possible to get useful indications for the safe storage or exhibition of silver archaeological artefacts, their cleaning and conservation.

  8. A five-year analysis of the incidence of glomerulonephritis at Cairo University Hospital-Egypt

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    Salwa Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our study aimed to obtain a comprehensive review of the incidence of biopsy-proven glomerulonephritis (GN at the Cairo University Hospitals, Egypt, over the last five years. We analyzed the clinical and pathological data of all renal biopsy samples that were performed during the period from July 2003 to July 2008. Renal biopsy samples of 924 patients were referred for pathological assessment during the period of the study [437 male and 487 female patients; their mean age was 26.5 ± 14.6 years (range: 2.5-71 years]. Focal segmental glomerulo-nephritis was the most frequent cause of primary GN (21.21%, followed by mesangial proliferative GN (18.93%, diffuse proliferative GN (13.96%, focal proliferative GN (12.77% and membranous GN (10.93%. The results could be explained by the high incidence of lupus nephritis among the study subjects as well as the relatively young age of the study group.

  9. Detection, Characterization, and Molecular Typing of Human Mycoplasma spp. from Major Hospitals in Cairo, Egypt

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    Mirihan A. Metwally

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas are fastidious slow growing organisms lacking a cell wall and mostly isolated from the mucosal surfaces of the respiratory and genitourinary tracts. There is a dearth of information regarding clinical Mycoplasma spp. isolates among Egyptian patients. A total of 170 samples were collected from patients and apparently healthy personnel in local public hospitals in Cairo, Egypt. Isolation of Mycoplasma spp. was carried out using appropriate culture media and further identification was carried out by biochemical tests followed by serotyping using specific antisera. Confirmation was done by PCR for detection of different Mycoplasma spp. using genus-specific primers targeting 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Characterization of the antibiotic resistance and sensitivity pattern against different antimicrobials was carried out using disc diffusion test. The results indicated the presence of six Mycoplasma spp. in 22.94% of the samples. Mycoplasmas were detected more frequently in throat swabs than sputum. Mycoplasma pneumoniae was highly sensitive to macrolides and quinolones but less sensitive to aminoglycosides and tetracyclines. Molecular techniques were found to be of more rapid, highly sensitive, able to detect nonviable organisms, and cost effective. These results shed light on difficulties of Mycoplasma detection and the superiority of molecular techniques over culture.

  10. Algal control and enhanced removal in drinking waters in Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Dars, Farida M S E; Abdel Rahman, M A M; Salem, Olfat M A; Abdel-Aal, El-Sayed A

    2015-12-01

    Algal blooms at the major water treatment plants in Egypt have been reported since 2006. While previous studies focused on algal types and their correlation with disinfection by-products, correlation between raw water quality and algal blooms were not explored. Therefore, a survey of Nile water quality parameters at a major water intake in the Greater Cairo Urban Region was conducted from December 2011 to November 2012. Bench-scale experiments were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the conventional chloride/alum treatment compared with combined Cl/permanganate pre-oxidation with Al and Fe coagulants during the outbreak period. Addition of permanganate (0.5 mg/L) significantly reduced the chlorine demand from 5.5 to 2.7 mg/L. The applied alum coagulant dose was slightly reduced while residual Al was reduced by 27% and the algal count by 50% in the final treated waters. Applying ferric chloride and ferric sulfate as coagulants to waters treated with the combined pre-oxidation procedure effectively reduced algal count by 60% and better the total organic carbon reduction and residual aluminum in the treated water. Multivariate statistical analysis was used to identify the relationship between water quality parameters and occurrence of algae and to explain the impact of coagulants on the final water quality.

  11. Spectroscopic Characterization of Dust-Fall Samples Collected from Greater Cairo, Egypt.

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    Shaltout, Abdallah A; Allam, Mousa A; Mostafa, Nasser Y; Heiba, Zein K

    2016-04-01

    This work aimed to characterize dust-fall samples collected from street's trees in Greater Cairo (GC), Egypt, and its surroundings by different spectroscopic techniques, namely; X-ray diffraction (XRD), attenuated total-reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), particle-size analyzer, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray measurements. Samples were collected from 19 different locations inside and outside of GC. Quantitative phase analysis of the dust-fall samples was performed using the Rietveld method. Results showed that the most frequently observed phases in the dust-fall samples were calcite (CaCO3), dolomite (CaMg(CO3)2), gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O), and quartz (SiO2) with average concentrations of 39 ± 16, 8 ± 7, 22 ± 13, and 33 ± 14 wt%, respectively. The occurrence of these constituents referred to a combination of different anthropogenic and natural sources. The ATR-FTIR results are in good agreements with XRD data of the different observed phases. Based on the SEM and particle-size measurements, quantitative determination of the particle-size distribution was described. It was found that not only the large-sized particles are deposited but also the small-sized ones (PM10 and PM2.5). In addition, the particle size of the collected dust-fall samples varied from 0.1 to 200 µm with an average particle size of 17.36 µm; however, the particle size ranged from 2.5 to 40 µm predominated in all of the dust-fall samples.

  12. Genetic characterisation of multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica serotypes isolated from poultry in Cairo, Egypt

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    Mohammed Abdel-Maksoud

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food-borne diseases pose serious health problems, affecting public health and economic development worldwide.Methods: Salmonella was isolated from samples of chicken parts, skin samples of whole chicken carcasses, raw egg yolks, eggshells and chicken faeces. Resulting isolates were characterised by serogrouping, serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL production. Antibiotic resistance genes and integrons were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR.Results: The detection rates of Salmonella were 60%, 64% and 62% in chicken parts, skin, and faeces, respectively, whereas the egg yolks and eggshells were uniformly negative. Salmonella Kentucky and S. Enteritidis serotypes comprised 43.6% and 2.6% of the isolates, respectively, whilst S. Typhimurium was absent. Variable resistance rates were observed against 16 antibiotics; 97% were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, 96% to nalidixic acid and tetracycline and 76% to ampicillin. Multidrug resistance was detected in 82% (64/78 of the isolates and ESBL production was detected in 8% (6/78. The β-lactamase blaTEM-1 gene was detected in 57.6% and blaSHV-1 in 6.8% of the isolates, whilst the blaOXA gene was absent. The sul1gene was detected in 97.3% and the sul2 gene in 5.3% of the isolates. Sixty-four of the 78 isolates (82% were positive for the integrase gene (int I from class 1 integrons, whilst int II was absent.Conclusion: This study reveals the presence of an alarming number of multidrug-resistant Salmonella isolates in the local poultry markets in Cairo. The high levels of drug resistance suggest an emerging problem that could impact negatively on efforts to prevent and treat poultry and poultry-transmitted human diseases in Egypt.

  13. Combining active and passive seismic methods for the characterization of urban sites in Cairo, Egypt

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    Adly, Ashraf; Poggi, Valerio; Fäh, Donat; Hassoup, Awad; Omran, Awad

    2017-07-01

    The geology at Kottamiya, Rehab City and Zahraa-Madinat-Nasr to the East of Cairo (Egypt) is composed of low-velocity sediments on top of a rigid rock basement. Such sediments include the loose sands of the Gebel Ahmar formation, marl and shales of Maadi formation, in addition to sparse quaternary soil covers. Due to the contrast of the seismic impedance with the underlying bedrock, these soft sediments have the potential of considerably amplifying the ground motion during an earthquake. For the evaluation of site-specific seismic hazard, we computed the seismic site response in these areas by developing 1-D velocity models and derived average seismic velocities, including Vs30. To do that, we applied different active and passive source techniques, including the horizontal to vertical Fourier spectral ratio of ambient vibration recordings and multichannel analysis of artificially generated surface waves. A set of models representing the velocity structure of the site is then obtained by combined inversion of Rayleigh wave dispersion curves and ellipticity functions. While dispersion curves are used to constrain the uppermost low-velocity part of the soil profile, ellipticity helps in resolving the structure at the depth of the sediment-bedrock interface. From the retrieved velocity models, numerical ground-motion amplification is finally derived using 1-D SH-wave transfer function. We account for uncertainty in amplification by using a statistical model that accounts for the misfit of all the inverted velocity profiles. The study reveals that the different sites experience an important frequency-dependent amplification, with largest amplification occurring at the resonance frequencies of the sites. Amplification up to a factor of 5 is found, with some variability depending on the soil type (Vs30 ranges between 340 and 415 m s-2). Moreover, amplification is expected in the frequency range that is important for buildings (0.8-10 Hz), which is additional confirmation

  14. Characterization of virulent Listeria monocytogenes isolates recovered from ready-to-eat meat products and consumers in Cairo, Egypt

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    Maysa A. I. Awadallah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of some virulence genes distributed in Listeria monocytogenes isolated from ready-to-eat (RTE meat products and consumers in Cairo province, Egypt. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 beef luncheon, chicken luncheon and frankfurter beef (40 samples, each were collected from 10 different local shops situated in Al-salam city, Cairo province, Egypt. Stool samples were collected from 40 people who had the habit of consuming RTE meat. The suspected L. monocytogenes isolates were subjected to a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR for rapid speciation and virulence determination using primers specific for inIA, inIC, and inIJ genes. Results: Culture examination of all samples on Oxford media revealed presence of colonies characteristic to L. monocytogenes in 6 beef luncheon (15%, 4 chicken luncheon (10%, 1 frankfurter beef (2.5% and 1 human stool (2.5% samples. Species identity of L. monocytogenes was verified through the amplification of a 800 bp fragment with inIA primers in 2 out of 6 culture isolates from beef luncheon (5%, and 1 out 4 culture isolates from chicken luncheon (2.5% samples. Statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the occurrence of L. monocytogenes in different food samples examined (p>0.05. The virulence of these strains was ascertained by the presence of 517 bp and 238 bp fragments of inIC and inIJ genes, respectively in the isolates that contained the 800 bp fragment. The culture isolates obtained from one frankfurter beef sample, and one human stool sample were found negative by multiplex PCR for the presence of L. monocytogenes and its virulence specific genes. Conclusion: It could be concluded that L. monocytogenes are circulating in beef and chicken luncheon sold in Cairo, Egypt. Multiplex PCR is reliable for confirmation of L. monocytogenes. This study suggests the implementation of hygienic measures at all levels from production to consumption

  15. Medicolegal study of child sexual abuse in greater Cairo, Egypt, during a 7-year period: 2005-2011.

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    Elgendy, Ibrahim Sadik; Hassan, Nermeen Adly

    2013-12-01

    Child sexual abuse has gained public attention and has become 1 of the most high-profile crimes. This study aimed to determine the demographic and medicolegal aspects of child sexual abuse in greater Cairo, Egypt. This is a retrospective study from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2011. Data were collected from a Cairo medicolegal department and were statistically analyzed. The total number of cases was 1832 victims; 57.9% were males and 42.1% were females. Most assaults occurred in 2010 (16.2%) and 2011 (17.5%). The age group 6 to 12 years accounted for higher rate (49%), mostly in males (71.8%). A total of 83.3% of the victims belonged to low social class, and 72.3% of the victims were out of school. Only 1.9% of the victims had a mental disability. The crime scene was an unknown place in 78.1%. All offenders were males; most cases had 1 offender (82.5 %); and most offenders were extrafamilial (94.2%), of low social level, illiterate, unemployed, and between 18 and 30 years old. The unmarried offenders assaulted the females more than the males, whereas the married assaulted the males more than the females. A total of 5.8% were intrafamilial offenders; 62.7% of these cases were incest against girls and 37.3% were sodomy against boys. Clothes were normal in 48.8%. Anal assault (52.3%) and incomplete vaginal penetration (32%) were the commonest types. There was no significant relation between findings, investigations, and time. In conclusion, child sexual abuse in greater Cairo represents a problem. Therefore,forensic medicine should be a part of a multidisciplinary approach to prevent, investigate, and treat the problem.

  16. Effects of hand hygiene campaigns on incidence of laboratory-confirmed influenza and absenteeism in schoolchildren, Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaat, Maha; Afifi, Salma; Dueger, Erica; El-Ashry, Nagwa; Marfin, Anthony; Kandeel, Amr; Mohareb, Emad; El-Sayed, Nasr

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of an intensive hand hygiene campaign on reducing absenteeism caused by influenza-like illness (ILI), diarrhea, conjunctivitis, and laboratory-confirmed influenza, we conducted a randomized control trial in 60 elementary schools in Cairo, Egypt. Children in the intervention schools were required to wash hands twice each day, and health messages were provided through entertainment activities. Data were collected on student absenteeism and reasons for illness. School nurses collected nasal swabs from students with ILI, which were tested by using a qualitative diagnostic test for influenza A and B. Compared with results for the control group, in the intervention group, overall absences caused by ILI, diarrhea, conjunctivitis, and laboratory-confirmed influenza were reduced by 40%, 30%, 67%, and 50%, respectively (pabsenteeism caused by these illnesses.

  17. Changes in the Urban Spatial Structure of the Greater Cairo Metropolitan Area, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, A. A. M.

    2011-08-01

    Since the 1980s, rapid population growth and urbanization have become issues in big cities like Greater Cairo (GC). As a consequence of explosive growth, the living conditions of Cairo Metropolis deteriorate. Development trends of the last twenty years have increased general wealth and modernization, this sets out how GC megacity is creating an increased demand for land combined with environmental degradation. Planning a sustainable development of mega cities requires understanding of physical change of the main environmental drivers. However, this talk will be concerned with monitoring and analysis of dynamic environment changes to capture and refine the urban patterns in Greater Cairo Metropolis on the basis of pixel-based and object-based classifications. Satellite images (TM, ETM+, & Spot) of different dates and resolutions, and ground truth data collected from available maps, field observation, and personal experience were used to execute the image segmentation analysis to reveal urban patterns and expansions. By using Erdas Imagine, and eCognition Developer software, land use/land cover image classifications were constructed, which detect regimes and trends in land changes. Two main types of urban patterns could be detected (passing from centre to periphery). The first one is informal and the second one is formal building. The informal type mainly comprises slums and urban encroachment on arable land. The formal one mostly consists of new cities and legal houses. Moreover, a rate of land cover changes in Greater Cairo during the last three decades could be described as a rapid progression. In contrast, the combination between field observations and classification analyses showed that the high urban densities based on classification of satellite images does not reflect the real densities of population in urban areas in Greater Cairo.

  18. Prevalence of stuttering in primary school children in Cairo-Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Ella, Mahmoud; Saleh, Marwa; Habil, Ihab; El Sawy, Mohammed; El Assal, Lamia

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of stuttering among primary school children in Cairo. A cross-sectional design was employed. Using a multi-stage random sample from 10 schools in Cairo, a total of 8765 primary school students were enrolled in the study. The teacher referring method was initially used to detect stuttering students, which was then confirmed by a Speech Language Pathologist (SLP) using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria. Personal data were collected for all students and separate questionnaires were administered to the parents of each stuttering child, inquiring about consanguinity, family history, presence of other disorders and family attitudes towards the child. Prevalence of stuttering among primary school children in Cairo was 1.03%. The prevalence of stuttering showed a declining trend in the older age group. Stuttering was 7-fold more prevalent among left-handed students. Males had a higher prevalence of stuttering, but didn't reach statistical significance. Anxiety was expressed in 25% of the families of affected children. Positive family history was found in 28% of cases, mainly among first-degree relatives. The current study showed a prevalence of stuttering comparable to other areas of the world with some evidence of hereditary background, although lower than that reported by other studies.

  19. All Eyes on Egypt: Islam and the Medical Use of Dead Bodies Amidst Cairo's Political Unrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, Sherine

    2016-01-01

    Using dead bodies for medical purposes has long been considered taboo in Egypt. Public health campaigns, physicians' pleas, and the urgings of religious scholars all failed to alter public opinion regarding the donation of dead bodies either for instructional material or for therapeutic treatments. Yet in 2011, amid revolutionary turmoil in Egypt, a campaign was launched for people to donate their eyes upon death; this time, people readily signed up to be donors. Focusing on mass eye trauma that occurred in Egypt amid the political uprisings of 2011, I raise questions about when and why Islam can explain people's attitudes and behaviors, particularly toward death and medicine. The case of mass eye trauma in Egypt and citizens' reformulations of questions once jealously controlled by state-aligned doctors, politicians, and religious scholars unsettles the boundaries between 'religion' and 'secularism' in medical practice. [Formula: see text].

  20. Experimental Investigation Related To Some Predicted Results Of Reliable High Frequency Radio Communication Links Between Benghazi-Libya And Cairo-Egypt.

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    Mohamed Yousef Ahmed Abou-Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the central radio propagation laboratory (CRPL method of ionospheric prediction of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS in U.S.A was used in practical calculations of the optimal working frequencies for reliable high frequency (HF radio communication links between Benghazi-Libya and Cairo-Egypt. The results were drawn in the form of curves by using the computer. The computer was used to measure the received signal level variation of frequencies 11.980 MHz, 11.785 MHz which were transmitted with a power of 250 KW, 100 KW respectively from the Egypt Arabic Republic Broadcasting station in Cairo city, directed to the North Africa and South Europe regions. The measurements were taken during daytime's for winter (December, January& February and summer (June, July & August seasons.

  1. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

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    Tamer M Fouad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available

    The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate

  2. CLINICAL FEATURES AND CLINICAL OUTCOME OF ACUTE PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA PATIENTS TREATED AT CAIRO NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola Khorshid

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study reports the clinical features and treatment outcome of 67 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL presented to National Cancer Institute (NCI-Cairo, in Egypt from January 2007 to January 2011. The median follow-up time was 36 months. All patients were treated with the simultaneous administration of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA and anthracyclin. The treatment protocol was modified due to resource limitations at the NCI-Cairo by replacing of idarubicin with doxorubicin in most of the cases and the inclusion of cytarbine during the consolidation phase only in pediatric patients. All patients who achieved molecular complete remission (CRm after consolidation received two-year maintenance treatment with low dose chemotherapy composed of 6 mercaptopurine, methotrexate and intermittent ATRA courses. The median age at presentation was 29 years. There was a slight male predominance (53%.  Bleeding was the most common presenting symptom (79%. Most patients had an intermediate risk Sanz score (49% and 34% had a high risk score.  All patients achieved molecular CR at end of consolidation therapy with a median duration of 100 days. The main therapeutic complications during the induction phase were febrile neutropenia (42%, bleeding (18% and differentiation syndrome (11%. Five patients died at diagnosis due to bleeding, three died during induction chemotherapy due to febrile neutropenia (n=2 and bleeding (n=1 and one patient died during consolidation therapy due to febrile neutropenia.  The 3-year OS was 89% and relapse rate was 3%. Adapting standard AIDA treatment protocols to limited resources by reducing dose-intensity during treatment consolidation, using ATRA in the consolidation phase and alternative anthracyclin (doxorubicin may be a valid treatment option in developing countries. In spite of the increased incidence of high and intermediate risk score APL in our sample, we reported an acceptable CR rate, toxicity and OS.

  3. Qualitative interviews with non-national tuberculosis patients in Cairo, Egypt: understanding the financial and social cost of treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohiniva, Anna L; Mokhtar, Alaa; Azer, Ashraf; Elmoghazy, Esaam; Kamal, Eman; Benkirane, Manal; Dueger, Erica

    2016-11-01

    Limited data are available about the challenges of non-national TB patients undergoing long-term treatment courses in an urban setting. This study aimed to understand the financial and social cost of adherence of non-national TB patients in Cairo, Egypt as a means to inform the development of context-specific interventions to support treatment adherence. In 2011, 22 in-depth interviews were conducted with TB patients from Sudan, Ethiopia, Eritrea, Somalia and Djibouti to obtain qualitative data. Analysis was based on thematic analysis that aimed to identify recurrent themes and codes from the narratives. The study identified a number of factors that influence TB treatment adherence. Uncertain financial status due to limited or no employment was frequently discussed in interviews, which resulted in fear of not being able to support family, loss of pride, dependence on family and friends, fear of losing housing, food insecurity and limited food options. Respondents also feared infecting other household members and longed for opportunities to discuss their illness and treatment experiences with other individuals but their social networks were often limited. TB-related stigma was driven by shame and blame of infection. Respondents also believed stigma was based on their foreign origin. Stigma manifested in distancing and exclusion in various ways, resulting in isolation, psychological distress and reluctance to disclose TB status to others. Poverty-related factors and social context with a special focus on stigma should be considered when developing strategies for supporting long-term treatment courses for non-national patients in Cairo and other similar urban settings.

  4. Occurrence of keratinolytic fungi and related dermatophytes in soils in Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Y A; el-Din, A A; Hassanein, S M

    1992-01-01

    120 soil samples collected from various sites of Cairo were processed for the isolation of keratinophilic fungi by "ToKaVa" hair baiting technique. 22 species belonging to 6 genera were isolated viz.: Chrysosporium tropicum, C. indicum, C. keratinophilum, C. queenslandicum, C. merdarium, C. anamorph of Arthroderma curreyi, C. pannicola, C. lobatum, C. anamorph of Renispora flavissima, C. pseudomerdarium, Microascus mangini, Malbranchea gypsea, Ml. State of Uncicarpus reesii, Ml. State of Coccidioides immitis, Microsporum gypseum, Mr. distortum Mr. audouinii, Mr. fulvum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, T. terrestre, T. verrucosum and Epidermophyton floccosum. The frequency of occurrence of the isolated fungi was determined. Microsporum gypseum, Chrysosporium tropicum and Chrysosporium indicum were the most frequent species recovered from soil. Most species of keratinophilic fungi were isolated from university, public garden and zoo garden. The distribution of the isolates are discussed.

  5. Ecology of the mosquito larvae in urban environments of Cairo Governorate, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, Sherif E; Kenawy, Mohamed A; Abdel-Rahman, Hashim A; Gad, Adel M; Hamed, Adel F

    2012-04-01

    Mosquitoes were surveyed over one year period in two localities in Cairo representing different levels of urban planning: El-Muqattam (planned) and Abu-Seir (unplanned). Culex pipiens, Cx. perexiguus, Cx. pusillus, Ochlerotatus caspius, Culiseta longiareolata and Anopheles multicolor were the collected species at both sites. Mosquitoes were more common in Abu-Seir than in El-Muqattam, with larvae of the filaria vector Cx. pipiens accounting for 81% and 52% of recorded individuals at these sites, respectively. Five types of the potential breeding habitats were detected of which, the cesspits (El-Muqattam) and drainage canals (Abu-Seir) were the most common while springs in El-Muqattam and drainage canals in Abu-Seir were the most productive types. Both Cx. pipiens and Cx. perexiguus bred year round with peaks of abundance coinciding with higher temperatures.

  6. Assessment of groundwater quality using geographical information system (GIS), at north-east Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shahat, M F; Sadek, M A; Mostafa, W M; Hagagg, K H

    2016-04-01

    The present investigation has been conducted to delineate the hydrogeochemical and environmental factors that control the water quality of the groundwater resources in the north-east of Cairo. A complementary approach based on hydrogeochemistry and a geographical information system (GIS) based protectability index has been employed for conducting this work. The results from the chemical analysis revealed that the groundwater of the Quaternary aquifer is less saline than that of the Miocene aquifer and the main factors that control the groundwater salinity in the studied area are primarily related to the genesis of the original recharging water modified after by leaching, dissolution, cation exchange, and fertilizer leachate. The computed groundwater quality index (WQI) falls into two categories: fair for almost all the Miocene groundwater samples, while the Quaternary groundwater samples are all have a good quality. The retarded flow and non-replenishment of the Miocene aquifer compared to the renewable active recharge of the Quaternary aquifer can explain this variation of WQI. The index and overlay approach exemplified by the DUPIT index has been used to investigate the protectability of the study aquifers against diffuse pollutants. Three categories (highly protectable less vulnerable, moderately protectable moderately vulnerable and less protectable highly vulnerable) have been determined and areally mapped.

  7. Storm-generated accumulation of nummulite banks in Eocene of Cairo, Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aigner, T.

    1983-03-01

    Nummulite banks which are common in neritic and shelf-edge facies in many parts of the Tethyan Eocene have been mainly regarded as reef-type buildups so far. However, stratification and biofabrics of such banks in the middle Eocene around Cairo demonstrate the importance of physical processes in molding nummulitic sediment bodies. Initiation of a nummulite bank at the Giza Pyramids Plateau is localized by a preexisting paleohigh, inherited from Late Cretaceous tectonism. On this submarine swell (about 1 x 1.5 km wide), ecological conditions were optimal for a flourishing Nummulites gizehensis-community, resulting in greater sediment production than in adjacent environments. Growth of the nummulite bank into a sediment body over 30 m (98 ft) in thickness and more than 1 km (.62 mi) in length is strongly enhanced by mechanical concentration of nummulite tests into coquinal packstones. These are interpreted to be a product of storm-generated winnowing. Paleoecological evidence shows that nummulite banks are largely an in-situ lag deposit. Periods of nummulite settlement are episodically disturbed by catastrophic storm events, which result in winnowing and local accumulation of the heavier bioclasts. During shallowing, patch reefs and a back-bank lagoon formed on the landward side of the bank. This facies association may be regarded as a model for hydrocarbon reservoirs. The high intraparticle porosity in nummulite tests (54%) makes the banks a potential reservoir, while adjacent and overlying lagoonal mudstone and wackestone may serve as source and cap rocks.

  8. Grouting of Multiple Leaf-Masonry Walls: Application on Some Islamic Historical Monuments in Cairo, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed HEMEDA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Present study summarizes an overview on the available experimental and practical data and results from laboratory testing (ungrouted and grouted three leaf masonry wallettes in compression and in diagonal compression. On the basis of the experimental results, (A the structural behavior of the multiple leaf-masonry walls studied in details (b the parameters that affect the behavior of ungrouted masonry are detected and commented upon, and (c the behavior of grouted masonry studied in details. Particularly attention to be paid to large walls whose construction may comprise different kinds of materials. Such walls include cavity walls; rubble filled masonry walls and veneered brick walls which have poor quality core. Not only may the interior of the wall be less capable of carrying load but movement of the core material may also be a source of new stresses. As the experimental results show that the key parameter for the improvement of the mechanical properties of masonry is not the compressive strength of the injected grout, emphasis is given to ternary, as well as to hydraulic lime based grouts: those materials are expected to ensure durable interventions, they lead to a significant enhancement of the mechanical properties of masonry. On the basis of the experimental data on wallettes, as well as based on recent data from tests on grouted cylinders made of filling materials, simple formulae are drived, allowing for the strength of masonry to be calculated, and scientifically interventions processes and techniques had been applied to selected historical monuments in Cairo.

  9. A clinicoepidemiological study of esophageal cancer patients at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soumaya Ezzat; Hisham El Hossieny; Mohamed Abd Alla; Azza Nasr; Nagwan Anter; Ahmed Adel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purposes of this study were to (1) assess the clinicoepidemiological characteristics of esopha-geal cancer patients, (2) analyze the prognostic factors determining treatment failure and survival, and (3) evaluate the results of various treatment modalities for locoregional and disseminated disease and their ef ect on disease-free survival and overal survival (OS). Methods Clinicoepidemiological retrospective data from 81 esophageal cancer patients treated at the Na-tional Cancer Institute of Cairo between 2007 and 2011 were evaluated. Results The study showed that patients with esophageal cancer commonly present with local y advanced disease (87.7% had T-stage 3 and 12.3% had T-stage 4). There was a significant correlation between surgery and survival; patients who received radical surgery and postoperative radiation had a better median survival than patients who received radical radiotherapy (20 months vs. 16 months, respectively; P = 0.04). There was also a significant statistical correlation between radical concomitant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) and pal iative treatment. Patients who received radical NCRT had a better median survival than patients who received pal-liative radiotherapy (16 months vs. 10 months, respectively; P = 0.001). The median fol ow-up period for al patients was 7 months. The median OS of the whole group was 12 months. The OS after 1 and 2 years was 57.8% and 15%, respectively. Conclusion High-dose NCRT is an acceptable alternative for patients unfit for surgery or with inoperable disease. High-dose radiation is more ef ective than low-dose radiation in terms of local control, time to relapse, and OS. Further study using a larger series of patients and introducing new treatment protocols is necessary for a final evaluation.

  10. Geomechanical Investigations for Architectural Heritage Preservation. The Habib Sakakini Palace in Cairo, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed HEMEDA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The understanding of the geotechnical problems and failure mechanisms of stone structures of Sakakini palace (1897 AC entails a comprehensive study on the mechanical behavior of the stones and other construction materials. In addition to micro analysis, geological and geomorphologic interests, several investigations on stone deterioration and engineering geology were performed. First phase included more advanced techniques, which provided additional information on particular aspects of site deterioration and it included laser analysis (LIBS, electron probe micro analysis, micro XRD and XRF analyses, scanning electron microscope analysis coupled with EDX probing, transmission electron microscopy and grain size distribution analysis, permeability and pore size distribution of stone, mortars, core binders and other construction materials. Second phase included the determination of mechanical properties of building stones, such as compressive strength, modulus of elasticity, tensile strength, and shear strength. To obtain reliable values for these properties, a suitable number of samples should be extracted, prepared for testing, and properly tested. The test results are then analyzed to establish the investigated stone properties. The testing program includes extracting seven cylindrical cores from the basement stone walls of Sakakini’s mansion in down town Cairo. The objectives of the study are to provide a characterization of micro structures and the mechanical properties of the stones of Sakakini’s Mansion; The purpose of the present research is to provide recommendations regarding the strengthening and the safety of architectural heritage under long and short-term loading. For this purpose, a set of experimental tests and of advanced numerical analyses are to be carried out.

  11. Deterioration of the Floor of Interior Courtyard of Sultan Hassan Mosque in Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazel, Tarek

    The college- mosque of Sultan Hassan is considered one of the finest examples of Islamic architecture not only in Egypt but also in the East. Its open interior courtyard is paved with three different types of marble slabs. These marble slabs suffer from severe deterioration. Causes of this deterioration were determined accurately through the ocular examination of the courtyard and confirmed by the laboratory tests which were carried out on samples representing the three common types of marble used in the floor namely the white, the red and the black marble. Sun light and heat are the main deterioration factors and the consequent thermal expansion is the main property which led to the detected deterioration phenomena. Types and mechanisms of deterioration affected the floor were described and explained.

  12. Optimizing pain care delivery in outpatient facilities: experience in NCI, Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Khaled Abdel

    2011-04-01

    As a result of increasing waiting lists of patients attending National Cancer Institute of Cairo, we are faced to provide high-quality pain care service through our outpatient pain clinic. The program description presented here shows the capacity of a 24 hours/7 days outpatient cancer pain management service to provide rapidly accessible, high-quality care to patients with complex pain and palliative care symptom burdens. In addition, this model avoids inpatient hospital admissions. Pain clinics of cancer are committed to helping patients and families identify and implement the treatments necessary to achieve optimum functional ability and the best possible quality of life. These clinics also help to communicate and work with the family physician, surgeon, and other physicians associated with patient treatment. Cancer pain is complex in its causes, and affects all parts of the body. It involves the tissues, body systems , and the mind. Being multidimensional, it is never adequately addressed with unidimensional treatment. Pain management must extend beyond physical approaches to include the psychological, social, and even spiritual aspects of the patient. Effective integrated treatment fosters self awareness and teaches appropriate and effective self care. With time, complex issues are managed, pain is reduced, and the patient moves toward peak physical and psychological functioning. These goals can be achieved by providing the highest quality pain management services. Patients attending the clinic get treated medically for their physical ailments. Their emotional and psychological problems also need to be attended with an atmosphere of love and care. The mission of the highest quality service is to obtain customer satisfaction with reduction of cost in a multidisciplinary (or better interdisciplinary) approach. This can be reached by proper identification of the customers either internal or external, assessing their needs, and implementing plans for their

  13. Seasonal and spatial variation of atmospheric particulate matter in a developing megacity, the Greater Cairo, Egypt Egipto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zakey, A.S. [The Abdus Salam International Centre of Theoretical Physics (ICTP) Trieste (Italy)]. E-mail: azakey@ictp.it; Abdel-Wahab, M.M. [Cairo University, Department of Meteorology, Faculty of Science, Cairo (Egypt); Pettersson, J.B.C.; Gatari, M.J.; Hallquist, M. [Department of Chemistry, Atmospheric Science, Goeteborg University, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2008-04-15

    As an example of a developing megacity the Greater Cairo (GC) area in Egypt has been evaluated with respect to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) and lead (Pb). Particulate matter was collected during 2001-2002 in the two size fractions PM{sub 2}.5 and PM{sub 1}0 at 17 sites representing different activities (industrial, urban, residential and background condition). The PM concentrations were generally high, with yearly average PM{sub 2}.5 and PM{sub 1}0 values of 85 {+-} 12 and 170 {+-} 25 {mu}g/m{sup -}3, respectively. On an annual scale, the high PM levels were due to many sources that included traffic, waste burning and wind blown dust particles emitted from the desert outside GC and the Moqattam hill inside GC. On a seasonal scale, the PM concentrations were highest in the industrial sector during spring, the dusty season, due to the combined effect of dust storm events and anthropogenic emissions over GC. The lowest seasonal concentrations were recorded in the summer season at the background sites. There was a marked increase in PM levels during the period October to December due to burning of waste from harvested rice in the agriculture area in the Nile Delta (north of Cairo). The highest PM{sub 2}.5/PM{sub 1}0 ratio was recorded in the urban sector (0.59) while the lowest ratio was recorded in the residential sector (0.32). The PM{sub 2}.5 and PM{sub 1}0 samples were also analyzed for Pb in order to address the influence of different emission sources. The monthly average concentrations of Pb in both PM{sub 2}.5 (Pb{sub 2}.5) and PM{sub 1}0 (Pb{sub 1}0) varied between 0.4 and 1.8 {+-} {mu}g m{sup -}3 at the non industrial sites. The concentrations were significantly higher in the industrial areas, where concentration up to a maximum of 16 {+-} g m{sup -}3 could be observed. Both the high lead and PM concentrations measured are contributing to local environmental pollution. GC is subjected to high concentrations of particulates most of the year. There is no

  14. Teaching in Cairo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gary H.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author shares his teaching experience at Sadat Academy--a four-year business college located in Cairo, Egypt--where he taught business ethics and organizational behavior to 240 students. He also describes his students' behavior and how he was warmly welcomed by the people despite the fact the he is an American.

  15. Ecological Risk Assessment of Metal Pollution along Greater Cairo Sector of the River Nile, Egypt, Using Nile Tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, as Bioindicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael A. Omar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to evaluate seasonal metal pollution along Greater Cairo sector of the River Nile, Egypt, using wild Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, as bioindicator and to conduct a risk assessment for human consumers. Greater Cairo is the largest populated area along the whole course of River Nile with a wide range of anthropogenic activities. Effects of metal pollution on fish body indices were studied using condition factor (CF and scaled mass index (SMI. Metal pollution index (MPI showed that the total metal load in fish organs followed the follwoing order: kidney > liver > gill > muscle which gives a better idea about the target organs for metal accumulation. Metal concentrations in fish muscle (edible tissue showed the following arrangement: Fe > Zn > Cu > Mn > Pb > Cd. Metal’s bioaccumulation factor (BAF in fish muscle showed the following arrangement: Zn > Cu > Fe > Mn > Cd and Pb. The hazard index (HI as an indicator of human health risks associated with fish consumption showed that adverse health effects are not expected to occur in most cases. However, the metals’ cumulative risk effects gave an alarming sign specifically at high fish consumption rates.

  16. Radioactive contamination of the atmosphere of Cairo, Egypt, from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kameesy, S U; Salama, E

    2013-06-01

    Radioactive contamination in air dust particles of Cairo atmosphere from the Fukushima accident was detected by the gamma-ray spectroscopy technique. Analysis of the spectra obtained by using an High-Purity Germanium detector showed that there were some traces of (131)I and (134, 137)Cs. Estimate and study of concentration of those radionuclides were done over a period of about 5 months after the accident. Comparison with corresponding results in different countries all over the world has been performed.

  17. Physico-chemical characteristics of the mosquito breeding water in two urban areas of Cairo Governorate, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Kenawy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Certain physico-chemical characteristics of mosquito breeding habitats [temperature, pH, salinity, turbidity, dissolved oxygen (DO and nitrite] were examined relative to the distribution of mosquito larval species in two urban areas of Cairo Governorate namely El- Muqattam (M and Abu-Seir (A. Mean values and ranges of such characteristics for the reported mosquito species (Culex pipiens, Cx. perexiguus, Ochlerotatus caspius, Cx. pusillus and Culiseta longiareolata were reported. In conclusion, based on the significant correlations of the different characteristics with the abundance of the two common larval species (Culex pipiens and Cx. perexiguus, salinity and DO may be considered the predictor variables associated with the immature abundance. Considering altogether mosquitoes, there is an increasing presence from planned safe (M to unplanned unsafe (A habitats mainly due to turbidity and nitrite.

  18. Prevalence of common canine digestive problems compared with other health problems in teaching veterinary hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal M. H. Rakha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to ascertain the prevalence of common digestive problems compared to other health problems among dogs that were admitted to the teaching veterinary hospital, faculty of veterinary medicine, Cairo University, Egypt during 1 year period from January to December 2013. Also, study the effect of age, sex, breeds, and season on the distribution of digestive problems in dogs. Materials and Methods: A total of 3864 dogs included 1488 apparently healthy (included 816 males and 672 females and 2376 diseased dogs (included 1542 males and 834 females were registered for age, sex, breed, and the main complaint from their owners. A complete history and detailed clinical examination of each case were applied to the aids of radiographic, ultrasonographic, and endoscopic examination tools. Fecal examination was applied for each admitted case. Rapid tests for parvovirus and canine distemper virus detection were also performed. Results: A five digestive problems were commonly recorded including vomiting, diarrhea, concurrent vomiting with diarrhea, anorexia, and constipation with a prevalence (% of 13.6, 19.1, 10.1, 13.1, and 0.5 respectively while that of dermatological, respiratory, urinary, neurological, cardiovascular, auditory, and ocular problems was 27.9, 10.5, 3.3, 0.84, 0.4, 0.25, and 0.17 (% respectively. This prevalence was obtained on the basis of the diseased cases. Age and breed had a significant effect on the distribution of digestive problems in dogs (p0.05 on the distribution of such problems. Conclusion: Digestive problems were the highest recorded problems among dogs, and this was the first records for such problems among dogs in Egypt. Age, gender, and breeds had a significant effect on the distribution of the digestive problems in dogs while season had a non-significant effect on the distribution of such problems. The present data enable veterinarians in Egypt to ascertain their needs for diagnostic tools

  19. Evaluation of daily intake for some elements of radiation protection concern by inhabitants of Greater Cairo Area, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H.E. Monged

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of K, Ca, U, Th, Cs, Sr, I, Al, Cd, Cu, Mn, Pb, Ni, Zn and Cr were determined in common foodstuffs consumed by adult inhabitants of Greater Cairo Area (GCA. Some of these elements have chemical and biological similarity to some of the radionuclides abundantly encountered during nuclear power production and therefore data on these elements could provide important information on their biokinetic behavior. A total of 120 samples were analyzed using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS. Highest contributions for the intake of micronutrients (Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn arise from broad bean, rice and wheat flour consumption. Meat, milk, eggs and some vegetables are the major sources of K, Ca, U, Th, Cs, Al, Cd and Pb intake. The medium daily intakes for the adult inhabitants of GCA from the analyzed elements were reported. The lower daily intake of Ca, Th, Cs and I by adult inhabitants of GCA could be due to significantly lower consumption of milk and milk products. The significantly lower intake of calcium by adult inhabitants of GCA may lead to higher uptake of radiostrontium and could result in perhaps higher internal radiation dose. The lower intake values obtained for thorium and uranium, which suggests that radiation dose from their ingestion at natural background levels, is likely to be lower than what may be concluded from International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP data. Concerning micronutrients, the recommended values of daily intake of Cu and Mn are conveniently supplied by diet; however, for Cr and Zn they are lower than the recommended daily allowance. Due to high metals concentrations and consumption rates, broad bean is the foodstuff that provided the highest ingestion rates of Cu, Mn, Ni and Zn, being therefore a very important source of micronutrients.

  20. Cancer Screening Knowledge and Attitudes of Under- and Post-Graduate Students at Kasr Al Ainy School of Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedrak, Amal Samir; Galal, Yasmine Samir; Amin, Tarek Tawfik

    2016-01-01

    Increasing knowledge and awareness of cancer screening significantly influence health promotion behavior which could markedly reduce incidence rates. In many countries, health care providers are the principal source of information concerning cancer screening. This study was carried out to assess the level of knowledge concerning cancer screening among medical students, house officers and residents and to explore their attitude towards cancer screening practices. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Kasr Al Ainy Medical School at Cairo University in Egypt, with 300 undergraduate medical students and 150 postgraduates (interns and residents) enrolled. A pre-tested self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from the study participants regarding personal and education-related information, knowledge about cancer screening and its sources, and attitude towards cancer screening. More than 64% of participants had knowledge scores of ≤ 10 points (out of 24). The total knowledge score (out of 6 points) for breast cancer screening increased from 1.9±1.0 to 2.3±1.2 and 2.4±1.1 for 4th, 5th and 6th year respectively, interns showed the highest score of 2.6 ±1.1, P= 0.001. Year of enrollment at medical school was a significant positive predictor of acquiring knowledge about cancer screening (post graduate vs. undergraduate students) (OR= 1.30, C.I =1.01-1.63), lack of or none receiving of orientation/training about cancer screening was the sole negative significant predictor for proper knowledge about cancer screening (OR=0.50, C.I=0.31-0.82). Over 92% of students agreed that they had insufficient knowledge about cancer screening, 88.2% appraised the need to have enough knowledge in order to direct/advice patients, relatives and friends, and 93.7% required that the faculty should emphasize the importance of cancer screening in the delivered curricula at medical school. A relatively low to moderate level of knowledge about cancer screening was detected

  1. Simultaneous detection of Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia duodenalis and cryptosporidia by immunochromatographic assay in stool samples from patients living in the Greater Cairo Region, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banisch, Dagmar M; El-Badry, Ayman; Klinnert, Jorge V; Ignatius, Ralf; El-Dib, Nadia

    2015-08-01

    Gastrointestinal infection due to intestinal parasites is an enormous health problem in developing countries and its reliable diagnosis is demanding. Therefore, this study aimed at evaluating a commercially available immunochromatographic assay (ICA) for the detection of cryptosporidia, Giardia duodenalis, and Entamoeba histolytica/dispar for its usefulness in the Greater Cairo Region, Egypt. Stool samples of 104 patients who presented between October 2012 and March 2013 with gastrointestinal symptoms or for the exclusion of parasites at Kasr-Al-Ainy University Medical School were examined by light microscopy of wet mounts and the triple ICA. Microscopy revealed in 20% of the patients [95% confidence interval (CI), 13.5-29.0%] parasites with Hymenolepis nana, E. histolytica/dispar and Blastocystis hominis being the most frequent ones, but was not able to detect G. duodenalis and cryptosporidia, whereas ICA was positive in 21% (95% CI, 14.3-30.0%) and detected E. histolytica/dispar in 12.5% (95% CI, 7.3-20.4%), cryptosporidia in 6.7% (95% CI, 3.1-13.5%) and G. duodenalis in 15.4% (95% CI, 9.6-23.6%) of the patients. Detection of one or more pathogens was associated with access to water retrieved from a well or pump (p = 0.01). Patients between 20 and 29 years of age (p = 0.08) and patients with symptoms of 5 days or longer (p = 0.07) tended to have a higher risk to be infected than patients of other age groups or with shorter-lasting symptoms. In conclusion, the ICA was easy to perform and timesaving. Importantly, it enabled the detection of cryptosporidia, which cannot be found microscopically in unstained smears, demonstrated a higher sensitivity for the detection of G. duodenalis than microscopy, and was more specific for distinguishing E. histolytica/dispar from apathogenic amoeba.

  2. Lead concentrations in Hymenolepis diminuta adults and Taenia taeniaeformis larvae compared to their rat hosts (Rattus norvegicus) sampled from the city of Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sures, B; Scheible, T; Bashtar, A R; Taraschewski, H

    2003-11-01

    Concentrations of lead, determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry, were compared between the cestodes Hymenolepis diminuta and Taenia taeniaeformis and its host rat (Rattus norvegicus). Rats were sampled at 2 sites, which differed in respect to lead pollution as quantified from road dust, adjacent to the city of Cairo, Egypt. Comparing lead levels among host tissues and the parasites the significantly highest accumulation was found in H. diminuta, followed by rat kidney and larvae of T. taeniaeformis. Calculation of bioconcentration factors showed that H. diminuta contained 36-, 29-, 6- and 6-fold higher lead levels than intestinal wall, liver, kidney and larvae of T. taeniaeformis, at the more polluted site. At the less contaminated site lead bioconcentration factors for H. diminuta were found to be 87, 87 and 11 referred to intestine, liver and kidney of the host. Due to a high variability of the lead concentrations in H. diminuta it was not possible to indicate differences in metal pollution between both sampling sites. This variability may be influenced by different age structures of cestode infrapopulations. It is likely that younger worms contain lower metal levels than older worms due to a shorter exposure period. Thus, it is necessary to standardize the sampling of worms which should be used for indication purposes. Due to a lack of adequate sentinel species in terrestrial habitats more studies are required to validate and standardize the use of helminths as accumulation bioindicators in order to obtain mean values with low standard deviations. The host-parasite system rat-H. diminuta appears to be a useful and promising bioindication system at least for lead in urban ecosystems as rats as well as the tapeworm are globally distributed and easily accessible.

  3. The 1st Euro-Mediterranean Workshop: Natural Products in Health and Diseases: Cairo, Egypt, March 2, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal D. Moudgil

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural plant products have been used for centuries for health maintenance and treatment of a variety of diseases in various traditional systems of medicine in Egypt and other African countries, India, China, and other countries around the world. Over the past several decades, the popularity of herbal and other natural products has gradually increased in many western countries. Despite the increasing popularity of natural products, both the public and the professionals are skeptical about the use of these products. Reasons for this skepticism include, but are not limited to, the lack of proper documentation about the source and formulations used; standardization of the composition, batch-to-batch consistency, documented safety of herbal products; and information about the mechanisms of action of these products. The 1st Euro-Mediterranean Workshop: Natural Products in Health and Diseases was organized by the Euro-Mediterranean Association of Life Sciences (EMALS and various other local organizations to review and discuss the above-mentioned strengths and limitations of the use of natural products. The aim of this workshop was to share best practices and expertise about natural products, and to identify opportunities for collaboration among researchers, health professionals, and business personnel in a productive atmosphere.

  4. Sustainable business and clean technology markets in megacities : an explorative research of their dynamics in Cairo and Mexico City

    OpenAIRE

    Mejía-Dugand, Santiago; Hjelm, Olof; Baas, Leenard

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the results of a research project on environmental technology diffusion and the dynamics of business arenas within the sector, with two megacities as case studies: Mexico City and Cairo. The term “environmental technologies” is used in a broad sense, referring to technological solutions that contribute to the improvement of the environmental performance of cities. With this in mind, a focus on the demand side (i.e. the cities) is the point of departure, and a bottom-up ap...

  5. Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    Attention in this discussion of Egypt is directed to the following: geography; the people; history; government and political conditions; the economy; defense; foreign relations; and relations between Egypt and the US. The population totaled 50.5 million in 1986 with an annual growth rate of 2.8%. The infant mortality rate is 102/1000 (1986), and life expectancy is 58.3 years. Located in the northeastern corner of Africa, Egypt has a land area of about 1 million square kilometers and is bounded by the Mediterranean Sea, Libya, Sudan, the Red Sea, the Gulf of Aqaba, and Israel. Egypt is the most populous country in the Arab world. Egyptians are a fairly homogenous people of Hamitic origin. Mediterranean and Arab influences appear in the north, and there is some mixing in the south with the Nubians of northern Sudan. Egypt has been a unified state for over 5000 years, and archeological evidence indicates that a developed Egyptian society has existed for considerably longer. The constitution of Egypt provides for a strong executive with authority vested in an elected president who can appoint 1 or more vice presidents, a prime minister, and a cabinet. Egypt's legislative body has 458 members -- 448 popularly elected and 10 appointed by the president. Power is concentrated in the hands of the president and the National Democratic Party's majority in the People's Assembly, but opposition parties organize, publish their views, and represent their followers at various levels in the political system. The process of gradual political liberalization begun by Sadat has continued under Mubarak. In fiscal year 1987 the gross domestic product (GDP) reached about US$30 billion. Agriculture and services each contribute about 1/3 of GDP; the remainder comes from industry, petroleum, mining, electricity, and construction. At this time, the Egyptian economy faces several challenges. In 1986 the government of Egypt initiated a major review of economic policy and initiated an economic

  6. Exploring the Data Fusion of European SAR and Landsat Satellites for Monitoring the Urban Changes in Greater Cairo (Egypt) from 2010 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, J. Manuel; Verstraeten, Gert; Hanssen, Ramon F.; Ruiz-Armenteros, Antonio M.

    2016-08-01

    Before Arab Spring revolution, Greater Cairo had been the focus of urban growth studies due to its huge increase of population in the last decades, also using remote sensing satellites. Probably, the change in its urban extent may have been affected by the Arab Spring activity since it started in 2011, as it has been discussed by international organisations for which they are trying to get the answer to this phenomenon.This work uses the European Envisat and Sentinel-1A satellites as well as the American Landsat 7 and 8 for creating pre-revolution (2010) and post-revolution (2015) land use maps by combining the different SAR and Multi-Spectral (MS) sensors. By comparing the generated LUC maps, we identify the urban changes that occurred during the past 5 years, giving an answer to the question of the quantification of the urban increase in Greater Cairo.

  7. A model for Southern Mediterranean research institute self-assessment: a SWOT analysis-based approach to promote capacity building at Theodor Bilharz Research Institute in Cairo (Egypt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghinolfi, Davide; El Baz, Hanan G; Borgonovi, Elio; Radwan, Amr; Laurence, Ola; Sayed, Hanan A; De Simone, Paolo; Abdelwadoud, Moaz; Stefani, Alessandro; Botros, Sanaa S; Filipponi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    THEBERA is a project funded by the European Union (EU), as an ERA-WIDE FP7 project, aiming to strengthen the Theodor Bilharz Research Institute (TBRI) capacities. A SWOT (strength/weakness/opportunities/threats) analysis of human, structural and organisational existing resources was performed in light of an extensive analysis of liver disease research and clinical management in Egypt, for a full understanding of TBRI needs. Strength and weakness features were identified and analysed, so were actions to be implemented and targets to be accomplished, to develop a business plan gathering the required critical mass (political, scientific, industrial, social) to select investment priorities, to sacrifice non-strategic areas of research, to promote national and international connections and industrial innovations, to update diagnostics and research device technologies and clinical management processes at European levels, to implement fundraising activities, to organise and properly assess training activities for young researchers, physicians, nurses, and technicians. Research institute self assessment is a priority need for sustainable capacity building and for future build-up of a competent health care research institute. Sustainable capacity building strategies must be designed on needs assessment, involving salient requirements: clear strategy, leverage of administrative capacities, industrial support and connections, systematised training programmes and enhancement of mobility of health care staff implemented within ill-defined boundaries and continuously re-evaluated with multiple feedback loops in order to build a complex, adaptable and reliable system based on value. Copyright © 2014 Arab Journal of Gastroenterology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The book covers Egyptian history from the Predynastic to the late Roman Period. It also introduces early contemporary literary references to ancient Egypt and uses a number of theoretical approaches to interrogate the archaeological and textual data. Egyptology and Egyptian archaeology are often...... in archaeological studies, such as materiality, performativity, corporeality, embodiment, identity, and popular culture studies. Egyptian material is explored via these themes, to create nuanced and contextual interpretations of particular sites, events, artefacts and practices. Egypt: Ancient Histories, Modern...... to a discipline whose historical materials seem to be so rich and varied. The reason for this study is to challenge such insularity and to demonstrate the utility of integrating theoretical ideas with specific studies of ancient Egyptian material. The chapters in this volume explore a variety of ancient...

  9. Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The book covers Egyptian history from the Predynastic to the late Roman Period. It also introduces early contemporary literary references to ancient Egypt and uses a number of theoretical approaches to interrogate the archaeological and textual data. Egyptology and Egyptian archaeology are often...... in archaeological studies, such as materiality, performativity, corporeality, embodiment, identity, and popular culture studies. Egyptian material is explored via these themes, to create nuanced and contextual interpretations of particular sites, events, artefacts and practices. Egypt: Ancient Histories, Modern...... to a discipline whose historical materials seem to be so rich and varied. The reason for this study is to challenge such insularity and to demonstrate the utility of integrating theoretical ideas with specific studies of ancient Egyptian material. The chapters in this volume explore a variety of ancient...

  10. The 4th Euro-Mediterranean Conference of Natural Products and Drug Discovery: Back to Mother Nature (BioNat-IV, Cairo/Sharm El-Sheikh, Egypt, March 3–7, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf A. Khalil

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The 4th Euro-Mediterranean Conference of Natural Products and Drug Discovery: Back to Mother Nature (BioNat-IV was recently (from March 3rd through 7th, 2015 convened in Cairo and Sharm El-Sheikh along the Red Sea coast of Egypt. Overall, the meeting provided a platform for scientists from different nations to discuss emerging ideas that focused on cell signaling in cancer; the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases; the identification and use of natural products as well as novel drug delivery approaches for the treatment of cancer, arthritis, diabetes, tuberculosis, fungal infection, etc.; and untapped or unconventional sources for natural products. This fourth in a row conference tried to bridge the gap not only between basic research and clinical applications, but also between developed nations and developing countries. With the continuing success of these past meetings, the fifth Euro-Mediterranean Conference of Natural Products and Drug Discovery (BioNat-V is slated to be in February 2017.

  11. Audit of maternal mortality ratio and causes of maternal deaths in the largest maternity hospital in Cairo, Egypt (Kasr Al Aini) in 2008 and 2009: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Wael F; Ragab, Wael S; Aboulgheit, Samah S

    2013-09-01

    This study examined maternal deaths at Cairo University Maternity Hospital between January 2008 and December 2009. The aim was to calculate Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) as well as identify the causes and predisposing factors to maternal deaths. Data were collected from the files of the hospitalized pregnant women in the hospital. There were 38 maternal deaths and MMR was 79 per 100,000 live births for the two years examined. The main causes of death were obstetric hemorrhage, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and cardiac arrest. Substandard medical care and the delay in seeking of medical advice were two contributing factors to maternal deaths recorded. The need for audit and publication of all obstetric hospitals MMR to compare and identify areas of improvements is recommended.

  12. Darfur Refugees in Cairo: Mental Health and Interpersonal Conflict in the Aftermath of Genocide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meffert, Susan M.; Marmar, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    Hundreds of thousands of Darfur people affected by the Sudanese genocide have fled to Cairo, Egypt, in search of assistance. Collaborating with Africa and Middle East Refugee Assistance (AMERA), the authors conducted a mental health care needs assessment among Darfur refugees in Cairo. Information was collected using individual and focus group…

  13. Volcano-sedimentary characteristics in the Abu Treifiya Basin, Cairo-Suez District, Egypt: Example of dynamics and fluidization over sedimentary and volcaniclastic beds by emplacement of syn-volcanic basaltic rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, E. A.; Abdel Motelib, A.; Hammed, M. S.; El Manawi, A. H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the Neogene lava-sediment mingling from the Abu Treifiya Basin, Cairo-Suez district, Egypt. The lava-sediment interactions as peperites have been identified for the first time at the study area and can be used as paleoenvironmental indicators. The identification of peperite reflects contemporaneous time relationship between volcanism and sedimentation and this finding is of primary importance to address the evolutional reconstruction of the Abu Treifiya Basin. Characterization of the facies architecture and textural framework of peperites was carried out through detailed description and interpretation of their outcrops. The peperites and sedimentary rocks are up to 350 m thick and form a distinct stratigraphic framework of diverse lithology that is widespread over several kilometers at the study area. Lateral and vertical facies of the peperites vary from sediment intercalated with the extrusive/intrusive basaltic rocks forming peperitic breccias to lava-sediment contacts at a large to small scales, respectively. Peperites encompass five main facies types ascribed to: (i) carbonate sediments-hosted fluidal and blocky peperites, (ii) lava flow-hosted blocky peperites, (iii) volcaniclastics-hosted fluidal and blocky peperites, (iv) sandstone/siltstone rocks-hosted blocky peperites, and (iv) debris-flows-hosted blocky peperites. Soft sediment deformation structures, vesiculated sediments, sediments filled-vesicles, and fractures in lava flows indicate that lava flows mingled with unconsolidated wet sediments. All the peperites in this study could be described as blocky or fluidal, but mixtures of different clast shapes occur regardless of the host sediment. The presence of fluidal and blocky juvenile clasts elucidates different eruptive styles, reflecting a ductile and brittle fragmentation. The gradual variation from fluidal to blocky peperite texture, producing the vertical grading is affected by influencing factors, e.g., the viscosity, magma

  14. Technological and economic study of ship recycling in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welaya, Yousri M. A.; Abdel Naby, Maged M.; Tadros, Mina Y.

    2012-12-01

    The ship recycling industry is growing rapidly. It is estimated that the International Maritime Organization's (IMO) decision to phase-out single hull tankers by 2015 will result in hundreds of ships requiring disposal. At present, the ship recycling industry is predominantly based in South Asia. Due to the bad practice of current scrapping procedure, the paper will highlight the harm occurring to health, safety and environment. The efforts of the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) which led to the signing of the Hong Kong International Convention are also reviewed. The criteria and standards required to reduce the risk and damage to the environment are discussed and a proposed plan for the safe scrapping of ships is then presented. A technological and economic study for the ship recycling in Egypt is carried out as a case study. This includes the ship recycling facility size and layout. The equipment and staff required to operate the facility are also evaluated. A cost analysis is then carried out. This includes site development, human resources, machineries and equipment. A fuzzy logic approach is used to assess the benefits of the ship breaking yard. The use of the fuzzy logic approach is found suitable to make decisions for the ship breaking industry. Based on given constraints, the proposed model has proved capable of assessing the profit and the internal rate of return.

  15. Implementation of Web-Based Education in Egypt through Cloud Computing Technologies and Its Effect on Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Seoud, M. Samir Abou; El-Sofany, Hosam F.; Taj-Eddin, Islam A. T. F.; Nosseir, Ann; El-Khouly, Mahmoud M.

    2013-01-01

    The information technology educational programs at most universities in Egypt face many obstacles that can be overcome using technology enhanced learning. An open source Moodle eLearning platform has been implemented at many public and private universities in Egypt, as an aid to deliver e-content and to provide the institution with various…

  16. Egypt receives computers from CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    On Tuesday 22 October, CERN officially celebrated sending IT equipment to Egypt, the fifth country to benefit from such donations after Morocco, Ghana, Bulgaria and Serbia. Although no longer adequate for CERN's cutting-edge research, these machines are still suitable for less demanding applications.   Rolf Heuer and Amr Radi, during the official ceremony. In a ceremony to mark the occasion, Rolf Heuer, CERN Director-General, and Egyptian physicist Amr Radi, team leader of ASRT (Egypt’s Academy of Scientific Research and Technology) within the CMS collaboration, who has played a major part in the operation, expressed their enthusiasm for the project. A total of 196 servers and 10 routers will be installed on the ASRT premises in Cairo, where they will be used to analyse data from the ALICE and CMS experiments. For more information about CERN’s donations of IT equipment, see this Bulletin article.

  17. Prospects of effective microorganisms technology in wastes treatment in Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emad A Shalaby

    2011-01-01

    Sludge dewatering and treatment may cost as much as the wastewater treatment. Usually large proportion of the pollutants in wastewater is organic. They are attacked by saprophytic microorganisms, i.e. organisms that feed upon dead organic matter. Activity of organisms causes decomposition of organic matter and destroys them, where the bacteria convert the organic matter or other constituents in the wastewater to new cells, water, gases and other products. Demolition activities, including renovation/remodeling works and complete or selective removal/demolishing of existing structures either by man-made processes or by natural disasters, create an extensive amount of wastes. These demolition wastes are characterized as heterogeneous mixtures of building materials that are usually contaminated with chemicals and dirt. In developing countries, it is estimated that demolition wastes comprise 20% to 30% of the total annual solid wastes. In Egypt, the daily quantity of construction and demolition (C&D) waste has been estimated as 10 000 tones. That is equivalent to one third of the total daily municipal solid wastes generated per day in Egypt. The zabbaliin have since expanded their activities and now take the waste they collect back to their garbage villages where it is sorted into recyclable components: paper, plastics, rags, glass, metal and food. The food waste is fed to pigs and the other items are sold to recycling centers. This paper summarizes the wastewater and solid wastes management in Egypt now and future.

  18. Islamic Law and Legal Education in Modern Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakissa, Aria Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the transmission of Islamic legal knowledge in modern Egypt. It is based on two years of ethnographic fieldwork in Cairo among formally trained Islamic scholars. With governmental permission, I was able to attend classes at both al-Azhar's Faculty of Shari'ah and Cairo University's Dar al-'Ulum. I also participated in…

  19. Islamic Law and Legal Education in Modern Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakissa, Aria Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the transmission of Islamic legal knowledge in modern Egypt. It is based on two years of ethnographic fieldwork in Cairo among formally trained Islamic scholars. With governmental permission, I was able to attend classes at both al-Azhar's Faculty of Shari'ah and Cairo University's Dar al-'Ulum. I…

  20. Assembling a Revolution: Graffiti, Cairo and the Arab Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Lennon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines the ways revolutionary desire was articulated and interpreted through graffiti in Cairo, Egypt during the Arab Spring and its immediate aftermath. For writers in Cairo, graffiti was one of many in a constellation of resistances that undermined everyday life in Hosni Mubarak’s Egypt and the SCAF-controlled interim government. Ordinary surfaces of the city were illegally marked, displaying revolutionary potentiality by allowing the seemingly powerless rhetorical openings of engagement. Far from being a monolithic discourse, graffiti created geographies of material protest that were locally enacted but globally contextualized. Political graffiti, like the overall protests of the Arab Spring, emerged in large numbers at particular moments, but its numerous roots spread distinctly into the past. First contextualizing Cairo graffiti as a tool for revolutionary protest, the article then examines specific writers (Mahmoud Graffiti, Ganzeer, particular ‘battleground' spaces (Tahrir Square, Mohamed Mahmoud Street, different graffiti mutations (tags, pieces, murals and contrary aesthetic manipulations of the form (‘No Walls’ campaign, graffiti advertisements by multinational corporations in order to assemble a graffiti scene in Cairo as it follows the ebbs and flows of revolutionary desire.

  1. Biomedical and health informatics education and research at the Information Technology Institute in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, R; Khalifa, A

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, Egypt has experienced a revolution in the field of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) that has had a corresponding impact on the field of healthcare. Since 1993, the Information Technology Institute (ITI) has been leading the development of the Information Technology (IT) professional training and education in Egypt to produce top quality IT professionals who are considered now the backbone of the IT revolution in Egypt. For the past five years, ITI has been adopting the objective of building high caliber health professionals who can effectively serve the ever-growing information society. Academic links have been established with internationally renowned universities, e.g., Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) in US, University of Leipzig in Germany, in addition those with the Egyptian Fellowship Board in order to enrich ITI Medical Informatics Education and Research. The ITI Biomedical and Health Informatics (BMHI) education and training programs target fresh graduates as well as life-long learners. Therefore, the program's learning objectives are framed within the context of the four specialization tracks: Healthcare Management (HCM), Biomedical Informatics Research (BMIR), Bioinformatics Professional (BIP), and Healthcare Professional (HCP). The ITI BMHI research projects tackle a wide-range of current challenges in this field, such as knowledge management in healthcare, providing tele-consultation services for diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases for underserved regions in Egypt, and exploring the cultural and educational aspects of Nanoinformatics. Since 2006, ITI has been positively contributing to develop the discipline of BMHI in Egypt in order to support improved healthcare services.

  2. The October 12, 1992, Dahshur, Egypt, Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thenhaus, P.C.; Celebi, M.; Sharp, R.V.

    1993-01-01

    Cairo and northeastern Egypt experienced a rare, damaging earthquake on October 12, 1992. The earthquake, which measured 5.9 on the Richter magnitude scale, was centered near the village of Dahshur, about 18 km south of Cairo. The computed hypocentral depth of the earthquake, about 25 km, is consistent with the fact that fault rupture associated with the earthquake did not reach the surface. 

  3. A New Approach: The Cairo Conference. Focus: Education, Population, and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolis, Cilla Ungerth, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This bulletin provides news on the follow-up to the World Conference on Education for All (Jomtien, Thailand, 1990) at which 155 countries pledged to provide education for all children and adults and massively reduce illiteracy before the year 2000. This bulletin focuses on the September 1994 Cairo (Egypt) Population Conference and the issues of…

  4. Cairo: repackaging population control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, H

    1995-01-01

    Aid agencies, charities, and other nongovernmental organizations once denounced population control programs as racist interference in the third world. Yet, at the United Nations Conference on Population and Development in Cairo last September, these same organizations endorsed very similar ideas. The U.N. can now claim that even its fiercest critics not only have muted their criticism of population control programs but now positively endorse them. Over the last 30 years, population control has been consciously repackaged by the U.S. establishment. The image of population control has changed from being overtly anti-third world to being about giving the people of the third world--especially women--basic rights in family planning. Wrapped up in the language of women's empowerment and environmentalism, the establishment's old arguments about there being too many nonwhite babies in the world, have, unfortunately, won the day.

  5. [The silences of Cairo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazi, S

    1994-10-01

    At the Conference on Population and the Environment in Cairo, the Vatican, Malta, and about 10 Latin American countries would not endorse passages on sexuality, defense of life, and anything which might condone abortion. About 12 Islamic states opposed all references which may authorize premarital and extramarital sexual intercourse and sex education for adolescents. Another problem which held the attention of the delegates was family regrouping of immigrants in host countries. Most Western countries wanted the word ¿rights' removed from that part of the action plan addressing family regrouping of immigrants. Even though several developing countries are dissatisfied with immigration problems, they do not want to limit family regrouping. Delegates sanctioned US$ 17 billion to be dispersed for family planning in developing countries by 2000, but who will donate these funds? The controversy over abortion and sexuality made delegates forget to address the environment and development. Since 1992, pressure by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) has forced development out of the economic sphere. NGOs stress the importance of the social dimension of development in developing countries. The debate on poverty, which was supposed to occur in Cairo, did not take place. According to many NGOs and representatives from developing countries, the conference spent 10 days on abortion and only 10 minutes on development. NGOs disapproved of the relegation of human development problems and structural adjustment problems to the background. Developing countries wanted to discuss foreign aid and the inequalities between rich and poor countries. By 2000, there will be 300 million more poor persons. Several delegates from developed countries conceded that their governments would reorient foreign aid to family planning programs in developing countries. Have they forgotten that development is an essential condition for slowing population growth, which is what they want?

  6. Censorship and Security Agents Pervade Egypt's Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    This article offers a glimpse into one of the many ways in which the Egyptian government and the campus administrators it appoints are slowly and persistently squeezing the life out of universities in Cairo, Egypt. Classroom discussions are monitored, faculty appointments and academic research are scrutinized, and faculty participation in outside…

  7. Seismic hazard studies in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Abuo El-Ela A.; El-Hadidy, M.; Deif, A.; Abou Elenean, K.

    2012-12-01

    The study of earthquake activity and seismic hazard assessment of Egypt is very important due to the great and rapid spreading of large investments in national projects, especially the nuclear power plant that will be held in the northern part of Egypt. Although Egypt is characterized by low seismicity, it has experienced occurring of damaging earthquake effect through its history. The seismotectonic sitting of Egypt suggests that large earthquakes are possible particularly along the Gulf of Aqaba-Dead Sea transform, the Subduction zone along the Hellenic and Cyprean Arcs, and the Northern Red Sea triple junction point. In addition some inland significant sources at Aswan, Dahshour, and Cairo-Suez District should be considered. The seismic hazard for Egypt is calculated utilizing a probabilistic approach (for a grid of 0.5° × 0.5°) within a logic-tree framework. Alternative seismogenic models and ground motion scaling relationships are selected to account for the epistemic uncertainty. Seismic hazard values on rock were calculated to create contour maps for four ground motion spectral periods and for different return periods. In addition, the uniform hazard spectra for rock sites for different 25 periods, and the probabilistic hazard curves for Cairo, and Alexandria cities are graphed. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) values were found close to the Gulf of Aqaba and it was about 220 gal for 475 year return period. While the lowest (PGA) values were detected in the western part of the western desert and it is less than 25 gal.

  8. Climate change and predicted trend of fungal keratitis in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad-Hussein, A; El-Mofty, H M; Hassanien, M A

    2011-06-01

    Rising rates of invasive fungal infections may be linked to global climate change. A study was made of the trend of ophthalmic fungal corneal keratitis in the greater Cairo area of Egypt and its association with climate records during the same period. Data on diagnosed cases of fungal keratitis were collected from records of ophthalmic departments of Cairo University hospital and atmospheric temperature and humidity for the greater Cairo area were obtained from online records. Statistical analysis showed a significant increase in the relative frequency of keratomycosis during 1997-2007. The rise correlated significantly with rises n min,mum temperature and the maximum atmospheric humidity in the greater Cairo area over the same period (after exclusion of the effect of the maximum atmos pheric temperature). The predicted increase in keratomycosis up to the year 2030 corresponds to predicted increases in CO2 emissions and surface temperature from climate change models for Egypt.

  9. RETRACTED: Rift-related active fault-system and a direction of maximum horizontal stress in the Cairo-Suez district, northeastern Egypt: A new approach from EMR-Technique and Cerescope data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagag, Wael; Obermeyer, Hennes

    2016-09-01

    This article has been retracted: please see Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal (https://www.elsevier.com/about/our-business/policies/article-withdrawal). This article has been retracted at the request of Editor-in-Chief Read Mapeo in agreement with Editor-in-Chief Damien Delvaux. The authors have plagiarized part of the following papers. The introduction and methodology sections of the paper are similar and in places slightly modified versions of the abstract, introduction and sections 2.4.2.1 and 2.4.2.2 of the PhD Thesis of Michael Krumbholz (2010) https://ediss.uni-goettingen.de/handle/11858/00-1735-0000-0006-B2EB-A. Text from the sections of introduction, methodology and "EMR-measurements in the Cairo-Suez district" is found also in the paper "Detection of active faults using EMR-Technique and Cerescope at Landau area in central Upper Rhine Graben, SW Germany" that was published by the authors in the Journal of Applied Geophysics 124 (2016) 117-129 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jappgeo.2015.11.019. One of the conditions of submission of a paper for publication is that authors declare explicitly that their work is original and has not appeared in a publication elsewhere. Re-use of any data should be appropriately cited. As such this article represents a severe abuse of the scientific publishing system. The scientific community takes a very strong view on this matter and apologies are offered to readers of the journal that this was not detected during the submission process.

  10. Metropolitan food supply : case study Cairo : a quick scan study to enhance fresh food supply and minimize postharvest losses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den W.H.A.M.; Boerrigter, H.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate options for “Metropolitan food production systems” in Egypt and specifically in the Cairo region, a ‘cold chain quick scan’ is conducted by Wageningen UR post-harvest specialists. The study comprehends a quick scan for market demand, market willingness and a search for trend developme

  11. Metropolitan food supply : case study Cairo : a quick scan study to enhance fresh food supply and minimize postharvest losses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den W.H.A.M.; Boerrigter, H.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate options for “Metropolitan food production systems” in Egypt and specifically in the Cairo region, a ‘cold chain quick scan’ is conducted by Wageningen UR post-harvest specialists. The study comprehends a quick scan for market demand, market willingness and a search for trend developme

  12. Metropolitan food supply : case study Cairo : a quick scan study to enhance fresh food supply and minimize postharvest losses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den W.H.A.M.; Boerrigter, H.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate options for “Metropolitan food production systems” in Egypt and specifically in the Cairo region, a ‘cold chain quick scan’ is conducted by Wageningen UR post-harvest specialists. The study comprehends a quick scan for market demand, market willingness and a search for trend

  13. Road map for renewable energy research and development in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel K. Khalil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Egypt possesses excellent potential for renewable energy (RE including solar, wind and biomass energy. Renewable energy technologies (RETs and systems have different needs for support in terms of research and development, demonstration and market development. For this purpose, the Energy Research Center (ERC at Cairo University has carried out a study with the ultimate goal of formulating a national development strategy and action plan for the local manufacture of renewable energy systems (RESs and components. The present study positions the different RETs and RESs and identifies the research and development needs for each technology. The study also suggests how to establish a competitive market for RET. For this purpose it builds and analyses a set of likely scenarios, and proposes a practical development strategy and a detailed action plan for achieving it.

  14. Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Barron, W.F. (Hong Kong Univ. (Hong Kong)); Kamel, A.M. (Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt)); Santiago, H.T. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an intermediate evaluation'' of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

  15. Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Barron, W.F. [Hong Kong Univ. (Hong Kong); Kamel, A.M. [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt); Santiago, H.T. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an ``intermediate evaluation`` of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

  16. Egypt Aiming at Attracting Investment from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Audrey GUO

    2009-01-01

    @@ Jointly with China Economic & Trade Counselor Office in Egypt,the General Authority for Investment (GAFI) and the General Authority for Special Economic Zone North-West Gulf of Suez (SEZone) held China-Africa Development Fund Conference in Cairo,Egypt on March 16,2009.The Minister of Investment Egypt Dr.Mahmoud Mohieldin,Chinese Ambassador to Egypt Mr.Wu Chunhua,Chairman of GAFI and SEZone Mr.Assem Ragab,Vice President of China-Africa Development Fund Mr.Lu Qingchen,Economic and Trade Minister Counselor of the Chinese Embassy in Egypt Mr.Cao Jiachang,as well as over 100 Chinese/Egyptian businessmen attended the conference.

  17. Risk perception and priority setting for intervention among hepatitis C virus and environmental risks: a cross-sectional survey in the Cairo community

    OpenAIRE

    Dewedar Sahar; Gad Rita R; Mohamed Mostafa K; Schwarzinger Michaël; Fontanet Arnaud; Carrat Fabrice; Luchini Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) recently emerged as a major public health hazard in Egypt. However, dramatic healthcare budget constraints limit access to the costly treatment. We assessed risk perception and priority setting for intervention among HCV, unsafe water, and outdoor air pollution in Cairo city. Methods A survey was conducted in the homes of a representative sample of household heads in Cairo city. Risk perception was assessed using the "psychometric paradigm" where he...

  18. 开罗夜未眠%SLEEPLESS iN CaiRo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ During the last few years,my neighborhood in Cairo has experienced such an influx of refugees from the Iraq war that longtime residents have begun,with a mixture of affection and unease,to call it New Baghdad.Two dialects of Arabic are spoken in the streets,and there is Iraqi flatbread for sale in the local market.The family living in the apartment upstairs came to Egypt from Iraq nine months ago.

  19. Seismic hazard studies in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abuo El-Ela A. Mohamed

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of earthquake activity and seismic hazard assessment of Egypt is very important due to the great and rapid spreading of large investments in national projects, especially the nuclear power plant that will be held in the northern part of Egypt. Although Egypt is characterized by low seismicity, it has experienced occurring of damaging earthquake effect through its history. The seismotectonic sitting of Egypt suggests that large earthquakes are possible particularly along the Gulf of Aqaba–Dead Sea transform, the Subduction zone along the Hellenic and Cyprean Arcs, and the Northern Red Sea triple junction point. In addition some inland significant sources at Aswan, Dahshour, and Cairo-Suez District should be considered. The seismic hazard for Egypt is calculated utilizing a probabilistic approach (for a grid of 0.5° × 0.5° within a logic-tree framework. Alternative seismogenic models and ground motion scaling relationships are selected to account for the epistemic uncertainty. Seismic hazard values on rock were calculated to create contour maps for four ground motion spectral periods and for different return periods. In addition, the uniform hazard spectra for rock sites for different 25 periods, and the probabilistic hazard curves for Cairo, and Alexandria cities are graphed. The peak ground acceleration (PGA values were found close to the Gulf of Aqaba and it was about 220 gal for 475 year return period. While the lowest (PGA values were detected in the western part of the western desert and it is less than 25 gal.

  20. Implementation of renewable energy technologies - Opportunities and barriers. Egypt country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The project used case studies of renewable energy implementation projects to analyse the reasons for success or failure of specific projects or technologies. In particular the study aimed to identify possibilities for 'removing' the main barriers and thus 'promoting' increased implementation of (RETs), and to 'generalise' the experiences from the case studies and produce results that can be disseminated and utilized further in a planned second phase. The specific objectives for Egypt Country Study were: 1) To determine, on the basis of analysis of the past experience, the barriers against implementation of RETs in Egypt, and to identify the favourable conditions and actions required for such implementation. 2) To apply the knowledge gained and results of the analysis of past projects for a detailed analysis of barriers to a chosen set of potential RETs implementation projects with view to success. 3) To identify specific RET projects for implementation including necessary actions to overcome identified barriers. The case study revealed that; for Domestic Solar Water Heating (DSWH) the main barriers are; the economic barriers followed by the awareness / information barriers, then the Technical and Institution barriers. For the PV rural electrification, the most important barriers are; the economic and financial barriers, the awareness and information barriers then the technical barriers. For the large-scale biogas systems, the main barriers are the institution and capacity, economic, policy and awareness / information respectively. According to the project results the main actions that could be taken to overcome the barriers and make use of the available opportunities are: Economic / Financial: 1) Creation of new financial schemes for the RETs applications components and systems. 2) Reducing the taxes and duties for the components and / or materials needed for Renewable Energy (RE) systems. 3) More government-supported market incentives

  1. A comparative dosimetric study of 3-dimensional conformal radical radiotherapy for bladder cancer patients versus conventional 2-dimensional radical radiotherapy in NCI-Cairo, Egypt%埃及开罗国家癌症研究所膀胱癌患者的三维适形根治性放疗与传统的二维根治性放疗的比较剂量学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Mahmoud; Hesham A. El-Hossiny; Nashaat A. Diab; Marwa A. El Razek

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study was to compare this multiple-field conformal technique to the 2-dimensional (2D) conventional technique with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues. Methods: We conducted a single institutional prospective comparative dosimetric analysis of 15 patients who received radical radiation therapy for bladder cancer presented to Radiotherapy Department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo (Egypt), in period between November 2011 to July 2012 using 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy technique for each patient, a second 2D conventional radiotherapy treatment plan was done, the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis. Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both (3D & 2D) plans while it was demonstrated that this multiple field conformal technique produced superior distribution compared to 2D technique, with considerable sparing of rectum and to lesser extent for the head of both femora. Conclusion: From the present study, it is recommended to use 3D planning for cases of bladder cancer especially in elderly patients as it produces good coverage of the target volume as well as good sparing of the surrounding critical organs.

  2. A Parametric Urban Design Approach to Urban Development in Cairo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinø, Nicolai

    2017-01-01

    -designer professionals can provide input and evaluate the spatial effects instantly in the context of participatory design processes. Cairo, Egypt, currently experiences rapid urban growth, while formal urban planning is absent in large parts, resulting in large-scale informal and unplanned development. A parametric...... in the course of participatory processes, as the consequences of changing different parameters cannot easily be evaluated by means of traditional design tools. In recent years, new parametric design tools have opened up new possibilities for dynamic scenario building in urban design. By way of a parametric...... design approach, different urban design parameters can be modified and new urban space scenarios can be rendered three-dimensionally in almost real time. In short, this is parametric urban design. It opens up completely new possibilities for participatory design, as both lay stakeholders and non...

  3. Analytical study of Saint Gregory Nazianzen Icon, Old Cairo, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, Yousry M.; Abdel-Maksoud, Gomaa; Magdy, Mina

    2015-11-01

    The study aims to evaluate the state of icon through characterization of the icon layers (ground, paint and varnish layers) and to provide tools for assessment the impact of aging and environmental conditions in order to produce some solutions for conservation of the icon. Analytical techniques used in this study were attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X ray spectroscopy (FESEM-EDX) and amino acid analyzer (AAA). The results obtained revealed that gypsum and lead white were used for ground layer. The identified pigments were lamp carbon black, brown ochre, Prussian blue, yellow ochre and gold leaf. Egg yolk was the binder used with most of pigments and animal glue was used with gold color. The varnish used was shellac resin. It was concluded that stable pigments gave permanent colors and environmental conditions had an influence on promotion of oxidation process. Auto-oxidation of binder and varnish materials occurred by the action of pigment components and light result in cracking of the paint film and fading of the varnish glaze.

  4. Using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data for Hazard Estimation in Some Active Regions in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed Mohamed, Abdel-Monem

    2016-07-01

    Egypt rapidly growing development is accompanied by increasing levels of standard living particular in its urban areas. However, there is a limited experience in quantifying the sources of risk management in Egypt and in designing efficient strategies to keep away serious impacts of earthquakes. From the historical point of view and recent instrumental records, there are some seismo-active regions in Egypt, where some significant earthquakes had occurred in different places. The special tectonic features in Egypt: Aswan, Greater Cairo, Red Sea and Sinai Peninsula regions are the territories of a high seismic risk, which have to be monitored by up-to date technologies. The investigations of the seismic events and interpretations led to evaluate the seismic hazard for disaster prevention and for the safety of the dense populated regions and the vital national projects as the High Dam. In addition to the monitoring of the recent crustal movements, the most powerful technique of satellite geodesy GNSS are used where geodetic networks are covering such seismo-active regions. The results from the data sets are compared and combined in order to determine the main characteristics of the deformation and hazard estimation for specified regions. The final compiled output from the seismological and geodetic analysis threw lights upon the geodynamical regime of these seismo-active regions and put Aswan and Greater Cairo under the lowest class according to horizontal crustal strains classifications. This work will serve a basis for the development of so-called catastrophic models and can be further used for catastrophic risk management. Also, this work is trying to evaluate risk of large catastrophic losses within the important regions including the High Dam, strategic buildings and archeological sites. Studies on possible scenarios of earthquakes and losses are a critical issue for decision making in insurance as a part of mitigation measures.

  5. Feelings of betrayal by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and emotionally distressed Sudanese refugees in Cairo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meffert, Susan M; Musalo, Karen; Abdo, Akram Osman; Alla, Omayma Ahmed Abd; Elmakki, Yasir Omer Mustafa; Omer, Afrah Abdelrahim; Yousif, Sahar; Metzler, Thomas J; Marmar, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    Thousands of Sudanese refugees have fled to Cairo, Egypt in the wake of Sudanese civil conflicts. Sudanese refugees were evaluated with respect to symptoms of depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and social stress. Four respondents (22%) indicated that their interactions with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in Cairo, Egypt were the worst experiences since war-related atrocities. Fourteen participants (63.6%) felt 'extremely' betrayed by the UNHCR on a four point scale. Greater feelings of betrayal by the UNHCR were associated with greater avoidance and arousal symptoms of PTSD, symptoms of depression and trait anger. This is the first study of which we are aware that examines the relationship between sense of betrayal by the UNHCR and symptoms of PTSD, depression and anger among asylum seekers.

  6. Egipto: visita profesional a El Cairo

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Santo Domingo, Nuria

    1996-01-01

    This report reflects the study made to different libraries of Cairo during a professional visit in October 1996. It is worth to mention among these libraries the National Library, with its important Centre for Restauration and Microfilmation, which was created thanks to the economical aid of the Spanish AECID; and the National Archives. Apart from that, there is a special mention to two public libraries, diferent in conception, the "Cairo Great Library" and the "Mubarak Public Library". Final...

  7. Precision farming solution in Egypt using the wireless sensor network technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherine M. Abd El-kader

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives an overview of the wireless sensor network, studies its application in precision farming, and its importance for improving the agriculture in Egypt. An example for using wireless sensor network in cultivating the potato crop in Egypt is given, and it is shown that the cost of the system with respect to the yearly benefit from exporting potato crop after recovering the loss from its export preventing (this loss is estimated to be 2 billion pounds which is the value of the potato export to Russia annually, after the expected consequence of increasing the yield size and quality, after the expected savings in the resources used in cultivation such as the fertilizer and irrigation water, and after recovering the monetary loss results from the harms caused by excessive use of pesticides, is acceptable, and it can be said that this cost can be recovered in one year. It is concluded that the APTEEN protocol is the most suitable routing strategy to precision farming and its network lifetime can reach 6.5 month which is a period more than the maximum value of the potato crop lifetime that estimated to be 120 day, but it is greater than the yearly cultivation period of potato in Egypt which reaches 6 month.

  8. Citizenship Education in Post-Revolutionary Egypt: Examining the Curriculum of a Civic Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waly, Salma G.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how civic organizations in Egypt after the revolution prepare students to be active citizens with a solid understanding of what their roles and duties are in an emergent democratic system. Through examining the curriculum of the summer school of one of the civic organizations in Cairo, I first look at the…

  9. Thirty-Five Years of Care of Child Language in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotby, M. Nasser; El-Sady, Safaa; Hegazi, Mona

    2010-01-01

    The team of the Unit of Phoniatrics and Logopedics of the Ain Shams University Clinic in Cairo, Egypt, has worked for three and half decades to spread awareness of child language disorders. This involved publications to inform the public, as well as health care professionals, about the needs of children with delayed language, through description…

  10. Printing in the Arab World with emphasis on the Bulaq press in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Tadrus, Fawzi M.

    1982-01-01

    This article is a survey of the printing art in the Arab world in general, and Egypt in particular. The first, and still the most important Egyptian printing house, is the BiiUiq Press, which was founded in Cairo by the Wali (Viceroy of the Sultan of Turkey), Muhammad 'Ali (1805-1849).

  11. Egypt/FOF reorganize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    In Egypt, both the national family planning program and the privately operated social marketing program, Family of the Future (FOF), are currently being reorganized. The Population and Family Planning Board, orginally charged with the responsibility of overseeing the national family planning program, was replaced by the newly created National Council. The reasons for the change and the type of program changes which will ensue from this organizational change are unclear. The FOF recently adopted a new management organizational structure, implemented a computerized management and information system, and initiated a staff training program. The management of the program's product line is now divided into 3 sections. There are separate sections for IUDs, barrier methods, and hormonal methods. Each section is responsible for developing a marketing plan for its products and overseeing the distribution of its products. The management staff is now provided with management skills training. To date, 9 managers have received training in management techniques in the US at George Washington University. Personal computers are being installed at the FOF office in Cairo. The system will be used to keep tract of inventory, volunteer activities, and product distribution and to handle accounting procedures. These innovations are expected to facilitate the handling of planned changes in FOF's product line. FOF will begin selling surgical gloves, as a supplemental item for its currently marketed IUD kit, and pregnancy testing kits for use by physicians and hospitals. Other anticipated introductions include Depo Provera, an injectable contraceptive, the new Ortho vaginal tablet which will replace the currently marketed Annan vaginal tablet, and possibly, the implant contraceptive, Norplant. Triton is currently under contract with the US Agency for International Development to provide technical assistance for the FOF program. This contract is due to expire in December, 1984, and a

  12. Restoration and Conservation of Islamic Monuments in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-15

    ENGINEERING CENTER for ARCHAEOLOGY and ENVIRONMENT, BACKGROUND THE PRESENT STRUCTURE of the EGYPTIAN ANTIQUITIES ORGANIZATION ABSTRACTS (AVAILABLE AS OF 8...serve as an outpost in Egypt for American institutions with archaeological programs. ARCE established a perma- nent office in Cairo to assist expedition...catalog of the Luxor Museum. The last decade saw ARCE grow tremendously, with the introduction of lectures, tours and symposia for the Egyptian and American

  13. Egypt(2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽萍

    2005-01-01

    The Sphinx is one of the best-known monuments on Earth and dates back over 4,500 years to the Old Kingdom and the time of king Khafre--bailder of the second largost pyramid on the Giza plateau on Cairo's outskirts. The Sphinx is about 73.5 metres in length. It was originally sculptured from a limestone and, formost of its history, the Sphinx has been at least partly covered in sand.

  14. Alternative energy technologies: their application in developing countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Carmona, L.S.

    1980-08-01

    This paper was presented at the Fourth Annual Conference of INTA, in Cairo, Egypt, in October 1980. It deals with the possibilities of using alternative energy technologies in planned urban areas in the developing countries. The case of Mexico is used to analyze use, energy balance, inventories of energy resources, and forecasts of energy supply by the year 2000. Described is the relationship between urban structures and energy requirements, providing data and commentary with respect to Mexican national urban plans, and with its programs in the energy area. Data in charts, maps, and statistics are included.

  15. Ostrich (Struthio camelus) production in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R G; Mahrose, K M A; El-Shafei, M; Marai, I F M

    2008-06-01

    This review discusses the historical, developmental and practices of ostrich farming in Egypt. In the early 20th century, ostrich farming was very important for production of ostrich feathers and documents were produced to perfect the art of procuring the plumes from the birds and subsequently processing them. Pharaohs used ostrich feathers for adornment. Of 43 provinces, 12 were featured in 2003-2004 as farming ostriches: Alexandria, Al-Behera, Al-Dakahlia, Al-Wadi Al-Gadid, Aswan, Cairo, El-Sharkia, Geiza, Ismailia, Kafr-El-Sheikh, Matrouh and Nubaria. Abattoirs and tanneries specialising in ostrich handling are limited to two. Egypt has numerous strengths and opportunities to develop its ostrich sector. Rising meat prices suggest that fresh ostrich meat is unaffordable to many locals. Funds may be allocated to local advertising campaigns to promote ostrich meat; provision of incentives to farmers; and improving the capacity of abattoirs.

  16. Shattered dreams of Sudanese refugees in Cairo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala W Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available At least 28 Sudanese were killed in December 2005 as Egyptian riot police violently dispersed a sit-in near the Cairo offices of UNHCR. A year later, those responsible for human rights violations have not been held to account and some refugees who went missing remain unaccounted for.

  17. Getting into hot water Problematizing hot water service demand: The case of Old Cairo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culhane, Thomas Henry

    -help strategies, the greater flexibility they provide may lead to superior long-term outcomes in a time of uncertain and rising energy and commodities prices and an increasing availability of new, less expensive, increasingly modular, and more efficient technologies that are easier for individual households to install and use, especially if the State or non-governmental institutions can provide implementation support. The descriptive statistics and the multivariate models obtained through the analysis of the data gathered in the surveys show that while purchase price and running costs for dedicated water heating systems are considerations for families desiring hot water, the infrastructural demands of modern appliances vis a vis a consumer's given built environment and the historical/cultural legacy of the consumer's past hot water choices and practices are often more important determinants of the kind of water heating used and desired today. Our study shows, for example, that while higher income is associated with owning a water heater in a simple model with few explanatory variables (Model 3) it's significance disappears when controlling for Ethnicity and infrastructural elements (Model 1). This might suggest that while within communities there is a point at which making more money implies a shift to consumer "modernity", overall the availability of more money in these neighborhoods as a whole doesn't guarantee that the utility promised by modern appliances will be realized. A similar point can be made about formal education levels, which appear insignificant in our models. Policy that aimed merely at sending more kids to school would not address the great deficiencies that many Egyptian schools are noted for. There is no guarantee that merely expanding Egypt's "universal education" policy to include children who have fallen through the cracks would help increase consumer awareness or consumer choice. On the other hand both water availability and presence of hot water pipes, as

  18. The Impact of Social Networks and Mobile Technologies on the Revolutions in the Arab World—A Study of Egypt and Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Maurushat

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Revolts in Tunisia and Egypt have led many observers to speak of the “first digital revolution” in the Arab world. Social media sites, such as Twitter and Facebook, are now recognised as the important tools that facilitated the “Jasmine Revolution”. In fact, the willingness of the Mubarak government to block all internet connection in Egypt has demonstrated the concern over the power of new technologies in facilitating political change. The tenacity of the social movements that are still on-going in the Arab world continues to demonstrate the important role that networked technologies—such as the internet, satellite channels and social networking sites—play in revolutions. The revolutions demonstrate an effective use of social media and other network technologies as an organisational tool, and as a means of asserting pressure on current rulers and future governments. Accordingly, this article seeks to expose freedom of expression as a fundamental democratic principle and the internet network as a vehicle driving the demonstrations in the Arab countries of Tunisia and Egypt.

  19. Explanations of sleep paralysis among Egyptian college students and the general population in Egypt and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Baland; Simons-Rudolph, Joseph; Jalal, Bamo; Hinton, Devon E

    2014-04-01

    This cross-cultural study compared explanations of sleep paralysis (SP) in two countries and two groups with different levels of education in one country. Comparisons were made between individuals having experienced SP at least once in a lifetime from Cairo, Egypt (n = 89), Copenhagen, Denmark (n = 59), and the American University in Cairo, Egypt (n = 44). As hypothesized, participants from the general Egyptian population were more likely to endorse supernatural causal explanation of their SP compared to participants from Denmark; participants from the American University in Cairo were less likely to endorse supernatural causes of their SP compared to participants from the general Egyptian population. Moreover, participants from the American University in Cairo were marginally significantly more likely to endorse supernatural causes of their SP compared to participants from Denmark. Additionally, we explored which culturally bound explanations and beliefs about SP existed in Egypt and Denmark. We found that nearly half (48%) of the participants from the general Egyptian population believed their SP to be caused by the Jinn, a spirit-like creature with roots in Islamic tradition, which constitutes a culturally bound interpretation of the phenomenology of SP in this region of the world. Case studies are presented to illustrate these findings.

  20. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #9: ORD PROVIDES TECHNICAL SUPPORT TO EPA/OIA & DOS INITIATIVE IN EGYPT

    Science.gov (United States)

    This ninth edition reports on a workshop on global climate change that was held in Cairo, Egypt, on May 10-12, 1999. The workshop represented a successful partnership between EPA's Office of International Affairs, Office of Research and Development (ORD), Office of Air and Radiat...

  1. Right to assisted reproductive technology: overcoming infertility in low-resource countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhorn, Marcia C

    2009-08-01

    This article examines the high prevalence of primary and secondary infertility in low-resource countries. Provision of assisted reproductive technology (ART) to overcome both female and male infertility is in line with the reproductive rights agenda developed at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo 15 years ago. In addition to the right to control fertility, reproductive rights must encompass the right to facilitate fertility when fertility is threatened. Facilitation of fertility may require resort to ART, among both men and women. Egypt is highlighted as a positive example of progress in this regard.

  2. Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Virginia

    This four-week fourth grade social studies unit dealing with religious dimensions in ancient Egyptian culture was developed by the Public Education Religion Studies Center at Wright State University. It seeks to help students understand ancient Egypt by looking at the people, the culture, and the people's world view. The unit begins with outlines…

  3. New Educational Services Development: Framework for Technology Entrepreneurship Education at Universities in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Warda, Sherein Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The overall objective of the current study is to explore how universities can better developing new educational services. The purpose of this paper is to develop framework for technology entrepreneurship education (TEPE) within universities. Design/Methodology/Approach: Qualitative and quantitative research approaches were employed. This…

  4. New Educational Services Development: Framework for Technology Entrepreneurship Education at Universities in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Warda, Sherein Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The overall objective of the current study is to explore how universities can better developing new educational services. The purpose of this paper is to develop framework for technology entrepreneurship education (TEPE) within universities. Design/Methodology/Approach: Qualitative and quantitative research approaches were employed. This…

  5. Characterization of Ancient Egyptian Wall Paintings, the Excavations of Cairo University at Saqqara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein MAREY MAHMOUD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at characterizing some Egyptian wall paintings discovered during the excavations of Cairo University (since 1988 and recently in 2005 at Saqqara area in the south of Cairo. There, a number of tombs dating back to the 19th dynasty (c.1293–1185 BC were discovered. The walls of these tombs are carved with bass and raised reliefs and painted with different colours. The characterization of the wall paintings was done by means of optical microscopy (OM, scanning electron microscopy (backscattered electron mode, BSE equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray detector (EDS, micro XRF spectrometry (µ-XRF, and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD. The analysis of the examined samples indicated that the blue pigment is Egyptian blue (Cuprorivaite, the green pigment is Egyptian green, the red pigment is red ochre, and the yellow pigment is a blended layer of yellow ochre and orpiment (As2S3. The results will help in providing an image concerning some painting materials used during the new Kingdom in ancient Egypt

  6. [Adventures of the feminist movement on the road to Cairo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, S; Matamala, M; Palomino, N; Ramos, S

    1994-01-01

    The meeting of the health network of Latin American and Caribbean women was held in July 1993 and focused on strategies and issues of reproductive health and rights of women on the way to the Cairo conference in 1994. The complexity of the debate in the area of population politics was indicated by the pronatalist views expressed by the Vatican and Islam fundamentalism, the arguments and beliefs of the ecologists, the dichotomy of the North-South confrontation, and the tension between Western modernity and tradition. Several limitations also hamstrung feminists: with regard to fertility, the preoccupation with reproduction-sexuality-motherhood; advocation of the demographic transition in spite of pronatalist policies; and the absence of inefficiency of services. Tension within the feminist movement also surfaced with respect to tools used for exercising reproductive rights, reproductive decisions as permitted by technology, the radical division between masculine and feminine in feminist analysis, and false option between separatism and integration in political strategies. The limitations and paralyzing tension which frustrate the feminist debate about population can be transformed into fertile undertakings by articulating long-term projects; redefining the concepts of population and of population policies with regard to fertility and reproductive rights; by constructing the mechanisms of consensus within the movement (development of a common agenda); by defining the desirable alliances, possible alliances, and the necessary negotiations; and by following up the Cairo Conference with a Plan of Action and other meetings as the upcoming session on social development in Copenhagen in 1995 and the Conference on Women and Development in Beijing in 1995.

  7. Epidemiology of Schistosomiasis in Egypt: Travel through Time: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashida M.R. Barakat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease caused by blood flukes (Trematodes of the genus Schistosoma (S.. It is well documented that schistosomiasis haematobium was endemic in Ancient Egypt. Infection was diagnosed in mummies 3000, 4000 and 5000 years old. Scott was the first to describe the pattern of schistosomiasis infection in Egypt. Schistosomiasis haematobium was highly prevalent (60% both in the Nile Delta and Nile Valley South of Cairo in districts of perennial irrigation while it was low (6% in districts of basin irrigation. Schistosoma mansoni infected 60% of the population in the Northern and Eastern parts of the Nile Delta and only 6% in the Southern part. Neither S. mansoni cases nor its snail intermediate host were found in the Nile Valley South of Cairo. The building of the Aswan High Dam -which was completed in 1967 – did not cause any increase in schistosomiasis prevalence. In 1990, a study conducted in nine governorates of Egypt confirmed the change in the pattern of schistosomiasis transmission in the Delta. There was an overall reduction in S. mansoni prevalence while Schistosoma haematobium had continued to disappear. In Middle and Upper Egypt there was consistent reduction in the prevalence of S. haematobium except in Sohag, Qena, and Aswan governorates. However, foci of S. mansoni were detected in Giza, Fayoum, Menya and Assiut. All schistosomiasis control projects implemented in Egypt from 1953 to 1985 adopted the strategy of transmission control and were based mainly on snail control supplemented by anti-bilharzial chemotherapy. In 1997, the National Schistosomiasis Control Program (NSCP was launched in the Nile Delta. It adopted morbidity control strategy with Praziquantel mass treatment as the main component. In 1996, before the NSCP, 168 villages had S. mansoni prevalence >30%, 324 villages 20–30% and 654 villages 10–20%. By the end of 2010, in the whole country only 29 villages had prevalence >3% and none had

  8. Opportunities to broaden bilateral relations between Egypt and the Netherlands in the areas of water management and agriculture : A Scoping Exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zingstra, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    The report provides information based on which the Royal Netherlands Embassy in Cairo can detail its strategy for broadening the cooperation between Egypt and the Netherlands in the area of water management and agriculture. The mounting problems in the field of water resources management combined

  9. A Comparative Study of Piano Curricula in Egypt and the USA (with Specific Reference to the School of Music at the University of Illinois)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Sahar Abdel Moneim Hanafy

    2010-01-01

    This research draws a comparison between the School of Music at the University of Illinois, USA and the Faculty of Music Education at Helwan University in Cairo, Egypt (the researcher's academic appointment is at Menofia University, but she teaches on the faculty of Helwan University). The research answers two important questions: (1) What…

  10. A Comparative Study of Piano Curricula in Egypt and the USA (with Specific Reference to the School of Music at the University of Illinois)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Sahar Abdel Moneim Hanafy

    2010-01-01

    This research draws a comparison between the School of Music at the University of Illinois, USA and the Faculty of Music Education at Helwan University in Cairo, Egypt (the researcher's academic appointment is at Menofia University, but she teaches on the faculty of Helwan University). The research answers two important questions: (1) What…

  11. København - Cairo tur/retur

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindekilde, Lasse

    2012-01-01

    authorities that travelled to Egypt, Lebanon, and Syria in December 2005. These actors were forced into a more defensive mode of claims-making soon after their return to Denmark through processes of name-calling and stigmatization. Building on this case study, the article concludes by suggesting some...

  12. Indices of water quality and metal pollution of Nile River, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Satar, Amaal M.; Ali, Mohamed H.; Mohamed E. Goher

    2017-01-01

    Nile River is the valued natural and exclusive source of fresh water in Egypt, where the drinking water supply is limited to the river. The water quality of 24 sites between Aswan and Cairo along the Nile was investigated. To evaluate the suitability of water for aquatic life and drinking purposes, the indices of water quality (WQI), heavy metal pollution (HPI) and contamination (Cd) were computed. The water quality variations were mainly related to inorganic nutrients and heavy metals, where...

  13. Max Herz Pasha on Arab-Islamic Art in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Ormos, István

    2016-01-01

    Having spent ten years in subordinate posts at the Technical Bureau of the Waqf Ministry, Max Herz (1856–1919; fig. 1) became chief architect to the Egyptian Comité de Conservation des Monuments de l’Art Arabe in 1890. He occupied this position, which had been created for him personally, until the end of 1914. As chief architect, he played a key role in the conservation of Arab-Islamic architectural monuments in Egypt, in Cairo primarily. The importance of the job was indicated by the fact th...

  14. Seminar on Egypt population policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantner, J F

    1984-01-01

    The information and viewpoints presented at the Seminar on Egypt Population Policy held in Cairo on October 16-18 were summariezed and critically assessed. The seminar was organized by the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population's Committee on the Utilization ofDemographic Knowlege in Policy Formulation and Planning for the purpose of assessing the policy making the utility of social science and demographc knowledge with specific reference to Egypt's family planning program. The seminar was attended by demographers, social scientists, and experienced policy makers, and the discussion was highly focused. Seminar papers and discussions sought to clarify Egypt's current demographic situation, attempted to use sample survey data to identifyfertility determinants, analyzed Egypt's policyresponses to the population problem, assessed the national family planning program, identified the type of knowledge available for policy making, and noted areas where policy relevant information is lacking. Evidence presented at the seminar indicated that Egyptian fertility is still high and that corrected the total fertility rate for 1980 was close to 6. Since, 1960, fertility declined in all regions of the country, but between 1976-80 the decline decelerated. This deceleration appears to be a temporary phenonemon. There is evidence that the age at marriage is increasing, that the population is motivated to use contraception when desired family size is reached, that contraceptive use is cost sensitive, and that the overall decline in fertility since the 1960s occurred in all parts of the country. Papers which presented analyses of fertility determinants, based on sample survey data, provided little useful insight for policy formulation. The studies indicate that the impact of family planning services on different segments of the population varies, and that these impacts may be increased if social and economic development persists. The preception of the population

  15. Occupational and Environmental Risk Factors for Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis in Egypt: A Multicenter Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RA Elmetwally

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the advances in medical therapy and technology, the prognosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF remains poor and the need for disease prevention based on identifying the risk factors becomes mandatory. Occupational and environmental exposures were studied in several countries and found to play important role in the disease development. However, in Egypt, a little attention has been paid to study the effect of these factors in the disease development. Objective: To identify the occupational and environmental risk factors associated with the development of IPF in Egypt.Methods: A multicenter hospital-based case-control study was carried out in chest hospitals affiliated to three Egyptian cities—Cairo, Tanta and Mansoura. Subjects were 201 patients with confirmed IPF (cases and 205 age-, sex- and residence-matched controls. Data on occupational and environmental factors were obtained from a questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent risk factors of IPF in both sexes for single factors with adjustment for age, residence and smoking status.Results: Compared with the controls, the risk of IPF in male workers was observed to increase significantly in chemical and petrochemical industries and carpentry and wood working (OR=2.56, 95% CI: 1.02–7.01, and with occupational exposures to wood dust and wood preservatives. Among female workers, a significant increase was observed in farming (OR=3.34, 95% CI: 1.17–10.12, raising birds and occupational exposures to animal feeds, products and dusts and pesticides. Risk of IPF decreased significantly in male workers and insignificantly among female workers in sales and clerical related activities. The environmental exposures to birds and cats were significantly associated with elevated risk of IPF development in both sexes.Conclusion: In Egypt, farming, raising birds and wood working are important risk factors for the development of IPF.

  16. Occupational and environmental risk factors for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in Egypt: a multicenter case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadalla, N J; Hegazy, A; Elmetwally, R A; Wahby, I

    2012-07-01

    Despite the advances in medical therapy and technology, the prognosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains poor and the need for disease prevention based on identifying the risk factors becomes mandatory. Occupational and environmental exposures were studied in several countries and found to play important role in the disease development. However, in Egypt, a little attention has been paid to study the effect of these factors in the disease development. To identify the occupational and environmental risk factors associated with the development of IPF in Egypt. A multicenter hospital-based case-control study was carried out in chest hospitals affiliated to three Egyptian cities-Cairo, Tanta and Mansoura. Subjects were 201 patients with confirmed IPF (cases) and 205 age-, sex- and residence-matched controls. Data on occupational and environmental factors were obtained from a questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the independent risk factors of IPF in both sexes for single factors with adjustment for age, residence and smoking status. Compared with the controls, the risk of IPF in male workers was observed to increase significantly in chemical and petrochemical industries and carpentry and wood working (OR = 2.56, 95% CI: 1.02-7.01), and with occupational exposures to wood dust and wood preservatives. Among female workers, a significant increase was observed in farming (OR = 3.34, 95% CI: 1.17-10.12), raising birds and occupational exposures to animal feeds, products and dusts and pesticides. Risk of IPF decreased significantly in male workers and insignificantly among female workers in sales and clerical related activities. The environmental exposures to birds and cats were significantly associated with elevated risk of IPF development in both sexes. In Egypt, farming, raising birds and wood working are important risk factors for the development of IPF.

  17. Energy Analysis for New Hotel Buildings in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. George B. Hanna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the results of energy simulation analysis to determine the effectiveness of building characteristics in reducing electrical energy consumption for hotel buildings in Egypt. Specifically, the impact on building envelope performance is investigated for different strategies such as window size, glazing type and building construction for two geographical locations in Egypt (Cairo and Alexandria. This paper also studies the energy savings in hotel buildings with 200 rooms for different Lighting Power Densities (LPD, Energy Input Ratios (EIR, Set point Temperatures (SPT and HVAC systems. The study shows certain findings of practical significance, e.g. that a Window-to-Wall Ratio of 0.20 and reasonably shaded windows lower the total annual electricity use for hotel buildings by more than 20% in the two Egyptian locations.

  18. Ancient Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swamy, Ashwin Balegar

    This thesis involves development of an interactive GIS (Geographic Information System) based application, which gives information about the ancient history of Egypt. The astonishing architecture, the strange burial rituals and their civilization were some of the intriguing questions that motivated me towards developing this application. The application is a historical timeline starting from 3100 BC, leading up to 664 BC, focusing on the evolution of the Egyptian dynasties. The tool holds information regarding some of the famous monuments which were constructed during that era and also about the civilizations that co-existed. It also provides details about the religions followed by their kings. It also includes the languages spoken during those periods. The tool is developed using JAVA, a programing language and MOJO (Map Objects Java Objects) a product of ESRI (Environmental Science Research Institute) to create map objects, to provide geographic information. JAVA Swing is used for designing the user interface. HTML (Hyper Text Markup Language) pages are created to provide the user with more information related to the historic period. CSS (Cascade Style Sheets) and JAVA Scripts are used with HTML5 to achieve creative display of content. The tool is kept simple and easy for the user to interact with. The tool also includes pictures and videos for the user to get a feel of the historic period. The application is built to motivate people to know more about one of the prominent and ancient civilization of the Mediterranean world.

  19. Nomenclatural notes on the genus Pteranthus (Caryophyllaceae) with lectotypification of the name Camphorosma pteanthus and Pteranthus trigynus, and comments on Forsskål's seeds sent from Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iamonico, Dulio; Friis, Ib; Jarvis, Charles;

    2015-01-01

    The nomenclatural history of the genus Pteranthus ( Caryophyllaceae) is reviewed. Original material of Camphorosma pteranthus and Pteranthus dichotomus came from a single gathering made by Forsskål in the desert outside Cairo, Egypt, in March 1762. The original material of C. pteranthus was grown...

  20. Experience of dysmenorrhea among a group of physical therapy students from Cairo University: an exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel DM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Dalia M Kamel,1,2 Sayed A Tantawy,2,3 Gehan A Abdelsamea1 1Department of Physical Therapy for Obstetrics & Gynecology, Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 2Physiotherapy Department, College of Medical and Health Sciences, Ahlia University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain; 3Department of Physiotherapy, Centre of Radiation, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt Introduction: Dysmenorrhea is a condition describing the painful cramps that women feel before or during the menstrual period. While dysmenorrhea is the most common gynecologic complaint affecting adolescent and young women and there has been significant progress in understanding its pathophysiology and managing the symptoms, many young women do not seek medical consultation and remain untreated.Aim of the study: The aim of the study was to explore the prevalence of dysmenorrhea, its physical impact, and associated coping behaviors among university students.Methods: A total of 269 female college students volunteered to participate in the study. Data regarding the students’ experience with dysmenorrhea were collected via self-reported questionnaire developed based on relevant literature. Pain was scored on visual analog scale (VAS.Results: Most respondents (84.01% reported feeling pain in the abdomen and back (VAS score, 5.00. Mood swings (84.8% and dizziness (48.2% were, respectively, the most common affective and somatic symptoms related to menstruation. There was a significant difference in the amount of menstrual flow (p=0.004 and incidence of dysmenorrhea (p=0.03 according to menstrual regularity. Most students (91.2% did not seek medical consultation for dysmenorrhea, and 62.4% used analgesics. However, no significant correlation (p=0.25 was found between analgesic intake and pain relief. While most students (90.7% did not miss exams, 48.7% reported poor satisfaction with their academic performance because of dysmenorrhea

  1. Risk perception and priority setting for intervention among hepatitis C virus and environmental risks: a cross-sectional survey in the Cairo community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewedar Sahar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV recently emerged as a major public health hazard in Egypt. However, dramatic healthcare budget constraints limit access to the costly treatment. We assessed risk perception and priority setting for intervention among HCV, unsafe water, and outdoor air pollution in Cairo city. Methods A survey was conducted in the homes of a representative sample of household heads in Cairo city. Risk perception was assessed using the "psychometric paradigm" where health hazards are evaluated according to several attributes and then summarized by principal component analysis. Priority setting was assessed by individual ranking of interventions reducing health hazards by 50% over five years. The Condorcet method was used to aggregate individual rankings of the three interventions (main study or two of three interventions (validation study. Explanatory factors of priority setting were explored in multivariate generalized logistic models. Results HCV was perceived as having the most severe consequences in terms of illness and out-of-pocket costs, while outdoor air pollution was perceived as the most uncontrollable risk. In the main study (n = 2,603, improved water supply received higher priority than both improved outdoor air quality (60.1%, P P Conclusions The Cairo community prefers to further improving water supply as compared to improved outdoor air quality and screening and treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

  2. en cementos el Cairo S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXANDER CORREA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo tiene como finalidad difundir los estudios de repetibilidad y reproducibilidad de la medida, conocidos como Estudios R&R, a partir del diseño experimental. Con su aplicación se busca identificar y disminuir la variabilidad presente en las mediciones de los ensayos que se realizan en los laboratorios de control de calidad. La efectividad de este tipo de estudios radica principalmente en el control que se haga de las variables que intervienen en los procesos de medición, estas variables son el medio ambiente en que son desarrolladas, el estado de los equipos e implementos utilizados, la capacitación que tiene el operario, el uso de material homogéneo y la aplicación de un método normalizado. El artículo describe una secuencia ordenada de los pasos que se deben seguir antes y durante la realización de un Estudio R&R, además muestra la aplicación de esta metodología en la empresa Cementos El Cairo, donde fueron realizadas dos corridas del método a la prueba finura de cemento, en la primera se identifica la variabilidad presente en los ensayos, de este primer acercamiento surgen algunos ajustes que son implementados rápidamente por la empresa y con el afán de mejorar estos procesos es planeada la segunda corrida, terminado este segundo ciclo se obtiene, aunque en poca proporción, una variabilidad menor a la del primer ciclo.

  3. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Gylling; Said Said, Usama; Badger, Jake

    2006-01-01

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  4. Wind Atlas for Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The results of a comprehensive, 8-year wind resource assessment programme in Egypt are presented. The objective has been to provide reliable and accurate wind atlas data sets for evaluating the potential wind power output from large electricityproducing wind turbine installations. The regional wind...... climates of Egypt have been determined by two independent methods: a traditional wind atlas based on observations from more than 30 stations all over Egypt, and a numerical wind atlas based on long-term reanalysis data and a mesoscale model (KAMM). The mean absolute error comparing the two methods is about...... 10% for two large-scale KAMM domains covering all of Egypt, and typically about 5% for several smaller-scale regional domains. The numerical wind atlas covers all of Egypt, whereas the meteorological stations are concentrated in six regions. The Wind Atlas for Egypt represents a significant step...

  5. Model-based analysis of an outbreak of bubonic plague in Cairo in 1801.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelot, Xavier; Whittles, Lilith K; Hall, Ian

    2017-06-01

    Bubonic plague has caused three deadly pandemics in human history: from the mid-sixth to mid-eighth century, from the mid-fourteenth to the mid-eighteenth century and from the end of the nineteenth until the mid-twentieth century. Between the second and the third pandemics, plague was causing sporadic outbreaks in only a few countries in the Middle East, including Egypt. Little is known about this historical phase of plague, even though it represents the temporal, geographical and phylogenetic transition between the second and third pandemics. Here we analysed in detail an outbreak of plague that took place in Cairo in 1801, and for which epidemiological data are uniquely available thanks to the presence of medical officers accompanying the Napoleonic expedition into Egypt at that time. We propose a new stochastic model describing how bubonic plague outbreaks unfold in both rat and human populations, and perform Bayesian inference under this model using a particle Markov chain Monte Carlo. Rat carcasses were estimated to be infectious for approximately 4 days after death, which is in good agreement with local observations on the survival of infectious rat fleas. The estimated transmission rate between rats implies a basic reproduction number R0 of approximately 3, causing the collapse of the rat population in approximately 100 days. Simultaneously, the force of infection exerted by each infected rat carcass onto the human population increases progressively by more than an order of magnitude. We also considered human-to-human transmission via pneumonic plague or human specific vectors, but found this route to account for only a small fraction of cases and to be significantly below the threshold required to sustain an outbreak. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Cairo-Paris:The Urban Imaginary of the Self

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sherif, Mona A.Selim

    2010-01-01

    AbstractCairo-Paris: The Urban Imaginary of the SelfByMona A. Selim El-SherifDoctor of Philosophy in Near Eastern StudiesProfessor Margaret Larkin, Chair My dissertation Cairo- Paris: the urban imaginary of the Self, examines expressions of Egyptian modernity through the use of the urban experience as a paradigm for it. The dissertation uses the three different genres of the essay, the novel, and film, in order to examine expressions of Egyptian modernity in its urban context. The disser...

  7. Liquefaction analysis of alluvial soil deposits in Bedsa south west of Cairo

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    Kamal Mohamed Hafez Ismail Ibrahim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bedsa is one of the districts in Dahshour that lays south west of Cairo and suffered from liquefaction during October 1992 earthquake, Egypt. The soil profile consists of alluvial river Nile deposits mainly sandy mud with low plasticity; the ground water is shallow. The earthquake hypocenter was 18 km far away with local magnitude 5.8; the fault length was 13.8 km, as recorded by the Egyptian national seismological network (ENSN at Helwan. The analysis used the empirical method introduced by the national center for earthquake engineering research (NCEER based on field standard penetration of soil. It is found that the studied area can liquefy since there are saturated loose sandy silt layers at depth ranges from 7 to 14 m. The settlement is about 26 cm. The probability of liquefaction ranges between 40% and 100%. The presence of impermeable surface from medium cohesive silty clay acts as a plug resisting and trapping the upward flow of water during liquefaction, so fountain and spouts at weak points occurs. It is wise to use point bearing piles with foundation level deeper than 14 m beyond the liquefiable depth away from ground slopes, otherwise liquefaction improving techniques have to be applied in the area.

  8. Napoleon in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Brian

    1989-01-01

    Recounts the 1798 Egyptian campaign of Napoleon Bonaparte, whose Scientific and Artistic Commission documented and described the glories of ancient Egypt. The expedition was a disaster by military standards, but the cultural legacies included the Rosetta Stone, and a chronicle entitled "Description de L'Egypte," which did much to…

  9. Delineating active faults by using integrated geophysical data at northeastern part of Cairo, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Awad Sultan Araffa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical techniques such as gravity, magnetic and seismology are perfect tools for detecting subsurface structures of local, regional as well as of global scales. The study of the earthquake records can be used for differentiating the active and non active fault elements. In the current study more than 2200 land magnetic stations have been measured by using two proton magnetometers. The data is corrected for diurnal variations and then reduced by IGRF. The corrected data have been interpreted by different techniques after filtering the data to separate shallow sources (basaltic sheet from the deep sources (basement complex. Both Euler deconvolution and 3-D magnetic modeling have been carried out. The results of our interpretation have indicated that the depth to the upper surface of basaltic sheet ranges from less than 10–600 m, depth to the lower surface ranges from 60 to 750 m while the thickness of the basaltic sheet varies from less than 10–450 m. Moreover, gravity measurements have been conducted at the 2200 stations using a CG-3 gravimeter. The measured values are corrected to construct a Bouguer anomaly map. The least squares technique is then applied for regional residual separation. The third order of least squares is found to be the most suitable to separate the residual anomalies from the regional one. The resultant third order residual gravity map is used to delineate the structural fault systems of different characteristic trends. The trends are a NW–SE trend parallel to that of Gulf of Suez, a NE–SW trend parallel to the Gulf of Aqaba and an E–W trend parallel to the trend of Mediterranean Sea. Taking seismological records into consideration, it is found that most of 24 earthquake events recorded in the study area are located on fault elements. This gives an indication that the delineated fault elements are active.

  10. Trypanosoma evansi in dromedary camel: with a case report of zoonosis in greater Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridy, Fouad M; El-Metwally, Mohamed Tolba; Khalil, Hazem H M; Morsy, Tosson A

    2011-04-01

    Trypanosoma evansi (Steel, 1885) Balbiani, is the cause of trypanosomiasis (Surra) which multiples in the blood and body fluids. The incubation period varies from 7-15 days. The mortality rate was up to 20% and fatality rate may reach up to 100% in untreated camels. Three hundred randomly selected camels were 200 males 4-6 years old and 100 females 10-15 years. They were examined clinically and diagnosed by Giemsa stained blood smear, anti- trypanosomiasis-antibodies by ELISA and urine Thymol turbidity test for natural infection with T. evani (Surra). The results showed that camels were naturally infected with T. evansi as indicated by stained blood film examination and/or ELISA. Infection in males was 6.0% (stained blood smears), 8.0% (ELISA) and 5.0% (urine thymol turbidity test). In females the infection rate was 9.0%, 24.0% and 12% respectively. By correlation with suggestive clinical manifestations, ELISA proved to be more sensitive and specific (13.3%) than stained blood films (10.0%) and urine Thymol turbidity test (7.3%). Regarding humans, one out of 30 was positive as indicated by ELISA and stained blood smear but was negative by urine thymol turbidity test. The human case was successfully treated as indicated clinically, parasitologically and serologically. This is the first reported Egyptian human case of trypanosomiasis evansi, a neglected zoonosis.

  11. NILES 94; International Conference Held in Cairo, Egypt on 26-30 March 1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-30

    coins metaphors for men . He has knowledge of all •.•e .9 . l This translation first published 1956 by Penguin Classics Edited by E.V. Rieu . 1 037 (5...University. of dysphagia waqs obtained in all cases. Initial responce was relatd to the site and growth pattern of the tumour. Reobliteratoin rate was...less able to recover after heat exposure. We report the case of a 54 years old female patient with recalcitrant verrucae vulgares on her little

  12. Study of the Etiological Causes of Toe Web Space Lesions in Cairo, Egypt

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    Hussein Mohamed Hassab-El-Naby

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The etiology of foot intertrigo is varied. Several pathogens and skin conditions might play a role in toe web space lesions. Objective. To identify the possible etiological causes of toe web space lesions. Methods. 100 Egyptian patients were enrolled in this study (72 females and 28 males. Their ages ranged from 18 to 79 years. For every patient, detailed history taking, general and skin examinations, and investigations including Wood’s light examination, skin scraping for potassium hydroxide test, skin swabs for bacterial isolation, and skin biopsy all were done. Results. Among the 100 patients, positive Wood’s light fluorescence was observed in 24 and positive bacterial growth was observed in 85. With skin biopsy, 52 patients showed features characteristic for eczema, 25 showed features characteristic for fungus, 19 showed features characteristic for callosity, and 3 showed features characteristic for wart while in only 1 patient the features were characteristic for lichen planus. Conclusion. Toe web space lesions are caused by different etiological factors. The most common was interdigital eczema (52% followed by fungal infection (25%. We suggest that patients who do not respond to antifungals should be reexamined for another primary or secondary dermatologic condition that may resemble interdigital fungal infection.

  13. Study of the Etiological Causes of Toe Web Space Lesions in Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassab-El-Naby, Hussein Mohamed; Mohamed, Yasser Fathy; Abdo, Hamed Mohamed; Kamel, Mohamed Ismail; Hablas, Wael Refaat; Mohamed, Osama Khalil

    2015-01-01

    Background. The etiology of foot intertrigo is varied. Several pathogens and skin conditions might play a role in toe web space lesions. Objective. To identify the possible etiological causes of toe web space lesions. Methods. 100 Egyptian patients were enrolled in this study (72 females and 28 males). Their ages ranged from 18 to 79 years. For every patient, detailed history taking, general and skin examinations, and investigations including Wood's light examination, skin scraping for potassium hydroxide test, skin swabs for bacterial isolation, and skin biopsy all were done. Results. Among the 100 patients, positive Wood's light fluorescence was observed in 24 and positive bacterial growth was observed in 85. With skin biopsy, 52 patients showed features characteristic for eczema, 25 showed features characteristic for fungus, 19 showed features characteristic for callosity, and 3 showed features characteristic for wart while in only 1 patient the features were characteristic for lichen planus. Conclusion. Toe web space lesions are caused by different etiological factors. The most common was interdigital eczema (52%) followed by fungal infection (25%). We suggest that patients who do not respond to antifungals should be reexamined for another primary or secondary dermatologic condition that may resemble interdigital fungal infection.

  14. Egypt site of first CSM marketing audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    The 1st application of the marketing audit concept to a CSM project was implemented in Egypt's Family of the Future (FOF) contraceptive social marketing program in 1982. The audit defined the basic mission of the FOF as one of assisting the government in achieving its long range family planning goals. The stated FOF objectives are as follows: to create an awareness or an increase in demand for family planning services, particularly among the lower socioeconomic strata in urban Egypt; to establish and maintain a reliable supply mechanism to make FOF products more readily acceptable and available from pharmacies; and to consolidate the CSM operations and services first in the greater Cairo area and then expand to other urban areas in Egypt. The core strategy of the FOF incorporates several elements, including intensive media based advertising and personal promotion to promote the concept of family planning and to educate the general public about contraceptive alternatives. FOF product prices are considerably lower than commercial prices. Dr. Alan R. Andreasen, who conducted the audit on behalf of the FOF technical assistance contractor, noted that the FOF is growing rapidly and stated that the audit recommendations were intended to help FOF management. Dr. Andreasen conducted interviews with all the senior personnel at FOF and met with various specialized staff members such as the Public Relations Manager. Dr. Andreasen noted that at the time of the audit the FOF could claim major accomplishments in creating an awareness of the need for family planning and in product sales. From the time products were launched in 1979 through 1981 condom sales increased 260%. Foaming tablet sales increased more than 320% and IUD sales increased nearly 330%. The introduction of the Copper 7 IUD accounted for 35% of the growth of IUD sales in 1981. Couple years of protection (CYP) provided by all products increased from 45,533 in 1979 to 190,831 in 1981, an increase over 300%. The

  15. Hotline in Egypt marks change in government attitude to AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The first 24-hour AIDS hotline in the Arab world will open in Cairo, Egypt, in October 1995. The opening of the new service marks a change in attitude on the part of the Egyptian government, which has maintained a discreet AIDS control program in the past. Approval from religious leaders was necessary for the new program to begin; the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) played a prominent role in negotiations. The "Counsel and Hot Line Centre," which will be based in Imbala district, will employ 19 people, including two doctors and two psychologists. The Centre was funded with US$300,000 from the Ford Foundation. Currently, 478 persons with HIV infections and 110 people with AIDS have been reported. The ministry estimates that there are 5000-7000 persons with HIV infections in Egypt. Although these figures were greeted with suspicion by organizations outside of Egypt, subsequent testing has indicated low prevalence rates for this country, despite high tourism and a large population of migrant workers.

  16. Production and analysis of a biosimilar erythropoietin in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebied WM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wael M Ebied,1 Hytham M Ahmed,2 Fawzy A Elbarbry31SEDICO Pharmaceuticals, Merck & Co External Partner, 6th of October City, Cairo, 2Pharmaceutical Analysis Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, Damanhour University, Damanhour, Egypt; 3Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Pacific University Oregon, Hillsboro, OR, USAAbstract: Although management of chronic diseases has been a major challenge for health care systems in developed and developing countries, biopharmaceuticals have been successful in treating many life-threatening conditions. However, the high cost of these agents restricts their availability to countries where patients and/or health care systems are able to afford them. Licensing these biopharmaceuticals as biosimilars after expiration of their patents might increase access to such medicines at an affordable price in developing countries. South Egypt Drug Industries Company (SEDICO is an Egyptian pharmaceutical company that has had the opportunity to manufacture some of these drugs. SEDICO biotechnology products, such as insulin, erythropoietin, streptokinase, angiokinase, follicle-stimulating hormone, aprotinin, filgrastim, and somatropin, have been available on the Egyptian market for more than 6 years. For this paper, erythropoietin, which has been investigated over a number of years, was chosen as a representative example of SEDICO biotechnology products. Our findings confirm that SEDICO erythropoietin can compete with the originator epoetins on the Egyptian market with high quality and at a lower cost.Keywords: biosimilars, developing countries, insulin, human growth hormone, erythropoietin, epoetin, Egypt

  17. Indirect determination of broadband turbidity coefficients over Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Metwally, Mossad

    2013-01-01

    Long-term data from diffuse and global irradiances were used to calculate direct beam irradiance which was used to determine three atmospheric turbidity coefficients (Linke T L , Ångström β and Unsworth-Monteith δ a ) at seven sites in Egypt in the period from 1981 to 2000. Seven study sites (Barrani, Matruh, Arish, Cairo, Asyut, Aswan and Kharga) have been divided into three categories: Mediterranean climate (MC), desert Nile climate (DNC) and urban climate (UC, Cairo). The indirect method (i.e., global irradiance minus diffuse irradiance) used here allows to estimate the turbidity coefficients with an RMSE% ≤20 % (for β, δ a and T L ) and ~30 % (for β) if compared with those estimated by direct beam irradiance and sunphotometeric data, respectively. Monthly averages of T L , β and δ a show seasonal variations with mainly maxima in spring at all stations, due to Khamsin depressions coming from Sahara. Secondary maxima is observed in summer and autumn at DNC and MC (Barrani and Arish) stations in summer due to dust haze which prevails during that season and at UC (Cairo) in autumn, due to the northern extension of the Sudan monsoon trough, which is accompanied by small-scale depressions with dust particles. The mean annual values of β, δ a , and T L (0.216, 0.314, and 4.6, respectively) are larger in Cairo than at MC stations (0.146, 0.216, and 3.8, respectively) and DNC stations (0.153, 0.227, and 3.8, respectively). Both El-Chichon and Mt. Pinatubo eruptions were examined for all records data at MC, UC and DNC stations. The overburden caused by Mt. Pinatubo's eruption was larger than El-Chichon's eruption and overburden for β, and T L at DNC stations (0.06, and 0.58 units, respectively) was more pronounced than that at MC (0.02, and 0.26, respectively) and UC (0.05 and 0.52 units, respectively) stations. The annual variations in wind speed and turbidity parameters show high values for both low and high wind speed at all stations. The wind directions

  18. Building Opportunity Out of Science and Technology (BOOST): Enhancing Capacity for Hydrologic Science in Morocco and Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryar, A. E.; Milewski, A.; Sultan, M.; Benaabidate, L.; Laftouhi, N.; Fekri, A.; Cherif, O.; Elewa, H.; Garamoon, H.; Ward, J. W.; Hanley, C.

    2013-12-01

    Across North Africa and the Middle East, absolute water scarcity and impaired water quality pose significant challenges. Another critical issue is suitable employment opportunities for university graduates. With the support of the U.S. State Department, we developed a 2-year pilot project (BOOST) to address both problems by working with graduate students in hydrologic sciences on developing 'hard' (technical) and 'soft' (professional) skills. Two cohorts of six students each were selected from Morocco and Egypt. The Moroccans were geology students from three universities, whereas the Egyptians included four geologists, a soil scientist, and a physical geographer from four universities. English proficiency was emphasized and at least half the participants in each cohort were female. Training began during spring 2012 with an Internet-based course introducing GIS, remote sensing, and hydrologic modeling. Students traveled to the USA in summer 2012 for a week of field training activities and a week-long, 'hands-on' workshop as a capstone to the long-distance course. Field activities in the Concho River watershed of west Texas included mapping of hydraulic heads in an unconfined aquifer, measurements of stream flow and infiltration rates, and analyses of water-quality parameters (temperature, pH, electrical conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and alkalinity). In a second Internet-based course during fall 2012, students developed resumes and LinkedIn pages, gave written and oral summaries of webinars (on career options for geoscientists and hydrologic topics), and completed a module on research ethics. The capstone activity for the second course was presentation of posters on research topics at the 2012 Geological Society of America Annual Meeting. During winter-spring 2013, students participated in outreach activities such as training other students at their institutions. The group met for final debriefing and discussions with stakeholders (secondary-school educators and

  19. Mismatch Repair Status and BRAF Mutation Status in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Patients: A Pooled Analysis of the CAIRO, CAIRO2, COIN, and FOCUS Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venderbosch, S.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Maughan, T.S.; Smith, C.G.; Cheadle, J.P.; Fisher, D.; Kaplan, R.; Quirke, P.; Seymour, M.T.; Richman, S.D.; Meijer, G.A.; Ylstra, B.; Heideman, D.A.; Haan, A.F.J. de; Punt, C.J.A.; Koopman, M.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence and prognostic value of mismatch repair (MMR) status and its relation to BRAF mutation (BRAF(MT)) status in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: A pooled analysis of four phase III studies in first-line treatment of mCRC (CAIRO, CAIRO2, COIN,

  20. Regional distribution of lead in human milk from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M A; Ragab, A A; Kamel, A; Jones, J; el-Sebae, A K

    1996-05-01

    Bioaccumulation of lead during chronic exposure and its mobilization and secretion with mother's milk constitute a serious health hazard to the newly born children. Lead levels in human breast milk of 120 Egyptian women representing 20 different governorates throughout Egypt were determined using a graphite furnace Atomic Absorption spectrometer. According to the daily permissible intake (DPI) value established by the WHO of 5.0 micrograms/kg/d in mother's milk, the mean values of lead were around the permissible level in most of the Egyptian governorates. However, lead levels in mother's milk from Alexandria, Assiut and Cairo were significantly higher than the permissible value. Higher lead levels in mother's milk from these governorates may be attributed to heavy automobile traffic using leaded gasoline in addition to the use of lead water pipelines in these areas.

  1. A survey of oral health, Qalyub project, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WHEATCROFT, M G; KLIMT, C R

    1959-01-01

    This report presents the results of an oral health survey of 4324 individuals in three villages near Cairo, Egypt.The results show that the incidence of dental decay (expressed as the number of carious teeth per individual) in this group of Egyptians was lower than that reported for the over-all population of the USA, and that the prevalence of periodontal disease in the group studied was about three times as high as that reported in the USA.There was a statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of asymptomatic enlargement of the parotid glands and the occurrence of angular cheilosis in the same individuals. Other forms of oral disease were observed infrequently.Water samples from the survey area were assayed for fluorides and were shown to contain fluoride levels below that considered to give protection against dental caries.

  2. A survey of oral health, Qalyub Project, Egypt*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatcroft, M. G.; Klimt, C. R.

    1959-01-01

    This report presents the results of an oral health survey of 4324 individuals in three villages near Cairo, Egypt. The results show that the incidence of dental decay (expressed as the number of carious teeth per individual) in this group of Egyptians was lower than that reported for the over-all population of the USA, and that the prevalence of periodontal disease in the group studied was about three times as high as that reported in the USA. There was a statistically significant relationship between the occurrence of asymptomatic enlargement of the parotid glands and the occurrence of angular cheilosis in the same individuals. Other forms of oral disease were observed infrequently. Water samples from the survey area were assayed for fluorides and were shown to contain fluoride levels below that considered to give protection against dental caries. PMID:13638795

  3. FOLLOWING THE NEW SILK ROAD BETWEEN YIWU AND CAIRO

    OpenAIRE

    Pliez, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    International audience; What link can be established between Tripoli, capital of the former rogue state of Libya, the small Egyptian border town of Salloum, inhabited by Bedouins, the Egyptian metropolis of Cairo, and Yiwu, a market city three hours’ drive from Shanghai? At first glance, the question may seem like a guessing game, but in fact it leads geographers, anthropologists, and other social scientists to face the increasing difficulty of working out the unexpected and often invisible c...

  4. Reverse Gear: Cairo's Dependence on a Disappearing Paradigm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malcolm Potts; Martha Campbell

    2005-01-01

    In the 1960s and 1970 s, attention was focused on rapid population growth and large scale family planning programs were launched in many developing countries.However, the paradigm for understanding fertility decline assumed that exogenous socioeconomic changes were necessary to reduce family size. By the mid-1990s, the standard model of the demographic transition had been all but discarded, partly there were numerous country experiences inconsistent with the model. The 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) emphasized women's broader needs, which were important but were promoted by reducing attention to population and the need for family planning. The timing of this shift was peculiar, because the Cairo proponents were depending on an already discredited model of reproductive behavior. The policy shift at Cairo undermined the political coalition that had supported international family planning since the 1960s. As a result of declining financial support, the health of women has deteriorated seriously in the past decade. Meantime,the countries that have been successful in lifting unprecedented numbers of people out of abject poverty were acting independently of the Cairo consensus.

  5. Profile of genetic disorders prevalent in northeast region of Cairo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2012-02-04

    Feb 4, 2012 ... In Egypt advanced maternal age has significant role ..... secondary craniosynostosis according to history, clinical exam- ination and investigations. .... turing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) after ARMS-PCR ...

  6. Assessment and management of water resources in Egypt to face drought and water scarcity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Wouter; El Guindy, Samia; Salah El Deen, Magdy; Roest, Koen; Smit, Robert; Froebrich, Jochen

    2013-04-01

    Egypt is one of the countries hardest hit by global and climate change. Challenges include population growth; increased demands for food, water, and energy; as well as changing land use patterns and urbanization. Egypt's part of the Mediterranean is characterized by a very complex hydrological system, as it lacks rainfall (Cairo average 30 mm/year) and it is completely dependent on the Nile river flow. The growth of the Egyptian population and its economy in the near future leads to an increase in the demand for water and the overall water allocation priority basically is: first drinking water, then industry, and whatever is remaining will be available for agriculture and nature. Because the agricultural sector uses more than 80 per cent of available water, the main option available to reduce water scarcity in the priority sectors of the economy is to allocate less to the agriculture sector. Scientifically based advances in facing future drought and water scarcity through innovations increasing yields and food security by measures leading to "more crop per drop" are required. New and modern large- and medium-scale agriculture is being developed in desert areas with participation of the private sector for investments. To prepare the farming community and others elsewhere, for the future situation of water shortages, a paradigm shift is needed. New farming systems under tight water supply conditions are in development to prepare for a future with less water. Egyptian farming systems need a major transition to prevent further marginalization of agriculture, which would also have a major impact on food security. Central to this transition should be the increase of value generated per volume available water, also referred to as "more crop per drop" or "more cash per splash". There is room for the urgently required improvement: the present return on water in agriculture in Egypt is about US 0.25 /m3, where values of over US 1 /m3 are "easily" reached elsewhere. Moreover

  7. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  8. Risk perception and priority setting for intervention among hepatitis C virus and environmental risks: a cross-sectional survey in the Cairo community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzinger, Michaël; Mohamed, Mostafa K; Gad, Rita R; Dewedar, Sahar; Fontanet, Arnaud; Carrat, Fabrice; Luchini, Stéphane

    2010-12-20

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) recently emerged as a major public health hazard in Egypt. However, dramatic healthcare budget constraints limit access to the costly treatment. We assessed risk perception and priority setting for intervention among HCV, unsafe water, and outdoor air pollution in Cairo city. A survey was conducted in the homes of a representative sample of household heads in Cairo city. Risk perception was assessed using the "psychometric paradigm" where health hazards are evaluated according to several attributes and then summarized by principal component analysis. Priority setting was assessed by individual ranking of interventions reducing health hazards by 50% over five years. The Condorcet method was used to aggregate individual rankings of the three interventions (main study) or two of three interventions (validation study). Explanatory factors of priority setting were explored in multivariate generalized logistic models. HCV was perceived as having the most severe consequences in terms of illness and out-of-pocket costs, while outdoor air pollution was perceived as the most uncontrollable risk. In the main study (n = 2,603), improved water supply received higher priority than both improved outdoor air quality (60.1%, P < .0001) and screening and treatment of chronic hepatitis C (66.3%, P < .0001), as confirmed in the validation study (n = 1,019). Higher education, report of HCV-related diseases in the household, and perception of HCV as the most severe risk were significantly associated to setting HCV treatment as the first priority. The Cairo community prefers to further improving water supply as compared to improved outdoor air quality and screening and treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

  9. Marshak Lectureship Talk: Women in Physics in Egypt and the Arab World

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, Karimat

    2009-03-01

    Until the end of the 19th Century Science was not classified into different disciplines. The first woman named in the history of science was Merit Ptah (2700 BC) in Egypt's Valley of the Kings. In the new Egypt the first girl's school started in Cairo in 1873 and the first University in 1908. Only a few girls attended the University at that time, mainly studying the humanities. The first Egyptian woman physicist graduated in 1940 and received her PhD in nuclear physics in the USA. Nowadays the number of women in physics is increasing in all branches of physics, some of them are senior managers and others have been decorated with various prizes. In this talk some statistics will be given to show the percentage of women in physics in relation to other fields of science in Egypt. In Saudi Arabia the first girls' school started in 1964 and the first college for women, which was a section of King Abdul-Aziz University (where education is not mixed), started in 1975. I was the founder of the Physics Department of this women's section. Egyptians have played significant roles in teaching schoolchildren and university students of both sexes in all the Arab countries: Saudi Arabia, Sudan, Kuwait, Yemen, the Gulf States, Libya, Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan. But with respect to Algeria, Tunisia and Morocco, our role was limited, since classes are taught in French. Arab women living in the countries located east of Egypt still have many difficulties facing them, needing to overcome many technical, academic, and social problems, while women in the countries located west of Egypt have fewer problems. There were many problems in the early days of education in Egypt but the women of Egypt worked hard to gain the same rights as men and were able to pave the way for all Arab women. I myself met many difficulties in my early days. This talk will also describe the impact of the regional conference on Women in Physics in Africa and Middle East, which was held in Cairo in 2007.

  10. Animal brucellosis in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareth, Gamal; Hikal, Ahmed; Refai, Mohamed; Melzer, Falk; Roesler, Uwe; Neubauer, Heinrich

    2014-11-13

    Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis that affects the public health and economic performance of endemic as well as non-endemic countries. In developing nations, brucellosis is often a very common but neglected disease. The purpose of this review is to provide insight about brucellosis in animal populations in Egypt and help to understand the situation from 1986 to 2013. A total of 67 national and international scientific publications on serological investigations, isolation, and biotyping studies from 1986 to 2013 were reviewed to verify the current status of brucellosis in animal populations in Egypt. Serological investigations within the national surveillance program give indirect proof for the presence of brucellosis in cattle, buffaloes, sheep, goats, and camels in Egypt. Serologic testing for brucellosis is a well-established procedure in Egypt, but most of the corresponding studies do not follow the scientific standards. B. melitensis biovar (bv) 3, B. abortus bv 1, and B. suis bv 1 have been isolated from farm animals and Nile catfish. Brucellosis is prevalent nationwide in many farm animal species. There is an obvious discrepancy between official seroprevalence data and data from scientific publications. The need for a nationwide survey to genotype circulating Brucellae is obvious. The epidemiologic situation of brucellosis in Egypt is unresolved and needs clarification.

  11. Exploring Instructors' Technology Readiness, Attitudes and Behavioral Intentions towards E-Learning Technologies in Egypt and United Arab Emirates

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Alfy, Shahira; Gómez, Jorge Marx; Ivanov, Danail

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the association between technology readiness, (a meta-construct consisting of optimism, innovativeness, discomfort, and insecurity), attitude, and behavioral intention towards e-learning technologies adoption within an education institution context. The empirical study data is collected at two private universities located in…

  12. Dwarfs in ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Chahira

    2006-02-15

    Ancient Egypt was one of the most advanced and productive civilizations in antiquity, spanning 3000 years before the "Christian" era. Ancient Egyptians built colossal temples and magnificent tombs to honor their gods and religious leaders. Their hieroglyphic language, system of organization, and recording of events give contemporary researchers insights into their daily activities. Based on the record left by their art, the ancient Egyptians documented the presence of dwarfs in almost every facet of life. Due to the hot dry climate and natural and artificial mummification, Egypt is a major source of information on achondroplasia in the old world. The remains of dwarfs are abundant and include complete and partial skeletons. Dwarfs were employed as personal attendants, animal tenders, jewelers, and entertainers. Several high-ranking dwarfs especially from the Old Kingdom (2700-2190 BCE) achieved important status and had lavish burial places close to the pyramids. Their costly tombs in the royal cemeteries and the inscriptions on their statutes indicate their high-ranking position in Egyptian society and their close relation to the king. Some of them were Seneb, Pereniankh, Khnumhotpe, and Djeder. There were at least two dwarf gods, Ptah and Bes. The god Ptah was associated with regeneration and rejuvenation. The god Bes was a protector of sexuality, childbirth, women, and children. He was a favored deity particularly during the Greco-Roman period. His temple was recently excavated in the Baharia oasis in the middle of Egypt. The burial sites and artistic sources provide glimpses of the positions of dwarfs in daily life in ancient Egypt. Dwarfs were accepted in ancient Egypt; their recorded daily activities suggest assimilation into daily life, and their disorder was not shown as a physical handicap. Wisdom writings and moral teachings in ancient Egypt commanded respect for dwarfs and other individuals with disabilities.

  13. Surgery in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Zawahry, M D; Ramzy, A F; el-Sahwi, E; Bahnasy, A F; Khafaga, M; Rizk-Allah, M A; Abou el-Hoda, M F

    1997-07-01

    The history of medicine can never be complete without referral to ancient Egyptian medicine. Imhotep has been identified as the god of medicine. There are 13 faculties of medicine in Egypt; the oldest is the Kasr El Aini Faculty, which started in 1925. We review undergraduate and postgraduate education in Egypt. The Egyptian Society of Surgeons organizes the scientific surgical activities. Schistosomiasis is a national health problem. Health care is provided by many types of hospitals, including university, teaching, Ministry of Public Health, military, and private hospitals.

  14. Measurements of air pollutants at two disposal sites in Cairo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köck, M

    1989-01-01

    40,000 people live on the periphery of Cairo. They dispose of the city's entire waste. A complete recycling of the waste is carried out (up to 90%). The rest is burnt. Enormous fume emissions result form the incomplete burning process of their constituents of rest wastes (plastic, paper rests, tins cloth rests, org. material). The daily burning process lasts from midday to approximately 11 p.m. The main pollutants measured were: Carbon monoxide, hydrochloric acid and sulphur dioxide. As the results demonstrate, high amounts of carbon monoxide and hydrochloric acid are emitted from the burning process.

  15. Conference report. Can spirit of Cairo survive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, R

    1994-01-01

    Country representatives from around the globe came together at the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) to draft a document in the spirit of compromise and unified intent. Marked controversy and conflict plagued the conference, both before and during the official meetings. Accord was nonetheless reached. The author wonders how long and to what extent the euphoria and compromise of the ICPD will last now that official talks are over. It is clear that paranoia and discord subsumed during the conference will persist, foment, and potentially resurface in confrontation over time. The South, for example, was upset about the failure of the conference to focus more upon development and environmental issues, while the Southern women's groups invested their energies into political ideologies and their development as a counterforce to international multinational scientific and corporate lobbies on pharmaceutical and contraceptive technologies. The women's caucus instead adopted a Western world view of sexuality which effectively permeated their lobbying and the conference. While dissent may resurface over time, the ICPD nonetheless set into motion positive processes for nongovernmental organization participation in a spirit of partnership within the UN systems and in the formulation of national policies and programs of their respective countries. In closing, the author expresses her regret that China and India maintained a low profile at the official meeting, and that Pakistan, rooted in Islam, spoke for the Indian subcontinent.

  16. Land reclamation in Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    2009-01-01

    For decades, Egypt has tried to increase its agricultural area through reclamation of desert land. The significance of land reclamation goes beyond the size of the reclaimed area and number of new settlers and has been important to Egyptian agricultural policies since the 1952-revolution. This pa...

  17. Ancient Egypt: Personal Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolinski, Arelene

    This teacher resource book provides information on ancient Egypt via short essays, photographs, maps, charts, and drawings. Egyptian social and religious life, including writing, art, architecture, and even the practice of mummification, is conveniently summarized for the teacher or other practitioner in a series of one to three page articles with…

  18. Present Situation of GPS Observations and Seismicity in and around Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Salah

    2016-07-01

    Egypt has suffered from a numerous of destructive earthquakes such as Aswan earthquake (1981, Mag 5.4) near the High dam, Dahshour earthquake (1992, Mag 5.9) near Cairo city and Aqaba earthquake (1995, Mag 7.2). As the category of earthquake damage includes all the phenomena related to the direct and indirect damages, the Egyptian authorities do a great effort to mitigate the earthquake disasters. The seismicity especially at the zones of high activity is investigated in details in order to obtain the active source zones not only by the Egyptian National Seismic Network (ENSN) but also by the local seismic networks. Studies of crustal movements in Egypt started as early as 1983 following the occurrence of Aswan earthquake in 1981. The first program for monitoring the crustal deformation has been started in Aswan area during the winter of 1983. Since the year of 1994 till now (currently 24 CORS stations), the geodetic observations by means of Space Technique (GPS) were applied instead of the terrestrial ones to cover some other regions of the country. These regions include Sinai, Gulf of Suez, Greater Cairo, Aswan and the Middle part on the River Nile. Data adjustment and analysis of the repeated GPS campaigns from the different networks prevailed significant movements which may help in more understanding the geodynamics of these regions. In the meantime, GPS measurements of crustal motions for 189 sites extending east-west from the Caucasus Mountains to the Adriatic Sea and north-south from the southern edge of the Eurasian plate to the northern edge of the African plate were carried out to Estimate the plate motions at stations located at different plates. From the previous results, we could find there are some correlations between the computed surface deformation and the earthquake occurrences in Local and regional scales. In the regional scales, the Hellenic arc is the region which shows very well this correlation. While in the Local scales, there are some

  19. Determination of rare earth elements in dust deposited on tree leaves from Greater Cairo using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Abdallah A; Khoder, M I; El-Abssawy, A A; Hassan, S K; Borges, Daniel L G

    2013-07-01

    This work aims at monitoring the rare earth elements (REEs) and Th in dust deposited on tree leaves collected inside and outside Greater Cairo (GC), Egypt. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was employed. The concentration of REEs in the collected dust samples was found to be in the range from 1 to 60 μg g(-1). The highest concentration of REEs was found in dust samples collected outside GC, in the middle of the Nile Delta. This would refer to the availability of black sands, due to desert wind occurrence during the sample collection, and anthropogenic activities. The limits of detection of the REEs ranged from 0.02 ng g(-1) for Tm to 3 ng g(-1) for Yb. There was an obvious variation in the concentration of REEs inside and outside GC due to variations of natural and anthropogenic sources. Strong correlations among all the REEs were found.

  20. The Vatican at the United Nations. Cairo + 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissling, F

    1999-01-01

    During the International Conference on Population and Development in Cairo, a remarkable consensus on population and development was forged and a Programme of Action was issued. With its permanent observer status among governments at the UN, the Vatican had attempted to block such a worldwide consensus on a new structure for population and development programs, based on women's empowerment, universal and voluntary access to contraception, and improved reproductive health for all. After 5 years of implementing the Cairo Programme of Action, the UN conducted a review and appraisal of its implementation, ending with a final preparatory meeting and a Special Session of the UN General Assembly. During the review process and the meeting, the Vatican remained active but fell short, on the whole, of thwarting progress. The Vatican delegation was made up of five individuals--two women and three men, including two priests. Almost all their interventions were focused on the goal of obstructing progressive understanding of what would be necessary if the Programme of Action were to be fully and fairly implemented. This included the provision of emergency contraception to refugees; the definition of human rights; addressing unsafe abortion as a major public health issue; the provision of condoms for protection against HIV/AIDS; adolescent rights to privacy and confidentiality; and the inclusion of sex education in school curricula.

  1. Political history of modern Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. Islam Islami

    2016-07-01

    Gamal Abdel Nasser was the one who established the Republic of Egypt and ended the monarchy rule in Egypt following the Egyptian revolution in 1952. Egypt was ruled autocratically by three presidents over the following six decades, by Nasser from 1954 until his death in 1970, by Anwar Sadat from 1971 until his assassination 1981, and by Hosni Mubarak from 1981 until his resignation in the face of the 2011 Egyptian revolution.

  2. 开罗贫民窟问题的解决对山西城市发展的借鉴意义%The significance of solving the problems in Cairo slum to Shanxi city development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶; 车效梅

    2012-01-01

    贫民窟是世界城市化进程中的普遍现象。埃及与中国同属发展中国家,又是中东阿拉伯世界最早实施"开放"政策的国家,其首都开罗贫民窟与山西城市棚户区在景观特征和社会特征方面呈现出相似性,在具体类型比较中差异明显,埃及政府在公共住房、搬迁安置以及贫民窟升级改造政策中的经验、教训,值得山西城市借鉴。%Slums is a common phenomenon in the process of urbanization.Both china and Egypt belong to the developing countries,and Egypt was the first country that carried out the opening policy in the middle east Arab Countries.Slums in the Cairo,the capital of Egypt,and shantytown in the main cities of Shanxi shows many similarities in the characteristics of Landscape and society.meanwhile there are many differences in a comparative study of concrete classification.By Comparing renovation measures in Shanxi and Cairo,the measures taken by Egyptian officials,including the public housing policy,the placement,and slum upgrading,also brought impact on slums renovation from which Shanxi government can learn something.

  3. Orthopedic surgery in ancient Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Background - Ancient Egypt might be considered the cradle of medicine. The modern literature is, however, sometimes rather too enthusiastic regarding the procedures that are attributed an Egyptian origin...

  4. More sustainable energy in Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderberg Petersen, L.

    2007-01-01

    Last autumn, Risø completed eight years of work mapping out Egypt’s wind climate and wind resources. The result was a 260-page Wind Atlas for Egypt. Thanks to this, Egypt will be able to increase the share of renewable energy.......Last autumn, Risø completed eight years of work mapping out Egypt’s wind climate and wind resources. The result was a 260-page Wind Atlas for Egypt. Thanks to this, Egypt will be able to increase the share of renewable energy....

  5. Myxomycetes from upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Raheem, Ahmed M

    2002-01-01

    The results of the first inventory of Myxomycetes from the subtropical region Upper Egypt are reported. The substrates were wood, bark of living and dead tree and leaf litter. 20 species belonging to 17 genera of Myxomycetes were identified. Wood was the best substrate for Myxomycetes colonization. Ceratiomyxa fruticulosa, Didymiun melanospermum, Licea biforis and Lycogala epidendrum were the most common species. Brief description and classification of species are provided.

  6. Contribution of geophysical studies on detection of the Petrified Frost Qattamiya, Cairo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Awad Sultan Araffa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Different geophysical tools such as resistivity, seismic refraction, and magnetic survey have been applied to delineate the subsurface stratigraphy and structural elements, which controlled the distribution and origin of the Petrified wood in Qattamiya, Cairo, Egypt. Land magnetic survey was carried out in the study area through two stages, the first stage includes all area by measuring 11,674 stations and the second stage was carried out in the detailed area that was located at the southeastern part of the all area including 9441 stations. All measurements have been corrected for diurnal variation and reduced to the north magnetic pole. The results of magnetic interpretation indicated that the area dissected by different structural elements trend toward NE–SW, NW–SE, N–S and E–W directions. Twenty-eight samples have been collected from the detailed area to analyze for magnetic susceptibility values. Four electrical resistivity tomography (ERT profiles were measured by using dipole–dipole configuration to estimate the vertical and lateral variation of the subsurface sequence. Results of quantitative interpretation of the ERT data indicate that the subsurface sequence consists of different geoelectric units; the first unit is characterized by high resistivity values upto 1000 ohm m corresponding to sand, gravel and Petrified wood at the surface and extends to a depth of a few meters. The second geoelectric unit is corresponding to sandy clay which exhibits moderate resistivity (few hundred ohm m values with thickness ranging from 6 to10 m. The third geoelectric unit is characterized by very low resistivity corresponding to clay of depth ranging from 10 to 30 m overlaying the fourth unit which reached to a depth ranging from 30 to 56 m and characterized by very high resistivity (8000 ohm m corresponding to limestone. Three shallow seismic refraction spreads of geophone spacing 7.5 m were measured to investigate the subsurface

  7. Egypt Highlighted at International Tourism Fair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    During the Beijing International Travel and Tourism Market 2006 (BITTM) fair, the Egypt Tourism Authority launched a tourism-promotional campaign, entitled "Egypt Shines for You." To mark the 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between China and Egypt, the Egypt Tourism Authority plans to implement a year-long promotional initiative in China to popularize Egypt's tourist destinations and culture. Dr. Nasser Abdel-Aal, Tourism Counselor at the Egyptian

  8. Egypt & Financial Crisis

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Financial crisis that occurred in August 2008 was unforeseen, sudden, sharp, and had a great impact on the global financial market. Egypt is one of the countries was affected by this financial crisis as a market economy country, and WTO member. in this paper I will try to study the implication of such crisis on the Egyptian economy in the fields of tourism, Suez canal, oil field, and GDP, not only the economy factor were effected, but also the Egyptian market represented in its compon...

  9. The eye and its diseases in Ancient Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. Ry

    1997-01-01

    Ophthalmology, History of ophthalmology, eyes in the Ancient Egypt, eye disease in Ancient Egypt, porotic hyperostosis, mummification......Ophthalmology, History of ophthalmology, eyes in the Ancient Egypt, eye disease in Ancient Egypt, porotic hyperostosis, mummification...

  10. Exporting a Scandinavian Learning Model to Egypt and Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Youssef, Sandra Safwat; Bygholm, Ann; Jæger, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    many challenges. In this paper, we will present findings from an ethnographic study of the learning systems in higher education in Denmark, Egypt and Vietnam. The sample includes undergraduate level classes taught in Denmark, Egypt and Vietnam. The selected learning setting include an 'Academic......The recent advances in technology have made the process of exporting Western education more easy, and Blended Learning techniques is often the method of choice for exported educational programs. Although, in theory, this make perfect sense, yet in practice, the export of education has encountered...

  11. Achieving the Cairo Conference (ICPD) goal for youth in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Laila; Rob, Ubaidur; Bhuiya, Ismat; Khan, M E; Islam, Md Rafiqul

    Sexual and reproductive health education is not yet formally introduced in Bangladesh without which the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo's goal to ensure young people's right to access to such information and services will remain unfulfilled. The Population Council provided technical assistance to a governmental department to pilot youth reproductive health education. Study findings from the pre- and posttests of 379 matched respondents revealed significant changes in knowledge, attitudes, and life-skills. Knowledge about long-term contraceptives and skills on negotiating safe sex improved significantly by 63% and 26%, respectively. Youths who do not consider menstruation as a disease nearly doubled, and misunderstandings about the mother's role in sex determination of a child were significantly dispelled. Decisions not to accompany friends in visiting sex workers and to use condoms, ignoring friends' disapproval, were increased over 18%. Over 98% of students reported that teachers discussed condoms, while only 12% alleged unfriendly behavior. Findings motivated the department to scale up the reproductive health curriculum.

  12. Psychiatric Morbidity among a Sample of Orphanage Children in Cairo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. EL Koumi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study identifies the prevalence of emotional and behavioral problems and the associated factors in orphanage children. Methods. This cross-sectional study was conducted in three private orphanages in Cairo. Two hundred sixty-five children of ages ranging from 6 to 12 years living in three different orphanages care systems were included in the study. A sociodemographic information form and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL were used. Children were clinically interviewed and psychiatric disorders were identified. Diagnoses were done according to the manual for diagnosis and statistics of mental disorder fourth version (DSMIV. A written formal consent from the director of social solidarity was obtained before inclusion in the study. Results. The prevalence of behavioral disturbances was 64.53% among those in institutional care and the most prominent psychiatric disorders were nocturnal enuresis (23.3%, attention deficit hyperkinetic disorder (ADHD (19.62%, oppositional defiant disorder (17.36%. Age at first admission, causes of receiving institutional care, and moves 2 or more times between institutions were significantly associated with an increased risk of behavioral and emotional problems. Conclusion. Our study showed that children living in institutions are prone to suffer from psychiatric disorders. Stability of the caregiver acts as a protective variable.

  13. Role of Leisure Time Physical Activity in Cancer Prevention: Awareness and Practice among Medical Students at Cairo University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Mohamed Abdelmoaty, Alshaimaa; Fouad Abd El Badei, Alaa; Obaid, Hamzah Ahmed; Mohamed, Esraa Mowafy; abosheab, Alaa; Abdulkarim, Ali; Abdelsadek, Omar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Physical inactivity is accountable for a sizable proportion of breast and colorectal cancers and other non-communicable diseases. The higher the individual’s awareness about the protective role of physical activity (PA) in reducing chronic disease, the greater the adoption of PA will be. Objectives: To determine the level of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and awareness towards the role of LTPA in cancer prevention among a sample of Medical students at Cairo University, Egypt. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study, with multistage sampling (a total of 519 students from second to six year students) and a self administered questionnaire covering the study objectives. Results: A significant decrease in the actual?? level of LTPA was noted with students’ year of enrollment at the medical school. However, their knowledge about roles of PA in preventing coronary heart, elevated blood pressure, and elevated cholesterol exceeded 80%, with steady increase in relation to the year of enrolment from the second to 6th years. Their knowledge about PA preventive influence for cancer was low irrespective of the year enrolment (32.2% for prevention of colon and 16.2% for breast cancers). The main sources of knowledge about the role of PA in cancer prevention were the internet and media (77%). Conclusion: The students demonstrated a decline in their LTPA coupled with poor knowledge about the role of LTPA in cancer prevention. Revision of the current curricula should be considered with inclusion of more information on the role of LTPA in cancer prevention to facilitate better awareness of medical students and through them their future patients. Creative Commons Attribution License

  14. Egypt- Old Ally, New Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    agriculture, land reclamation, pastoralism, petroleum, mining, fishing and tourism industries. The Egyptian government should simultaneously pursue a...Mohammed, Bioleaching of Rare Earth Elements and Uranium from Sinai Soil , Egypt Using Actinomycetes, The Egyptian Journal of Hospital Medicine 2013

  15. The schistosomiasis problem in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak, A B

    1982-01-01

    This report provides an overview of past and current efforts to control schistosomiasis in Egypt, describes recent trends, and analyzes factors responsible for changes in transmission. For the purpose of long-term planning and developing control strategies, the country has been divided into eight geographic zones: Suez Canal Zone, Sainai, Nile Delta, Guiza, Fayoum, Middle Egypt, Upper Egypt, and the High Dam Lake Zone. Overall control priorities are examined and the strategy for each zone is described. The most recent information on changes in epidemiologic patterns of schistosomiasis in Egypt is mentioned, as well as the introduction of newer therapeutic agents. Lastly, the role of outside funding agencies in supporting schistosomiasis control is examined.

  16. Case control study to identify risk factors for acute hepatitis C virus infection in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandeel Amr M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of risk factors of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Egypt is crucial to develop appropriate prevention strategies. Methods We conducted a case–control study, June 2007-September 2008, to investigate risk factors for acute HCV infection in Egypt among 86 patients and 287 age and gender matched controls identified in two infectious disease hospitals in Cairo and Alexandria. Case-patients were defined as: any patient with symptoms of acute hepatitis; lab tested positive for HCV antibodies and negative for HBsAg, HBc IgM, HAV IgM; and 7-fold increase in the upper limit of transaminase levels. Controls were selected from patients’ visitors with negative viral hepatitis markers. Subjects were interviewed about previous exposures within six months, including community-acquired and health-care associated practices. Results Case-patients were more likely than controls to have received injection with a reused syringe (OR=23.1, CI 4.7-153, to have been in prison (OR=21.5, CI 2.5-479.6, to have received IV fluids in a hospital (OR=13.8, CI 5.3-37.2, to have been an IV drug user (OR=12.1, CI 4.6-33.1, to have had minimal surgical procedures (OR=9.7, CI 4.2-22.4, to have received IV fluid as an outpatient (OR=8, CI 4–16.2, or to have been admitted to hospital (OR=7.9, CI 4.2-15 within the last 6 months. Multivariate analysis indicated that unsafe health facility practices are the main risk factors associated with transmission of HCV infection in Egypt. Conclusion In Egypt, focusing acute HCV prevention measures on health-care settings would have a beneficial impact.

  17. Integrated geophysical studies on the area east of Abu Gharadig basin, southern Cairo, Egypt, using potential field data

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Awady, Mohammed Mohamed; El-Badrawy, Hussein Tawfek; Abuo El-Ela, Amin Mohamed; Solimaan, Mohamed Refaat; Alrefaee, Hamed Abdelhamid; Elbowab, Mostafa

    2016-12-01

    Potential field data of the area east of Abu Gharadig basin were used to delineate the tectonic framework of probable economic interest and for future development plans for the area. To achieve this goal, the RTP and Bouguer gravity maps of the study area were subjected to several filtering and processing techniques. The regional magnetic map shows NE-SW high regional magnetic trends at the northwestern and southeastern parts as well as low magnetic trends at the central part reflecting thick non-magnetized sediments and/or deep highly magnetized basement rocks. Similarly, the regional gravity map shows NE-SW diagonal high and low gravity trends across the entire area of study as well as a distinct increase of gravity values toward the northwest corner reflecting thickening of sedimentary cover and/or deepening of denser basement rock at the central part. The residual maps reveal many anomalies of shallow sources with different polarities, amplitudes and extensions in the form of alternating high and low gravity and magnetic indicating that the basement rocks are dissected by faults forming uplifted and downthrown blocks. Edge detection techniques outlined effectively the boarders and extensions of the structural highs and lows through showing gravity and magnetic maxima over the edges of these tectonic features. Moreover, the River Nile course is controlled by shallow normal faults affecting the recent Nile sediments and is clearly shown by edge detection maps of gravity data. Euler deconvolution of magnetic and gravity data reveals clustering of solution along fault trends or causative bodies centers. The Euler depth estimate to the basement surface shows a good correlation with the depth determined by the power spectrum method where its value ranges around 4 km. The interpreted basement tectonic map of the study area is dominated by ENE-WSW Syrian Arc, NW-SE Gulf of Suez and Red Sea, NE-SW Aqaba, E-W Mediterranean and N-S East Africa tectonic trends. The older tectonic trends were reactivated then intersected by younger ones.

  18. Integrated geophysical studies on the area east of Abu Gharadig basin, southern Cairo, Egypt, using potential field data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mohamed El-Awady

    2016-12-01

    Euler deconvolution of magnetic and gravity data reveals clustering of solution along fault trends or causative bodies centers. The Euler depth estimate to the basement surface shows a good correlation with the depth determined by the power spectrum method where its value ranges around 4 km. The interpreted basement tectonic map of the study area is dominated by ENE–WSW Syrian Arc, NW–SE Gulf of Suez and Red Sea, NE–SW Aqaba, E–W Mediterranean and N–S East Africa tectonic trends. The older tectonic trends were reactivated then intersected by younger ones.

  19. Job Stress and Self-Efficacy among Psychiatric Nursing Working in Mental Health Hospitals at Cairo, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Rania. A.

    2016-01-01

    Nursing stress is considered a problem that affects the practice worldwide. Job stress is a harmful response physically and emotionally when the nurses' skills, resources, and needs could not fulfill the requirement of the job. This study was aimed to assess job stress and self-efficacy among psychiatric nursing working in mental health hospitals…

  20. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices of family physicians and nurses regarding unintentional injuries among children under 15 years in Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elboray, Shereen; Elawdy, Mohamed Yehia; Dewedar, Sahar; Elezz, Nahla Abo; El-Setouhy, Maged; Smith, Gordon S; Hirshon, Jon Mark

    2017-03-01

    Unintentional injuries are a leading cause of death among children, especially in developing countries. Lack of reliable data regarding primary health care professionals' role in childhood unintentional injury prevention hinders the development of effective prevention strategies. A survey of 99 family physicians and nurses from 10 family health centres sought to develop insight into their knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding unintentional injury prevention for children injuries and injury prevention. Falls and road traffic crashes were identified as primary causes of childhood injuries by 54.5%. While >90% agreed injury prevention counselling (IPC) could be effective, only 50.5% provided IPC. Lack of time and educational materials were the leading barriers to provision of IPC (91.9% and 85.9%, respectively), while thinking counselling is not part of their clinical duties was the least perceived barrier (9.1%). There is a large disconnect between providers' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding IPC, more training and provision of counselling tools are essential for improving IPC by Egyptian medical providers.

  1. International Congress of Fluid Mechanics, 3rd, Cairo, Egypt, Jan. 2-4, 1990, Proceedings. Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayfeh, A.H.; Mobarak, A.; Rayan, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    This conference presents papers in the fields of flow separation, unsteady aerodynamics, fluid machinery, boundary-layer control and stability, grid generation, vorticity dominated flows, and turbomachinery. Also considered are propulsion, waves and sound, rotor aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, Euler and Navier-Stokes equations, cavitation, mixing and shear layers, mixing layers and turbulent flows, and fluid machinery and two-phase flows. Also addressed are supersonic and reacting flows, turbulent flows, and thermofluids.

  2. Cadmium status in Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It is inferred from these studies that releases of Cd are still increasing and it is recommended that measures must be taken to reduce emissions of cadmium. Any cadmium discharged into the Egyptian environment may move from one compartment to another at varying rates,resulting in an accumulation in compartments such as soils and biota. Such accumulation can be expected to increase with continued emissions,and attention should be given to all sources of cadmium, natural as well as anthropogenic especially in the industrial cities in Egypt. Cadmium present in sewage, as well as industrial effluent (also, other liquid and solid wastes) and sewage sludge will increase levels in soils and is xpected to contribute to dietary levels and body burdens. The current information indicates that such effects may have to be evaluated over long periods of time, possibly as long as 50 - 100 years.

  3. Countdown to Cairo: U.S. consumption weighs in.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Population pressures in the industrialized world affect long-term sustainability. The United States' population comprises only 5% of the world's total, yet it consumes 25% of the world's commercial energy, 27% of the world's aluminum, and over 20% of its tin, copper, and lead. Americans produce twice as much waste per person as most Europeans, and many times more than people in the developing world. Sustainable development is a central theme of the delegates to the UN's Cairo conference on population and development, and efforts to mitigate excessive resource use will undoubtedly be a topic. Delegates are searching for programs to help eradicate poverty; empower and advance women in education, employment, and health; and stabilize population growth. The adoption of policies to alter unsustainable and environmentally damaging patterns of consumption will be equally important. In April, 1994, President Clinton's Council on Sustainable Development set up a special task force to explore US population and consumption issues. US population pressures are becoming ever more visible: increasing traffic congestion, mounting garbage, air pollution, and severe water shortages. The US population, currently at 260 million, is the third highest in the world. The nation adds about 3 million to its population every year. The Census Bureau projects that by the year 2000, the population will reach 275 million. The national total fertility rate has risen to 2.1. In the industrialized world, only Iceland and Ireland, both at 2.2, are higher. The average American's energy use is equivalent to the consumption of 3 Japanese, 6 Mexicans, 12 Chinese, 33 Indians, 147 Bangladeshis, 281 Tanzanians, or 422 Ethiopians. It is uncertain whether metropolitan areas can meet the housing, health, education, and employment needs of millions more Americans. Policies in industrialized nations that reduce pollution and excessive resource use and slow population growth are needed to ensure a quality future

  4. Biomphalaria alexandrina in Egypt: Past, present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Iman F Abou-El-Naga

    2013-09-01

    The African species of Biomphalaria appeared as a result of the relatively recent west-to-east trans-Atlantic dispersal of the Biomphalaria glabrata-like taxon. In Egypt, Biomphalaria alexandrina is the intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni. Biomphalaria alexandrina originated in the area between Alexandria and Rosetta and has historically been confined to the Nile Delta. Schistosoma mansoni reached Egypt via infected slaves and baboons from the Land of Punt through migrations that occurred as early as the Vth Dynasty. The suggestion of the presence of Schistosoma mansoni infection in Lower Egypt during Pharaonic times is discussed despite the fact that that there is no evidence of such infection in Egyptian mummies. It is only recently that Biomphalaria alexandrina colonized the Egyptian Nile from the Delta to Lake Nasser. This change was likely due to the construction of huge water projects, the development of new water resources essential for land reclamation projects and the movement of refugees from the Suez Canal zone to the Delta and vice versa. The situation with respect to Biomphalaria in Egypt has become complicated in recent years by the detection of Biomphalaria glabrata and a hybrid between both species; however, follow-up studies have demonstrated the disappearance of such species within Egypt. The National Schistosoma Control Program has made great strides with respect to the eradication of schistosoma; however, there has unfortunately been a reemergence of Schistosoma mansoni resistant to praziquantel. There are numerous factors that may influence the prevalence of snails in Egypt, including the construction of water projects, the increase in reclaimed areas, global climate change and pollution. Thus, continued field studies in addition to the cooperation of several scientists are needed to obtain an accurate representation of the status of this species. In addition, the determination of the genome sequence for Biomphalaria alexandrina and the

  5. Biomphalaria alexandrina in Egypt: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-El-Naga, Iman F

    2013-09-01

    The African species of Biomphalaria appeared as a result of the relatively recent west-to-east trans-Atlantic dispersal of the Biomphalaria glabrata-like taxon. In Egypt, Biomphalaria alexandrina is the intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni. Biomphalaria alexandrina originated in the area between Alexandria and Rosetta and has historically been confined to the Nile Delta. Schistosoma mansoni reached Egypt via infected slaves and baboons from the Land of Punt through migrations that occurred as early as the Vth Dynasty. The suggestion of the presence of Schistosoma mansoni infection in Lower Egypt during Pharaonic times is discussed despite the fact that that there is no evidence of such infection in Egyptian mummies. It is only recently that Biomphalaria alexandrina colonized the Egyptian Nile from the Delta to Lake Nasser. This change was likely due to the construction of huge water projects, the development of new water resources essential for land reclamation projects and the movement of refugees from the Suez Canal zone to the Delta and vice versa. The situation with respect to Biomphalaria in Egypt has become complicated in recent years by the detection of Biomphalaria glabrata and a hybrid between both species; however, follow-up studies have demonstrated the disappearance of such species within Egypt. The National Schistosoma Control Program has made great strides with respect to the eradication of schistosoma; however, there has unfortunately been a reemergence of Schistosoma mansoni resistant to praziquantel. There are numerous factors that may influence the prevalence of snails in Egypt, including the construction of water projects, the increase in reclaimed areas, global climate change and pollution. Thus, continued field studies in addition to the cooperation of several scientists are needed to obtain an accurate representation of the status of this species. In addition, the determination of the genome sequence for Biomphalaria alexandrina and the

  6. Joint Egypt/United States report on Egypt/United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 1 of 5 Vols. Executive summary, main report and appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The International Energy Assessment Program between Egypt and the U.S. was formulated from mid-March to mid-July, 1978. The assessment identified energy demand and supply options for Egypt that are consistent with its indigenous energy resources; assessed Egypt's ability to effectively use those options; and identified measures by which Egypt's energy-planning activities could be improved. The assessment addressed all known and potential energy supply options (oil, gas, coal, oil shale, hydroelectric, nuclear power, geothermal, solar, wind, and biomass). Using the Reference Energy System, two future energy supply/demand balances are constructed (for 1985 and the year 2000) and these are compared with a historical (1975) supply/demand balance. The feasibility of each of the options is established in terms of the availability of the required resources and of the processing, conversion, transport, and utilization technology.

  7. Egypt: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-25

    with France and Russia ............................................................................... 9 U.S. Policy: How Important is Egypt...ability to import food and fuel. 3 Tourism receipts, a major source of foreign exchange, 4 declined by 15% in 2015, as concern over terrorism...Egypt earned $7.2 billion in tourism revenues. In 2010, it had earned $12.5 billion. See, “Egypt sees Tourist Returns down 10 pct after Plane Crash

  8. Nilo Cairo, a medicina e a Universidade Federal do Paraná

    OpenAIRE

    Fraiz, Ipojucan Calixto

    2014-01-01

    Resumo: Nesta tese, toma-se como objeto a trajetória de Nilo Cairo da Silva, médico homeopata, que realizou sua formação na Faculdade de Medicina do Rio de Janeiro, ao mesmo tempo em que desenvolvia carreira militar no exército brasileiro, chegando ao posto de capitão. O recorte deste estudo somente considerou os aspectos decisivos para sua formação médica; assim, não foi trabalhada em detalhes a carreira militar. Utilizou-se a sociologia de Norbert Elias, por entender que Nilo Cairo faz part...

  9. Surveillance of avian influenza viruses in migratory birds in Egypt, 2003-09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Atef; Saad, Magdi; Elassal, Emad; Amir, Ehab; Plathonoff, Chantal; Bahgat, Verina; El-Badry, Maha; Ahmed, Lu'ay S; Fouda, Mostafa; Gamaleldin, Mohammed; Mohamed, Nahed Abd-Elal; Salyer, Stephanie; Cornelius, Claire; Barthel, Robert

    2012-07-01

    Migratory (particularly aquatic) birds are the major natural reservoirs for type A influenza viruses. However, their role in transmitting highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses is unclear. Egypt is a "funnel" zone of wild bird migration pathways from Central Asia and Europe to Eastern and Central Africa ending in South Africa. We sought to detect and isolate avian influenza viruses in migratory birds in Egypt. During September 2003-February 2009, the US Naval Medical Research Unit Number 3, Cairo, Egypt, in collaboration with the Egyptian Ministry of Environment, obtained cloacal swabs from 7,894 migratory birds captured or shot by hunters in different geographic areas in Egypt. Samples were processed by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR for detection of the influenza A matrix gene. Positive samples were processed for virus isolation in specific-pathogen-free embryonated eggs and isolates were subtyped by PCR and partial sequencing. Ninety-five species of birds were collected. Predominant species were Green-Winged Teal (Anas carolinensis; 32.0%, n=2,528), Northern Shoveler (Anas clypeata; 21.4%, n=1,686), and Northern Pintail (Anas acuta; 11.1%, n=877). Of the 7,894 samples, 745 (9.4%) were positive for the influenza A matrix gene (mainly from the above predominant species). Thirteen of the 745 (1.7%) were H5-positive by PCR (11 were low-pathogenic avian influenza and two were HPAI H5N1). The prevalences of influenza A was among regions were 10-15%, except in Middle Egypt (4%). Thirty-nine influenza isolates were obtained from PCR-positive samples. Seventeen subtypes of avian influenza viruses (including H5N1 and H7N7) were classified from 39 isolates using PCR and partial sequencing. Only one HPAI H5N1 was isolated in February 2006, from a wild resident Great Egret (Ardea alba). No major die-offs or sick migratory birds were detected during the study. We identified avian influenza virus subtypes not previously reported in Egypt. The HPAI H5N1 isolated

  10. Molecular identification and phylogenetic analysis of Trypanosoma evansi from dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) in Egypt, a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Said; Ryu, Oishi; Tada, Chika; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Inoue, Noboru; Nakai, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Animal trypanosomiasis is one of the major constraints of livestock industry in developing countries. In the present study, prevalence of Trypanosome evansi was assessed in the blood of dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) brought to Al Bassatein abattoir, Cairo, Egypt, by mouse inoculation test out of 84 tested camels, 4 animals (4.7%) were infected. Molecular analysis was achieved by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of part of ribosomal RNA gene including 18S, ITS1, 5.8S and ITS2 regions. Despite the conserved nature of 18S region, ITS region showed obvious heterogeneity compared to analogous sequences in database. Analysis of transferrin receptor encoding gene (ESAG6) showed variable repertoire in the studied isolates, which may indicate to a novel structure of T. evansi population from Egypt and/or a difference in host range. Furthermore, analysis of variable surface glycoprotein RoTat 1.2 gene marker revealed some heterogeneity at this gene locus. To our knowledge, this is the first molecular analysis of T. evansi in Egypt.

  11. Female Genital Mutilation in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nissrin Hoffmann

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Female Genital Mutilation is widely practiced in Egypt as well as in big sections of the African continent. The tradition of mutilation of the female genital areas has been practiced over the course of many years in the country and has been attributed to being promoted by the Islamic religion in Egypt. The Islamic religion is the most widely practiced religion within Egypt and therefore is linked to being the main reason why the country possesses one of the highest prevalence rates of the practice within Africa, according to many surveys performed by many leading agencies and nongovernmental organizations that advocate for the abolition of the practice within the country. FGM as a social health concern has been realized as not possessing any health benefits for the women and young girls who are taken through the practice.

  12. Prevalence of extensively drug-resistant gram negative bacilli in surgical intensive care in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanin, Ahmed; Eladawy, Akram; Mohamed, Hossam; Salah, Yasmin; Lotfy, Ahmed; Mostafa, Hanan; Ghaith, Doaa; Mukhtar, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of extensively drug resistant gram negative bacilli (XDR-GNB) is rapidly progressing; however in Egypt data are sparse. We conducted the present study to quantify the incidence, risk factors and outcome of patients harboring XDR-GNB. A one year prospective study was done by collecting all the bacteriological reports for cultures sent from the surgical intensive care unit, Cairo university teaching hospital. XDR-GNB were defined as any gram negative bacilli resistant to three or more classes of antimicrobial agents. Patients with XDR-GNB compared with those sustaining non extensively drug-resistant infection. A multivariate logistic regression model was created to identify independent predictors of multi-resistance. During one-year study period, a total of 152 samples (65%) out of 234 gram negative bacilli samples developed extensively drug resistant infection. XDR strains were significantly higher in Acinetobacterspp (86%), followed by Pseudomonas (63%), then Proteus (61%), Klebsiella (52%), and E coli (47%). Fourth generation cephalosporine (Cefipime) had the lowest susceptibility (10%) followed by third generation cephalosporines (11%), Quinolones (31%), Amikacin (42%), Tazobactam (52%), Carbapinems (52%), and colistin (90%). Relaparotomy was the only significant risk factor for acquisition of XDR infection. Extensively drug-resistant gram negative infections are frequent in our ICU. This is an alarming health care issue in Egypt which emphasizes the need to rigorously implement infection control practices.

  13. Solar Energy for Rural Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalam, Tarek I.; Darwish, Ziad; Hatem, Tarek M.

    Egypt is currently experiencing the symptoms of an energy crisis, such as electricity outage and high deficit, due to increasing rates of fossil fuels consumption. Conversely, Egypt has a high solar availability of more than 18.5 MJ daily. Additionally, Egypt has large uninhabited deserts on both sides of the Nile valley and Sinai Peninsula, which both represent more than 96.5 % of the nation's total land area. Therefore, solar energy is one of the promising solutions for the energy shortage in Egypt. Furthermore, these vast lands are advantageous for commissioning large-scaled solar power projects, not only in terms of space availability, but also of availability of high quality silicon (sand) required for manufacturing silicon wafers used in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Also, rural Egypt is considered market a gap for investors, due to low local competition, and numerous remote areas that are not connected to the national electricity grid. Nevertheless, there are some obstacles that hinder the progress of solar energy in Egypt; for instance, the lack of local manufacturing capabilities, security, and turbulent market in addition to other challenges. This paper exhibits an experience of the authors designing and installing decentralized PV solar systems, with a total rated power of about 11 kW, installed at two rural villages in at the suburbs of Fayoum city, in addition to a conceptual design of a utility scale, 2 MW, PV power plant to be installed in Kuraymat. The outcomes of this experience asserted that solar PV systems can be a more technically and economically feasible solution for the energy problem in rural villages.

  14. 78 FR 43852 - Correction for the Cairo, IL and Belmond, IA Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... published on December 28, 2012 in FR Doc. 2012-76454, in the first column, the ``Areas Open for Designation..., Lake County, Tennessee. Correction In the Federal Register Notice published on December 28, 2012 in FR... Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration Correction for the Cairo, IL and Belmond,...

  15. International Agendas and Local Manifestations: Universities in Cairo, Beirut and Jerusalem after World War I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Valeska

    2015-01-01

    This article traces the influence of international networks in three Middle Eastern universities from the 1920s onwards: the American University of Beirut, the American University in Cairo and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. It shows how American, internationalist, imperial and religious actors competed and how the universities were placed in…

  16. International Agendas and Local Manifestations: Universities in Cairo, Beirut and Jerusalem after World War I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Valeska

    2015-01-01

    This article traces the influence of international networks in three Middle Eastern universities from the 1920s onwards: the American University of Beirut, the American University in Cairo and the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. It shows how American, internationalist, imperial and religious actors competed and how the universities were placed in…

  17. Pattern of antibiotic abuse – a population based study in Cairo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdel Gawad Elmasry

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed high rates of antibiotic abuse among Cairo population. This needs to be guided through different strategies. An easy access to an affordable health care service with a considerable quality is the first step side by side with establishing a national antibiotic policy to be followed by all healthcare workers.

  18. Regeneration as an approach for the development of informal settlements in Cairo metropolitan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada Farouk Hassan

    2012-09-01

    Finally the paper ends by discussing the capability of the application of this approach in dealing with the informal settlements in Cairo metropolitan as proper approach to cope with the need of dealing effectively with those shadows in the urban context.

  19. Een koninklijke baksteen uit Egypte

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haarlem, W.

    2007-01-01

    A ‘royal’ brick from Egypt A mudbrick with the name of Menkheperre, High Priest of Amun and Sovereign of Thebes in the 21st Dynasty, was recently given to the Museum. The historical context, building techniques and possible provenance are discussed.

  20. The relationship between Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance in developing countries. Case of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adham Genedy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores and tests the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR and corporate financial performance (CFP in developing countries, focusing mainly to examine the financial aspects of high vs low-ranked firms in the CSR Index in Egypt for eight consecutive years (excluding 2011 because of its special situation due to instability caused by the revolution. Moreover, this study empirically examines different financial ratios for 18 firms listed in Egyp-tian Stock Exchange EGX 30 for eight years, 2007 – 2015. Using the Standard and Poor’s index (S&P/EGX ESG Index to measure the CSR, and using accounting based measures (from Egypt for information Dissemination (EGID database and the Cairo and Alexandria Stock Exchange Disclosure book. This study’s purpose is to find the suitable measures of the CFP along with CSR, as well as, the relationship between them, to conclude whether CSR is beneficial for compa-nies or not. The main question here is: What is the type and significance of the relationship be-tween CSR and the CFP in Egypt? the ANOVA analysis was chosen and used on both compa-ny’s CSR and CFP variables, also constructed a Pearson Correlation between CSR and CFP va-riables and examined the multiple regression model to discriminate between the CFP of high and low-ranked firms in the CSR Index and recognize the type and significance of the relationship be-tween CSR and CFP. The results show that CSR has a positive significant relation with the CFP. The paper has implications for enhancing the understanding of performance management by understanding the relationship between CSR and CFP.

  1. Multidrug-resistant organisms in neonatal sepsis in two tertiary neonatal ICUs, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Hesham A; Mohamed, Maha H; Badran, Nabil F; Mohsen, Manal; Abd-Elrhman, Al-Sayed A

    2016-03-01

    Neonatal sepsis remains a serious problem in any neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Bacterial organisms have developed increased resistance to commonly used antibiotics. Because not enough data are available from Egypt, the aim of the present study was to determine the causative bacteria and the level of their resistance to commonly used antibiotics in tertiary NICUs in Cairo, Egypt. A 3.5-year retrospective study was carried out at NICUs of the Children's Hospital of Ain Shams University and that of El-Hussein Hospital, Al-Azhar University, Egypt. Records of neonates were reviewed. All neonates with culture-proven sepsis were included in the study. Almost one-third of the admitted neonates (33.4%) were diagnosed as having neonatal sepsis, 32.25% of them culture-proven. Early/late onset sepsis was found in 35.4 and 64.6%, respectively. Gram-negative/gram-positive bacteria was found in 68 to 25.6%. Fungal infection was detected in 9% of the isolates. Escherichia coli was the main pathogen isolated in both early-onset sepsis (41.2%) and late-onset sepsis (24.5%). Overall, 77% of the isolates were multidrug-resistant (60% of gram-positive bacteria and 83.4% of gram-negative bacteria). Nearly 80% (79%) of mortality was caused by multidrug-resistant organisms. Gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria showed high resistance against commonly used antibiotics such as ampicillin, amoxicillin, cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, and gentamicin. There is an alarming increase in antibiotic resistance to the commonly used antibiotics. Continuous surveillance for antibiotic susceptibility is needed to ensure proper empirical therapy. Improvement of infection control practices, avoidance of irrational use of antibiotics, and revision of the protocols are mandatory in the prevention of neonatal sepsis.

  2. Skeletal dysplasia in ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Chahira

    2008-12-01

    The ancient Egyptian civilization lasted for over 3000 years and ended in 30 BCE. Many aspects of ancient Egyptian culture, including the existence of skeletal dysplasias, and in particular achondroplasia, are well known through the monuments and records that survived until modern times. The hot and dry climate in Egypt allowed for the preservation of bodies and skeletal anomalies. The oldest dwarf skeleton, the Badarian skeleton (4500 BCE), possibly represents an epiphyseal disorder. Among the remains of dwarfs with achondroplasia from ancient Egypt (2686-2190 BCE), exists a skeleton of a pregnant female, believed to have died during delivery with a baby's remains in situ. British museums have partial skeletons of dwarfs with achondroplasia, humeri probably affected with mucopolysaccharidoses, and a skeleton of a child with osteogenesis imperfecta. Skeletal dysplasia is also found among royal remains. The mummy of the pharaoh Siptah (1342-1197 BCE) shows a deformity of the left leg and foot. A mummified fetus, believed to be the daughter of king Tutankhamun, has scoliosis, spina bifida, and Sprengel deformity. In 2006 I reviewed the previously existing knowledge of dwarfism in ancient Egypt. The purpose of this second historical review is to add to that knowledge with an expanded contribution. The artistic documentation of people with skeletal dysplasia from ancient Egypt is plentiful including hundreds of amulets, statues, and drawing on tomb and temple walls. Examination of artistic reliefs provides a glance of the role of people with skeletal dysplasia and the societal attitudes toward them. Both artistic evidence and moral teachings in ancient Egypt reveal wide integration of individuals with disabilities into the society.

  3. A preliminary identification of insect successive wave in Egypt on control and zinc phosphide-intoxicated animals in different seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marah Mohammad Abd El-Bar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presented study aimed primarily to document a baseline data of the decay process of rabbits and guinea pigs and their associated arthropod fauna, which are placed in an urban city: El Abbassyia, Cairo Governorate, Egypt, during winter and summer seasons, and to compare these data with the corresponding figure for zinc phosphide-intoxicated carrions. Generally, control rabbits and control guinea pigs were faster in their decay comparing the corresponding figure of the zinc phosphide–intoxicated group. A delay in colonization of insects was noticed either in the winter season for both groups, or additionally for the zinc phosphide groups. The associated insect fauna was represented in 6 orders, 20 families, and 36 genera and species. Necrophagous arthropods that supported decomposition of carcasses were mainly of orders Diptera and Coleoptera. Calliphoridae was the first insect family that colonized the different carcasses. The mean numbers of control immature dipterous maggots and similarly, the control coleopteran larvae significantly exceeded the corresponding mean numbers for the zinc phosphide-intoxicated groups in both winter and summer seasons in either rabbits or guinea pig groups. Moreover, the mean numbers of dipterous maggots or coleopteran larvae of rabbits significantly surpassed the corresponding figures for guinea pigs in both seasons. This study may add as a reference for the succession wave arthropod fauna in Cairo Governorate in winter and summer seasons. Moreover, it is the first record of the arthropod successive wave on zinc phosphide–intoxicated remains.

  4. 75 FR 52924 - Designation for the Amarillo, TX; Cairo, IL; State of Louisiana; State of North Carolina; Belmond...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... information regarding the designation criteria in section 7(f)(l) of the USGSA (7 U.S.C. 79(f)) and determined... Headquarters location and telephone start end Amarillo Amarillo, TX (806-372-2152)........ 10/1/2010 9/30/2013 Additional Location: Guymon, OK.... Cairo Cairo, IL (618-734-1316) 10/1/2010 9/30/2013 Louisiana Baton...

  5. New cities between sustainability and real estate investment: A case study of New Cairo city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reham M. Hafez

    2017-04-01

    This research reviews the basis of development of the new cities. The influence of the real estate investment in some Arab countries, then it handles the case study – “New Cairo city”. Discussing all the investing factors made the city in its current status. Then comes the recommendations in a trial to get an alternative structure to achieve sustainability in light of the current determinants and growth stages.

  6. Difficult airway management patterns among anesthesiologists practicing in Cairo University Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neamat I. Abdel rahman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The practice of anesthesiologists in Cairo university hospitals is close to the recommendations of the ASA guidelines for management of difficult airway. There is increased skills in fiberoptic bronchoscopes and SGA with increased frequency of difficult airway managements training courses; however, they need to improve their skills in awake fiberoptic intubations technique and they need to be trained on invasive airway management access to close the discrepancy between their theoretical choices in different situations and their actual skills.

  7. Assessment of diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer cases at two cancer centers in Egypt and Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schairer, Catherine; Soliman, Amr S; Omar, Sherif; Khaled, Hussein; Eissa, Saad; Ayed, Farhat Ben; Khalafallah, Samir; Ayoub, Wided Ben; Kantor, Elizabeth D; Merajver, Sofia; Swain, Sandra M; Gail, Mitchell; Brown, Linda Morris

    2013-04-01

    The diagnosis of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is largely clinical and therefore inherently somewhat subjective. The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnosis of IBC at two centers in North Africa where a higher proportion of breast cancer is diagnosed as IBC than in the United States (U.S.). Physicians prospectively enrolled suspected IBC cases at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) - Cairo, Egypt, and the Institut Salah Azaiz (ISA), Tunisia, recorded extent and duration of signs/symptoms of IBC on standardized forms, and took digital photographs of the breast. After second-level review at study hospitals, photographs and clinical information for confirmed IBC cases were reviewed by two U.S. oncologists. We calculated percent agreement between study hospital and U.S. oncologist diagnoses. Among cases confirmed by at least one U.S. oncologist, we calculated median extent and duration of signs and Spearman correlations. At least one U.S. oncologist confirmed the IBC diagnosis for 69% (39/50) of cases with photographs at the NCI-Cairo and 88% (21/24) of cases at the ISA. All confirmed cases had at least one sign of IBC (erythema, edema, peau d'orange) that covered at least one-third of the breast. The median duration of signs ranged from 1 to 3 months; extent and duration of signs were not statistically significantly correlated. From the above-mentioned outcomes, it can be concluded that the diagnosis of a substantial proportion of IBC cases is unambiguous, but a subset is difficult to distinguish from other types of locally advanced breast cancer. Among confirmed cases, the extent of signs was not related to delay in diagnosis.

  8. Development and validation of a lead emission inventory for the Greater Cairo area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Safar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies that investigate the environmental health risks to Cairo residents invariably conclude that lead is one of the area’s major health hazards. The Cairo Air Improvement Project (CAIP, which was implemented by a team led by Chemonics International, funded by USAID in partnership with the Egyptian Environmental Affairs Agency (EEAA, started developing a lead emission inventory for the greater Cairo (GC area in 1998. The inventory contains a list by major source of the annual lead emissions in the GC area. Uses of the inventory and associated database include developing effective regulatory and control strategies, assessing emissions trends, and conducting modeling exercises. This paper describes the development of the current lead emissions inventory (1999–2010, along with an approach to develop site specific emission factors and measurements to validate the inventory. This paper discusses the major sources of lead in the GC area, which include lead smelters, Mazout (heavy fuel oil combustion, lead manufacturing batteries factories, copper foundries, and cement factories. Included will be the trend in the lead emissions inventory with regard to the production capacity of each source category. In addition, the lead ambient measurements from 1999 through 2010 are described and compared with the results of Source Attribution Studies (SAS conducted in 1999, 2002, and 2010. Due to EEAA/CAIP efforts, a remarkable decrease in more than 90% in lead emissions was attained for 2007.

  9. Astronomy Education Challenges in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fady Beshara Morcos, Abd

    2015-08-01

    One of the major challenges in Egypt is the quality of education. Egypt has made significant progress towards achieving the Education for All and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Many associations and committees as education reform program and education support programs did high efforts in supporting scientific thinking through the scientific clubs. The current state of astronomical education in Egypt has been developed. Astronomy became a part in both science and geography courses of primary, preparatory and secondary stages. Nowadays the Egyptian National Committee for Astronomy, put on its shoulders the responsibility of revising of astronomy parts in the education courses, beside preparation of some training programs for teachers of different stages of educations, in collaboration with ministry of education. General lectures program has been prepared and started in public places , schools and universities. Many TV and Radio programs aiming to spread astronomical culture were presented. In the university stage new astronomy departments are established and astrophysics courses are imbedded in physics courses even in some private universities.

  10. CHIEFS & CHIEFDOMS IN PROTODYNASTIC EGYPT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AntonioPérezLargacha

    1995-01-01

    Ever smce they were discovered, the standards depicted on the decorated pottery and protodynastic objects have been interpreted in different ways, all related to the traditional theory that Egypt was unified by Narmer who conquered Lower Egypt and founded the first dynasty. However, recent excavations in centers like Hierakonpolis or regions like the Nile Delta (van der Brink 1992), have modified the traditional view of Egyptian unification and old interpretations have had to be rejected. The idea that Upper Egypt’s northward expansion reached the Nile Delta at the end of Naqada Ⅱ is now generally accepted; during Naqada Ⅲ there was a single material culture in Egypt and, perhaps, a single ruler. The questions become: was there only one king at that time, and if not, how many kings were there? Did cultural unification occur after political unification or was the culture unified before the political unification, and if so, how long before? To know the answers to these questions, we must study the early

  11. Electric Power and SHP in Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GamalAliElOuni

    2002-01-01

    Location:Northeast Africa.Bordered by the Mediterranean to the north.Sudan to the south.Red Sea and Suez Gulf to east.Palestine & Israel to the northeast,Libya to west.Area: 1.002 Million km2, and inhabited area is about 5%.Capital:Cairo.Climate:Hot dry in summer.Warm rainy in winter.

  12. Urban immigration and outmigration in Egypt: an analytical study of birthplace in the 1976 census.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-nasr, A S; Attiya, M

    1985-06-01

    The 1976 census was used as the basic data source to study 4 principal migratory trends in Egypt: urban-urban inmigration; rural-urban inmigration; urban-urban outmigration; and urban-rural outmigration. First, a general comparison was made of the 4 principal trends and of overall migration to and from urban areas. Next, the 2 principal trends -- rural-urban inmigration and urban-urban outmigration -- and their respective influences on net migration to urban areas were compared. Finally, net migration to each of the 3 principal areas of attraction (Cairo, Giza, and Alexandria) was studied and the manner in which it is influenced by the 2 principal trends. Rural to urban migrants make up about 6.4% of the urban population whereas migrants from other urban areas constitute about 19% of the urban population. Rural to urban inmigration rates are characterized by the fact that they are more dispersed, varied, and uneven than urban outmigration rates. Cairo and Giza are approximately equal in regard to their volume of inmigration from rural and other urban areas. Overall net migration to urban areas is more closely related to urban inmigration from rural areas than to urban to urban outmigration (0.83 as against 0.63). Positive net migration results more from a high volume of urban inmigration from rural areas than from a low volume of urban to urban outmigration, while negative net migration is attributable primarily to a low volume of urban inmigration from rural areas as compared with the volume of urban to urban outmigration. The correlation between rural to urban inmigrations rates and the overall net migration rates was much stronger than the correlation between them and the urban to urban outmigration rates. The data confirmed the important role of urban areas as both recipients and as sources of migrants. Areas which "acquire" migrants at the expense of other areas, i.e., areas with positive net migration, and areas which "lose" migrants do not differ greatly in

  13. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN THREE COURTYARDS OF TRADITIONAL HOUSES IN ISLAMIC CAIRO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehia Hassan Wazeri

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Direct  solar radiation  is considered  the most  important  climatic  element,  which  has direct  and indirect influences on designing buildings and open spaces. In hot arid regions, like Cairo, the main aim is to reduce the heat load in summer, and to maximize it in winter. The aim of the present comparative study is to determine the shaded area and the quantity of direct solar radiation (on 21 June & 21 December fall on walls, floors and openings of three courtyards in traditional Islamic houses in old Cairo. For this purpose a network of three traditional courtyards houses has been selected in old Islamic Cairo. The first is Zaynab Khatun house (built 1468AD, the second is Gamal Al-Din Al-Dahaby (built 1637AD, and the third is Es-Sinnari house (built 1794AD. Key words: courtyards; traditional houses; Islamic Cairo.     Abstrak Radiasi  matahari  langsung  merupakan  elemen  iklim  yang  paling  penting  untuk  dipertimbangkan  dalam perancangan, baik yang memberikan pengaruh langsung maupun tidak langsung pada perancangan bangunan dan ruang terbuka. Di daerah kering dan panas, seperti halnya Cairo, beban panas di musim panas dikurangi dan dimaksimalkan di musim dingin. Tujuan dari penelitian yang menggunakan tiga studi banding ini adalah untuk menentukan daerah yang teduh dan melihat jumlah radiasi matahari langsung pada tanggal 21 Juni dan 21 Desember, yang mengenai  pada dinding, lantai dan bukaan  yang bersumber dari halaman rumah tradisional Islam di kota tua Kairo. Untuk itu, telah dipilih tiga rumah tradisional di Kairo yang memiliki halaman yaitu rumah Zaynab Khatun yang dibangun pada 1468AD, kedua rumah Gamal Al-Din Al-Dahaby yang dibangun pada 1637AD, dan yang ketiga adalah rumah Es-Sinnari yang dibangun pada 1794AD.   Kata kunci: halaman, rumah-rumah tradisional, Islam Kairo.

  14. Joint Egypt/United States report on Egypt/United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 3 of 5 Vols. Annexes 2--5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The principal objectives of the energy assessment project for Egypt are to develop understanding of the current status of the principal energy users in Egypt's industrial and agricultural sectors; to estimate the energy demand and efficiency for each selected subsector within these major sectors; to identify opportunities for fuel type changes, technology switches, or production pattern changes which might increase the efficiency with which Egypt's energy is used both now and in the future; and based on options identified, to forecast energy efficiencies for selected Egyptian subsectors for the years 1985 and 2000. The areas studied in the industrial sector are the iron and steel, aluminum, fertilizer, chemical, petrochemical, cement, textile, and automotive manufacturing industries. Those studied in the agricultural sector concern drainage and irrigation, mechanization, and food processing. Additional information in 4 annexes include industrial/agricultural sector options; residential/commercial, transportation, and fossil fuels supply options.

  15. Inclusiveness in Higher Education in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupito, Emily; Langsten, Ray

    2011-01-01

    In Egypt, before 1952, education, especially higher education, was the province of a privileged few. After the 1952 Revolution, in pursuit of social justice and economic development, Egypt's leaders eliminated fees, instituted a universal admission examination, promised government employment to all graduates of higher education, and expanded the…

  16. Women--Sex Objects in Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutimer, Brian T. P.

    Although it has been said that the women in Ancient Egypt enjoyed a reasonable state of social and professional equality with men, this paper presents an alternate theory--that women were second-class citizens whose physical prowess was secondary to their role as sex objects. It appears that men and women in Ancient Egypt often participated in the…

  17. Single Finds. The case of Roman Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Survery of single or stray finds from Roman Egypt and discussion of them as evidence for the circulation and use of coins......Survery of single or stray finds from Roman Egypt and discussion of them as evidence for the circulation and use of coins...

  18. Egypt: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-12

    smuggling of illegal workers, prostitutes, and even Palestinian brides for grooms inside Gaza. It is not uncommon for Palestinian smugglers to bribe security...Egypt in a difficult diplomatic position. On the one hand, Egypt has attempted to symbolically support international efforts to alleviate the

  19. Impact of Geoethics in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdelMakosud, kholoud Mohamed; Ezzat, Nada

    2016-04-01

    Geoethics, is a new term that could be unknown in the Arab world,where its translation in Arabic language make some kind of problems,with special emphasis on Egypt; spreading this term and the importance of it to professionals and un professionals is not an easy task.Culture and awareness problems face us on dealing with it. In this working paper the researchers study two levels of educational samples, the first one is of young geo-scientists and the other one is of young people of different disciplines to make over view survey (monitoring the base level) about knowing geoethics and another survey after applying some lectures and workshops to the same samples to monitor the second level. The aim of the research is to find out how people will accept this term and its application and how we can spread it through community with different effective ways. In Egypt there are some kind of culture problems could affect on spreading of any new concept, these problems could be overcome by some scientific, social and culture recommendations, these recommendations could be applied in both Arab countries and African Countries with few modifications.

  20. [The pathogen spectrum of the conjunctiva of inhabitants of refuse disposal sites in Cairo. I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixl, W; Sixl-Voigt, B; Stögerer, M; Bencko, V; Köck, M; Marth, E; Schaffler, R; Schuhmann, G; Pichler-Semmelrock, F

    1989-01-01

    In Cairo's waste disposal sites conjunctivitis is frequently found resulting from the burning process of plastic, paper, etc.. Recurrent secondary contamination of the conjunctiva by pathogenic and non-pathogenic microorganisms often takes place; however, in certain germ species, the differentiation between pathogenic or non-pathogenic organisms within a damaged mucous membrane cannot be made. Furthermore, in this study, we have attempted to investigate germ reproduction during the application of PVP-eyedrops. However, our results cannot be conclusive because of the high environmental contamination, very low personal hygiene resulting from contaminated water and the constant exposure of samples to environmental contamination. Studies will be continued.

  1. China and Egypt Work Together to Ensure Bilateral Trade and Investment Ties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan; Liu Jinliang

    2006-01-01

    @@ Egypt's Minister of Trade and industry, Rachid Mohamed paid a week-long visit to China from September 4 to September 11, 2006. During the visit, he met Chinese government officials and business representatives about engaging China in the development of Egyptian industry and attracting Chinese investment, technology and know-how into key industrial projects.

  2. Issues in Strategic Planning for Vocational Education: Lessons from Algeria, Egypt, and Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmi, Jamil

    1991-01-01

    Although Algeria, Egypt, and Morocco have followed substantially different development strategies, they exhibit similar signs of crisis in vocational education. An integrated approach to planning that acknowledges social, financial, technological, and economic constraints could help coordinate general and vocational education and specialized…

  3. Managing the growing energy demand - The case of Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Kholy, Hosni; Faried, Ragy

    2010-09-15

    The electric energy consumption rate in Egypt has an average increase of 7% per year through the last three decades. In order to satisfy the ever increasing energy demand, several actions were, and have to be taken. These actions have to be carried out in parallel. The one having the greatest effect is the measures carried out for energy conservation and loss reduction. Diversifying the energy source such as utilization of Renewable Energy technologies can contribute to satisfying the demand and extending the hydro-carbon reserves life. Regional integration of electrical networks will save expenditures used to build additional power plants.

  4. Bryozoan Nodules as a Frame-Builder of Bryozoan-Microreef, Middle Miocene Sediments, Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdelbaset S. El-Sorogy

    2015-01-01

    Bryozoan nodules, coralline algae, scleractinian corals and oysters form an important or-ganic buildup, 1.2–4.5 m thick in the Langhian-Serravaliann sediments of Egypt. Based on type, shape and size of the substrate, bryozoan nodules take tree-like and globular morphologies. Tree-like speci-mens reach 10 cm in maximum height and 3 cm in diameter, while Globular ones attain 9 cm in maxi-mum diameter. Most tree-like nodules are perforated with wide or narrow pores, few are non-perforated. Globulars and few tree-like forms are with mamelon-like structures. Perforations on the outer surfaces may indicate a symbiotic relationship between bryozoans and a live plant substrate. Nod-ules from Homiera and Gharra areas of the Cairo-Suez District with wider perforations may indicate growth in slightly lighter or turbid areas of the continental shelf than those of North Western Desert of narrower perforations. Non-perforated nodules may assume an incrustation on ephemeral substrate.

  5. U.S.-Egypt Security Cooperation after Egypt’s January 2011 Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    OMC ) at the U.S. Embassy in Cairo. 36Derek S. Reveron, 105, quotes the Chairman, Joint...limited or no publicity, reflecting the political sensitivity of the US military presence in the region. 18 OMC articulates their COCOM country...level plans. The Embassy works with OMC representatives in-country to integrate COCOM with State plans, specifically, the State Department Mission

  6. ISCC Kuraymat Integrated Solar Combined Cycle Power Plant in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brakmann, G.

    2006-07-01

    The New and Renewable Energy Authority (NREA) of Egypt intends to implement an Integrated Solar Combined Cycle Power Plant, ISCC Kuraymat, to be located about 95 km south of Cairo, on the eastern side of the river Nile, at a northern latitude of 29{sup o} 16' and an eastern longitude of 31{sup o} 15'. The complete ISCC Project shall be implemented in three (3) contract lots: One (1) Contract Lot for Solar Island as EPC cum OandM contract for engineering, procurement, construction, testing, commissioning and five (5) years operation and maintenance; (Two contracts will be used for this Lot (Solar Island), one for EPC and one for the OandM part of the Lot.) The Solar Island shall consist of a parabolic trough solar field capable to generate about 110 MW (thermal) of solar heat at a temperature of 393{sup o}C, the related IandC and control room and the heat transfer fluid (HTF) system up to the HTF inlet and outlet flanges of the Solar Heat Exchanger(s). The Contractor for Solar Island shall guarantee the supply of solar heat to the Solar Heat Exchanger(s) as a function of normal direct solar irradiation (DNI) and of solar position. One (1) Contract for Combined Cycle Island as EPC contract for engineering, procurement, construction, testing and commissioning and extended two (2) year warranty period. The Combined Cycle Island shall consist of one (1) or two (2) gas turbine(s) with ISO rating of about 80 MWe (total), one (1) or two (2) heat recovery steam generator(s) (HRSG), one (1) steam turbine of about 70 MWe, solar heat exchanger(s) capable to absorb about 110 MW (thermal) of solar heat plus all associated balance of plant equipment. The Contractor(s) for Combined Cycle Island shall guarantee the supply of electricity and the heat rate as a function of ambient temperature and as a function of solar heat supply from the Solar Island. One (1) Contract for Combined Cycle Island as OandM contract for five (5) year operation and maintenance. (Author)

  7. OPTIMIZATION PROCEDURE FOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STAGE OF CAIRO-DAMIETTA SELF-PROPELLED GRAIN BULK SHIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Moustafa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The global logistics center for the storage and handling of grain which will be constructed at Damietta port will extremely increase the annual movement of grain through Cairo-Damietta waterway. Therefore, the demand for inland grain bulk ships has increased significantly in the recent years. This paper introduces a procedure to find out the fleet size and optimum characteristics of self-propelled grain bulk ships working between Cairo and Damietta through River Nile. The characteristics of the Cairo–Damietta waterway are investigated to define the constraints on dimensions and speed for such ship type. Also, mathematical model for the objective function was developed considering: powering, voyage, weight, stability and cost calculation. In this research, Specific cost (Sc, cost of transporting one ton of cargo a distance of one kilometre, is considered as the objective function for this optimization process. This optimization problem is handled as a single objective nonlinear constrained optimization problem using a specially developed computer program. Solutions are generated by varying design variables systematically in certain steps. The best of these solutions is then taken as the estimated optimum. Finally, the problem is presented, the main constrains analyzed and the optimum solution shown.

  8. Impact of industrial wastewater disposal on surface water bodies in Mostord area north Greater Cairo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The studied area (Shoubra El-Khima, Bahteem and Mostorod) lies in the industrial area north of Greater Cairo. The area suffers from several environmental problems such as sewage and disposal of pollutants from the surrounding factories into the surface water pathways in the area. Water samples were collected seasonally from different waterways found in the area, domestic and or industrial liquid wastes from 12 discharge tubes of different factories (as a point source of pollution). Chemical characteristics of different water samples and its heavy metals content were determined using ion coupled plasma technique (ICP). Results indicate that industrial and domestic wastewater samples contain several toxic levels of tested heavy metals (Cd, Co, Pb and Ni) which have a serious impact on surface waterways in the area.Shebin El-Qanater collector drain samples exhibited the highest levels of Cd, Co, Pb and Ni compared to other tested water bodies Mostorod collector drain samples showed the highest levels of Zn and Cu. Industrial effluent samples collected from Cairo Company for Fabric industry had the highest amounts of total Zn Cu, Cd, Co and Pb, while Delta steel company discharges the highest amounts of total Fe and Mn. Al-Ahleya Plastic Company discharges the highest amounts of total-Ni. Generally, it is necessary to impose the environmental laws and its regulation regarding the industrial wastewater treatments and disposals to minimize the risk of the adverse effects of these pollutants.

  9. Review of Parasitic Zoonoses in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    This review presents a comprehensive picture of the zoonotic parasitic diseases in Egypt, with particular reference to their relative prevalence among humans, animal reservoirs of infection, and sources of human infection. A review of the available literature indicates that many parasitic zoonoses are endemic in Egypt. Intestinal infections of parasitic zoonoses are widespread and are the leading cause of diarrhea, particularly among children and residents of rural areas. Some parasitic zoono...

  10. Spectrum of Glomerulonephritis in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barsoum Rashad

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of the profile of glomerular disease in a particular geographical region is of fundamental academic, clinical and epidemiological importance. It helps in the recognition of specific risk factors and subsequent planning for adequate prevention. In the present study, 1234 consecutive renal biopsies referred to the nephropathology team of Cairo University over two years were retrospectively analyzed. The main indications for biopsy included nephrotic syndrome, persistent sub-nephrotic proteinuria, recurrent hematuria, suspected secondary hypertension, lupus nephritis and acute and chronic renal failure of undetermined etiology. Proliferative forms of glomerulonephritis [GN] (32.1% and focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis [FSGS] were the most prevalent lesions among patients with the nephrotic syndrome (22.6%. In subjects with sub-nephrotic proteinuria, FSGS was the principal lesion followed by proliferative lesions. Although all forms of GN were encountered in those presenting with recurrent hematuria, mesangioproliferative GN and FSGS were significantly more frequent. IgA glomerular deposits were detected in 9.8% of all GNs and 15% of those presenting with hematuria. One half of the biopsies obtained for the assessment of suspected secondary hypertension showed only changes compatible with the effect of hypertension per se, i.e. nephroangiosclerosis. On the other hand, a parenchymal renal lesion was found in 52.9% of biopsies. The common glomerular pathologies in patients with lupus nephritis were Classes III and IV. Among patients with chronic renal failure, the predominant lesion was chronic interstitial nephritis (32.6%. An acute interstitial inflammatory element was also detected in 8.4% of cases. About one third of the biopsies obtained for acute renal failure showed acute tubular (11% or cortical (13.2% necrosis. Another third showed vasculitis (17.6% or acute interstitial nephritis (14.3%, and the remaining showed chronic

  11. EL VIAJE DE IBN BATTUTA A EGIPTO EN 1326. LAS CIUDADES DE ALEJANDRÍA Y E L CAIRO. DATOS PARA LA HISTORIA Y LA GEOGRAFÍA DE LA EDAD MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Espinar Moreno

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available El viaje realizado por Ibn Battuta a Egipto en 1326,  junto a otras visitas de este importante viajero, nos ha permitido obtener una serie de datos sobre la vida de los hombres que vivían en aque- llas tierras. Las descripciones de ciudades como Alejandría y El Cairo, además de otras poblaciones mas pequeiías, permiten conocer los caminos mas transitados, situación política, social y económica, monumentos más destacados, historia, personajes de la cultura, costumbres, tradiciones, leyendas, fiestas, papel del río  Nilo, productos industriales y de alimentación, precios, etc. En definitiva, este viajero nos ofrece una descripcion detallada de las tierras egipcias a mediados del siglo XIV.Palabras clave:Ibn Battuta; Viajeros de la Edad Media; Ciudades de Alejandría y  El Cairo; Civilización y cultura de la Edad Media;Résumé:Le voyage réalisé par Ibn Battuta llÉgypte en 1326, pres de d'autres visites de cet important voyageur, il nous a permis d'obtenir une série de notices sur la vie des hommes qu'ils vivaient dans ces terres. Les descriptions de villes cornme Alexandrie et Le Caire, en plus de d'autres populations mais petites, ils permettent de connaitre les chemins mais passés, situation politique, sociale et économique,monuments plus remarquables, historie, personnages de la culture, coutumes, traditions, légendes, fetes, papier du fleuve Nilo, produits industriels et d'alimentation, prix, etc. En définitive, ce voyageur nous offre une description détaillée des terres égyptiennes vers le milieu du siecle XIV.Mots Clé:Ibn Battuta; Voyageurs du Moyen Age; Villes d'Alexandrie et Le Caire; Civilisation et culture du Moyen Age;Abstract:The trip carried out by Ibn Battuta to Egypt in 1326, together with other visits of this important traveler, has allowed us to obtain a series of data about the life of the men living in those lands. The descriptions of cities like Alexandria and Cairo, besides other smalles populations

  12. Diphtheria immunity status in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwan, El-Rashdy M; El-Awady, Mostafa K

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine immune status to corynebacterium diphtheria by screening for protective antibodies in a sample of Egyptian population. The study population consisted of 709 healthy subjects aged from 2 months to 105 years, inhabitants of 6 regions of Egypt. The study utilized Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure serum levels IgG antibodies reactive with diphtheria toxoid. Levels of diphtheria toxoid antibody > or = 0.1 IU/ ml were defined as immune/protected, 23.9 % of the population were found to be susceptible to diphtheria (IgG level antibodies decreased in old ages (< 60 y) with the females being more susceptible then males. These results recommend a booster immunization for the susceptible age groups.

  13. Egypt

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alaaeldin F. Mohamed

    disorders characterized by the absence or reduced pigmentation of the skin, hair and eyes. To assess ... and analyzed using standard statistical software. Results: The ..... to skin cancer and optic neuronal defects shared in all types of. Table 2 ...

  14. Ancient Egypt in our Cultural Heritage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Vasiljević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Inspiration derived from ancient Egypt is usually expressed through the Egyptian motifs in arts and popular culture of the 19th and 20th centuries, as well as through the non-scientific interpretations of the culture, very much based upon the Renaissance ones. The number and variety of material and non-material traces of this fascination are most expressed in the countries where, along with the early support for the institutional development of Egyptology, there existed economically potent educated middle classes (Western and Central Europe, USA, but may also be traced elsewhere. The public fascination by ancient Egypt has not ceased by the times of foundation of Egyptology, marked by the decipherment of the hieroglyphic script in 1822. Until the end of the 20th century Egyptologists have rarely dealt with the prelude to their discipline, limiting their interest to the critical approach to ancient sources and to noting the attempts to interpret the hieroglyphic script and the function of pyramids. However, the rising importance of the reception studies in other disciplines raised the interest of Egyptologists for the "fascination of Egypt", thus changing the status of various modes of expressing "Egyptomania" – they have thus become a part of the cultural heritage, registered, documented, preserved and studied. The research of this kind is only beginning in Serbia. The line of inquiry enhances the knowledge of the scope, manifestations and roles of the interest in Egypt, not limited by the national or political borders. On the other hand, the existence of the cultural heritage similar to the wider European view of ancient Egypt – short remarks by Jerotej Račanin, Kandor by Atanasije Stojković, the usage of architectural motifs derived from Egypt, the emergence of small private collections, to mention several early examples – all show that the research into the reception of ancient Egypt may contribute to the knowledge about the history

  15. Joint Egypt/United States report on Egypt/United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 4 of 5 Vols. Annexes 6--10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purvis, Edward E.; Teagan, Peter; Little, Arthur D.; Kaplan, George; Kunze, Jay; Warchol, Edward J.

    1979-04-01

    Annex 6, which investigates the possible hydroelectric resources of Egypt, reveals that presently the only existing sites are on the upper Nile at the High and Aswan Dams. There are 8 sites on the Nile where it is practical to add hydroelectric generation and, of these, only 4 are feasible for immediate construction. There are also pumped-storage sites on the Nile and the Red Sea. There is also the Qattara Depression in the Western Desert which can be utilized for conventional, as well as pumped-storage generation, by bringing water from the Mediterranean Sea to the depression by canal or tunnel. The options were considered for construction of hydro plants to met the electric load growth of Egypt when other forms of energy supply would be integrated into a comprehensive supply pattern. In Annex 7, the prospective use of nuclear energy to meet Egypt's resources (uranium and thorium) to implement a nuclear energy program, and potential effects of the expanded use of nuclear energy are discussed. Annex 8 discusses solar energy (technology descriptions and impacts, solar thermal power, photovoltaics). Also wind power generation, biomass utilization, desalination, solar air conditioning and refrigeration, and cost of power from diesel engines are discussed. Annex 9 covers geothermal potentials in Egypt, discussing resources with temperatures above 180/sup 0/C; from 150 to 180/sup 0/C; from 100 to 150/sup 0/C; and with temperatures below 100/sup 0/C. Annex 10 discusses the electric power systems in Egypt. The following subjects are covered: existing electric power systems; electrical power facilities under construction or planned for construction by 1985; past and projected growth of electrical energy; distribution; and electrical power system projected from 1985 to 2000. (MCW)

  16. Crime in relation to urban design. Case study: The Greater Cairo Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Adel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Crime is a part of any social system and known to human communities since its origins. It differs from community to another, even within one community it doesn’t occur equally in all places and nor by the same way. It is also concentrated in some places more than others, sometimes increases, sometimes decreases, etc. Previous researches have proved that crime rate has significant correlation with different social factors: education levels, poverty rates and lack of social organization, while others have drawn the attention to its relation with the built environment. They proposed that crime occurs in places where both opportunities and criminals are available. The role of this paper is to identify urban circumstances related to crime occurrence within the Greater Cairo Region, and to propose different ways to reduce these crimes. Consecutively, agglomeration’s main districts were scrutinized according to social analysis, street-network pattern and land-use.

  17. Leptospirosis in man, in wild and in domestic animals at waste disposal sites in Cairo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebek, Z; Sixl, W; Valova, M; Schaffler, R

    1989-01-01

    The authors examined 65 Rattus rattus, 28 pigs, 12 donkeys, 67 goats, 5 sheep, 1 cow and 1 dog as well as 196 inhabitants at two settlements on the waste disposal sites at the periphery of Cairo. Rattus norvegicus were positive in 55.4% for L. ictero-haemorrhagiae, pigs in 14.3% for L. pomona and in 3.6% for L. ictero-haemorrhagiae. 2 out of 12 donkeys were positive for L. pomona, 1 of them for L. pyrogenes and L. icterohaemorrhagiae as well, goats in 1.5% for L. grippotyphosa. Human sera reacted positively in 8.7% of the cases, 7.1% of which with L. bratislava, 1.0% with L. icterohaemorrhagiae and 0.5% with L. grippotyphosa and L. sejroe respectively.

  18. Proposal for a strategic management plan for experimental agricultural and academic farm "El Cairo" of Arauca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías Nieves

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design for a strategic management plan for the Experimental Agricultural and Academic Farm: El Cairo of the Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Orinoquía branch. A non-experimental methodological design was used, from which a situational analysis of the farm was generated, which was used as a basis to formulate and design a Strategic Management plan for a five-year period. It was concluded that the current organization and management plan does not meet the mission objectives of research, teaching, and continuing education, suggesting a need for the articulation of the farm with the administrative and academic structure of the university in carrying out the strategic management plan derived from the current research.

  19. From Cairo to the Straits Settlements: Modern Salafiyyah Reformist Ideas in Malay Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Zakariya

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Early twentieth-century Malay Peninsula witnessed the emergence of Islamic reform movements. The Malay reformists who were discontented with the socio-economic and political conditions of the Malays criticised the Malay elites and called for “reformation” of their society. The Malay reformists derived inspirations for their reformist ideology from the leading Middle Eastern reformists, Muhammad ≤Abduh, Rashīd Riḍā and others, known as salafiyyah. Available data suggest that the transmission of salafiyyah ideas in particular, and Middle Eastern reformism in general, to Malay Peninsula were made possible by many factors. Of these factors, the roles of the ḥaramayn, the centres of learning in Cairo and the invention of printing machines have been least explored. This study attempts to fill in the void in the existing literature.

  20. The prevalence of active nutritional rickets in Egyptian infants in Cairo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amani Osman Mahmoud

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: Rickets is still prevalent in Egypt; however, at a lower prevalence than that reported before. We recommend examining all infants at the age of 18 months by primary health care physicians and screening by ALP as this age showed a prevalence of rickets of 12/1000 to direct proper treatment and avoid the physical deformities resulting from insufficient calcium and/or vitamin D in infants in the early stages of walking. For the screening and diagnosis of rickets in a limited resources country like Egypt, we recommend the measurement of ALP. Proper education about calcium rich foods, adequate number of servings/day and adequate sun exposure is of paramount importance.

  1. Integrated Human Futures Modeling in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passell, Howard D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aamir, Munaf Syed [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bernard, Michael Lewis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beyeler, Walter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fellner, Karen Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hayden, Nancy Kay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jeffers, Robert Fredric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Malczynski, Leonard A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mitchell, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Silver, Emily [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tidwell, Vincent C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Villa, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vugrin, Eric D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engelke, Peter [Atlantic Council, Washington, D.C. (United States); Burrow, Mat [Atlantic Council, Washington, D.C. (United States); Keith, Bruce [United States Military Academy, West Point, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Human Futures Project provides a set of analytical and quantitative modeling and simulation tools that help explore the links among human social, economic, and ecological conditions, human resilience, conflict, and peace, and allows users to simulate tradeoffs and consequences associated with different future development and mitigation scenarios. In the current study, we integrate five distinct modeling platforms to simulate the potential risk of social unrest in Egypt resulting from the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile in Ethiopia. The five platforms simulate hydrology, agriculture, economy, human ecology, and human psychology/behavior, and show how impacts derived from development initiatives in one sector (e.g., hydrology) might ripple through to affect other sectors and how development and security concerns may be triggered across the region. This approach evaluates potential consequences, intended and unintended, associated with strategic policy actions that span the development-security nexus at the national, regional, and international levels. Model results are not intended to provide explicit predictions, but rather to provide system-level insight for policy makers into the dynamics among these interacting sectors, and to demonstrate an approach to evaluating short- and long-term policy trade-offs across different policy domains and stakeholders. The GERD project is critical to government-planned development efforts in Ethiopia but is expected to reduce downstream freshwater availability in the Nile Basin, fueling fears of negative social and economic impacts that could threaten stability and security in Egypt. We tested these hypotheses and came to the following preliminary conclusions. First, the GERD will have an important short-term impact on water availability, food production, and hydropower production in Egypt, depending on the short- term reservoir fill rate. Second, the GERD will have a very small impact on

  2. Women's position and family planning in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindasamy, P; Malhotra, A

    1996-01-01

    In this report, data from the 1988 Egypt Demographic and Health Survey are used to address some of the most frequently raised questions about the relationship between gender inequality and reproductive behavior. The findings from binomial and multinomial logit models show that while the relationship between women's position and fertility control in Egypt is complex, some clear, broad patterns exist that have important theoretical and policy implications. First, although women's status in Egypt is clearly multidimensional, the reproductive aspect of women's position has a strong connection with the nonreproductive dimensions. Second, the case of the continued use of education and employment as proxies of women's position, especially in relationship to fertility control, is considerably discredited by the results. Finally, the findings indicate that Egyptian culture supports gender equality in the form of interaction and negotiation rather than women's autonomy.

  3. Highlighting the medical applications of 3D printing in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, Mahmoud A; Abdelghany, Khaled; Hamza, Hosamuddin

    2015-12-01

    Computer-assisted designing/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology has enabled medical practitioners to tailor physical models in a patient and purpose-specific fashion. It allows the designing and manufacturing of templates, appliances and devices with a high range of accuracy using biocompatible materials. The technique, nevertheless, relies on digital scanning (e.g., using intraoral scanners) and/or digital imaging (e.g., CT and MRI). In developing countries, there are some technical and financial limitations of implementing such advanced tools as an essential portion of medical applications. This paper focuses on the surgical and dental use of 3D printing technology in Egypt as a developing country.

  4. Ghetto poverty and pollution in Egypt: a deadly threat for western countries caused by new and infectious mutants. A cultural, social and microbiological synopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassili, J H; Baradaeus, Cyril

    2012-10-01

    Egypt, whose soil germinated the first civilization, monotheism, refined ethics and culture of sharing the abundance of extracted natural resources among its populace became the crucible proliferating de-novo genotypes of organic and moral maladies. The enigma is these mutations are synchronized by several factors, namely; failing medical health, if there is any, abundant filth, cultural bankruptcy, over population, dogmatic militarism, societal deprivation and characterization, etc. These domineering ingredients fossilized Egypt as of 1952 coup in an irrevocable national apoptosis, together with the crippled social justice and imbalanced distribution of wealth among Egyptians, rates of bacterial and viral evolution to second generation resistant to known medical interventions are expected to exponentially accelerate. Therefore, it deemed essential to elaborate on pollution and psychosis-induced inflammations and grievous crimes evoked by dogmatic cults at the breeding source, e.g., ghettos and sporadic locations of the homeless in Cairo, Alexandria and Upper Egyptian villages. While this second generation of viral and bacterial diseases could labor plagues threatening the precariously maintained so-called social fabric of Middle Eastern countries, that are uniquely segregating its populace according to their dogmatic affiliations and soaked into intolerance, it would definitely compromise the integrity of the expensively managed medical care system of developed countries.

  5. Status of fertility control in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefnawi, F I

    1982-01-01

    The concern for fertility control is not alien to the cultural and religious heritage of Egypt. Historically, Egyptian interest in fertility dates to the Pharoahs. Contraceptive recipes written at least 15-18 centuries B.C. have been found. Romans may have borrowed some of the more effective methods from Egypt when it became part of the Roman Empire as evidenced by the decline in size of aristocratic Roman families at the beginning of the Christian era. Muslim conquerors of Egypt encouraged fertility control. In the 9th century differences of opinion about the legality of contraception appeared among the interpreters of Islamic law. Some methods found in the writings of Muslim doctors as al-Razi and Avicenna still survive in the folk medicine of Egypt. In modern times use of barrier methods of contraception were encouraged by family planning organizations in Egypt. The medical profession was not deeply involved since these methods did not require much medical assistance. In 1936 a religiouss verdict declared contraception to be a lawful act of Islam. National programs in family planning in the 1960's encouraged the use of the Lippes Loop IUD. The medical problem of blood loss associated with the IUD caused anxiety because of the high incidence of anemia in the female Egyptian population. There was also a cultural limitation on the wide use of the IUD. "Spotting" due to the IUD resulted in females being ritually unclean and therefore unfit to pray or observe the Islamic fast. The Pill, initially favored caused complications due to its effect on breast milk which is the universal source of nutrition for infants in Egypt. Replacement of the Pill by depo-provera injections during the post partum period of lactation is a practical solution. Permanent sterilization is limited to females and only performed when medically indicated. Abortion is illegal and permitted only as a therapeutic measure.

  6. Reaching women in Egypt: a success story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mousa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Women in Egypt are more likely than men to suffer from low vision or blindness from avoidable causes.1–3 This is, in large part, because women are not using eye care services as frequently as men, especially in rural areas.4–5 A 2002 community-based survey of 4,500 people in Al Minya Governorate, Upper Egypt showed that the prevalence of cataract in women was double that in men and that trachomatous trichiasis was four times as prevalent in women as in men

  7. TREATMENT OF FRACTURES IN ANCIENT EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. K. Bashurov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most complete information about the medicine in Ancient Egypt two papyrus provided: a large medical papyrus of G. Ebers and papyrus about the surgery of E. Smith. Smith’s papyrus is of particular interest as it contains the information on the status of surgery in Ancient Egypt. Papyrus consists of descriptions of the clinical cases. To the present time, 48 cases have survived; it is arranged in order of location - from the head down to the feet. Orthopedic deformities were reflected in the figures on the walls of the pyramids and temples as well as the description of the mummies and archaeological finds.

  8. [Cardiopulmonary resuscitation already in Egypt 5,000 years ago?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocklitz, A

    1997-06-06

    In light of the medically relevant features of the ancient Egyptian mouth-opening ceremony, the question of the effectiveness of medical practices in Egypt thousands of years ago is examined, whereby the religious and cultural framework also plays a significant role. In the Land on the Nile myth and reality clearly generated special conditions which favoured the systematic treatment of questions of resuscitation. Numerous examples show that this had practical consequences in the area of everyday medicine. In addition, rebirth and resurrection were central elements of the cult of the dead which had exact medical equivalents. These equivalents may demonstrate the advanced state of resuscitation practices in Egypt at that time. In this context, a reconstruction of an ancient Egyptian mouth-opening instrument is presented. In the cult of the dead, this instrument played a role which can be compared to the function of a modern laryngoscope. It appears possible that at the time of the pyramids the Egyptians already had an understanding of the technology required to perform instrument-aided artificial respiration. Whether or not they actually possessed a fundamental knowledge of the principles of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation remains unclear. Nevertheless, the astonishingly functional characteristics of the reconstructed mouth-opening instrument suggest that it was developed for more than purely symbolic purposes.

  9. Subsurface investigation on Quarter 27 of May 15th city, Cairo, Egypt using electrical resistivity tomography and shallow seismic refraction techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Awad Sultan Araffa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Geophysical tools such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT and shallow seismic (both P-wave seismic refraction and Multi-channel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW are interesting techniques for delineating the subsurface configurations as stratigraphy, structural elements, caves and water saturated zones. The ERT technique is used to delineate the contamination, to detect the buried objects, and to quantify some aquifer properties. Eight 2-D (two dimensional electrical resistivity sections were measured using two different configurations (dipole–dipole and Wenner. The spread length is of 96 m and the electrodes spacing are 2, 4 and 6 m, respectively to reach a depth ranging from 13 to 17 m. The results indicate that, the subsurface section is divided into main three geo-electrical units, the first is fractured marl and limestone which exhibits high resistivity values ranging from 40 to 300 ohm m. The second unit is corresponding to marl of moderate resistivity values and the third unit, which is the deeper unit, exhibits very low resistivity values corresponding to clayey marl. The fourth layer is marly clay with water. The presence of clay causes the most geotechnical problems. Fourteen shallow seismic sections (both for P-wave and MASW were carried out using spread of 94 m and geophone spacing of 2 m for each P-wave section. The results demonstrate that the deduced subsurface section consists of four layers, the first layer exhibits very low P-wave velocity ranging from 280 to 420 m/s, the second layer reveals P-wave velocity ranging from 400 to 1200 m/s, the third layer has P-wave velocity ranging from 970 to 2000 m/s and the fourth layer exhibits high velocity ranging from 1900 to 3600 m/s. The ERT and shallow seismic results, reflect the presence of two parallel faults passing through Quarter 27 and trending NW-SE.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Period of HD 19356 recorded in the Cairo Calendar? (Jetsu+, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jetsu, L.; Porceddu, S.; Lyytinen, J.; Kajatkari, P.; Lehtinen, J.; Markkanen, T.; Toivari-Viitala, J.

    2016-08-01

    Ancient Egyptian Scribes (AES) wrote Calendars of Lucky and Unlucky Days that assigned good and bad prognoses for the days of the year. These prognoses were based on mythological and astronomical events considered influential for everyday life. The best preserved calendar is the Cairo Calendar (CC) in papyrus Cairo 86637 dated to 1271-1163B.C. Here, we concentrate on statistics, astrophysics, and astronomy. We show that n~200 good prognoses would induce PMoon and PAlgol in CC, even if the remaining n~700 good and bad prognoses had aperiodic origins. The connections between Algol and AES are discussed in detail in S. Porceddu et al. (2013, in preparation, Paper III), where we date CC to 1224 B.C. (2 data files).

  11. Supply and Demand for Graduates in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabsheibani, Gholamreza

    1991-01-01

    Data from a sample of university graduates in Egypt are used to test the effect of a mismatch in higher education policy and labor demand on future employment patterns. The results are delayed employment or underemployment and consequent lowering of lifetime earnings of college graduates. (MSE)

  12. Toward replacement fertility in Egypt and Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltigani, Eltigani E

    2009-09-01

    Egypt and Tunisia began their fertility transition at almost identical fertility levels and at roughly the same time period, yet the difference in the pace of decline has been such that the total fertility rate (TFR) in Tunisia reached replacement level by the year 2001, whereas the TFR in Egypt remains above three live births per woman. This article draws on the secondary literature and on several nationally representative surveys from the two countries between 1978 and 2005 to provide empirical evidence of the difference in the pace of fertility decline and to analyze the determinants of the differential. Findings include (a) variation across the two countries in the consistency of fertility decline among the segments of the population leading the transition; (b) that the success of each country's family planning program was influenced by the role of political leaders and the extent of the program's integration within socioeconomic development objectives; (c) that the impact of contraception on TFR decline became an important factor in the mid-1980s; and (d) that the greatest determinant of the discrepancy in the pace of fertility decline is the disparity in age at marriage, which rose more significantly in Tunisia than in Egypt. The latter finding indicates that reaching replacement fertility in Egypt hinges primarily on further declines in marital fertility, resulting from reduction of wanted fertility and from an expansion of family planning program coverage and improved efficiency of service delivery and use.

  13. Review of parasitic zoonoses in egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Ahmed I; Uga, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    This review presents a comprehensive picture of the zoonotic parasitic diseases in Egypt, with particular reference to their relative prevalence among humans, animal reservoirs of infection, and sources of human infection. A review of the available literature indicates that many parasitic zoonoses are endemic in Egypt. Intestinal infections of parasitic zoonoses are widespread and are the leading cause of diarrhea, particularly among children and residents of rural areas. Some parasitic zoonoses are confined to specific geographic areas in Egypt, such as cutaneous leishmaniasis and zoonotic babesiosis in the Sinai. Other areas have a past history of a certain parasitic zoonoses, such as visceral leishmaniasis in the El-Agamy area in Alexandria. As a result of the implementation of control programs, a marked decrease in the prevalence of other zoonoses, such as schistosomiasis and fascioliasis has been observed. Animal reservoirs of parasitic zoonoses have been identified in Egypt, especially in rodents, stray dogs and cats, as well as vectors, typically mosquitoes and ticks, which constitute potential risks for disease transmission. Prevention and control programs against sources and reservoirs of zoonoses should be planned by public health and veterinary officers based on reliable information from systematic surveillance.

  14. Adolescent tramadol use and abuse in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiony, Medhat M; Salah El-Deen, Ghada M; Yousef, Usama; Raya, Yasser; Abdel-Ghani, Mohamed M; El-Gohari, Hayam; Atwa, Samar A

    2015-05-01

    Tramadol abuse liability is underestimated and the evidence of abuse and dependence is emerging. It has many health and social consequences especially in adolescents. Tramadol abuse has not been well studied in Egypt. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence and associated correlates of tramadol use and abuse among school students in Egypt. A total of 204 students, aged 13-18 years, from six schools in Zagazig, Egypt, were screened for tramadol use using The Drug Use Disorders Identification Test and a urine screen for tramadol. The prevalence of tramadol use was 8.8% among school students and the average age at onset of tramadol use was 16.5 ± 1.1. Some 83% of the users were using tramadol alone while the rest (17%) were using a combination of tramadol, alcohol, and cannabis. Two-thirds of these students started with tramadol as the first drug after the onset of tobacco smoking. Over one third of tramadol users had drug-related problems and 6% had dependence. There was a significant association between tramadol use and older age, male gender, and smoking. Drug-related problems were negatively correlated with age at onset of tramadol use. Tramadol use was common among adolescents and over one third of tramadol users had drug-related problems. Population-based longitudinal studies are needed to investigate tramadol use and the possible role of tramadol as a gateway drug in the development of substance abuse in Egypt.

  15. Biosystematic studies on Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) in Egypt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdel Khalik, K.N.E.

    2002-01-01

    The present work deals with a systematic investigation of 45 taxa belonging to 23 genera of the tribes Arabideae, Euclidieae, Hesperideae, Lunarieae, Matthioleae and Sisymbrieae of the family Brassicaceae from Egypt. This work is largely based on herbarium material received on loan fr

  16. Journey to Egypt: A Board Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvidge, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    This author describes how her elementary students first became interested in studying ancient Egypt. Her students' interest in the ancient Egyptian studies began when a student checked out a library book on Egyptology that contained colorful images and was soon swarmed by interested classmates. Many of her students began practicing writing…

  17. Ambient levels of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere of Greater Cairo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoder, M. I.

    Ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) samples were collected at three locations, two in urban areas in Greater Cairo (Ramsis and Haram) and background one in rural area in Menofiya province (Kafr El-Akram), during the period of June, 2004-August, 2004. The highest concentrations of VOCs were found in Ramsis, whereas the lowest concentrations were detected in Kafr El-Akram, and the difference in mean concentrations were statistically significant ( pp)-xylene. This similarity implies a similar emission sources of VOCs in both urban locations, vehicle exhausts are the dominant one. Greater Cairo has high levels of volatile aromatic hydrocarbons compared with many polluted cities in the world. The BTEX (benzene: toluene: ethylbenzene: xylenes) concentration ratios were (2.01:4.94:1:4.95), (2.03:4.91:1:4.87) and (2.31:2.98:1:2.59) in Ramsis, Haram and Kafr El-Akram, respectively. The average toluene/benzene (T/B), ( m, p)-xylene/benzene (( m, p)-X/B) and o-xylene/benzene ( o-X/B) concentration ratios were 2.45, 1.61and 0.85, respectively in Ramsis and 2.42, 1.61 and 0.78, respectively in Haram. The ratios in both urban locations were of the same magnitude and close to those obtained from automotive exhausts, indicating that the ambient BTEX originate mainly from motor vehicle emissions. However, the (T/B), (( m, p)-X/B) and ( o-X/B) concentration ratios were 1.29, 0.71 and 0.41 in Kafr El-Akram, respectively. These ratios were lower than those found in Ramsis and Haram locations and in automotive exhaust, suggesting that the BTEX in Kafr El-Akram do not come from a local source and are exclusively results from the diffusion and dispersion of VOCs produced from the traffic density in the surrounding cities. Significant positive correlation coefficients ( p<0.001) were found between the concentrations of BTEX compounds at the three sampling locations. The diurnal variation of VOCs concentrations in Ramsis location showed two daily peaks linked to traffic density.

  18. An Economic Analysis of Potential Impacts of Climate Change in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Onyeji, S.C.; Fischer, G.

    1993-01-01

    Projections of climate impacts on crop yields simulated for different GCM scenarios are used, in a recursively dynamic general equilibrium framework, to account for potential economy-wide impacts of climate change in Egypt. Comparing these impact projections to those obtained under a reference, business-as-usual, scenario assuming some moderate changes in the political, economic or technological sphere, indicates that global warming has potentially negative effects. The analysis is based on ...

  19. Evaluating the combined efficacy of polymers with fungicides for protection of museum textiles against fungal deterioration in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Kareem, Omar

    2010-01-01

    Fungal deterioration is one of the highest risk factors for damage of historical textile objects in Egypt. This paper represents both a study case about the fungal microflora deteriorating historical textiles in the Egyptian Museum and the Coptic museum in Cairo, and evaluation of the efficacy of several combinations of polymers with fungicides for the reinforcement of textiles and their prevention against fungal deterioration. Both cotton swab technique and biodeteriorated textile part technique were used for isolation of fungi from historical textile objects. The plate method with the manual key was used for identification of fungi. The results show that the most dominant fungi isolated from the tested textile samples belong to Alternaria, Aspergillus, Chaetomium, Penicillium and Trichoderma species. Microbiological testing was used for evaluating the usefulness of the suggested conservation materials (polymers combined with fungicides) in prevention of the fungal deterioration of ancient Egyptian textiles. Textile samples were treated with 4 selected polymers combined with two selected fungicides. Untreated and treated textile samples were deteriorated by 3 selected active fungal strains isolated from ancient Egyptian textiles. This study reports that most of the tested polymers combined with the tested fungicides prevented the fungal deterioration of textiles. Treatment of ancient textiles by suggested polymers combined with the suggested fungicides not only reinforces these textiles, but also prevents fungal deterioration and increases the durability of these textiles. The tested polymers without fungicides reduce the fungal deterioration of textiles but do not prevent it completely.

  20. Quality of Life Outcomes in a Pediatric Thalassemia Population in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Soheir; Afifi, Hanan; Thomas, Manal; Magdy, Phoebe; El-Kamah, Ghada

    2017-01-01

    Thalassemia is a disorder of hemoglobin (Hb) synthesis characterized by chronic hemolysis. In β-thalassemias major (β-TM), patients require regular transfusion at an early age due to severe anemia. Subsequently, intensive chelation therapy is initiated to mitigate the effects of the resultant iron overload. Clinical disease burden and the demanding treatment can affect health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcomes in this population. The aim of this study was to assess HRQoL outcomes in Egyptian pediatric thalassemia patients. Patients were enrolled simultaneously from the hematology clinic at the National Research Institute in Cairo, Egypt. The Arabic version of SF36 tool was used to assess HRQoL outcomes. Socioeconomic data were collected by patient and parent interviews. Clinical data were collected by review of medical records. One hundred and thirty patients and 60 controls were enrolled, with a mean age of 5.4 ± 3.2 years and 6.3 ± 3.0, respectively. The HRQoL outcome scores were lower in all domains in the thalassemia group compared to the control group (p = 0.0001). Transfusion-dependent (TD) patients had lower HRQoL scores compared to nontransfusion-dependent (NTD) patients (p = 0.0001). Patient education and maternal education were independently associated with better HRQoL scores (p = 0.007, p = 0.028, respectively). Residents of rural areas reported lower scores compared to urban residents (p = 0.026). Thalassemia was associated with lower HRQoL scores, in all domains, compared to HRQoL in unaffected controls. Chronic transfusion independence, patient education, and maternal education were all associated with higher HRQoL scores. Psychological, social, and economic support for families with thalassemia are all essential tools to improve HRQoL outcomes.

  1. Images as Messengers of Coptic Identity. An Example from Contemporary Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild Bjerre Finnestad

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past thirty years the production of two-dimensional images designed to be used in religion has flourished in the Coptic Orthodox Church of Egypt. After generations with little or negligible activity, enterprising ateliers can today be found all over the country.' Many of them are strategically placed in influential convents and monasteries and at important educational institutions. In this production of art, the Section of Coptic Art at the Higher Institute of Coptic Studies in Abbasiya in Cairo occupies a leading position. Under the direction of Professor Isaac Fanous Youssef the section is attempting to develop a Coptic iconography and style — which the Coptic Orthodox Church does not have. Images of Christ, Mary, and the saints are central in Coptic cultic life, but there is a traditional openness to all kinds of styles and the dominant ones are European and Byzantinesque, well-known in both Western and Eastern Christianity. Also other artists are engaged in developing an especially Coptic iconography and style, but Isaac Fanous and his pupils have received the greater attention and also have the support of official church authorities. The primary aim given for images in Coptic religion is that of being tools for communicating with and partaking of the Holy World.' The focus of this paper is on the usages and functions which the images have in Coptic life, in particular how they serve the construction of ethnic consciousness and cohesion of the Copts. Coptic identity is an important issue for the Copts. The images in question are included in a conscious effort to formulate and mediate who the Copts are. Through choice of themes, composition of motifs, and style, the images impart Coptic self-conception.

  2. Practical Study on Treatment of Selected Decorated Tapestry in Applied Art Museum, Cairo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neven Kamal FAHIM

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the method of treatment of tapestry textile, that considers the most common technique used in decoration of textile since the new kingdom until now, it is called Kabaty. The paper deals with selected piece of museum of Applied Art Faculty in Cairo. Treatment procedure was performed by several stages; firstly, Dating by comparing the decoration technique, the type of material and the decorative motifs existed in the object with another one known its date. Then samples taken from object were examined by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope to identify type of fibers and surface morphology .x-ray analysis was performed to identify mordant and dust. FTIR analysis to identify dyes in dyed samples. Then, the paper deal with the treatment of tapestry pieces by testing sensitive of fiber to water, mechanical cleaning and chemical cleaning to remove stain, washing stage using distilled water, and finally consolidation the object by fixed on support of natural linen which was stretched on wooden frame treated by anti-fungal substance.

  3. Exporting a Scandinavian Learning Model to Egypt and Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Youssef, Sandra Safwat; Bygholm, Ann; Jæger, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    many challenges. In this paper, we will present findings from an ethnographic study of the learning systems in higher education in Denmark, Egypt and Vietnam. The sample includes undergraduate level classes taught in Denmark, Egypt and Vietnam. The selected learning setting include an 'Academic...... Communication and Grammar' class in Denmark, a 'Financial Management' class in Vietnam and a 'Marketing Management' class in Egypt. To analyze the data collected, the researcher developed a model based on a constructivist understanding of learning processes. Three detailed descriptions of observations made......, and the LS observed in Egypt is predominantly student-materials centered...

  4. Oriental Fantasy : A postcolonial discourse analysis of Western belly dancers’ imaginations of Egypt and dance festivals in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Hooi, Mavis

    2015-01-01

    Belly dance is popularly practised in the West, and every year, thousands of enthusiasts and professionals from around the world travel to attend belly dance festivals in Egypt, which is considered the cultural centre of the dance. This bachelor’s thesis examines the discourses produced by Western or ʽwhiteʼ belly dancers from Sweden and Finland, on the topics of tourism in Egypt and belly dance festivals in Egypt. The texts are analysed using James Paul Gee's discourse analytical framework, ...

  5. FAMILY SUPPORT FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH-SEEKING BEHAVIOR: A QUALITATIVE STUDY IN RURAL SOUTHERN EGYPT (UPPER EGYPT)

    OpenAIRE

    ASMAA GHAREEB MOHAMED; Ohashi, Ayumi; HIGUCHI, MICHIYO; Chiang, Chifa; SHOKRIA ADLY LABEEB; Aoyama, Atsuko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This qualitative study investigated the influence of family support on women’s health-seeking behavior in rural southern Egypt (Upper Egypt). We carried out separate focus group discussions (FGDs) with 3 groups (6 women with children under 5 years old, 6 men, and 4 elderly women, respectively) in a village in Assiut Governorate, an underprivileged region in Upper Egypt. The FGDs aimed to identify how different types of family support affected women’s health-seeking behavior in areas ...

  6. Tick paralysis: first zoonosis record in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosabah, Amira A Abd El-rahman; Morsy, Tosson A

    2012-04-01

    Tick paralysis caused by the secretion of toxin with saliva while taking a blood meal is an important veterinary disease, but is rare in humans. Although it has certain geographical proclivities, it exists worldwide. Tick paralysis was demonstrated for the first time in Egypt among four children living in rural area at Giza Governorate. The clinical pictures were confused with rabies; myasthensia gravis; botulism; diphtheritic polyneuropathy encountered in rural areas. The recovery of tick infesting the four little children and negative clinical and laboratory data of all diseases denoted tick paralysis. The encountered ticks infesting their animals were Rhipicephalus sanguineus on dogs, Hyalomma dromedarii on camels and Hyalomma anatolicum excavatum and Haemaphysalis sp. on goats. The case was recognized as first record of tick paralysis in Egypt.

  7. LETTING GO: DE-RADICALIZATION IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Kaya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature on the causes of how terrorist organizations are formed and how counter terrorism measures can be more effective is immense. What is novel in terrorism literature is de-radicalization in terrorist organizations. This paper hopes to shed light on the de-radicalization process in terrorist organizations based in Egypt. In order to achieve that goal, the first part of the paper will deal with the de-radicalization process. The second part will briefly describe the major radical terrorist organizations that are effective in Egypt. The last part will combine the two parts and bring in suggestions on the de-radicalization process itself. Terrorism and de-radicalization are complicated threats to nearly all societies. Therefore, it is important to go beyond security and intelligence approaches and take proactive measures. It is best to view what is de-radicalization and how it can be achieved.

  8. China Knitting Delegation Visiting Turkey and Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Mr.Zhao Hong,V.President of China National Knitting Industry Association,also the chief editor of this magazine,will visit Turkey and Egypt,taking with him a delegation from Zhutang Town,one of the most important knitting industry clusters in China.The purpose of the visit is to strengthen the business relationship with lzmir area,one of the textile clustering areas in Turkey,to encourage bilateral investment and cooperation between the two industries despite Turkish trade remedy cases against textile imports from China.Observers view the regular visits between the two industries as a positive and optimistic signal for"burying the hatchet"to shake hands for more successful investment promotion and business cooperation.Egypt is famous for its long-staple cotton,and the yarn made of it is always an interest to Chinese knitters.

  9. Rural childhoods in Egypt's desert lands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adriansen, Hanne Kirstine

    . Many settlers move to the Mubarak villages in order to give their children a good start in life. The desert villages are associated with a type of ‘rural idyll’. The process of settling in the desert impacts upon the children’s possible pathways to adulthood and their identities and social...... relationships. Not only do the children grow up in a different physical context, they are also exposed to new norms, values and behaviour that influences their everyday life and shape their identity. Especially the change from living in large, extended families to living in nuclear families as well as women......’s new roles impact upon the children’s lives. The social contexts shaping the desert childhoods are in some ways more similar to contexts in ‘developed’ countries than in other parts of rural Egypt. The paper ends up by contrasting ideas of rural childhoods in Egypt with those found in ‘developed...

  10. [Concepts of the heart in Ancient Egypt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziskind, Bernard; Halioua, Bruno

    2004-03-01

    The heart was regarded in Ancient Egypt as the organic motor of the body and also the seat of intelligence, an important religious and spiritual symbol. It was considered as one of the eight parts of human body. Counter to other organs it had to be kept carefully intact in the mummy to ensure its eternal life. In Ancient Egypt, the concept of heart included three constituents: heart-haty, heart-ib, and the spiritual seat of intelligence, emotion and memory. The hieroglyphs representing the heart early in the first dynasty were drawn with eight vessels attached to it. Egyptian doctors have elaborated an original conception of cardiovascular physiology which endured 30 centuries.

  11. MERS Coronaviruses in Dromedary Camels, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Daniel K. W.; Poon, Leo L.M.; Gomaa, Mokhtar M.; Shehata, Mahmoud M.; Perera, Ranawaka A. P. M.; Abu Zeid, Dina; El Rifay, Amira S.; Siu, Lewis Y.; Guan, Yi; Webby, Richard J; Mohamed A Ali; Peiris, Malik; Kayali, Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    We identified the near-full-genome sequence (29,908 nt, >99%) of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) from a nasal swab specimen from a dromedary camel in Egypt. We found that viruses genetically very similar to human MERS-CoV are infecting dromedaries beyond the Arabian Peninsula, where human MERS-CoV infections have not yet been detected.

  12. China-Egypt, Closer in Crisis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Wei

    2009-01-01

    @@ Rashid Mohamed Rashid, Egyp-tian minister of Ministry of Trade and Industry, with his commercial delegation visited China in the late February, seeking for more cooperation channels and projects for two countries' development in the current international financial crisis.On February 25, the China-Egypt Busi-ness Seminar was held in Beijing, to usher over 200 entrepreneurs from both sides sit together to have the matching-making.

  13. Egypt: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-27

    power has engendered a fierce backlash from Brotherhood opponents who deeply distrust its motives . President Morsi on November 22, 2012, declared...Egypt from sliding into a dark tunnel of conflict, internal fighting, criminality, accusations of treason, sectarian discord and the collapse of state...order to assist exports18 and tourism , the Central Bank has tried to manage the gradual devaluation of the currency (Egyptian Pound), which has slid

  14. Seismicity and kinematic evolution of middle Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, A.; Abdel-Monem, S. M.; Sakr, K.; Ali, Sh. M.

    2006-08-01

    Based on historical and instrumental seismicity as well as recent GPS measurements, the seismicity and kinematic evaluation of middle Egypt is presented. Middle Egypt suffered in historical times by six major earthquakes and the Ramses II temple on the west bank of the Nile in Luxor, was almost destroyed by an ancient event. The temporal distribution of recent earthquakes (1900-1997) is highly scattered with only nine events recorded. Only after the installation of the modern Egyptian national seismograph network (ENSN) the seismic record of middle Egypt increased with a total of 280 earthquakes from 1998 to 2004. Focal mechanism solutions of the largest five events during the ENSN's operation period reveal reverse faulting mechanism with minor strike-slip component on the west bank of the Nile, while a normal faulting mechanism dominate in the eastern side. The orientations of both P- and T-axes are consistent with the Red Sea-Gulf of Suez stress field. Dynamic source parameters of these five events were derived from P-wave spectra as well. Three campaigns of GPS measurements were carried out for the middle Egypt network that established after the first instrumental earthquake on 14 December 1998 in this area. The velocity vectors for each epoch of observations were calculated and deformation analysis was performed. The horizontal velocity varies between 1 and 4 mm/year across the network. The deformation pattern suggests significant contraction across the southeastern sector of the study area while, the northwestern part is characterized by an extension strain rates. High shear strain is observed along the epicenteral area of the Mw = 4.0 June 2003 earthquake possibly reflecting the stress accumulation stage of a seismic cycle.

  15. Political Stability and Military Intervention in Egypt

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Casey; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2013-01-01

    Policy choices in the wake of recent mass protests in Egypt will determine the likelihood of civil war in the short run and the prospects for democracy in the long run. Economic conditions can be improved by international action to reduce grain-based biofuel production and finance employment generation. Creating the conditions for stable democracy requires accepting power-sharing mechanisms in which the military will have an important role.

  16. First evidence of enterobiasis in ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, P D

    2002-10-01

    The oldest and most common parasite for which we have direct evidence, in the New World, is Enterobius vernicularis. Numerous archaeological sites, especially in the arid American southwest, have yielded fecal samples positive for pinworm ova, some of these dating back 10,000 yr. Reports of pinworm from the Old World are scarce. This article reports the first evidence of pinworm infection from Roman-occupied (30 BC-AD 395) Egypt.

  17. CPAFFC Delegation Visits Egypt and Uganda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    <正>At the invitation of the Egyptian-Chinese Friendship Association(ECFA) and the Uganda-China Friendship Association(UCFA),a goodwill delegation led by Wang Mingyi,vice chairman of the Standing Committee of the Henan Provincial People’s Congress and honorary president of the Henan Provincial People’s Association for Friendship with Foreign Countries,paid a friendly visit to Egypt and Uganda from November 3 to 14,2006.

  18. Area Handbook Series: Egypt: A Country Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Ptolemaic pharaohs and endured until the suicide of Cleopatra in 30 B.C., at which time direct Roman control was instituted. The early Ptolemies were...Idfu) and Den- ,Ata (present-day Dandarah). The last of the Ptolemies was Cleopatra , the wife of Julius Cae- sar and later Mark Antony. During her...reign, Egypt again became a factor in Mediterranean politics. Cleopatra was a woman of genius and a worthy opponent of Rome. Her main preoccupations were

  19. Integrated Human Futures Modeling in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passell, Howard D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aamir, Munaf Syed [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bernard, Michael Lewis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beyeler, Walter E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fellner, Karen Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hayden, Nancy Kay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jeffers, Robert Fredric [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Malczynski, Leonard A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mitchell, Michael David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Silver, Emily [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tidwell, Vincent C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Villa, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vugrin, Eric D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Engelke, Peter [Atlantic Council, Washington, D.C. (United States); Burrow, Mat [Atlantic Council, Washington, D.C. (United States); Keith, Bruce [United States Military Academy, West Point, NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Human Futures Project provides a set of analytical and quantitative modeling and simulation tools that help explore the links among human social, economic, and ecological conditions, human resilience, conflict, and peace, and allows users to simulate tradeoffs and consequences associated with different future development and mitigation scenarios. In the current study, we integrate five distinct modeling platforms to simulate the potential risk of social unrest in Egypt resulting from the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile in Ethiopia. The five platforms simulate hydrology, agriculture, economy, human ecology, and human psychology/behavior, and show how impacts derived from development initiatives in one sector (e.g., hydrology) might ripple through to affect other sectors and how development and security concerns may be triggered across the region. This approach evaluates potential consequences, intended and unintended, associated with strategic policy actions that span the development-security nexus at the national, regional, and international levels. Model results are not intended to provide explicit predictions, but rather to provide system-level insight for policy makers into the dynamics among these interacting sectors, and to demonstrate an approach to evaluating short- and long-term policy trade-offs across different policy domains and stakeholders. The GERD project is critical to government-planned development efforts in Ethiopia but is expected to reduce downstream freshwater availability in the Nile Basin, fueling fears of negative social and economic impacts that could threaten stability and security in Egypt. We tested these hypotheses and came to the following preliminary conclusions. First, the GERD will have an important short-term impact on water availability, food production, and hydropower production in Egypt, depending on the short- term reservoir fill rate. Second, the GERD will have a very small impact on

  20. Lyme borreliosis: A neglected zoonosis in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhelw, Rehab A; El-Enbaawy, Mona I; Samir, Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, the causal organism of Lyme borreliosis. In Egypt, available data about the occurrence of Lyme disease are scarce and no structured studies documented the presence of Lyme borreliosis in Egyptian animals and tick reservoirs verifying its zoonotic evidence. Besides, no successful trials to isolate B. burgdorferi from clinical samples have occurred. This study was conducted to investigate B. burgdorferi infection as an emerging zoonosis neglected in Egypt. A total number of 92 animals, tick and human companion specimens were collected and subjected for culture, PCR and/or serodetection. B. burgdorferi has been detected and isolated from Egyptian animal breeds. We also detected the presence of outer surface protein A gene of B. burgdorferi by PCR as well as anti-B. burgdorferi IgM by ELISA in human contacts who were suffering from fever of unknown origin. This report represents the first systematic study on animals associated with patients suffering from febrile illness to confirm the emerging of such neglected zoonosis in Egypt.

  1. GPS-GRAVIMETRIC GEOID DETERMINATION IN EGYPT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to improve the geoid byGPS/leveling data in Egypt.Comparisons of the gravimetric geoid with GPS/leveling data have been performed.On the basis of a gravimetric geoid fitted to GPS/leveling by the least square method,a smoothed geoid was obtained.A high-resolution geoid in Egypt was computed with a 2.5′×2.5′ grid by combining the data set of 2 600 original point gravity values,30″×30″ resolution Digital Terrain Model (DTM) grid and the spherical harmonic model EGM96.The method of computation involved the strict evaluation of the Stokes integral with 1D-FFT.The standard deviation of the difference between the gravimetric and the GPS/leveling geoid heights is ±0.47 m.The standard deviation after fitting of the gravimetric geoid to the GPS/leveling points is better than ±13 cm.In the future we will try to improve our geoid results in Egypt by increasing the density of gravimetric coverage.

  2. Acute mastoiditis: A one year study in the pediatric hospital of Cairo university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Hoshy Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute mastoiditis is a serious complication of acute otitis media especially in the pediatric age group. This study reports the authors' experience in the treatment of children admitted with acute mastoiditis to the Pediatric Hospital of Cairo University throughout the year 2007, also we aimed to evaluate our current management of this serious disease. Methods Nineteen children were included in this study, 11 females and 8 males, their ages ranged from 9 months to 11 years. All children were treated with intravenous antibiotic on initial admission, myringotomy was considered for cases that did not respond to medical treatment for 48 hours, while cortical mastoidectomy (with myringotomy was reserved for cases that presented initially with subperiosteal abscess with or without post-auricular fistula, cases with intracranial complications and for cases that showed no response to myringotomy (after 48 hours. Follow up of the patients was carried out for at least 1 year. Results Medical management alone was enough in 5 cases (26%; all of them had erythematous tender mastoid on first presentation. Seven cases (37% needed myringotomy; 2 of them showed no response and they needed cortical mastoidectomy and the other 5 cases responded well except for 1 case that developed post-auricular subperiosteal abscess 2 months later necessitating cortical mastoidectomy with no evidence of recurrence till the end of the follow-up period. Seven cases (37% presented with subperiosteal abscess and they needed cortical mastoidectomy with myringotomy; they showed no recurrence till the end of the study. Conclusion Conservative management is an effective method in the treatment of non-complicated acute mastoiditis, but myringotomy should be considered if there is no response within 48 hours. Cortical mastoidectomy should be used in conjunction with the medical management in the treatment of complicated cases.

  3. "To change the world." Cairo conference reaches consensus on plan to stabilize world growth by 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-01

    After 6 days of debate and 200 speakers during September 5-13, 1994, participants from 180 countries at the Cairo International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) agreed on a strategy for curbing global population growth over the next 20 years. The objective was sustained economic growth and sustainable development. In his opening remarks, UN Secretary-General Boutros Boutros-Ghali said that the objective was to balance humanity and the environment with the means to sustain life, and that the efficacy of the world economic order depended to some extent on the ICPD. Participants were urged to use rigor, tolerance, and conscience in conference deliberations. Men and women should have the right and the means to choose their families' futures. The preamble stated that the ICPD would probably be the last opportunity in the twentieth century to address globally the issues relating to population and development. UN Population Fund Executive Director Nafis Sadik remarked that the ICPD had the potential to change the world. Egyptian President Mohamed Hosni Mubarak was elected president of the ICPD. Mubarak stated that solutions to population problems must go beyond demographic accounting and incorporate change in social, economic, and cultural conditions. Norway's Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland stated that development in many countries never reached many women. She called it a hypocritical morality that allowed women to suffer and die from unwanted pregnancies, illegal abortions, and miserable living conditions. US Vice President Albert Gore called for comprehensive and holistic solutions. The essential features of social change would involve democracy, economic reform, low rates of inflation, low levels of corruption, sound environmental management, free and open markets, and access to developed country markets. Pakistan's Prime Minister Benazir urged the empowerment of women. Many expressed the concern about unsustainable consumption in industrialized

  4. Noise assessment inside the second-line of the Greater Cairo Underground Metro

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mostafa E Aly

    2005-02-01

    Underground metro trains, which connect different terminals of big crowded cities, are the best means of public transportation. The metro is environmentally friendly because the trains are electrically driven and so do not emit chemical air-pollutants. The number of people using the Greater Cairo Underground Metro approaches two million per day, beside about one thousand workers in the different activities related to the metro. Metro users and workers complain about the high noise levels emitted by metro units travelling in the tunnels, especially at the turns, the entrance of tunnels and at stations while braking. Exposure to high noise levels for a long time causes many health hazards: either auditory, such as temporary and permanent hearing loss, or extra-auditory such as effects on the cardiovascular system, blood pressure, heart and respiratory rates, central nervous system. Noise also leads to stress problems such as lack of concentration, leading to accidents. Noise has adverse effects on psychological, biological, immunological and hormonal systems of the body. Due to the above mentioned reasons, suggestion has been made to start this research to assess and diagnose these problems, and to find the proper methods for early detection and proper management of these health hazards; in addition to the engineering solutions for the noise problem. Measurements of noise levels have been made inside the units while travelling and outside the units at the stations platforms to evaluate the noise problem and to suggest some kind of solutions to the problem. The calculations of different noise indices have been made and compared with international criteria and national laws. The comparison shows that the noise levels are clearly unacceptable, for indices $L_{1},L_{99},$ and LNP, both inside the metro units and outside the units at station platforms along the passage.

  5. The early warning application role in facing the environmental crisis and disasters: "Preliminarily risk management strategy for the greater city of Cairo"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghoneem Yousef M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural disasters are inevitable and it is almost impossible to fully recoup the damage caused by the disasters. But it is possible to minimize the potential risk by developing disaster early warning strategies, methods using the new technology applications which play a crucial role in efficient mitigation and management of disasters. This paper describes the importance of the remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS in evolving a suitable strategy for disaster, crises and risk management using these technologies. The main objective of this paper is to make a Preliminary risk management plan (it is a logical and systematic method of identifying, analyzing, treating and monitoring the risks involved in any activity or process. This process helps Administrations to focus on priorities and in decisions on deploying limited resources to deal with the highest risks using the Environmental risk map of the greater city of Cairo demonstrating the most high-risk administrative areas in the city, supported by field evidence and different sources of information. to reduce the loss of life and property and protect the Nation from all hazards, including natural disasters and other man-made disasters, by leading and supporting the Nation in a risk-based, comprehensive emergency management system of preparedness, protection, response, recovery, and mitigation. This study has shown that how can the early warning Applications can be useful in analyzing, Integrating and managing different datasets for predicting the environmental crises and disasters that may affect the urbanism inside the city and help in the preparation of the Risk management plan.

  6. Tech Talk for Social Studies Teachers: Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahl, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Presents an annotated bibliography of 10 Web sites concerning ancient Egypt that have materials appropriate for social studies classes. Includes virtual tours of Egypt and specific temples, explorations of the pyramids, archaeological and geographic information, and information on the Egyptian "Book of the Dead." (MJP)

  7. Egypt and the Augustan Cultural Revolution : an interpretative archaeological overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerde, (Marike) van M.E.J.J.

    2015-01-01

    As part of the VIDI 'Cultural innovation in a globalising society: Egypt in the Roman world', this research explores manifestations of Egypt in the material culture of Augustan Rome. This period was a crucial turning point for the urban landscape of Rome, which was characterised by cultural

  8. Student Academic Freedom in Egypt: Perceptions of University Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain-Al-Dien, Muhammad M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate student academic freedom from the university education students' point of view in Egypt. This study adopted a survey research design in which the questionnaire was the main data collection instrument. The study participants comprised 800 university education students in Egypt. The result of the…

  9. Resource Unit on Egypt for the Intermediate Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husbands, Kenneth; Taylor, Bob

    Resources for teaching about modern and ancient Egypt are provided in this guide for intermediate grade social studies teachers. Material includes: a detailed outline for a unit on Egypt which contains a geographic overview followed by sections on the Nile River Valley, agriculture, the pharaohs, religion, architecture, science, hieroglyphics,…

  10. Integrate the Arts. The Art of Ancient Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Mary

    1996-01-01

    Presents three art projects that can bring to life the study of ancient Egypt for elementary students. After researching Egypt's history and culture, students can create King Tut masks, make Cleopatra headdresses, and craft cartouche pendants. The article describes the materials needed and steps required to complete each project. (SM)

  11. Power and Gender in Ancient Egypt: The Case of Hatshepsut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Kristina; Wurtzel, Kate

    2009-01-01

    Hatshepsut (1479-1458 B.C.E) ruled New Kingdom Egypt for roughly 20 years as one of the few female pharaohs in the history of ancient Egypt. Her rule began when her husband died and her stepson was too young to be pharaoh. To legitimize her role as pharaoh, Hatshepsut began a significant building campaign by constructing numerous images, temples,…

  12. The economics of hybrid power systems for sustainable desert agriculture in Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamel, S.M.; Dahl, C.

    2005-01-01

    Egypt has embarked on an ambitious desert land reclamation program in order to increase total food production. Energy planners for these desert agriculture locations have chosen diesel generation power technology because minimization of the initial capital cost of a power supply system is their top...... to investigate the economic potential of such systems in Egypt’s desert agriculture sector. Using optimization software, we assess the economics of hybrid power systems versus the present diesel generation technology in a remote agricultural development area. We also consider the emission reduction advantages...

  13. Framing Egypt : Roman literary perceptions of Egypt from Cicero to Juvenal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemreize, M.E.C.

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive study of Roman literary references to Egypt without preference for one particular period, author or subject, in contrast to most previous scholarship. In doing so, it shows that these references vary greatly, are context-dependent, and cannot be rightly understood when

  14. Framing Egypt : Roman literary perceptions of Egypt from Cicero to Juvenal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leemreize, M.E.C.

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive study of Roman literary references to Egypt without preference for one particular period, author or subject, in contrast to most previous scholarship. In doing so, it shows that these references vary greatly, are context-dependent, and cannot be rightly understood when interp

  15. Research on the Food Security Condition and Food Supply Capacity of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Food security is chronically guaranteed in Egypt because of the food subsidy policy of the country. However, the increasing Egyptian population is straining the food supply. To study changes in Egyptian food security and future food supply capacity, we analysed the historical grain production, yield per unit, grain-cultivated area, and per capita grain possession of Egypt. The GM (1,1 model of the grey system was used to predict the future population. Thereafter, the result was combined with scenario analysis to forecast the grain possession and population carrying capacity of Egypt under different scenarios. Results show that the increasing population and limitations in cultivated land will strain Egyptian food security. Only in high cultivated areas and high grain yield scenarios before 2020, or in high cultivated areas and mid grain yield scenarios before 2015, can food supply be basically satisfied (assurance rate ≥ 80% under a standard of 400 kg per capita. Population carrying capacity in 2030 is between 51.45 and 89.35 million. Thus, we propose the use of advanced technologies in agriculture and the adjustment of plant structure and cropping systems to improve land utilization efficiency. Furthermore, urbanization and other uses of cultivated land should be strictly controlled to ensure the planting of grains.

  16. Research on the food security condition and food supply capacity of Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jian; Xiang, Youzhen; Hao, Wenhui; Feng, Yongzhong; Yang, Gaihe; Ren, Guangxin; Han, Xinhui

    2014-01-01

    Food security is chronically guaranteed in Egypt because of the food subsidy policy of the country. However, the increasing Egyptian population is straining the food supply. To study changes in Egyptian food security and future food supply capacity, we analysed the historical grain production, yield per unit, grain-cultivated area, and per capita grain possession of Egypt. The GM (1,1) model of the grey system was used to predict the future population. Thereafter, the result was combined with scenario analysis to forecast the grain possession and population carrying capacity of Egypt under different scenarios. Results show that the increasing population and limitations in cultivated land will strain Egyptian food security. Only in high cultivated areas and high grain yield scenarios before 2020, or in high cultivated areas and mid grain yield scenarios before 2015, can food supply be basically satisfied (assurance rate ≥ 80%) under a standard of 400 kg per capita. Population carrying capacity in 2030 is between 51.45 and 89.35 million. Thus, we propose the use of advanced technologies in agriculture and the adjustment of plant structure and cropping systems to improve land utilization efficiency. Furthermore, urbanization and other uses of cultivated land should be strictly controlled to ensure the planting of grains.

  17. In-situ measurement of texture development rate in CaIrO3 post-perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Simon A.; Walker, Andrew M.; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2016-08-01

    The rate of crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) development during deformation of post-perovskite is crucial in interpreting seismic anisotropy in the lowermost mantle but the stability field of MgSiO3 post-perovskite prevents high-strain deformation experiments being performed on it. Therefore, to constrain the rate of CPO development in post-perovskite, we deformed CaIrO3, a low-pressure analogue of MgSiO3 post-perovskite, in simple shear at 3.2 GPa and 400 °C to a shear strain (γ) of 0.81. From X-ray diffraction patterns acquired during deformation, we invert for CPO as a function of strain. By comparing the CPO that develops with visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) models we constrain the critical resolved shear stresses (CRSS) of the non-primary slip-systems in CaIrO3 to be of order 6 times stronger than the primary [ 1 0 0 ] (0 1 0) slip system. This value is significantly less than has been assumed by previous studies and if applicable to MgSiO3 implies that seismic anisotropy in the D″ layer develops slower than has previously been assumed.

  18. Oedematous skin disease of buffalo in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, S A

    2001-05-01

    This review covers a historical view and etiology of oedematous skin disease which affects buffalo in Egypt, the microbiology of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis causing the disease: its virulence; clinical signs; mechanism of pathogenesis; histopathology; mode of transmission; immunological aspects; treatment and control. It is concluded that C. pseudotuberculosis serotype II is the main cause of OSD and exotoxin phospholipase D and its lipid contents of the cell wall are the major causes of pathogenesis. After declaring the role of Hippobosca equina in transmission of the causative agent among buffaloes, control of OSD is now available.

  19. Astronomy at Nabta Playa, Southern Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKim Malville, J.

    Nabta Playa may contain the oldest human-made features with astronomical alignments in Egypt. In the Late and Terminal Neolithic (7,500-5,400 BP), nomadic pastoralists built a ceremonial center on the western shore of Nabta Playa, consisting of some 30 complex megalithic structures, stone circles, and lines of megaliths crossing the playa. The megaliths may once have aligned with Arcturus, the Belt of Orion, Sirius, and α Cen. Reorientations of the northern set of megaliths suggest a response to precession. Elaborate burials at the nearby cemetery at Gebel Ramlah indicate the nomads consisted of Mediterranean and sub-Saharan populations with little social stratification.

  20. Egypt: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-12

    agricultural output, large domestic market , and strategic location between the Mediterranean and Red Seas. Most importantly, the British saw Egypt as vital to...the Fundación para las Relaciones Internacionales y el Diálogo Exterior (FRIDE), March 6, 2008. 17 Steven A. Cook, "Adrift on the Nile: The Limits of...widespread due to Israel’s total blockade of Gaza, Hamas’s demand for weapons, and the lack of viable economic alternatives to black market activity on

  1. In Pursuit of Dignity: Education and Social Mobility in the Life Trajectories of Women Commercial School Graduates in Cairo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Elgeziri (Moushira)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis addresses the role of education in women’s social mobility, focusing on the case of female graduates of commercial schools in Egypt. Technical education, which encompasses the commercial variant along with two other streams, has been intriguing in both its beginnings and evol

  2. Formal and informal Patronage among Jews in the Islamic East: evidence from the Cairo Geniza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustow, Marina

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the political culture of the Islamic East under Fatimid and Buwayhid rule (tenth-twelfth centuries via relationships between patrons, clients, protégés, and partners. The main body of evidence I utilize are letters and petitions from the Cairo Geniza that employ the same specialized vocabulary of patron-client relationships one finds in Arabic histories of the period: idioms referring to the exchange of benefit, reciprocal service, protection, oversight, patronage, and loyalty. The Geniza letters, written without regard for posterity, suggest that these idioms were used well beyond the courts and were understood and deployed by men and women, the literate and illiterate, the important and the inconsequential. Yet the use of certain terms in Judaeo-Arabic also differs from their use in Arabic: some reflect devaluation over time, while others hardened into formulaic phrases. These differences suggest that some forms of patronage did not thrive beyond the hothouse of the court; viewed from another perspective, they also suggest that even outside courtly literature, one can retrieve fossils of older forms of patronage in the terms used to describe relationships between leaders and their followers as well as among people more nearly equal in station. A society’s use of social metaphors reveals something of what its members value, what they choose to retain and perpetuate from the past, how they function in moments of crisis, and how successfully their rulers have managed to convince them of the legitimacy of the social and political order. Conversely, the vocabulary of patronage was a social technique that allowed Jews to conduct business, engage in politics and communal regulation, and to amass and retain followers in a variety of spheres, including that of the rabbinic academies who proffered the construction of Judaism that became hegemonic over the course of the Middle Ages.

    Este artículo aborda la cultura pol

  3. Morphological and molecular identification of the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus and the camel tick Hyalomma dromedarii (Acari: Ixodidae vectors of Rickettsioses in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hend H. A. M. Abdullah

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Rickettsioses have an epidemiological importance that includes pathogens, vectors, and hosts. The dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus and the camel tick Hyalomma dromedarii play important roles as vectors and reservoirs of Rickettsiae. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Rickettsiae in ixodid ticks species infesting dogs and camels in Egypt, in addition to, the morphological and molecular identification of R. sanguineus and H. dromedarii. Materials and Methods: A total of 601 and 104 of ticks’ specimens were collected from dogs and camels, respectively, in Cairo, Giza and Sinai provinces. Hemolymph staining technique and OmpA and gltA genes amplification were performed to estimate the prevalence rate of Rickettsiae in ticks. For morphological identification of tick species, light microscope (LM and scanning electron microscope (SEM were used. In addition to the phylogenetic analyses of 18S rDNA, Second internal transcript spacer, 12S rDNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit-1, and 16S rDNA were performed for molecular identification of two tick species. Results: The prevalence rate of Rickettsiae in ticks was 11.6% using hemolymph staining technique and 6.17% by OmpA and gltA genes amplification. Morphological identification revealed that 100% of dogs were infested by R. sanguineus while 91.9% of camels had been infested by H. dromedarii. The phylogenetic analyses of five DNA markers confirmed morphological identification by LM and SEM. The two tick species sequences analyses proved 96-100% sequences identities when compared with the reference data in Genbank records. Conclusion: The present studies confirm the suitability of mitochondrial DNA markers for reliable identification of ticks at both intra- and inter-species level over the nuclear ones. In addition to, the detection of Rickettsiae in both ticks’ species and establishment of the phylogenetic status of R. sanguineus and H. dromedarii would be useful in

  4. Morphological and molecular identification of the brown dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus and the camel tick Hyalomma dromedarii (Acari: Ixodidae) vectors of Rickettsioses in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Hend H A M; El-Molla, Amal; Salib, Fayez A; Allam, Nesreen A T; Ghazy, Alaa A; Abdel-Shafy, Sobhy

    2016-10-01

    Rickettsioses have an epidemiological importance that includes pathogens, vectors, and hosts. The dog tick Rhipicephalus sanguineus and the camel tick Hyalomma dromedarii play important roles as vectors and reservoirs of Rickettsiae. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Rickettsiae in ixodid ticks species infesting dogs and camels in Egypt, in addition to, the morphological and molecular identification of R. sanguineus and H. dromedarii. A total of 601 and 104 of ticks' specimens were collected from dogs and camels, respectively, in Cairo, Giza and Sinai provinces. Hemolymph staining technique and OmpA and gltA genes amplification were performed to estimate the prevalence rate of Rickettsiae in ticks. For morphological identification of tick species, light microscope (LM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used. In addition to the phylogenetic analyses of 18S rDNA, Second internal transcript spacer, 12S rDNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit-1, and 16S rDNA were performed for molecular identification of two tick species. The prevalence rate of Rickettsiae in ticks was 11.6% using hemolymph staining technique and 6.17% by OmpA and gltA genes amplification. Morphological identification revealed that 100% of dogs were infested by R. sanguineus while 91.9% of camels had been infested by H. dromedarii. The phylogenetic analyses of five DNA markers confirmed morphological identification by LM and SEM. The two tick species sequences analyses proved 96-100% sequences identities when compared with the reference data in Genbank records. The present studies confirm the suitability of mitochondrial DNA markers for reliable identification of ticks at both intra- and inter-species level over the nuclear ones. In addition to, the detection of Rickettsiae in both ticks' species and establishment of the phylogenetic status of R. sanguineus and H. dromedarii would be useful in understanding the epidemiology of ticks and tick borne rickettsioses in Egypt.

  5. Framework for Bridges Maintenance in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham Abd Elkhalek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional approaches for bridges maintenance is proven to be inefficient as they lead to random way of spending maintenance budget and deteriorating bridge conditions. In many cases, maintenance activities are performed due to user complaints. The objective of this paper is to develop a practical and reliable framework to manage the maintenance and repair activities of Bridges network in Egypt considering performance and budget limits. The model solves an optimization problem that maximizes the average condition of the network given the limited budget using Genetic Algorithm (GA. The main tasks of the system are bridge inventory, condition assessment, deterioration using markov model, and maintenance optimization. The developed model takes into account multiple parameters including serviceability requirements, budget allocation, element importance on structural safety and serviceability, bridge impact on network, and traffic. A questionnaire is conducted to complete the research scope. The proposed model is implemented in software, which provides a friendly user interface. The results of the framework are multi – year maintenance plan for the entire network for up to five years. A case study is presented for validating and testing the model with Data collected from “General Authority for Roads, Bridges and Land Transport” in Egypt.

  6. Political Participation and Power Relations in Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shehata, Mostafa

    2017-01-01

    The political use of media in Egypt post-2011 revolution brought about drastic transformations in political activism and power structures. In the context of communication power theory, this article investigates the effects of newspapers and social network sites on political participation and poli......The political use of media in Egypt post-2011 revolution brought about drastic transformations in political activism and power structures. In the context of communication power theory, this article investigates the effects of newspapers and social network sites on political participation...... and political power relations. The research employed a mixed methodology, comprised of a survey of 527 Egyptian youth and semi-structured interviews of 12 political activists and journalists. The results showed a significant relationship between reading newspapers and youth’s political participation......, but not between using social network sites and political participation. In addition, newspapers and social network sites were platforms for a series of conflicts and coalitions that emerged between pro- and anti-revolution actors. Despite the importance of social network sites as key tools for informing...

  7. THE ROLE OF LIBRARIES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CULTURAL TOURISM WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS TO THE BIBLIOTHECA ALEXANDRINA IN EGYPT

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Cultural tourism has grown rapidly in the past few decades as a result of more income, higher levels of education, globalization processes that make the world a smaller place, technology, the effects of media and telecommunications and new types of cultural attractions. Libraries, as cultural institutions, may contribute significantly to the development of cultural tourism. One good example is the role of Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt.

  8. THE ROLE OF LIBRARIES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CULTURAL TOURISM WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS TO THE BIBLIOTHECA ALEXANDRINA IN EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Lazarevic

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cultural tourism has grown rapidly in the past few decades as a result of more income, higher levels of education, globalization processes that make the world a smaller place, technology, the effects of media and telecommunications and new types of cultural attractions. Libraries, as cultural institutions, may contribute significantly to the development of cultural tourism. One good example is the role of Bibliotheca Alexandrina in Egypt.

  9. Volcanically-Induced Nile Flood Failure Promotes Internal Revolt and Suppresses Interstate Conflict in Hellenistic Egypt, 305-30 BCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Francis; Manning, Joseph; Stine, Alexander; Boos, William; Storelvmo, Trude; Sigl, Michael; Marlon, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions are a primary driver of abrupt short-term climatic changes. State-of-the-art revisions to polar ice-core chronologies now allow us to track the impacts of a sequence of major and closely-recurring volcanic eruptions on the great Ptolemaic kingdom centred in Egypt, between 305-30 BCE. This was a formidable Mediterranean cultural and economic power in the efflorescent Hellenistic era of the first four centuries BCE, a period bracketed by Alexander the Great on one end and Cleopatra on the other, and known for its considerable advancement in science and material culture. In this paper we show a link between major volcanic eruptions that register through elevated sulphate deposition in the polar ice, and a suppression of the agriculturally-critical Nile summer flood, identifiable in annual Nilometer measurements from Rhoda, Cairo, between 641 and 1469 CE. This likely relates to a volcanic perturbation of the East African monsoon, responsible for the rainfall in the Ethiopian highlands that drives the annual summer flood, and the effect can also be identified in ancient papyri that indicate the quality of the Nile flood in the first several centuries BCE. Volcanic eruptions in this period are also shown to correspond in timing with the initiation of a series of hitherto poorly understood internal revolts against Ptolemaic rule in Egypt, while also corresponding in timing to the cessation of major interstate conflicts (the nine "Syrian Wars", running 274-96 BCE) between the Ptolemaic kingdom and their powerful Near Eastern rival, the Seleukid empire. Subsistence crises driven by volcanically-induced suppression of the Nile flood are likely to have played a key causal role in these events, an understanding that helps to advance our knowledge of the major historical events of the formative Hellenistic era, which set the scene for the rise of the Roman Empire. Our findings also suggest the potential of integrating human and natural archives to

  10. Governance and Risk Management: Empirical Evidence from Malaysia and Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rashidah Abdul Rahman; Siti Balqis Noor; Tariq Ismail

    2013-01-01

    ... management practices of Islamic banks in Malaysia and Egypt. The findings of this study identified that the Islamic banks in the selected countries are somewhat efficient in their risk management process...

  11. Mitigation options for the industrial sector in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelil, I.A.; El-Touny, S.; Korkor, H. [Organization for Energy Conservation and Planning (OECP), Cairo (Egypt)

    1996-12-31

    Though its contribution to the global Greenhouse gases emission is relatively small, Egypt has signed and ratified the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UN FCCC) and has been playing an active role in the international efforts to deal with such environmental challenges. Energy efficiency has been one of the main strategies that Egypt has adopted to improve environmental quality and enhance economic competitiveness. This paper highlights three initiatives currently underway to improve energy efficiency of the Egyptian industry. The first is a project that has been recently completed by OECP to assess potential GHG mitigation options available in Egypt`s oil refineries. The second initiative is an assessment of GHG mitigation potential in the Small and Medium size Enterprises (SME) in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria. The third one focuses on identifying demand side management options in some industrial electricity consumers in the same city.

  12. Biomphalaria alexandrina in Egypt: Past, present and future

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abou-El-Naga, Iman F

    2013-01-01

    .... In Egypt, Biomphalaria alexandrina is the intermediate host for Schistosoma mansoni. Biomphalaria alexandrina originated in the area between Alexandria and Rosetta and has historically been confined to the Nile Delta...

  13. Molecular identification of falciparum malaria and human tuberculosis co-infections in mummies from the Fayum depression (Lower Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Lalremruata

    Full Text Available Due to the presence of the lake Quarun and to the particular nature of its irrigation system, it has been speculated that the Fayum, a large depression 80 kilometers south-west of modern Cairo, was exposed to the hazards of malaria in historic times. Similarly, it has been speculated that, in the same area, also human tuberculosis might have been far more widespread in the antiquity than in its recent past. If these hypotheses were confirmed, it would imply that frequent cases of co-infection between the two pathogens might have occurred in ancient populations. To substantiate those speculations, molecular analyses were carried out on sixteen mummified heads recovered from the necropolis of Abusir el Meleq (Fayum dating from the 3(rd Intermediate Period (1064-656 BC to the Roman Period (30 BC-300 AD. Soft tissue biopsies were used for DNA extractions and PCR amplifications using well-suited protocols. A partial 196-bp fragment of Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 gene and a 123-bp fragment of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex insertion sequence IS6110 were amplified and sequenced in six and five of the sixteen specimens, respectively. A 100% concordance rates between our sequences and those of P. falciparum and M. tuberculosis complex ones were obtained. Lastly, concomitant PCR amplification of P. falciparum and M. tuberculosis complex DNA specific fragments was obtained in four mummies, three of which are (14C dated to the Late and Graeco-Roman Periods. Our data confirm that the hydrography of Fayum was extremely conducive to the spread of malaria. They also support the notion that the agricultural boom and dense crowding occurred in this region, especially under the Ptolemies, highly increased the probability for the manifestation and spread of tuberculosis. Here we extend back-wards to ca. 800 BC new evidence for malaria tropica and human tuberculosis co-occurrence in ancient Lower Egypt.

  14. Black cloud and transport of anthropogenic pollution across the Mediterranean Sea over Nile Delta region in Egypt during Fall season

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Askary, H. M.; Prasad, A. K.; Kafatos, M.

    2010-12-01

    The Nile River Delta is the most populous region of Egypt with major agricultural and industrial activities. The region suffers from intense episodes of natural and anthropogenic pollution especially during Spring (March-April-May), Summer (June-July-August), Fall (September-October-November), and Winter (December-January-February) seasons. Previous studies found that the summer season shows long range transport of pollutants from Europe which is widely accepted. Recent studies attribute the local biomass burning in open fields to be the major culprit behind increased levels of pollution over major cities of the Delta region (such as Cairo) especially during the Fall season. Such episodes result in dense fog and haze which is locally known as "Black Cloud". We have analyzed multiple satellite datasets such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) higher resolution aerosol parameters, vertical profiles from AIRS (meteorological and other parameters), Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model (HYSPLIT), Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GOCART) Model, and ground collected data (AOD, PM10, SO2 and NO2) to study the cause of Fall-time pollution over the Delta region. We show that the major episodes of pollution, even during Fall season, is attributed to the inter-continental transport of pollution especially across the Mediterranean. The back-trajectories from HYSPLIT model and satellite data clearly show the source of the plume visible in the MODIS data. We have computed month-to-month mean of the back-trajectories during Fall season (2004-2009) and classified the back trajectories using available ground data to identify major sources of pollution during Fall. The vertical profile of the atmosphere from AIRS shows arrival of plume from northern regions affecting the air quality over all the major cities of the Delta region. Similar analysis can be applied to major population centers in the Indo-Gangetic region in

  15. Schistosomiasis and cancer in egypt: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Hussein

    2013-09-01

    Schistosomiasis is not known to be associated with any malignant disease other than bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is still the most common malignant tumor among males in Egypt and some African and Middle East countries. However, the frequency rate of bladder cancer has declined significantly during the last 25 years. This drop is mainly related to the control of Schistosomiasis. Many studies have elucidated the pathogenic events of Schistosomal-related bladder cancer with a suggested theory of pathogenesis. Furthermore, the disease presents with a distinct clinicopathologic profile that is quite different from bladder cancer elsewhere with younger age at presentation, more male predominance, more invasive stages, and occurrence of squamous cell carcinoma pathologic subtype. However, recent data suggest that this profile has been dramatically changed over the past 25 years leading to minimization of the differences between its features in Egypt and that in Western countries. Management of muscle-invasive localized disease is mainly surgery with 5-year survival rates of 30-50%. Although still a debatable issue, adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy have improved treatment outcomes including survival and bladder preservation rates in most studies. This controversy emphasizes the need of individualized treatment options based on a prognostic index or other factors that can define the higher risk groups where more aggressive therapy is needed. The treatment for locally advanced and/or metastatic disease has passed through a series of clinical trials since 1970s. These phase II and III trials have included the use of single agent and combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimens. The current standard of systemic chemotherapy of generally fit patients is now the gemcitabine-cisplatin combination. In conclusion, a changing pattern of bladder cancer in Egypt is clearly observed. This is mainly due to the success in the control of Schistosomiasis

  16. CAIROELLA TRICAMERATA N. GEN., N. SP. (FORAMINIFERIDA, MILIOLOIDEA FROM THE LOWER CENOMANIAN OF MONTE CAIRO (SOUTHERN LATIUM, CENTRAL ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURIZIO CHIOCCHINI

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A new porcelaneous foraminifer, Cairoella tricamerata n. gen., n. sp., is here described from the lower Cenomanian of the Monte Cairo area near Cassino (Southern Latium, Italy. The new taxon is characterized by an early stage with triloculine to quinqueloculine coiling, followed by one or two whorls, each consisting of three or more tubular, curved, flattened and undivided chambers, with depressed sutures; it is ascribed  to the superfamily Milioloidea, but the inferred  attribution to the family Hauerinidae remains uncertain. In the type-locality its occurrence is restricted to the back-edge facies of the Latium-Abruzzi carbonate platform represented by fossiliferous grain-supported limestone rich in Sellialveolina viallii Colalongo, 1963.

  17. Labour migration and rural development in Egypt. A study of return migration in six villages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, C

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of the impact of labor migration on social change in 6 rural villages (Shanawan and Kafr Shanawan north of Cairo, Kafr Yusuf and Tambul el Kubra near Simbalaween, and Abu Girg and Bani Walims in Minya governate) in Egypt was conducted in 1987-88. Since the 1991 Gulf war, the political environment, the labor markets, and the structure of migration opportunities have changed. An estimated 5% of rural households might have been directly affected by migrants' departure from Kuwait and Iraq. Data collection involved a household census survey of 8620 households, of which 2483 were migrants, including 1765 return migrants. A sample of return migrant (639) was interviewed about their migration experiences. Participant observation was also conducted among migrants and nonmigrants, and case studies were developed. Villages were demographically and socioeconomically very different; migration ranged from 18.5-434.2%. Structural change was measured on a scale of 1 to 6 in terms of population size, literacy of household heads, share of agricultural occupations, share of new red brick houses, and availability of infrastructural or institutional facilities. The probability of having a household with a migrant member increased with the rural character of the village. Landholdings or other major household variables were unrelated to migration. Rural outmigration was almost exclusively male, the average age was 29.6 years, and the average stay was 2.6 years. Migration destination was specific to individuals but affected by occupation and family or village resources. Professionals were overrepresented in Saudi Arabia, and farm and unskilled laborers or the unemployed were overrepresented in Iraq. Remittances from international migration have contributed along with the economic reforms of Sadat to new, private initiatives from all strata in rural society. 74.3% of returnees stated that improvement in income and living standards was the motivation for migration; many motives

  18. Development And Climate Change In Egypt: Focus On Coastal Resources

    OpenAIRE

    M. El Raey; Hagenstad, M.; Smith, J.; Agrawala, S.; M. van Aalst; Conway, D.; Moehner, A.

    2004-01-01

    This report presents the integrated case study for Egypt carried out under an OECD project on Development and Climate Change. The report is structured around a three-tiered framework. First, recent climate trends and climate change scenarios for Egypt are assessed and key sectoral impacts are identified and ranked along multiple indicators to establish priorities for adaptation. Second, donor portfolios are analyzed to examine the proportion of development assistance activities af...

  19. Perceived stress among tomorrow’s attorneys in Mansoura, Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa Amr; Abdel-Hady El-Gilany

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Few data are available on the level and sources of stress among law students in the Middle East generally and in Egypt specifically. We conducted this study to identify the prevalence and predictors of perceived stress among law students in Mansoura University, Egypt. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study covered 426 law students selected through a stratified cluster sampling method. The questionnaire covered four categories, including 15 items on sources of...

  20. The Cairo Declaration And The Diaoyu Islands%《开罗宣言》与钓鱼岛

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘庭华

    2014-01-01

    The Cairo Declaration is important legal basis documents of treating defeated Japan after WW Ⅱ, it had strongly condemned Japan ’ s fascist barbaric aggression against the other small and weak Nations in Southeast Asia and China , affirmed the rights that China regain territory invaded by Japan clearly and specifically .However , since the"cold war"intensifies, United States destroyed the principles , purpose and spirit of The Cairo Declaration and The Potsdam Proclamation one by one , and sent the China's Diaoyu Islands which stolen by Japan to Japan , causing the today ’s sovereignty of the Diaoyu Islands dispute .Looking back on this period of history will help peo-ple understand the true face of history.%《开罗宣言》是第二次世界大战后,处理战败国日本的重要法律性依据文件,它严厉谴责了日本法西斯对中国和东南亚其他弱小民族的野蛮侵略,明确而具体地肯定了中国收复被日本侵占的领土的神圣权利。但是,由于“冷战”的加剧,美国逐一严重违背或破坏《开罗宣言》和《波茨坦公告》的原则、宗旨和精神,将日本窃取中国的钓鱼岛私相授受给日本,从而导致今日钓鱼岛主权的争端,东亚和平的不安稳。回顾这段历史,将有助于人们认清历史的本来真实面目。

  1. Status of marine protected areas in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy, M.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Egypt has sought to protect its natural resources and marine biodiversity by establishing a network of six MPAs that are generally located in the Gulf of Aqaba and the Red Sea; most of them include interconnected marine and terrestrial sectors based on conserving coral reefs and accompanying systems. We assessed the present status of MPA networks that showed a set of important results manifested in some strengths (i.e. proper selection according to specific criteria, management plans, etc., and also some weaknesses (i.e. a relatively small protected proportion of the Egyptian marine territorial waters, significant pressures mainly by tourism activities, etc.. Finally, some recommendations are proposed from this work (i.e. incorporate more habitats that are not well represented in the network, especially on the Mediterranean Sea; establishing a touristic carrying capacity of each area; etc. to improve the current situation.

  2. Occult hepatitis B virus infection in Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    The emerging evidence of the potentially clinicalimportance of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection(OBI) increases the interest in this topic. OBI mayimpact in several clinical contexts, which include thepossible transmission of the infection, the contributionto liver disease progression, the development ofhepatocellular carcinoma, and the risk of reactivation.There are several articles that have published on OBI inEgyptian populations. A review of MEDLINE databasewas undertaken for relevant articles to clarify theepidemiology of OBI in Egypt. HBV genotype D is theonly detectable genotype among Egyptian OBI patients.Higher rates of OBI reported among Egyptian chronicHCV, hemodialysis, children with malignant disorders, andcryptogenic liver disease patients. There is an evidenceof OBI reactivation after treatment with chemotherapy.The available data suggested that screening for OBI mustbe a routine practice in these groups of patients. Furtherstudies needed for better understand of the epidemiologyof OBI among Egyptian young generations after the eraof hepatitis B vaccination.

  3. Building trust in biotechnology crops in light of the Arab Spring: a case study of Bt maize in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezezika Obidimma C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The case of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt maize in Egypt presents a unique perspective on the role of trust in agricultural biotechnology (agbiotech public-private partnerships (PPPs. This is especially relevant given the recent pro-democracy uprisings that spread throughout the Arab world that have significantly impacted the current political climate and status of both the public and private sector, and especially public-private collaborative initiatives. This case study aims to shed light on various trust-building practices adopted, and trust-related challenges faced, in the Bt maize project in Egypt. Methods We reviewed published materials on Bt maize in Egypt and collected data through direct observations and semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with stakeholders of the Bt maize project in Egypt. Data from the interviews were analyzed based on emergent themes to create a comprehensive narrative on how trust is understood and built among the partners and with the community. Results We have distilled five key lessons from this case study. First, it is important to have transparent interactions and clearly defined project priorities, roles and responsibilities among core partners. Second, partners need to engage farmers by using proven-effective, hands-on approaches as a means for farmers to build trust in the technology. Third, positive interactions with the technology are important; increased yields and secure income attributable to the seed will facilitate trust. Fourth, there is a need for improved communication strategies and appropriate media response to obviate unwarranted public perceptions of the project. Finally, the political context cannot be ignored; there is a need to establish trust in both the public and private sector as a means to secure the future of agbiotech PPPs in Egypt. Conclusions Most important to the case of Egypt is the effect of the current political climate on project success. There is reason

  4. Highlight of Grid-connected PV systems in administrative buildings in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Said

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy applications are becoming increasingly common in Egypt. The abundant sunshine in Egypt, as well as the increasing competitiveness of solar energy systems including- but not limited to photovoltaic (PV, – predicts that these technologies could be weighed to be raised in Egypt.PV systems are installed on roof tiles or other parts of building structures to supplement grid utility, reduce electric bills, and provide emergency back–up energy. Moreover, they simultaneously reduce significant amounts of CO2 emissions. It is foreseen, a number of residential and public buildings in Egypt are using solar power to cut electric utility bills significantly. The approximately payback period to recover the investment costs for PV systems is up to about 5 years.  In addition, it is more economical to use PV system than grid utility systems. The two components that determine the total initial price of a grid- connected PV system are the modules and the balance of systems (BOS. The BOS includes different components such as mounting frames, inverters and site- specific installation hardware.The Government of Egypt (GOE has endorsed the deployment of PV systems through three approaches. It started with a prime minister decree to install PV projects on one-thousand of the governmental buildings. This was followed by as an initiative called "Shamsk ya Masr", and finally the Feed-in Tariff (FiT projects.Following the prime minster decree the Egyptian Electricity Holding Company (EEHC and its affiliated companies took the lead to install PV systems at the top roof of their administrative buildings and interconnect these systems to the electricity network where the suitable locations have been selected for mounting them. About 90 PV systems have been already mounted with about a capacity of 9 MW. On the other hand, "Shamsk ya Masr" has considered energy efficiency (EE so as to complement the PV systems, which will be installed on administrative

  5. Professor Hassan K. Awwad; The Father of Radiation Oncology and Radiobiology in Egypt and the Arab World, His Good Deeds Last Forever and Inspire us for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Mohamed S; El-Badawi, Samy A; Abd Elbaky, Hoda

    2007-03-01

    Our most respected professor Hassan K. Awwad passed away on January 5th, 2007, at the age of 81. He was considered as the father of radiotherapy in Egypt. He was always named "The Professor", as he was the founder of the radiotherapy departments at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University&Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University. He also shared in developing NEMROCK (Kasr El Aini Center of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine), the place where he graduated and worked during his early years of experience. He, together with professor Reda Hamza, dean of NCI, Cairo at that time, had initiated 7 oncology centers all over Egypt, from Aswan in the South to Dammietta and Damanhour in the North. These 7 centers were developed by the Ministry of Health. Prof. Awwad and Prof. Hamza were responsible for facility providing and plans. They chose all the necessary equipment, tools and personnel. These centers were in action since 1988 and are currently taking care of the oncology patients in a wide area of the country. Prof. Awwad graduated from the Faculty of medicine, Cairo University, in 1949. He had his Medical Doctorate (MD) in Radiotherapy from Alexandria University in 1956. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) awarded him fellowships in France (Institute Gustave Rossy) to gain experience in brachytherapy in 1956 and 1971, England 1956, 1959. Another fellowship was awarded to Prof Awwad in Harvard University (Peter Bent Brigham Hospital) in radiobiology and radiotherapy during the years 1964-1965. He personally and with other members of the National Cancer Institute gave much of their efforts and time to teach, train and guide young radiotherapists, biologists, physicists and radiation therapists through direct on-hand teaching and training as well as holding training courses for radiation oncologists, physicists and technologists. He insisted to ensure its regularity 4 times yearly. These courses trained a lot of personnel from all over Egypt, Sudan

  6. Kutadgu Bilig'in Kahire Nüshası I Notes on Cairo Manuscript of Qutadgu Bilig I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdem UÇAR

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A lot of research has been done and monographies have been written regarding Qutadgu Bilig, however, only few of these were about its text and manuscripts. Because Reşit Rahmeti Arat (1900-1964 spent half of his life on this work and published a perfect translation and due to his scholarly authority, Turcologists handled the textualproblems of QB tentatively. It was Robert Dankoff who studied ReşitRahmeti Arat‟s publication and did remarkable and direct comments onit. Dankoff thinks that Arat‟s biggest mistake was to esteem threemanuscripts equally and acting with arbitrary attitude without aprinciple while introducing the main text. Dankoff took Arat‟sevaluations into cosideration and prepared the organization schemas ofthe manuscripts and suggested that the manuscripts went through asix step process. According to this schema, the lost X manuscript, thesource of Cairo and Vienna manuscripts, is based upon the Archtype,which was formed in the third phase. Cairo and Vienna manuscripts donot directly come from the same root. Vienna manuscript does not comefrom the root which Cairo manuscript is based upon (X manuscript. Itis based upon a Y manuscript, which is missing and comes from thesource that Cairo manuscript is based upon. Considering the fact thatVienna manuscript was written in 1439, Cairo manuscript was writtenbefore 1367 and Fergana manuscript was probably written in XIII.Century, we can clearly say that these three manuscripts were notwritten by Yūsuf Ḫāṣ Ḥācib or under his supervision. Therefore,research on Qutadgu Bilig text manuscripts should have started withthe detailed edition of all manuscripts. After detecting the features ofeach manuscript, researchers should start forming the „main text’ about‘the text which was written by the author himself’. Kutadgu Bilig hakkında günümüze değin birçok araştırma ve monografi çalışması hazırlanmış, ancak bu araştırmaların çok az bir kısmı eserin

  7. What impedes the development of renewable energy technology in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Elnokaly, Amira; Elseragy, Ahmed

    2007-01-01

    Worldwide energy assessments now indicate that improving the energy efficiency and sustainability of buildings, appliances, office equipment, factories, and vehicles could free-up more than a trillion dollars per decade. In addition, these improvements would prevent the release of a rash of environmental pollutants. Greater reliance on sustainability offers countries worldwide a means of maintaining economic growth and environmental quality. This study is part of continuing research work ...

  8. Views of Ancient Egypt. Teacher's Guide. School Arts: Looking/Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Linda; Brenner, Carla

    This teaching guide discusses ancient Egyptian culture, the lithographs made by Napoleon's scientists in 1798-99 to study and record every aspect of Egypt, the world's subsequent fascination with Egypt, ancient Egyptian architecture, Egyptian writing, and archeologists' illustrations of Egypt. The guide suggests activities for elementary school,…

  9. Responding to the challenges of breast cancer in egypt and other arab countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Saghir, Nagi S

    2008-12-01

    Physicians in Egypt and other Arab and developing countries still have to deal on a daily basis with large numbers of patients with advanced stages of breast cancer at presentation. Efforts at measuring the magnitude of the breast cancer issues, epidemiology, and awareness, are now moving further in the right direction. We are now starting to face the challenges of early detection of breast cancer as well as the implementation of proper modern management. Dorria S. Salem et al. publish in this issue of the Journal of Egyptian NCI an outline and initial results of a very ambitious Women Health Outreach Program (WHOP) designed to be completed in 5 phases 1. She and her co-authors state that those 5 phases include a prior training and demonstration phase that was completed in the Imaging Unit of Kasr El Aini Hospital in Cairo, as well as a one-year pilot phase completed between October 2007 and October 2008. Authors present us with results of screening of 20.098 women over the age of 45 years, between October 30, 2007 and February 9, 2009 in Cairo, Alexandria and Suez Governorates in Egypt. In addition to breast cancer, WHOP included screening for diabetes, hypertension and obesity. WHOP investigators are to be congratulated for this extraordinary ambitious project and all the efforts put into it. They were well prepared in regards to having a multi-disciplinary working team and they included in their project programs for training of clerks, data managers, radiographers, nurses, radiologists and other physicians who deal with diagnosis and management of breast cancer. They also included engineers and arranged for mobile units to reach women who could not otherwise reach them. WHOP investigators are to be commended also for performing a field plan demonstration project and testing it and for measuring citizens' response before finalizing their plans and starting the project1. They set a great example for other people working in the field. Breast cancer is the most

  10. New Media and Political Dissent in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirschkind, Charles

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores some of the ways that the Internet, and particularly the practice of blogging, has opened up new political possibilities in Egypt. As I examine, political bloggers in this country (Islamist as well as secularist have pioneered new language forms and video styles in order to articulate an arena of political life they refer to as “the street.” Egyptian bloggers render visible and publicly speakable practices of state violence that other media outlets cannot easily disclose. In discussing the sensory epistemology informing these blogging practices, I give particular attention to the way traditions concerning the sonority of the Arabic language and the relation of written to spoken forms are exploited and reworked by some of Egypt’s most prominent political bloggers. I also examine how these language practices find a visual and aural analogy in the grainy cellphone video recordings found on many of Egypt’s political blogs. This paper analyzes such practices in relation to emergent forms of political agency and contestation in contemporary Egypt.

    El autor explora algunos de los modos como Internet, en particular el escribir y publicar en un blog, ha abierto nuevas posibilidades políticas en Egipto. El estudio revela que los blogueros políticos en este país (que incluye tanto a islamistas como a laicistas han creado nuevas formas de lenguaje y nuevos estilos de vídeo con los que vertebrar un espacio de vida política al que se refieren como “la calle”. Los blogueros egipcios hacen visibles y motivo de debate público acciones violentas del Estado que otros medios informativos no pueden divulgar con la misma facilidad. El autor se detiene especialmente en el modo como los blogueros políticos más sobresalientes del país recurren y adaptan las tradiciones relativas a la sonoridad de la lengua árabe y a la conexión que existe en ella entre las formas habladas y las escritas. Asimismo, examina el modo como

  11. Identifying the Practice of Tattooing in Ancient Egypt and Nubia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey J. Tassie

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Tattooing was practised by many ancient societies, including the ancient Egyptians and Nubians. Egypt, for example, boasts iconographic and physical evidence for tattooing for a period spanning at least 4000 years – the longest known history of tattooing in the world. The second oldest physical evidence for tattooing worldwide was recovered from Middle Kingdom contexts in Egypt and C-Group contexts in Nubia (the Hanslabjoch ice man being the oldest. It has been suggested that tattooing was also practised in the Predynastic period as evidenced by figurines with geometric designs, however, no physical evidence for tattooing has yet been found for this early period. Strangely there is almost no mention of tattooing in ancient Egyptian written records. Historical and ethnographic records indicate that tattooing was also practised much more recently in the Coptic, Islamic and modern eras. Unlike many past societies, tattooing in Egypt appears to have been a custom practised almost exclusively on women. Tattooing tools have not yet been positively identified from ancient Egypt. Ethnographic sources suggest that bundles of metal rods were used in Egypt’s more recent history. This paper discusses physical and iconographic evidence for tattooing in ancient Egypt and investigates whether five copper rods found at Kafr Hassan Dawood, a Predynastic to Early Dynastic site in the East Delta, could be physical evidence for tattooing during this early period.

  12. Renewable energy potential from biomass residues in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Said, N.; Zamorano, M. [Civil Engineering Dept., Univ. of Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, Granada (Spain); El-Shatoury, S.A. [Botany Dept., Faculty of Sciences, Suez Canal Univ., Ismailia (Egypt)

    2012-11-01

    Egypt has been one of the developing countries following successful programs for the development of renewable energy resources, with special emphasis on solar, wind and biomass. Utilization of biomass as a source of energy is important from energetic as well as environmental viewpoint. Furthermore, Egypt produces millions of biomass waste every year causing pollution and health problems. So, the incorporation of biomass with other renewable energy will increase the impact of solving energy and environmental problem. There is a good potential for the utilization of biomass energy resources in Egypt. Four main types of biomass energy sources are included in this study: agricultural residues, municipal solid wastes, animal wastes and sewage sludge. Analysis of the potential biomass resource quantity and its theoretical energy content has been computed according to literature review. The agriculture crop residue represents the main source of biomass waste with a high considerable amount of the theoretical potential energy in Egypt. Rice straw is considered one of the most important of such residue due to its high amount and its produced energy through different conversion techniques represent a suitable candidate for crop energy production in Egypt.

  13. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism Diversity in Cephalosporium maydis from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Amgad A; Zeller, Kurt A; Ismael, Abou-Serie M; Fahmy, Zeinab M; El-Assiuty, Elhamy M; Leslie, John F

    2003-07-01

    ABSTRACT Cephalosporium maydis, the causal agent of late wilt of maize, was first described in Egypt in the 1960s, where it can cause yield losses of up to 40% in susceptible plantings. We characterized 866 isolates of C. maydis collected from 14 governates in Egypt, 7 in the Nile River Delta and 7 in southern (Middle and Upper) Egypt, with amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. The four AFLP primer-pair combinations generated 68 bands, 25 of which were polymorphic, resulting in 52 clonal haplotypes that clustered the 866 isolates into four phylogenetic lineages. Three lineages were found in both the Nile River Delta and southern Egypt. Lineage IV, the most diverse group (20 haplotypes), was recovered only from governates in the Nile River Delta. In some locations, one lineage dominated (up to 98% of the isolates recovered) and, from some fields, only a single haplotype was recovered. Under field conditions in Egypt, there is no evidence that C. maydis reproduces sexually. The nonuniform geographic distribution of the pathogen lineages within the country could be due to differences in climate or in the farming system, because host material differs in susceptibility and C. maydis lineages differ in pathogenicity.

  14. Future studies and research in Egypt. Overview, examples, perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goell, Edgar

    2012-02-15

    During the last decade there have been several distinct activities and efforts with regards to future research in Egypt. Several institutions and capacities have been created. Although these capacities do not always meet high scientific standards, their results and studies offer important and well-grounded elements for future-oriented discussions and political decisions. Not least because of the Egypt revolt which started in January 2011 and the ongoing complex and conflicting societal struggles in Egypt the objective needs as well as the demand for systematic future thinking and future studies will very likely increase further. For that reason this report presents an overview about the context conditions, experiences and forms of future research in Egypt. The major challenges as well as the major issues are described. The main part is the description of the most important institutions, which are conducting future research, their projects and in addition two concrete projects, which try to practice Sustainable Development in different ways. Finally, several (self-)critical assessments and perspectives from selected experts of the future research community in Egypt will be presented.

  15. "Breaking the bureaucracy": drug registration and neocolonial relations in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, R A

    1998-06-01

    According to the Egyptian Ministry of Health, the per capita use of prescription drugs in Egypt is amongst the highest in the world. Multinational pharmaceutical companies license their proprietary products for manufacture and sale in Egypt through their Egyptian subsidiaries. A Ministry of Health Committee reviews and approves for sale all drugs marketed in the country. Aside from being an extremely lucrative market itself, approval of a drug for sale and manufacture in Egypt also opens to the pharmaceutical companies other markets in the Arab world. The Egyptian drug approval process is thus both important for assuring the health of Egyptian nationals and a high-stakes activity for the pharmaceutical companies. This paper examines the social relations and interactions of multinational pharmaceutical representatives in Egypt with Egyptian researchers in relation to the Ministry of Health's drug approval process. From time-to-time events focus attention on the huge financial rewards reaped by multinational pharmaceutical companies from their activities in lesser developed countries. This attention not infrequently has revealed the "drugging of the Third World" as a result of actions by expatriate multinational pharmaceutical officials. Indigenous review procedures such as those established by the Egyptian Ministry of Health might guard against such external exploitation. This paper shows how in place of external exploitation, indigenous pharmaceutical company officials have manipulated local patterns of social interaction to construct a system of reciprocal obligations which may frustrate intended safeguards, and by reconstructing colonial institutional structures, creates a pattern of neocolonialism in Egypt.

  16. Islām al-kāfir fī ḥāl al-khuṭba: concerning the conversion of “infidels” to Islam during the Muslim Friday sermon in Mamluk Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones, Linda G.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibn al-Ḥājj al-‘Abdarī a Maliki jurist in Mamluk Cairo, denounced a religious “innovation” (bid‘a that had apparently become current in fourteenthcentury Egypt: “Infidels” would interrupt the Muslim Friday sermon in order to profess or reiterate their conversion to Islam before the entire congregation. Ibn al-Ḥājj urged preachers not to tolerate such interruptions under any circumstances, a posture that seems at odd with Mamluk policy of inducing such conversions especially among the Coptic community. The Maliki jurist’s legal arguments furnish new insights into the hitherto unexplored role of the Friday liturgical sermon in the conversion to Islam. This article will explain the legal basis of Ibn al-Ḥājj’s opposition to this practice, propose some explanations for the motivations behind the would-be convert’s interruption of the sermon, and relate this phenomenon to the historical context of tense Muslim-Christian relations in fourteenth-century Mamluk Egypt.

    Ibn al-Ḥaŷŷ al-‘Abdarī, un jurista malikí en el Cairo mameluco, denunció una “innovación religiosa” (bid‘a que se extendió en el Egipto del siglo XIV. Los “infieles” interrumpían el sermón del viernes, aparentemente, para proclamar o reiterar su conversión al Islam ante la congregación. Ibn al-Ḥaŷŷ instó a los predicadores a no tolerar dichas interrupciones bajo ninguna circunstancia –postura que parece contradecir a la política impuesta por los mamelucos de forzar la conversión de los infieles, sobre todo de los procedentes de la comunidad copta. Los argumentos legales de Ibn al-Ḥaŷŷ arrojan nueva luz sobre el papel, hasta entonces ignorado por los estudiosos, del sermón del viernes en la conversión al islam. El artículo analiza las bases jurídicas de la oposición manifestada por Ibn al-Ḥaŷŷ hacia esta práctica, explica los posibles motivos que indujeron a los conversos a interrumpir el serm

  17. Limitations of navigation through Nubaria canal, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Magdy G

    2014-03-01

    Alexandria port is the main Egyptian port at the Mediterranean Sea. It is connected to the Nile River through Nubaria canal, which is a main irrigation canal. The canal was designed to irrigate eight hundred thousand acres of agricultural lands, along its course which extends 100 km. The canal has three barrages and four locks to control the flow and allow light navigation by some small barges. Recently, it was decided to improve the locks located on the canal. More than 40 million US$ was invested in these projects. This decision was taken to allow larger barges and increase the transported capacity through the canal. On the other hand, navigation through canals and restricted shallow waterways is affected by several parameters related to both the channel and the vessel. Navigation lane width as well as vessel speed and maneuverability are affected by both the channel and vessel dimensions. Moreover, vessel dimensions and speed will affect the canal stability. In Egypt, there are no guide rules for navigation through narrow and shallow canals such Nubaria. This situation threatens the canal stability and safety of navigation through it. This paper discussed the characteristics of Nubaria canal and the guide rules for navigation in shallow restricted water ways. Dimensions limitation for barges navigating through Nubaria canal is presented. New safe operation rules for navigation in Nubaria canal are also presented. Moreover, the implication of navigation through locks on canal discharge is estimated.

  18. Limitations of navigation through Nubaria canal, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdy G. Samuel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alexandria port is the main Egyptian port at the Mediterranean Sea. It is connected to the Nile River through Nubaria canal, which is a main irrigation canal. The canal was designed to irrigate eight hundred thousand acres of agricultural lands, along its course which extends 100 km. The canal has three barrages and four locks to control the flow and allow light navigation by some small barges. Recently, it was decided to improve the locks located on the canal. More than 40 million US$ was invested in these projects. This decision was taken to allow larger barges and increase the transported capacity through the canal. On the other hand, navigation through canals and restricted shallow waterways is affected by several parameters related to both the channel and the vessel. Navigation lane width as well as vessel speed and maneuverability are affected by both the channel and vessel dimensions. Moreover, vessel dimensions and speed will affect the canal stability. In Egypt, there are no guide rules for navigation through narrow and shallow canals such Nubaria. This situation threatens the canal stability and safety of navigation through it. This paper discussed the characteristics of Nubaria canal and the guide rules for navigation in shallow restricted water ways. Dimensions limitation for barges navigating through Nubaria canal is presented. New safe operation rules for navigation in Nubaria canal are also presented. Moreover, the implication of navigation through locks on canal discharge is estimated.

  19. Diatomaceous Deposits of Fayium,Egypt;Characterization and Dvaluation for Industrial Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.S.HASSAN; I.A.IBRAHIM; 等

    1999-01-01

    The Holocene lacustrine diatomaceous earth of Fayium,South West of Cairo,has been studied to define its minerals,chemistry,petrography and physical properties.Minerals were processed by way of calcination at 550℃ ,followed by acid leaching to reduce levels of mineral impurities.The diatomite is of biogenic opal A.with calcite as the main ganue mineral,quartz and clay minerals(smectite followed by kaolinite in abundance and a trace amount of illite).Silica in the diatomaceous earth accounts for about 63% on average.Positive correlation between CaO and CO2 indicates that Ca is present mainly as calcite.Al2O3,Fe2O3,MgO and K2O are attributed mainly to clay minerals.However,the physical properties of the diatomaceous earth as filter-aids and filler for paints and plastics are poor because of general high levels of impurities.The technological performances of the diatomaceous earth have been significantly improved owing to upgrading of diatoms through mineral processing trical.

  20. THE FIRST TURKISH GOVERNOR OF EGYPT IN EARLY MIDDLE AGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik ISMAYILOV

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, to Egypt in the early medieval period, the governor was given information about Abu Salih al-Haresi. Abbasid rule during the administration of the state’s role in the Turks spoke of Turkey’s first governor of Egypt from the previous situation was briefly explained. Abu-l-Abbas es-Seffah of the first Abbasid caliph in time, the Turks took place in the army while during the second Caliph Abu Jafar Al-Mensur was brought up to the task state. The third caliph al-Mahdi gave the Egyptian governor to Abu Salih al-Haresi, having Turkish origin. Abu Salih’s personality, his beeing governor to Egypt and the information about his activities were analysed basing on international resources.

  1. A dynamic simulation model of desertification in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rasmy

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a system dynamic model to simulate and analyze potential future state of desertification in Egypt. The presented model enhances the MEDALUS methodology developed by European Commission. It illustrates the concept of desertification through different equations and simulation output graphs. It is supplemented with a causal loop diagram showing the feedback between different variables. For the purpose of testing and measuring the effect of different policy scenarios on desertification in Egypt, a simulation model using stock and flow diagram was designed. Multi-temporal data were used to figure out the dynamic changes in desertification sensitivity related to the dynamic nature of desert environment. The model was applied to Al Bihira governorate in western Nile Delta, Egypt, as the study area, and the results showed that the urban expansion, salinization, and not applying the policy enforcement are considered the most variables provoking the desertification.

  2. Television minidramas: social marketing and evaluation in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, S D

    1997-06-01

    Television has been extensively used to communicate health messages for over a decade in Egypt. Viewers of the evening soap operas have been seeing six commercials for family planning, oral rehydration solution (ORS), and immunizations. People of all social classes can sing the jingles of the most popular ads. The producers of these health spots use increasingly sophisticated story lines, settings, and characters representing rural peasants, played by popular and well-liked actors. Evaluation of the content and impact of these messages has lagged behind the creative sophistication of their production. This article reviews the context and content of televised health messages in Egypt during the 1980s, critically assesses the evaluation of mass media health education, and suggests strategies for more effective evaluation. The author worked for some years with a private donor agency that funded the production of a number of televised health commercials in Egypt.

  3. Gendering the Gift of Life: Family Politics and Kidney Donation in Egypt and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley-Matoka, Megan; Hamdy, Sherine F

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we demonstrate how living kidney donation is a particularly gendered experience. We draw on anthropologists' contributions to understanding the globalization of reproductive technologies to argue that kidney donation similarly endangers and preserves fertility, thereby unsettling and reifying gendered familial labor. Based on fieldwork in two ethnographic sites--Egypt and Mexico--we examine how kidney donation is figured as a form of social reproduction. In both settings, kidney recipients rely almost exclusively on organs from living donors. We focus on how particular gender ideologies--as evident, for example, in the trope of the "self-sacrificing mother"--can serve as a cultural technology to generate donations in an otherwise organ-scarce medical setting. Alternatively, transplantation can disrupt gender norms and reproductive viability. In demonstrating the pervasiveness of gendered tropes in the realm of transplantation, we unsettle assumptions about the "family" as the locus of pure, altruistic donation.

  4. An Agent-Based Modeling for Pandemic Influenza in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Khalil, Khaled M.; Abdel-Aziz, M.; Nazmy, Taymour T.; Salem, Abdel-Badeeh M.

    2010-01-01

    Pandemic influenza has great potential to cause large and rapid increases in deaths and serious illness. The objective of this paper is to develop an agent-based model to simulate the spread of pandemic influenza (novel H1N1) in Egypt. The proposed multi-agent model is based on the modeling of individuals' interactions in a space time context. The proposed model involves different types of parameters such as: social agent attributes, distribution of Egypt population, and patterns of agents' i...

  5. Prevalence and antimicrobial resistance pattern of bacterial meningitis in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaban Lamyaa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Infectious diseases are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing world. In Egypt bacterial diseases constitute a great burden, with several particular bacteria sustaining the leading role of multiple serious infections. This article addresses profound bacterial agents causing a wide array of infections including but not limited to pneumonia and meningitis. The epidemiology of such infectious diseases and the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae are reviewed in the context of bacterial meningitis. We address prevalent serotypes in Egypt, antimicrobial resistance patterns and efficacy of vaccines to emphasize the importance of periodic surveillance for appropriate preventive and treatment strategies.

  6. Women's Status, Autonomy, and Fertility in Transitional Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Samari, Goleen

    2015-01-01

    Among the 22 Arab countries, Egypt ranks amongst the worst for the treatment of women. Additionally, in the last 6 years, fertility surged to a 20-year high of 3.5 births per woman. Poorer women’s status and autonomy is often linked to high fertility; however, little is known about the factors that shape women’s autonomy and fertility in Egypt. This study evaluates determinants of women’s autonomy and the relationship between autonomy and fertility over time in a representative, longitudinal ...

  7. Food gap and food security of sugar in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    SHEHATA, Gaber Ahmed Bassyouni

    2015-01-01

    The research aims mainly to study food gap and food security of sugar in Egypt through studying of several sub-goals represented in: estimating models of general trends function for some economic indicators of sugar in Egypt during the period (1995- 2012), studying of the most important indicators of food security of sugar, estimating the size of the food gap of sugar and knowledge of the most important factors responsible for, and studying the policies and means to achieve food security of s...

  8. Women in Post-Revolutionary Egypt - Can Behavior Be Controlled"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hervik, Peter; Nielsen, Mette Toft

    and in drawings. Based on the analysis of this material the reader gets insights into personal experiences, believes and opinions of a diverse group of women in terms of age, economic class, education, geography, culture, religion, ethnicity, marital status, and political orientation. The detail-rich empirical......This book addresses how identity, structures, and agency affect women’s everyday lives in post-revolutionary Egypt. The authors analyse the topic both on a macro- as well as on a micro-level. Through interviews and workshops, women around Egypt express their own experiences in dialogue, in groups...

  9. Dosimetric study comparing intensity modulated and conformal pelvic radiotherapy boost plans in locally advanced cancer cervix in NCI-Cairo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Mahmoud; Hesham A. EL-Hossiny; Nashaat A. Diab; Mahmoud Shosha

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study was to compare 5 field conformal technique to the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) 8 fields technique in boosting locally advanced cancer cervix cases after external beam radiotherapy with respect to target volume coverage and dose to normal tissues. Methods: We conducted a single institutional comparative dosimetric analysis of 10 patients with cancer cervix who was presented to radiotherapy department in National Cancer Institute, Cairo in period between June 2012 to September 2012 and received a CRT boost in the place of planned brachytherapy after large field pelvic radiotherapy (PRT) with concurrent chemotherapy were retrospectively identified. All tumors were situated in the low central pelvis. Two plans were done for every patient; one using the 8 fields IMRT and the second one using 5 fields' 3DCRT the two techniques were then compared using dose volume histogram (DVH) analysis for the PTV, bladder, rectum and both femoral heads. Results: Comparing different DVHs, it was found that the planning target volume (PTV) was adequately covered in both plans while it was demonstrates that the 8 fields IMRT technique carried less doses reaching OARs (rectum, bladder, both femoral heads). Conclusion: From the present study, it is concluded that IMRT technique spared more efficiently OARs than CRT technique but both techniques covered the PTV adequately so whenever possible IMRT technique should be used.

  10. Quantifying the Driving Forces of Informal Urbanization in the Western Part of the Greater Cairo Metropolitan Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher Osman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the driving forces (DFs of informal urbanization (IU in the greater Cairo metropolitan region (GCMR using the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP. The IU patterns in the GCMR have been extremely influenced by seven DFs: geographical characteristics, availability of life facilities, economic incentives, land demand and supply, population increase, administrative function, and development plans. This research found that these forces vary significantly in how they influence urban growth in the three study sectors, namely, the middle, north, and south areas in the western part of the GCMR. The forces with the highest influence were economic incentives in the middle sector, population increase in the north sector, and the administrative function in the south sector. Due to the lower availability of buildable land in the middle sector, the land demand and supply force had a lesser influence in this sector compared to in the north and south sectors. The development plans force had medium influence in all sectors. The geographical characteristics force had little influence in both the middle and the north sectors, but higher influence than economic incentives, availability of life facilities, and development plans in the south sector. Because of the spatial variances in life facilities organizations in the GCMR, the life facilities availability force had little effect on IU in the south sector.

  11. Rigorous Progress on Algorithms Based Routing and Wavelength Assignment in Trans-Egypt Network (TEGYNET Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El–Naser A. Mohammed

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In simple wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM networks, a connection must be established along a route using a common wavelength on all of the links along the route. The introduction of wavelength converters into WDM cross connects increases the hardware cost and complexity. Given a set of connection requests, the routing and wavelength assignment problem involves finding a route (routing and assigning a wavelength to each request. This paper has presented the WDM technology is being extensively deployed on point to point links within transport networks in the EGYPT. However, WDM promises advantages for switching and routing as well as for transmission. Optical cross connects are currently being developed which can switch an entire wavelength from an input fiber to an output fiber so that large bandwidth circuits can be routed through the network according to wavelength. High speed, fixed bandwidth, end to end connections called lightpaths can then be established between different nodes. Our suggested Trans-Egypt Network (TEGYNET which uses optical cross connects to route lightpaths through the network are referred to as wavelength routing networks. The average setup time, average link utilization, traffic load, blocking probability, and achievable link utilization in the presence of both single path and multi math routing are the major interesting parameters in the design of TEGYNET topology.

  12. Seismic hazard assessment in Aswan, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deif, A.; Hamed, H.; Ibrahim, H. A.; Abou Elenean, K.; El-Amin, E.

    2011-12-01

    The study of earthquake activity and seismic hazard assessment around Aswan is very important due to the proximity of the Aswan High Dam. The Aswan High Dam is based on hard Precambrian bedrock and is considered to be the most important project in Egypt from the social, agricultural and electrical energy production points of view. The seismotectonic settings around Aswan strongly suggest that medium to large earthquakes are possible, particularly along the Kalabsha, Seiyal and Khor El-Ramla faults. The seismic hazard for Aswan is calculated utilizing the probabilistic approach within a logic-tree framework. Alternative seismogenic models and ground motion scaling relationships are selected to account for the epistemic uncertainty. Seismic hazard values on rock were calculated to create contour maps for eight ground motion spectral periods and for a return period of 475 years, which is deemed appropriate for structural design standards in the Egyptian building codes. The results were also displayed in terms of uniform hazard spectra for rock sites at the Aswan High Dam for return periods of 475 and 2475 years. In addition, the ground-motion levels are also deaggregated at the dam site, in order to provide insight into which events are the most important for hazard estimation. The peak ground acceleration ranges between 36 and 152 cm s-2 for return periods of 475 years (equivalent to 90% probability of non-exceedance in 50 years). Spectral hazard values clearly indicate that compared with countries of high seismic risk, the seismicity in the Aswan region can be described as low at most sites to moderate in the area between the Kalabsha and Seyial faults.

  13. Political Culture and the Nature of Political Participation in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Nasser’s Egypt, Austin: Univ. of Texas Press, 1971. Meisel, J.H., The Myth of the Ruling Class: Gaetano Mosca and the Elite, Ann Arbor: Univ. of Michigan... Mosca called the "second strata of the ruling class" - the strata without which the leadership could not 27 rule (Meisel 1962, p. 217]. The clientage

  14. Using Social Studies Themes to Investigate Modern Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Janie

    2010-01-01

    Many elementary teachers explore the marvels of ancient Egypt with their students, as evidenced by the numerous available websites on this topic for teaching elementary history. The drama and mystery of ancient civilizations with treasures such as mummies, King Tut, and the Giza Pyramids are intriguing to children, yet there is another layer of…

  15. Arab Spring Impact on Executive Education in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafa, Dina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of the Arab Spring on public administration programs in Egypt, with a special focus on executive education programs. Design/Methodology/Approach: The study draws on stakeholder analysis, and uses both primary and secondary data. Findings: The author describes the impact of the Arab Spring…

  16. The Great Pyramid Builders: An Integrated Theme on Ancient Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Brian

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a themed classroom project designed to teach about the culture and civilization of ancient Egypt. In preparing the project, it is noted that teachers should remember that different learning styles, including activities that provide meaningful experiences, are appropriate in accommodating the various ways children learn.…

  17. The Politics of Educational Transfer and Policymaking in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ali S.

    2010-01-01

    For the past two centuries, western modern education has informed education policies and practices in Egypt. However, few researchers have analyzed the historical or current politics of educational transfer in this country. This article investigates the ways in which foreign transfer has influenced Egyptian education, both historically and…

  18. African Refugees in Egypt: Trauma, Loss, and Cultural Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Hani M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of pre-immigration trauma on the acculturation process of refugees, as reflected in the manifestations of their continuing bonds with native cultures. Six African refugees who sought refuge in Egypt because of wars and political persecution were interviewed about the circumstances of their departure from their…

  19. 77 FR 33439 - Trade Mission to Egypt and Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-06

    ... Arab country with a population of 90 million, Egypt is the fourth largest export market for U.S...-revolution), airports and seaports will need upgraded security systems. Police and customs authorities will... fencing and intruder sensing, industrial access controls, maritime surveillance and protection,...

  20. Political Exclusion and Violence: The Islamist movement in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Islamist Social Movements. Edited by Quintan Wiktorowicz, Islamic Activism, a Social Movement Theory Approach, (Bloomington; Indiana University Press...East International, 16 April 2004, 25. Singerman, Diane. The Networked World of Islamist Social Movements. Edited by Quintan Wiktorowicz, Islamic...Mobilizing Islam: Religion, Activism, and Political Change in Egypt. New York: Columbia University Press, 2002. 104 Wiktorowicz, Quintan

  1. African Refugees in Egypt: Trauma, Loss, and Cultural Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Hani M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the influence of pre-immigration trauma on the acculturation process of refugees, as reflected in the manifestations of their continuing bonds with native cultures. Six African refugees who sought refuge in Egypt because of wars and political persecution were interviewed about the circumstances of their departure from their…

  2. Angles of Elevation of the Pyramids of Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Arthur F.

    1982-01-01

    The nature and history of the construction of pyramids in Egypt is detailed. It is noted that one can only theorize about why the Egyptians used particular angles of elevation. It is thought, perhaps, that new clues will provide a clear solution to this mystery as additional artifacts and hieroglyphics are discovered. (MP)

  3. Archaeocidaris M’Coy (Echinoidea) from the Carboniferous of Egypt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis, D.N.; Donovan, S.K.

    2005-01-01

    Collections in museums usually have boxes of specimens which remain ‘undiscovered’ and yet which may be of importance or interest. The recent rediscovery of specimens of Archaeocidaris in the Nationaal Natuurhistorisch Museum, Leiden, from the Carboniferous of Egypt illustrates this point. These spe

  4. Metropolitan food supply in Egypt : hydroponics production of leafy vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waldhauer, N.; Broek, van den W.H.A.M.; Soethoudt, J.M.; Boerrigter, H.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This study incorporates the follow up activities of the two earlier missions of Wageningen UR/Food & Biobased Research (FBR) to Egypt, the exploration mission of 2013 (Broek and Boerrigter, 2014a) and the commitment mission of 2014 (Broek, Boerrigter and Waldhauer, 2014b), targeting the

  5. Adaptations of International Standards on Educational Leadership Preparation in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purinton, Ted; Khalil, Dalia

    2016-01-01

    This paper is a case study of one leadership preparation program, utilizing US school leadership standards and practices, offered in Egypt. This case study illuminates how cultural and policy distinctions impact differing necessities of educational leadership, and how those necessities conflict or concur with the international standards and…

  6. Perfectionism and Self Concept among Primary School Children in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofaha, Gamal Al Sayed; Ramon, Patricia Robledo

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The main purpose of this study is to explore the correlation between dimensions of perfectionism and self-concepts among school aged students in Egypt. Method: Two hundred-eighty four children (fifth and sixth graders) participated in this study. The mean age of the participants was 144.37 months, SD 6.36. Pearson correlation…

  7. Scribing Work Songs at an Archeological Dig in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Donna

    2011-01-01

    This article reports research conducted in the northeastern corner of Egypt's Nile Delta during an excavation at the Mendes archeological dig site in July-August, 2007. Donald Redford, Professor at Pennsylvania State University, accepted the author as the only nonarcheologist that year. In addition to duties of measuring, registering, and storing…

  8. [Egypt: Selected Readings, Egyptian Mummies, and the Egyptian Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Museum of Natural History, Washington, DC.

    This resource packet presents information and resources on ancient Egypt. The bibliography includes readings divided into five sections: (1) "General Information" (46 items); (2) "Religion" (8 items); (3) "Art" (8 items); (4) "Hieroglyphics" (6 items); and (5) selections "For Young Readers" (11…

  9. Using Social Studies Themes to Investigate Modern Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Janie

    2010-01-01

    Many elementary teachers explore the marvels of ancient Egypt with their students, as evidenced by the numerous available websites on this topic for teaching elementary history. The drama and mystery of ancient civilizations with treasures such as mummies, King Tut, and the Giza Pyramids are intriguing to children, yet there is another layer of…

  10. Communicative English Language Teaching in Egypt: Classroom Practice and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mona Kamal; Ibrahim, Yehia A.

    2017-01-01

    Following a "mixed methods" approach, this research is designed to examine whether teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) in Egypt's public schools matches the communicative English language teaching (CELT) approach. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from 50 classroom observations, 100 questionnaire responses from…

  11. Wind atlas for Egypt: Measurements, micro- and mesoscale modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, N.G.; Hansen, J.C.; Badger, J.

    2006-01-01

    with SRTM 3 elevation data and satellite imagery, provide the means for immediate WAsP wind resource assessments anywhere in Egypt. In addition to the very high wind resource in the Gulfs of Suez and Aqaba, the wind atlas has discovered a large region in the Western Desert with a fairly high resource...

  12. Pre-Exilic Halakhic Text in Judeo-Spanish from the Cairo Genizah by R. Jacob Canpanton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arad, Dotan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article brings to light a unique responsum preserved in the Taylor-Schechter Cairo Genizah collection. Though it does expound upon the halakhic and historic content of the responsum, these do not introduce many innovations, and are not the source of its uniqueness. The singularity of the document is that the text, written in Hebrew letters, is in Castilian vernacular with words and expressions in Hebrew. Whereas in Islamic lands a tradition of halakhic writing in Judeo-Arabic developed (until its disappearance in the late Middle Ages, halakhic writings in a language other than Hebrew or Aramaic were rare in Europe. The responsum was composed, in our estimation, in the 15th century, and is one of relatively few written in Spain in this period that have been preserved. The responsum enriches our knowledge of the language of the Jews while still in the Peninsula, and also sheds light on their religious and cultural life. It was authored by R. Jacob Ca[n]-panton, whom we suggest is the father of the well-known scholar R. Isaac Canpanton. Information on R. Jacob is limited, and until now there were no known halakhic writings of his. If our identification is correct, it serves to illuminate further the personality of this Jewish sage.Este artículo da a conocer un responsum único conservado en la colección Taylor-Schechter de la Guenizá de El Cairo. Se edita el texto y se explica el contenido halájico e histórico del responsum, si bien, desde ese punto de vista no contiene muchas innovaciones. Su singularidad radica en que está escrito en castellano en caracteres hebreos. Aunque en la órbita de los países musulmanes hubo un desarrollo de escritos halájicos en árabe judío (hasta su desaparición en un periodo tardío, el uso de lenguas distintas del hebreo o el arameo para contenidos halájicos había sido raro en Europa. Según nuestra estimación, este responsum se compuso en el siglo xv y es uno de los conservados de este periodo. El

  13. Attenuation of seismic waves in Central Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdouh Abbas Morsy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Attenuation of seismic waves in central Egypt had never been studied before. The results of the research on the seismic attenuation are based upon the information collected by the seismological network from 1998 to 2011. 855 earthquakes were selected from the Egyptian seismological catalog, with their epicenter distances between 15 and 150 km, their magnitudes ranging from 2 and 4.1 and focal depths reaching up to 30 km. The first systematic study of attenuation derived from the P-, S- and coda wave in the frequency range 1–24 Hz is presented. In the interpretation of the results both single and multiple scattering in a half space are considered. The single scattering model proposed by Sato (1977 was used. Two methods, the coda (Qc and the Multiple Lapse Time Window (MLTW method are used. The aim of this study is to validate these interpretations in the region and to try to identify the effects of attenuation due to intrinsic (Qi and scattering attenuation (Qsc. The mean Qc value calculated was Qc = (39 ± 1f1.0±0.009. The average Qc at 1.5 Hz is (53 ± 6 and Qc = (900 ± 195 at 24 Hz with Qo ranging between 23 and 107, where η ranging between 0.9 and 1.3. The quality factor (Q was estimated from spectra of P- and S-waves by applying a spectral ratio technique. The results show variations in Qp and QS as a function of frequency, according to the power law Q = 56η1.1. The seismic albedo is 0.7 at all stations and it mean that the earthquake activity is due to tectonic origin. The attenuation and frequency dependency for different paths and the correlation of the results with the geotectonic of the region are presented. The Qc values were calculated and correlated with the geology and tectonics of the area. The relatively low Qo and the high frequency dependency agree with the values of a region characterized by a low tectonic activity and vise versa.

  14. Epidemiological Study Of Risky Behaviours And Their Relation With Mental Ill Health Among Secondary School Students In Cairo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essam A. El-Moselhy; Morsy A. Ammar; Khaled M. Abd-Allah; Ibrahim A.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional design was carried out on 827 students from general and technical secondary schools in Cairo. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of risky behaviours among the studied students, to assess their relation with sociodemographic factors and psychological problems and to explore student's attitude toward these behaviours. The data were collected by a standardized interviewing form. Different psychological symptoms were assessed using Middle Sex Hospital Questionnaire. The study showed, 54.1% of the students were having unhealthy diet and tobacco smoking behaviours. Also, all the risky behaviours, except absence of physical exercise practice and suicide attempt, were more common among boys. The most important sociodemographic risk factors were; positive family history of risky behaviours, one parent family and the student's work beside studying (OR=7.11, 4.07 and 3.37, respectively. The most important reasons for unhealthy diet, carrying weapon and engagement in casual sex were imitation (55.2%, to feel grown up (47.1% and peer pressure (39.1%, respectively. While, the most common psychological problem was hysteria (15.1% and the most common neurotic trait was sadness (41.9%. The most important psychological problems risk factors were obsession and hysteria (OR=5.53 and 4.59, respectively. While, the most important neurotic traits risk were irritability and sadness (OR=9.53 and 8.05, respectively. No awareness to the reported risk was present among 96.4% of the students having the risky behaviours (OR=6.41.

  15. Naked eye observations for morning twilight at different sites in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Hassan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Twilight observations were carried out in the period between 1984 and 1987 in different seasons at different sites of Egypt (Baharia, Matrouh, Kottamia and Aswan through a cooperation project between Dar El-Iftaa’ and the Egyptian Academy of Scientific Research and Technology. Naked eye observations of the first light of the dawn were done in parallel to the photoelectric measurements of the twilight phenomena. The depression of the sun below the horizon corresponding to the first light was calculated from the time of observations. Our estimates show that the normal eye can just discriminate the dawn (the first white light thread at a depression of 14.7° with a maximum value of 15.08° and a minimum value of 12.01°. This result agrees with result obtained by our previous photoelectric measurements.

  16. [Possibilities for improved production of meat and milk in state agricultural plants in Egypt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    One of the possible ways of overcoming the deficit of animal protein in human nutrition is that of increasing the livestock and increasing the performance of the animals. Egypt wants to follow this way, especially utilizing the possibilities offered by the newly reclaimed land. For this purpose efficient herds must be developed in the newly reclaimed areas in large-scale production units and under optimum farming conditions. This includes above all a continuous supply of feedstuff by means of intensive field forage cultivation. Starting in August 1973, the test station for agricultural machinery of the GDR VVB Land-und Nahrungsgütertechnik at El Ghasair has investigated the problems connected with a continuous daily supply of fresh feed-stuff to large livestock (cattle) and with preservation methods suited to this aim. First results are reported of applying an advanced technology - and partly GDR farm machinery - in cultivating and harvesting green fodder and hay, using Alexandrian clover and lucern.

  17. Size distribution of aerosol particles: comparison between agricultural and industrial areas in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadros, M.T.Y.; Madkour, M. [Mansoura Univ., Physics Dept., Mansoura (Egypt); Elmetwally, M. [Egyptian Meteorological Authority, Abbasyia-Cairo (Egypt)

    1999-07-01

    Mie theory has been used in this work to obtain a theoretical calculation of the size distribution of aerosol particles by using tabulated mean of the Angstrom wavelength exponent {alpha}{sub o}. Comparison was done between an industrial polluted area (Helwan, which is a neighbor to Cairo city), and an agricultural relatively unpolluted area (Mansoura, about 140 km from Cairo). The results show that the size distribution obeys the Junge power law. The size of particles in the polluted area is larger than that in the unpolluted area. (Author)

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma in Egypt:A single center study over a decade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdel-Rahman El-Zayadi; Hanaa M Badran; Eman MF Barakat; Mohy El-Deen Attia; Sherine Shawky; Mostafa K Mohamed; Osaima Selim; Ahmed Saeid

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To identify the trend, possible risk factors and any pattern change of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in Egyptover a decade.METHODS: All HCC patients attending Cairo Liver Center between January 1993 and December 2002, were enrolledin the study. Diagnosis of HCC was based on histopath ological examination and/or detection of hepatic focal lesions by two imaging techniques plus α-fetoprotein level above 200 ng/mL. The duration of the study was divided into two periods of 5 years each; period Ⅰ (1993-1997) and period Ⅱ (1998-2002). Trend, demographic features of patients (age, gender, and residence), risk factors (HBsAg,HCV-Ab, schistosomiasis and others) and pattern of the focal lesions were compared between the two periods.Logistic regression model was fitted to calculate the adjusted odds ratios for the potential risk factors. The population attributable risk percentage was calculated to estimate the proportion of HCC attributed to hepatitis B and C viral infections.RESULTS: Over a decade, 1 328 HCC patients out of 22 450 chronic liver disease (CLD) patients were diagnosed with an overall proportion of 5.9%. The annual proportion of HCC showed a significant rising trend from 4.0% in 1993 to 7.2% in 2002 (P = 0.000). A significant increase in male proportion from 82.5% to 87.6% (P = 0.009); M/F from 5:1 to 7:1 and a slight increase of the predominant age group (40-59 years) from 62.6% to 66.8% (P = 0.387)in periods Ⅰ and Ⅱ respectively, reflecting a shift to younger age group. In the bivariate analysis, HCC was significantly higher in rural residents, patients with history of schistosomiasis and/or blood transfusion. Yet, after adjustment, these variables did not have a significant risk for development of HCC. There was a significant decline of HBsAg from 38.6% to 20.5% (P = 0.000), and a slight increase of HCV-Ab from 85.6% to 87.9% in periods Ⅰ and Ⅱ respectively. HBV conferred a higher risk to develop HCC more than HCV in period Ⅰ (OR 1.9 vs

  19. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  20. Obstacles Facing Promoting Tourism for Islamic Landmarks from the Perspective of Tour Operators in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The UNESCO launched a campaign #unite4heritage in Egypt to defeat extremism and intolerance. The message of such campaigne is peace, dialogue and unity embedded in cultural heritage. As culture and tourism are linked together, such message could be delivered through improving culture heritage tourism in Egypt. Islamic landmarks  are considered as a part of human heritage. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify how much tour operators in Egypt include Islamic landmarks in their pr...

  1. Telemedicine in Egypt: SWOT analysis and future trends [Telemedizin in Ägypten: SWOT-Analyse und Zukunftstrends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalifa, Aly

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available [english] Today, many countries have succeeded in integrating telemedicine and advanced technologies into a broad-range of healthcare processes including diagnosis, treatment, disease prevention, and health education & research. Nevertheless, many developing countries are still unable to sustain meaningful telemedicine projects. Egypt has achieved significant progress in building the Information Society (IS, by providing an enabling legal and regulatory framework, and an adequate Information and Communications Technology (ICT infrastructure. However, telemedicine projects in Egypt still face common problems and challenges that hinder the wide-scale adoption of eHealth systems. This study provides a comprehensive Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT analysis of the current telemedicine applications in Egypt. Based on that, four future trends in Telemedicine in Egypt 2020 have been identified from governmental, financial, technological, and medical perspectives. Consequently, these future trends were aligned to the global trends in telemedicine. The main output of this study is that telemedicine should be part of a National eHealth Initiative.[german] Bis heute konnten in vielen Ländern erfolgreich Telemedizin und moderne Informationstechnik in vielen medizinischen Prozessen von der Diagnostik über Therapie und Vorsorge bis hin zur Medizinischen Ausbildung und Forschung integriert werden. Aber gerade in Entwicklungsländern ist es oft nicht gelungen, nützliche Telemedizin-Lösungen dauerhaft zu etablieren. Ägypten hat bereits erhebliche Fortschritte dabei gemacht, sich zu einer Informationsgesellschaft zu entwickeln. Es wurden rechtliche und regulatorische Rahmenbedingungen geschaffen, in deren Rahmen eine leistungsfähige Infrastruktur für Informations- und Kommunikationstechnik aufgebaut werden konnte. Dennoch sehen sich ägyptische Telemedizinprojekte immer noch mit erheblichen Problemen und Herausforderungen

  2. Phlyctenular eye disease in association with Hymenolepis nana in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussaini, M K; Khalifa, R; Al-Ansary, A T; Hussain, G H; Moustafa, K M

    1979-01-01

    It had been previously noticed that infection with parasites was common in children suffering from phlyctenulosis. In the present study the stools of 471 patients suffering from phlyctenular disease were examined and it was found that 62.6% of them had Hymenolepis nana ova in their stools as compared with 10.8% of the controls. All patients had Hymenolipis nana immune sera. Many of these patients had abdominal symptoms. Hymenolepis nana is a cestode parasite discovered by Bilharz in Cairo in 1851. Infections with it have the same age incidence and geographical distribution as phlyctenular eye disease. It has a tissue stage responsible for a state of hypersensitivity which is thought to be responsible for the phlyctenules. PMID:486380

  3. An Agent-Based Modeling for Pandemic Influenza in Egypt

    CERN Document Server

    Khalil, Khaled M; Nazmy, Taymour T; Salem, Abdel-Badeeh M

    2010-01-01

    Pandemic influenza has great potential to cause large and rapid increases in deaths and serious illness. The objective of this paper is to develop an agent-based model to simulate the spread of pandemic influenza (novel H1N1) in Egypt. The proposed multi-agent model is based on the modeling of individuals' interactions in a space time context. The proposed model involves different types of parameters such as: social agent attributes, distribution of Egypt population, and patterns of agents' interactions. Analysis of modeling results leads to understanding the characteristics of the modeled pandemic, transmission patterns, and the conditions under which an outbreak might occur. In addition, the proposed model is used to measure the effectiveness of different control strategies to intervene the pandemic spread.

  4. Resistance to Mobile Banking Adoption in Egypt: A Cultural Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rehaballah Elbadrawy

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mobile banking (m-banking faces various types of resistance that may hinder customers’ adoption inEgypt. This study identifies three groups of m-banking non-adopters, namely postponers, opponents andrejectors. The objective of the study is to explore the reasons for resisting m-banking services in Egypt andwhether it differs with regards to these customer groups. Accordingly, a questionnaire was distributed, Chisquare tests, Kruskal-Wallis H tests and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA test. Frequencies andcross tabulations were used. The results indicate that the three non-adopter groups differ significantly withrespect to usage, value, and image barriers. On the other hand, risk and tradition barriers did not showany statistical significance; however, risk barrier received the highest overall mean. Significant relationsbetween usage, risk and image barriers with the gender and level of education were noted. Finally, findingsenabled a clear mapping between Hofstede’s cultural dimensions and the study’s results.

  5. Entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakatsanis, Georgios; Bierbach, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    The study investigates the entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity distribution, in order to provide a chart of Egypt's embodied water balance in agricultural trade, in relation to distances with its major counterparties. Moreover, our calculations on the amount of the embodied water traded between Egypt and each of its partners take place according to a combination of available data on the blue, green and grey water footprints as well as the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) database of traded amounts per crop type. A study on the virtual water trade gravity, enables us to enrich former related studies (Fracasso 2014; Fracasso, Sartori and Schiavo 2014) via examining Egypt's water supply dependence on the Nile River and if comparative advantages -purely from the side of water quantities- can be identified via recognizing which water footprint categories are particularly high. Additionally, this methodology can comprise -from a fundamental level- a guide for revealing the importance of water footprint types for Egypt's agricultural sector; hence, Egypt's potential comparative advantages, as far as quantitative water endowments are exclusively concerned (without consideration of water or crop prices). Although it is pointed out very correctly by various authors (Antonelli and Sartori 2014) that the virtual water trade concept does not incorporate many important aspects of water supply -such as heavy water price subsidizing- to be used accurately for the identification of comparative advantages, we consider that the purely quantitative examination can provide strong fundamental indications -especially for green and grey water footprints, which are hypothesized to be less sensitive to subsidizing. In overall, this effect can very well provide a primary indication on the organization of the global alimentation trade network (Yang et al. 2006). The gravity equation used contains water footprint data for the 15 top traded crops and the distances for Egypt

  6. The practice and politics of archaeology in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskell, L

    2000-01-01

    Archaeologists working in Egypt have rarely considered the local/global ramifications and responsibilities of their field practices: many continue to operate under what might be termed the residual effects of colonialism. Taking an explicitly postcolonial stance I argue that there is much more at stake than the intellectual enterprise. This paper outlines the ways in which scholars could undertake a more engaged archaeology and how we might more closely be involved with the people and pasts of modern Egypt. The connected tensions of tourism and terrorism are foregrounded, demonstrating that heritage issues are salient to both spheres. Finally, I explore the nation's relationship to its pharaonic past over the past few centuries and include some contemporary articulations and representations.

  7. Monitoring the urbanization of the Nile Delta, Egypt.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sultan, M.; Fiske, M.; Stein, T.; Gamal, M.; El Araby, H.; Madani, A.; Mehanee, S.; Becker, R.; Environmental Research; Washington Univ.; Cairo Univ. Center for Environmental Hazard Mitigation

    1999-11-01

    Comparisons of satellite images of the Nile Delta, acquired in 1972, 1984 and 1990, indicate that urban growth is endangering Egypt's agricultural productivity. Urban areas occupied a minimum of 3.6%, 4.7% and 5.7% of the Delta in 1972, 1984 and 1990, respectively, an increase of 58% in 18 years. Approximately half of this increase occurred between 1984 and 1990. If this trend continues, Egypt could lose 12% of its total agricultural area to urbanization by 2010. Despite the fact that growth is pronounced around the cities, it is the growth around the thousands of small villages that poses the largest threat to the agricultural productivity of the Nile Delta. The cumulative growth rate for the cities and large villages between 1972 and 1990 is 37%, and that for the small villages is 77% for the same time period.

  8. Indian Academy of Sciences. Volume 105. Number 6. December 1993. Proceedings of the International Conference on Solar Energy Storage Applied Photochemistry (2nd) Held in Cairo, Egypt on 6-11 January 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    19 203 Zarleiou 0 C. Joussot-Dubien J, Zepp Rt G and Zika R G 1984 Environ. Sri. Technol. IS 158A Zepp R G,. Schlotzhauer P F and Sink R M 1985 Ent...for bold face types. Authors must indicate wherever special characters (Greek. German. script. scalar, vector , tensor, matrix. etc.) are required. All...other The Test letters will be set in italic types. Vectors must be underlined by a wavy line and tensmrs by two wavy The paper must be divided into

  9. Schistosomiasis and the risk of bladder cancer in Alexandria, Egypt.

    OpenAIRE

    Bedwani, R.; Renganathan, E.; El Kwhsky, F.; Braga, C.; Abu Seif, H. H.; Abul Azm, T.; Zaki, A.; De Franceschi, S.; Boffetta, P; La Vecchia, C.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between history of schistosomiasis and bladder cancer risk was investigated using data from a case-control study conducted between January 1994 and July 1996 in Alexandria, Egypt. Cases were 190 subjects with incident, histologically confirmed invasive cancer of the bladder, and controls were 187 subjects admitted to hospital for acute, non-neoplastic, non-urinary tract conditions. Eighty-six cases (45%) vs 69 controls (37%) reported a history of urinary schistosomiasis. The ...

  10. Inflation and Inflation Uncertainty Revisited: Evidence from Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mesbah Fathy Sharaf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The welfare costs of inflation and inflation uncertainty are well documented in the literature and empirical evidence on the link between the two is sparse in the case of Egypt. This paper investigates the causal relationship between inflation and inflation uncertainty in Egypt using monthly time series data during the period January 1974–April 2015. To endogenously control for any potential structural breaks in the inflation time series, Zivot and Andrews (2002 and Clemente–Montanes–Reyes (1998 unit root tests are used. The inflation–inflation uncertainty relation is modeled by the standard two-step approach as well as simultaneously using various versions of the GARCH-M model to control for any potential feedback effects. The analyses explicitly control for the effect of the Economic Reform and Structural Adjustment Program (ERSAP undertaken by the Egyptian government in the early 1990s, which affected inflation rate and its associated volatility. Results show a high degree of inflation–volatility persistence in the response to inflationary shocks. Granger-causality test along with symmetric and asymmetric GARCH-M models indicate a statistically significant bi-directional positive relationship between inflation and inflation uncertainty, supporting both the Friedman–Ball and the Cukierman–Meltzer hypotheses. The findings are robust to the various estimation methods and model specifications. The findings of this paper support the view of adopting inflation-targeting policy in Egypt, after fulfilling its preconditions, to reduce the welfare cost of inflation and its related uncertainties. Monetary authorities in Egypt should enhance the credibility of monetary policy and attempt to reduce inflation uncertainty, which will help lower inflation rates.

  11. PREVALENCE OF CONSANGUINEOUS MARRIAGES IN SOUTH SINAI, EGYPT

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAMAH, G.; ABDEL-RAOUF, E.; Talaat, A; SAAD-HUSSEIN, A.; Hamamy, H.; MEGUID, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    A total of 3961 married couples from six major geographical areas representing the South Sinai governorates in Egypt were studied to assess the rate of consanguineous marriage. The population of six selected areas (St Catherines, Nuweiba, Abu Rudeis, Ras Sudr, El Tor and Abu Zenima) were subdivided into Bedouin, urban and mixed populations. A questionnaire-based interview was conducted showing that the consanguinity rate in this region is 37.5%, with the highest rate recorded in Abu Rudeis (5...

  12. On the Formation of the Early Territorial Statein Ancient Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    This article aims at a reinterpretation of the formation of the earlyterritorial state in ancient Egypt from a multi-perspective. In the light ofthe recent studies on the available written material and new excavations,the author seeks to prove that the emergence of the early territorial statewas the result of the interaction of various elements. In the author'sopinion, the strong political ambition of the Upper Egyptian ruling elitesplayed a decisive role in the process of unification.

  13. Maternal mortality: a tertiary care hospital experience in Upper Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Abbas

    2016-05-01

    Conclusions: Preeclampsia and PPH, as well as their complications are the leading causes of death in one of the biggest tertiary care university hospitals in Egypt. However, there are other important avoidable predisposing factors that should be dealt with including lack of patient education, delayed transfer from other hospitals, and substandard practice. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(5.000: 1466-1471

  14. Governance and Risk Management: Empirical Evidence from Malaysia and Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Rashidah Abdul Rahman; Siti Balqis Noor; Tariq H Ismail

    2013-01-01

    The perceptions of Islamic banking professionals are surveyed through a questionnaire to explore whether the process of risk management mediates board involvement in risk management and risk management practices of Islamic banks in Malaysia and Egypt. The findings of this study identified that the Islamic banks in the selected countries are somewhat efficient in their risk management process. It was noticed that board involvement in risk management, process of risk management and risk managem...

  15. Adjustment of wheat production to market reform in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Kherallah, Mylène; Minot,Nicholas; Gruhn, Peter

    1999-01-01

    In response to slow growth in the agricultural sector and as part of a general shift towards a more market-oriented economy, the Government of Egypt started liberalizing the agricultural sector in 1987. Controls over wheat production and marketing were eliminated and wheat producer prices were brought closer to international levels. As a result, there has been remarkable increases in wheat crop area and yields, causing wheat production to triple from 1986 to 1998. This study analyzes the resu...

  16. The Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, Jordan and Syria: A Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    20, 2007, 25. 90 Helena Cobban, “The Political Ideas Completing for Support in the Arab World,” The Christian Science Monitor, March 20, 2007, 9...must control her.”116 113 Curtis R. Ryan, “Political Strategies and regime Survival in Egypt...history of the modern Middle East. Colorado: Westview Press, 2004. Cobban, Helena . “The political ideas competing for support in the Arab World” The

  17. Prevalence and type distribution of human papillomavirus among women older than 18 years in Egypt: a multicenter, observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fadel Shaltout

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: The overall prevalence of HPV in Egypt was 10.4% and was highest (9.2% amongst women aged 45–54 years. These data provide important reference information for public health authorities considering HPV prevention in Egypt.

  18. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  19. Measurement of Women's Agency in Egypt: A National Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yount, Kathryn M; VanderEnde, Kristin E; Dodell, Sylvie; Cheong, Yuk Fai

    2016-09-01

    Despite widespread assumptions about women's empowerment and agency in the Arab Middle East, psychometric research of these constructs is limited. Using national data from 6214 married women ages 16-49 who took part in the 2006 Egypt Labor Market Panel Survey, we applied factor analysis to explore and then to test the factor structure of women's agency. We then used multiple indicator multiple cause structural equations models to test for differential item functioning (DIF) by women's age at first marriage, a potential resource for women's agency. Our results confirm that women's agency in Egypt is multi-dimensional and comprised of their (1) influence in family decisions, including those reserved for men, (2) freedom of movement in public spaces, and (3) attitudes about gender, specifically violence against wives. These dimensions confirm those explored previously in selected rural areas of Egypt and South Asia. Yet, three items showed significant uniform DIF by women's categorical age at first marriage, with and without a control for women's age in years. Models adjusting for DIF and women's age in years showed that women's older age at first marriage was positively associated with the factor means for family decision-making and gender-violence attitudes, but not freedom of movement. Our findings reveal the value of our analytical strategy for research on the dimensions and determinants of women's agency. Our approach offers a promising model to discern "hierarchies of evidence" for social policies and programs to enhance women's empowerment.

  20. Active surveillance for avian influenza virus, Egypt, 2010-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Ghazi; Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S; Gomaa, Mokhtar M; Maatouq, Asmaa M; Shehata, Mahmoud M; Moatasim, Yassmin; Bagato, Ola; Cai, Zhipeng; Rubrum, Adam; Kutkat, Mohamed A; McKenzie, Pamela P; Webster, Robert G; Webby, Richard J; Ali, Mohamed A

    2014-04-01

    Continuous circulation of influenza A(H5N1) virus among poultry in Egypt has created an epicenter in which the viruses evolve into newer subclades and continue to cause disease in humans. To detect influenza viruses in Egypt, since 2009 we have actively surveyed various regions and poultry production sectors. From August 2010 through January 2013, >11,000 swab samples were collected; 10% were positive by matrix gene reverse transcription PCR. During this period, subtype H9N2 viruses emerged, cocirculated with subtype H5N1 viruses, and frequently co-infected the same avian host. Genetic and antigenic analyses of viruses revealed that influenza A(H5N1) clade 2.2.1 viruses are dominant and that all subtype H9N2 viruses are G1-like. Cocirculation of different subtypes poses concern for potential reassortment. Avian influenza continues to threaten public and animal health in Egypt, and continuous surveillance for avian influenza virus is needed.

  1. Distribution of the GNSS-LEO occultation events over Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoniem, Ibrahim; Mousa, Ashraf El-Kutb; El-Fiky, Gamal

    2017-06-01

    The space-based GNSS RO technique is a promising tool for monitoring the Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere (Mousa et al., 2006). The current paper presents the distribution of the occultation events over Egypt using the operating LEO satellites and GNSS by its two operating systems. By the present research, Egypt could raise NWP Models efficiency by improving meteorological data quality. Twenty operating LEO missions (e.g. Argentinean SAC-C, European MetOp-A, German TerraSAR-X, Indian OceanSat-2, etc.) sent by different countries all over the world were used to derive the occultation events position through Egypt borders by receiving signal from the American global positioning system (GPS) and the Russian global navigation satellite system (GLONASS). Approximately 20,000 km Altitude satellites are transmitting enormous number of rays by the day to approximately 800 km satellites passing by the Earth atmosphere. Our mission is to derive all of these rays position (start and end) by calculating satellites position by the time, determine the rays in the occultation case and derive the atmosphere tangent point position for all occultating rays on the Earth surface (Occultation Events).

  2. Opportunity without Equity: Educational Inequality and Constitutional Protections in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Jackson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The claim that the law can be an inequality-reducing weapon is a staple of legal and political discourse. Although it is hard to dispute that legal provisions sometimes work to reduce inequality, we argue that, at least in the domain of equal opportunity in education, the pattern of these effects can be more perverse than has typically been appreciated. Positive laws implemented in the name of promoting equality of opportunity may yield only a narrowly formal equality, with the goal of substantive equality undermined because a high-profile reform will often expose the pathway to educational success. The pathway, once exposed, can then be navigated and successfully subverted by the socioeconomically advantaged. We illustrate such pitfalls of a positive legal approach by examining educational inequality in Egypt, a country with long-standing constitutional protections for equality of opportunity in education. Using data recently collected from a cohort of young people, we show that despite the institutional commitments to equality of opportunity present in Egypt, privileged families have a range of options for subverting the aims of positive legal provisions. We argue that the pattern of educational inequality in Egypt is distinctive relative to countries without similar legal protections.

  3. A background to the feminist movement in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoodfar, H

    1992-01-01

    The origins of the feminist movement in Egypt can be traced back to the social restructuring that occurred during the reign of Mohammed Ali (1805-48). At that time, a debate raged over whether female education was essential to national development. Reformers such as Kassim Amin argued in favor of education for all women and condemned polygamy, supporting their arguments with references to the Koran. Women from the upper classes used their wealth, over which Muslim law gives them full control, to found hospitals, schools, and training centers. By 1914, there were 14 magazines devoted to women's issues. Women participated in anticolonial movements and nationalist party activities while continuing to advocate improvements in women's status. In 1924, Egypt became the 1st Islamic country to deveil women without state intervention. The Egyptian Feminist Party was founded in 1923, and the Women's Political Party was established in 1942 to coordinate the fight for women's equality and the revision of family law. Women's full political rights gained recognition when Egypt won independence in 1956, and the 1st female Minister, Hekmat Abu-Zaid, was appointed in 1962. Ironically, the feminist movement stagnated in the 1st few decades after independence as women's organizations became coopted into the state. The movement has been revitalized, however, by Islamic attacks on women's rights.

  4. RECURRENT/PERSISTENT PNEUMONIA AMONG CHILDREN IN UPPER EGYPT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Saad

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: Recurrent/persistent pneumonia in children continues to be a major challenge for the paediatricians. We aimed to determine the prevalence and underlying causes of recurrent/persistent pneumonia in children in Upper Egypt. Settings: Assiut University Children Hospital, Assiut, Egypt.   Methods: Patients with pneumonia admitted to the hospital during 2 years were investigated (microbiological, biochemical, immunological and radiological tests for recurrent/persistent pneumonia to determine its prevalence and to find out the underlying causes.   Results: 113 out of 1228 patients (9.2% met the diagnosis of recurrent/persistent pneumonia. Identified causes were;  aspiration syndromes (17.7%, pulmonary TB (14%, congenital heart disease (11.5%, bronchial asthma (9.7%, immune deficiency disorders (8.8% and vitamin D deficiency rickets (7%. Other causes included; congenital anomalies of the respiratory tract, interstitial lung diseases, bronchiectasis, and sickle cell anemia. No predisposing factors could be identified in 15% of cases. Conclusion: Approximately 1 in 10 children with pneumonia in our locality had recurrent/persistent pneumonia. The most frequent underlying cause for recurrent/persistent pneumonia in children in Upper Egypt is aspiration syndromes, followed by pulmonary TB.

  5. Dimensions of quality of antenatal care service at Suez, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanan Abbas Abdo Abdel Rahman El Gammal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The 5 th millennium development goal aims at reducing maternal mortality by 75% by the year 2015. According to the World Health Organization, there was an estimated 358,000 maternal deaths globally in 2008. Developing countries accounted for 99% of these deaths of which three-fifths occurred in Sub-Saharan Africa. In primary health care (PHC, quality of antenatal care is fundamental and critically affects service continuity. Nevertheless, medical research ignores the issue and it is lacking scientific inquiry, particularly in Egypt. Aim of the Study: The aim of the following study is to assess the quality of antenatal care in urban Suez Governorate, Egypt. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional primary health care center (PHCC based study conducted at five PHCC in urban Suez, Egypt. The total sample size collected from clients, physicians and medical records. Parameters assessed auditing of medical records, assessing provider and pregnant women satisfaction. Results: Nearly 97% of respondents were satisfied about the quality of antenatal care, while provider′s satisfaction was 61% and for file, auditing was 76.5 ° 5.6. Conclusion: The present study shows that client satisfaction, physicians′ satisfaction and auditing of medical record represent an idea about opportunities for improvement.

  6. Future of Energy in Egypt and the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani Nokraschy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available If the whole world, which Egypt is a part of, continues business as usual in the field of electricitygeneration, namely, using the same regimes adopts today, burning fossil fuels and Uranium fission,both fuels will run out within sixty years at most and the world will definitely return to the Stone Age.Shall this be the end of the Egyptian people … the history makers?Generating energy is the next necessity to human life after water and food, since it is the majorstimulus of development. However, what is the aim of development if it is only momentary; thenfollowed by an endless abyss?Shall we wait till fossil and nuclear fuels run out? Jostling over the remaining fuel will certainly befierce and we will pay a high price for it, a matter that will subsequently lead to demolishing theingredients of development.Considering that oil is now dominating our way of life, it shall be wise to start immediately planning forthe post-oil age, provided that it is a sustainable plan set up to continue its validity as long as humanslive on this planet; this cannot be achieved except if we shift to renewable energies.Looking at Egypt and its available renewable energy sources, it becomes evident that the solarenergy, particularly in Upper Egypt, can give more than the present and future needs of the Egyptiansociety and even cover the demand of the whole world for electricity.

  7. Presidential Succession Scenarios in Egypt and Their Impact on U.S.-Egyptian Strategic Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    cam - paign (with supporters plastering his image on walls in Cairo) for the same purpose.27 Given the authori- tarian nature of the Egyptian regime...the firmest believers in the need to awak - en a project for an Egyptian renaissance.”42 Moussa is a charismatic figure who was a very popular foreign

  8. 78 FR 13304 - Notice of Decision To Issue Permits for the Importation of Strawberry Fruit From Egypt Into the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... Strawberry Fruit From Egypt Into the Continental United States AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection... permits for the importation into the continental United States of fresh strawberry fruit from Egypt. Based... weeds via the importation of fresh strawberry fruit from Egypt. DATES: Effective Date: February 27,...

  9. Education in Ancient and the Present Egypt: From 4000 B.C. to A.D. 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwan, Nour Eldin

    The discovery and deciphering of the Rosetta stone led to a rediscovery of Egypt's contribution to world culture and civilization. This document outlines the growth of knowledge and education in ancient Egypt and emphasizes the disciplines of science, medicine, art, philosophy, agriculture, and engineering. Ancient Egypt's decline and the…

  10. Liver transplantation in Egypt from West to East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galal H El-Gazzaz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Galal H El-Gazzaz1, Azza H El-Elemi21Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Forensic Medicine and Ethics, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, EgyptBackground: Egyptian patients with end-stage liver disease need to seek whole cadaveric liver transplantation (CLT abroad. We studied the outcome of Egyptian patients who underwent CLT in China.Methods: Between 2004–2006, 22 patients who underwent CLT in China and attended two liver surgery outpatient clinics in Egypt for follow-up were included in the study. Demographic, preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up data after coming back from China were reviewed.Results: For 22 patients of median age 48 years (30–62 and with BMI 27.5 ± 6.2, the median follow-up was 23.5 months (range 1–48; 18 patients were males. Hepatitis C (HCV-cirrhosis alone or with schistosomiasis was the main indication for CLT (n = 12; Hepatitis B (HBV-cirrhosis was the indication for transplantation in two patients, HCV-cirrhosis with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in six, HBV-cirrhosis with HCC in one, and both HBV- and HCV-related cirrhosis with HCC in another. There were eight deaths, one as a result of primary nonfunction, one because of postoperative bleeding, two because of recurrent HCV, and four because of recurrent HCC. Overall survival at one and three years was 68.5% and 64%, respectively, and 50% and 37.5% for HCC patients, respectively, while three-year survival was 80% for hepatitis patients. Twelve patients (54% developed complications. Biliary complications occurred in 45% of cases.Conclusion: CLT tourism to China raises serious concerns regarding selection criteria and ethical issues. Furthermore, the negative impact of this practice on the successful setting up of LT programs in Egypt must be addressed carefully. In Egypt efforts should be directed to get legalization for CLT.Keywords: hepatitis B, hepatitis C, end-stage liver disease, transplantation, Egypt, China

  11. The road to liberating citizens While governing the urban areas. The tale of two cities: Cairo and buenos aires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza Sirry

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The relation between the political agenda, the social and economic policies, and urban planning and fabric of cities as a product cannot be missed. And as cities are centres of national economic growth and given that the future of the world will be urban it is thus ironic that the majority of the population of almost all cities in almost all developing countries lives in houses that are below standards, in areas that lack services and basic infrastructure. Furthermore, the people who live in these areas suffer from high present of socio-economic problems such as unemployment and literacy. The poorest of the population have to pay more for their houses, service and infrastructure provision. And they lack access to formal credit and thus to opportunities (Sirry 2004. The cities have become places of frustration instead of places of hope and opportunities. It is not thus surprising that the world is witnessing a wave of upheavals all over its’ cities. In the two case studies the article will try to discuss the background of the country and the political, social, and economic conditions and the physical outcome that is manifested in the image of its cities specially the capital city and how can the change towards democracy help the country, its cities and the urban population. The period covered is called by many the contemporary period, it starts in 50’s in Egypt and 70’s in Argentine.

  12. Family support for women's health-seeking behavior: a qualitative study in rural southern Egypt (Upper Egypt).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Ayumi; Higuchi, Michiyo; Labeeb, Shokria Adly; Mohamed, Asmaa Ghareds; Chiang, Chifa; Aoyama, Atsuko

    2014-02-01

    This qualitative study investigated the influence of family support on women's health-seeking behavior in rural southern Egypt (Upper Egypt). We carried out separate focus group discussions (FGDs) with 3 groups (6 women with children under 5 years old, 6 men, and 4 elderly women, respectively) in a village in Assiut Governorate, an underprivileged region in Upper Egypt. The FGDs aimed to identify how different types of family support affected women's health-seeking behavior in areas including maternal health and common illnesses of women and children. Our results showed that maternal health issues were often discussed by husbands and wives, while mothers-in-law had little apparent influence. We also found that women could access support resources more easily than expected through their extended families. Our study showed that husbands had an important role in encouraging women's health in the family, while the effect of mothers-in-law on women's health-seeking behavior was not substantial. The study indicated that women received considerable support from co-resident family members, their natal family, and their neighbors, which helped women in seeking health services.

  13. FAMILY SUPPORT FOR WOMEN’S HEALTH-SEEKING BEHAVIOR: A QUALITATIVE STUDY IN RURAL SOUTHERN EGYPT (UPPER EGYPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    OHASHI, AYUMI; HIGUCHI, MICHIYO; ADLY LABEEB, SHOKRIA; GHAREDS MOHAMED, ASMAA; CHIANG, CHIFA; AOYAMA, ATSUKO

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This qualitative study investigated the influence of family support on women’s health-seeking behavior in rural southern Egypt (Upper Egypt). We carried out separate focus group discussions (FGDs) with 3 groups (6 women with children under 5 years old, 6 men, and 4 elderly women, respectively) in a village in Assiut Governorate, an underprivileged region in Upper Egypt. The FGDs aimed to identify how different types of family support affected women’s health-seeking behavior in areas including maternal health and common illnesses of women and children. Our results showed that maternal health issues were often discussed by husbands and wives, while mothers-in-law had little apparent influence. We also found that women could access support resources more easily than expected through their extended families. Our study showed that husbands had an important role in encouraging women’s health in the family, while the effect of mothers-in-law on women’s health-seeking behavior was not substantial. The study indicated that women received considerable support from co-resident family members, their natal family, and their neighbors, which helped women in seeking health services. PMID:25129988

  14. Optimization of industrial production of rifamycin B by Amycolatopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. .... Ten ml of the fermentation broth culture were placed in the small ..... Safety and bactericidal activity of rifalazil in patients with pulmonary.

  15. Optimization of industrial production of rifamycin B by Amycolatopsis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    1Microbial Biotechnology Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. 2Department of ... Rifamycins were first isolated from a fermentation culture at the ..... Safety and bactericidal activity of rifalazil in patients with pulmonary.

  16. XmnI polymorphism: Relation to ОІ-thalassemia phenotype and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fadwa Said

    2015-01-10

    Jan 10, 2015 ... b Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt. Received 19 ... HbF production has an ameliorating effect in patients who ..... phism in Chinese and Malay b-thalassaemia patients in Malaysia.

  17. E-Learning as an Alternative Strategy for Tourism Higher Education in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Galal M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to be one of the earliest studies to investigate tourism e-learning in Egypt, thus, it will initially shed light on the current standing of e-learning in Egypt before proceeding to: identify the present status of e-learning in Egyptian tourism higher education; explore the potential advantages and drawbacks of using…

  18. "Discourse on the Go": Thematic Analysis of Vehicle Graffiti on the Roads of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Nashar, Mohamed; Nayef, Heba

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates graffiti drawn on vehicles in Egypt as an expression of their authors' social values, religious ideologies and political affiliations. Little research has been done in Egypt on these meaning-loaded messages. This paper gives further evidence that graffiti are a very powerful mode of expression for groups that feel…

  19. 75 FR 3953 - Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Central Government of Egypt Pursuant to section 7086(c)(2) of the... section 7086(c)(1) of the Act with respect to the Government of Egypt, and I hereby waive such...

  20. 76 FR 31673 - Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Arab Republic of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Waiver of Restriction on Assistance to the Arab Republic of Egypt Pursuant to Section 7086(c)(2) of the... Act with respect to the Arab Republic of Egypt and I hereby waive such restriction. This...

  1. 77 FR 24555 - Determination on Foreign Military Financing Assistance for Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Determination on Foreign Military Financing Assistance for Egypt Pursuant to section 7041(a)(1)(C) of the... Foreign Military Financing for Egypt, and I hereby waive this restriction. This determination shall...

  2. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Salmonella serovars in milk and cheese in Mansoura city, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Hussein El-Baz

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: The present study confirms the presence of Salmonella in milk and cheese samples in Mansoura, Egypt, indicating that the dairy products can act as potential sources of Salmonella infection. Thus, appropriate hygienic measures are suggestive for combating Salmonellosis in Egypt. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(1.000: 45-51

  3. E-Learning as an Alternative Strategy for Tourism Higher Education in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Galal M. H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This research aims to be one of the earliest studies to investigate tourism e-learning in Egypt, thus, it will initially shed light on the current standing of e-learning in Egypt before proceeding to: identify the present status of e-learning in Egyptian tourism higher education; explore the potential advantages and drawbacks of using…

  4. BOCI-Egypt : Brucellosis and Tuberculosis control 21- 25 March 2011

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nell, A.J.; Vugt, van F.

    2011-01-01

    This is the report of the first mission to Egypt for the project: Impact of brucellosis and tuberculosis on animal production and public health (BO-10-009-118). The objective of this mission was: to make an assessment of the current needs and problems in Egypt related to brucellosis and tuberculosis

  5. NPC Vice Chairman Ismail Amat Leads Chinese Friendship Delegation to Turkey and Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>A9-member Chinese friendship delegation led by Ismail Amat, vice chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress (NPC) and president of the China-Turkey Friendship Association (CTFA) and the China-Egypt Friendship Association (CEFA), visited Turkey and Egypt from November 29 to December 9, 2003 at

  6. NPC Vice Chairman Ismail Amat Leads Chinese Friendship Delegation to Turkey and Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GaoXuesong

    2004-01-01

    A9-member Chinese friendship delegation led by Ismail Amat, vice chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People's Congress (NPC) and president of the China-Turkey Friendship Association (CTFA) and the China-Egypt Friendship Association (CEFA), visited Turkey and Egypt from November 29 to December 9, 2003 at

  7. Influence of Safety Problems on the Development of International Tourism in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina G. Dzhilavyan

    Full Text Available The article deals with the description of the ancient lands – Egypt. Issued linked to repeated terrorism threads affecting the tourism industry in Egypt are considered. The drawbacks in the tourism industry the holiday makers might encounter are shown.

  8. School Psychology in Egypt: Results of the 2008 International School Psychology Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Shane R.; Alghorani, Mohammad Adnan; Darweish, Abdel-Hameed; Abdelaziz, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    The International School Psychology Survey (ISPS) was used to gather information about the characteristics, training, roles, activities, preferences, research interests and the challenges experienced by school psychology specialists in Egypt. To the degree that the data are representative of the school psychology specialists Egypt, it appears that…

  9. The Landing of CMS Missionaries to an Ottoman Dominion: Missionary Education in Egypt (1825-1862)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurdogan, Azru M.

    2016-01-01

    During the period under investigation (1825-1862), Egypt was a dominion of the Ottoman Empire and attracted the attention and interest of all European states that had been displaying their military and commercial superiority for a long time. In the nineteenth century, Egypt was not only destitute of schools, but had also entered a rapid…

  10. Eternal Egypt: Masterworks of Ancient Art from the British Museum. Learning from Exhibitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces the exhibition "Eternal Egypt: Masterworks of Ancient Art from the British Museum" that explores the four major periods of Egyptian history. Provides background information on ancient Egypt and describes the art that was present in each of the four kingdoms. (CMK)

  11. 78 FR 45285 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Egypt's Mysterious Book...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-26

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Egypt's Mysterious Book of the..., 2003), I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Egypt's Mysterious Book... custodians. I also determine that the exhibition or display of the exhibit objects at The Walters Art...

  12. The CAIRO4 study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    't Lam-Boer, Jorine; Mol, Linda; Verhoef, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    unresectable metastases of CRC and few or absent symptoms of the primary tumour are randomized 1:1 between systemic therapy only, and resection of the primary tumour followed by systemic therapy. Systemic therapy will consist of fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy in combination with bevacizumab. The primary...

  13. Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayali, Ghazi; Kandeil, Ahmed; El-Shesheny, Rabeh; Kayed, Ahmed S; Maatouq, Asmaa M; Cai, Zhipeng; McKenzie, Pamela P; Webby, Richard J; El Refaey, Samir; Kandeel, Amr; Ali, Mohamed A

    2016-03-01

    In Egypt, avian influenza A subtype H5N1 and H9N2 viruses are enzootic in poultry. The control plan devised by veterinary authorities in Egypt to prevent infections in poultry focused mainly on vaccination and ultimately failed. Recently, widespread H5N1 infections in poultry and a substantial increase in the number of human cases of H5N1 infection were observed. We summarize surveillance data from 2009 through 2014 and show that avian influenza viruses are established in poultry in Egypt and are continuously evolving genetically and antigenically. We also discuss the epidemiology of human infection with avian influenza in Egypt and describe how the true burden of disease is underestimated. We discuss the failures of relying on vaccinating poultry as the sole intervention tool. We conclude by highlighting the key components that need to be included in a new strategy to control avian influenza infections in poultry and humans in Egypt.

  14. A study on the establishment of nuclear cooperative relations and future direction between Korea and Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, M. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. J.; Yun, S. W.; Ko, H. S

    2000-10-01

    This study was carried out in order to review the cooperation with Egypt and establish and activate the cooperative relations with Egypt. Recent policy trends in the use and development of nuclear energy in Egypt, were investigated including introduction of nuclear power plant, and cooperative relations between two nations were also established under the implementation of the project. It was agreed through exchanges of visits of nuclear cooperation delegation; 1) exchange of visits of cooperation delegation, 2) invitation of egypt experts to policy seminar 3) cooperation between relevant nuclear related organizations of two countries, 4) future cooperation fields and directions between two countries. It is recommended that cooperation with Egypt be implemented systematically through the long term based on national basic cooperation directions and integrated strategies.

  15. Perspectives of Students’ Behavior Towards Mobile Learning (M-learning in Egypt: an Extension of the UTAUT Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Ali

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of third-generation (3G mobile technologies has led to the emergence of a new kind of learning called mobile learning (m-learning. M-learning means the use of mobile devices to access learning materials at anytime and anywhere with the aid of mobile terminals and networks. This paper explores the possibility of applying m-learning for schools in Egypt through a proposed model of acceptance factors that may affect the students’ intentions to adopt m-learning. We use the original model of Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT and extended it with three new factors mobility, interactivity, and enjoyment.

  16. Joint Egypt/United States report on Egypt/United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 5 of 5 Vols. Annexes 11--13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The principal features of the existing environment of Egypt are characterized and the main problem areas identified in Annex 11. The environmental, health, and associated social issues that must be considered in choosing from among the options available to Egypt for meeting projected future energy needs are identified. The environmental impacts associated with these options are discussed and observations are made of alternte ways to minimize environmental insults. Annex 12, Manpower, analyzes the energy-related manpower situation of Egypt. Manpower education and training resources of Egypt; the existing manpower base of Egypt; manpower needs of the energy strategies; a comparison of manpower needs and existing manpower base; and the underlying economic and social factors that will make Egypt energy facility development very difficult to plan and execute are discussed. Annex 13 summarizes a preliminary analysis of the capital, labor, materials, and equipment resources required to implement alternative Egyptian energy futures and documents the assessment of several Egyptian energy development programs selected by the DOE. It egins with brief overviews of the ESPM model and data base. It then describes the method by which the system was adapted to Egyptian conditions and the results of this modification. The comparison Case energy development program is described, followed by a summary of ESPM-derived facility and resource requirements. Finally, the sensitivity of these results to several alternative energy strategies is illustrated.

  17. Estimation of seismic moments from local magnitudes and coda durations for the Cairo earthquake aftershocks recorded at Kottamyia (KEG Broadband station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. F. Abdelwahed

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectral analysis of fifty-five KEG VBB records from the October 12, 1992 Cairo earthquake source region was performed to obtain the seismic moment. We obtained this parameter in turn to develop empirical local magnitude (ML, seismic moment (Mo, coda duration (D relations for that region. In this study the data consist of Lg-waves on the vertical component seismograms for the recorded earthquakes with ML ranging from 1.7 to 4.7. The derived empirical relation between the seismic moment (Mo and magnitude ML for the aftershocks sequence with 1.7 = ML < 3.5 is Log (Mo = (0.96 ± 0.05 ML + (17.88 ± 0.13. We found a correlation between the coda duration (D and Log of the moment (Log (Mo as follows: Log (Mo = (2.35 ± 0.27 Log (D + (16.33 ± 0.48.

  18. Impact of an infection-control program on nurses' knowledge and attitude in pediatric intensive care units at Cairo University hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Yasmine S; Labib, John R; Abouelhamd, Walaa A

    2014-04-01

    Healthcare-associated infection is a prominent problem among patients in pediatric intensive care units (PICU) as it could result in significant morbidity, prolonged hospitalization, and increase in medical care costs. The role of nurses is extremely important in preventing hazards and sequela of healthcare-associated infections. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a health education program regarding infection-control measures on nurses' knowledge and attitude in PICUs at Cairo University hospitals. This was a pre-post test interventional study in which a convenient sample of 125 nurses was taken from the nursing staff in different PICUs at Cairo University hospitals. The study took place in three phases. In the first phase, the nursing staff's knowledge, attitude and practice concerning infection-control measures were tested using a self-administered pretested questionnaire and an observation checklist. The second phase included health education sessions in the form of powerpoint and video presentations; and in the third phase the nurses' knowledge and attitude on infection-control measures were reassessed. A significantly higher level of knowledge was revealed in the postintervention phase as compared with the preintervention phase with regards to the types of nosocomial infections (94.4 vs. 76.8%, Pcontrol nosocomial infections (89.6 vs. 68%, Pcontrol measures could protect them completely from acquiring infection (79.2 vs. 65.6%, P=0.033). Statistically significant higher total knowledge and attitude scores were revealed in the postintervention phase as compared with the preintervention one (Pattitude after educational program was offered to the nursing staff. Educational training programs should be multidisciplinary interventions in the era of quality control to help healthcare workers realize the importance of basic infection-control measures in reducing pediatric morbidity and mortality and improving the quality of care.

  19. The occurrence of keratinophilic fungi in sewage sludge from Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hafez, A I; el-Sharouny, H M

    1990-01-01

    The keratinophilic fungi of 40 sewage sludge samples from Upper Egypt were studied using a goat hair-baiting technique. 43 species representing 22 genera were isolated, 17 species of which were dermatophytes and closely related fungi: Chrysosporium state of Arthroderma tuberculatum, C. asperatum, C. georgii, C. indicum, C. keratinophilum, C. pseudomerdarium, C. queenslandicum, Chrysosporium state of Thielavia sepedonium, C. tropicum, Microsporum cookei, M. gypseum, Myceliophthora anamorph of Corynascus novoguineensis, M. vellerea and Trichophyton terrestre. 26 species of cycloheximide resistant fungi were collected and these included members of Acremonium, Aspergillus, Alternaria, Chaetomium, Cladosporium, Cunninghamella, Emericella, Fusarium, Geotrichum, Penicillium and others.

  20. Megaselia scalaris causing human intestinal myiasis in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazayad, Said A M; Rifaat, Manal M A

    2005-04-01

    Megaselia scalaris is a worldwide distributed insect of medical importance. In a laboratory-based study, stool samples with undefined maggot infestation were examined and the presence of M. scalaris maggots was confirmed. Binocular stereo-microscopy was used for identification of the maggots. Larvae were allowed to develop into adults onto a human stool culture. The larvae and the emerged flies were identified using standard keys. This may be the first report of M. scalaris as a causative agent of human myiasis in Egypt. Details of the third instar larva, pupa and adults were given.

  1. Governance and Risk Management: Empirical Evidence from Malaysia and Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashidah Abdul Rahman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The perceptions of Islamic banking professionals are surveyed through a questionnaire to explore whether the process of risk management mediates board involvement in risk management on risk management practices of Islamic banks in Malaysia and Egypt. The findings of this study identified that the Islamic banks are somewhat efficient in their risk management process. Furthermore, high involvement of boards in risk management will significantly increase risk management process, and in turn, leads to significantly higher risk management practices in the organizations. Hence, boards should take formal responsibility for setting, managing and periodically assessing the risk management culture of the organizations.  

  2. Cytotoxic acetogenins from Annona glabra cultivated in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Abdel-lateff

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bio-assay guided fraction of the methanolic extract of Annona glabra seeds (Annonaceae, cultivated in Egypt, revealed to the isolation of three bis-tetrahydrofuran acetogenins; squamocin-C (1 , squamocin-D (2 , and annonin I (3 . Compounds 1 and 2 were obtained as stereoisomeric mixture. All isolates were assayed for their cytotoxicity twards brine shrimp and five in vitro cancer cell lines (A549, HT29, MCF 7, RPMI, and U251, and showed significant activity The structures of all compounds were determined by interpretation of their NMR and MS analyses.

  3. Management of Egypt's Surface and Groundwater Resources: Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, M.; Ahmed, M.; Yan, E.; Milewski, A.; Mohamed, L.; Farag, A. Z. A.

    2014-12-01

    The River Nile is the main source of fresh water in Egypt. Most of Egypt's River Nile water (>85%) originates as precipitation over the Ethiopian highlands and is channeled by the Blue Nile. The construction (years: 2011 to 2017) of the Renaissance Dam (reservoir capacity: 70 x 109m3) on the Blue Nile poses an extreme threat to Egypt's population. If the reservoir was to be filled in 7 years, Egypt will lose (during each of 7 years following dam completion) a minimum of 15 x 109m3 of its annual allocation (55 x 109m3) to reservoir filling (10 x 109m3), evaporation (3.5 x 109m3), and infiltration (1.5 x 109m3). Three solutions are proposed: Solution I takes advantage of the cyclicity of Nile floods and is based on findings from a calibrated (against temporal head data) unconfined 2-dimensional transient groundwater flow model for Lake Nasser and surroundings and a calibrated (against lake levels) surface water model. Models show with time: (1) losses to infiltration will decrease (1975-193: 58.4 109m3; 1993-2001: 43.6 x 109m3) due to silting of Lake bottom and encroachment of excess Lake Nasser water will increase (e.g., 1975-1993: none; 1993-2001: 17 x 109m3). We propose to develop sustainable agricultural in the Western Desert: (1) In high flood years, excess Lake Nasser water (e.g., 1993-2001: 17 x 109m3) is channeled across the plateau bounding (from west) the River Nile valley to artificially recharge the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System (NSAS) that crops out west of the plateau and, (2) in low flood years, we extract the recharged groundwater. Solution II calls on mining the NSAS at reasonable rates. Using temporal (January 2003 - September 2012) Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) data we estimate the annual depletion rates at 2 x 109m3 due to artificial extraction (1.5 x 109m3) and natural discharge (0.5 x 109m3). Assuming current GRACE depletion rates, the recoverable groundwater (5,180 x 109m3) will last for 2500 years; if we were to quadruple

  4. Two New Flavone Glycosides from Chenopodiumambrosioides Growing Wildly in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala M. Hammoda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chenopodiumambrosioides (Chenopodiaceae growing wildly in Egypt was subjected to antioxidant –guided phytochemical investigation and the EtOAc fraction afforded the two new flavone glycosides; scutellarein-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2-α-rhamnopyranoside (1 and scutella-rein-7-O-α-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→2-α-rhamnopyranoside (2. In addition, the invitro antioxidant activities of the plant alcohol extract, CHCl 3 fraction, EtOAc fraction and isolates were studied.

  5. Familial epilepsy in the pharaohs of ancient Egypt's eighteenth dynasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafian, Hutan

    2012-09-01

    The pharaohs of Egypt's famous eighteenth dynasty all died early of unknown causes. This paper comprehensively reviews and analyses the medical literature and current evidence available for the New Kingdom rulers - Tuthmosis IV, Amenhotep III, Akhenaten, Smenkhkare and Tutankhamun. The integration of these sources reveals that the eighteenth dynasty rulers may have suffered from an inherited condition that may explain their untimely deaths. The description of recurring strong religious visions, likely neurological disease and gynecomastia, supports the theory that these pharaohs may have suffered from a familial temporal epilepsy syndrome that ultimately led to their early downfall.

  6. The First Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt International Scientific Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Mohamed S

    2009-10-01

    A wide gathering of scientists, clinicians, pharmacists and nurses specialized in pediatric oncology practice met to celebrate the second anniversary of Children's Cancer Hospital, Egypt (CCHE). The celebration was in the form of high-brow teaching lectures and reports presented by international experts in the fields of pediatric CNS tumors, solid tumors (neuroblastoma, nephroblastoma, soft tissue and bone tumors, lymphoma, leukemia and pediatric oncology nursing. The conference extends its activities to hospital management, clinical pharmacy and telemedicine. Furthermore, CCHE experts presented the efforts performed to establish a state-of-the-art pediatric oncology hospital equipped with all needed facilities to raise the standard of care to the highest levels.

  7. Abu Simbel Radio Telescope Project in the upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, M.

    1999-03-01

    This paper shows the importance of building a radio telescope at Abu Simbel in the south of Egypt as part of the European VLBI Network (EVN) to cover the gap between the radio telescopes in Western Europe and the radio telescope at Hartebeesthoek in South Africa. The telescope can be used for solar and stellar observations at wavelengths ranging between centimetres and millimetres, and for geodetic VLBI studies. The suggested diameter is 32 meters for the telescope and it is expected to work in the frequency range from 1.4 to 43 GHz. Abu Simbel is characterised by excellent atmospheric transparency, dry climate, and low population without any artificial interference.

  8. Rates and characteristics of sleep paralysis in the general population of Denmark and Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Baland; Hinton, Devon E

    2013-09-01

    In the current research we report data from two studies that examined rates and characteristics of sleep paralysis (SP) in the general population of Denmark and Egypt. In Study I, individuals from Denmark and Egypt did not differ in age whereas there were more males in the Egyptian sample (47 vs. 64 %); in Study II, individuals from Denmark and Egypt were comparable in terms of age and gender distribution. In Study I we found that significantly fewer individuals had experienced SP in Denmark [25 % (56/223)] than in Egypt [44 % (207/470)] p < .001. In Study II we found that individuals who had experienced at least one lifetime episode of SP from Denmark (n = 58) as compared to those from Egypt (n = 143) reported significantly fewer SP episodes in a lifetime relative to SP experiencers from Egypt (M = 6.0 vs. M = 19.4, p < .001). SP in the Egyptian sample was characterized by high rates of SP (as compared to in Denmark), frequent occurrences (three times that in the Denmark sample), prolonged immobility during SP, and great fear of dying from the experience. In addition, in Egypt, believing SP to be precipitated by the supernatural was associated with fear of the experience and longer SP immobility. Findings are discussed in the context of cultural elaboration and salience theories of SP.

  9. Obstacles Facing Promoting Tourism for Islamic Landmarks from the Perspective of Tour Operators in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzan Bakri Hassan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The UNESCO launched a campaign #unite4heritage in Egypt to defeat extremism and intolerance. The message of such campaigne is peace, dialogue and unity embedded in cultural heritage. As culture and tourism are linked together, such message could be delivered through improving culture heritage tourism in Egypt. Islamic landmarks  are considered as a part of human heritage. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify how much tour operators in Egypt include Islamic landmarks in their programs to determine the obstacles facing promoting cultural tourism in Islamic landmarks' areas. Additionally, the study would identify positive results in the case of developing heritage tourism in Egypt. To achieve a high result, a survey approach was employed to collect data from 100 tour operators, using a completed questionnaire technique as well as a Likert Scale and statistical models in order to test and interpret the research outcomes. The research findings indicated that although tour operators in Egypt are convinced of the significance of the Islamic landmarks, there is no contradiction between creating global understanding and at the same time achieving benefit to the local community. However, there is a range of obstacles facing promoting such type of tourism in Egypt. Keywords: Culture heritage tourism, community, Egypt, Islamic civilization.

  10. [In Egypt, researchers assess the health of village women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A May 1991 workshop on reproductive morbidity attended by 60 participants in Cairo included presentation of results of a study of 509 nonpregnant women aged 20-60 years. The study was conducted by an anthropologist, a biostatistician, 2 obstetrician-gynecologists, and a microbiologist in 2 rural villages of Gizeh. The majority of the women studied had married before age 19, and 80% were illiterate. Despite initial reticence, over 90% of the village women ultimately took part in the study. The team observed the frequency with which the women accepted illness, weakness, and pain as a normal part of life. Physical examinations revealed that 44% had vaginitis, 9% were anemic, 17% had severe anemia, 56% had prolapse, 18% were hypertensive, and 42% were obese. Survey questionnaires revealed that 36% experienced pain during intercourse, 18% had pain in the lower abdomen, 71% had menstrual pain, 15% had pruritus, and 48% feared they were sterile. The team observed that the women were apparently reluctant to use the local health services. The villages had their own health centers staffed by female physicians, but only 1/3 of the women giving birth in the preceding 2 years had sought prenatal care, and 75% chose to deliver at home. Relations between the health workers and the village women must be strengthened if the situation is to be improved. The seminar recommended that the health and social workers make greater efforts to encourage use of the health services by local women.

  11. THE ROLE OF COCCOPHAGUS SCUTELLARIS (HYMENOPTERA: APHELINIDAE) IN THE BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF SOFT SCALE INSECTS (HOMOPTERA:COCCIDAE) IN EGYPT%埃及黄盾食蚧蚜小蜂在生物防治蚧壳虫中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaaban Abd-Rabou

    2002-01-01

    在埃及,黄盾食蚧蚜小蜂Coccophagus scutellaris(Dalman)是一种有效防治蚧壳虫的寄生蜂.研究中分别用6种蚧壳虫Ceroplastes flridensis Comstock,Coccus hesperidum L.,Pulvinaria floccifera(Westwood),P.psidii Maskell,Saissetia coffeae(Walker)以及S.oleae(Oliver)来饲养黄盾食蚧蚜小蜂.1999-2000年间,在埃及的Beni-Suef,Cai-ro,Giza,Gharbiya和北海岸等5个地方,C.scutellaris大规模的发生在7-11月间.C.scutellaris对S.coffeae和S.oleae的最高寄生率分别是发生在1999年11月和8月的26%和22%,因此可以认为,黄盾食蚧蚜小蜂是对这两种蚧壳虫有效的寄生蜂.%Coccophagus scutellaris (Dalman) is one of the specific parasitoids that attack soft scale insects inEgypt. In the present study, C. scutellaris was reared from 6 species of soft scale insects. These are Ceroplastesflori-densis Comstock, Coccus hesperidum L., Pulvinaria floccifera (Westwood), P. psidii Maskell, Saissetia coffeae(Walker) and S. oleae (Oliver) .The abundance of C. scutellaris was monitored from July to Nov. 1999 - 2000 in fivelocalities in Egypt, the Beni-Suef, Cairo, Giza, Gharbiya and the Northern coast. C. scutellaris is considered an ef-fective parasitoid of S. coffeae and S. oleae with maximum parasitism rates reaching 26% and 22% in Nov. and Aug.1999, respectively.

  12. Survey on coenurosis in sheep and goats in Egypt

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    Enas A. Desouky

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 75 sheep and goats from apparently healthy and from clinically affected flocks were examined for Coenurus cerebralis cysts from different localities in Egypt. Of 25 animals examined from clinically diseased sheep and goats, 25 (100% revealed the presence of infestation with one to four coenuri in the brain. The sites of predilection were the left hemisphere (48%, followed by the right hemisphere (40% and the cerebellum (12%. There was no apparent effect of the age of sheep and goats on susceptibility to infestation with C. cerebralis. Another 50 animals from apparently healthy sheep and goat herds presented no C. cerebralis cysts. The cysts from infested sheep could infest newborn puppies experimentally, with a prepatent period of 60 days post infestation. A total of 15 immature worms that were recovered from one puppy did not reach patency until 105 days post infestation with C. cerebralis cyst scolices. Pathological changes in C. cerebralis-infested sheep brain revealed parasitic elements, demyelinated nerve tracts, hyperaemic blood vessels with round cell infiltration, encephalomalacia with round cell infiltration and palisading macrophages and giant cells, as well as focal replacement of the brain parenchyma with caseated and calcified materials. The morphological characteristics of both the larval stage from sheep and goats and adult worms of Taenia multiceps from experimentally infested dogs are described. The results conclude that C. cerebralis is one of the principal causes of nervous manifestations of coenurosis in clinically diseased sheep and goats in Egypt.

  13. Development of Reliability Indices for Electric Distribution Network in Egypt

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    Eman Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Reliability indices (RIs are the elemental benchmark used by Egyptian Electricity Holding Company (EEHC, and the Electric Utility and Consumer Protection Regulatory Agency (Egypt ERA to evaluate the continuity and compliance of supply, which surpasses the customer's requirements and satisfaction. The power system is very complex, mixing huge different types of generating resources and clusters to supply electric power through transmission and distribution system to a number of customers with varying requirements.The main function of electric system is to supply customers with electric energy that has an acceptable degree of reliability and quality. The power system continuity of supply level is controlled through system indices. The most widely used reliability indices are SAIFI, SAIDI and CAIDI (IEEE std. 1366-2000.Historical electrical indices, reliability indices threshold and satisfaction index are used as guide for electric network performance, which measure the adequate and secure power supply.The paper presents the reliability indices, relation between indices and satisfaction area to highlight the appropriate guideline values for electric systems, also presents the development of indices since 2011 to now for distribution network in Egypt.

  14. Nicotine dependance among adult male smokers in rural Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, Rita R; El-Setouhy, Maged; Haroun, Amany; Gadalla, Shahinaz; Abdel-Aziz, Fatma; Aboul-Fotouh, Aisha; Mohamed, Mostafa K; Mikhail, Nabiel; Israel, Ebenezer

    2003-12-01

    Nicotine dependence is a significant public health problem. This study describes the nicotine dependence status among male adults in rural communities in Egypt. A survey was carried out in five rural villages in Egypt to study the smoking prevalence. A total of 938 current smokers were identified and their nicotine dependence status was studied. About 9% of all smokers in the studied villages were found to have heavy dependence to nicotine. Heavy dependence was associated with younger age of smoking initiation (p<0.05) and more smoking in the first hours of the day (p<0.001). Heavy dependent smokers are less likely to quit smoking (p<0.001), lack the confidence to quit by themselves (p<0.001) and less likely to have tried to quit earlier (p<0.001). Dependent smokers are more likely to smoke in the presence of their children (p<0.001). Reasons for smoking included the habit of smoking helping them to keep them going when tired, to make them alert and not knowing what to do with their hands without a cigarette. The main reasons they identified for restarting smoking after quitting were the signs of withdrawal namely headaches, irritability and difficulty in concentration. Nicotine dependence status and attributes were comparable to studies reported in other countries around the world. Enhanced behavioral and medical intervention strategies are needed to motivate helping both low and heavy nicotine dependent smokers to increase the number and effectiveness of quit attempts.

  15. Perceived stress among tomorrow’s attorneys in Mansoura, Egypt

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    Mostafa Amr

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Few data are available on the level and sources of stress among law students in the Middle East generally and in Egypt specifically. We conducted this study to identify the prevalence and predictors of perceived stress among law students in Mansoura University, Egypt. Subjects and Methods: A cross-sectional study covered 426 law students selected through a stratified cluster sampling method. The questionnaire covered four categories, including 15 items on sources of stress (stressors. Perceived stress scale and Hospital anxiety and depression scale were used to measure stress, anxiety and depression.Results: A high level of perceived stress, anxiety and depression were reported by 42.2%, 59.2% and 18.2%, respectively. On the scale for sources of stress, 80% experienced personal troubles and two thirds of the sample had relationship, academic and environmental problems. Conclusions: It appears that the law students have a high level of perceived stress and majority of it is generated from personal factors and less from the academic or environmental factors. Additional studies are needed to improve our understanding of the causes and consequences of law students' stress.

  16. Covert Diplomacy Between Israel and Egypt During Nasser Rule

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    Ido Yahel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The history of Egypt and Israel consists of four wars and hundreds of border incidents that have taken the lives of tens of thousands of people. It seems that only the rise to power of a leader in the stature of Anwar Sadat could put an end to this bloody circle, because the previous president, Gamal Abdel Nasser, was not willing to hold any kind of political contact with Israel. But Nasser’s reign involved constant political contact between Egypt and Israel, most of whom remain confidential. This article attempts to examine whether any of these contacts were likely to succeed and yield a peace treaty between the two countries, an agreement that could have prevented three wars and saved the lives of so many people on both sides. It will do so by examining these contacts, their characteristics, and the reasons for their failure, while dividing them into three periods: the 1948 war to the 1956 war, the 1956 war to the 1967 war, and the 1967 war to the death of Nasser in 1970.

  17. On the Development and Evolution of Astronomy in ancient Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maravelias, S. E.

    In the present paper the development and evolution of astronomy in = Ancient Egypt are briefly examined. Emphasis is given to the = applications of astronomy on: (i) the orientation of temples and = pyramids, and the subsequent determination of the year; (ii) the = reorientation of temples --after the lapse of several centuries-- (due = to the fact that the priesthood was empirically aware of the precession = of equinoxes, and the subsequent use of this very fact in order to = estimate the archaeological age of temples, tombs and pyramids; (iii) = the heliacal rising of Sirius, which was used by ancient = priests-astronomers in order to fix the New Year's Day and determine the = seasons of the civil year, although the discre pancy of the Sothic cycle = in their calendrical system was not seriously taken into account. = Finally the conclusion put forward is that astronomy in Ancient Egypt = never reached the grounds of pure science (as in Ancient Greece), at = least before the Ptolemaic era, but always remained under the influence = of traditionalism and mythology pertaining more to the sphere of = religion and dogma.

  18. Beleaguered Egypt project running out of funds and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Started in 1979 as part of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), the Family of the Future (FOF) social marketing project accounts for 35% of all contraceptives used in Egypt. FOF left the IPPF in 1981 to work as a nonprofit, semiprivate organization under the supervision of Egypt's Ministry of Health and has become the third largest social marketing project in the world. FOF has, however, gone through 5 executive directors in the last 6 years, prompting critics to think that the Board of Directors is hand-picked by the Egyptian Ministry of Health. additional allegations of financial mismanagement have caused the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) to cancel over $1.5 million in annual funding and product support for the program. Until recently, FOF has benefited from products and operations and technical assistance totalling near $20 million as part of a USAID 10-year, $118-million Egyptian effort. FOF has responded to the funding cut by downsizing its staff and preparing to raise contraceptive prices. Even though USAID has solicited proposals for competitive replacement programs, the new executive director is optimistic that funding cuts leading to organizational change and price increases will ultimately help FOF become self-sufficient. Once USAID-provided supplies have been depleted, FOF will most likely turn to IPPF for assistance.

  19. Hybrid renewable energy systems for the supply of services in rural settlements of mediterranean partner countries. The HYRESS project - the case study of the hybrid system - microgrid in Egypt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, G.; Mohamed, E.S.; Kyriakarakos, G. [Agricultural Univ. of Athens (Greece); Kassem, A.W.S. [Alexandria Univ., El Chatbi (Egypt). Dept. of Agricultural Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Hybrid renewable energy systems is one of the most promising application of renewable energy technologies in remote areas, where the cost of grid extension is prohibitive and the price of fossil fuels increase drastically with the remoteness of the location. Applications of hybrid systems range from small power supplies for remote households providing electricity for lighting or water pumping and water supply to village electrification for remote communities. The strategic objective of the HYRESS project is to remove the knowledge barriers against the installation of Renewable Energy Systems and creation of micro grids. In order to fulfill this objective, three different modular hybrid systems with the generating technologies connected to the AC side were designet, installed and evaluated in three selected remote sites far away from the grid in Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. This paper describes the hybrid system installed in Egypt as a case study and presents first operation results. (orig.)

  20. Myrrh and trematodoses in Egypt: an overview of safety, efficacy and effectiveness profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Ghani, Rashad A; Loutfy, Naguiba; Hassan, Azza

    2009-09-01

    Myrrh is an herbal product that has been used since ancient ages for traditional medication and other purposes. The revolution of myrrh as an antiparasitic agent in Egypt began in the 1990s through scientific evidence-based research. The human trematode infections in Egypt were the main focus of research with stories of success and disagreement, at times. The present paper reviewed the antiparasitary activity of myrrh with stress on its possible mode of action, its safety, efficacy and effectiveness on trematode infections in experimental studies and clinical trials in Egypt as well as its molluscicidal effects on the intermediate hosts of trematodes.

  1. Isotopic Evidence for Early Trade in Animals between Old Kingdom Egypt and Canaan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth R Arnold

    Full Text Available Isotope data from a sacrificial ass and several ovicaprines (sheep/goat from Early Bronze Age household deposits at Tell es-Safi/Gath, Israel provide direct evidence for the movement of domestic draught/draft and husbandry animals between Old Kingdom Egypt (during the time of the Pyramids and Early Bronze Age III Canaan (ca. 2900-2500 BCE. Vacillating, bi-directional connections between Egypt and Canaan are known throughout the Early Bronze Age, but here we provide the first concrete evidence of early trade in animals from Egypt to Canaan.

  2. Effects of environmental factors on monuments: the Harkhuf Tomb in Aswan, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Marina

    2015-04-01

    the left and for a longer period, being under the direct sunrays for a longer period. In the interior, during the day, the temperature excursion is much more moderate, but some dew formation has been observed which contributes to the mold formation in parts of the walls of the tumb. In addition, some measurements of wind intensity and direction show a persistent wind blowing from N-NE starting mid-morning, around 10:30 am until late afternoon. In particular, the observations permitted: > to understand if the different parts of the façade of the tomb are under the influence of physical stress of different intensity due to the temperature gradient detected along the façade itself; > to determine if and in which conditions the temperatures excursion together with the right level of relative humidity of the air favor the formation of dew at dawn and of high dew point values. This study is part of the multidisciplinary project TECH (Technologies for the Egyptian Cultural Heritage) funded by the National Reserach Council of Italy and by the Academy of Scientific Research and Technology of Egypt (ASRT).

  3. Dermatophytes and other associated fungi in patients attending to some hospitals in Egypt

    OpenAIRE

    Abd Elmegeed,Al Shimaa M.; S.A. Ouf; Moussa, Tarek A. A.; Eltahlawi,S.M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Dermatophytes are keratinophilic fungi that infect keratinized tissues causing diseases known as dermatophytoses. Dermatophytes are classified in three genera, Epidermophyton, Microsporum, and Trichophyton. This investigation was performed to study the prevalence of dermatomycosis among 640 patients being evaluated at the dermatology clinics at Kasr elainy, El-Husein and Said Galal hospitals in Cairo and Giza between January 2005 and December 2006. The patients were checked for various diseas...

  4. Injection drug use is a risk factor for HCV infection in urban Egypt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Paez Jimenez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify current risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV transmission in Greater Cairo. DESIGN AND SETTING: A 1:1 matched case-control study was conducted comparing incident acute symptomatic hepatitis C patients in two "fever" hospitals of Greater Cairo with two control groups: household members of the cases and acute hepatitis A patients diagnosed at the same hospitals. Controls were matched on the same age and sex to cases and were all anti-HCV antibody negative. Iatrogenic, community and household exposures to HCV in the one to six months before symptoms onset for cases, and date of interview for controls, were exhaustively assessed. RESULTS: From 2002 to 2007, 94 definite acute symptomatic HCV cases and 188 controls were enrolled in the study. In multivariate analysis, intravenous injections (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.2-20.2, medical stitches (OR = 4.2; 95% CI = 1.6-11.3, injection drug use (IDU (OR = 7.9; 95% CI = 1.4-43.5, recent marriage (OR = 3.3; 95% CI = 1.1-9.9 and illiteracy (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.8-8.5 were independently associated with an increased HCV risk. CONCLUSION: In urban Cairo, invasive health care procedures remain a source of HCV transmission and IDU is an emerging risk factor. Strict application of standard precautions during health care is a priority. Implementation of comprehensive infection prevention programs for IDU should be considered.

  5. Case control study to identify risk factors for acute hepatitis C virus infection in Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kandeel, Amr M; Talaat, Maha; Afifi, Salma A; El-Sayed, Nasr M; Abdel Fadeel, Moustafa A; Hajjeh, Rana A; Mahoney, Frank J

    2012-01-01

    .... We conducted a case-control study, June 2007-September 2008, to investigate risk factors for acute HCV infection in Egypt among 86 patients and 287 age and gender matched controls identified in two...

  6. Systematic Revision of the Genus Pancratium L. (Amaryllidaceae in Egypt with a New Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza EL-HADIDY

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In Egypt, taxonomic aspects of the genus Pancratium L. (Amaryllidaceae, Pancratieae were thoroughly studied to point out the most reliable characters for taxon delimitation. Here, we base our species on both geographical and morphological features. The detailed taxonomic revision of genus Pancratium is based on field studies and the examination of representative specimens together with the authentic types deposited in the major herbaria of Egypt and Kew. Variations in the aerial scape, spathe, perianth, corona-teeth, pistil, stamens, capsules and seeds, as well as those of leaf base and leaf orientation are good markers to separate the different species. As a result, five species are recognized, including P. trianthum as a new record to the flora of Egypt. It is restricted to the south-eastern corner of Egypt (Gebel Elba region and being unique in possessing solitary spathe and long attenuate leaf base. A specific key and descriptions are given with typifications.

  7. High-precision radiocarbon chronometry of ancient Egypt, and comparisons with Nubia, Palestine and Mesopotamia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, F.A.; Robinson, S.W.

    1987-03-01

    The use of radiocarbon age measurements in historical chronology is examined for ancient Egypt and neighbouring regions. A methodology is presented aimed at improving the reliability and precision of radiocarbon age determinations.

  8. Sedimentological and petrophysical characteristics of Raha Formation at Wadi Tubia, Northern Gulf of Aqaba, Sinai, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S. Mousa

    2011-06-01

    Statistical analysis of the measured petrophysical data shows that, the dolomitic lithic arenite and fossiliferous bioclastic grainstone microfacies have a good storage capacity in the Raha Formation of Wadi Tubia, Northern Gulf of Aqaba, Sinai, Egypt.

  9. Entrepreneurial intention benefitting from education, training and competence: Egypt and Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashourizadeh, Shayegheh; Nasiri, Niloofar; Schøtt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The question is, for adults in Egypt and Iran, are education, training and competencies positively interrelated and is this human capital benefitting intention to start a business?– Data on people’s human capital and intentions have been collected by the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor in 2008....... The sample is 2,068 adults in Egypt and 2,610 adults in Iran who were not owning-managing a starting or operating business. Multivariate analyses reveal considerable effects of human capital in Egypt and Iran. Education benefits training, training during schooling benefits training after schooling, education...... and training largely benefit competencies such as self-efficacy and opportunity-alertness and education, training and competencies all benefit intention to start a business, but effects differ between Egypt and Iran. The study is valuable and original by demonstrating considerable effects of higher education...

  10. Gravity and magnetotelluric investigations to elicit the origin of Hammam Faraun hot spring, Sinai Peninsula, Egypt

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Abdelzaher, Mohamed; Nishijima, Jun; El-Qady, Gad; Aboud, Essam; Masoud, Osama; Soliman, Mamdoh; Ehara, Sachio

    2011-01-01

    ... with varied temperatures was located around the Gulf of Suez. Gravity and magnetotelluric surveys were made in the area of Hammam Faraun hot spring, which represents the most promising area for geothermal development in Egypt...

  11. Carotenoids in certain higher plants from various ecological niches of Egypt

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    B. Czeczuga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The carotenoids content in Posidonia oceanica, Nelumbium nuciferum, Opuntia ficus-indica and Zygophyllum album from different ecological niches in Egypt was studied. Considerable differences, both qualitative and quantitative among four investigated plant species were found.

  12. Correlation between maternal milk and infant serum levels of chlorinated pesticides (CP) and the impact of elevated CP on bleeding tendency and immune status in some infants in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaalan, Mona F; Abdelraouf, Sahar M; Mohamed, Waleed A; Hassanein, Fetouh S

    2012-01-01

    Chlorinated pesticides (CP) are environmentally persistent pollutants that (prenatally through the placenta and post-natally via breastfeeding) are transferred from mother to child. Considering the significant bleeding tendency noted in infants of CP-intoxicated mothers in Egypt, this study aimed to investigate any correlation between levels of these xenobiotics in mothers' milk and bleeding tendencies of their infants, as well as a possible role of any related immunosuppression in this phenomenon. This study examined 180 newborns presenting with altered bleeding tendencies and their mothers, and 180 normal newborns and their mothers (serving as a controls), selected from the Breastfeeding Unit, Center for Social and Preventive Medicine at the Cairo University Pediatric Hospital. Chlorinated pesticides (e.g., hexachlorocyclohexane, DDT, hepta-chloroepoxide, α- and β-endosulfan, aldrin, endrin, dieldrin) levels and their derivatives were measured in mothers' milk as well as in serum of neonates using gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry. To link bleeding tendency with lactational intoxication of neonates by CP, newborns' blood was assessed for: platelet count, bleeding and prothrombin time, liver enzymes, Vitamin K, TNFα, and IL-10. Breast milk CP levels were associated with a higher incidence of bleeding in infants. Interference with the coagulation cascade was supported by changes in prothrombin time (prolonged), platelet counts (decreased), liver enzymes (increased), and serum vitamin K concentrations (decreased). Moreover, the significant decrease in WBC count and lymphocytes added to depressed cytokine secretion, i.e., TNFα and IL-10, suggested an organochlorine-induced immunotoxicity in infants developmentally exposed to the agents. We conclude that maternal transfer of CP, via breastfeeding or across the placenta, was sufficient to achieve similar CP levels in the serum of their infants; this correlated with a manifesting of altered

  13. [Migrations and economic and social change in Egypt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ged, A

    1985-01-01

    The inexistence in the Arab world of institutions to facilitate development led Egypt to adopt the infitah, a policy of economic opening which is not a voluntarist economic strategy but rather is intended to create a climate favorable to a more capitalistic orientation for individuals with access to petroleum income. Egypt's gross national product grew by 4.6%/year in the dozen years through 1965, but thereafter growth was sluggish or even negative. After 1967 the choices of the dominant economic classes were oriented toward liberalism, and the arrival of Sadat allowed this orientation to prevail even before the infitah. The various measures of the infitah were designed to promote investment, reactivate the private sector, and reorganize the public sector. Most of the specific projects approved through 1978 were in the tertiary sector, they did little to stimulate further development, and the total number of jobs created was relatively insignificant. The transformation of the Egyptian economy is due not so much to the infitah as to 4 other elements: oil, income from the Suez canal, tourism, and emigration. At present petroleum represents 30% of Egypt's exports, the Suez canal will probably bring in $1.5 billion annually in coming years, and tourism brought in $1 billion in 1984, but in terms of economic and social impact on the total population emigration is much more important. The number of emigrants increased from 100,000 in 1973 to over 3 million in 1984 and the extent of their remittances increased from $184 million in 1973 to nearly $4 billion at present. Serious shortages of skilled and unskilled labor have been created by the departure of 10-15% of the overall labor force and a higher proportion for some skilled professions. The number of workers in construction more than doubled from 1971-79, while 10% of the agricultural labor force departed. Agricultural wages increased by an average of 7.1% in these years as agricultural workers were attracted to the

  14. The Egyptian Farming Practices Technological Development and Its Determinants

    OpenAIRE

    Abdou, Amin I.

    2005-01-01

    Tendency toward application of advanced technology in farming practices has been accelerated in Egypt since the mid Seventies of the last century. Both domestic technology generation and foreign technology transfer were encouraged. High-quality cultivars, mechanized farming operations, and modern agricultural systems, such as protected agriculture and organic farming were strongly introduced. As such, this study tended to assess the Egyptian experience in farming modernization, areas of succe...

  15. Recent environmental change and prehistoric human activity in Egypt and Northern Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Kathleen

    2004-03-01

    This paper reviews the various Late Quaternary records that are available from western Egypt and northern Sudan, which includes more than 500 published radiocarbon dates and various sedimentary archives from local landscape components, including palaeolakes, soils, drainages (wadis), and archaeological sites. This palaeoenvironmental compilation frames the spatial and temporal context of local cultural activities when the region was most hospitable ˜9000-6000 BP; at this time, monsoonal weather influenced the portion of the African continental interior, creating enough convective rainfall for occasional surface water storage. In this part of the modern Sahara, rapid hydroclimatic changes play a key role in geomorphic evolution and resource availability. As 'watering holes' formed and dried up in the Early to Middle Holocene, Neolithic people developed various subsistence strategies, including opportunistic hunting of small animals (e.g. gazelle and hare), and food-related (e.g. wild sorghum, millet, and legumes) activities: gathering, plant cultivation and livestock-rearing. During its wettest phases during the 'monsoonal maximum,' the area was drought-prone, sustaining a meager steppe-shrub desert flora. Further desertification and aeolian deflation during the Middle and Late Holocene fostered technological innovation, migration and settlement, as well as the further development of agrarian communities and complex culture.

  16. Reservoir assessment of the Nubian sandstone reservoir in South Central Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Nader; Barakat, Moataz; Abdallah, Hamed

    2017-05-01

    The Gulf of Suez is considered as one of the most important petroleum provinces in Egypt and contains the Saqqara and Edfu oil fields located in the South Central portion of the Gulf of Suez. The Nubian sandstone reservoir in the Gulf of Suez basin is well known for its great capability to store and produce large volumes of hydrocarbons. The Nubian sandstone overlies basement rocks throughout most of the Gulf of Suez region. It consists of a sequence of sandstones and shales of Paleozoic to Cretaceous age. The Nubian sandstone intersected in most wells has excellent reservoir characteristics. Its porosity is controlled by sedimentation style and diagenesis. The cementation materials are mainly kaolinite and quartz overgrowths. The permeability of the Nubian sandstone is mainly controlled by grain size, sorting, porosity and clay content especially kaolinite and decreases with increase of kaolinite. The permeability of the Nubian Sandstone is evaluated using the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR technology) and formation pressure data in addition to the conventional logs and the results were calibrated using core data. In this work, the Nubian sandstone was investigated and evaluated using complete suites of conventional and advanced logging techniques to understand its reservoir characteristics which have impact on economics of oil recovery. The Nubian reservoir has a complicated wettability nature which affects the petrophysical evaluation and reservoir productivity. So, understanding the reservoir wettability is very important for managing well performance, productivity and oil recovery.

  17. Laser Scanning of a Monolithic Column during Processing in Middle Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajioka, O.; Hori, Y.

    2011-09-01

    From ancient quarries around Akoris in Middle Egypt, which belong to the Ptolemaic and Roman periods, the stone blocks could be carried to the working area located in the outside of the city. Those blocks included a giant monolithic column measured approximately 14m in length, which had been cracked for reasons unknown and must have contributed to disuse of monolith. The first deal is a comparison of plans drawn by the point clouds by laser scanning with those coming from plane-tabling, which had been one of popular methods for measuring in the last century. This part shows how the laser scanning technology is useful in far better measuring and documentation of the site. The second discuss is about a detailed assessment of the procedure of processing through the observation of chisel marks and the detail analysis about the 3 dimensional data. In the result, we are succeed to show the restoration of the procedure of the proceedings using guidelines and a wooden curve since we concentrate attention on the point of abstracting the centre line and shaving the surface into the round shape.

  18. Minor crops for export: a case study of boscalid, pyraclostrobin, lufenuron and lambda-cyhalothrin residue levels on green beans and spring onions in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafi, Ahmad; Garau, Vincenzo L; Caboni, Pierluigi; Sarais, Giorgia; Cabras, Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Dissipation rates of boscalid [2-chloro-N-(4' -chlorobiphenyl-2-yl)nicotinamide], pyraclostrobin [methyl 2-[1-(4-chlorophenyl) pyrazol-3-yloxymethyl]-N-methoxycarbanilate], lufenuron [(RS)-1-[2,5-dichloro-4-(1,1,2,3,3,3-hexafluoropropoxy)phenyl]-3-(2,6-difluorobenzoyl)urea] and lambda-cyhalothrin [(R)-cyano(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl (1S,3S)-rel-3-[(1Z)-2-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoro-1-propenyl]-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate] in green beans and spring onions under Egyptian field conditions were studied. Field trials were carried out in 2008 in a Blue Nile farm, located at 70 kilometer (km) from Cairo (Egypt). The pesticides were sprayed at the recommended rate and samples were collected at pre-determined intervals. After treatment (T(0)) the pesticide residues in green beans were 7 times lower than in spring onions. This is due to a different structure of vegetable plant in the two crops. In spring onions, half-life (t(1/2)) of pyraclostrobin and lufenuron was 3.1 days and 9.8 days respectively. At day 14th (T(14)) after treatment boscalid residues were below the Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) (0.34 versus 0.5 mg/kg), pyraclostrobin and lambda -cyhalothrin residues were not detectable (ND), while lufenuron residues were above the MRL (0.06 versus 0.02 mg/kg). In green beans, at T(0), levels of boscalid, lufenuron and lambda -cyhalothrin were below the MRL (0.28 versus 2 mg/kg; ND versus 0.02 mg/kg; 0.06 versus 0.2 mg/kg, respectively) while, after 7 days treatment (T(7)) pyraclostrobin residues were above the MRL (0.03 versus 0.02 mg/kg). However, after 14 days the residue level could go below the MRL (0.02 mg/kg), as observed in spring onions.

  19. Antimicrobial resistance and mecA characterization of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and non-S. aureus of beef meat origin in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamelia Mahmoud Osman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA have been found in various farm animal species throughout the world. Yet, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA, methicillin-susceptible non-S. aureus (MS-NSA and methicillin-resistant non-S. aureus (MR-NSA were not investigated. Therefore, we persued to determine the diversity in theirphenotypic virulence assay, phenotypic antimicrobial resistance profile and molecular characterisation in one of the food chains in Egypt. Samples were collected during 2013 from beef meat at retail. Twenty seven isolates comprising five species (S. hyicus, S. aureus, S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, S. intermedius and S. lentus were characterized for their antibiotic resistance phenotypic profile and antibiotic resistance genes (mecA, cfr, gyrA, gyrB and grlA. Out of the 27 Staphylococcus isolates only one isolate was resistant to the 12 antibiotics representing nine classes. Raw beef meat sold across the Great Cairo zone, contains 66.7% of MRS, with highest prevalence was reported in S. aureus (66.7%, while the MRS non-S. aureus strains constituted 66.7% from which S. hyicus (60%, S. intermedius (33.3%, S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans (100% and S. lentus (100% were MRS. Seven S. aureus, six S. hyicus, four S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, three S. intermedius and one S. lentus isolates although being resistant to oxacillin yet, 11/27 (40.7% carried the mecA gene. At the same time, the cfr gene was present in 2 of the nine S. aureus isolates, and totally undetectable in S. hyicus, S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, S. intermedius and S. lentus. Although global researches largely focused into MRSA and MR-NSA in animals on pigs, the analysis of our results stipulates that buffaloes and cattle could be MRSA dispersers and that this theme is not specific to pigs. Detection of MSSA virulence determinants is a must, as although oxacillin resistance may be absent yet, the MSSA may carry the virulence determinants which could

  20. Antimicrobial Resistance, Biofilm Formation and mecA Characterization of Methicillin-Susceptible S. aureus and Non-S. aureus of Beef Meat Origin in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Kamelia M; Amer, Aziza M; Badr, Jihan M; Helmy, Nashwa M; Elhelw, Rehab A; Orabi, Ahmed; Bakry, Magdy; Saad, Aalaa S A

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been found in various farm animal species throughout the world. Yet, methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-susceptible non-S. aureus (MS-NSA), and methicillin-resistant non-S. aureus (MR-NSA) were not investigated. Therefore, we persued to determine the diversity in their phenotypic virulence assay, phenotypic antimicrobial resistance profile and molecular characterization in one of the food chains in Egypt. Samples were collected during 2013 from beef meat at retail. Twenty seven isolates comprising five species (S. hyicus, S. aureus, S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, S. intermedius, and S. lentus) were characterized for their antibiotic resistance phenotypic profile and antibiotic resistance genes (mecA, cfr, gyrA, gyrB, and grlA). Out of the 27 Staphylococcus isolates only one isolate was resistant to the 12 antibiotics representing nine classes. Raw beef meat sold across the Great Cairo zone, contains 66.7% of MRS, with highest prevalence was reported in S. aureus (66.7%), while the MRS non-S. aureus strains constituted 66.7% from which S. hyicus (60%), S. intermedius (33.3%), S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans (100%), and S. lentus (100%) were MRS. Seven S. aureus, six S. hyicus, four S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, three S. intermedius, and one S. lentus isolates although being resistant to oxacillin yet, 11/27 (40.7%) carried the mecA gene. At the same time, the cfr gene was present in 2 of the nine S. aureus isolates, and totally undetectable in S. hyicus, S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, S. intermedius, and S. lentus. Although, global researches largely focused into MRSA and MR-NSA in animals on pigs, the analysis of our results stipulates, that buffaloes and cattle could be MRSA dispersers and that this theme is not specific to pigs. Detection of MSSA virulence determinants is a must, as although oxacillin resistance may be absent yet, the MSSA may carry the virulence determinants which