WorldWideScience

Sample records for technologies program hydrogen

  1. Slush Hydrogen Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Edwin C.

    1994-01-01

    A slush hydrogen (SH2) technology facility (STF) was designed, fabricated, and assembled by a contractor team of McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (MDA), Martin Marietta Aerospace Group (MMAG), and Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI). The STF consists of a slush generator which uses the freeze-thaw production process, a vacuum subsystem, a test tank which simulates the NASP vehicle, a triple point hydrogen receiver tank, a transfer subsystem, a sample bottle, a pressurization system, and a complete instrumentation and control subsystem. The STF was fabricated, checked-out, and made ready for testing under this contract. The actual SH2 testing was performed under the NASP consortium following NASP teaming. Pre-STF testing verified SH2 production methods, validated special SH2 instrumentation, and performed limited SH2 pressurization and expulsion tests which demonstrated the need for gaseous helium pre-pressurized of SH2 to control pressure collapse. The STF represents cutting-edge technology development by an effective Government-Industry team under very tight cost and schedule constraints.

  2. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-03-01

    This plan details the goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks and schedule for EERE's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen Program. Similar detailed plans exist for the other DOE offices that make up the Hydrogen Program.

  3. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  4. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Michael A. [Southwest Research Institute; Page, Richard A. [Southwest Research Institute

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to

  5. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-08-01

    This report documents the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  6. DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

    2011-06-30

    technologies. The overall objective was to develop an integrated system to directly produce high pressure, high-purity hydrogen from a single unit, which can meet the DOE cost H2 cost target of $2 - $3/gge when mass produced. The project was divided into two phases with the following tasks and corresponding milestones, targets and decision points. Phase 1 - Task 1 - Verify feasibility of the concept, perform a detailed techno-economic analysis, and develop a test plan; and Task 2: Build and experimentally test a Proof of Concept (POC) integrated membrane reformer/metal hydride compressor system. Phase 2 - Task 3: Build an Advanced Prototype (AP) system with modifications based on POC learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

  7. Literature Review for the Baseline Knowledge Assessment of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truett, L.F.

    2003-12-10

    The purpose of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies (HFCIT) Program Baseline Knowledge Assessment is to measure the current level of awareness and understanding of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and the hydrogen economy. This information will be an asset to the HFCIT program in formulating an overall education plan. It will also provide a baseline for comparison with future knowledge and opinion surveys. To assess the current understanding and establish the baseline, the HFCIT program plans to conduct scientific surveys of four target audience groups--the general public, the educational community, governmental agencies, and potential large users. The purpose of the literature review is to examine the literature and summarize the results of surveys that have been conducted in the recent past concerning the existing knowledge and attitudes toward hydrogen. This literature review covers both scientific and, to a lesser extent, non-scientific polls. Seven primary data sources were reviewed, two of which were studies based in Europe. Studies involved both closed-end and open-end questions; surveys varied in length from three questions to multi-page interviews. Populations involved in the studies were primarily adults, although one study involved students. The number of participants ranged from 13 to over 16,000 per study. In addition to the primary surveys, additional related studies were mined for pertinent information. The primary conclusions of the surveys reviewed are that the public knows very little about hydrogen and fuel cell technologies but is generally accepting of the potential for hydrogen use. In general, respondents consider themselves as environmentally conscious. The public considers safety as the primary issue surrounding hydrogen as a fuel. Price, performance, and convenience are also considerations that will have major impacts on purchase decisions.

  8. Advanced research and technology program for advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  9. Advanced research and technology programs for advanced high-pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  10. Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-01

    This document outlines activities for educating key target audiences, as suggested by workshop participants. Held December 4-5, 2002, the Hydrogen Technology Education Workshop kicked off a new education effort coordinated by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  11. Background, current status, and prognosis of the ongoing slush hydrogen technology development program for the NASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, R. L.; Hardy, T. L.; Whalen, M. V.; Richter, G. P.; Tomsik, T. M.

    1990-01-01

    Among the Hydrogen Projects at the NASA Lewis Research Center (NASA LeRC), is the task of implementing and managing the Slush Hydrogen (SLH2) Technology Program for the United States' National AeroSpace Plane Joint Program Office (NASP JPO). The objectives of this NASA LeRC program are to provide verified numerical models of fluid production, storage, transfer, and feed systems and to provide verified design criteria for other engineered aspects of SLH2 systems germane to a NASP. The pursuit of these objectives is multidimensional, covers a range of problem areas, works these to different levels of depth, and takes advantage of the resources available in private industry, academia, and the U.S. Government. A summary of the NASA LeRC overall SLH2 program plan, is presented along with its implementation, the present level of effort in each of the program areas, some of the results already in hand, and the prognosis for the effort in the immediate future.

  12. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  13. 2010 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2011-02-01

    This report summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments in FY2009 for the DOE Hydrogen Program, including the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program and hydrogen-related work in the Offices of Science; Fossil Energy; and Nuclear Energy, Science, and Technology. It includes reports on all of the research projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program between October 2009 and September 2010.

  14. Hydrogen technologies and the technology learning curve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, H.-H.

    1998-01-01

    On their bumpy road to commercialization, hydrogen production, delivery and conversion technologies not only require dedicated research, development and demonstration efforts, but also protected niche markets and early adopters. While niche markets utilize the unique technological properties of hydrogen, adopters exhibit a willingness to pay a premium for hydrogen fueled energy services. The concept of the technology learning curve is applied to estimate the capital requirements associated with the commercialization process of several hydrogen technologies. (author)

  15. Register of hydrogen technology experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtke, P. R.

    1975-01-01

    This register presents the names of approximately 235 individuals who are considered experts, or very knowledgeable, in various fields of technology related to hydrogen. Approximately 90 organizations are represented. Each person is listed by organizational affiliation, address, and principal area of expertise. The criteria for selection of names for the register are extensive experience in a given field of work, participation in or supervision of relevant research programs, contributions to the literature, or being recognized as an expert in a particular field. The purpose of the register is to present, in easy form, sources of dependable information regarding highly technical areas of hydrogen technology, with particular emphasis on safety. The register includes two indexes: an alphabetical listing of the experts and an alphabetical listing of the organizations with which they are affiliated.

  16. Hydrogen aircraft technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive evaluation is conducted of the technology development status, economics, commercial feasibility, and infrastructural requirements of LH2-fueled aircraft, with additional consideration of hydrogen production, liquefaction, and cryostorage methods. Attention is given to the effects of LH2 fuel cryotank accommodation on the configurations of prospective commercial transports and military airlifters, SSTs, and HSTs, as well as to the use of the plentiful heatsink capacity of LH2 for innovative propulsion cycles' performance maximization. State-of-the-art materials and structural design principles for integral cryotank implementation are noted, as are airport requirements and safety and environmental considerations.

  17. A Summary of the Slush Hydrogen Technology Program for the National Aero-Space Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcnelis, Nancy B.; Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.; Kudlac, Maureen T.; Moran, Matthew E.; Tomsik, Thomas M.; Haberbusch, Mark S.

    1995-01-01

    Slush hydrogen, a mixture of solid and liquid hydrogen, offers advantages of higher density (16 percent) and higher heat capacity (18 percent) than normal boiling point hydrogen. The combination of increased density and heat capacity of slush hydrogen provided a potential to decrease the gross takeoff weight of the National Aero-Space Plane (NASP) and therefore slush hydrogen was selected as the propellant. However, no large-scale data was available on the production, transfer and tank pressure control characteristics required to use slush hydrogen as a fuel. Extensive testing has been performed at the NASA Lewis Research Center K-Site and Small Scale Hydrogen Test Facility between 1990 and the present to provide a database for the use of slush hydrogen. This paper summarizes the results of this testing.

  18. Progress of Nuclear Hydrogen Program in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jae

    2009-01-01

    To cope with dwindling fossil fuels and climate change, it is clear that a clean alternative energy that can replace fossil fuels is required. Hydrogen is considered a promising future energy solution because it is clean, abundant and storable and has a high energy density. As other advanced countries, the Korean government had established a long-term vision for transition to the hydrogen economy in 2005. One of the major challenges in establishing a hydrogen economy is how to produce massive quantities of hydrogen in a clean, safe and economical way. Among various hydrogen production methods, the massive, safe and economic production of hydrogen by water splitting using a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) can provide a success path to the hydrogen economy. Particularly in Korea, where usable land is limited, the nuclear production of hydrogen is deemed a practical solution due to its high energy density. To meet the expected demand for hydrogen, the Korea Atomic Energy Institute (KAERI) launched a nuclear hydrogen program in 2004 together with Korea Institute of Energy Research (KIER) and Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST). Then, the nuclear hydrogen key technologies development program was launched in 2006, which aims at the development and validation of key and challenging technologies required for the realization of the nuclear hydrogen production demonstration system. In 2008, Korean Atomic Energy Commission officially approved a long-term development plan of the nuclear hydrogen system technologies as in the figure below and now the nuclear hydrogen program became the national agenda. This presentation introduces the current status of nuclear hydrogen projects in Korea and the progress of the nuclear hydrogen key technologies development. Perspectives of nuclear process heat applications are also addressed

  19. HTTR workshop (workshop on hydrogen production technology)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiina, Yasuaki; Takizuka, Takakazu

    2004-12-01

    Various research and development efforts have been performed to solve the global energy and environmental problems caused by large consumption of fossil fuels. Research activities on advanced hydrogen production technology by the use of nuclear heat from high temperature gas cooled reactors, for example, have been flourished in universities, research institutes and companies in many countries. The Department of HTTR Project and the Department of Advanced Nuclear Heat Technology of JAERI held the HTTR Workshop (Workshop on Hydrogen Production Technology) on July 5 and 6, 2004 to grasp the present status of R and D about the technology of HTGR and the nuclear hydrogen production in the world and to discuss about necessity of the nuclear hydrogen production and technical problems for the future development of the technology. More than 110 participants attended the Workshop including foreign participants from USA, France, Korea, Germany, Canada and United Kingdom. In the Workshop, the presentations were made on such topics as R and D programs for nuclear energy and hydrogen production technologies by thermo-chemical or other processes. Also, the possibility of the nuclear hydrogen production in the future society was discussed. The workshop showed that the R and D for the hydrogen production by the thermo-chemical process has been performed in many countries. The workshop affirmed that nuclear hydrogen production could be one of the competitive supplier of hydrogen in the future. The second HTTR Workshop will be held in the autumn next year. (author)

  20. Hydrogen arcjet technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankovic, John M.; Hamley, John A.; Haag, Thomas W.; Sarmiento, Charles J.; Curran, Francis M.

    1991-01-01

    During the 1960's, a substantial research effort was centered on the development of arcjets for space propulsion applications. The majority of the work was at the 30 kW power level with some work at 1-2 kW. At the end of the research effort, the hydrogen arcjet had demonstrated over 700 hours of life in a continuous endurance test at 30 kW, at a specific impulse over 1000 s, and at an efficiency of 0.41. Another high power design demonstrated 500 h life with an efficiency of over 0.50 at the same specific impulse and power levels. At lower power levels, a life of 150 hours was demonstrated at 2 kW with an efficiency of 0.31 and a specific impulse of 935 s. Lack of a space power source hindered arcjet acceptance and research ceased. Over three decades after the first research began, renewed interest exists for hydrogen arcjets. The new approach includes concurrent development of the power processing technology with the arcjet thruster. Performance data were recently obtained over a power range of 0.3-30 kW. The 2 kW performance has been repeated; however, the present high power performance is lower than that obtained in the 1960's at 30 kW, and lifetimes of present thrusters have not yet been demonstrated. Laboratory power processing units have been developed and operated with hydrogen arcjets for the 0.1 kW to 5 kW power range. A 10 kW power processing unit is under development and has been operated at design power into a resistive load.

  1. SHARED TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIFFIN, JOHN M. HAUT, RICHARD C.

    2008-03-07

    The program established a collaborative process with domestic industries for the purpose of sharing Navy-developed technology. Private sector businesses were educated so as to increase their awareness of the vast amount of technologies that are available, with an initial focus on technology applications that are related to the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies (Hydrogen) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. Specifically, the project worked to increase industry awareness of the vast technology resources available to them that have been developed with taxpayer funding. NAVSEA-Carderock and the Houston Advanced Research Center teamed with Nicholls State University to catalog NAVSEA-Carderock unclassified technologies, rated the level of readiness of the technologies and established a web based catalog of the technologies. In particular, the catalog contains technology descriptions, including testing summaries and overviews of related presentations.

  2. 2010 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-02-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  3. Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    The paper discusses the objectives of a hydrogen energy systems technology study directed toward determining future demand for hydrogen based on current trends and anticipated new uses and identifying the critical research and technology advancements required to meet this need with allowance for raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects. Attention is focused on historic production and use of hydrogen, scenarios used as a basis for projections, projections of energy sources and uses, supply options, and technology requirements and needs. The study found more than a billion dollar annual usage of hydrogen, dominated by chemical-industry needs, supplied mostly from natural gas and petroleum feedstocks. Evaluation of the progress in developing nuclear fusion and solar energy sources relative to hydrogen production will be necessary to direct the pace and character of research and technology work in the advanced water-splitting areas.

  4. New hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents an overview of the overall hydrogen system. There are separate sections for production, distribution, transport, storage; and applications of hydrogen. The most important methods for hydrogen production are steam reformation of natural gas and electrolysis of water. Of the renewable energy options, production of hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity from wind turbines or by gasification of biomass were found to be the most economic for Finland. Direct use of this electricity or the production of liquid fuels from biomass will be competing alternatives. When hydrogen is produced in the solar belt or where there is cheap hydropower it must be transported over long distances. The overall energy consumed for the transport is from 25 to 40 % of the initial available energy. Hydrogen storage can be divided into stationary and mobile types. The most economic, stationary, large scale hydrogen storage for both long and short periods is underground storage. When suitable sites are not available, then pressure vessels are the best for short period and liquid H 2 for long period. Vehicle storage of hydrogen is by either metal hydrides or liquid H 2 . Hydrogen is a very versatile energy carrier. It can be used to produce heat directly in catalytic burners without flame, to produce electricity in fuel cells with high efficiency for use in vehicles or for peak power shaving, as a fuel component with conventional fuels to reduce emissions, as a way to store energy and as a chemical reagent in reactions

  5. Project plan hydrogen energy systems technology. Phase 1: Hydrogen energy systems technology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    An overview of the potential need for hydrogen as a source of energy in the future was presented in order to identify and define the technology requirements for the most promising approaches to meet that need. The following study objectives were discussed: (1) determination of the future demand for hydrogen, based on current trends and anticipated new uses, (2) identification of the critical research and technology advances required to meet this need considering, to the extent possible, raw material limitations, economics, and environmental effects, and (3) definition and recommendation of the scope and space of a National Hydrogen Energy Systems Technology Program and outline of a Program Development Plan.

  6. 2016 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-03-09

    The 2016 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2016 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; market transformation; and Small Business Innovation Research projects.

  7. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2015-12-23

    The 2015 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2015 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production; hydrogen delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; systems analysis; and market transformation.

  8. Appendix B: Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies Program inputs for FY 2008 benefits estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    Document summarizes the results of the benefits analysis of EERE’s programs, as described in the FY 2008 Budget Request. EERE estimates benefits for its overall portfolio and nine Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD3) programs.

  9. WE-NET: Japanese hydrogen program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsugi, Chiba; Harumi, Arai; Kenzo, Fukuda

    1998-01-01

    The Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), in the Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI), started the New Sunshine Program in 1993 by unifying the Sunshine Program (R and D on new energy technology), the Moonlight Program (R and D on energy conservation technology), and the Research and Development Program for Environmental Technology. The objective of the new program is to develop innovative technologies to allow sustainable growth while solving energy and environmental issues. One of the new projects in this program is the ''International Clean Energy System Technology Utilizing Hydrogen (World Energy Network)'': WE-NET. The goal of WE-NET is to construct a worldwide energy network for effective supply, transportation and utilization of renewable energy using hydrogen. The WE-NET program extends over 28 years from 1993 to 2020. In Phase 1, we started core research in areas such as development of high efficiency technologies including hydrogen production using polymer electrolyte membrane water electrolysis, hydrogen combustion turbines, etc. (author)

  10. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan (September 2011)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    The Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Plan outlines the strategy, activities, and plans of the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, which includes hydrogen and fuel cell activities within the EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program and the DOE offices of Nuclear Energy, Fossil Energy, and Science.

  11. Clean air program : use of hydrogen to power the advanced technology transit bus (ATTB) : an assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-11-01

    The Advanced Technology Transit Bus (ATTB), developed under primary funding from : the U.S. DOT/Federal Transit Administration (FTA), currently uses a power plant : based on a natural gas burning IC engine-generator set. FTA is interested in : demons...

  12. Oxygen/hydrogen component technology status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, D. L.; Lauffer, J. R.; Smith, G. R.; Zachary, A. T.

    1972-01-01

    The advanced technology applicable to oxygen/hydrogen systems for auxiliary propulsion systems and other high energy upper stage applications is being developed. Turbopump, propellant conditioner (gas generator and heat exchanger), thruster, igniter, valve, and flow controller components are being evaluated. A brief description of turbopump, conditioner, valve, and thruster experimental programs is presented. Design and hot-firing test data are discussed.

  13. Hydrogen energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morovic, T.; Pilhar, R.; Witt, B.

    1988-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of different energy systems from the economic point of view has to be based on data showing all relevant costs incurred and benefits drawn by the society from the use of such energy systems, i.e. internal costs and benefits visible to the energy consumer as prices paid for power supplied, as well as external costs and benefits. External costs or benefits of energy systems cover among other items employment or wage standard effects, energy-induced environmental impacts, public expenditure for pollution abatement and mitigation of risks and effects of accidents, and the user costs connected with the exploitation of reserves, which are not rated high enough to really reflect and demonstrate the factor of depletion of non-renewable energy sources, as e.g. fossil reserves. Damage to the natural and social environment induced by anthropogenous air pollutants up to about 90% counts among external costs of energy conversion and utilisation. Such damage is considered to be the main factor of external energy costs, while the external benefits of energy systems currently are rated to be relatively unsignificant. This means that an internalisation of external costs would drive up current prices of non-renewable energy sources, which in turn would boost up the economics of renewable energy sources, and the hydrogen produced with their energy. Other advantages attributed to most of the renewable energy sources and to hydrogen energy systems are better environmental compatibility, and no user costs. (orig.) [de

  14. 2009 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen Program, November 2009 (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-11-01

    This report summarizes the hydrogen and fuel cell R&D activities and accomplishments of the DOE Hydrogen Program for FY2009. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; and systems analysis.

  15. 2013 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2013 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  16. 2014 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2014 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  17. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyapal, Sunita [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Annual Progress Report summarizes fiscal year 2011 activities and accomplishments by projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  18. FY 2005 Annual Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-10-01

    In cooperation with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies, the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program is advancing the state of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in support of the President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative. The initiative seeks to develop hydrogen, fuel cell, and infrastructure technologies needed to make it practical and cost-effective for Americans to choose to use fuel cell vehicles by 2020. Significant progress was made in fiscal year 2005 toward that goal.

  19. Advances in nickel—hydrogen technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, J. G.; Hall, A. M.

    This paper outlines the current major activities in nickel—hydrogen technology at Yardney, which consist of: an update on life cycle testing of ManTech 50 Ah NiH 2 cells in the LEO regime; an overview of the Air Force/Industry briefing on the Yardney ManTech program; nickel electrode process upgrading; 4.5 in. cell development; bipolar NiH 2 battery development.

  20. Hydrogen tomorrow: Demands and technology requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    National needs for hydrogen are projected and the technologies of production, handling, and utilization are evaluated. Research and technology activities required to meet the projected needs are determined.

  1. Hydrogen fuel cell engines and related technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-12-01

    The manual documents the first training course developed on the use of hydrogen fuel cells in transportation. The manual contains eleven modules covering hydrogen properties, use and safety; fuel cell technology and its systems, fuel cell engine desi...

  2. Importance of international standards on hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bose, T.K.; Gingras, S.

    2001-01-01

    This presentation provided some basic information regarding standards and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). It also explained the importance of standardization activities, particularly ISO/TC 197 which applies to hydrogen technologies. Standards are established by consensus. They define the minimum requirements that will ensure that products and services are reliable and effective. Standards contribute to the elimination of technical barriers to trade (TBT). The harmonization of standards around the world is desirable in a free trade environment. The influence of the TBT on international standardization was discussed with particular reference to the objectives of ISO/TC 197 hydrogen technologies. One of the priorities for ISO/TC 197 is a hydrogen fuel infrastructure which includes refuelling stations, fuelling connectors, and storage technologies for gaseous and liquid hydrogen. Other priorities include an agreement between the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the ISO, in particular the IEC/TC 105 and ISO/TC 197 for the development of fuel cell standards. The international standards that have been published thus far include ISO 13984:1999 for liquid hydrogen, land vehicle fuelling system interface, and ISO 14687:1999 for hydrogen fuel product specification. Standards are currently under development for: liquid hydrogen; airport hydrogen fuelling facilities; gaseous hydrogen blends; basic considerations for the safety of hydrogen systems; gaseous hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and gaseous hydrogen for land vehicle filling connectors. It was concluded that the widespread use of hydrogen is dependent on international standardization

  3. Survey of the Economics of Hydrogen Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padro, C. E. G.; Putsche, V.

    1999-09-14

    A survey of the economics of hydrogen production, storage, transport, and end-use technologies has been completed. More than 100 publications concerning the economics of current and near-term hydrogen technologies were surveyed. Technologies more than 20 years from commercialization were not considered.

  4. Characterizations of Hydrogen Energy Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energetics Inc

    2003-04-01

    In 1996, Dr. Ed Skolnik of Energetics, Incorporated, began a series of visits to the locations of various projects that were part of the DOE Hydrogen Program. The site visits/evaluations were initiated to help the DOE Program Management, which had limited time and limited travel budgets, to get a detailed snapshot of each project. The evaluations were soon found to have other uses as well: they provided reviewers on the annual Hydrogen Program Peer Review Team with an in-depth look at a project--something that is lacking in a short presentation--and also provided a means for hydrogen stakeholders to learn about the R&D that the Hydrogen Program is sponsoring. The visits were conducted under several different contract mechanisms, at project locations specified by DOE Headquarters Program Management, Golden Field Office Contract Managers, or Energetics, Inc., or through discussion by some or all of the above. The methodology for these site-visit-evaluations changed slightly over the years, but was fundamentally as follows: Contact the Principal Investigator (PI) and arrange a time for the visit; Conduct a literature review. This would include a review of the last two or three years of Annual Operating Plan submittals, monthly reports, the paper submitted with the last two or three Annual Peer Review, published reviewers' consensus comments from the past few years, publications in journals, and journal publications on the same or similar topics by other researchers; Send the PI a list of questions/topics about a week ahead of time, which we would discuss during the visit. The types of questions vary depending on the project, but include some detailed technical questions that delve into some fundamental scientific and engineering issues, and also include some economic and goal-oriented topics; Conduct the site-visit itself including--Presentations by the PI and/or his staff. This would be formal in some cases, informal in others, and merely a &apos

  5. Oxygen/hydrogen technology test bed status update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, J. S.

    1988-01-01

    An overview is provided of the Hydrogen/Oxygen Technology Test Bed program. The status of the program, the program direction, plans for testing, and plans for technology implementation within the program are delineated. Test Bed goals and objectives are defined and the current status of the Test Bed engine is provided. A test facility status and a summary of the test facility capabilities are given.

  6. Hydrogen energy for tomorrow: Advanced hydrogen production technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The future vision for hydrogen is that it will be cost-effectively produced from renewable energy sources and made available for widespread use as an energy carrier and a fuel. Hydrogen can be produced from water and when burned as a fuel, or converted to electricity, joins with oxygen to again form water. It is a clean, sustainable resource with many potential applications, including generating electricity, heating homes and offices, and fueling surface and air transportation. To achieve this vision, researchers must develop advanced technologies to produce hydrogen at costs competitive with fossil fuels, using sustainable sources. Hydrogen is now produced primarily by steam reforming of natural gas. For applications requiring extremely pure hydrogen, production is done by electrolysis. This is a relatively expensive process that uses electric current to dissociate, or split, water into its hydrogen and oxygen components. Technologies with the best potential for producing hydrogen to meet future demand fall into three general process categories: photobiological, photoelectrochemical, and thermochemical. Photobiological and photoelectrochemical processes generally use sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. Thermochemical processes, including gasification and pyrolysis systems, use heat to produce hydrogen from sources such as biomass and solid waste.

  7. 2016 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyapal, Sunita [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-02-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  8. 2012 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  9. 2015 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-12-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  10. Hydrogen storage technology materials and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Klebanoff, Lennie

    2012-01-01

    Zero-carbon, hydrogen-based power technology offers the most promising long-term solution for a secure and sustainable energy infrastructure. With contributions from the world's leading technical experts in the field, Hydrogen Storage Technology: Materials and Applications presents a broad yet unified account of the various materials science, physics, and engineering aspects involved in storing hydrogen gas so that it can be used to provide power. The book helps you understand advanced hydrogen storage materials and how to build systems around them. Accessible to nonscientists, the first chapt

  11. Development of hydrogen storage technologies

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Langmi, Henrietta W

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available -how” The hydrogen storage challenge Hydrogen: • Lightest element, lowest density • Strong covalent bond • Low polarisation ability → Weak interaction between H2 molecules • At room temp and atm pressure: 5 kg H2 occupies vessel of ≈ 5 m diameter (5 kg... and manufacturing methods to improve the characteristics of hydrogen storage tanks • Composite = Carbon fibre + resin + fillers • Resin modification (improve mechanical properties) • Finite element modelling (design capabilities) http...

  12. Status of nickel-hydrogen cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, D. R.

    1980-01-01

    Nickel hydrogen cell technology has been developed which solves the problems of thermal management, oxygen management, electrolyte management, and electrical and mechanical design peculiar to this new type of battery. This technology was weight optimized for low orbit operation using computer modeling programs but is near optimum for other orbits. Cells ranging in capacity up to about 70 ampere-hours can be made from components of a single standard size and are available from two manufacturers. The knowledge gained is now being applied to the development of two extensions to the basic design: a second set of larger standard components that will cover the capacity range up to 150 ampere-hours; and the development of multicell common pressure vessel modules to reduce volume, cost and weight. A manufacturing technology program is planned to optimize the producibility of the cell design and reduce cost. The most important areas for further improvement are life and reliability which are governed by electrode and separator technology.

  13. Hydrogen Programs of Asian Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken-ichiro Ota

    2006-01-01

    The global sustainability is a key word of the future energy system for human beings. It should be friendly to the earth and also to human beings. Considering the limit of resources, the materials recycling would be very important. Considering the second law of thermodynamics, the entropy production through any processes would be the final problems for the sustainable growth. We have to think how to dispose the increasing entropy outside earth in the clean energy system. At present, the global carbon cycle is changing by the emission of CO 2 with the large consumption of fossil fuels. The global environment including human society should stand on harmonizing with the earth, where the global recycles of materials are important. Thinking about the global recycles of carbon and water quantitatively, the existence of water is 27,000 times larger than that of carbon. The transportation of water is 3,160 times faster than that of carbon. These figures show that the hydrogen from water is a superior energy carrier, compared to the carbon. The environmental impact factor was defined as the ratio of annual quantity of materials produced by energy consumption of mankind to a natural movement on earth. The influence of human activities on the global environment can be evaluated quantitatively by this environmental impact factor. The environmental impact factor of water on the earth, 0.0001, is more than two orders of magnitude less than that of carbon, 0.036. This means the hydrogen/water cycle is superior to the carbon cycle as material circulation for energy system of mankind. The energy consumption will increase tremendously in Asian countries due to their population increase and economic growth. We need a clean energy system for the sustainable growth. The hydrogen energy system is the most suitable energy system. In this paper the recent hydrogen energy programs of Japan, China and Korea will be introduced. (author)

  14. Hydrogen Programs of Asian Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ken-ichiro OTA

    2006-01-01

    The global sustainability is a key word of the future energy system for human beings. It should be friendly to the earth and also to human beings. Considering the limit of resources, the materials recycling would be very important. Considering the second law of thermodynamics, the entropy production through any processes would be the final problems for the sustainable growth. We have to think how to dispose the increasing entropy outside earth in the clean energy system. At present, the global carbon cycle is changing by the emission of CO 2 with the large consumption of fossil fuels. The global environment including human society should stand on harmonizing with the earth, where the global recycles of materials are important. Thinking about the global recycles of carbon and water quantitatively, the existence of water is 27,000 times larger than that of carbon. The transportation of water is 3,160 times faster than that of carbon. These figures show that the hydrogen from water is a superior energy carrier, compared to the carbon. The environmental impact factor was defined as the ratio of annual quantity of materials produced by energy consumption of mankind to a natural movement on earth. The influence of human activities on the global environment can be evaluated quantitatively by this environmental impact factor. The environmental impact factor of water on the earth, 0.0001, is more than two orders of magnitude less than that of carbon, 0.036. This means the hydrogen/water cycle is superior to the carbon cycle as material circulation for energy system of mankind. The energy consumption will increase tremendously in Asian countries due to their population increase and economic growth. We need a clean energy system for the sustainable growth. The hydrogen energy system is the most suitable energy system. In this paper the recent hydrogen energy programs of Japan, China and Korea will be introduced. (authors)

  15. Hydrogen technology survey: Thermophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccarty, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    The thermodynamic functions, transport properties, and physical properties of both liquid and gaseous hydrogen are presented. The low temperature regime is emphasized. The tabulation of the properties of normal hydrogen in both Si and engineering units is given along with the tabulation of parahydrogen.

  16. Financing hydrogen technologies in a turbulent market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    This PowerPoint presentation included several viewgraphs which explained the volatility of power technology stocks and described the investment climate for hydrogen technologies. The three drivers of the energy technology market are: (1) a basic shift in energy markets to gaseous fuels with hydrogen being the long term winner, (2) power quality and reliability requirements of the new economy, and (3) mass-produced energy appliances that are restructuring the electric utility industry. The excitement surrounding energy technologies stems from the fact that technology efforts that have been underway for decades are coming to market fruition with products such as fuel cells, micro-turbines, photovoltaics, sterling engines, and hydrogen systems. New micro-generation technologies offer high performance reliability and modularity, low cost, minimal environmental impacts, and customer control. At the same time, the new economy is making demands on the aging utility infrastructure. The Arete Corporation has invested into the following hydrogen technologies for micro-generation: Ballard Power Systems Inc., Proton Energy Systems Inc., Hydrogenics Corp., H2 Gen Innovations Inc., Hydrogen Technologies, PEM Fuel Cells, PEM Electrolyzers, PEM Test Stations, and Steam Methane Reformers. 1 tab., 6 figs

  17. The Hydrogen Economy as a Technological Bluff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderburg, Willem H.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen economy is a technological bluff in its implied assurance that, despite the accelerating pace at which we are depleting the remaining half of our fossil fuels, our energy future is secure. Elementary thermodynamic considerations are developed to show that a hydrogen economy is about as feasible as a perpetual motion machine. Hydrogen…

  18. Vehicle Technologies Program Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-09-05

    Overview of the Vehicle Technologies Program including external assessment and market view; internal assessment, program history and progress; program justification and federal role; program vision, mission, approach, strategic goals, outputs, and outcomes; and performance goals.

  19. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  20. The hydrogen technology assessment, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Addison

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this phase 1 report is to begin to form the information base of the economics and energy uses of hydrogen-related technologies on which the members of the National Hydrogen Association (NHA) can build a hydrogen vision of the future. The secondary goal of this report is the development of NHA positions on national research, development, and demonstration opportunities. The third goal, with the aid of the established hydrogen vision and NHA positions, is to evaluate ongoing federal research goals and activities. The evaluations will be performed in a manner that compares the costs associated with using systems that achieve those goals against the cost of performing those tasks today with fossil fuels. From this ongoing activity should emerge an NHA information base, one or more hydrogen visions of the future, and cost and performance targets for hydrogen applications to complete in the market place.

  1. The US Department of Energy hydrogen baseline survey: assessing knowledge and opinions about hydrogen technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christy Cooper; Tykey Truett; R L Schmoyer

    2006-01-01

    To design and maintain its education program, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program conducted a statistically-valid national survey to measure knowledge and opinions of hydrogen among key target audiences. The Hydrogen Baseline Knowledge Survey provides a reference for designing the DOE hydrogen education strategy and will be used in comparisons with future surveys to measure changes in knowledge and opinions over time. The survey sampled four U.S. populations: (1) public; (2) students; (3) state and local government officials; and (4) potential large-scale hydrogen end-users in three business categories. Questions measured technical understanding of hydrogen and opinions about hydrogen safety. Other questions assessed visions of the likelihood of future hydrogen applications and sources of energy information. Several important findings were discovered, including a striking lack of technical understanding across all survey groups, as well as a strong correlation between technical knowledge and opinions about safety: those who demonstrated an understanding of hydrogen technologies expressed the least fear of its safe use. (authors)

  2. Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Future Energy Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuster, Patrick; Alekseev, Alexander; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-06-07

    Future energy systems will be determined by the increasing relevance of solar and wind energy. Crude oil and gas prices are expected to increase in the long run, and penalties for CO 2 emissions will become a relevant economic factor. Solar- and wind-powered electricity will become significantly cheaper, such that hydrogen produced from electrolysis will be competitively priced against hydrogen manufactured from natural gas. However, to handle the unsteadiness of system input from fluctuating energy sources, energy storage technologies that cover the full scale of power (in megawatts) and energy storage amounts (in megawatt hours) are required. Hydrogen, in particular, is a promising secondary energy vector for storing, transporting, and distributing large and very large amounts of energy at the gigawatt-hour and terawatt-hour scales. However, we also discuss energy storage at the 120-200-kWh scale, for example, for onboard hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles using compressed hydrogen storage. This article focuses on the characteristics and development potential of hydrogen storage technologies in light of such a changing energy system and its related challenges. Technological factors that influence the dynamics, flexibility, and operating costs of unsteady operation are therefore highlighted in particular. Moreover, the potential for using renewable hydrogen in the mobility sector, industrial production, and the heat market is discussed, as this potential may determine to a significant extent the future economic value of hydrogen storage technology as it applies to other industries. This evaluation elucidates known and well-established options for hydrogen storage and may guide the development and direction of newer, less developed technologies.

  3. Proceedings of the 1993 DOE/NREL Hydrogen Program Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The US Department of Energy has conducted programs of research and development in hydrogen and related technologies since 1975. The current program is conducted in accordance with the DOE Hydrogen Program Plan FY 1993--FY 1997 which was published in June 1992. The plan establishes program priorities and guidance for the allocation of funding. The core program. currently under the Office of Energy Management, supports projects in the areas of hydrogen production, storage and systems research. A program review is held annually to evaluate each research project for technical quality, progress and programmatic benefit. The evaluation is conducted by a panel of technical experts. This proceedings of the Program Review conducted in May 1993 is a compilation of all research projects supported by the Hydrogen Program during FY 1993. It is produced in the anticipation that will serve as a useful technical reference for those interested in the status of hydrogen technologies. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  4. US blanket technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental research in US programs related to blanket technology is described through brief summaries of the objectives, facilities, recent experimental results and principal investigators for the Blanket Technology Program, TRIO-1 Experiment, TSTA, Fusion Hybrid Program and selected activities in the Fusion Materials and Fusion Safety Programs in neutronics research

  5. Hydrogen Energy Coordinating Committee annual report: Summary of DOE hydrogen programs for FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The FY 1988 Summary is the eleventh consecutive yearly report providing an overview of the hydrogen-related programs of the DOE offices represented on the HECC. A historical summary of the hydrogen budgets of these offices is given. The distribution by mission-related program element for FY 1988, and the non-mission-related activities are given. Total DOE funding in FY 1988 for mission-related hydrogen research was $5.2 million; DOE non-mission-related hydrogen research funding totaled $30.0 million. The individual program elements are described in the body of this report, and more specific program information is given in the Technology Summary Forms in Appendix A. 2 tabs

  6. Technology Commercialization Program 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-11-01

    This reference compilation describes the Technology Commercialization Program of the Department of Energy, Defense Programs. The compilation consists of two sections. Section 1, Plans and Procedures, describes the plans and procedures of the Defense Programs Technology Commercialization Program. The second section, Legislation and Policy, identifies legislation and policy related to the Program. The procedures for implementing statutory and regulatory requirements are evolving with time. This document will be periodically updated to reflect changes and new material.

  7. Student Technology Assistant Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eck, Rick; Marvin, Eric; Burr-McNeal, Blake; Jones, Marshall; Lowther, Deborah

    Schools face significant challenges in implementing computing technology within their curriculum. When technology support falters, the integrity of a school district's entire technology program is at risk. Teachers who have invested time to develop lesson plans using technology, especially those who are still newcomers, are less likely to continue…

  8. 2008 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2008-06-13

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2008 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 9-13, 2008, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; systems analysis; and manufacturing.

  9. 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 13-17, 2013, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  10. 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 16-20, 2014, in Washington, DC. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  11. 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2015-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  12. 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-12-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, held on June 7-11, 2010, in Washington, DC. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; and systems analysis.

  13. 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 14-18, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  14. 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satyapal, S. [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2009-10-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 18-22, 2009, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; education; safety, codes, and standards; technology validation; systems analysis; and manufacturing R&D.

  15. 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 9-13, 2011, in Arlington, Virginia. It covers the program areas of hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; manufacturing R&D; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; education; market transformation; and systems analysis.

  16. Proceedings of the 2000 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NREL

    2000-11-01

    The 2000 US Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program Review was sponsored by the Office of Power Delivery Systems, Office of Power Technologies, US Department of Energy. The proceedings from this meeting serve as an important technology reference for the DOE Hydrogen Program. This document contains technical progress reports on research and technology validation projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program in Fiscal Year 2000. The growth of fuel cell technology will provide a basis for the establishment of the hydrogen option into both transportation and electricity supply markets.

  17. Exploring Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brus, David; Hotek, Doug

    2010-01-01

    One of the most significant technological issues of the 21st Century is finding a way to fulfill the energy demands without destroying the environment through global warming and climate change. Worldwide human population is on the rise, and with it, the demand for more energy in pursuit of a higher quality of life. In the meantime, as people use…

  18. Technical Integration of Nuclear Hydrogen Production Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ki Young; Park, J. K.; Chang, J. H.

    2009-04-01

    These works focus on the development of attainment indices for nuclear hydrogen key technologies, the analysis of the hydrogen production process and the performance estimation for hydrogen production systems, and the assessment of the nuclear hydrogen production cost. For assessing the degree of attainments in comparison with the final goals of VHTR technologies in progress of researches, subdivided are the prerequisite items confirmed to the NHDD concepts. We developed and applied R and D quality management methodology to meet 'Development of Key Technologies for Nuclear Hydrogen' project. And we also distributed R and D QAM and R and D QAP to each teams and are in operation. The preconceptual flow diagrams of SI, HTSE, and HyS processes are introduced and their material and energy balances have been proposed. The hydrogen production thermal efficiencies of not only the SI process as a reference process but also the HTSE and HyS processes were also estimated. Technical feasibility assessments of SI, HTSE, and HyS processes have been carried out by using the pair-wise comparison and analytic hierarchy process, and it is revealed that the experts are considering the SI process as the most feasible process. The secondary helium pathway across the SI process is introduced. Dynamic simulation codes for the H2S04vaporizer, sulfuric acid and sulfur trioxide decomposers, and HI decomposer on the secondary helium pathway and for the primary and secondary sulfuric acid distillation columns, HIx solution distillation column, and preheater for HI vapor have been developed and integrated

  19. 2012 DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2012-10-26

    The 2012 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting was held May 14-18, 2012 in Crystal City, Virginia. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Hydrogen Program and the Vehicle Technologies Program: a total of 309 individual activities were reviewed for Vehicle Technologies, by a total of 189 reviewers. A total of 1,473 individual review responses were received for the technical reviews.

  20. New energy technologies. Research program proposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-02-01

    This document presents the most promising program propositions of research and development and the public financing needed for their realization. The concerned technologies are: the hydrogen and the fuel cell PAN-H, the separation and the storage of the CO 2 , the photovoltaic solar electricity, the PREBAT program of the building energy recovery and the bio-energies. (A.L.B.)

  1. Hydrogen-oxygen Space Shuttle ACPS thruster technology review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, J. W.; Herr, P. N.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive program has provided the technology groundwork for the use of hydrogen-oxygen propellants in the Space Shuttle Attitude Control Propulsion System (ACPS) thrustors. This work has concentrated on generation of technology for injectors, cooled thrust chambers, valves, and ignition systems. The thrustors are designed to meet a unique and stringent set of requirements, including: long life for 100 mission reuses, high performance, light weight, ability to provide long duration firings as well as small impulse bits, ability to operate over wide ranges of propellant inlet conditions and to withstand reentry heating. The program has included evaluation of thrustors designed for ambient temperature and cold gaseous propellants at the vehicle interface.

  2. NASA's Technology Utilization Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, C. F.

    1972-01-01

    NASA's Technology Utilization Program is described, illustrating how it can be useful in achieving improved productivity, providing more jobs, solving public sector challenges, and strengthening the international competitive situation. Underlying the program is the fact that research and development conducted in NASA's aeronautics and space programs have generated much technical information concerning processes, products, or techniques which may be useful to engineers, doctors, or to others. The program is based on acquisition and publication, working with the user, and applications engineering.

  3. Proceedings of the 1999 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NREL

    2000-08-28

    The Proceedings of the 1999 US Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program Review serve as an important technology reference for the DOE Hydrogen Program. This document contains technical progress reports on 60 research and technology validation projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program in Fiscal Year 1999, in support of its mission to make hydrogen a cost-effective energy carrier for utility, building, and transportation applications. Each year, the Program conducts a rigorous review of its portfolio of projects, utilizing teams of experts to provide vital feedback on the progress of research.

  4. Geothermal Technologies Program: Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-02-01

    This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Alaska. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

  5. Selecting appropriate technology for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamhankar, S.S.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' Technologies for the production of synthesis gas (H2 + CO), a precursor to hydrogen, from a variety of fossil fuels are well known in industrial applications at relatively large scale. These include Steam Reforming (SR), Auto-Thermal Reforming (ATR) and Partial Oxidation (POX). A particular technology is selected based on the feed type and the desired products. Steam reforming is a mature technology, and is most prevalent for hydrogen production because of its high efficiency. However, at the smaller scale, the capital cost becomes a more significant factor, and a substantial reduction in this cost is necessary to meet the overall H2 gas cost targets, such as that stated by DOE ($1.50/kg). In developing small-scale H2 technologies, often, incremental improvements are incorporated. While useful, these are not adequate for the desired cost reduction. Also, for effective cost reduction, the whole system, including production, purification and associated equipment needs to be evaluated; cost reduction in just one of the units is not sufficient. This paper provides a critical assessment of the existing as well as novel technology options, specifically targeted at small scale H2 production. The technology options are evaluated to clearly point out which may or may not work and why. (author)

  6. Proceedings of the 1995 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The 1995 US DOE Hydrogen Program Review was held April 18-21, 1995 in Coral Gables, FL. Volume II of the Proceedings contains 8 papers presented under the subject of hydrogen storage and 17 papers presented on hydrogen production. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  7. Hydrogen fuelled buses: Italian ENEA research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosini, G.; Ciancia, A.; Pede, G.

    1993-01-01

    Current hydrogen automotive fuels research studies being conducted by ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technology, Energy and the Environment) are being targeted towards the development of hydrogen fueled vans and buses for use in highly polluted urban environments where the innovative vehicles' air pollution abatement characteristics would justify their high operating costs as compared with those of conventional automotive alternatives. The demonstration vehicle being used in the experimental studies and performance tests is a two liter minibus with a spark ignition engine power rated at 55 kW with gasoline operation and 45 kW with hydrogen. Detailed design notes are given regarding the retrofitting of the minibus chassis to house the aluminium gas storage tanks and the adaptation of the engine to operate with compressed hydrogen. Attention is given to efforts being made to resolve combustion control and fueling problems. Focus is on the progress being made in the development of an efficient and safe electronically controlled fuel injection system

  8. Roles Prioritization of Hydrogen Production Technologies for Promoting Hydrogen Economy in the Current State of China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Gao, Suzhao; Tan, Shiyu

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen production technologies play an important role in the hydrogen economy of China. However, the roles of different technologies played in promoting the development of hydrogen economy are different. The role prioritization of various hydrogen production technologies is of vital importance...... for the stakeholders/decision-makers to plan the development of hydrogen economy in China and to allocate the finite R&D budget reasonably. In this study, DPSIR framework was firstly used to identify the key factors concerning the priorities of various hydrogen production technologies; then, a fuzzy group decision...... information. The prioritization results by using the proposed method demonstrated that the technologies of coal gasification with CO2 capture and storage and hydropower-based water electrolysis were regarded as the two most important hydrogen production pathways for promoting the development of hydrogen...

  9. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-08-01

    This report identifies the commercial and near-commercial (emerging) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  10. HyTech - The Hydrogen Technology Laboratory at Savannah River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motyka, T.; Knight, J.R.; Heung, L.K.; Lee, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    SRS recently announced the formation of the Hydrogen Technology Laboratory (HyTech) to work with industry and government in developing technologies based on the site's four decades of experience with tritium and other forms of H. HyTech will continue to sustain the site's ongoing role in H technology applications for defense programs. In addition, the laboratory will work with the chemical, transportation, power, medical, and other industries to develop and test related technologies. HyTech, which is located in the Savannah River Technology Center, will make use of its facilities and staff, as well as the infrastructure within the site's Tritium Facilities. More than 80 SRS scientists, engineers, and technical professionals with backgrounds in chemistry, engineering, materials science, metallurgy, physics, and computer science will work with the laboratory. This paper describes some of HyTech's current initiatives in the area of H storage, transportation, and energy applications

  11. DOE Hydrogen Program 2004 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-10-01

    This document summarizes the project evaluations and comments from the DOE Hydrogen Program 2004 Annual Program Review. Hydrogen production, delivery and storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; and education R&D projects funded by DOE in FY2004 are reviewed.

  12. DOE Hydrogen Program: 2010 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-01

    This document summarizes the comments provided by peer reviewers on hydrogen and fuel cell projects presented at the FY 2010 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), held June 7-11, 2010 in Washington, D.C.

  13. BIG hydrogen: hydrogen technology in the oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The BIG Hydrogen workshop was held in Calgary, Alberta, Canada on February 13, 2006. About 60 representatives of industry, academia and government attended this one-day technical meeting on hydrogen production for the oil and gas industry. The following themes were identified from the presentations and discussion: the need to find a BIG hydrogen replacement for Steam Methane Reformer (SMR) because of uncertainty regarding cost and availability of natural gas, although given the maturity of SMR process (reliability, known capital cost) how high will H2 prices have to rise?; need for a national strategy to link the near-term and the longer-term hydrogen production requirements, which can take hydrogen from chemical feedstock to energy carrier; and in the near-term Canada should get involved in demonstrations and build expertise in large hydrogen systems including production and carbon capture and sequestration

  14. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luigi Bonadio

    2006-01-01

    The next generation of engineers and scientists will face great technical, economic and political challenges to satisfy increasing demands for a secure, reliable and affordable global energy system that maintains and enhances current standards of living. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program aims to bolster the quality and relevance of primary and secondary school teaching in emerging areas of science, technology and environmental/sustainability studies using hydrogen, in its capacity as a versatile energy carrier, as the educational basis for teacher and student learning. Critical advances in specific areas of hydrogen production, distribution, storage and end-use technologies arise when students are engaged to develop and apply a broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge and practical skills. A comprehensive hydrogen and fuel cell technology teaching module will be developed to complement existing fuels and energy curricula across Australian schools. The pilot program will be delivered via the collaboration of nine trial schools, a broad range of technical and pedagogy experts and representatives of professional bodies and industry. The program features essential and extensive teacher consultation, a professional learning and development course, industry site visits and a dedicated research and evaluation study. This initiative aims to bolster teacher literacy and student participation in the design, construction and operation of various hydrogen and fuel cell devices and extended activities. Students will reflect on and formally present their learning experiences via several dedicated fora including an awards ceremony where outstanding performance of leading schools, teachers and student groups within the cluster will be acknowledged. (authors)

  15. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luigi Bonadio [Senior Consultant Luigi Bonadio and Associates (Australia)

    2006-07-01

    The next generation of engineers and scientists will face great technical, economic and political challenges to satisfy increasing demands for a secure, reliable and affordable global energy system that maintains and enhances current standards of living. The Australian Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Education Program aims to bolster the quality and relevance of primary and secondary school teaching in emerging areas of science, technology and environmental/sustainability studies using hydrogen, in its capacity as a versatile energy carrier, as the educational basis for teacher and student learning. Critical advances in specific areas of hydrogen production, distribution, storage and end-use technologies arise when students are engaged to develop and apply a broad range of disciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge and practical skills. A comprehensive hydrogen and fuel cell technology teaching module will be developed to complement existing fuels and energy curricula across Australian schools. The pilot program will be delivered via the collaboration of nine trial schools, a broad range of technical and pedagogy experts and representatives of professional bodies and industry. The program features essential and extensive teacher consultation, a professional learning and development course, industry site visits and a dedicated research and evaluation study. This initiative aims to bolster teacher literacy and student participation in the design, construction and operation of various hydrogen and fuel cell devices and extended activities. Students will reflect on and formally present their learning experiences via several dedicated fora including an awards ceremony where outstanding performance of leading schools, teachers and student groups within the cluster will be acknowledged. (authors)

  16. Hydrogen/oxygen auxiliary propulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Brian D.; Schneider, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of hydogen/oxygen (H/O) auxiliary propulsion system (APS) concepts and low thrust H/O rocket technology. A review of H/O APS studies performed for the Space Shuttle, Space Tug, Space Station Freedom, and Advanced Manned Launch System programs is given. The survey also includes a review of low thrust H/O rocket technology programs, covering liquid H/O and gaseous H/O thrusters, ranging from 6600 N to 440 mN thrust. Ignition concepts for H/O thrusters and high-temperature, oxidation-resistant chamber materials are also reviewed.

  17. Energetic and economic evaluations on hydrogen storage technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arca, S.; Di Profio, P.; Germani, R. [Perugia Univ., Perugia (Italy). Centro di Eccellenza Materiali Innovativi Nanostrutturati, Dip. Chimica; Savelli, G.; Cotana, F.; Rossi, F.; Amantini, M. [Universita degli Studi di Perugia, Perugia (Italy). Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Sezione di Fisica Tecnica

    2008-07-01

    With the development of the hydrogen economy and fuel cell vehicles, a major technological issue has emerged regarding the storage and delivery of large amounts of hydrogen. Several hydrogen storage methodologies are available while other technologies are being developed aside from the classical compression and liquefaction of hydrogen. A novel technology is also in rapid process, which is based on clathrate hydrates of hydrogen. The features and performances of available storage systems were evaluated in an effort to determine the best technology throughout the hydrogen chain. For each of the storage solutions presented, the key parameters were compared. These key parameters included interaction energy between hydrogen and support; real and practical storage capacity; and specific energy consumption. The paper presented the study methods and discussed hydrogen storage technologies using compressed hydrogen; metal hydrides; liquefied hydrogen; carbon nanotubes; ammonia; and gas hydrates. Carbon dioxide emissions were also evaluated for each storage system analyzed. The paper also presented the worst scenario. It was concluded that a technology based on clathrate hydrates of hydrogen, while being far from optimized, was highly competitive with the classical approaches. 21 refs., 9 figs.

  18. HTTR demonstration program for nuclear cogeneration of hydrogen and electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Sumita, Junya; Terada, Atsuhiko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Yan, Xing L.; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Tachibana, Yukio; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency initiated a High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) demonstration program in accordance with recommendations of a task force established by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology according to the Strategic Energy Plan as of April 2014. The demonstration program is designed to complete helium gas turbine and hydrogen production system technologies aiming at commercial plant deployment in 2030s. The program begins with coupling a helium gas turbine in the secondary loop of the HTTR and expands by adding the H 2 plant to a tertiary loop to enable hydrogen cogeneration. Safety standards for coupling the helium gas turbine and H 2 plant to the nuclear reactor will be established through safety review in licensing. A system design and its control method are planned to be validated with a series of test operations using the HTTR-GT/H 2 plant. This paper explains the outline of HTTR demonstration program with a plant concept of the heat application system directed at establishing an HTGR cogeneration system with 950°C reactor outlet temperature for production of power and hydrogen as recommended by the task force. Commercial deployment strategy including a development plan for the helium gas turbine is also presented. (author)

  19. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology. A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Michael [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology (NCHT) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program's nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  20. Oil-free centrifugal hydrogen compression technology demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heshmat, Hooshang [Mohawk Innovative Technology Inc., Albany, NY (United States)

    2014-05-31

    One of the key elements in realizing a mature market for hydrogen vehicles is the deployment of a safe and efficient hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure on a scale that can compete economically with current fuels. The challenge, however, is that hydrogen, being the lightest and smallest of gases with a lower viscosity and density than natural gas, readily migrates through small spaces and is difficult to compresses efficiently. While efficient and cost effective compression technology is crucial to effective pipeline delivery of hydrogen, the compression methods used currently rely on oil lubricated positive displacement (PD) machines. PD compression technology is very costly, has poor reliability and durability, especially for components subjected to wear (e.g., valves, rider bands and piston rings) and contaminates hydrogen with lubricating fluid. Even so called “oil-free” machines use oil lubricants that migrate into and contaminate the gas path. Due to the poor reliability of PD compressors, current hydrogen producers often install duplicate units in order to maintain on-line times of 98-99%. Such machine redundancy adds substantially to system capital costs. As such, DOE deemed that low capital cost, reliable, efficient and oil-free advanced compressor technologies are needed. MiTi’s solution is a completely oil-free, multi-stage, high-speed, centrifugal compressor designed for flow capacity of 500,000 kg/day with a discharge pressure of 1200 psig. The design employs oil-free compliant foil bearings and seals to allow for very high operating speeds, totally contamination free operation, long life and reliability. This design meets the DOE’s performance targets and achieves an extremely aggressive, specific power metric of 0.48 kW-hr/kg and provides significant improvements in reliability/durability, energy efficiency, sealing and freedom from contamination. The multi-stage compressor system concept has been validated through full scale

  1. Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

    2005-11-05

    Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options

  2. Hydrogen research and development in Hawaii: Hawaii natural energy institute's hydrogen from renewable resources research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, K.R.; Rocheleau, R.E.; Takahashi, P.K.; Jensen, C.M.

    1993-01-01

    Hawaii, an energy-vulnerable state, has launched a Renewable Resources Research Program, focusing on hydrogen production and storage; the main tasks of this effort are: photoelectrochemical production of hydrogen through the use of coated silicon electrodes; solar conversion and the production of hydrogen with cyanobacteria; improved hydrogen storage through the use of nonclassical poly-hydride metal complexes. 10 refs

  3. Robotics Technology Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) is a ''needs-driven'' effort. A lengthy series of presentations and discussions at DOE sites considered critical to DOE's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programs resulted in a clear understanding of needed robotics applications toward resolving definitive problems at the sites. A detailed analysis of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR), Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA), Mixed Waste Operations (MWO), and Decontamination ampersand Dismantlement (D ampersand D). The RTDP Group realized that much of the technology development was common (Cross Cutting-CC) to each of these robotics application areas, for example, computer control and sensor interface protocols. Further, the OTD approach to the Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT ampersand E) process urged an additional organizational break-out between short-term (1--3 years) and long-term (3--5 years) efforts (Advanced Technology-AT). The RDTP is thus organized around these application areas -- TWR, CAA, MWO, D ampersand D and CC ampersand AT -- with the first four developing short-term applied robotics. An RTDP Five-Year Plan was developed for organizing the Program to meet the needs in these application areas

  4. Nuclear Technology Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, J.E. (ed.)

    1990-10-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period April--September 1988. These programs involve R D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned with examining the feasibility of substituting low-enriched for high-enriched uranium in the production of fission-product {sup 99}Mo. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories.

  5. Nuclear technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmon, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Technology Programs of the Chemical Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, in the period October 1989--March 1990. These programs involve R ampersand D in three areas: applied physical chemistry, separation science and technology, and nuclear waste management. The work in applied physical chemistry includes investigations into the processes that control the release and transport of fission products under accident-like conditions, the thermophysical properties of metal fuel and blanket materials of the Integral Fast Reactor, and the properties of selected materials in environments simulating those of fusion energy systems. In the area of separation science and technology, the bulk of the effort is concerned with developing and implementing processes for the removal and concentration of actinides from waste streams contaminated by transuranic elements. Another effort is concerned water waste stream generated in production of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene. In the area of waste management, investigations are underway on the performance of materials in projected nuclear repository conditions to provide input to the licensing of the nation's high-level waste repositories

  6. ABC Technology Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) facility will be designed to accomplish the following mission: 'Provide a weapon's grade plutonium disposition capability in a safe, economical, and environmentally sound manner on a prudent schedule for [50] tons of weapon's grade plutonium to be disposed on in [20] years.' This mission is supported by four major objectives: provide a reliable plutonium disposition capability within the next [15] years; provide a level of safety and of safety assurance that meets or exceeds that afforded to the public by modern commercial nuclear power plants; meet or exceed all applicable federal, state, and local regulations or standards for environmental compliance; manage the program in a cost effective manner. The ABC Technology Development Program defines the technology development activities that are required to accomplish this mission. The technology development tasks are related to the following topics: blanket system; vessel systems; reactivity control systems; heat transport system components; energy conversion systems; shutdown heat transport systems components; auxiliary systems; technology demonstrations - large scale experiments

  7. Hydrogen Energy Coordinating Committee annual report: Summary of DOE hydrogen programs for FY 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    The HECC was established over 13 years ago to ensure that the many varied aspects of hydrogen technology within the Department are coordinated. Each year the committee brings together technical representative within the Department to coordinate activities, share research results and discuss future priorities and directions. This FY 1990 summary is the thirteenth consecutive yearly report. It provides an overview of the hydrogen-related programs of the DOE offices represented in the HECC for the fiscal year. For the purposes of this report, the research projects within each division have been organized into two categories: Fuels-related Research and Non-fuels-related Research. An historical summary of the hydrogen budgets of the several divisions is given. Total DOE funding in FY 1990 was $6.8 million for fuels-related research and $32.9 million for non-fuels-related research. The individual program elements are described in the body of this report, and more specific program information can be found in the Technology Summary Forms in Appendix A

  8. Microbial electrolysis cells as innovative technology for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chorbadzhiyska, Elitsa; Hristov, Georgi; Mitov, Mario; Hubenova, Yolina

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen production is becoming increasingly important in view of using hydrogen in fuel cells. However, most of the production of hydrogen so far comes from the combustion of fossil fuels and water electrolysis. Microbial Electrolysis Cell (MEC), also known as Bioelectrochemically Assisted Microbial Reactor, is an ecologically clean, renewable and innovative technology for hydrogen production. Microbial electrolysis cells produce hydrogen mainly from waste biomass assisted by various bacteria strains. The principle of MECs and their constructional elements are reviewed and discussed. Keywords: microbial Electrolysis Cells, hydrogen production, waste biomass purification

  9. Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusibani, Elin; Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki

    2010-01-01

    Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

  10. Space Technology Research Grants Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Space Technology Research Grants Program will accelerate the development of "push" technologies to support the future space science and exploration...

  11. 2011 Annual Progress Report: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-11-01

    In the past year, the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program (the Program) made substantial progress toward its goals and objectives. The Program has conducted comprehensive and focused efforts to enable the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in diverse sectors of the economy. With emphasis on applications that will effectively strengthen our nation's energy security and improve our stewardship of the environment, the Program engages in research, development, and demonstration of critical improvements in the technologies. Highlights of the Program's accomplishments can be found in the sub-program chapters of this report.

  12. Hydrogen hybrid vehicle engine development: Experimental program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Blarigan, P. [Sandia National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    A hydrogen fueled engine is being developed specifically for the auxiliary power unit (APU) in a series type hybrid vehicle. Hydrogen is different from other internal combustion (IC) engine fuels, and hybrid vehicle IC engine requirements are different from those of other IC vehicle engines. Together these differences will allow a new engine design based on first principles that will maximize thermal efficiency while minimizing principal emissions. The experimental program is proceeding in four steps: (1) Demonstration of the emissions and the indicated thermal efficiency capability of a standard CLR research engine modified for higher compression ratios and hydrogen fueled operation. (2) Design and test a new combustion chamber geometry for an existing single cylinder research engine, in an attempt to improve on the baseline indicated thermal efficiency of the CLR engine. (3) Design and build, in conjunction with an industrial collaborator, a new full scale research engine designed to maximize brake thermal efficiency. Include a full complement of combustion diagnostics. (4) Incorporate all of the knowledge thus obtained in the design and fabrication, by an industrial collaborator, of the hydrogen fueled engine for the hybrid vehicle power train illustrator. Results of the CLR baseline engine testing are presented, as well as preliminary data from the new combustion chamber engine. The CLR data confirm the low NOx produced by lean operation. The preliminary indicated thermal efficiency data from the new combustion chamber design engine show an improvement relative to the CLR engine. Comparison with previous high compression engine results shows reasonable agreement.

  13. Negotiating sustainable innovation? Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weert Canzler

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the German Federal Government made the consequential decision to change its energy program. This not only as a result of the decision to shut down the existing nuclear power plants within the next few years, but also due to vital challenges like climate change and security of energy supply. The shift in the energy-technology paradigm from fossil fuel technologies to regenerative energies might appear as a merely technical process at first glance. Yet, the road to environmental sustainability is paved with economic and social stumbling blocks. The concept of sustainable development is not a blueprint for technical progress but requires deliberations on questions about innovations and governance: How do we want to live and how do we want to get there? This paper traces the negotiations of sustainable innovation on the example of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in Germany. The institutional set up in this field is analyzed and the new organizational actors are identified. These actors attempt to inform and persuade others of the benefits of hydrogen and fuel cells in order to establish a common view that is to guide the further development. However, while they succeeded in mobilizing enough actors to launch the largest Public Private Partnership in this sector in the EU, they could not attain the leadership in the public discourse on these technologies. It seems that an attractive guiding vision of a sustainable, post-fossil energy future and a broad acceptance in daily use would have been major prerequisites for such leadership.

  14. Hydrogen from coal: Production and utilisation technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoko, E.; McLellan, B.; Dicks, A.L.; da Costa, J.C. Diniz

    2006-01-01

    Although coal may be viewed as a dirty fuel due to its high greenhouse emissions when combusted, a strong case can be made for coal to be a major world source of clean H 2 energy. Apart from the fact that resources of coal will outlast oil and natural gas by centuries, there is a shift towards developing environmentally benign coal technologies, which can lead to high energy conversion efficiencies and low air pollution emissions as compared to conventional coal fired power generation plant. There are currently several world research and industrial development projects in the areas of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles (IGCC) and Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell (IGFC) systems. In such systems, there is a need to integrate complex unit operations including gasifiers, gas separation and cleaning units, water gas shift reactors, turbines, heat exchangers, steam generators and fuel cells. IGFC systems tested in the USA, Europe and Japan employing gasifiers (Texaco, Lurgi and Eagle) and fuel cells have resulted in energy conversions at efficiency of 47.5% (HHV) which is much higher than the 30-35% efficiency of conventional coal fired power generation. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are the front runners in energy production from coal gases. These fuel cells can operate at high temperatures and are robust to gas poisoning impurities. IGCC and IGFC technologies are expensive and currently economically uncompetitive as compared to established and mature power generation technology. However, further efficiency and technology improvements coupled with world pressures on limitation of greenhouse gases and other gaseous pollutants could make IGCC/IGFC technically and economically viable for hydrogen production and utilisation in clean and environmentally benign energy systems. (author)

  15. Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2005-12-01

    DOE's Solar and Wind Technologies for Hydrogen Production Report to Congress summarizes the technology roadmaps for solar- and wind-based hydrogen production. Published in December 2005, it fulfills the requirement under section 812 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005.

  16. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 6 Report Promoting a Southeast Hydrogen Consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this project task was to establish a technical consortium to promote the deployment of hydrogen technologies and infrastructure in the Southeast. The goal was to partner with fuel cell manufacturers, hydrogen fuel infrastructure providers, electric utilities, energy service companies, research institutions, and user groups to improve education and awareness of hydrogen technologies in an area that is lagging behind other parts of the country in terms of vehicle and infrastructure demonstrations and deployments. This report documents that effort.

  17. Overview of the U.S. DOE Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards Program. Part 4: Hydrogen Sensors; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buttner, William J.; Rivkin, Carl; Burgess, Robert; Brosha, Eric; Mukundan, Rangachary; James, C. Will; Keller, Jay

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen sensors are recognized as a critical element in the safety design for any hydrogen system. In this role, sensors can perform several important functions including indication of unintended hydrogen releases, activation of mitigation strategies to preclude the development of dangerous situations, activation of alarm systems and communication to first responders, and to initiate system shutdown. The functionality of hydrogen sensors in this capacity is decoupled from the system being monitored, thereby providing an independent safety component that is not affected by the system itself. The importance of hydrogen sensors has been recognized by DOE and by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's Safety and Codes Standards (SCS) program in particular, which has for several years supported hydrogen safety sensor research and development. The SCS hydrogen sensor programs are currently led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The current SCS sensor program encompasses the full range of issues related to safety sensors, including development of advance sensor platforms with exemplary performance, development of sensor-related code and standards, outreach to stakeholders on the role sensors play in facilitating deployment, technology evaluation, and support on the proper selection and use of sensors.

  18. Proceedings of the 1994 DOE/NREL Hydrogen Program Review, April 18--21, 1994, Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The US Department of Energy has conducted programs of research and development in hydrogen and related technologies since 1975. The current program, conducted in accordance with the DOE Hydrogen Program Plan FY 1993--FY 1997 published in June 1992, establishes program priorities and guidance for allocating funding. The core program, currently under the Office of Energy Management, supports projects in the areas of hydrogen production, storage, and systems research. At an annual program review, each research project is evaluated by a panel of technical experts for technical quality, progress, and programmatic benefit. This Proceedings of the April 1994 Hydrogen Program Review compiles all research projects supported by the Hydrogen Program during FY 1994. For those people interested in the status of hydrogen technologies, we hope that the Proceedings will serve as a useful technical reference. Individual reports are processed separately.

  19. The NASA Hydrogen Energy Systems Technology study - A summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumann, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    This study is concerned with: hydrogen use, alternatives and comparisons, hydrogen production, factors affecting application, and technology requirements. Two scenarios for future use are explained. One is called the reference hydrogen use scenario and assumes continued historic uses of hydrogen along with additional use for coal gasification and liquefaction, consistent with the Ford technical fix baseline (1974) projection. The expanded scenario relies on the nuclear electric economy (1973) energy projection and assumes the addition of limited new uses such as experimental hydrogen-fueled aircraft, some mixing with natural gas, and energy storage by utilities. Current uses and supply of hydrogen are described, and the technological requirements for developing new methods of hydrogen production are discussed.

  20. Development of a national center for hydrogen technology. A summary report of activities completed at the national center hydrogen technology from 2005 to 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Michael J. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2011-06-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT project's 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  1. The CFFTP technology applications program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project (CFFTP) was originally conceived as having a Technology Applications Program to help fulfill its mandate of extending and adapting existing Canadian technology for use in international fusion programs. This technology was determined to be materials, breeder technology, remote handling, health and saftey, and tritium fuel systems. The CFFTP Applications Program has done work for the STARFIRE, MARS and TFTR reactors as well as developing two computer codes for tritium fuel systems. In the future the Technology Applications Program will be involved in the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX) as well as work for NET, JET and Frascati

  2. Technology issues associated with using densified hydrogen for space vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.

    1992-01-01

    Slush hydrogen and triple-point hydrogen offer the potential for reducing the size and weight of future space vehicles because these fluids have greater densities than normal-boiling-point liquid hydrogen. In addition, these fluids have greater heat capacities, which make them attractive fuels for such applications as the National Aerospace Plane and cryogenic depots. Some of the benefits of using slush hydrogen and triple-point hydrogen for space missions are quantified. Some of the major issues associated with using these densified cryogenic fuels for space applications are examined, and the technology efforts that have been made to address many of these issues are summarized.

  3. Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production by Alternative Thermochemical Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lvov, Serguei; Chung, Mike; Fedkin, Mark; Lewis, Michele; Balashov, Victor; Chalkova, Elena; Akinfiev, Nikolay; Stork, Carol; Davis, Thomas; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Stanford, Thomas; Weidner, John; Law, Victor; Prindle, John

    2011-01-06

    Hydrogen fuel is a potentially major solution to the problem of climate change, as well as addressing urban air pollution issues. But a key future challenge for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier is a sustainable, low-cost method of producing it in large capacities. Most of the world's hydrogen is currently derived from fossil fuels through some type of reforming processes. Nuclear hydrogen production is an emerging and promising alternative to the reforming processes for carbon-free hydrogen production in the future. This report presents the main results of a research program carried out by a NERI Consortium, which consisted of Penn State University (PSU) (lead), University of South Carolina (USC), Tulane University (TU), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Thermochemical water decomposition is an emerging technology for large-scale production of hydrogen. Typically using two or more intermediate compounds, a sequence of chemical and physical processes split water into hydrogen and oxygen, without releasing any pollutants externally to the atmosphere. These intermediate compounds are recycled internally within a closed loop. While previous studies have identified over 200 possible thermochemical cycles, only a few have progressed beyond theoretical calculations to working experimental demonstrations that establish scientific and practical feasibility of the thermochemical processes. The Cu-Cl cycle has a significant advantage over other cycles due to lower temperature requirements – around 530 °C and below. As a result, it can be eventually linked with the Generation IV thermal power stations. Advantages of the Cu-Cl cycle over others include lower operating temperatures, ability to utilize low-grade waste heat to improve energy efficiency, and potentially lower cost materials. Another significant advantage is a relatively low voltage required for the electrochemical step (thus low electricity input). Other advantages include common chemical agents and

  4. HYSOLAR an overview on the German-Saudi Arabian program on solar hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steeb, H.; Seeger, W.

    1993-01-01

    The first phase of HYSOLAR, which ended in 1991, was focusing mainly on investigation, test and improvement of hydrogen production technologies. This paper shortly reviews the most important results: a 2 kW test and research facility in Jeddah; fundamental research in the fields of photo-electrochemistry, advanced alkaline electrolysis and alkaline fuel cells; system studies and decentralized hydrogen utilization; program for education. An outlook into the second phase program, where more emphasis is laid on hydrogen utilization technologies, is also included. 1 tab., 93 refs

  5. Hydrogen-control systems for severe LWR accident conditions - a state-of-technology report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilliard, R K; Postma, A K; Jeppson, D W

    1983-03-01

    This report reviews the current state of technology regarding hydrogen safety issues in light water reactor plants. Topics considered in this report relate to control systems and include combustion prevention, controlled combustion, minimization of combustion effects, combination of control concepts, and post-accident disposal. A companion report addresses hydrogen generation, distribution, and combustion. The objectives of the study were to identify the key safety issues related to hydrogen produced under severe accident conditions, to describe the state of technology for each issue, and to point out ongoing programs aimed at resolving the open issues.

  6. Hydrogen-control systems for severe LWR accident conditions - a state-of-technology report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilliard, R.K.; Postma, A.K.; Jeppson, D.W.

    1983-03-01

    This report reviews the current state of technology regarding hydrogen safety issues in light water reactor plants. Topics considered in this report relate to control systems and include combustion prevention, controlled combustion, minimization of combustion effects, combination of control concepts, and post-accident disposal. A companion report addresses hydrogen generation, distribution, and combustion. The objectives of the study were to identify the key safety issues related to hydrogen produced under severe accident conditions, to describe the state of technology for each issue, and to point out ongoing programs aimed at resolving the open issues

  7. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  8. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies - Task 1 Report Technology Evaluation of Hydrogen Light Duty Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Rousseau, Aymeric

    2007-12-01

    This task analyzes the candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles for near-term use in the Southeastern U.S. The purpose of this work is to assess their potential in terms of efficiency and performance. This report compares conventional, hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) with gasoline and hydrogen-fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) as well as fuel cell and fuel cell hybrids from a technology as well as fuel economy point of view. All the vehicles have been simulated using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT). First, some background information is provided on recent American automotive market trends and consequences. Moreover, available options are presented for introducing cleaner and more economical vehicles in the market in the future. In this study, analysis of various candidate hydrogen-fueled vehicles is performed using PSAT and, thus, a brief description of PSAT features and capabilities are provided. Detailed information on the simulation analysis performed is also offered, including methodology assumptions, fuel economic results, and conclusions from the findings.

  9. NASA's Commercial Communication Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, James W.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with "NASA's Commercial Communication Technology Program" are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Coordination/Integration of government program; 2) Achievement of seamless interoperable satellite and terrestrial networks; 3) Establishment of program to enhance Satcom professional and technical workforce; 4) Precompetitive technology development; and 5) Effective utilization of spectrum and orbit assets.

  10. Novel wide-area hydrogen sensing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoagland, W.; Benson, D.K.; Smith, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    Element One, Inc. is developing novel, low cost visual indicators for hydrogen gas to complement electronic hydrogen sensors or serve as a low-cost alternative in situations where an electronic signal is not needed. The indicator consists of a thin film coating or a nano-particle pigment of a transition metal oxide such as tungsten oxide along with a catalyst such as platinum or palladium. The oxide is partially reduced in the presence of hydrogen in concentrations as low as 300 parts per million and changes from transparent to a dark color. The change is fast and easily seen from a distance. In air, the color change is reversed spontaneously when the source of hydrogen gas is removed. A number of possible implementations have been successfully demonstrated in the laboratory including hydrogen indicating paints, tape, cautionary decals, and coatings for hydrogen storage tanks. These and other implementations may find use in vehicles, stationary appliances, piping, refueling stations and in closed spaces such as maintenance and residential garages for hydrogen-fueled vehicles. (authors)

  11. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  12. Use of regenerative energy sources and hydrogen technology 2006. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann, J.; Luschtinetz, T.

    2006-01-01

    This volume contains 25 contributions, which were held on the 13th symposium ''Use of regenerative energy sources and hydrogen technology'' in Stralsund (Germany). Separate documentation items analysing 16 of the contributions have been prepared for the ENERGY database

  13. Use of regenerative energy sources and hydrogen technology 2014. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luschtinetz, Thomas; Lehmann, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    This proceedings contains 38 papers with the following main topics: wind and hydrogen technology, developments in the use of bioenergy, fuel cells, photovoltaics. Two contributions were recorded separately for this database. [de

  14. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of the Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2009 is to provide an updated status of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) commercial-scale demonstrations of clean coal technologies (CCT). These demonstrations have been performed under the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Program Update 2009 provides: (1) a discussion of the role of clean coal technology demonstrations in improving the nation’s energy security and reliability, while protecting the environment using the nation’s most abundant energy resource—coal; (2) a summary of the funding and costs of the demonstrations; and (3) an overview of the technologies being demonstrated, along with fact sheets for projects that are active, recently completed, or recently discontinued.

  15. DOE Hydrogen Program: 2006 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliken, J.

    2006-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the FY 2006 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 16-19, 2006, in Arlington, Virginia. The projects evaluated support the Department of Energy and President Bush's Hydrogen Initiative. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE to make funding decisions. Project areas include hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; and systems analysis.

  16. DOE Hydrogen Program: 2005 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalk, S. G.

    2005-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the FY 2005 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 23-26, 2005, in Arlington, Virginia. The projects evaluated support the Department of Energy and President Bush's Hydrogen Initiative. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE to make funding decisions. Project areas include hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; and systems analysis.

  17. DOE Hydrogen Program: 2007 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milliken, J.

    2007-09-01

    This report summarizes comments from the Peer Review Panel at the FY 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, held on May 14-18, 2007, in Washington, D.C. The projects evaluated support the Department of Energy and President Bush's Hydrogen Initiative. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE to make funding decisions. Project areas include hydrogen production and delivery; hydrogen storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes and standards; education; and systems analysis.

  18. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensive use of a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives data base, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented in 1986. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings relating the status of air liquefaction technology are presented both as a singular technical area, and also as that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; Heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; Para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; Hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; Hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sinks; Liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket type combustion devices; Air Collection and Enrichment System (ACES); and Technically related engine concepts.

  19. Hydrogen delivery technology rRoadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2005-11-01

    Hydrogen holds the long-term potential to solve two critical problems related to the energy infrastructure: U.S. dependence on foreign oil and U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases and pollutants. The U.S. transportation sector is almost completely reliant on petroleum, over half of which is currently imported, and tailpipe emissions remain one of the country’s key air quality concerns. Fuel cell vehicles operating on hydrogen produced from domestically available resources – including renewable resources, coal with carbon sequestration, or nuclear energy – would dramatically decrease greenhouse gases and other emissions, and would reduce dependence on oil from politically volatile regions of the world. Clean, domestically-produced hydrogen could also be used to generate electricity in stationary fuel cells at power plants, further extending national energy and environmental benefits.

  20. Hydrogen-Enhanced Natural Gas Vehicle Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, Dan; Collier, Kirk

    2009-01-22

    The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of HCNG fuel (30 to 50% hydrogen by volume and the remainder natural gas) to reduce emissions from light-duty on-road vehicles with no loss in performance or efficiency. The City of Las Vegas has an interest in alternative fuels and already has an existing hydrogen refueling station. Collier Technologies Inc (CT) supplied the latest design retrofit kits capable of converting nine compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled, light-duty vehicles powered by the Ford 5.4L Triton engine. CT installed the kits on the first two vehicles in Las Vegas, trained personnel at the City of Las Vegas (the City) to perform the additional seven retrofits, and developed materials for allowing other entities to perform these retrofits as well. These vehicles were used in normal service by the City while driver impressions, reliability, fuel efficiency and emissions were documented for a minimum of one year after conversion. This project has shown the efficacy of operating vehicles originally designed to operate on compressed natural gas with HCNG fuel incorporating large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). There were no safety issues experienced with these vehicles. The only maintenance issue in the project was some rough idling due to problems with the EGR valve and piping parts. Once the rough idling was corrected no further maintenance issues with these vehicles were experienced. Fuel economy data showed no significant changes after conversion even with the added power provided by the superchargers that were part of the conversions. Driver feedback for the conversions was very favorable. The additional power provided by the HCNG vehicles was greatly appreciated, especially in traffic. The drivability of the HCNG vehicles was considered to be superior by the drivers. Most of the converted vehicles showed zero oxides of nitrogen throughout the life of the project using the State of Nevada emissions station.

  1. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2011 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satypal, S.

    2011-09-01

    This document summarizes the comments provided by peer reviewers on hydrogen and fuel cell projects presented at the FY 2011 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), held May 9-13, 2011 in Arlington, Virginia

  2. A review of nickel hydrogen battery technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithrick, John J.; Odonnell, Patricia M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper on nickel hydrogen batteries is an overview of the various nickel hydrogen battery design options, technical accomplishments, validation test results and trends. There is more than one nickel hydrogen battery design, each having its advantage for specific applications. The major battery designs are individual pressure vessel (IPV), common pressure vessel (CPV), bipolar and low pressure metal hydride. State-of-the-art (SOA) nickel hydrogen batteries are replacing nickel cadmium batteries in almost all geosynchronous orbit (GEO) applications requiring power above 1 kW. However, for the more severe low earth orbit (LEO) applications (greater than 30,000 cycles), the current cycle life of 4000 to 10,000 cycles at 60 percent DOD should be improved. A NASA Lewis Research Center innovative advanced design IPV nickel hydrogen cell led to a breakthrough in cycle life enabling LEO applications at deep depths of discharge (DOD). A trend for some future satellites is to increase the power level to greater than 6 kW. Another trend is to decrease the power to less than 1 kW for small low cost satellites. Hence, the challenge is to reduce battery mass, volume and cost. A key is to develop a light weight nickel electrode and alternate battery designs. A common pressure vessel (CPV) nickel hydrogen battery is emerging as a viable alternative to the IPV design. It has the advantage of reduced mass, volume and manufacturing costs. A 10 Ah CPV battery has successfully provided power on the relatively short lived Clementine Spacecraft. A bipolar nickel hydrogen battery design has been demonstrated (15,000 LEO cycles, 40 percent DOD). The advantage is also a significant reduction in volume, a modest reduction in mass, and like most bipolar designs, features a high pulse power capability. A low pressure aerospace nickel metal hydride battery cell has been developed and is on the market. It is a prismatic design which has the advantage of a significant reduction in volume and a

  3. Proceedings of the 1st JAEA/KAERI information exchange meeting on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Sakaba, Nariaki; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Yan, Xing L.; Hino, Ryutaro

    2007-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has completed an implementation with Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology, 'The Implementation of Cooperative Program in the Field of Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy between KAERI and JAEA. 'To facilitate efficient technology development on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen by the IS process, an information exchange meeting was held at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA on August 28-30, 2006 under Program 13th of the JAEA/KAERI Implementation, 'Development of HTGR and Nuclear Hydrogen Technology'. JAEA and KAERI mutually showed the status and future plan of the HTTR (High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) project in Japan and of the NHDD (Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration) project in Korea, respectively, and discussed collaboration items. This proceedings summarizes all materials of presented technical discussions on HTGR and hydrogen production technology as well as the meeting briefing including collaboration items. (author)

  4. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCar & Vehicle Technologies Program CARB Executive Order Exemption Process for a Hydrogen-fueled Internal Combustion engine Vehicle -- Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-04-01

    The CARB Executive Order Exemption Process for a Hydrogen-fueled Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle was undertaken to define the requirements to achieve a California Air Resource Board Executive Order for a hydrogenfueled vehicle retrofit kit. A 2005 to 2006 General Motors Company Sierra/Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD pickup was assumed to be the build-from vehicle for the retrofit kit. The emissions demonstration was determined not to pose a significant hurdle due to the non-hydrocarbon-based fuel and lean-burn operation. However, significant work was determined to be necessary for Onboard Diagnostics Level II compliance. Therefore, it is recommended that an Experimental Permit be obtained from the California Air Resource Board to license and operate the vehicles for the durability of the demonstration in support of preparing a fully compliant and certifiable package that can be submitted.

  5. Technology issues associated with fueling the national aerospace plane with slush hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, Ned P.

    1988-01-01

    The National Aerospace Plane is a horizontal takeoff and landing, single stage-to-orbit vehicle using hydrogen fuel. The first flights are planned for the mid 1990's. The success of this important national program requires advances in virtually every discipline associated with both airbreathing and space flight. The high heating value, cooling capacity, and combustion properties make hydrogen the fuel of choice, but low density results in a large vehicle. Both fuel cooling capacity and density are increased with the use of slush hydrogen and result in significant reductions in vehicle size. A national program to advance this technology and to find engineering solutions to the many design issues is now under way. The program uses the expertise of the cryogenics production and services industry, the instrumentation industry, universities and governments. The program will be discussed to highlight the major issues and display progress to date.

  6. Investigation of nickel hydrogen battery technology for the RADARSAT spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccoy, D. A.; Lackner, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    The low Earth orbit (LEO) operations of the RADARSAT spacecraft require high performance batteries to provide energy to the payload and platform during eclipse period. Nickel Hydrogen cells are currently competing with the more traditional Nickel Cadmium cells for high performance spacecraft applications at geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) and Leo. Nickel Hydrogen cells appear better suited for high power applications where high currents and high Depths of Discharge are required. Although a number of GEO missions have flown with Nickel Hydrogen batteries, it is not readily apparent that the LEO version of the Nickel Hydrogen cell is able to withstand the extended cycle lifetime (5 years) of the RADARSAT mission. The problems associated with Nickel Hydrogen cells are discussed in the contex of RADARSAT mission and a test program designed to characterize cell performance is presented.

  7. Hydrogen and fuel cells emerging technologies and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Sorensen (Sorensen), Bent

    2011-01-01

    A hydrogen economy, in which this one gas provides the source of all energy needs, is often touted as the long-term solution to the environmental and security problems associated with fossil fuels. However, before hydrogen can be used as fuel on a global scale we must establish cost effective means of producing, storing, and distributing the gas, develop cost efficient technologies for converting hydrogen to electricity (e.g. fuel cells), and creating the infrastructure to support all this. Sorensen is the only text available that provides up to date coverage of all these issues at a level

  8. A feasibility study of conceptual design for international clean energy network using hydrogen conversion technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi; Hamada, Akiyoshi; Kitamura, Kazuhiro

    1998-01-01

    Clean energy is more and more required worldwide in proportion to actualization of global environmental issues including global warming. Therefore, it is an urgent task to realize promotion of worldwide introduction of clean energy which exists abundantly and is widely distributed in the world, such as hydropower and solar energy, while reducing the dependence on fossil fuel. However, since the renewable energy, differing from so called fossil fuel, is impossible to transport for long distance and store as it is, its utilization is subject to be limited. As one possible resolution of this kind of issues, 'International clean energy network using hydrogen conversion technology' which enables conversion of renewable energy from low cost hydropower into hydrogen energy and also into the transportable and storable form, is a meaningful concept. This system technology enables dealing of this hydrogen energy in international market as in the same manner as fossil fuel. It is considered to enable promotion of international and large scale introduction of such clean energy, along with the contribution to diversified and stabilized international energy supply. In this study, based upon the above-mentioned point of view and assumption of two sites, one on supply side and another on demand side of hydrogen energy, three systems are presumed. One of the systems consists of liquid hydrogen as transportation and storage medium of hydrogen, and the others intermediately convert hydrogen into methanol or ammonia as an energy carrier. A overall conceptual design of each system spanning from hydrogen production to its utilization, is conducted in practical way in order to review the general technical aspects and economical aspects through cost analysis. This study is administrated through the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) as a part of the International Clean Energy Network Using Hydrogen Conversion (so-called WE-NET) Program with funding from

  9. Microfabricated Hydrogen Sensor Technology for Aerospace and Commercial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Bickford, R. L.; Jansa, E. D.; Makel, D. B.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.; Powers, W. T.

    1994-01-01

    Leaks on the Space Shuttle while on the Launch Pad have generated interest in hydrogen leak monitoring technology. An effective leak monitoring system requires reliable hydrogen sensors, hardware, and software to monitor the sensors. The system should process the sensor outputs and provide real-time leak monitoring information to the operator. This paper discusses the progress in developing such a complete leak monitoring system. Advanced microfabricated hydrogen sensors are being fabricated at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) and tested at NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) and Gencorp Aerojet (Aerojet). Changes in the hydrogen concentrations are detected using a PdAg on silicon Schottky diode structure. Sensor temperature control is achieved with a temperature sensor and heater fabricated onto the sensor chip. Results of the characterization of these sensors are presented. These sensors can detect low concentrations of hydrogen in inert environments with high sensitivity and quick response time. Aerojet is developing the hardware and software for a multipoint leak monitoring system designed to provide leak source and magnitude information in real time. The monitoring system processes data from the hydrogen sensors and presents the operator with a visual indication of the leak location and magnitude. Work has commenced on integrating the NASA LeRC-CWRU hydrogen sensors with the Aerojet designed monitoring system. Although the leak monitoring system was designed for hydrogen propulsion systems, the possible applications of this monitoring system are wide ranged. Possible commercialization of the system will also be discussed.

  10. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  11. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2016 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2016-11-01

    The fiscal year 2016 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 6-10, 2016, in Washington, D.C. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  12. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2017 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-10-16

    The fiscal year 2017 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June June 5-9, 2017, in Washington, D.C. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  13. Geothermal Technologies Program: Direct Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-08-01

    This general publication describes geothermal direct use systems, and how they have been effectively used throughout the country. It also describes the DOE program R&D efforts in this area, and summarizes several projects using direct use technology.

  14. Advanced hydrogen/methanol utilization technology demonstration. Phase II: Hydrogen cold start of a methanol vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This is the Phase 11 Final Report on NREL Subcontract No. XR-2-11175-1 {open_quotes}Advanced Hydrogen/Methane Utilization Demonstration{close_quotes} between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, Golden, Colorado and Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. (HCI), Littleton, Colorado. Mr. Chris Colucci was NREL`s Technical Monitor. Colorado State University`s (CSU) Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory was HCI`s subcontractor. Some of the vehicle test work was carried out at the National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control and Safety (NCVECS) at CSU. The collaboration of the Colorado School of Mines is also gratefully acknowledged. Hydrogen is unique among alternative fuels in its ability to burn over a wide range of mixtures in air with no carbon-related combustion products. Hydrogen also has the ability to burn on a catalyst, starting from room temperature. Hydrogen can be made from a variety of renewable energy resources and is expected to become a widely used energy carrier in the sustainable energy system of the future. One way to make a start toward widespread use of hydrogen in the energy system is to use it sparingly with other alternative fuels. The Phase I work showed that strong affects could be achieved with dilute concentrations of hydrogen in methane (11). Reductions in emissions greater than the proportion of hydrogen in the fuel provide a form of leverage to stimulate the early introduction of hydrogen. Per energy unit or per dollar of hydrogen, a greater benefit is derived than simply displacing fossil-fueled vehicles with pure hydrogen vehicles.

  15. Robotics Technology Crosscutting Program. Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP) is a needs-driven effort. A length series of presentations and discussions at DOE sites considered critical to DOE's Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Programs resulted in a clear understanding of needed robotics applications toward resolving definitive problems at the sites. A detailed analysis of the resulting robotics needs assessment revealed several common threads running through the sites: Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR), Contaminant Analysis Automation (CAA), Mixed Waste Operations (MWO), and Decontamination and Dismantlement (D and D). The RTDP Group also realized that some of the technology development in these four areas had common (Cross Cutting-CC) needs, for example, computer control and sensor interface protocols. Further, the OTD approach to the Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT and E) process urged an additional organizational breakdown between short-term (1--3 years) and long-term (3--5 years) efforts (Advanced Technology-AT). These factors lead to the formation of the fifth application area for Crosscutting and Advanced Technology (CC and AT) development. The RTDP is thus organized around these application areas -- TWR, CAA, MWO, D and D, and CC and AT -- with the first four developing short-term applied robotics. An RTDP Five-Year Plan was developed for organizing the Program to meet the needs in these application areas

  16. High Temperature Electrolysis for Hydrogen Production from Nuclear Energy – TechnologySummary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; M. G. McKellar; E. A. Harvego; M. S. Sohal; K. G. Condie

    2010-02-01

    The Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, has requested that a Hydrogen Technology Down-Selection be performed to identify the hydrogen production technology that has the best potential for timely commercial demonstration and for ultimate deployment with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). An Independent Review Team has been assembled to execute the down-selection. This report has been prepared to provide the members of the Independent Review Team with detailed background information on the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process, hardware, and state of the art. The Idaho National Laboratory has been serving as the lead lab for HTE research and development under the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. The INL HTE program has included small-scale experiments, detailed computational modeling, system modeling, and technology demonstration. Aspects of all of these activities are included in this report. In terms of technology demonstration, the INL successfully completed a 1000-hour test of the HTE Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) technology demonstration experiment during the fall of 2008. The HTE ILS achieved a hydrogen production rate in excess of 5.7 Nm3/hr, with a power consumption of 18 kW. This hydrogen production rate is far larger than has been demonstrated by any of the thermochemical or hybrid processes to date.

  17. Overview of U.S. programs for hydrogen from renewables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses US program for hydrogen from renewable energy sources. Renewable energy sources include biomass, wind, solar, hydropower, geothermal and ocean waves. Although nuclear power is not considered renewable, a case can be made that it is, but requires recycling of spent fuel. The paper also discusses hydrogen production, storage and delivery. It discusses fuel cells, safety codes and standards and system analysis

  18. Advanced supersonic technology concept study: Hydrogen fueled configuration, summary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.; Morris, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Conceptual designs of hydrogen fueled supersonic transport configurations for the 1990 time period were developed and compared with equivalent technology Jet A-1 fueled vehicles to determine the economic and performance potential of liquid hydrogen as an alternate fuel. Parametric evaluations of supersonic cruise vehicles with varying design and transport mission characteristics established the basis for selecting a preferred configuration. An assessment was made of the general viability of the selected concept including an evaluation of costs and environmental considerations, i.e., exhaust emissions and sonic boom characteristics. Technology development requirements and suggested implementation schedules are presented.

  19. Advanced supersonic technology concept study: Hydrogen fueled configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, G. D.

    1974-01-01

    Conceptual designs of hydrogen fueled supersonic transport configurations for the 1990 time period were developed and compared with equivalent technology Jet A-1 fueled vehicles to determine the economic and performance potential of liquid hydrogen as an alternate fuel. Parametric evaluations of supersonic cruise vehicles with varying design and transport mission characteristics established the basis for selecting a preferred configuration which was then studied in greater detail. An assessment was made of the general viability of the selected concept including an evaluation of costs and environmental considerations, i.e., exhaust emissions and sonic boom characteristics. Technology development requirements and suggested implementation schedules are presented.

  20. Electrolytic hydrogen fuel production with solid polymer electrolyte technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titterington, W. A.; Fickett, A. P.

    1973-01-01

    A water electrolysis technology based on a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) concept is presented for applicability to large-scale hydrogen production in a future energy system. High cell current density operation is selected for the application, and supporting cell test performance data are presented. Demonstrated cell life data are included to support the adaptability of the SPE system to large-size hydrogen generation utility plants as needed for bulk energy storage or transmission. The inherent system advantages of the acid SPE electrolysis technology are explained. System performance predictions are made through the year 2000, along with plant capital and operating cost projections.

  1. A singular facility scientific technological to promote the hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, M.

    2010-01-01

    Declining fossil fuel reserves raises concerns about new energy resources that will lead to energy systems based on distributed generation and active distribution systems that require new energy storage systems. Hydrogen is a good candidate to operate as storage and as energy carrier that still needs scientific and technological breakthroughs to facilitate their integration into this new energy culture. Spain has supported numerous public-private cooperative efforts that have culminated in the creation of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology Experiment and Fuel Cells. (Author)

  2. Overview of international fusion technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.E.; Baublitz, J.E.; Beard, D.S.; Cohen, M.M.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Finfgeld, C.R.; Haas, G.M.; Head, C.R.; Murphy, M.R.; Nardella, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    World fusion technology programs, as well as current progress and future plans for the U.S., are discussed. Regarding conceptual design, the international INTOR tokamak study, the Garching Ignition Test Reactor Study, the U.S. Engineering Test Facility conceptual design, the Argonne National Laboratory Commercial Tokamak Study, mirror conceptual designs, and alternate concepts and applications studies are summarized. With regard to magnetics, progress to date in the large coil program and pulsed coil program is summarized. In the area of plasma heating and fueling and exhaust, work on a new positive ion source research and development program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory is described, as is negative ion work. Tradeoff considerations for radio-frequency heating alternatives are made, and a new 60-100 GHz electron cyclotron heating research and development program is discussed. Progress and plans for solid hydrogen pellet injector development are analyzed, as are plans for a divertor technology initiative. A brief review of the U.S. alternate applications and environment and safety program is included

  3. CLEAN HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY FOR 3-WHEEL TRANSPORTATION IN INDIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna Sapru

    2005-11-15

    Hydrogen is a clean burning, non-polluting transportation fuel. It is also a renewable energy carrier that can be produced from non-fossil fuel resources such as solar, wind and biomass. Utilizing hydrogen as an alternative fuel for vehicles will diversify the resources of energy, and reduce dependence on oil in the transportation sector. Additionally, clean burning hydrogen fuel will also alleviate air pollution that is a very severe problem in many parts of world, especially major metropolitan areas in developing countries, such as India and China. In our efforts to foster international collaborations in the research, development, and demonstration of hydrogen technologies, through a USAID/DOE cost-shared project, Energy Conversion Devices, Inc.,(www.ovonic.com) a leading materials and alternative energy company, in collaboration with Bajaj Auto Limited, India's largest three-wheeler taxi manufacturer, has successfully developed and demonstrated prototype hydrogen ICE three-wheelers in the United States and India. ECD's proprietary Ovonic solid-state hydrogen storage technology is utilized on-board to provide a means of compact, low pressure, and safe hydrogen fuel. These prototype hydrogen three-wheelers have demonstrated comparable performance to the original CNG version of the vehicle, achieving a driving range of 130 km. The hydrogen storage system capable of storing 1 kg hydrogen can be refilled to 80% of its capacity in about 15 minutes at a pressure of 300 psi. The prototype vehicles developed under this project have been showcased and made available for test rides to the public at exhibits such as the 16th NHA annual meeting in April 2005, Washington, DC, and the SIAM (Society of Indian Automotive Manufacturers) annual conference in August 2005, New Delhi, India. Passengers have included members of the automotive industry, founders of both ECD and Bajaj, members of the World Bank, the Indian Union Minister for Finance, the President of the Asia

  4. Proceedings of the 1998 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review: Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    This document contains technical progress reports on 42 research projects funded by the DOE Hydrogen Program in Fiscal Year 1998, in support of its mission to make hydrogen a cost-effective energy carrier for utility, building, and transportation applications. Each year, the Program conducts a rigorous review of its portfolio of projects, utilizing teams of experts to provide vital feedback on the progress of research. These proceedings serve as an important technology reference for the DOE Hydrogen Program. The papers in Volume 2 are arranged under the following topical sections: Storage and separation systems; Thermal systems; and Transportation systems. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. The development of hydrogen sensor technology for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Jefferson, G. D.; Madzsar, G. C.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    1993-01-01

    The motivation and present status of each of the major components of the NASA Lewis Research Center hydrogen sensor program. The testing facility used to test the sensors and the proposed expansion of this facility are discussed. The Schottky diode prototype sensors, the use of SiC as a semiconductor for a hydrogen sensor, and the present characterization of PdCr are addressed. Future directions for the program are examined. It is concluded that results thus far are encouraging and that further development work is necessary.

  6. Computer programs for thermodynamic and transport properties of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, W. J.; Mc Carty, R. D.; Roder, H. M.

    1968-01-01

    Computer program subroutines provide the thermodynamic and transport properties of hydrogen in tabular form. The programs provide 18 combinations of input and output variables. This program is written in FORTRAN 4 for use on the IBM 7044 or CDC 3600 computers.

  7. Solar Hydrogen Energy Systems Science and Technology for the Hydrogen Economy

    CERN Document Server

    Zini, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    It is just a matter of time when fossil fuels will become unavailable or uneconomical to retrieve. On top of that, their environmental impact is already too severe. Renewable energy sources can be considered as the most important substitute to fossil energy, since they are inexhaustible and have a very low, if none, impact on the environment. Still, their unevenness and unpredictability are drawbacks that must be dealt with in order to guarantee a reliable and steady energy supply to the final user. Hydrogen can be the answer to these problems. This book presents the readers with the modeling, functioning and implementation of solar hydrogen energy systems, which efficiently combine different technologies to convert, store and use renewable energy. Sources like solar photovoltaic or wind, technologies like electrolysis, fuel cells, traditional and advanced hydrogen storage are discussed and evaluated together with system management and output performance. Examples are also given to show how these systems are ...

  8. Development of hydrogen, alcohol and biomass technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes verification tests on fuel conversion to methanol for oil-fired thermal power plants. Methanol is a liquid in normal temperatures, easy to transport and store, clean and affluent in raw material availability, such as natural gas and coal. High-efficiency refuse power generation uses refuses having been made high in calories, produces high temperature and pressure steam stably, and aims at high-efficiency power generation. In manufacturing high-efficiency methane gas, general refuses having been removed of non-combustible materials such as metals are solubilized, and then methane fermentation is carried out to recover energy as methane and give waste water a high-level treatment at the same time. The paper also describes joint researches with developing countries on simplified purification systems for industrial waste water by using anaerobic treatment. Discussions have been given on low-temperature crushing and sorting of wastes from large-size household electric appliances to re-utilize them and recover energy therefrom. Discussions have also been given on new methods for manufacturing methanol for fuel, such as an air-phase fluidized bed method that achieves cost reduction by means of upsizing, and a low-temperature liquid phase method which simplifies manufacturing facilities. Descriptions are given also on a global-scale utilization system for hydrogen electrolyzed by using hydraulic power and solar power. 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Economic and ordinal benefits of Hydrogen Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannantoni, C.; Zoli, M.

    2009-01-01

    A method for assessing economic, environmental and energy investments is particularly suited for hydrogen technologies, because it makes it possible to calculate business returns, negative externalities and, above all, the economic benefits to the citizens: the monetizable positive externalities and the ordinal benefits, i.e. those which cannot be reduced to a simple monetary value. [it

  10. Status and Planning of South Africa's Nuclear Hydrogen Production Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravenswaay, J. P.; Niekerk, F.; Kriek, R. J.; Blom, E.; Krieg, H. M.; Niekerk, W. M. K.; Merwe, F.; Vosloo, H. C. M. [North-West University, Potchefstroom (South Africa)

    2009-05-15

    In May 2007 the South African Cabinet approved a National Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies R and D and Innovation Strategy. The Strategy will focus on research, development and innovation for (amongst others) by building on the existing knowledge in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGR) and coal gasification Fischer-Tropsch technology, to develop local cost-competitive hydrogen production methods. As part of the roll-out strategy, the South African Department of Science and Technology (DST) created three Competence Centers (CC), including a Hydrogen Infrastructure Competence Centre hosted by the North-West University (NWU) and the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR). The Hydrogen Infrastructure CC is tasked with developing Hydrogen Production, Storage, Distribution as well as Codes and Standards programs within the framework of the DST strategic objectives. A 700kW Heliostat field is to be constructed at the CSIR. It is planned that the following processes will be investigated there: Steam Methane Reforming, High Temperature Steam Electrolysis, Metal-oxide redox process. At the NWU the main focus will be on the large scale, CO{sub 2} free, hydrogen production through thermo-chemical water splitting using nuclear heat from a suitable heat source such as a HTGR. The following will be investigated: Plasma-arc reforming of methane, Investigating the integration of a HTGR with a coal-to-liquid process, steel manufacture and ammonia production, The Hybrid-Sulphur process for the production of hydrogen.

  11. Robotics crosscutting program: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    The Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for cleaning up the legacy of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste at contaminated sites and facilities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons complex, preventing further environmental contamination, and instituting responsible environmental management. Initial efforts to achieve this mission resulted in the establishment of environmental restoration and waste management programs. However, as EM began to execute its responsibilities, decision makers became aware that the complexity and magnitude of this mission could not be achieved efficiently, affordably, safely, or reasonably with existing technology. Once the need for advanced cleanup technologies became evident, EM established an aggressive, innovative program of applied research and technology development. The Office of Technology Development (OTD) was established in November 1989 to advance new and improved environmental restoration and waste management technologies that would reduce risks to workers, the public, and the environment; reduce cleanup costs; and devise methods to correct cleanup problems that currently have no solutions. In 1996, OTD added two new responsibilities - management of a Congressionally mandated environmental science program and development of risk policy, requirements, and guidance. OTD was renamed the Office of Science and Technology (OST). This documents presents information concerning robotics tank waste retrieval overview, robotic chemical analysis automation, robotics decontamination and dismantlement, and robotics crosscutting and advanced technology

  12. Pollution Prevention Program: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has established a national Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT ampersand E) Program for pollution prevention and waste minimization at its production plants During FY89/90 the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), through the Office of Technology Development (OTD), established comprehensive, pollution prevention technical support programs to demonstrate new, environmentally-conscious technology for production processes. The RDDT ampersand E program now entails collaborative efforts across DOE. The Pollution Prevention Program is currently supporting three major activities: The DOE/US Air Force Memorandum of Understanding Program is a collaborative effort to utilize the combined resources of DOE and the Department of Defense, eliminate duplication of effort in developing technologies, and to facilitate technology solutions aimed at reducing waste through process modification, material substitution or recycling. The Waste Component Recycle, Treatment and Disposal Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) will develop recycle, treatment, and disposal processes and associated technologies for use in the dismantlement of non-nuclear weapons components, to support US arms treaties and policies. This program will focus on meeting all security and regulatory requirements (with additional benefit to the commercial electronics industry). The Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing Integrated Demonstration (ECMID) will effectively implement ECM technologies that address both the needs of the DOE Complex and US electronics industry, and encourage strong interaction between DOE and US industry. The ECMID will also develop life cycle analysis tools that will aid decisionmakers in selecting the optimum process based on the tradeoffs between cost an environmental impact

  13. NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities, Program Year 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, David L.; Raissi, Ali

    2006-01-01

    This document presents the final report for the NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities project for program year 2003. This multiyear hydrogen research program has positioned Florida to become a major player in future NASA space and space launch projects. The program is funded by grants from NASA Glenn Research Center with the objective of supporting NASA's hydrogen-related space, space launch and aeronautical research activities. The program conducts over 40 individual projects covering the areas of cryogenics, storage, production, sensors, fuel cells, power and education. At the agency side, this program is managed by NASA Glenn Research Center and at the university side, co-managed by FSEC and the University of Florida with research being conducted by FSEC and seven Florida universities: Florida International University, Florida State University, Florida A&M University, University of Central Florida, University of South Florida, University of West Florida and University of Florida. For detailed information, see the documents section of www.hydrogenresearch.org. This program has teamed these universities with the nation's premier space research center, NASA Glenn, and the nation's premier space launch facility, NASA Kennedy Space Center. It should be noted that the NASA Hydrogen Research at Florida Universities program has provided a shining example and a conduit for seven Florida universities within the SUS to work collaboratively to address a major problem of national interest, hydrogen energy and the future of energy supply in the U.S.

  14. Liquid Hydrogen Consumption During Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jonathan K.

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the issue of liquid hydrogen consumption and the points of its loss in prior to the shuttle launch. It traces the movement of the fuel from the purchase to the on-board quantity and the loss that results in 54.6 of the purchased quantity being on board the Shuttle.

  15. The NASA hydrogen energy systems technology study: A summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumann, E. A.

    1976-01-01

    The results and conclusions of the study, which found a significant current usage of hydrogen, dominated by chemical-industry needs and supplied mostly from natural gas and petroleum feedstocks are discussed. These needs are expected to increase significantly in the remainder of this century and to largely outgrow the current means of supply. Several hydrogen production methods were evaluated. Those not dependent on fossil resources were found to be presently more costly and technically more difficult than fossil-feedstock-based technologies, but it is clear that they will eventually need to be implemented.

  16. Hydrogen as Future Energy Carrier: The ENEA Point of View on Technology and Application Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ronchetti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen and fuel cells should reduce costs and increase reliability and durability to compete in the energy market. A considerable long term effort is necessary for research, development and demonstration of adequate solutions; important programs in this sense are carried out in the main industrialized countries, with the involvement of many industries, research structures and stakeholders. In such framework a relevant role is played in Italy by ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment. In the paper the main aspects related to the possible hydrogen role in the future society are addressed, according to ENEA perspectives.

  17. Development of a hydrogen gas sensor using microfabrication technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Qinghai; Stuczynski, Matthew; Madzsar, George C.

    1992-01-01

    Microfabrication and micromachining technologies are used to produce a hydrogen gas sensor based on a palladium-silver film. The sensor uses a heater that is fabricated by diffusing p-type borones into the substrate, forming a resistance heater. A diode for temperature measurement is produced using p-type boron and n-type phosphor diffused into the substrate. A thickness of the palladium-silver film is approximately 300 arcsec. The hydrogen gas sensor employs the proven palladium-silver diode structure and is surrounded by a phosphor doped resistance heater which can be heated up to a temperature of 250 C. Experimental results show that the sensor is capable of operating over a wide range of hydrogen concentration levels between 0-95 percent without any hysteresis effects.

  18. Applications of hydrogen peroxide in electrochemical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Gallegos, Alberto Armando

    1998-12-01

    It is demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide can be produced with a current efficiency of 40-70% by the cathodic reduction of oxygen at a reticulated vitreous carbon electrode in a divided flow-cell using catholytes consisting of aqueous chloride or sulphate media, pH >>{sub 2}. The supporting electrolyte does not influence either the current efficiency for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or its rate of production. The current efficiency for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not a strong function of the potential and this suggests that 2e- and 4e- reduction of oxygen occurs in parallel at different sites on the carbon surface. Voltammetry experiments showed that (a) the I-E response for oxygen reduction at pH >>{sub 2} is a function of the electrode surface and/or the supporting electrolyte; (b) both H{sub 2} evolution and oxygen reduction are retarded on carbon with increasing ionic strength; (c) the presence of ferrous ions lead to the homogeneous decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} away from the cathode surface but their effectiveness as a catalyst for this decomposition depends on their speciation in solution which changes during an electrolysis. The use of a three-dimensional electrode fabricated from reticulated vitreous carbon allows Fenton`s reagent to be electroproduced at a practical rate which makes possible the removal of organics in slightly acidic aqueous media. A wide range of highly toxic organic molecules (phenol, catechol, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, oxalic acid, aniline, cresol and amaranth) have been oxidised in mild conditions and a significant fraction of the organic carbon is evolved as CO{sub 2}. In all cases studied the initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) was depleted to levels higher than 85%, indicating a complete mineralisation of the organic pollutants. The life-time of the reticulated vitreous carbon cathode was demonstrated to be over 1000 hours during two and a half years of experiments. During this time the cathode performance was very good, leading to

  19. Hydrogen peroxide as a signal controlling plant programmed cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gechev, Tsanko S.; Hille, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has established itself as a key player in stress and programmed cell death responses, but little is known about the signaling pathways leading from H2O2 to programmed cell death in plants. Recently, identification of key regulatory mutants and near-full genome coverage

  20. The NASA photovoltaic technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, J. P.; Loria, J. C.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA Office of Aeronautical and Space Technology OAST Program in space photovoltaics is reviewed. From the perspective of national landmark mission requirements and five year and 25-year long range plans, the texture of the program is revealed. Planar silicon and concentrator GaAs array technology advances are discussed. Advances in lightweight (50 micro cell) arrays and radiation tolerance research are presented. Recent progress in cascade cells and ultralightweight GaAs planar cells is noted. Progress in raising silicon cell voltage to its theoretical maximum is detailed. Advanced concepts such as plasmon converters and the Long Duration Exposure Facility LDEF flight experiments pertaining to solar cell and array technology are also shown.

  1. New Technology in Hydrogen Absorbers for Muon Cooling Channels

    CERN Document Server

    Cummings, M A C

    2005-01-01

    Ionization cooling is the only technique fast enough to cool and focus muons for neutrino factories and muon colliders, and hydrogen is the optimal material for maximum cooling and minimal multiple scattering. Liquid hydrogen absorber R&D for the Muon Collaboration has proceeded on parallel and complementary fronts. The continuing LH2 absorber engineering and technical developments by the MuCool group conducted by ICAR* institutions (NIU, IIT and UIUC), the University of Mississippi and Oxford University, in cooperation with Fermilab, will be summarized, including results from the first hydrogen absorber tests at the newly constructed FNAL Mucool Test Area (MTA). The program includes designs for the high-powered test of an absorber prototype (external heat exchange) at the MTA which are nearing completion to be installed by summer 2005, an alternative absorber design (internal heat exchange) being finalized for the approved cooling experiment (MICE) at Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, and a novel idea for ...

  2. COLD-SAT - An orbital cryogenic hydrogen technology experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, J. R.; Wachter, Joseph P.; Powers, Albert G.

    1989-01-01

    The COLD-SAT spacecraft will perform subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and transfer experiments under low-gravity conditions to provide engineering data for future space transportation missions. Consisting of an experiment module mated to a spacecraft bus, COLD-SAT will be placed in an initial 460 km circular orbit by an Atlas I commercial launch vehicle. After deployment, the three-axis-controlled spacecraft bus will provide electric power, experiment control and data management, communications, and attitude control along with propulsive acceleration levels ranging from 10 (-6) to 10(-4) g. These accelerations are an important aspect of some of the experiments, as it is desired to know the effects that low gravity levels might have on the heat and mass transfer processes involved. The experiment module will contain the three liquid hydrogen tanks, valves, pressurization equipment, and instrumentation. At launch all the hydrogen will be in the largest tank, which has helium-purged MLI and is loaded and topped off by the hydrogen tanking system used for the Centaur upper stage of the Atlas. The two smaller tanks will be utilized in orbit for performing some of the experiments. The experiments are grouped into two classes on the basis of their priority, and include six regarded as enabling technology and nine regarded as enhancing technology.

  3. COLD-SAT: An orbital cryogenic hydrogen technology experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, J. R.; Wachter, Joseph P.; Powers, Albert G.

    1989-01-01

    The COLD-SAT spacecraft will perform subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and transfer experiments under low-gravity conditions to provide engineering data for future space transportation missions. Consisting of an experiment module mated to a spacecraft bus, COLD-SAT will be placed in an initial 460 km circular orbit by an Atlas I commercial launch vehicle. After deployment, the three-axis-controlled spacecraft bus will provide electric power, experiment control and data management, communications, and attitude control along with propulsive acceleration levels ranging from 10(-6) to 10(-4)g. These accelerations are an important aspect of some of the experiments, as it is desired to know the effects that low gravity levels might have on the heat and mass transfer processes involved. The experiment module will contain the three liquid hydrogen tanks, valves, pressurization equipment, and instrumentation. At launch all the hydrogen will be in the largest tank, which has helium-purged MLI and is loaded and topped off by the hydrogen tanking system used for the Centaur upper stage of the Atlas. The two smaller tanks will be utilized in orbit for performing some of the experiments. The experiments are grouped into two classes on the basis of their priority, and include six regarded as enabling technology and nine regarded as enhancing technology.

  4. Nuclear power plant safety improvement based on hydrogen technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Aminov, R.Z.; Yurin, V.E.

    2015-01-01

    An effective application for hydrogen technologies at nuclear power plants is proposed, which improves the plant maneuverability during normal operation, and provides for in-house power supply during the plant blackout. The reliability of the NPP's emergency power supply was assessed probabilistically for the plant blackout conditions with the simultaneous use of an auxiliary full-time operating steam turbine and the emergency power supply system channels with diesel generators. The proposed ...

  5. Common pressure vessel development for the nickel hydrogen technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleck, G.

    1981-01-01

    The design of a pressure vessel nickel hydrogen cell is described. The cell has the following key features: it eliminates electrolyte bridging; provides for independent electrolyte management for each unit stack; provides for independent oxygen management for each unit stack; has good heat dissipation; has a mechanically sound and practical interconnection; and has the maximum in common with state of the art individual pressure vessel technology.

  6. Advances in nickel hydrogen technology at Yardney Battery Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, J. G.; Hall, A. M.

    1987-01-01

    The current major activites in nickel hydrogen technology being addressed at Yardney Battery Division are outlined. Five basic topics are covered: an update on life cycle testing of ManTech 50 AH NiH2 cells in the LEO regime; an overview of the Air Force/industry briefing; nickel electrode process upgrading; 4.5 inch cell development; and bipolar NiH2 battery development.

  7. Advances in nickel hydrogen technology at Yardney Battery Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, J. G.; Hall, A. M.

    1987-09-01

    The current major activites in nickel hydrogen technology being addressed at Yardney Battery Division are outlined. Five basic topics are covered: an update on life cycle testing of ManTech 50 AH NiH2 cells in the LEO regime; an overview of the Air Force/industry briefing; nickel electrode process upgrading; 4.5 inch cell development; and bipolar NiH2 battery development.

  8. HTGR generic technology program plan (FY 80)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Purpose of the program is to develop base technology and to perform design and development common to the HTGR Steam Cycle, Gas Turbine, and Process Heat Plants. The generic technology program breaks into the base technology, generic component, pebble-bed study, technology transfer, and fresh fuel programs. (DLC)

  9. Acceptance of hydrogen technologies and the role of trust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmer, R. [Independent Institute for Environmental Concerns, Berlin (Germany). Resource Protection and Landscape Ecology; Hoelzinger, N. [Spilett New Technologies GmbH, Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    It is well known in socio-economic studies, that the success of an innovation process depends not only on the technological innovation itself or the state of the economic and institutional environment, but also on the public acceptance of the innovation. Public acceptance can be an obstacle for the development and introduction of a new and innovative idea as the example of genetic engineering in agriculture shows. In respect to hydrogen technology this means, that the compilation and communication of scientific risk assessments are not sufficient to generate or enhance public acceptance. Moreover, psychological, social and cultural aspects of risk perception have to be considered when introducing new technologies. This paper focuses on trust as a central parameter of risk perception and the public acceptance of new technologies. (orig.)

  10. European hydrogen and fuel cell technology platform. Strategic overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alleau, Th.

    2005-01-01

    In January 2004, following the recommendation of the High Level Group, the European Commission set up the European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform (HFP) a partnership of over 300 stakeholders. Its brief? To prepare and direct an effective strategy for bringing hydrogen and fuel cells to market in order to exploit their outstanding environmental and economic potential. An Advisory Council of 35 representatives from a broad range of industry, EC, public authority, academic and NGO stakeholders was set up to guide the activity, together with a number of subsidiary bodies. Two steering panels were then charged with defining a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) and Deployment Strategy (DS) respectively in order to drive the transition forward. This report gives a work in progress strategic overview, with further details provided in the Executive Summaries of the Strategic Research Agenda and Deployment Strategy foundation documents. (authors)

  11. European hydrogen and fuel cell technology platform. Strategic overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alleau, Th

    2005-07-01

    In January 2004, following the recommendation of the High Level Group, the European Commission set up the European Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Platform (HFP) a partnership of over 300 stakeholders. Its brief? To prepare and direct an effective strategy for bringing hydrogen and fuel cells to market in order to exploit their outstanding environmental and economic potential. An Advisory Council of 35 representatives from a broad range of industry, EC, public authority, academic and NGO stakeholders was set up to guide the activity, together with a number of subsidiary bodies. Two steering panels were then charged with defining a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) and Deployment Strategy (DS) respectively in order to drive the transition forward. This report gives a work in progress strategic overview, with further details provided in the Executive Summaries of the Strategic Research Agenda and Deployment Strategy foundation documents. (authors)

  12. Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Prospective Benefits Assessment Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, T. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Taylor, C. H. [TA Engineering, Inc., Catonsville, MD (United States); Moore, J. S. [TA Engineering, Inc., Catonsville, MD (United States); Ward, J. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2016-02-23

    Under a diverse set of programs, the Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies offices of DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invest in research, development, demonstration, and deployment of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies. This report estimates the benefits of successfully developing and deploying these technologies (a “Program Success” case) relative to a base case (the “No Program” case). The Program Success case represents the future with completely successful deployment of Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) technologies. The No Program case represents a future in which there is no contribution after FY 2016 by the VTO or FCTO to these technologies. The benefits of advanced vehicle, hydrogen production, delivery and storage, and fuel cell technologies were estimated on the basis of differences in fuel use, primary energy use, and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from light-, medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, including energy and emissions from fuel production, between the base case and the Program Success case. Improvements in fuel economy of various vehicle types, growth in the stock of fuel cell vehicles and other advanced technology vehicles, and decreased GHG intensity of hydrogen production and delivery in the Program Success case over the No Program case were projected to result in savings in petroleum use and GHG emissions. Benefits were disaggregated by individual program technology areas, which included the FCTO program and the VTO subprograms of batteries and electric drives; advanced combustion engines; fuels and lubricants; materials (for reduction in vehicle mass, or “lightweighting”); and, for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles, reduction in rolling and aerodynamic resistance. Projections for the Program Success case indicate that by 2035, the average fuel economy of on-road, light-duty vehicle stock could be 47% to 76

  13. Long-Term Demonstration of Hydrogen Production from Coal at Elevated Temperatures Year 6 - Activity 1.12 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanislowski, Joshua; Tolbert, Scott; Curran, Tyler; Swanson, Michael

    2012-04-30

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has continued the work of the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) Program Year 6 Task 1.12 project to expose hydrogen separation membranes to coal-derived syngas. In this follow-on project, the EERC has exposed two membranes to coal-derived syngas produced in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU). Western Research Institute (WRI), with funding from the State of Wyoming Clean Coal Technology Program and the North Dakota Industrial Commission, contracted with the EERC to conduct testing of WRI’s coal-upgrading/gasification technology for subbituminous and lignite coals in the EERC’s TRDU. This gasifier fires nominally 200–500 lb/hour of fuel and is the pilot-scale version of the full-scale gasifier currently being constructed in Kemper County, Mississippi. A slipstream of the syngas was used to demonstrate warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation using membrane technology. Two membranes were exposed to coal-derived syngas, and the impact of coal-derived impurities was evaluated. This report summarizes the performance of WRI’s patent-pending coalupgrading/ gasification technology in the EERC’s TRDU and presents the results of the warm-gas cleanup and hydrogen separation tests. Overall, the WRI coal-upgrading/gasification technology was shown to produce a syngas significantly lower in CO2 content and significantly higher in CO content than syngas produced from the raw fuels. Warm-gas cleanup technologies were shown to be capable of reducing sulfur in the syngas to 1 ppm. Each of the membranes tested was able to produce at least 2 lb/day of hydrogen from coal-derived syngas.

  14. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 2 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Moreover, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be a major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  15. Solar/hydrogen systems technologies. Volume II (Part 1 of 2). Solar/hydrogen systems assessment. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escher, W. J.D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Hanson, J. A.

    1980-06-02

    Volume II of the Solar/Hydrogen Systems Assessment contract report (2 volumes) is basically a technological source book. Relying heavily on expert contributions, it comprehensively reviews constituent technologies from which can be assembled a wide range of specific solar/hydrogen systems. Covered here are both direct and indirect solar energy conversion technologies; respectively, those that utilize solar radiant energy input directly and immediately, and those that absorb energy from a physical intermediary, previously energized by the sun. Solar-operated hydrogen energy production technologies are also covered in the report. The single most prominent of these is water electrolysis. Utilization of solar-produced hydrogen is outside the scope of the volume. However, the important hydrogen delivery step is treated under the delivery sub-steps of hydrogen transmission, distribution and storage. An exemplary use of the presented information is in the synthesis and analysis of those solar/hydrogen system candidates documented in the report's Volume I. Morever, it is intended that broad use be made of this technology information in the implementation of future solar/hydrogen systems. Such systems, configured on either a distributed or a central-plant basis, or both, may well be of major significance in effecting an ultimate transition to renewable energy systems.

  16. National hydrogen technology competitiveness analysis with an integrated fuzzy AHP and TOPSIS approaches: In case of hydrogen production and storage technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seongkon; Mogi, Gento

    2017-02-01

    The demand of fossil fuels, including oil, gas, and coal has been increasing with the rapid development of developing countries such as China and India. U.S., Japan, EU, and Korea have been making efforts to transfer to low carbon and green growth economics for sustainable development. And they also have been measuring to cope with climate change and the depletion of conventional fuels. Advanced nations implemented strategic energy technology development plans to lead the future energy market. Strategic energy technology development is crucial alternative to address the energy issues. This paper analyze the relative competitiveness of hydrogen energy technologies in case of hydrogen production and storage technologies from 2006 to 2010. Hydrogen energy technology is environmentally clean technology comparing with the previous conventional energy technologies and will play a key role to solve the greenhouse gas effect. Leading nations have increasingly focused on hydrogen technology R&D. This research is carried out the relative competitiveness of hydrogen energy technologies employed by an integrated fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (Fuzzy AHP) and The Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) approaches. We make four criteria, accounting for technological status, R&D budget, R&D human resource, and hydrogen infra. This research can be used as fundamental data for implementing national hydrogen energy R&D planning for energy policy-makers.

  17. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2012 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: May 14-18, 2012, Arlington, VA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-09-01

    This document summarizes the comments provided by peer reviewers on hydrogen and fuel cell projects presented at the fiscal year (FY) 2012 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), held May 14-18, 2012, in Arlington, VA.

  18. Relative efficiency of hydrogen technologies for the hydrogen economy : a fuzzy AHP/DEA hybrid model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.

    2009-01-01

    As a provider of national energy security, the Korean Institute of Energy Research is seeking to establish a long term strategic technology roadmap for a hydrogen-based economy. This paper addressed 5 criteria regarding the strategy, notably economic impact, commercial potential, inner capacity, technical spinoff, and development cost. The fuzzy AHP and DEA hybrid model were used in a two-stage multi-criteria decision making approach to evaluate the relative efficiency of hydrogen technologies for the hydrogen economy. The fuzzy analytic hierarchy process reflects the uncertainty of human thoughts with interval values instead of clear-cut numbers. It therefore allocates the relative importance of 4 criteria, notably economic impact, commercial potential, inner capacity and technical spin-off. The relative efficiency of hydrogen technologies for the hydrogen economy can be measured via data envelopment analysis. It was concluded that the scientific decision making approach can be used effectively to allocate research and development resources and activities

  19. Strengthening 4-H Program Communication through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robideau, Kari; Santl, Karyn

    2011-01-01

    Advances in technology are transforming how youth and parents interact with programs. The Strengthening 4-H Communication through Technology project was implemented in eight county 4-H programs in Northwest Minnesota. This article outlines the intentional process used to effectively implement technology in program planning. The project includes:…

  20. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.

    2012-09-28

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify patents related to hydrogen and fuel cells that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents’ current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs that are related to hydrogen and fuel cells.

  1. Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A.; Brown, Scott A.

    2011-09-29

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and document the commercial and emerging (projected to be commercialized within the next 3 years) hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products that resulted from Department of Energy support through the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Program in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). To do this, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook two efforts simultaneously to accomplish this project. The first effort was a patent search and analysis to identify hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related patents that are associated with FCT-funded projects (or projects conducted by DOE-EERE predecessor programs) and to ascertain the patents current status, as well as any commercial products that may have used the technology documented in the patent. The second effort was a series of interviews with current and past FCT personnel, a review of relevant program annual reports, and an examination of hydrogen- and fuel-cell-related grants made under the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, and within the FCT portfolio.

  2. NASA Lewis advanced IPV nickel-hydrogen technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithrick, John J.; Britton, Doris L.

    1993-01-01

    Individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology was advanced at NASA Lewis and under Lewis contracts. Some of the advancements are as follows: to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide electrolyte to improve cycle life and performance, to modify the state of the art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes and further improve cycle life, and to develop a lightweight nickel electrode to reduce battery mass, hence reduce launch and/or increase satellite payload. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen battery cells was reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 accelerated LEO cycles at 80 percent DOD compared to 3,500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. Results of the boiler plate cell tests have been validated at NWSC, Crane, Indiana. Forty-eight ampere-hour flight cells containing 26 and 31 percent KOH have undergone real time LEO cycle life testing at an 80 percent DOD, 10 C. The three cells containing 26 percent KOH failed on the average at cycle 19,500. The three cells containing 31 percent KOH failed on the average at cycle 6,400. Validation testing of NASA Lewis 125 Ah advanced design IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells is also being conducted at NWSC, Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis contract. This consists of characterization, storage, and cycle life testing. There was no capacity degradation after 52 days of storage with the cells in the discharged state, on open circuit, 0 C, and a hydrogen pressure of 14.5 psia. The catalyzed wall wick cells have been cycled for over 22,694 cycles with no cell failures in the continuing test. All three of the non-catalyzed wall wick cells failed (cycles 9,588; 13,900; and 20,575). Cycle life test results of the Fibrex nickel electrode has demonstrated the feasibility of an improved nickel electrode giving a higher specific energy nickel-hydrogen cell. A nickel-hydrogen boiler plate cell using an 80

  3. Control Robotics Programming Technology. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This Technology Learning Activity (TLA) for control robotics programming technology in grades 6-10 is designed to teach students to construct and program computer-controlled devices using a LEGO DACTA set and computer interface and to help them understand how control technology and robotics affect them and their lifestyle. The suggested time for…

  4. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    1999-03-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  5. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program Update 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2002-07-30

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program). The report address the role of the CCT Program, implementation, funding and costs, accomplishments, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results. Also includes Power Plant Improvement Initiative Projects.

  6. Integrated hydrogen/oxygen technology applied to auxiliary propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, David L.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of the Integrated Hydrogen/Oxygen Technology (IHOT) study was to determine if the vehicle/mission needs and technology of the 1990's support development of an all cryogenic H2/O2 system. In order to accomplish this, IHOT adopted the approach of designing Integrated Auxiliary Propulsion Systems (IAPS) for a representative manned vehicle; the advanced manned launch system. The primary objectives were to develop IAPS concepts which appeared to offer viable alternatives to state-of-the-art (i.e., hypergolic, or earth-storable) APS approaches. The IHOT study resulted in the definition of three APS concepts; two cryogenic IAPS, and a third concept utilizing hypergolic propellants.

  7. Demonstration plant Neunburg vorm Wald for testing solar hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szyszka, A.

    1992-01-01

    Demonstration plant Neunburg vorm Wald for testing solar hydrogen technologies. The Solar-Wasserstoff-Bayern GmbH (SWB), an associated company of the associate Bayernwerk AG (share of 60%), BMW INTEC Beteiligungs GmbH, Linde AG, MBB GmbH and Siemens AG (10% of each share) founded at the end of 1986, realizes, operates and supplements a demonstration plant in Neunburg vorm Wald, for which in a commercially feasible dimension important system steps are tested oriented to the practice in their combination with regard to energy management based on hydrogen as energy source. The project is planned for a long term separated into single project phases. The investment volume of about 64 millions estimated in October 1987 is kept well from the present view for phase 1, reaching to the end of 1991. The Federal Ministry for Research and Technology (BMFT) and the Bavarian State Ministry for Economy and Traffic (B ST MWV) support the part width to be subsidized of 35% and 15% respectively. (orig.) [de

  8. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Technology Validation and Market Introduction 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for technology validation and market introduction, including ENERGY STAR, building energy codes, technology transfer application centers, commercial lighting initiative, EnergySmart Schools, EnergySmar

  9. Development status on hydrogen production technology using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor at JAEA, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiozawa, Shusaku; Ogawa, Masuro; Hino, Ryutaro

    2006-01-01

    The high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), which is graphite-moderated and helium-cooled, is attractive due to its unique capability of producing high temperature helium gas and its fully inherent reactor safety. In particular, hydrogen production using the nuclear heat from HTGR (up to 900 deg. C) offers one of the most promising technological solutions to curb the rising level of CO 2 emission and resulting risk of climate change. The interests in HTGR as an advanced nuclear power source for the next generation reactor, therefore, continue to rise. This is represented by the Japanese HTTR (High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) Project and the Chinese HTR-10 Project, followed by the international Generation IV development program, US nuclear hydrogen initiative program, EU innovative HTR technology development program, etc. To enhance nuclear energy application to heat process industries, the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has continued extensive efforts for development of hydrogen production system using the nuclear heat from HTGR in the framework of the HTTR Project. The HTTR Project has the objectives of establishing both HTGR technology and heat utilization technology. Using the HTTR constructed at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA, reactor performance and safety demonstration tests have been conducted as planned. The reactor outlet temperature of 950 deg. C was successfully achieved in April 2004. For hydrogen production as heat utilization technology, R and D on thermo-chemical water splitting by the 'Iodine-Sulfur process' (IS process) has been conducted step by step. Proof of the basic IS process was made in 1997 on a lab-scale of hydrogen production of 1 L/h. In 2004, one-week continuous operation of the IS process was successfully demonstrated using a bench-scale apparatus with hydrogen production rate of 31 L/h. Further test using a pilot scale facility with greater hydrogen production rate of 10 - 30 m 3 /h is planned as

  10. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2017 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-10-18

    The fiscal year 2017 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June June 5-9, 2017, in Washington, D.C. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: GREEN BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This techno...

  12. The role of electricity storage and hydrogen technologies in enabling global low-carbon energy transitions

    OpenAIRE

    McPherson, M.; Johnson, N.; Strubegger, M.

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have noted the importance of electricity storage and hydrogen technologies for enabling large-scale variable renewable energy (VRE) deployment in long-term climate change mitigation scenarios. However, global studies, which typically use integrated assessment models, assume a fixed cost trajectory for storage and hydrogen technologies; thereby ignoring the sensitivity of VRE deployment and/or mitigation costs to uncertainties in future storage and hydrogen technology costs. Y...

  13. Using Technology to Enhance an Automotive Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Denis

    2009-01-01

    Denis Ashton uses technology in his automotive technology program at East Valley Institute of Technology (EVIT) to positively impact student outcomes. Ashton, the department chair for the automotive programs at EVIT, in Mesa, Arizona, says that using an interactive PowerPoint curriculum makes learning fun for students and provides immediate…

  14. A Technical and Economic Review of Solar Hydrogen Production Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Erik; Fowler, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen energy systems are being developed to replace fossil fuels-based systems for transportation and stationary application. One of the challenges facing the widespread adoption of hydrogen as an energy vector is the lack of an efficient, economical, and sustainable method of hydrogen production. In the short term, hydrogen produced from…

  15. A year in the life of an investor relations manager in the hydrogen technology section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merer, R.M.; Dundas, A.J.

    2001-01-01

    The technical and cost challenges of hydrogen technology were discussed. Stuart Energy manufactures appliances that generate hydrogen from water, using electricity. The basis for the water electrolysis process is hydrogen generation and supply. This is the basis for fuel cell technology for all applications, energy storage, grid stabilization, and electric power generation from renewable energy sources. Stuart Energy develops the technology for the hydrogen economy for industrial, transportation, and regenerative power markets. In the past decade, the company has reduced the cost and size of its equipment significantly, creating a viable solution to the infrastructure needs of a hydrogen based economy. This presentation focused in part on the new techniques that are necessary to attract and maintain investor interest in Stuart Energy with particular emphasis on investor emotions since Stuart Energy's initial public offering (IPO) in October 2000. At the time, oil prices were high and hydrogen technology was in demand. Since that time, the hydrogen index has dropped significantly and share values are far from their peak. The author explained how stock valuation is determined and emphasized that the hydrogen economy will be built on steady technology development and not on volatile shareholder emotions. The technology promises to generate and use hydrogen in a manner that offers the same or better performance than today's technology, at greater convenience and lower cost. Hydrogen also offers benefits of energy security, higher efficiency and sustainable development. 1 ref

  16. THE ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES ACCEPTANCE (ETA) PROGRAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr-Andres, Christina B.

    2001-01-01

    The Environmental Technologies Acceptance (ETA) Program at the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) is intended to advance the development, commercial acceptance, and timely deployment of selected private sector technologies for the cleanup of sites in the nuclear defense complex as well as the greater market. As shown in Table 1, this cooperative agreement funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) consists of three tasks: Technology Selection, Technology Development, and Technology Verification. As currently conceived, the ETA will address the needs of as many technologies as appropriate under its current 3-year term. This report covers activities during the first 6 months of the 3-year ETA program

  17. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Program Update 2003 (Volume 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2003-12-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  18. The developments of international hydrogen and fuel cell technology standards and the response strategies in Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tso, C.

    2009-01-01

    The application of hydrogen and fuel cells has expanded as the technology in international markets has improved. Leading countries have focused on establishing hydrogen and fuel cell technology standards. Both the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) continuously release new hydrogen and fuel cell related standards. Although the government of Taiwan is promoting the development of a hydrogen and fuel cell industry, it may delay the commercialized schedule if there are no hydrogen and fuel cell related standards and regulations in place. Standards and regulations must be established as quickly as possible in order to accelerate the progress of the hydrogen and fuel cell industry. This presentation reviewed the international progress in hydrogen and fuel cell development and explained Taiwan's response strategies regarding the adoption of hydrogen and fuel cell products in niche Taiwanese markets

  19. Slush hydrogen (SLH2) technology development for application to the National Aerospace Plane (NASP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, Richard L.; Hardy, Terry L.; Whalen, Margaret V.; Richter, G. P.

    1990-01-01

    The National Aerospae Plane (NASP) program is giving us the opportunity to reach new unique answers in a number of engineering categories. The answers are considered enhancing technology or enabling technology. Airframe materials and densified propellants are examples of enabling technology. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Lewis Research Center has the task of providing the technology data which will be used as the basis to decide if slush hydrogen (SLH2) will be the fuel of choice for the NASP. The objectives of this NASA Lewis program are: (1) to provide, where possible, verified numerical models of fluid production, storage, transfer, and feed systems, and (2) to provide verified design criteria for other engineered aspects of SLH2 systems germane to an NASP. This program is a multiyear multimillion dollar effort. The present pursuit of the above listed objectives is multidimensional, covers a range of problem areas, works these to different levels of depth, and takes advantage of the resources available in private industry, academia, and the U.S. Government. The NASA Lewis overall program plan is summarized. The initial implementation of the plan will be unfolded and the present level of efforts in each of the resource areas will be discussed. Results already in hand will be pointed out. A description of additionally planned near-term experimental and analytical work is described.

  20. Division of Environmental Control Technology program, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    Environmental engineering programs are reviewed for the following technologies; coal; petroleum and gas; oil shale; solar; geothermal and energy conservation; nuclear energy; and decontamination and decommissioning. Separate abstracts were prepared for each technology. (MHR)

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PROGRAM: FUEL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program evaluates the performance of innovative air, water, pollution prevention and monitoring technologies that have the potential to improve human health and the environment. This techno...

  2. 75 FR 14131 - Broadband Technology Opportunities Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Program AGENCY: National Telecommunications and Information Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce... for the electronic submission of CCI projects under the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program...

  3. Advanced Thermionic Converter Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, James R.

    2003-01-01

    A thermionic energy converter (TEC) is a direct energy conversion device, which converts heat to electricity with no moving parts. Thermionic converters are well suited to space nuclear power systems because of their high power density, high heat rejection temperature, and immunity to radiation. Several recent advances in thermionic energy conversion technology have greatly improved the efficiency of these devices. A research program was undertaken to independently confirm these advances, and to extend them to converters with practical geometry. The recent development of a stable cesium/oxygen vapor source has led to a significant improvement in performance. The addition of a small amount of oxygen to the cesium vapor can increase the emission current by a factor of three or more. The beneficial effects of oxygen are stable and reproducible. A TEC with a cold seal has been invented, which greatly simplifies construction, operation, and maintenance of the TEC. Electron reflection from the collector has been shown to reduce the performance of TEC's. Reflection suppressing materials were produced and tested. One sample showed evidence of reflection suppression, increasing the average output voltage by 0.16 V. Another sample did not. Research in this area is ongoing.

  4. How Programming Fits with Technology Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Geoffrey A.; Rich, Peter; Leatham, Keith R.

    2012-01-01

    Programming is a fundamental component of modern society. Programming and its applications influence much of how people work and interact. Because of people's reliance on programming in one or many of its applications, there is a need to teach students to be programming literate. Because the purpose of the International Technology and Engineering…

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BIOQUELL, INC. CLARIS C HYDROGEN PEROXIDE GAS GENERATOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Clarus C Hydrogen Peroxide Gas Generator, a biological decontamination device manufactured by BIOQUELL, Inc. The unit was tested by evaluating its ability to decontaminate seven types...

  6. Knowing hydrogen and loving it too? Information provision, cultural predispositions, and support for hydrogen technology among the Dutch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterberg, Peter

    2014-05-01

    This research note studies experimentally how the public translates information about hydrogen technology into evaluations of the latter. It does so by means of a nationally representative factorial survey in the Netherlands (n = 1,012), in which respondents have been given seven randomly selected pieces of (negative, positive and/or neutral) information about this technology. Findings are consistent with framing theory. For those with high trust in science and technology, positive information increases support, while negative information detracts from it. For those with low trust in science and technology, however, information provision has no effect at all on the evaluation of hydrogen technology. Precisely among the most likely targets of science communication, i.e., those without much trust in science and technology, providing positive information fails to evoke a more favorable evaluation from the latter.

  7. Hydrogen embrittlement of structural alloys. A technology survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, J. L., Jr.; Stuhrke, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Technical abstracts for about 90 significant documents relating to hydrogen embrittlement of structural metals and alloys are reviewed. Particular note was taken of documents regarding hydrogen effects in rocket propulsion, aircraft propulsion and hydrogen energy systems, including storage and transfer systems.

  8. Long-term environmental and socio-economic impact of a hydrogen energy program in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Lutero Carmo de [Uberlandia Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Uberlandia, MG (Brazil); Veziroglu, T. Nejat [Miami Univ., Clean Energy Research Inst., Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    2001-07-01

    In this study, a program of electrolytic hydrogen generation for Brazil through the assistance of photovoltaic cell panels is proposed. The generated hydrogen will serve as an energy carrier and will be used in every application where fossil fuels are being used today. Three scenarios have been considered: fast hydrogen introduction, slow hydrogen introduction, and no hydrogen introduction. The results show that hydrogen introduction (1) will increase the energy consumption, (2) will increase the gross national product per capita, (3) will reduce pollution, and (4) will increase the quality of life in Brazil. Fast hydrogen introduction brings the benefits by 20 years earlier. (Author)

  9. A fuzzy analytic hierarchy process approach for assessing national competitiveness in the hydrogen technology sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seong Kon; Kim, Jong Wook [Energy Policy Research Division, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 71-2 Jang-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea); Mogi, Gento [Department of Technology Management for Innovation, Graduate School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Gim, Bong Jin [Department of Industrial Engineering, Dankook University, San 29, Anseo-dong, Cheonan-si, Chungnam 330-714 (Korea)

    2008-12-15

    As it is more environmentally sound and friendly than conventional energy technologies that emit carbon dioxide, hydrogen technology can play a key role in solving the problems caused by the greenhouse gas effect and in coping with the hydrogen economy. Numerous countries around the world, including Korea, have increasingly focused on R and D where hydrogen technology development is concerned. This paper focuses on the use of the fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (fuzzy AHP), which is an extension of the AHP method and uses interval values to reflect the vagueness of human thought, to assess national competitiveness in the hydrogen technology sector. This analysis based on the AHP and fuzzy AHP methods revealed that Korea ranked 6th in terms of national competitiveness in the hydrogen technology sector. (author)

  10. Coal Mining Technology, An Innovative Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabash Valley Coll., Mt. Carmel, IL.

    Described in detail in this report are the processes and procedures involved in the development of a State funded curriculum and program for a new emerging technology, in this instance a Coal Mining Technology Program, to be taught at Wabash Valley College in Illinois. The document provides a step-by-step account of the determination of need,…

  11. Progress in BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Curtiss, J.; Economos, C.; Jahelka, J.; Sato, K.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of the BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program are discussed. The experimental facilities are described and two sets of preliminary experiments are presented. Chemical reaction time experiments have been performed to determine the length of time reactive mixtures of interest can be kept at temperature before reaction in the absence of ignition sources consumes the reactants. Preliminary observations are presented for temperatures in the range 588K--700K. Detonation experiments are described in which detonation cell width is measured as a measure of mixture sensitivity to detonation. Preliminary experiments are described which are being carried out to establish data reproducibility with previous measurements in the literature and to test out and refine experimental methods. Intensive studies of hydrogen combustion phenomena were carried out during the 1980s. Much of this effort was driven by issues related to nuclear reactor safety. The ''high-speed'' combustion phenomena of flame acceleration, deflagration-to-detonation transition, direct initiation of detonation, detonation propagation, limits of detonation in tubes and channels, transmission of detonations from confined to unconfined geometry and other related phenomena were studied using a variety of gaseous fuel-oxidant systems, including hydrogen-steam-air systems of interest in reactor safety studies. Several reviews are available which document this work [Lee, 1989; Berman, 1986

  12. Progress in BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Curtiss, J.; Economos, C.; Jahelka, J.; Sato, K.

    1992-12-31

    The objectives of the BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program are discussed. The experimental facilities are described and two sets of preliminary experiments are presented. Chemical reaction time experiments have been performed to determine the length of time reactive mixtures of interest can be kept at temperature before reaction in the absence of ignition sources consumes the reactants. Preliminary observations are presented for temperatures in the range 588K--700K. Detonation experiments are described in which detonation cell width is measured as a measure of mixture sensitivity to detonation. Preliminary experiments are described which are being carried out to establish data reproducibility with previous measurements in the literature and to test out and refine experimental methods. Intensive studies of hydrogen combustion phenomena were carried out during the 1980s. Much of this effort was driven by issues related to nuclear reactor safety. The ``high-speed`` combustion phenomena of flame acceleration, deflagration-to-detonation transition, direct initiation of detonation, detonation propagation, limits of detonation in tubes and channels, transmission of detonations from confined to unconfined geometry and other related phenomena were studied using a variety of gaseous fuel-oxidant systems, including hydrogen-steam-air systems of interest in reactor safety studies. Several reviews are available which document this work [Lee, 1989; Berman, 1986].

  13. Progress in BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.; Curtiss, J.; Economos, C.; Jahelka, J.; Sato, K.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives of the BNL High-Temperature Hydrogen Combustion Research Program are discussed. The experimental facilities are described and two sets of preliminary experiments are presented. Chemical reaction time experiments have been performed to determine the length of time reactive mixtures of interest can be kept at temperature before reaction in the absence of ignition sources consumes the reactants. Preliminary observations are presented for temperatures in the range 588K--700K. Detonation experiments are described in which detonation cell width is measured as a measure of mixture sensitivity to detonation. Preliminary experiments are described which are being carried out to establish data reproducibility with previous measurements in the literature and to test out and refine experimental methods. Intensive studies of hydrogen combustion phenomena were carried out during the 1980s. Much of this effort was driven by issues related to nuclear reactor safety. The high-speed'' combustion phenomena of flame acceleration, deflagration-to-detonation transition, direct initiation of detonation, detonation propagation, limits of detonation in tubes and channels, transmission of detonations from confined to unconfined geometry and other related phenomena were studied using a variety of gaseous fuel-oxidant systems, including hydrogen-steam-air systems of interest in reactor safety studies. Several reviews are available which document this work [Lee, 1989; Berman, 1986].

  14. A Review on the Production and Purification of Biomass-Derived Hydrogen Using Emerging Membrane Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Yin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen energy systems are recognized as a promising solution for the energy shortage and environmental pollution crises. To meet the increasing demand for hydrogen, various possible systems have been investigated for the production of hydrogen by efficient and economical processes. Because of its advantages of being renewable and environmentally friendly, biomass processing has the potential to become the major hydrogen production route in the future. Membrane technology provides an efficient and cost-effective solution for hydrogen separation and greenhouse gas capture in biomass processing. In this review, the future prospects of using gas separation membranes for hydrogen production in biomass processing are extensively addressed from two perspectives: (1 the current development status of hydrogen separation membranes made of different materials and (2 the feasibility of using these membranes for practical applications in biomass-derived hydrogen production. Different types of hydrogen separation membranes, including polymeric membranes, dense metal membranes, microporous membranes (zeolite, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, silica, etc. are systematically discussed in terms of their fabrication methods, gas permeation performance, structure stability properties, etc. In addition, the application feasibility of these membranes in biomass processing is assessed from both practical and economic perspectives. The benefits and possibilities of using membrane reactors for hydrogen production in biomass processing are also discussed. Lastly, we summarize the limitations of the currently available hydrogen membranes as well as the gaps between research achievements and industrial application. We also propose expected research directions for the future development of hydrogen gas membrane technology.

  15. Innovative Technology Development Program. Final summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beller, J.

    1995-08-01

    Through the Office of Technology Development (OTD), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a national applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program, whose goal has been to resolve the major technical issues and rapidly advance technologies for environmental restoration and waste management. The Innovative Technology Development (ITD) Program was established as a part of the DOE, Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT ampersand E) Program. The plan is part of the DOE's program to restore sites impacted by weapons production and to upgrade future waste management operations. On July 10, 1990, DOE issued a Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) through the Idaho Operations Office to solicit private sector help in developing innovative technologies to support DOE's clean-up goals. This report presents summaries of each of the seven projects, which developed and tested the technologies proposed by the seven private contractors selected through the PRDA process

  16. Innovative Technology Development Program. Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beller, J.

    1995-08-01

    Through the Office of Technology Development (OTD), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a national applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation program, whose goal has been to resolve the major technical issues and rapidly advance technologies for environmental restoration and waste management. The Innovative Technology Development (ITD) Program was established as a part of the DOE, Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E) Program. The plan is part of the DOE`s program to restore sites impacted by weapons production and to upgrade future waste management operations. On July 10, 1990, DOE issued a Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) through the Idaho Operations Office to solicit private sector help in developing innovative technologies to support DOE`s clean-up goals. This report presents summaries of each of the seven projects, which developed and tested the technologies proposed by the seven private contractors selected through the PRDA process.

  17. Impact of hydrogen onboard storage technologies on the performance of hydrogen fuelled vehicles: A techno-economic well-to-wheel assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, M.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/310873754; Faaij, A.P.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/10685903X

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen onboard storage technologies form an important factor in the overall performance of hydrogen fuelled transportation, both energetically and economically. Particularly, advanced storage options such as metal hydrides and carbon nanotubes are often hinted favourable to conventional, liquid

  18. Environmental technologies program, Fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This document presents details of the technology that is currently being demonstrated at the Hanford Site. The program is testing technology for cost and time savings in the following clean-up areas: detection and characterization; soil and ground water remediation; remote handling; waste minimization; and high-level, low-level, and mixed waste treatment. This document also contains a technology integration section.

  19. CICT Computing, Information, and Communications Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufenberg, Lawrence; Tu, Eugene (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The CICT Program is part of the NASA Aerospace Technology Enterprise's fundamental technology thrust to develop tools. processes, and technologies that enable new aerospace system capabilities and missions. The CICT Program's four key objectives are: Provide seamless access to NASA resources- including ground-, air-, and space-based distributed information technology resources-so that NASA scientists and engineers can more easily control missions, make new scientific discoveries, and design the next-generation space vehicles, provide high-data delivery from these assets directly to users for missions, develop goal-oriented human-centered systems, and research, develop and evaluate revolutionary technology.

  20. Integrated Temperature and Hydrogen Sensors with MEMS Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hongchuan; Huang, Min; Yu, Yibing; Tian, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Xiaohui; Zhang, Wanli; Zhang, Jianfeng; Huang, Yifan; Yu, Kun

    2017-12-31

    In this work, a PdNi thin film hydrogen gas sensor with integrated Pt thin film temperature sensor was designed and fabricated using the micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) process. The integrated sensors consist of two resistors: the former, based on Pt film, is used as a temperature sensor, while the latter had the function of hydrogen sensing and is based on PdNi alloy film. The temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) in both devices was measured and the output response of the PdNi film hydrogen sensor was calibrated based on the temperature acquired by the Pt temperature sensor. The SiN layer was deposited on top of Pt film to inhibit the hydrogen diffusion and reduce consequent disturbance on temperature measurement. The TCR of the PdNi film and the Pt film was about 0.00122/K and 0.00217/K, respectively. The performances of the PdNi film hydrogen sensor were investigated with hydrogen concentrations from 0.3% to 3% on different temperatures from 294.7 to 302.2 K. With the measured temperature of the Pt resistor and the TCR of the PdNi film, the impact of the temperature on the performances of the PdNi film hydrogen sensor was reduced. The output response, response time and recovery time of the PdNi film hydrogen sensors under the hydrogen concentration of 0.5%, 1.0%, 1.5% and 2.0% were measured at 313 K. The output response of the PdNi thin film hydrogen sensors increased with increasing hydrogen concentration while the response time and recovery time decreased. A cycling test between pure nitrogen and 3% hydrogen concentration was performed at 313 K and PdNi thin film hydrogen sensor demonstrated great repeatability in the cycling test.

  1. The development of hydrogen sensor technology at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Neudeck, Philip G.; Jefferson, G. D.; Madzsar, G. C.; Liu, C. C.; Wu, Q. H.

    1993-01-01

    The detection of hydrogen leaks in aerospace applications, especially those involving hydrogen fuel propulsion systems, is of extreme importance for reasons of reliability, safety, and economy. Motivated by leaks occurring in liquid hydrogen lines supplying the main engine of the Space Shuttle, NASA Lewis has initiated a program to develop point-contact hydrogen sensors which address the needs of aerospace applications. Several different approaches are being explored. They include the fabrication of PdAg Schottky diode structures, the characterization of PdCr as a hydrogen sensitive alloy, and the use of SiC as a semiconductor for hydrogen sensors. This paper discusses the motivation behind and present status of each of the major components of the NASA LeRC hydrogen sensor program.

  2. Clean Technology Evaluation & Workforce Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patricia Glaza

    2012-12-01

    The overall objective of the Clean Technology Evaluation portion of the award was to design a process to speed up the identification of new clean energy technologies and match organizations to testing and early adoption partners. The project was successful in identifying new technologies targeted to utilities and utility technology integrators, in developing a process to review and rank the new technologies, and in facilitating new partnerships for technology testing and adoption. The purpose of the Workforce Development portion of the award was to create an education outreach program for middle & high-school students focused on clean technology science and engineering. While originally targeting San Diego, California and Cambridge, Massachusetts, the scope of the program was expanded to include a major clean technology speaking series and expo as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  3. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Program update 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (also referred to as the CCT Program) is a $6.9 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Technology has a vital role in ensuring that coal can continue to serve U.S. energy interests and enhance opportunities for economic growth and employment while meeting the national committment to a clean and healthy global environment. These technologies are being advanced through the CCT Program. The CCT Program supports three substantive national objectives: ensuring a sustainable environment through technology; enhancing energy efficiency and reliability; providing opportunities for economic growth and employment. The technologies being demonstrated under the CCT Program reduce the emissions of sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, greenhouse gases, hazardous air pollutants, solid and liquid wastes, and other emissions resulting from coal use or conversion to other fuel forms. These emissions reductions are achieved with efficiencies greater than or equal to currently available technologies.

  4. DEB-silicone rubber hydrogen absorbing Raman detection technology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Suolong; Zhong Jingrong; Wang Huang; Yang Kaixu; Xiao Jiqun; Liu Jiaxi; Liao Junsheng

    2012-01-01

    The DEB-Pd/C hydrogen getter powder and DEB-Pd/C-silicone rubber getter film were prepared and used for hydrogen detection in close systems by laser Raman method. The DEB alkanes Raman peak intensity changes with the getter time were monitored by Raman spectrometer. As a result, silicone rubber has good compatibility with DEB getter, slow access to hydrogen and good flexible. The alkanes peak intensity-getter time followed a exponential rule. DEB getter films are suitable for Raman on-line monitor of cumulative hydrogen of a closed system at long time. (authors)

  5. State of technology on hydrogen fueled gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esgar, J. B.

    1974-01-01

    A series of investigations was conducted episodically from the 1950's to the early 1970's to investigate the feasibility and potential problem areas in the use of hydrogen fuel for gas turbine engines. A brief summary and bibliography are presented of the research that has been conducted by NASA, its predecessor NACA, and by industry under U. S. Air Force sponsorship. Although development efforts would be required to provide hydrogen fueled gas turbine engines for aircraft, past research has shown that hydrogen fueled engines are feasible, and except for flight weight liquid hydrogen pumps, there are no problem areas relating to engines requiring significant research.

  6. Semiconductor technology program. Progress briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement technology for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices is reviewed. Activities include: optical linewidth and thermal resistance measurements; device modeling; dopant density profiles; resonance ionization spectroscopy; and deep level measurements. Standardized oxide charge terminology is also described.

  7. Development of a Renewable Hydrogen Production and Fuel Cell Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Michael D. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2011-11-20

    This report presents the results of a program designed to develop an education program to 1) Provide exposure to the basics of hydrogen-based technologies to a large number of students. This exposure will provide a level of training that will allow students to converse and work with other scientists and engineers in this field. It will also serve to spark a level of interest in a subset of students who will then continue with more advanced coursework and/or research; 2) Provide a “mid-level” training to a moderate level of students. More detailed and directed education will provide students with the ability to work to support industry and government development of hydrogen technologies. This level of training would be sufficient to work in the industry, but not be a leader in research and development; and 3) Provide detailed training to a smaller subset of students with a strong interest and propensity to make significant contributions to the technology development. These individuals will have extensive hands-on experience through internships that will play a major role in industry, government, and academia.

  8. Proceedings of the 1996 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The 29 papers contained in Volume 1 are related to systems analysis and hydrogen production. Papers in the systems analysis section discuss utility markets, comparison of hydrogen with other alternative fuels, hydrogen vehicles, renewable hydrogen production, storage, and detection, and hydrogen storage systems development. Hydrogen production methods include the use of algae, photosynthesis, glucose dehydrogenase, syngas, photoelectrochemical reactions, photovoltaics, water electrolysis, solar photochemical reactions, pyrolysis, catalytic steam reforming, municipal solid wastes, thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas, and plasma reformers. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. Proceedings of the 1992 DOE/NREL hydrogen program review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocheleau, R.E.; Gao, Q.H.; Miller, E. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1992-07-01

    These proceedings contain 18 papers presented at the meeting. While the majority of the papers (11) had to do with specific hydrogen production methods, other papers were related to hydrogen storage systems, evaluations of and systems analysis for a hydrogen economy, and environmental transport of hydrogen from a pipeline leak.

  10. Knowing hydrogen and loving it too? : Information provision, cultural predispositions, and support for hydrogen technology among the Dutch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, Peter

    This research note studies experimentally how the public translates information about hydrogen technology into evaluations of the latter. It does so by means of a nationally representative factorial survey in the Netherlands (n = 1,012), in which respondents have been given seven randomly selected

  11. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. Program update 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program) is a $7.14 billion cost-shared industry/government technology development effort. The program is to demonstrate a new generation of advanced coal-based technologies, with the most promising technologies being moved into the domestic and international marketplace. Clean coal technologies being demonstrated under the CCT program are creating the technology base that allows the nation to meet its energy and environmental goals efficiently and reliably. The fact that most of the demonstrations are being conducted at commercial scale, in actual user environments, and under conditions typical of commercial operations allows the potential of the technologies to be evaluated in their intended commercial applications. The technologies are categorized into four market sectors: advanced electric power generation systems; environmental control devices; coal processing equipment for clean fuels; and industrial technologies. Sections of this report describe the following: Role of the Program; Program implementation; Funding and costs; The road to commercial realization; Results from completed projects; Results and accomplishments from ongoing projects; and Project fact sheets. Projects include fluidized-bed combustion, integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants, advanced combustion and heat engines, nitrogen oxide control technologies, sulfur dioxide control technologies, combined SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} technologies, coal preparation techniques, mild gasification, and indirect liquefaction. Industrial applications include injection systems for blast furnaces, coke oven gas cleaning systems, power generation from coal/ore reduction, a cyclone combustor with S, N, and ash control, cement kiln flue gas scrubber, and pulse combustion for steam coal gasification.

  12. Hydrogen Highways: Lessons on the Energy Technology-Policy Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waegel, Alex; Byrne, John; Tobin, Daniel; Haney, Bryan

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen economy has received increasing attention recently. Common reasons cited for investigating hydrogen energy options are improved energy security, reduced environmental impacts, and its contribution to a transition to sustainable energy sources. In anticipation of these benefits, national and local initiatives have been launched in the…

  13. Novel sugar-to-hydrogen technology promises transportation fuel independence

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The hydrogen economy is not a futuristic concept. The U.S. Department of Energy's 2006 Advance Energy Initiative calls for competitive ethanol from plant sources by 2012 and a good selection of hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles by 2020.

  14. Technology and Manufacturing Readiness of Early Market Motive and Non-Motive Hydrogen Storage Technologies for Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronnebro, Ewa

    2012-06-16

    PNNL’s objective in this report is to provide DOE with a technology and manufacturing readiness assessment to identify hydrogen storage technologies’ maturity levels for early market motive and non-motive applications and to provide a path forward toward commercialization. PNNL’s Technology Readiness Assessment (TRA) is based on a combination of Technology Readiness Level (TRL) and Manufacturing Readiness Level (MRL) designations that enable evaluation of hydrogen storage technologies in varying levels of development. This approach provides a logical methodology and roadmap to enable the identification of hydrogen storage technologies, their advantages/disadvantages, gaps and R&D needs on an unbiased and transparent scale that is easily communicated to interagency partners. The TRA report documents the process used to conduct the TRA, reports the TRL and MRL for each assessed technology and provides recommendations based on the findings.

  15. Improvement study for the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion technology

    OpenAIRE

    A. Haj Ayed; K. Kusterer; H.H.-W. Funke; J. Keinz; C. Striegan; D. Bohn

    2015-01-01

    The dry-low-NOx (DLN) micromix combustion principle is developed for the low emission combustion of hydrogen in an industrial gas turbine APU GTCP 36-300. The further decrease of NOx emissions along a wider operation range with pure hydrogen supports the introduction of the micromix technology to industrial applications. Experimental and numerical studies show the successful advance of the DLN micromix combustion to extended DLN operation range. The impact of the hydrogen fuel properties on t...

  16. Membrane pumping technology, helium and hydrogen isotopes separation in the fusion hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigarov, A.Yu.; Pistunovich, V.I.; Busnyuk, A.O.

    1994-01-01

    A gas pumping system for the ITER, improved by implementation of superpermeable membranes for selective hydrogen isotope exhaust, is considered. The study of the pumping capability of a niobium membrane for a hydrogen-helium mixture has been fulfilled. The membrane superpermeability can be only realized for atomic hydrogen. Helium does not pass through the membrane, and its presence does not affect the hydrogen pumping. A detailed Monte Carlo simulation of gas behavior for the experimental facility has been done. The probability of permeation for a hydrogen atom for one collision with the membrane is ∼0.1; the same probability of molecule permeation is ∼10 -5 . The probability for atomization, i.e. re-emission of an atomizer is ∼0.2; the probability of recombination of an atom is ∼0.2

  17. Geothermal Technologies Program 2011 Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollett, Douglas [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States); Stillman, Greg [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2011-06-01

    On June 6-10, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP or the Program) conducted its annual program peer review in Bethesda, Maryland. In accordance with the EERE Peer Review Guide, the review provides an independent, expert evaluation of the strategic goals and direction of the program and is a forum for feedback and recommendations on future program planning. The purpose of the review was to evaluate DOE-funded projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  18. Semiconductor technology program: Progress briefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, K. F.; Scace, R. I.; Walters, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Measurement technology for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices, is discussed. Silicon and silicon based devices are emphasized. Highlighted activities include semiinsulating GaAs characterization, an automatic scanning spectroscopic ellipsometer, linewidth measurement and coherence, bandgap narrowing effects in silicon, the evaluation of electrical linewidth uniformity, and arsenicomplanted profiles in silicon.

  19. Second program on energy research and technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    The second major energy research and development program is described. Renewable and nonrenewable energy resources are presented which include nuclear technology and future energy sources, like fusion. The current status and outlook for future progress are given.

  20. Hydrogen infrastructure within HySA national program in South Africa: road map and specific needs

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bessarabov, D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Department of Science and Technology of South Africa developed the National Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Technologies (HFCT) Research, Development and Innovation Strategy. The National Strategy was branded Hydrogen South Africa (HySA). HySA has been...

  1. Economic Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Participating in California Electricity Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichman, Joshua [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Townsend, Aaron [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Melaina, Marc [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-02-19

    As the electric sector evolves and increasing amounts of variable renewable generation are installed on the system, there are greater needs for system flexibility and sufficient capacity, and greater concern for overgeneration from renewable sources not well matched in time with electric loads. Hydrogen systems have the potential to support the grid in each of these areas. However, limited information is available about the economic competitiveness of hydrogen system configurations. This paper quantifies the value for hydrogen energy storage and demand response systems to participate in select California wholesale electricity markets using 2012 data. For hydrogen systems and conventional storage systems (e.g., pumped hydro, batteries), the yearly revenues from energy, ancillary service, and capacity markets are compared to the yearly cost to establish economic competitiveness. Hydrogen systems can present a positive value proposition for current markets. Three main findings include: (1) For hydrogen systems participating in California electricity markets, producing and selling hydrogen was found to be much more valuable than producing and storing hydrogen to later produce electricity; therefore systems should focus on producing and selling hydrogen and opportunistically providing ancillary services and arbitrage. (2) Tighter integration with electricity markets generates greater revenues (i.e., systems that participate in multiple markets receive the highest revenue). (3) More storage capacity, in excess of what is required to provide diurnal shifting, does not increase competitiveness in current California wholesale energy markets. As more variable renewable generation is installed, the importance of long duration storage may become apparent in the energy price or through additional markets, but currently, there is not a sufficiently large price differential between days to generate enough revenue to offset the cost of additional storage. Future work will involve

  2. Hydrogen: it's now. Hydrogen, essential today, indispensable tomorrow. Power-to-Gas or how to meet the challenge of electricity storage. To develop hydrogen mobility. Hydrogen production modes and scope of application of the IED directive - Interview. Regulatory evolutions needed for an easier deployment of hydrogen energy technologies for a clean mobility. Support of the Community's policy to hydrogen and to fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauberger, Pascal; Boucly, Philippe; Quint, Aliette; Pierre, Helene; Lucchese, Paul; Bouillon-Delporte, Valerie; Chauvet, Bertrand; Ferrari, Fabio; Boivin, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Published by the French Association for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells (AFHYPAC), this document first outlines how hydrogen can reduce our dependence on fossil energies, how it supports the development of electric mobility to reduce CO 2 emissions by transports, how it enables a massive storage of energy as a support to renewable energies deployment and integration, and how hydrogen can be a competitiveness driver. Then two contributions address technical solutions, the first one being Power-to-Gas as a solution to energy storage (integration of renewable energies, a mean for massive storage of electricity, economic conditions making the first deployments feasible, huge social and economical benefits, necessity of creation of an adapted legal and economic framework), and the second one being the development of hydrogen-powered mobility (a major societal concern for air quality, strategies of car manufacturers in the world, necessity of a favourable framework, the situation of recharging infrastructures). Two contributions address the legal framework regarding hydrogen production modes and the scope of application of the European IED directive on industrial emissions, and the needed regulatory evolutions for an easier deployment of Hydrogen-energy technologies for a clean mobility. A last article comments the evolution of the support of European policies to hydrogen and fuel cells through R and d programs, presents the main support program (FCH JU) and its results, other European financing and support policy, and discusses perspectives, notably for possible financing mechanisms

  3. Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Storage Technology: Fundamental Research for Optimization of Hydrogen Storage and Utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perret, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Nadavalath, Balakrishnan; Cornelius, Andrew; Hatchett, David; Bae, Chusung; Pang, Tao; Kim, Eunja; Hemmers, Oliver

    2011-03-28

    Design and development of improved low-cost hydrogen fuel cell catalytic materials and high-capacity hydrogenn storage media are paramount to enabling the hydrogen economy. Presently, effective and durable catalysts are mostly precious metals in pure or alloyed form and their high cost inhibits fuel cell applications. Similarly, materials that meet on-board hydrogen storage targets within total mass and volumetric constraints are yet to be found. Both hydrogen storage performance and cost-effective fuel cell designs are intimately linked to the electronic structure, morphology and cost of the chosen materials. The FCAST Project combined theoretical and experimental studies of electronic structure, chemical bonding, and hydrogen adsorption/desorption characteristics of a number of different nanomaterials and metal clusters to develop better fundamental understanding of hydrogen storage in solid state matrices. Additional experimental studies quantified the hydrogen storage properties of synthesized polyaniline(PANI)/Pd composites. Such conducting polymers are especially interesting because of their high intrinsic electron density and the ability to dope the materials with protons, anions, and metal species. Earlier work produced contradictory results: one study reported 7% to 8% hydrogen uptake while a second study reported zero hydrogen uptake. Cost and durability of fuel cell systems are crucial factors in their affordability. Limits on operating temperature, loss of catalytic reactivity and degradation of proton exchange membranes are factors that affect system durability and contribute to operational costs. More cost effective fuel cell components were sought through studies of the physical and chemical nature of catalyst performance, characterization of oxidation and reduction processes on system surfaces. Additional development effort resulted in a new hydrocarbon-based high-performance sulfonated proton exchange membrane (PEM) that can be manufactured at low

  4. The Changing Nature of Educational Technology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, J. Michael

    2015-01-01

    The many changes in educational technologies have been well documented in both the professional and popular literature. What is less well documented is the changing nature of programs that prepare individuals for careers in the broad multi-disciplinary field of educational technology. This article is a first attempt to look at how educational…

  5. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - July 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-07-01

    This quarterly newsletter is intended for participants and stakeholders in the DOE Solar Program. The content includes features on technology development, market transformation, and policy analysis for solar. Highlights include solar industry updates, DOE funding opportunity announcements and awards, and national laboratory technology developments.

  6. Characterization monitoring & sensor technology crosscutting program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the OFfice of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60).

  7. EPRI nuclear power plant decommissioning technology program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Karen S.; Bushart, Sean P.; Naughton, Michael; McGrath, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is a non-profit research organization that supports the energy industry. The Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Technology Program conducts research and develops technology for the safe and efficient decommissioning of nuclear power plants. (author)

  8. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - September 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-10-01

    This quarterly newsletter is intended for participants and stakeholders in the DOE Solar Program. The content includes features on technology development, market transformation, and policy analysis for solar. Highlights include solar industry updates, DOE funding opportunity announcements and awards, and national laboratory technology developments.

  9. Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    A NASA engineer with the Commercial Remote Sensing Program (CRSP) at Stennis Space Center works with students from W.P. Daniels High School in New Albany, Miss., through NASA's Small Spacecraft Technology Initiative Program. CRSP is teaching students to use remote sensing to locate a potential site for a water reservoir to offset a predicted water shortage in the community's future.

  10. Telecommunications and Technology Infrastructure Program, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This 16th annual report highlights up-to-date information on the programs supported through the Chancellor's Office Telecommunications and Technology Infrastructure Program (TTIP). To summarize 2012-13, one would describe it as a year of planning and preparation. The system-wide budget cuts of the past few years, reports of impacted classes, staff…

  11. Commercial Refrigeration Technology. Florida Vocational Program Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of South Florida, Tampa. Dept. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    The program guide for commercial refrigeration technology courses in Florida identifies primary considerations for the organization, operation, and evaluation of a vocational education program. Following an occupational description for the job title for refrigeration mechanic, and its Dictionary of Occupational Titles code, are six sections…

  12. Technology for gelled liquid cryogenic propellants - Metallized hydrogen/aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkovich, John; Palaszewski, Bryan

    1993-01-01

    The theoretical basis for solid-loaded or densified liquid hydrogen propellants for advanced space applications is outlined. Metallized propellants make it possible to increase the safety of propulsion systems as well as the payloads of future vehicles. Nanogellant formulated liquid hydrogen gels and other fuel gels are characterized by excellent settling stability, low yield point, and a high shear thinning index which makes them attractive for propulsion applications.

  13. HUMID AIR TURBINE CYCLE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Tuthill

    2002-07-18

    The Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle Technology Development Program focused on obtaining HAT cycle combustor technology that will be the foundation of future products. The work carried out under the auspices of the HAT Program built on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work performed in the past by Pratt & Whitney (P&W). This Program is an integral part of technology base development within the Advanced Turbine Systems Program at the Department of Energy (DOE) and its experiments stretched over 5 years. The goal of the project was to fill in technological data gaps in the development of the HAT cycle and identify a combustor configuration that would efficiently burn high moisture, high-pressure gaseous fuels with low emissions. The major emphasis will be on the development of kinetic data, computer modeling, and evaluations of combustor configurations. The Program commenced during the 4th Quarter of 1996 and closed in the 4th Quarter of 2001. It teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) with P&W, the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), and a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, kraftWork Systems Inc. The execution of the program started with bench-top experiments that were conducted at UTRC for extending kinetic mechanisms to HAT cycle temperature, pressure, and moisture conditions. The fundamental data generated in the bench-top experiments was incorporated into the analytical tools available at P&W to design the fuel injectors and combustors. The NETL then used the hardware to conduct combustion rig experiments to evaluate the performance of the combustion systems at elevated pressure and temperature conditions representative of the HAT cycle. The results were integrated into systems analysis done by kraftWork to verify that sufficient understanding of the technology had been achieved and that large-scale technological application and demonstration could be undertaken as follow-on activity. An optional program extended the

  14. New energy technologies. Research program proposition; Nouvelles technologies de l'energie. Proposition de programme de recherche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-02-01

    This document presents the most promising program propositions of research and development and the public financing needed for their realization. The concerned technologies are: the hydrogen and the fuel cell PAN-H, the separation and the storage of the CO{sub 2}, the photovoltaic solar electricity, the PREBAT program of the building energy recovery and the bio-energies. (A.L.B.)

  15. Spinoff 2002: Fortieth Anniversary Technology Utilization Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Since its inception 40 years ago, NASA's Technology Transfer Program has led the way for our nation to benefit from cutting-edge aerospace technologies. In addition to contributing to U.S. economic growth, these technologies are improving the quality of life on Earth while finding new ways to protect and preserve it. NASA's research and development efforts have advanced areas in medicine, communications, manufacturing, computer technology, and homeland security. These breakthroughs, translated into commercial products, are enhancing the lives of Americans everywhere. When a congressional mandate led NASA to develop the Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Program, the Agency began a wide dissemination of its research and development results. In doing so, NASA recognized that many of its technologies were transferable to industry for the development of commercial products. As a result, the Technology Utilization Program was born in 1962. The successful program went through several changes over the years, as its philosophy, mission, and goals adapted into the Technology Transfer Program we know today. The program strives to make the latest technologies available to industry as soon as they are developed. Each year, NASA's Spinoff publication showcases new products and services resulting from commercial partnerships between NASA and private industry. In the 2002 issue, the NASA field centers reflect upon the growth that has made these innovations available to the public. The Research and Development section examines past achievements, current successes, and future goals for each of the ten NASA centers. The Commercial Benefits section proudly highlights 51 new spinoff products, including a heart pump for patients needing a heart transplant, as well as an air purifier that destroys anthrax spores. The Technology Transfer and Outreach section describes the outreach achievements and educational successes made possible through the NASA Commercial Technology Network

  16. Lighting Computer Programs in Lighting Technology

    OpenAIRE

    EKREN, Nazmi; DURSUN, Bahtiyar; AYKUT, Ercan

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that the computer in lighting technology is a vital component for lighting designers. Lighting computer programs are preferred in preparing architectural projects in lighting techniques, especially in lighting calculations. Lighting computer programs, which arise with the aim of helping lighting designers, gain more interest day by day. The most important property of lighting computer programs is the ability to enable the simulation of lighting projects without requiring any ...

  17. Immobilization needs and technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, L.W.; Kan, T.; Shaw, H.; Armantrout, G.

    1995-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US and Russia agreed to large reductions in nuclear weapons. To aid in the selection of long-term management options, DOE has undertaken a multifaceted study to select options for storage and disposition of plutonium in keeping with US policy that plutonium must be subjected to the highest standards of safety, security, and accountability. One alternative being considered is immobilization. To arrive at a suitable immobilization form, we first reviewed published information on high-level waste immobilization technologies and identified 72 possible plutonium immobilization forms to be prescreened. Surviving forms were further screened using multi-attribute utility analysis to determine the most promising technology families. Promising immobilization families were further evaluated to identify chemical, engineering, environmental, safety, and health problems that remain to be solved prior to making technical decisions as to the viability of using the form for long- term disposition of plutonium. From this evaluation, a detailed research and development plan has been developed to provide answers to these remaining questions

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, 2013 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2013-10-01

    The fiscal year (FY) 2013 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from May 13-16, 2013, at the Crystal City Marriott and Crystal Gateway Marriott in Arlington, Virginia. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE).

  19. 76 FR 18166 - Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Technology Innovation.... ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board, National... INFORMATION: The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) Advisory Board is composed of ten members appointed by...

  20. 75 FR 22553 - Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Technology Innovation.... ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board, National... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Technology Innovation Program (TIP) Advisory Board is composed of ten members...

  1. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air-liquefaction technologies for combined-cycle propulsion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1992-01-01

    Given here is a technical assessment of the realization of cryogenic hydrogen induced air liquefaction technologies in a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process setting. The technical findings related to the status of air liquefaction technologies are reviewed. Compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers, heat exchanger atmospheric constituent fouling alleviation measures, para/ortho-hydrogen shift-conversion catalysts, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps, hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as a heat sink, liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices, and technically related engine concepts are discussed. Much of the LACE work is related to aerospaceplane propulsion concepts that were developed in the 1960's. Emphasis is placed on the Liquid Air Cycle Engine (LACE).

  2. Achievement report for fiscal 1974 on Sunshine Program. Research and development of hydrogen production technology using high-temperature and high-pressure water electrolysis; 1974 nendo koon koatsusui denkaiho ni yoru suiso seizo gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-05-30

    The goals at present are to clarify conditions for the realization of the water electrolysis process relative to various primary energy sources and to experimentally construct a small practical electrobath to operate at high temperature and high pressure for the attainment of high economic efficiency. Efforts in this fiscal year are mentioned below. Surveys and studies are conducted about hydrogen production by water electrolysis and about achievements in the past and problems at present concerning hydrogen production by water electrolysis in Japan and overseas. The expected role of water electrolysis in various primary energy sources is also studied and evaluated. For a high-temperature high-pressure water electrolysis bath conceptual design (small test plant, bathing temperature 120 degrees C, pressure 20atm, hydrogen production rate 2Nm{sup 3}/h), studies are conducted about a constant-load type high-temperature high-pressure (bipolar) diaphragm-assisted water electrolysis bath and a variable-load type high-temperature high-pressure diaphragm-assisted water electrolysis bath. Surveys and studies are also conducted about the expected role of water electrolysis in various primary energy sources, and the role is evaluated. (NEDO)

  3. Hydrogen storage alternatives - a technological and economic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersson, Joakim; Hjortsberg, Ove [Volvo Teknisk Utveckling AB, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    This study reviews state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage alternatives for vehicles. We will also discuss the prospects and estimated cost for industrial production. The study is based on published literature and interviews with active researchers. Among the alternatives commercially available today, we suggest using a moderate-pressure chamber for seasonal stationary energy storage; metal hydride vessels for small stationary units; a roof of high-pressure cylinders for buses, trucks and ferries; cryogenic high-pressure vessels or methanol reformers for cars and tractors; and cryogenic moderate-pressure vessels for aeroplanes. Initial fuel dispensing systems should be designed to offer hydrogen in pressurised form for good fuel economy, but also as cryogenic liquid for occasional needs of extended driving range and as methanol for reformer-equipped vehicles. It is probable that hydrogen can be stored efficiently in adsorbents for use in recyclable hydrogen fuel containers or rechargeable hydrogen vessels operating at ambient temperature and possibly ambient pressure by year 2004, and at reasonable or even low cost by 2010. The most promising alternatives involve various forms of activated graphite nanostructures. Recommendations for further research and standardisation activities are given.

  4. Technology Innovations from NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Stephen A.; Morris, Charles E. K., Jr.; Tyson, Richard W.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Next Generation Launch Technology Program has been on the cutting edge of technology, improving the safety, affordability, and reliability of future space-launch-transportation systems. The array of projects focused on propulsion, airframe, and other vehicle systems. Achievements range from building miniature fuel/oxygen sensors to hot-firings of major rocket-engine systems as well as extreme thermo-mechanical testing of large-scale structures. Results to date have significantly advanced technology readiness for future space-launch systems using either airbreathing or rocket propulsion.

  5. Characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology crosscutting program: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The technology development must also be cost effective and appropriate to EM-30/40/60 needs. Furthermore, the required technologies must be delivered and implemented when needed. Accordingly, and to ensure that available DOE and other national resources are focused an the most pressing needs, management of the technology development is concentrated on the following Focus Areas: Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation (PFA); Landfill Stabilization (LSFA); High-Level Waste Tank Remediation (TFA); Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal (MWFA); and Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition (FDDMDFA). Brief descriptions of CMST-CP projects funded in FY95 are presented

  6. Characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology crosscutting program: Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the Office of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60). The technology development must also be cost effective and appropriate to EM-30/40/60 needs. Furthermore, the required technologies must be delivered and implemented when needed. Accordingly, and to ensure that available DOE and other national resources are focused an the most pressing needs, management of the technology development is concentrated on the following Focus Areas: Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation (PFA); Landfill Stabilization (LSFA); High-Level Waste Tank Remediation (TFA); Mixed Waste Characterization, Treatment, and Disposal (MWFA); and Facility Deactivation, Decommissioning, and Material Disposition (FDDMDFA). Brief descriptions of CMST-CP projects funded in FY95 are presented.

  7. Broad specification fuels combustion technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, W. J.; Ekstedt, E. E.

    1984-01-01

    Design and development efforts to evolve promising aircraft gas turbine combustor configurations for burning broadened-properties fuels were discussed. Design and experimental evaluations of three different combustor concepts in sector combustor rig tests was conducted. The combustor concepts were a state of the art single-annular combustor, a staged double-annular combustor, and a short single-annular combustor with variable geometry to control primary zone stoichiometry. A total of 25 different configurations of the three combustor concepts were evaluated. Testing was conducted over the full range of CF6-80A engine combustor inlet conditions, using four fuels containing between 12% and 14% hydrogen by weight. Good progress was made toward meeting specific program emissions and performance goals with each of the three combustor concepts. The effects of reduced fuel hydrogen content, including increased flame radiation, liner metal temperature, smoke, and NOx emissions were documented. The most significant effect on the baseline combustor was a projected 33% life reduction, for a reduction from 14% to 13% fuel hydrogen content, due to increased liner temperatures.

  8. Microalgal hydrogen production: prospects of an essential technology for a clean and sustainable energy economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayro-Kaiser, Vinzenz; Nelson, Nathan

    2017-09-01

    Modern energy production is required to undergo a dramatic transformation. It will have to replace fossil fuel use by a sustainable and clean energy economy while meeting the growing world energy needs. This review analyzes the current energy sector, available energy sources, and energy conversion technologies. Solar energy is the only energy source with the potential to fully replace fossil fuels, and hydrogen is a crucial energy carrier for ensuring energy availability across the globe. The importance of photosynthetic hydrogen production for a solar-powered hydrogen economy is highlighted and the development and potential of this technology are discussed. Much successful research for improved photosynthetic hydrogen production under laboratory conditions has been reported, and attempts are underway to develop upscale systems. We suggest that a process of integrating these achievements into one system to strive for efficient sustainable energy conversion is already justified. Pursuing this goal may lead to a mature technology for industrial deployment.

  9. Social Perception of Hydrogen Technologies: The View of Spanish Stake holders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferri Anglada, S.

    2013-01-01

    This technical report presents an overview of the social perception and vision of a sample of Spanish stake holders on hydrogen technologies. The study is based on the implementation of a survey, combining both quantitative and qualitative data. An ad hoc electronic survey was design to collect views and perceptions on several key factors regarding this innovative energy alternative. The group of experts participating (N=130) in the study, comes mainly from research centers, universities and private companies. The survey addresses three major themes: expert views, social acceptability, and contextual factors of hydrogen technologies. The aim is to capture both the current and the future scene as viewed by the experts on hydrogen technologies, identifying key factors in terms of changes, uncertainties, obstacles and opportunities. The objective is to identify potential key features for the introduction, development, promotion, implementation, and large-scale deployment of a highly successful energy proposal in countries such as Iceland, one of the pioneers in base its economy on hydrogen technologies. To conclude, this report illustrates the positive engagement of a sample of Spanish stake holders towards hydrogen technologies that may prove vital in the transition towards the Hydrogen Economy in Spain. (Author)

  10. Fiber optic emerging technologies for detection of hydrogen in space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Alex A.

    2009-05-01

    Hydrogen detection in space application is very challenging; public acceptance of hydrogen fuel would require the integration of a reliable hydrogen safety sensor. For detecting leakage of cryogenic fluids in spaceport facilities, launch vehicle industry and aerospace agencies are currently relying heavily on the bulky mass spectrometers, which fill one or more equipment racks, and weigh several hundred kilograms. Optical hydrogen sensors are intrinsically safe since they produce no arc or spark in an explosive environment caused by the leakage of hydrogen. Safety remains a top priority since leakage of hydrogen in air during production, storage, transfer and distribution creates an explosive atmosphere for concentrations between 4% (v/v) - the lower explosive limit (LEL) and 74.5% (v/v) - the upper explosive limit (UEL) at room temperature and pressure. Being a very small molecule, hydrogen is prone to leakage through seals and micro-cracks. This paper describes the development of fiber optic emerging technologies for detection of hydrogen in space applications. These systems consisted of Micro Mirror, Fiber Bragg grating, Evanescent Optical Fiber and Colorimetric Technology. The paper would discuss the sensor design and performance data under field deployment conditions.

  11. Microsystem technology for high-flux hydrogen separation membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielens, F.C.; Tong, D.H.; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Vorstman, M.A.G.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2004-01-01

    The application of thin hydrogen-selective membranes suffers from the occurrence of pinholes and a significant resistance to mass transfer in the porous support. To overcome these problems, Pd, Pd/Ag and Pd–Ta–Pd membranes with a thickness between 0.5 and 1.2 μm have been deposited on a dense and

  12. Laboratory technology for hydrogen purification in liquefying installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avram, I.; David, E.; Dordea, M.; Peculea, M.; Pop, F.; Stanciu, V.; Varzaru, O.; Panu, E.; Curuia, M.; Fron, P.; Balint, I.; Culcer, M.; Roman, T.; Smeureanu, N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a laboratory installation for purification of the hydrogen to be liquefied. The purification is achieved by the procedure of physical adsorption at low temperature. This procedure implies the use of materials with extensive active surfaces such as activated carbon, molecular sieves and silica gels. The main stages of the purification process are described

  13. MiRTH-e: Microreactor technology for hydrogen and electricity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delsman, E.; Rebrov, J.; de Croon, M.H.J.M.; Schouten, J.C.; Kramer, G.J.; Cominos, V.; Richter, T.; Veenstra, T.T.; van den Berg, Albert; Cobden, P.; de Bruijn, F.J.; Ferret, C.; d'Ortona, U.; Falk, L.; Matlosz, M.; Ehrfeld, W.; Baselt, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    Research groups of six companies, institutes and universities hav joint forces in a European Community funded project, to develop a miniaturized, low-power fuel processor for the conversion of methanol into clean hydrogen for use in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The integrated unit

  14. Advanced gasifier and water gas shift technologies for low cost coal conversion to high hydrogen syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Andrew Kramer [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) and team members RTI International (RTI), Coanda Research and Development, and Nexant, are developing and maturing a portfolio of technologies to meet the United States Department of Energy (DOE) goals for lowering the cost of producing high hydrogen syngas from coal for use in carbon capture power and coal-to-liquids/chemicals. This project matured an advanced pilot-scale gasifier, with scalable and commercially traceable components, to readiness for use in a first-of-a-kind commercially-relevant demonstration plant on the scale of 500-1,000 tons per day (TPD). This was accomplished through cold flow simulation of the gasifier quench zone transition region at Coanda and through an extensive hotfire gasifier test program on highly reactive coal and high ash/high ash fusion temperature coals at GTI. RTI matured an advanced water gas shift process and catalyst to readiness for testing at pilot plant scale through catalyst development and testing, and development of a preliminary design basis for a pilot scale reactor demonstrating the catalyst. A techno-economic analysis was performed by Nexant to assess the potential benefits of the gasifier and catalyst technologies in the context of power production and methanol production. This analysis showed an 18%reduction in cost of power and a 19%reduction in cost of methanol relative to DOE reference baseline cases.

  15. Heavy-Section Steel Technology program overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennell, W.E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a status review of ongoing HSST program tasks aimed at refining the technology used in analysis of reactor pressure vessel fracture margins under pressurized thermal-shock (PTS) loading. Specific fracture-technology issues addressed include vessel flaw density and distribution, shallow flaws, fracture-toughness data transfer, circumferential cracks, ductile tearing and the influence of low-tearing toughness in stainless steel cladding. Preliminary results from the analysis and test programs are presented, together with interim assessments of their potential impact on a reactor vessel PTS analysis. 31 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab

  16. TECHSAT - A satellite technology analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCandless, Samuel W., III; McCandless, Samuel W., Jr.

    1992-08-01

    The paper presents a computer-modeling program, called TECHSAT, designed to analyze the effect of new technologies on remote sensing satellites and their subsystems. The user-interactive program resides on an IBM-compatible PC, making it possible to quickly assess mission options (such as orbital altitude and lifetime) and subsystem technologies (i.e., the type of such components as solar cells, batteries, fuel, and data handling hardware). TECHSAT allows the user to analyze several design paths and to quickly select specific designs for more in-depth study. TECHSAT also incorporates a stochastic mission life-cycle cost and sensor availability.

  17. NASA Technology Demonstrations Missions Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Susan

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Fiscal Year 2010 (FY10) budget introduced a new strategic plan that placed renewed emphasis on advanced missions beyond Earth orbit. This supports NASA s 2011 strategic goal to create innovative new space technologies for our exploration, science, and economic future. As a result of this focus on undertaking many and more complex missions, NASA placed its attention on a greater investment in technology development, and this shift resulted in the establishment of the Technology Demonstrations Missions (TDM) Program. The TDM Program, within the newly formed NASA Office of the Chief Technologist, supports NASA s grand challenges by providing a steady cadence of advanced space technology demonstrations (Figure 1), allowing the infusion of flexible path capabilities for future exploration. The TDM Program's goal is to mature crosscutting capabilities to flight readiness in support of multiple future space missions, including flight test projects where demonstration is needed before the capability can transition to direct mission The TDM Program has several unique criteria that set it apart from other NASA program offices. For instance, the TDM Office matures a small number of technologies that are of benefit to multiple customers to flight technology readiness level (TRL) 6 through relevant environment testing on a 3-year development schedule. These technologies must be crosscutting, which is defined as technology with potential to benefit multiple mission directorates, other government agencies, or the aerospace industry, and they must capture significant public interest and awareness. These projects will rely heavily on industry partner collaboration, and funding is capped for all elements of the flight test demonstration including planning, hardware development, software development, launch costs, ground operations, and post-test assessments. In order to inspire collaboration across government and industry

  18. Divison of Environmental Control Technology program, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    This report covers Division of Environmental Control Technology projects in progress during FY 1978, within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Department of Energy. It is the second in a planned series of annual reports. The Division of Environmental Control Technology (ECT) continues to support the Assistant Secretary for Environment (EV) in discharging two primary responsibilities: (1) under the Environmental Engineering (EE) Program, the independent overview and assessment of environmental control aspects of both the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) programs and the Nation's energy policies, and (2) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, the reduction of potential environmental hazards at the radioactively contaminated sites that are presently owned or were formerly used by the Government. This report presents a short summary of objectives, approach, progress and results, future plans, and a reference bibliography for each research, development, or assessment project within the program areas described above

  19. Reconnecting the technology characterisation of the hydrogen economy to contexts of consumption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodson, Mike; Marvin, Simon

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses a partial but powerful view of the hydrogen economy known as 'technology characterisation' (TC). TC offers particular representations of the supply of hydrogen technologies through 'measuring' the 'state of the art'. This view is seen as an important means of generating political and policy support for technological developments through outlining technical 'possibilities' and 'options' in relation to 'costs'. Through drawing on 10 TC documents a series of practices and issues are outlined. These documents are subjected to critical interrogation as a means of saying not how TC should be applied but in outlining how it often is applied. Our analysis of these documents claims that TC conceives of technological change through a process of narrowly framing understanding of what 'relevant' costs and technological possibilities are. We claim, through this critique, that this dominant way of narrowly characterising technological change in terms of the supply of technology would benefit from an appreciation of alternative 'ways of seeing' the development of hydrogen technologies, particularly in relation to 'contexts' of their appropriation, consumption and development. We suggest that this can be done through the development of two alternative ways of seeing: a Large Technical Systems approach which addresses wider systemic considerations, and localised 'niche' developments in nurtured spaces of reflexive social learning. Through subjecting the practices of a dominant way of seeing technological development-TC-to critique this opens up the possibilities for TC practitioners to reflect on the strengths and shortcomings of their own practices. This, in addition to outlining ways of seeing the appropriation and innovation of hydrogen technologies in specific contexts, through an LTS and niche approach, offers the potential for a dialogue between the supply and the contextualised appropriation of hydrogen technologies and thus for engaging disconnected

  20. Cosmic Origins (COR) Technology Development Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werneth, Russell; Pham, B.; Clampin, M.

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmic Origins (COR) Program Office was established in FY11 and resides at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The office serves as the implementation arm for the Astrophysics Division at NASA Headquarters for COR Program related matters. We present an overview of the Program’s technology management activities and the Program’s technology development portfolio. We discuss the process for addressing community-provided technology needs and the Technology Management Board (TMB)-vetted prioritization and investment recommendations. This process improves the transparency and relevance of technology investments, provides the community a voice in the process, and leverages the technology investments of external organizations by defining a need and a customer. Goals for the COR Program envisioned by the National Research Council’s (NRC) “New Worlds, New Horizons in Astronomy and Astrophysics” (NWNH) Decadal Survey report includes a 4m-class UV/optical telescope that would conduct imaging and spectroscopy as a post-Hubble observatory with significantly improved sensitivity and capability, a near-term investigation of NASA participation in the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency/Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (JAXA/ISAS) Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) mission, and future Explorers.

  1. Clean coal technology demonstration program: Program update 1996-97

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (known as the CCT Program) reached a significant milestone in 1996 with the completion of 20 of the 39 active projects. The CCT Program is responding to a need to demonstrate and deploy a portfolio of technologies that will assure the U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 297 billion tons could continue to supply the nation`s energy needs economically and in a manner that meets the nation`s environmental objectives. This portfolio of technologies includes environmental control devices that contributed to meeting the accords on transboundary air pollution recommended by the Special Envoys on Acid Rain in 1986. Operational, technical, environmental, and economic performance information and data are now flowing from highly efficient, low-emission, advanced power generation technologies that will enable coal to retain its prominent role into the next millennium. Further, advanced technologies are emerging that will enhance the competitive use of coal in the industrial sector, such as in steelmaking. Coal processing technologies will enable the entire coal resource base to be used while complying with environmental requirements. These technologies are producing products used by utilities and industrial processes. The capability to coproduce products, such as liquid and solid fuels, electricity, and chemicals, is being demonstrated at a commercial scale by projects in the CCT Program. In summary, this portfolio of technologies is satisfying the national need to maintain a multifuel energy mix in which coal is a key component because of its low-cost, availability, and abundant supply within the nation`s borders.

  2. Fuel Cell Development for NASA's Human Exploration Program: Benchmarking with "The Hydrogen Economy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, John H.

    2007-01-01

    The theoretically high efficiency and low temperature operation of hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells has motivated them to be the subject of much study since their invention in the 19th Century, but their relatively high life cycle costs kept them as a "solution in search of a problem" for many years. The first problem for which fuel cells presented a truly cost effective solution was that of providing a power source for NASA's human spaceflight vehicles in the 1960 s. NASA thus invested, and continues to invest, in the development of fuel cell power plants for this application. This development program continues to place its highest priorities on requirements for minimum system mass and maximum durability and reliability. These priorities drive fuel cell power plant design decisions at all levels, even that of catalyst support. However, since the mid-1990's, prospective environmental regulations have driven increased governmental and industrial interest in "green power" and the "Hydrogen Economy." This has in turn stimulated greatly increased investment in fuel cell development for a variety of commercial applications. This investment is bringing about notable advances in fuel cell technology, but, as these development efforts place their highest priority on requirements for minimum life cycle cost and field safety, these advances are yielding design solutions quite different at almost every level from those needed for spacecraft applications. This environment thus presents both opportunities and challenges for NASA's Human Exploration Program

  3. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay C. Almlie; Bruce Wood; Rich Schlupp

    2007-03-01

    In November 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), ePowerSynergies, Inc. (ePSI), and Resurfice Corporation teamed to develop, produce, and demonstrate the world's first and only fuel cell-powered ice resurfacer. The goals of this project were: {sm_bullet} To educate the public on the readiness, practicality, and safety of fuel cells powered by hydrogen fuel and {sm_bullet} To establish a commercialization pathway in an early-adopter, niche market. The vehicle was developed and produced in a short 3-month span. The vehicle made its world debut at U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan's (D-ND) 2005 Hydrogen Energy Action Summit. Subsequently, the vehicle toured North America appearing at numerous public events and conferences, receiving much attention from international media outlets.

  4. Dynamic Capacity and Delivery Performance of Adsorbed Hydrogen Tank Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Ernest; Gillespie, Andrew; Stalla, David; Prosniewski, Matthew; Smith, Adam; Pfeifer, Peter

    In an effort to reduce our carbon footprint and decrease our dependency on a finite fuel supply, mankind has been taking steps towards alternative fuel sources. One of the ideal fuel sources worth striving towards is hydrogen. Combusting hydrogen only produces water vapor and hydrogen is incredibly abundant. The largest hurdle of using hydrogen is the storage of the gas itself. Relying solely on compressing the gas requires large heavy gas cylinders for storage. The amount of gas stored at a given pressure can be greatly increased through the use of adsorbent materials. The nanoporous carbon powder we have used has achieved a gravimetric storage capacity of 31 g H2/kg C and a volumetric storage capacity of 8.7 g H2/L at room temperature and 100 bar. This was measured on our 5.3 L tank filled with our adsorbent material. This powder was able to be packed into the tank in such a way that we achieved a packing fraction of 0.63, which reflects the packing of random close packed spheres. We have used monoliths made from these powders to study the storage capabilities as well as the dynamic filling and discharging performance of our tank. With these monoliths, we are able to obtain a packing fraction of 0.96. We have also been able to measure gravimetric storage capacity of 20.4 g H2/kg C and a volumetric storage capacity of 11 g H2/L at 195 K and 50 bar on these monoliths. We hope to measure more of this 195 K isotherm as well as thorough isotherm and filling data at 273 K and 296 K.

  5. Commercial technologies from the SP-100 program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truscello, V.C.; Fujita, T.; Mondt, J.F.

    1995-01-01

    For more than a decade, Jet Propulsion Labortory and Los Alamos have managed a multi-agency funded effort to develop a space reactor power system. This SP-100 Program has developed technologies required for space power systems that can be implemented in the industrial and commercial sectors to improve competitiveness in the global economy. Initial steps taken to transfer this technology from the laboratories to industrial and commercial entities within United States include: (1) identifying specific technologies having commercial potential; (2) distributing information describing the identified technologies and interacting with interested commercial and industrial entities to develop application-specific details and requirements; and (3) providing a technological data base that leads to transfer of technology or the forming of teaming arrangements to accomplish the transfer by tailoring the technology to meet application-specific requirements. SP-100 technologies having commercial potential encompass fabrication processes, devices, and components. Examples: a process for bonding refractory metals to graphite, a device to sense the position of an actuator and a component to enable rotating machines to operate without supplying lubrication (self-lubricating ball bearing). Shortly after the NASA Regional Technology Transfer Centers widely disseminated information covering SP-100 technologies, over one hundred expressions of interest were received, which indicate that there is a large potential benefit in transferring SP-100 technology. Interactions with industrial and commercial entities have identified a substantial need for creating teaming arrangements involving the interested entity and personnel from laboratories and their contractors, who have the knowledge and ability to tailor the technology to meet application-specific requirements. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  6. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2016 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 6-10, 2016, Washington, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2016-10-01

    The fiscal year 2016 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 6-10, 2015, in Washington, D.C.. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  7. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2015 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 8-12, 2015, Arlington, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popovich, Neil

    2015-10-01

    The fiscal year 2015 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 8-12, 2015, in Arlington, Virginia. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  8. 75 FR 10464 - Broadband Technology Opportunities Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... window for Public Computer Center (PCC) and Sustainable Broadband Adoption (SBA) projects. DATES: All...; Extension of Application Closing Deadline for Comprehensive Community Infrastructure (CCI) Projects. SUMMARY... Infrastructure (CCI) projects under the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) is extended until 5:00...

  9. Application of Statistics in Engineering Technology Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wei; Fink, Rainer; Fang, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Statistics is a critical tool for robustness analysis, measurement system error analysis, test data analysis, probabilistic risk assessment, and many other fields in the engineering world. Traditionally, however, statistics is not extensively used in undergraduate engineering technology (ET) programs, resulting in a major disconnect from industry…

  10. A Technology Program that Rescues Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Leslie J.; Lesh, J. R.

    2004-03-01

    There has never been a long-duration deep space mission that did not have unexpected problems during operations. JPL's Interplanetary Network Directorate (IND) Technology Program was created to develop new and improved methods of communication, navigation, and operations. A side benefit of the program is that it maintains a cadre of human talent and experimental systems that can be brought to bear on unexpected problems that may occur during mission operations. Solutions fall into four categories: applying new technology during operations to enhance science performance, developing new operational strategies, providing domain experts to help find solutions, and providing special facilities to trouble-shoot problems. These are illustrated here using five specific examples of spacecraft anomalies that have been solved using, at least in part, expertise or facilities from the IND Technology Program: Mariner 10, Voyager, Galileo, SOHO, and Cassini/Huygens. In this era of careful cost management, and emphasis on returns-on-investment, it is important to recognize this crucial additional benefit from such technology program investments.

  11. 75 FR 62369 - Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... business, research, science and technology, engineering, education, and management consulting. The purpose... Program Advisory Board AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board, National...

  12. A Novel Eco-Friendly Vanadium Precipitation Method by Hydrothermal Hydrogen Reduction Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Guobin Zhang; Yimin Zhang; Shenxu Bao; Jing Huang; Liuhong Zhang

    2017-01-01

    In view of the serious pollution problems caused by the traditional vanadium precipitation process, the eco-friendly technology of hydrothermal hydrogen reduction was first applied to precipitate phase pure vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3) products from stripped pentavalent vanadium (V (V)) solution extracted from vanadium-bearing shale. Thermodynamic analysis demonstrate the method of hydrothermal hydrogen reduction is feasible for precipitating V2O3 from V (V) solution at a suitable pH range, an...

  13. [Progress and technology development on hydrogen production through bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aijie; Cao, Guangli; Xu, Chengjiao; Ren, Nanqi

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen production from lignocellulosic biomass is both sustainable and environmentally friendly, which is garnering more and more attention across the world, with an expectation to challenge the shortage of fossil fuels supply and climate change as well. In this article, the update research progress and technology development of biohydrogen production are reviewed, with a focus on biomass pretreatment, hydrogen-producing microorganisms and process engineering strategies. And in the meantime, a roadmap for more efficient and economic biohydrogen production is envisioned.

  14. Study and development of a hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell in solid polymer electrolyte technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosdale, R.

    1992-10-29

    The hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell appears today as the best candidate to the replacing of the internal combustion engine for automobile traction. This system uses the non explosive electrochemical recombination of hydrogen and oxygen. It is a clean generator whom only reactive product is water. This thesis shows a theoretical study of this system, the synthesis of different kinds of used electrodes and finally an analysis of water movements in polymer electrolyte by different original technologies. 70 refs., 73 figs., 15 tabs.

  15. First Wall, Blanket, Shield Engineering Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of DOE has the overall objective of providing engineering data that will define performance parameters for nuclear systems in advanced fusion reactors. The program comprises testing and the development of computational tools in four areas: (1) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of first-wall component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads; (2) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of blanket and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on bulk heating; (3) electromagnetic effects in first wall, blanket, and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on transient field penetration and eddy-current effects; (4) assembly, maintenance and repair with emphasis on remote-handling techniques. This paper will focus on elements 2 and 4 above and, in keeping with the conference participation from both fusion and fission programs, will emphasize potential interfaces between fusion technology and experience in the fission industry

  16. Energy Technology Analysis Prospects for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    Energy security, economic prosperity and environmental protection are prominent challenges for all countries. The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier and fuel cells as motive devices in transportation and energy distribution systems are possible solutions. This book provides the reader with an authoritative and objective analysis of policy responses and hurdles and business opportunities. Information regarding the latest RD&D, policy initiatives and private sector plans are assessed from the perspective of the rapidly changing global energy system in the next half century. This book prov

  17. H2FIRST: A partnership to advance hydrogen fueling station technology driving an optimal consumer experience.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moen, Christopher D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dedrick, Daniel E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pratt, Joseph William [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Balfour, Bruce [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Noma, Edwin Yoichi [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Somerday, Brian P. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); San Marchi, Christopher W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wipke, Keith [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Terlip, Danny [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Harrison, Kevin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sprik, Samuel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Harris, Aaron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) is establishing the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) partnership, led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). FCTO is establishing this partnership and the associated capabilities in support of H2USA, the public/private partnership launched in 2013. The H2FIRST partnership provides the research and technology acceleration support to enable the widespread deployment of hydrogen infrastructure for the robust fueling of light-duty fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). H2FIRST will focus on improving private-sector economics, safety, availability and reliability, and consumer confidence for hydrogen fueling. This whitepaper outlines the goals, scope, activities associated with the H2FIRST partnership.

  18. Ab-initio study of hydrogen technology materials for hydrogen storage and proton conduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luduena, Guillermo Andres

    2011-07-01

    This dissertation deals with two specific aspects of a potential hydrogen-based energy economy, namely the problems of energy storage and energy conversion. In order to contribute to the solution of these problems, the structural and dynamical properties of two promising materials for hydrogen storage (lithium imide/amide) and proton conduction (poly[vinyl phosphonic acid]) are modeled on an atomistic scale by means of first principles molecular dynamics simulation methods. In the case of the hydrogen storage system lithium amide/imide (LiNH{sub 2}/Li{sub 2}NH), the focus was on the interplay of structural features and nuclear quantum effects. For these calculations, Path-Integral Molecular Dynamics (PIMD) simulations were used. The structures of these materials at room temperature were elucidated; in collaboration with an experimental group, a very good agreement between calculated and experimental solid-state {sup 1}H-NMR chemical shifts was observed. Specifically, the structure of Li{sub 2}NH features a disordered arrangement of the Li lattice, which was not reported in previous studies. In addition, a persistent precession of the NH bonds was observed in our simulations. We provide evidence that this precession is the consequence of a toroid-shaped effective potential, in which the protons in the material are immersed. This potential is essentially flat along the torus azimuthal angle, which might lead to important quantum delocalization effects of the protons over the torus. On the energy conversion side, the dynamics of protons in a proton conducting polymer (poly[vinyl phosphonic acid], PVPA) was studied by means of a steered ab-initio Molecular Dynamics approach applied on a simplified polymer model. The focus was put on understanding the microscopic proton transport mechanism in polymer membranes, and on characterizing the relevance of the local environment. This covers particularly the effect of water molecules, which participate in the hydrogen bonding

  19. D and D technology development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the content of the current program of work for the Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) located in the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50). The authors began using large-scale demonstration projects (LSDPs) in 1996 to demonstrate and test innovative decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) technologies in ongoing US Department of Energy (DOE) decommissioning projects. These LSDPs have been conducted in and are planned for different types of DOE facilities such as research and production reactors; highly enriched uranium, tritium, and plutonium processing facilities; fuel reprocessing canyons; weapons production facilities; gaseous diffusion plants; hot cells; and waste processing facilities. The concept has been to focus on addressing DOE's high-priority deactivation and decommissioning needs through the LSDP strategy. In an LSDP, the focus area demonstrates improved technologies side by side with the current baseline technologies in ongoing site decommissioning projects. This approach helps reduce the risk and liability for the DOE users associated with the first-time use of a technology and promotes creative solutions that expand the D and D tool box beyond standard practices and technologies along with other benefits. As of January 1998, more than 50 technologies have been demonstrated covering the areas of characterization, decontamination, dismantlement, waste disposition, stabilization, and health and safety

  20. Wilberforce Power Technology in Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Edward M.; Buffinger, D. R.; Hehemann, D. G.; Breen, M. L.; Raffaelle, R. P.

    1999-01-01

    The Wilberforce Power Technology in Education Program is a multipart program. Three key parts of this program will be described. They are: (1) WISE-The Wilberforce Summer Intensive Experience. This annual offering is an educational program which is designed to provide both background reinforcement and a focus on study skills to give the participants a boost in their academic performance throughout their academic careers. It is offered to entering Wilberforce students. Those students who take advantage of WISE learn to improve important skills which enable them to work at higher levels in mathematics, science and engineering courses throughout their college careers, but most notably in the first year of college study. (2) Apply technology to reaming. This is being done in several ways including creating an electronic chemistry text with hypertext links to a glossary to help the students deal with the large new vocabulary required to describe and understand chemistry. It is also being done by converting lecture materials for the Biochemistry class to PowerPoint format. Technology is also being applied to learning by exploring simulation software of scientific instrumentation. (3) Wilberforce participation in collaborative research with NASA's John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field. This research has focused on two areas in the past year. The first of these is the deposition of solar cell materials. A second area involves the development of polymeric materials for incorporation into thin film batteries.

  1. Risk Perception of an Emergent Technology: The Case of Hydrogen Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rob Flynn

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Although hydrogen has been used in industry for many years as a chemical commodity, its use as a fuel or energy carrier is relatively new and expert knowledge about its associated risks is neither complete nor consensual. Public awareness of hydrogen energy and attitudes towards a future hydrogen economy are yet to be systematically investigated. This paper opens by discussing alternative conceptualisations of risk, then focuses on issues surrounding the use of emerging technologies based on hydrogen energy. It summarises expert assessments of risks associated with hydrogen. It goes on to review debates about public perceptions of risk, and in doing so makes comparisons with public perceptions of other emergent technologies—Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS, Genetically Modified Organisms and Food (GM and Nanotechnology (NT—for which there is considerable scientific uncertainty and relatively little public awareness. The paper finally examines arguments about public engagement and "upstream" consultation in the development of new technologies. It is argued that scientific and technological uncertainties are perceived in varying ways and different stakeholders and different publics focus on different aspects or types of risk. Attempting to move public consultation further "upstream" may not avoid this, because the framing of risks and benefits is necessarily embedded in a cultural and ideological context, and is subject to change as experience of the emergent technology unfolds. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0601194

  2. Hydrogen Technology and Energy Curriculum (HyTEC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Barbara

    2013-02-28

    The Lawrence Hall of Science of the University of California, Berkeley has collaborated with scientists and engineers, a local transit agency, school districts, and a commercial curriculum publisher to develop, field-test nationally, and publish a two-week curriculum module on hydrogen and fuel cells for high school science. Key partners in this project are the Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) of Humboldt State University, the Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit), FilmSight Productions, Lab-Aids, Inc., and 32 teachers and 2,370 students in field-test classrooms in California, Connecticut, Ohio, New York, South Carolina, and Washington. Field-test teachers received two to three days of professional development before teaching the curriculum and providing feedback used for revision of the curriculum. The curriculum, titled Investigating Alternative Energy: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells and published by Lab-Aids, Inc., includes a teachers guide (with lesson plans, resources, and student handout pages), two interactive computer animations, a video, a website, and a laboratory materials kit. The project has been disseminated to over 950 teachers through awareness workshops at state, regional, and national science teacher conferences.

  3. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  4. CRYOCOL a computer program to calculate the cryogenic distillation of hydrogen isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douglas, S.R.

    1993-02-01

    This report describes the computer model and mathematical method coded into the AECL Research computer program CRYOCOL. The purpose of CRYOCOL is to calculate the separation of hydrogen isotopes by cryogenic distillation. (Author)

  5. The hydrogen and the fuel cells in the world. Programs and evolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchese, P.

    2008-01-01

    HyPac is a french platform on the hydrogen and fuel cells, created in 2008. The author presents the opportunity of such a platform facing the world research programs and other existing platforms. (A.L.B.)

  6. Technological forecasting applied to the processes of hydrogen generation; Previsao tecnologica sobre os processos de geracao de hidrogenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Milton Satocy; Oliveira, Wagner dos Santos [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mails: msnakano@usp.br; wagner@ipen.br

    2008-11-15

    Fuel cells are attracting interest as efficient and clean energy conversion devices. Hydrogen is the combustible of the fuel cells and must be generated by an efficient and clean method. This work exploits Delphi methodology of technological forecasting applied to hydrogen generation and identifies the most probable methods that, in future, can be used to obtain hydrogen in Brazil. (author)

  7. A fuel conservation study for transport aircraft utilizing advanced technology and hydrogen fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, W.; Calleson, R.; Espil, J.; Quartero, C.; Swanson, E.

    1972-01-01

    The conservation of fossil fuels in commercial aviation was investigated. Four categories of aircraft were selected for investigation: (1) conventional, medium range, low take-off gross weight; (2) conventional, long range, high take-off gross weights; (3) large take-off gross weight aircraft that might find future applications using both conventional and advanced technology; and (4) advanced technology aircraft of the future powered with liquid hydrogen fuel. It is concluded that the hydrogen fueled aircraft can perform at reduced size and gross weight the same payload/range mission as conventionally fueled aircraft.

  8. Achievement report for fiscal 1982 on Sunshine Program-entrusted research and development. Survey on patent and information (Hydrogen energy); 1982 nendo tokkyo joho chosa kenkyu seika hokokokusho. Suiso energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1983-03-01

    Patents related to the research under the Sunshine Program are surveyed so as to ensure that the program be promoted smoothly and efficiently. Since the scope of the hydrogen energy technology is extensive, branches supposed to be relatively important only are surveyed, which include the production of hydrogen (thermochemical process, photochemical process, and electrolysis), storage and transportation of hydrogen, safety of hydrogen, hydrogen fuel cells, hydrogen-fueled engines, and hydrogen combustion devices. The basic policy to follow in the extraction of necessary patents is that all related to the hydrogen energy technology be collected from as many fields as possible. However, it is impossible to read all the laid-open patents. Under such circumstances, out of the items in IPC (International Patent Classification) used by the Patent Agency, those deemed to be closely related to the hydrogen energy technology are designated and, when the classification item attached to the official gazette matches one of the IPC classification items, it is extracted as a desired item after deliberation of its relationship with the hydrogen energy technology. (NEDO)

  9. Building technologies program. 1995 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selkowitz, S.E.

    1996-05-01

    The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Building Technology Program. The report is divided into four categories: windows and daylighting, lighting systems, building energy simulation, and advanced building systems. The objective of the Building Technologies program is to assist the U.S. building industry in achieving substantial reductions in building-sector energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions while improving comfort, amenity, health, and productivity in the building sector. Past efforts have focused on windows and lighting, and on the simulation tools needed to integrate the full range of energy efficiency solutions into achievable, cost-effective design solutions for new and existing buildings. Current research is based on an integrated systems and life-cycle perspective to create cost-effective solutions for more energy-efficient, comfortable, and productive work and living environments. Sixteen subprograms are described in the report.

  10. The space shuttle program technologies and accomplishments

    CERN Document Server

    Sivolella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    This book tells the story of the Space Shuttle in its many different roles as orbital launch platform, orbital workshop, and science and technology laboratory. It focuses on the technology designed and developed to support the missions of the Space Shuttle program. Each mission is examined, from both the technical and managerial viewpoints. Although outwardly identical, the capabilities of the orbiters in the late years of the program were quite different from those in 1981. Sivolella traces the various improvements and modifications made to the shuttle over the years as part of each mission story. Technically accurate but with a pleasing narrative style and simple explanations of complex engineering concepts, the book provides details of many lesser known concepts, some developed but never flown, and commemorates the ingenuity of NASA and its partners in making each Space Shuttle mission push the boundaries of what we can accomplish in space. Using press kits, original papers, newspaper and magazine articles...

  11. NASA/industry advanced turboprop technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemianski, Joseph A.; Whitlow, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental and analytical effort shows that use of advanced turboprop (propfan) propulsion instead of conventional turbofans in the older narrow-body airline fleet could reduce fuel consumption for this type of aircraft by up to 50 percent. The NASA Advanced Turboprop (ATP) program was formulated to address the key technologies required for these thin, swept-blade propeller concepts. A NASA, industry, and university team was assembled to develop and validate applicable design codes and prove by ground and flight test the viability of these propeller concepts. Some of the history of the ATP Project, an overview of some of the issues, and a summary of the technology developed to make advanced propellers viable in the high-subsonic cruise speed application are presented. The ATP program was awarded the prestigious Robert J. Collier Trophy for the greatest achievement in aeronautics and astronautics in America in 1987.

  12. Natural gas usage as a heat source for integrated SMR and thermochemical hydrogen production technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaber, O.; Naterer, G.F.; Dincer, I.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates various usages of natural gas (NG) as an energy source for different hydrogen production technologies. A comparison is made between the different methods of hydrogen production, based on the total amount of natural gas needed to produce a specific quantity of hydrogen, carbon dioxide emissions per mole of hydrogen produced, water requirements per mole of hydrogen produced, and a cost sensitivity analysis that takes into account the fuel cost, carbon dioxide capture cost and a carbon tax. The methods examined are the copper-chlorine (Cu-Cl) thermochemical cycle, steam methane reforming (SMR) and a modified sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle. Also, an integrated Cu-Cl/SMR plant is examined to show the unique advantages of modifying existing SMR plants with new hydrogen production technology. The analysis shows that the thermochemical Cu-Cl cycle out-performs the other conventional methods with respect to fuel requirements, carbon dioxide emissions and total cost of production. (author)

  13. Mixed Waste Integrated Program emerging technology development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, J.B.; Hart, P.W.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the management and treatment of its mixed low-level wastes (MLLW). MLLW are regulated under both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and various DOE orders. Over the next 5 years, DOE will manage over 1.2 m 3 of MLLW and mixed transuranic (MTRU) wastes. In order to successfully manage and treat these mixed wastes, DOE must adapt and develop characterization, treatment, and disposal technologies which will meet performance criteria, regulatory approvals, and public acceptance. Although technology to treat MLLW is not currently available without modification, DOE is committed to developing such treatment technologies and demonstrating them at the field scale by FY 1997. The Office of Research and Development's Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) within the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), OfFice of Technology Development, is responsible for the development and demonstration of such technologies for MLLW and MTRU wastes. MWIP advocates and sponsors expedited technology development and demonstrations for the treatment of MLLW

  14. Mixed Waste Integrated Program emerging technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hart, P.W. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the management and treatment of its mixed low-level wastes (MLLW). MLLW are regulated under both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and various DOE orders. Over the next 5 years, DOE will manage over 1.2 m{sup 3} of MLLW and mixed transuranic (MTRU) wastes. In order to successfully manage and treat these mixed wastes, DOE must adapt and develop characterization, treatment, and disposal technologies which will meet performance criteria, regulatory approvals, and public acceptance. Although technology to treat MLLW is not currently available without modification, DOE is committed to developing such treatment technologies and demonstrating them at the field scale by FY 1997. The Office of Research and Development`s Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) within the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), OfFice of Technology Development, is responsible for the development and demonstration of such technologies for MLLW and MTRU wastes. MWIP advocates and sponsors expedited technology development and demonstrations for the treatment of MLLW.

  15. Advanced acoustic cavity technology. [for hydrogen oxygen rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, W. S.; Oberg, C. L.; Kusak, L.

    1974-01-01

    A series of rocket motor firings was performed in a modified linear aerospike thrust chamber with the H2/O2 propellant combination to allow determination of the physical properties of the combustion gases in acoustic cavities located in the chamber side walls. A preliminary analytical study was first conducted to define theoretically both the appropriate cavity dimensions and the combustion gas flow field adjacent to the cavity openings. During the subsequent motor firings, cavity gas temperature profiles were measured and gas samples were withdrawn from the bottom of the cavities for compositional analysis by measurement of pressure/temperature variation and gas chromatography. Data were obtained with both radially and axially oriented cavities and with and without hydrogen bleed flow through the cavities. A simplified procedure was developed for predicting gas cavity and acoustic velocity for use in acoustic cavity design analyses.

  16. Capabilities to Support Thermochemical Hydrogen Production Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Ginosar

    2009-05-01

    This report presents the results of a study to determine if Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has the skilled staff, instrumentation, specialized equipment, and facilities required to take on work in thermochemical research, development, and demonstration currently being performed by the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). This study outlines the beneficial collaborations between INL and other national laboratories, universities, and industries to strengthen INL's thermochemical efforts, which should be developed to achieve the goals of the NHI in the most expeditious, cost effective manner. Taking on this work supports INL's long-term strategy to maintain leadership in thermochemical cycle development. This report suggests a logical path forward to accomplish this transition.

  17. Development and Improvement of Devices for Hydrogen Generation and Oxidation in Water Detritiation Facility Based on CECE Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozenkevich, M.; Andreev, B.; Magomedbekov, E.; Park, Yu.; Sakharovsky, Yu.; Perevezentsev, A.

    2005-01-01

    Water detritiation facility based on CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) technology needs an electrolyser for water conversion to hydrogen. Use of a conventional alkali electrolyser requires a very deep purification of hydrogen stream from alkali prior to injection to LPCE (Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange) column. In some applications conversion of detritiated hydrogen back into water is required. This is usually performed via hydrogen catalytic oxidation in a recombiner. This paper presents results of study to improve hydrogen and oxygen purification for alkali electrolysers and develop a hydrogen recombiner based on use of hydrophobic catalyst

  18. Technology Development for Hydrogen Propellant Storage and Transfer at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley; Krenn, Angela; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a major user of liquid hydrogen. In particular, NASA's John F. Kennedy (KSC) Space Center has operated facilities for handling and storing very large quantities of liquid hydrogen (LH2) since the early 1960s. Safe operations pose unique challenges and as a result NASA has invested in technology development to improve operational efficiency and safety. This paper reviews recent innovations including methods of leak and fire detection and aspects of large storage tank health and integrity. We also discuss the use of liquid hydrogen in space and issues we are addressing to ensure safe and efficient operations should hydrogen be used as a propellant derived from in-situ volatiles.

  19. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  20. Dynamic effects on the acceptance of hydrogen technologies - an international comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, Boris; Erdmann, Georg

    2008-01-01

    Social acceptance plays an important role for the future hydrogen economy and a broad market launch of hydrogen technologies. Neglecting the aspect of public acceptance and attitude may become a serious obstacle for the establishment of a mass market infrastructure. With a standardized questionnaire and a standardized procedure, personal interviews were conducted with at least 300 persons in Amsterdam, Barcelona, Berlin, Hamburg, London, Luxembourg, Madrid and Reykjavik, in total with 3352 persons. Thus the dynamics of the public attitude toward hydrogen were analyzed, whereby the possibility of setbacks and accidents was taken into consideration. Whereas 68% of the interviewed persons would be supportive of the aforementioned technologies, an amount of 31% was determined to be volatile. An amount of 77% stated that they would use a hydrogen bus instead of a conventional one if they could choose, but an amount of 21% was indifferent. It will be shown how these amounts can affect the balance of acceptance and how stable the acceptance of hydrogen technologies can be considered in the evaluated six countries. (author)

  1. Pre-treatment technologies for dark fermentative hydrogen production: Current advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieenia, Razieh; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Pivato, Alberto

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen is regarded as a clean and non-carbon fuel and it has a higher energy content compared to carbon fuels. Dark fermentative hydrogen production from organic wastes is the most promising technology for commercialization among chemical and biological methods. Using mixed microflora is favored in terms of easier process control and substrate conversion efficiencies instead of pure cultures. However, mixed cultures should be first pre-treated in order to select sporulating hydrogen producing bacteria and suppress non-spore forming hydrogen consumers. Various inoculum pre-treatments have been used to enhance hydrogen production by dark fermentation including heat shock, acid or alkaline treatment, chemical inhibition, aeration, irradiation and inhibition by long chain fatty acids. Regarding substrate pre-treatment, that is performed with the aim of enhanced substrate biodegradability, thermal pre-treatment, pH adjustment using acid or base, microwave irradiation, sonication and biological treatment are the most commonly studied technologies. This article reviews the most investigated pre-treatment technologies applied for either inoculum or substrate prior to dark fermentation, the long-term effects of varying pre-treatment methods and the subsequently feasibility of each method for commercialization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. DWPF CATALYTIC HYDROGEN GENERATION PROGRAM - REVIEW OF CURRENT STATUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.

    2009-07-10

    Significant progress has been made in the past two years in improving the understanding of acid consumption and catalytic hydrogen generation during the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processing of waste sludges in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). This report reviews issues listed in prior internal reviews, describes progress with respect to the recommendations made by the December 2006 external review panel, and presents a summary of the current understanding of catalytic hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, are historically known catalysts for the conversion of formic acid into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Rh, Ru, and Pd are present in the DWPF SRAT feed as by-products of thermal neutron fission of {sup 235}U in the original waste. Rhodium appears to become most active for hydrogen as the nitrite ion concentration becomes low (within a factor of ten of the Rh concentration). Prior to hydrogen generation, Rh is definitely active for nitrite destruction to N{sub 2}O and potentially active for nitrite to NO formation. These reactions are all consistent with the presence of a nitro-Rh complex catalyst, although definite proof for the existence of this complex during Savannah River Site (SRS) waste processing does not exist. Ruthenium does not appear to become active for hydrogen generation until nitrite destruction is nearly complete (perhaps less nitrite than Ru in the system). Catalytic activity of Ru during nitrite destruction is significantly lower than that of either Rh or Pd. Ru appears to start activating as Rh is deactivating from its maximum catalytic activity for hydrogen generation. The slow activation of the Ru, as inferred from the slow rate of increase in hydrogen generation that occurs after initiation, may imply that some species (perhaps Ru itself) has some bound nitrite on it. Ru, rather than Rh, is primarily responsible for the

  3. Divison of Environmental Control Technology program, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mott, William E.

    1979-06-01

    This report covers Division of Environmental Control Technology projects in progress during FY 1978, within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Department of Energy. It is the second in a planned series of annual reports. The Division of Environmental Control Technology (ECT) continues to support the Assistant Secretary for Environment (EV) in discharging two primary responsibilities: (1) under the Environmental Engineering (EE) Program, the independent overview and assessment of environmental control aspects of both the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) programs and the Nation's energy policies, and (2) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning Program, the reduction of potential environmental hazards at the radioactively contaminated sites that are presently owned or were formerly used by the Government. This report presents a short summary of objectives, approach, progress and results, future plans, and a reference bibliography for each research, development, or assessment project within the program areas described above.

  4. IPIRG programs - advances in pipe fracture technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkowski, G.; Olson, R.; Scott, P. [Batelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the advances made in fracture control technology as a result of the research performed in the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The findings from numerous experiments and supporting analyses conducted to investigate the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping and pipe systems subjected to high-rate loading typical of seismic events are summarized. Topics to be discussed include; (1) Seismic loading effects on material properties, (2) Piping system behavior under seismic loads, (3) Advances in elbow fracture evaluations, and (4) {open_quotes}Real{close_quotes} piping system response. The presentation for each topic will be illustrated with data and analytical results. In each case, the state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics prior to the first IPIRG program will be contrasted with the state-of-the-art at the completion of the IPIRG-2 program.

  5. Information exchange on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Wang Hong

    2010-07-01

    The worldwide interests in the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) have been growing because the high temperature heat produced by the reactor can be utilized not only for efficient power generation but also for broad process heat applications, especially for thermo-chemical hydrogen production to fuel a prospective hydrogen economy in future. Presently only two HTGR reactors are operational in the world, including the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the HTR-10 in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. JAEA and INET have cooperated since 1986 in the field of HTGR development, particularly on the HTTR and HTR-10 projects. This report describes the cooperation activities on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2009. (author)

  6. Information exchange on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Nozomu; Tachibana, Yukio; Sun Yuliang

    2009-07-01

    The worldwide interests in the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) have been growing because the high temperature heat produced by the reactor can be utilized not only for efficient power generation but also for broad process heat applications, especially for thermo-chemical hydrogen production to fuel a prospective hydrogen economy in future. Presently only two HTGR reactors are operational in the world, including the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and the HTR-10 in the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China. JAEA and INET have cooperated since 1986 in the field of HTGR development, particularly on the HTTR and HTR-10 projects. This report describes the cooperation activities on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen technology between JAEA and INET in 2008. (author)

  7. Recent insights into the cell immobilization technology applied for dark fermentative hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Gopalakrishnan; Mudhoo, Ackmez; Sivagurunathan, Periyasamy; Nagarajan, Dillirani; Ghimire, Anish; Lay, Chyi-How; Lin, Chiu-Yue; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2016-11-01

    The contribution and insights of the immobilization technology in the recent years with regards to the generation of (bio)hydrogen via dark fermentation have been reviewed. The types of immobilization practices, such as entrapment, encapsulation and adsorption, are discussed. Materials and carriers used for cell immobilization are also comprehensively surveyed. New development of nano-based immobilization and nano-materials has been highlighted pertaining to the specific subject of this review. The microorganisms and the type of carbon sources applied in the dark hydrogen fermentation are also discussed and summarized. In addition, the essential components of process operation and reactor configuration using immobilized microbial cultures in the design of varieties of bioreactors (such as fixed bed reactor, CSTR and UASB) are spotlighted. Finally, suggestions and future directions of this field are provided to assist the development of efficient, economical and sustainable hydrogen production technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. COMPENDIUM: SURVEYS EVALUATING KNOWLEDGE AND OPINIONS CONCERNING HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truett, Lorena Faith [ORNL; Cooper, Christy [U.S. Department of Energy; Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    This compendium updates a 2003 literature review of surveys of knowledge and opinions of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. Its purpose is to ensure that results of comparable surveys are considered in surveys conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Over twice as many studies related to the DOE survey have been published since 2003 than prior to that date. The fact that there have been significantly more studies implies that there have been further demonstration projects and/or increased interest in hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. The primary findings of these 15 new surveys, all of which were conducted in Europe (E) or North America (NA), to the DOE surveys are as follows: 1.Respondents who are more educated are more accepting of hydrogen technologies (NA). 2.Respondents who are more knowledgeable about hydrogen and/or fuel cells are more accepting of hydrogen technologies (E, NA). 3.When asked about issues of trust, respondents generally expressed distrust of the government or political parties but trusted scientists and environmental protection organizations (E). 4.Technical knowledge about hydrogen and fuel cell technologies is low (E, NA). 5.Respondents may express opinions about a technology even when they are lacking in knowledge of that technology (E). 6.Women and men have different priorities when deciding on an automobile purchase (E). 7.Public acceptance to hydrogen is vulnerable to perceptions of decreased safety (E, NA). 8.Public acceptance to hydrogen is vulnerable to perceptions of increased cost (E, NA). The DOE surveys are similar to surveys that examine technical knowledge of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, although the technical questions are certainly different. The DOE surveys are also similar to the opinion surveys in that they address many of the same issues, such as safety, sources of energy information, or trust. There are many differences between the surveys reviewed in this compendium and the DOE surveys. The

  9. Clean coal technology: Export finance programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    Participation by US firms in the development of Clean Coal. Technology (CCT) projects in foreign countries will help the United States achieve multiple national objectives simultaneously--addressing critical goals related to energy, environmental technology, industrial competitiveness and international trade. US participation in these projects will result in an improved global environment, an improvement in the balance of payments and an increase in US jobs. Meanwhile, host countries will benefit from the development of economically- and environmentally-sound power facilities. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (Public Law 101-549, Section 409) as supplemented by a requirement in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Public Law 102-486, Section 1331(f)) requires that the Secretary of Energy, acting through the Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee Subgroup on Clean Coal Technologies, submit a report to Congress with information on the status of recommendations made in the US Department of Energy, Clean Coal Technology Export Programs, Report to the United States Congress, February 1992. Specific emphasis is placed on the adequacy of financial assistance for export of CCTS. This report fulfills the requirements of the Act. In addition, although this report focuses on CCT power projects, the issues it raises about the financing of these projects are also relevant to other CCT projects such as industrial applications or coal preparation, as well as to a much broader range of energy and environmental technology projects worldwide.

  10. Cogeneration (hydrogen and electrical power) using the Texaco Gasification Power Systems (TGPS) technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, J.

    1994-01-01

    The information herein presents preliminary technical and cost data for an actual case study using Texaco Gasification Power Systems (TGPS) technology, incorporated as part of an overall refinery upgrade project. This study is based on gasification of asphalt and vacuum residue (see Table 1, feedstock properties) to produce hydrogen plus carbon monoxide (synthesis gas) for the ultimate production of high purity hydrogen and power at a major refinery in Eastern Europe. A hydrogen production of 101,000 Nm 3 /hr (9.1 tons/hr) at 99.9 (wt.%) purity plus 50 MW (net) power slated to be used by the refinery was considered for this study. Figure I shows a block diagram depicting the general refinery configuration upgrade as envisioned by the owner operator; included in the configuration as shown in the shaded area is the TGPS plant. Figure II shows a block flow diagram depicting the TGPS unit and its battery limits as defined for this project. The technology best suited to meet the demand for clean and efficient electric power generation and hydrogen production is the Texaco Gasification Power Systems (TGPS) process. This technology is based upon Texaco's proprietary gasification technology which is well proven with over 40 years of gasification experience. There are currently 37 operating units in the world today which have licensed the Texaco gasification process technology, with another 12 in design/construction. Total synthesis gas (hydrogen + carbon monoxide) production capacity is over 2,8 billion standard cubic feet per day. The TGPS, which is basically the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) based upon the Texaco gasification technology, was developed by combining and integrating gasification with power generation facilities. (author). 3 figs., 9 tabs., 4 refs

  11. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Tasks 3 & 4 Report Economic, Energy, and Environmental Analysis of Hydrogen Production and Delivery Options in Select Alabama Markets: Preliminary Case Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Gillette, Jerry; Elgowainy, Amgad; Mintz, Marianne

    2007-12-01

    This report documents a set of case studies developed to estimate the cost of producing, storing, delivering, and dispensing hydrogen for light-duty vehicles for several scenarios involving metropolitan areas in Alabama. While the majority of the scenarios focused on centralized hydrogen production and pipeline delivery, alternative delivery modes were also examined. Although Alabama was used as the case study for this analysis, the results provide insights into the unique requirements for deploying hydrogen infrastructure in smaller urban and rural environments that lie outside the DOE’s high priority hydrogen deployment regions. Hydrogen production costs were estimated for three technologies – steam-methane reforming (SMR), coal gasification, and thermochemical water-splitting using advanced nuclear reactors. In all cases examined, SMR has the lowest production cost for the demands associated with metropolitan areas in Alabama. Although other production options may be less costly for larger hydrogen markets, these were not examined within the context of the case studies.

  12. Peculiarities of a Technology for Hydrogen Production Using Energy-Storing Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozin, L.F.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents information about the possibility to produce high-purity hydrogen on a pilot and pilot-industrial scale (1000 m3H2/hour using energy-storing substances and gives some peculiarities of this technology.

  13. Carbon dioxide emission in hydrogen production technology from coke oven gas with life cycle approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burmistrz Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of Carbon Footprint (CF for technology of hydrogen production from cleaned coke oven gas was performed. On the basis of real data and simulation calculations of the production process of hydrogen from coke gas, emission indicators of carbon dioxide (CF were calculated. These indicators are associated with net production of electricity and thermal energy and direct emission of carbon dioxide throughout a whole product life cycle. Product life cycle includes: coal extraction and its transportation to a coking plant, the process of coking coal, purification and reforming of coke oven gas, carbon capture and storage. The values were related to 1 Mg of coking blend and to 1 Mg of the hydrogen produced. The calculation is based on the configuration of hydrogen production from coke oven gas for coking technology available on a commercial scale that uses a technology of coke dry quenching (CDQ. The calculations were made using ChemCAD v.6.0.2 simulator for a steady state of technological process. The analysis of carbon footprint was conducted in accordance with the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA.

  14. Development of Hydrogen Education Programs for Government Officials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Shannon [South Carolina Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Alliance, Columbia, SC (United States); Keller, Russ [Advanced Technology International, Cedarburg, WI (United States)

    2016-03-08

    1. Subcontractor/Technical Subject Matter Expert (Tasks 1-3) 2. Technical lead for LFG cleanup and hydrogen production systems Support for Feasibility Study 3. Technical Lead for Feasibility Study Coordination of site preparation activities for all project equipment 4. Host site

  15. The ASACUSA antihydrogen and hydrogen program: results and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbrunot, C.; Amsler, C.; Arguedas Cuendis, S.; Breuker, H.; Dupre, P.; Fleck, M.; Higaki, H.; Kanai, Y.; Kolbinger, B.; Kuroda, N.; Leali, M.; Mäckel, V.; Mascagna, V.; Massiczek, O.; Matsuda, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Simon, M. C.; Spitzer, H.; Tajima, M.; Ulmer, S.; Venturelli, L.; Widmann, E.; Wiesinger, M.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zmeskal, J.

    2018-03-01

    The goal of the ASACUSA-CUSP collaboration at the Antiproton Decelerator of CERN is to measure the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using an atomic spectroscopy beamline. A milestone was achieved in 2012 through the detection of 80 antihydrogen atoms 2.7 m away from their production region. This was the first observation of `cold' antihydrogen in a magnetic field free region. In parallel to the progress on the antihydrogen production, the spectroscopy beamline was tested with a source of hydrogen. This led to a measurement at a relative precision of 2.7×10-9 which constitutes the most precise measurement of the hydrogen hyperfine splitting in a beam. Further measurements with an upgraded hydrogen apparatus are motivated by CPT and Lorentz violation tests in the framework of the Standard Model Extension. Unlike for hydrogen, the antihydrogen experiment is complicated by the difficulty of synthesizing enough cold antiatoms in the ground state. The first antihydrogen quantum states scan at the entrance of the spectroscopy apparatus was realized in 2016 and is presented here. The prospects for a ppm measurement are also discussed. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  16. Innovations in fuel cells and related hydrogen technology in Norway – OECD Case Study in the Energy Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Godø, Helge; Nerdrum, Lars; Rapmund, Antje; Nygaard, Stian

    2003-01-01

    This report presents the results of an analysis undertaken by NIFU on innovations in fuel cells and related hydrogen technology in Norway. This country study is part of a larger effort jointly organized by the OECD’s Working Group on Technology and Innovation Policy (TIP) and IEA’s Committee on Energy Research and Technology. Organized as a Focus Group, a number of national case studies have been made on different energy technologies and energy sources, fuel cells and related hydrogen technol...

  17. Hydrogen technology in the oil and gas sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaacs, E.

    2006-01-01

    This presentation describes the structure and functions of the Energy Innovation Network, which is a new Canadian Federal not-for-profit Corporation owned jointly by multiple governments, energy companies and utilities. It's mandate is to promote all energy resources and technologies. It's strategic goals are to maintain Canada's economic advantage while ensuring environmental protection, take advantage of the shift in energy systems and to put Canada at the forefront of integration between energy systems

  18. Southern California Regional Technology Acceleration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochoa, Rosibel

    2014-09-30

    UC San Diego and San Diego State University are partnering to address these deficiencies in the renewable energy space in the greater San Diego region, accelerating the movement of clean energy innovation from the university laboratory into the marketplace, building on the proven model of the William J. von Liebig Center’s (vLC’s) Proof of Concept (POC) program and virtualizing the effort to enable a more inclusive environment for energy innovation and expansion of the number of clean energy start-ups and/or technology licenses in greater California.

  19. CECE: Expanding the Envelope of Deep Throttling Technology in Liquid Oxygen/Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engines for NASA Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliano, Victor J.; Leonard, Timothy G.; Lyda, Randy T.; Kim, Tony S.

    2010-01-01

    As one of the first technology development programs awarded by NASA under the Vision for Space Exploration, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) Deep Throttling, Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE) program was selected by NASA in November 2004 to begin technology development and demonstration toward a deep throttling, cryogenic engine supporting ongoing trade studies for NASA s Lunar Lander descent stage. The CECE program leverages the maturity and previous investment of a flight-proven hydrogen/oxygen expander cycle engine, the PWR RL10, to develop and demonstrate an unprecedented combination of reliability, safety, durability, throttlability, and restart capabilities in high-energy, cryogenic, in-space propulsion. The testbed selected for the deep throttling demonstration phases of this program was a minimally modified RL10 engine, allowing for maximum current production engine commonality and extensibility with minimum program cost. Four series of demonstrator engine tests have been successfully completed between April 2006 and April 2010, accumulating 7,436 seconds of hot fire time over 47 separate tests. While the first two test series explored low power combustion (chug) and system instabilities, the third test series investigated and was ultimately successful in demonstrating several mitigating technologies for these instabilities and achieved a stable throttling ratio of 13:1. The fourth test series significantly expanded the engine s operability envelope by successfully demonstrating a closed-loop control system and extensive transient modeling to enable lower power engine starting, faster throttle ramp rates, and mission-specific ignition testing. The final hot fire test demonstrated a chug-free, minimum power level of 5.9%, corresponding to an overall 17.6:1 throttling ratio achieved. In total, these tests have provided an early technology demonstration of an enabling cryogenic propulsion concept with invaluable system-level technology data

  20. Superconducting technology program Sandia 1996 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.P.

    1997-02-01

    Sandia's Superconductivity Technology Program is a thallium-based high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, open-system thick film conductor development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The research efforts currently underway are: (1) Process development and characterization of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting closed system wire and tape, (2) Investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based thick films using two-zone processing, and (3) Cryogenic design of a 30K superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY96 in each of these areas

  1. U.S. Climate Change Technology Program: Strategic Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    .... The Climate Change Technology Program (CCTP) was formed to coordinate the Federal Government's portfolio of climate-related technology research and development activities, including technology deployment and adoption activities...

  2. 76 FR 4350 - Health Information Technology Extension Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Health Information Technology Extension Program ACTION: Public Notice. SUMMARY: This notice announces changes to the Health Information Technology Extension... of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology, 200 Independence Ave, SW., Suite 729D...

  3. Fractional Consumption of Liquid Hydrogen and Liquid Oxygen During the Space Shuttle Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Jonathan K.

    2011-01-01

    The Space Shuttle uses the propellants, liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, to meet part of the propulsion requirements from ground to orbit. The Kennedy Space Center procured over 25 million kilograms of liquid hydrogen and over 250 million kilograms of liquid oxygen during the 3D-year Space Shuttle Program. Because of the cryogenic nature of the propellants, approximately 55% of the total purchased liquid hydrogen and 30% of the total purchased liquid oxygen were used in the Space Shuttle Main Engines. The balance of the propellants were vaporized during operations for various purposes. This paper dissects the total consumption of liqUid hydrogen and liqUid oxygen and determines the fraction attributable to each of the various processing and launch operations that occurred during the entire Space Shuttle Program at the Kennedy Space Center.

  4. Innovative regions and industrial clusters in hydrogen and fuel cell technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Anne Nygaard; Andersen, Per Dannemand

    2010-01-01

    Regional governments in Europe seem to be playing an increasing role in hydrogen and fuel cell (H2FC) development. A number of regions are supporting demonstration projects and building networks among regional stakeholders to strengthen their engagement in H2FC technology. In this article, we...... will analyse regions that are highly engaged in H2FC activity, based on three indicators: existing hydrogen infrastructure and production sites, general innovativeness and the presence of industrial clusters with relevance for H2FC. Our finding is that regions with high activity in H2FC development are also...

  5. An Experimental Study of Laboratory Hybrid Power System with the Hydrogen Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Minarik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents very small laboratory hybrid photovoltaic-hydrogen power system. The system was primarily assembled to verify the operability of the control algorithms and practical deployment of available commercial hydrogen technologies that are directly usable for storage of electricity produced from renewable energy sources in a small island system. This energetic system was installed and tested in Laboratory of fuel cells that is located in the university campus of VSB-Technical University of Ostrava. The energetic system consists of several basic components: a photovoltaic field, accumulators bank, water commercial electrolyzer and compact fuel cell system. The weather conditions recorded in two different weeks as model weather and solar conditions are used as case studies to test the energetic system and the results for two different cases are compared each other. The results show and illustrate selected behaviour curves of the power system and also average energy storage efficiency for accumulation subsystem based on hydrogen technologies or at the energetic system embedded components. On the basis of real measurement and its evaluation the ideal parameters of the photovoltaic field were calculated as well as the hydrogen technologies for supposed purpose and the power requirements.

  6. 76 FR 22673 - Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Institute of Standards and Technology Technology Innovation... the Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board. NIST is issuing this notice to correct the day of... Technology Innovation Program (TIP) Advisory Board is composed of ten members appointed by the Director of...

  7. Analysis of Engineering Content within Technology Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantz, Todd D.; Katsioloudis, Petros J.

    2011-01-01

    In order to effectively teach engineering, technology teachers need to be taught engineering content, concepts, and related pedagogy. Some researchers posit that technology education programs may not have enough content to prepare technology teachers to teach engineering design. Certain technology teacher education programs have responded by…

  8. Bachelor of Science-Engineering Technology Program and Fuel Cell Education Program Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Sleiti, Ahmad [Univ. of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2011-09-19

    The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology education project has addressed DOE goals by supplying readily available, objective, technical, and accurate information that is available to students, industry and the public. In addition, the program has supplied educated trainers and training opportunities for the next generation workforce needed for research, development, and demonstration activities in government, industry, and academia. The project has successfully developed courses and associated laboratories, taught the new courses and labs and integrated the HFCT option into the accredited engineering technology and mechanical engineering programs at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte (UNCC). The project has also established ongoing collaborations with the UNCC energy related centers of the Energy Production & Infrastructure Center (EPIC), the NC Motorsports and Automotive Research Center (NCMARC) and the Infrastructure, Design, Environment and Sustainability Center (IDEAS). The results of the project activities are presented as two major areas – (1) course and laboratory development, offerings and delivery, and (2) program recruitment, promotions and collaborations. Over the project period, the primary activity has been the development and offering of 11 HFCT courses and accompanying laboratories. This process has taken three years with the courses first being developed and then offered each year over the timeframe.

  9. Introduction to Radcalc: A computer program to calculate the radiolytic production of hydrogen gas from radioactive wastes in packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, J.R.; Hillesland, K.E.; Field, J.G.

    1995-04-01

    A calculational technique for quantifying the concentration of hydrogen generated by radiolysis in sealed radioactive waste containers was developed in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) study conducted by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc., and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) TMI-2 Technology Transfer Office. The study resulted in report GEND-041, entitled open-quotes A Calculational Technique to Predict Combustible Gas Generation in Sealed Radioactive Waste Containersclose quotes. The study also resulted in a presentation to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) which gained acceptance of the methodology for use in ensuring compliance with NRC IE Information Notice No. 84-72 (NRC 1984) concerning the generation of hydrogen within packages. NRC IE Information Notice No. 84-72: open-quotes Clarification of Conditions for Waste Shipments Subject to Hydrogen Gas Generationclose quotes applies to any package containing water and/or organic substances that could radiolytically generate combustible gases. EPRI developed a simple computer program in a spreadsheet format utilizing GEND-041 calculational methodology to predict hydrogen gas concentrations in low-level radioactive wastes containers termed Radcalc. The computer code was extensively benchmarked against TMI-2 (Three Mile Island) EPICOR II resin bed measurements. The benchmarking showed that the model developed predicted hydrogen gas concentrations within 20% of the measured concentrations. Radcalc for Windows was developed using the same calculational methodology. The code is written in Microsoft Visual C++ 2.0 and includes a Microsoft Windows compatible menu-driven front end. In addition to hydrogen gas concentration calculations, Radcalc for Windows also provides transportation and packaging information such as pressure buildup, total activity, decay heat, fissile activity, TRU activity, and transportation classifications

  10. Space Technology Mission Directorate Game Changing Development Program FY2015 Annual Program Review: Advanced Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, John; Fikes, John

    2015-01-01

    The Advance Manufacturing Technology (AMT) Project supports multiple activities within the Administration's National Manufacturing Initiative. A key component of the Initiative is the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO), which includes participation from all federal agencies involved in U.S. manufacturing. In support of the AMNPO the AMT Project supports building and Growing the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation through a public-private partnership designed to help the industrial community accelerate manufacturing innovation. Integration with other projects/programs and partnerships: STMD (Space Technology Mission Directorate), HEOMD, other Centers; Industry, Academia; OGA's (e.g., DOD, DOE, DOC, USDA, NASA, NSF); Office of Science and Technology Policy, NIST Advanced Manufacturing Program Office; Generate insight within NASA and cross-agency for technology development priorities and investments. Technology Infusion Plan: PC; Potential customer infusion (TDM, HEOMD, SMD, OGA, Industry); Leverage; Collaborate with other Agencies, Industry and Academia; NASA roadmap. Initiatives include: Advanced Near Net Shape Technology Integrally Stiffened Cylinder Process Development (launch vehicles, sounding rockets); Materials Genome; Low Cost Upper Stage-Class Propulsion; Additive Construction with Mobile Emplacement (ACME); National Center for Advanced Manufacturing.

  11. Improvement study for the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Haj Ayed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The dry-low-NOx (DLN micromix combustion principle is developed for the low emission combustion of hydrogen in an industrial gas turbine APU GTCP 36-300. The further decrease of NOx emissions along a wider operation range with pure hydrogen supports the introduction of the micromix technology to industrial applications. Experimental and numerical studies show the successful advance of the DLN micromix combustion to extended DLN operation range. The impact of the hydrogen fuel properties on the combustion principle and aerodynamic flame stabilization design laws, flow field, flame structure and emission characteristics is investigated by numerical analysis using an eddy dissipation concept combustion model and validated against experimental results.

  12. CO-PRODUCTION OF HYDROGEN AND ELECTRICITY USING PRESSURIZED CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED GASIFICATION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhen Fan

    2006-05-30

    Foster Wheeler has completed work under a U.S. Department of Energy cooperative agreement to develop a gasification equipment module that can serve as a building block for a variety of advanced, coal-fueled plants. When linked with other equipment blocks also under development, studies have shown that Foster Wheeler's gasification module can enable an electric generating plant to operate with an efficiency exceeding 60 percent (coal higher heating value basis) while producing near zero emissions of traditional stack gas pollutants. The heart of the equipment module is a pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) that is used to gasify the coal; it can operate with either air or oxygen and produces a coal-derived syngas without the formation of corrosive slag or sticky ash that can reduce plant availabilities. Rather than fuel a gas turbine for combined cycle power generation, the syngas can alternatively be processed to produce clean fuels and or chemicals. As a result, the study described herein was conducted to determine the performance and economics of using the syngas to produce hydrogen for sale to a nearby refinery in a hydrogen-electricity co-production plant setting. The plant is fueled with Pittsburgh No. 8 coal, produces 99.95 percent pure hydrogen at a rate of 260 tons per day and generates 255 MWe of power for sale. Based on an electricity sell price of $45/MWhr, the hydrogen has a 10-year levelized production cost of $6.75 per million Btu; this price is competitive with hydrogen produced by steam methane reforming at a natural gas price of $4/MMBtu. Hence, coal-fueled, PCFB gasifier-based plants appear to be a viable means for either high efficiency power generation or co-production of hydrogen and electricity. This report describes the PCFB gasifier-based plant, presents its performance and economics, and compares it to other coal-based and natural gas based hydrogen production technologies.

  13. Development of Evaluation Technology for Hydrogen Combustion in containment and Accident Management Code for CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. B.; Kim, D. H.; Song, Y. M.

    2011-08-01

    For a licensing of nuclear power plant(NPP) construction and operation, the hydrogen combustion and hydrogen mitigation system in the containment is one of the important safety issues. Hydrogen safety and its control for the new NPPs(Shin-Wolsong 1 and 2, Shin-Ulchin 1 and 2) have been evaluated in detail by using the 3-dimensional analysis code GASFLOW. The experimental and computational studies on the hydrogen combustion, and participations of the OEDE/NEA programs such as THAI and ISP-49 secures the resolving capabilities of the hydrogen safety and its control for the domestic nuclear power plants. ISAAC4.0, which has been developed for the assessment of severe accident management at CANDU plants, was already delivered to the regulatory body (KINS) for the assessment of the severe accident management guidelines (SAMG) for Wolsong units 1 to 4, which are scheduled to be submitted to KINS. The models for severe accident management strategy were newly added and the graphic simulator, CAVIAR, was coupled to addition, the ISAAC computer code is anticipated as a platform for the development and maintenance of Wolsong plant risk monitor and Wolsong-specific SAMG

  14. The hydrogen and the fuel cells in the world. Programs and evolutions; L'hydrogene et les piles a combustibles dans le monde. Programmes et evolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucchese, P. [CEA Saclay, Dir. des Nouvelles Technologies de l' Energie CEA, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    HyPac is a french platform on the hydrogen and fuel cells, created in 2008. The author presents the opportunity of such a platform facing the world research programs and other existing platforms. (A.L.B.)

  15. Physics of the Cosmos Program Annual Technology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Bruce Thai; Cardiff, Ann H.

    2015-01-01

    What's in this Report? What's New? This fifth Program Annual Technology Report (PATR) summarizes the Programs technology development activities for fiscal year (FY) 2015. The PATR serves four purposes.1. Summarize the technology gaps identified by the astrophysics community;2. Present the results of this years technology gap prioritization by the PCOS Technology Management Board (TMB);3. Report on newly funded PCOS Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) projects; and4. Detail progress, current status, and activities planned for the coming year for all technologies supported by PCOS Supporting Research and Technology (SRT) funding in FY 2015. .

  16. Identifying performance gaps in hydrogen safety sensor technology for automotive and stationary applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boon-Brett, L.; Bousek, J.; Black, G.; Moretto, P.; Castello, P.; Huebert, T.; Banach, U.

    2010-01-01

    A market survey has been performed of commercially available hydrogen safety sensors, resulting in a total sample size of 53 sensors from 21 manufacturers. The technical specifications, as provided by the manufacturer, have been collated and are displayed herein as a function of sensor working principle. These specifications comprise measuring range, response and recovery times, ambient temperature, pressure and relative humidity, power consumption and lifetime. These are then compared against known performance targets for both automotive and stationary applications in order to establish in how far current technology satisfies current requirements of sensor end users. Gaps in the performance of hydrogen sensing technologies are thus identified and areas recommended for future research and development. (author)

  17. Study of Systems and Technology for Liquid Hydrogen Production Independent of Fossil Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprafka, R. J.; Escher, W. J. D.; Foster, R. W.; Tison, R. R.; Shingleton, J.; Moore, J. S.; Baker, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Based on Kennedy Space Center siting and logistics requirements and the nonfossil energy resources at the Center, a number of applicable technologies and system candidates for hydrogen production were identified and characterized. A two stage screening of these technologies in the light of specific criteria identified two leading candidates as nonfossil system approaches. Conceptual design and costing of two solar-operated, stand alone systems, one photovoltaic based on and the other involving the power tower approach reveals their technical feasibility as sited as KSC, and the potential for product cost competitiveness with conventional supply approaches in the 1990 to 1210 time period. Conventional water hydrolysis and hydrogen liquefaction subsystems are integrated with the solar subsystems.

  18. Computer technology and computer programming research and strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Antonakos, James L

    2011-01-01

    Covering a broad range of new topics in computer technology and programming, this volume discusses encryption techniques, SQL generation, Web 2.0 technologies, and visual sensor networks. It also examines reconfigurable computing, video streaming, animation techniques, and more. Readers will learn about an educational tool and game to help students learn computer programming. The book also explores a new medical technology paradigm centered on wireless technology and cloud computing designed to overcome the problems of increasing health technology costs.

  19. Hydrogen Village : creating hydrogen and fuel cell communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.R.

    2009-01-01

    The Hydrogen Village (H2V) is a collaborative public-private partnership administered through Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Canada and funded by the Governments of Canada and Ontario. This end user-driven, market development program accelerates the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell (FC) technologies throughout the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The program targets 3 specific aspects of market development, notably deployment of near market technologies in community based stationary and mobile applications; development of a coordinated hydrogen delivery and equipment service infrastructure; and societal factors involving corporate policy and public education. This presentation focused on lessons learned through outreach programs and the deployment of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) heat and power generation; indoor and outdoor fuel cell back up power systems; fuel cell-powered forklifts, delivery vehicles, and utility vehicles; hydrogen internal combustion engine powered shuttle buses, sedans, parade float; hydrogen production/refueling stations in the downtown core; and temporary fuel cell power systems

  20. CFD based exploration of the dry-low-NOx hydrogen micromix combustion technology at increased energy densities

    OpenAIRE

    A. Haj Ayed; K. Kusterer; H.H.-W. Funke; J. Keinz; D. Bohn

    2017-01-01

    Combined with the use of renewable energy sources for its production, hydrogen represents a possible alternative gas turbine fuel within future low emission power generation. Due to the large difference in the physical properties of hydrogen compared to other fuels such as natural gas, well established gas turbine combustion systems cannot be directly applied for dry-low-NOx (DLN) hydrogen combustion. Thus, the development of DLN combustion technologies is an essential and challenging task fo...

  1. MIxed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP): Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The mission of the Mixed Waste Integrated Program (MWIP) is to develop and demonstrate innovative and emerging technologies for the treatment and management of DOE's mixed low-level wastes (MLLW) for use by its customers, the Office of Waste Operations (EM-30) and the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40). The primary goal of MWIP is to develop and demonstrate the treatment and disposal of actual mixed waste (MMLW and MTRU). The vitrification process and the plasma hearth process are scheduled for demonstration on actual radioactive waste in FY95 and FY96, respectively. This will be accomplished by sequential studies of lab-scale non-radioactive testing followed by bench-scale radioactive testing, followed by field-scale radioactive testing. Both processes create a highly durable final waste form that passes leachability requirements while destroying organics. Material handling technology, and off-gas requirements and capabilities for the plasma hearth process and the vitrification process will be established in parallel

  2. Air Force electrochemical power research and technology program for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Douglas

    1987-09-01

    An overview is presented of the existing Air Force electrochemical power, battery, and fuel cell programs for space application. Present thrusts are described along with anticipated technology availability dates. Critical problems to be solved before system applications occur are highlighted. Areas of needed performance improvement of batteries and fuel cells presently used are outlined including target dates for key demonstrations of advanced technology. Anticipated performance and current schedules for present technology programs are reviewed. Programs that support conventional military satellite power systems and special high power applications are reviewed. Battery types include bipolar lead-acid, nickel-cadmium, silver-zinc, nickel-hydrogen, sodium-sulfur, and some candidate advanced couples. Fuel cells for pulsed and transportation power applications are discussed as are some candidate advanced regenerative concepts.

  3. Support of a pathway to a hydrogen future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, A.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which outline the content of the presentation. Subjects addressed include: hydrogen research program vision; electricity industry restructuring -- opportunities and challenges for hydrogen; transportation sector -- opportunities for hydrogen; near-term and mid-term opportunities for hydrogen; and hydrogen production technologies from water. It is concluded that the global climate change challenge is the potential driver for the development of hydrogen systems.

  4. Program strategy document for the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, R.M.

    1979-07-01

    A multiyear program plan is presented which describes the program of the Nuclear Materials Transportation Technology Center (TIC) at Sandia Laboratories. The work element plans, along with their corresponding work breakdown structures, are presented for TTC activities in the areas of Technology and Information Center, Systems Development, Technology, and Institutional Issues for the years from 1979 to 1985

  5. Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan Research and Development 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2008-01-01

    Building Technologies Program Multi-Year Program Plan 2008 for research and development, including residential and commercial integration, lighting, HVAC and water heating, envelope, windows, and analysis tools.

  6. Technology test bed and hydrogen cold flow facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, Robert; Gautney, Tim

    1993-01-01

    The Technology Test Bed and Hydrogen Cold Flow facilities at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama provide unique testing capabilities for the aerospace community. Located at the Advanced Engine Test Facility (AETF), these facilities are operated and maintained by MSFC Propulsion Laboratory personnel. They provide a systems and components level testing platform for validating new technology concepts and advanced systems design and for gaining a better understanding of the test article internal environments. A discussion follows of the particular capabilities of each facility to provide a range of testing options for specific test articles.

  7. Clean Coal Technology Programs: Completed Projects (Volume 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy

    2003-12-01

    Annual report on the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP), Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), and Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). The report addresses the roles of the programs, implementation, funding and costs, project descriptions, legislative history, program history, environmental aspects, and project contacts. The project descriptions describe the technology and provides a brief summary of the demonstration results.

  8. Hydrogen Temperature-Programmed Desorption in Platinum Catalysts: Decomposition and Isotopic Exchange by Spillover Hydrogen of Chemisorbed Ammonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Miller, J.T.; Meyers, B.L.; Barr, M.K.; Modica, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    H{2}-TPD of Pt/alumina catalysts display multiple hydrogendesorptions. In addition to chemisorbed hydrogen (Peak I) atapproximately 175}o{C, there is a small hydrogen desorption (PeakII) at about 250}o{C and a large, irreversible hydrogen desorption(Peak III) at 450}o{C. The quantity of hydrogen

  9. Hydrogen storage for vehicular applications: Technology status and key development areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S.L.; Handrock, J.L.

    1994-04-01

    The state-of-the-art of hydrogen storage technology is reviewed, including gaseous, liquid, hydride, surface adsorbed media, glass microsphere, chemical reaction, and liquid chemical technologies. The review of each technology includes a discussion of advantages, disadvantages, likelihood of success, and key research and development activities. A preferred technological path for the development of effective near-term hydrogen storage includes both cur-rent DOT qualified and advanced compressed storage for down-sized highly efficient but moderate range vehicles, and liquid storage for fleet vehicle applications. Adsorbate media are also suitable for fleet applications but not for intermittent uses. Volume-optimized transition metal hydride beds are also viable for short range applications. Long-term development of coated nanoparticulate or metal matrix high conductivity magnesium alloy, is recommended. In addition, a room temperature adsorbate medium should be developed to avoid cryogenic storage requirements. Chemical storage and oxidative schemes present serious obstacles which must be addressed for these technologies to have a future role.

  10. Technology needs assessment for DOE environmental restoration programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duray, J.R.; Carlson, T.J.; Carpenter, C.E.; Cummins, L.E.; Daub, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    The 'Technology Needs Assessment Final Report' describes current and planned environmental restoration activity, identifies technologies intended to be used or under consideration, and ranks technology deficiencies in the U.S. Department of Energy's environmental restoration program. Included in the ranking are treatment technologies, characterization technologies, and non-technology issues that affect environmental restoration. Data used for the assessment was gathered during interviews in the spring of 1991 with DOE site personnel responsible for the environmental restoration work. (author)

  11. Results of the 2004 Knowledge and Opinions Surveys for the Baseline Knowledge Assessment of the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmoyer, Richard L [ORNL; Truett, Lorena Faith [ORNL; Cooper, Christy [U.S. Department of Energy

    2006-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program focuses on overcoming critical barriers to the widespread use of hydrogen fuel cell technology. The transition to a new, hydrogen-based energy economy requires an educated human infrastructure. With this in mind, the DOE Hydrogen Program conducted statistical surveys to measure and establish baselines for understanding and awareness about hydrogen, fuel cells, and a hydrogen economy. The baseline data will serve as a reference in designing an education program, and it will be used in comparisons with future survey results (2008 and 2011) to measure changes in understanding and awareness. Scientific sampling was used to survey four populations: (1) the general public, ages 18 and over; (2) students, ages 12-17; (3) state and local government officials; and (4) potential large-scale hydrogen users. It was decided that the survey design should include about 1,000 individuals in each of the general public and student categories, about 250 state and local officials, and almost 100 large-scale end users. The survey questions were designed to accomplish specific objectives. Technical questions measured technical understanding and awareness of hydrogen technology. Opinion questions measured attitudes about safety, cost, the environment, and convenience, as well as the likelihood of future applications of hydrogen technology. For most of the questions, "I don't know" or "I have no opinion" were acceptable answers. Questions about information sources assessed how energy technology information is received. The General Public and Student Survey samples were selected by random digit dialing. Potential large-scale end users were selected by random sampling. The State and Local Government Survey was of the entire targeted population of government officials (not a random sample). All four surveys were administered by computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI). For each population, the length of the survey was less than

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program 2014 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report: June 16-20, 2014, Washington, D.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-10-01

    The fiscal year (FY) 2014 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (AMR), in conjunction with DOE's Vehicle Technologies Office AMR, was held from June 16-20, 2014, at the Washington Marriott Wardman Park in Washington, D.C. This report is a summary of comments by AMR peer reviewers about the hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE).

  13. Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Office Research and Development Programs: Prospective Benefits Assessment Report for Fiscal Year 2018

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, T. S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Birky, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gohlke, David [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Under a diverse set of programs, the Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies Offices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy invest in early-stage research of advanced batteries and electrification, engines and fuels, materials, and energy-efficient mobility systems; hydrogen production, delivery, and storage; and fuel cell technologies. This report documents the estimated benefits of successful development and implementation of advanced vehicle technologies. It presents a comparison of a scenario with completely successful implementation of Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) technologies (the Program Success case) to a future in which there is no contribution after Fiscal Year 2017 by the VTO or FCTO to these technologies (the No Program case). Benefits were attributed to individual program technology areas, which included FCTO research and development and the VTO programs of electrification, advanced combustion engines and fuels, and materials technology. Projections for the Program Success case indicate that by 2035, the average fuel economy of on-road, light-duty vehicle stock could be 24% to 30% higher than in the No Program case, while fuel economy for on-road medium- and heavy-duty vehicle stock could be as much as 13% higher. The resulting petroleum savings in 2035 were estimated to be as high as 1.9 million barrels of oil per day, and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions were estimated to be as high as 320 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent per year. Projections of light-duty vehicle adoption indicate that although advanced-technology vehicles may be somewhat more expensive to purchase, the fuel savings result in a net reduction of consumer cost. In 2035, reductions in annual fuel expenditures for vehicles (both light- and heavy-duty) are projected to range from $86 billion to $109 billion (2015$), while the projected increase in new vehicle

  14. Proceedings of the 1995 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This document containes reports from the proceedings of the 1995 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Reports are organized under the topics of systems analysis, utilization, storage, and production. This volume, Volume I, contains the reports concerned with systems analysis and utilization. Individual reports were processed separately for the DOE data bases.

  15. Comparison of State-Funded Technology Maturation Programs.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warren, Drake [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hess, Marguerite Evelyn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the structure and impact of state-funded technology maturation programs that leverage research institutions for economic development throughout the United States. The lessons learned and practices identified from previous experiences will inform Sandia National Laboratories' Government Relations and Technology Partnerships teams as they participate in near-term discussions about the proposed Technology Readiness Gross Receipts Tax Credit and Program, and continue to shape longer-term program and partnership opportunities. This Page Intentionally Left Blank

  16. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed.

  17. In Situ Remediation Integrated Program: Technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The In Situ Remediation Integrated Program (ISR IP) was instituted out of recognition that in situ remediation could fulfill three important criteria: significant cost reduction of cleanup by eliminating or minimizing excavation, transportation, and disposal of wastes; reduced health impacts on workers and the public by minimizing exposure to wastes during excavation and processing; and remediation of inaccessible sites, including: deep subsurfaces, in, under, and around buildings. Buried waste, contaminated soils and groundwater, and containerized wastes are all candidates for in situ remediation. Contaminants include radioactive wastes, volatile and non-volatile organics, heavy metals, nitrates, and explosive materials. The ISR IP intends to facilitate development of in situ remediation technologies for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes in soils, groundwater, and storage tanks. Near-term focus is on containment of the wastes, with treatment receiving greater effort in future years. ISR IP is an applied research and development program broadly addressing known DOE environmental restoration needs. Analysis of a sample of 334 representative sites by the Office of Environmental Restoration has shown how many sites are amenable to in situ remediation: containment--243 sites; manipulation--244 sites; bioremediation--154 sites; and physical/chemical methods--236 sites. This needs assessment is focused on near-term restoration problems (FY93--FY99). Many other remediations will be required in the next century. The major focus of the ISR EP is on the long term development of permanent solutions to these problems. Current needs for interim actions to protect human health and the environment are also being addressed

  18. A field application experience of integrating hydrogen technology with wind power in a remote island location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazey, R.; Salman, S. K.; Aklil-D'Halluin, D. D.

    This paper aims to share the field application experience related to the development of an innovative stand-alone sustainable energy system known as the PURE project. The PURE project has been developed alongside a Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) scheme, which is supported by the UK Department of Trade and Industry and executed by siGEN in collaboration with The Robert Gordon University. The system has been constructed within an industrial estate on the island of Unst in Shetland, 200 miles north of the Scottish mainland. The energy system now supplies five business properties with clean reliable power and utilises wind turbine and hydrogen technology to provide a sustainable energy source. The stored hydrogen gas generated by the system is used as an energy source for periods when electrical demand within the business properties exceeds wind turbine production. The hydrogen is also utilised as a fuel source for transportation and as a transportable energy source for mobile power generation. The paper therefore gives a detailed description of the PURE project and discusses the field experience accumulated during the development and installation of the system. It also shares a number of practical issues that had to be overcome during its integration and operation. The installation of the PURE project has resulted in a number of unexpected conclusions being identified and marks a significant step forward in the accessible deployment of this technology for community use.

  19. U.S. Climate Change Technology Program: Strategic Plan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    .... climate change research and development activities. Under this new structure, climate change science and climate-related technology research programs are integrated to an extent not seen previously...

  20. Use of regenerative energy sources and hydrogen technology. Proceedings; Nutzung regenerativer Energiequellen und Wasserstofftechnik 2008. Tagungsband

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luschtinetz, Thomas; Lehmann, Jochen (eds.)

    2008-07-01

    Within the 15th symposium 'Use of regenerative energy sources and hydrogen technology' at 6th to 8th November, 2008, in Stralsund (Federal Republic of Germany), the following lectures were held: (1) Processing of mine gas by means of membrane technology (T. Brinkmann, W. Clemens, A. Dengel, B. Hoting); (2) Energy storage in salt caverns / developments and concrete projects for adiabatic compressed air and for hydrogen storage (F. Crotogino, S. Huebner); (3) Application of an ORC plant in the area of a hybrid wind-hydrogen-plant (J. Eliasz, K. Rychlik); (4) Wind Farm Cluster Management Sysem (A.J. Gesino, C.A. Quintero Marrone, R. Mackensen, M. Wolff, B. Lange, K. Rohrig); (5) Results of a field test of a combination of a wood boiler and Stirling engine (B. Gross); (6) NANOSTIR - Optimisation of solid fuel operated Stirling CHP units by means of nano technological coatings (B. Gross); (7) Fundamental investigations of long-term behaviour / damage behaviour of big PEM stacks (September 2005 - October 2007) (M. Hinz, O. Luschtinetz, J. Lehmann); (8) HyFLEET:CUTE project: Results from the biggest hydrogen bus project in the world (T. Kampet); (9) Comparison of new chains of distribution for biogas and natural gas (M. Klamp); (10) Generation of hydrogen from formic acid at ambient temperature and its use in a H2/O2 fuel cell (B. Loges, A. Boddien, H. Junge, M. Beller); (11) PE membranes out of biological materials (E. Mendieta); (12) Offshore wind power affects generation, network and consumption (A. Miege, J. Lehmann, T. Luschtinetz, C. Sponholz, F. Gamallo); (13) Comparative investigations at fixed and tracking PV systems (R. Mueller, A. Rackwitz); (14) Energetic utilisation of biomass - boundary conditions, state of the art and perspectives (M. Nelles, D. Banemann, N. Engler, A. Schuech); (15) Supply networks - a new method of analysis for an optimized use of regenerative energy (R. Nieberle, A. Simroth); (16) Steam - vapour hybrid power plant supplied with

  1. The United States Advanced Reactor Technologies Research and Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The following aspects are addressed: • Nuclear energy mission; • Reactor research development and deployment (RD&D) programs: - Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program; - Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support; - Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART)

  2. Ten questions on hydrogen Jean Dhers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The author proposes explanations and comments on the use of hydrogen in energy production. He discusses whether hydrogen can be a new energy technology within the context of a sustainable development, whether hydrogen is actually an energy vector, what would be the benefits of using hydrogen in energy applications, why it took so much time to be interested in hydrogen, when the hydrogen vector will be needed, whether we can economically produce hydrogen to meet energy needs (particularly in transports), whether hydrogen is the best suited energy vector for ground transports in the future, how to retail hydrogen for ground transports, what are the difficulties to store hydrogen for ground transport applications, and how research programs on hydrogen are linked together

  3. Proceedings of the workshop on new material development. Nano-technology and hydrogen energy society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Masaru; Asano, Masaharu; Ohshima, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Masaki; Ohgaki, Junpei

    2005-03-01

    We have newly held the Workshop on New Material Development in order to enhance the research activities on new material development using radiation. Theme of this workshop was 'nano-technology and hydrogen', both of which are considered to have great influence on our social life and have shown rapid progress in the related researches, recently. Researchers from domestic universities, research institutes, and private companies have attended at the workshop and had the opportunity to exchange information and make discussions about the latest trend in the leading edge researches, and have contributed to the material development in future. The technology for manufacturing and evaluation of very fine materials, which is essential for the nano-technology, and the development of new functional materials, which will support the hydrogen energy society in future, have increasingly become important and have been intensively investigated by many research groups. In such investigation, the ionizing radiation is indispensable as the tool for probing and modifying materials. For this reason, this workshop was held at JAERI, Takasaki, a center of excellence for radiation application in Japan. This workshop was held by JAERI, Takasaki, on November 19, 2004 under the joint auspices of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, the Chemical Society of Japan, the Polymer Science Society of Japan and the Japanese Society of Radiation Chemistry. The workshop was attended by 97 participates. We believe that this workshop supported by many academic societies will largely contribute to the research on new material development in the field of nano-technology and hydrogen. The 10 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  4. Test and Approval Center for Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Technologies: Phase I. Initiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and the mitigation of the human-caused global warming. Fuel cells (in particular solid oxide fuel cells) produce electricity and heat at higher efficiencies than conventional power plants. They emit less pollutants - for example no toxic NOx at all - than conventional plants do. Fuel cells can operate on fossil...... fuels (natural gas) and on alternative fuels as well. They can therefore bridge the gap between availability and efficient use of fossil fuels on the short term and establishment of an energy market based on renewables on the long term. Hydrogen is a zero carbon energy carrier that– just like......Fuel cells and hydrogen technologies hold the potential for decreasing emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants, for facilitating the increased use of renewable energy sources with high efficiencies and thereby contributing to the establishment of a sustainable energy system...

  5. Robotics Technology Development Program Cross Cutting and Advanced Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrigan, R.W.; Horschel, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    Need-based cross cutting technology is being developed which is broadly applicable to the clean up of hazardous and radioactive waste within the US Department of Energy's complex. Highly modular, reusable technologies which plug into integrated system architectures to meet specific robotic needs result from this research. In addition, advanced technologies which significantly extend current capabilities such as automated planning and sensor-based control in unstructured environments for remote system operation are also being developed and rapidly integrated into operating systems

  6. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-03-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2005. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program?s national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  7. 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-11-01

    The 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report summarizes the results of the 2013 Building Technologies Office (BTO) peer review, which was held in Washington, D.C., on April 2–4, 2013. The review was attended by over 300 participants and included presentations on 59 BTO-funded projects: 29 from BTO’s Emerging Technologies Program, 20 from the Commercial Buildings Integration Program, 6 from the Residential Buildings Integration Program, and 4 from the Building Energy Codes Program. This report summarizes the scores and comments provided by the independent reviewers for each project.

  8. The hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigg, A.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  9. The hydrogen highway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigg, A. [Fuel Cells Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' The Hydrogen Highway in British Columbia, Canada, is a coordinated, large-scale demonstration and deployment program aimed at accelerating the commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and products. It will be a showcase for fuel cell vehicles, refuelling stations and stationary power systems leading up to the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in Whistler, BC. The Hydrogen Highway is designed to help address many of the challenges to commercialization identified in the Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap. The project will create an early adopter network of hydrogen and fuel cell microenvironments where technology developers and users can learn about the technical, economic, environmental and social impacts of products. The Hydrogen Highway will give the public and potential purchasers an opportunity to feel, touch and see the new technology, as well as provide the industry with a venue in which to develop industry standards and supply chains of materials and components. While demonstration and deployment programs are a recognized and necessary component in the process to commercialize hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, there is no handbook describing how it should be done. This paper will describe the history, objectives, project details and some of the challenges associated with establishing Canada's Hydrogen Highway. (author)

  10. Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, T.A.

    1998-01-31

    The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

  11. Variable Cycle Engine Technology Program Planning and Definition Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, J. S.; Stern, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    The variable stream control engine, VSCE-502B, was selected as the base engine, with the inverted flow engine concept selected as a backup. Critical component technologies were identified, and technology programs were formulated. Several engine configurations were defined on a preliminary basis to serve as demonstration vehicles for the various technologies. The different configurations present compromises in cost, technical risk, and technology return. Plans for possible variably cycle engine technology programs were formulated by synthesizing the technology requirements with the different demonstrator configurations.

  12. The U.S. department of energy program on hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, David; Paster, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Clean forms of energy are needed to support sustainable global economics growth while mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and impacts on air quality. To address these challenges, the U.S. President's National Energy Policy and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Strategic Plan call for expanding the development of diverse domestic energy supplies. Working with industry, the Department developed a national vision roadmap for moving toward a hydrogen economy-a solution that holds the potential to provide sustainable clean, safe, secure, affordable, and reliable energy. DOE has examined and organized its hydrogen activities in pursuit of this national vision. This includes the development of fossil and renewable sources, as well as nuclear technologies capable of economically producing large quantities of hydrogen. (author)

  13. Validation test of advanced technology for IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells: Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1992-01-01

    Individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology was advanced at NASA Lewis and under Lewis contracts with the intention of improving cycle life and performance. One advancement was to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte to improve cycle life. Another advancement was to modify the state-of-the-art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes. The modified design is referred to as the advanced design. A breakthrough in the low-earth-orbit (LEO) cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen cells has been previously reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3,500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The boiler plate test results are in the process of being validated using flight hardware and real time LEO testing at the Naval Weapons Support Center (NWSC), Crane, Indiana under a NASA Lewis Contract. An advanced 125 Ah IPV nickel-hydrogen cell was designed. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term, LEO spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent KOH electrolyte; (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick; (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management; and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion due to charge/discharge cycling. The significant improvements resulting from these innovations are: extended cycle life; enhanced thermal, electrolyte, and oxygen management; and accommodation of nickel electrode expansion. The advanced cell design is in the process of being validated using real time LEO cycle life testing of NWSC, Crane, Indiana. An update of validation test results confirming this technology is presented.

  14. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  15. Integration of hydrogen energy technologies in stand-alone power systems analysis of the current potential for applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoulias, E.I.; Lymberopoulos, N.; Tsoutsos, T.; Glockner, R.; Mydske, H.J.; Vosseler, I.; Gavalda, O.; Taylor, P.

    2006-01-01

    The European study entitled: 'Market Potential Analysis for Introduction of Hydrogen Energy Technology in Stand-Alone Power Systems (H-SAPS)' aimed to establish a broad understanding of the market potential for H-SAPS and provide a basis for promoting in wide scale new technological applications. The scope of the study was limited to small and medium installations, up to a few hundred kW power rating and based on RE as the primary energy source. The potential for hydrogen technology in SAPS was investigated through an assessment of the technical potential for hydrogen, the market analysis and the evaluation of external factors. The results are mostly directed towards action by governments and the research community but also industry involvement is identified. The results include targeted market research, establishment of individual cost targets, regulatory changes to facilitate alternative grid solutions, information and capacity building, focused technology research and bridging the technology gaps. (author)

  16. The deployment of projects of hydrogen-related innovative technologies in Japan and some topics in the project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, K.; Mizutani, E.; Fukuda, K.

    2004-01-01

    The deployment of innovative technologies, which have the potentiality to make breakthroughs in the future but have been kept remained at early stages of development because of their uncertain technological values, is important in the course of introduction and dissemination of hydrogen energy into our society. In Japan, in the consecutive projects of 'World Energy Network' (WE-NET) and 'Development of Safe Utilization Technology and an Infrastructure for Hydrogen Use', both supported by New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO), significant results have been achieved in the project of 'Research on Innovative Technologies'. The framework and characteristics of this project are outlined with several research topics. In the exploratory research on the alternative catalytic materials to Platinum group metals for fuel cells and hydrogen production, a series of Tantalum oxynitrides were found potentially applicable as new electrodes catalysts the development of magnetic refrigeration of hydrogen is under way with the finding of materials with feasible properties; in search of innovative hydrogen storage systems, a new process of decalin dehydrogenation / naphthalene hydrogenation based on superheated liquid-film-type catalysis was developed. (author)

  17. Shippingport station decommissioning project technology transfer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKernan, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) decontaminated and dismantled the world's first nuclear-fueled, commercial-size electric power plant. The SSDP programmatic goal direction for technology transfer is documentation of project management and operations experience. The objective is to provide future nuclear facility decommissioning projects with pertinent SSDP performance data for project assessment, planning, and operational implementation. This paper sets out access and availability directions for SSDP technology acquisition. Discusses are technology transfer definition; technology transfer products including topical and other project reports, professional-technical society presentations, other project liaison and media relations, visual documentation, and technology transfer data base; and retrieving SSDP information

  18. MSFC nuclear thermal propulsion technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swint, Shane

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on non-nuclear materials assessment, nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) turbomachinery technologies, and high temperature superconducting magnetic bearing technology are presented. The objective of the materials task is to identify and evaluate candidate materials for use in NTP turbomachinery and propellant feed system applications. The objective of the turbomachinery technology task is to develop and validate advanced turbomachinery technologies at the component and turbopump assembly levels. The objective of the high temperature superconductors (HTS) task is to develop and validate advanced technology for HTS passive magnetic/hydrostatic bearing.

  19. Extension Youth Educators' Technology Use in Youth Development Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Carli; Buquoi, Brittany; Kotrlik, Joe W.; Machtmes, Krisanna; Bunch, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive-correlational study was to determine the use of technology in youth programming by Extension youth development educators in Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee. Data were collected via e-mail and a SurveyMonkey© questionnaire. Extension educators are using some technology in youth development programming. More…

  20. Persuasive technology as an intervention programs for Health care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intervention programs through computer application should be used to persuade and support health awareness, treatment and prevention. This paper investigate and review studies using persuasive technology in health intervention program in Malaysia. It presents the main objective, the technology persuasive principles ...

  1. Art of hydrogen technology: review; Arte da tecnologia do hidrogenio - revisao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capaz, Rafael Silva; Marvulle, Valdecir [Universidade Federal de Itajuba (UNIFEI), MG (Brazil). Inst. de Recursos Naturais

    2006-07-01

    The era we live in, since many years ago is called 'petroleum age', because still depends on 'black gold'. It is known however that petroleum will be over on day. This could justify the growing research into new energy sources which appear as renewable alternatives and with less environmental impact. The hydrogen technology art, increasingly nowadays, involves production steps since gasification reactions to thermal decomposition, storage in gas, liquid and intermediary compounds state, transportation and still its use especially in fuel cells. (author)

  2. The Plasma Focus Technology Applied to the Detection of Hydrogenated Substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, R.; Moreno, C.; Gonzalez, J.; Clausse, A

    2003-01-01

    The feasibility study of an industrial application of thermonuclear pulsors is presented.An experiment was conducted to detect hydrogenated substances using PF technology.The detection system is composed by two neutron detectors operated simultaneously on every shot.The first detector is used to register the PF neutron yield in each shot; whereas the other one was designed to detect neutrons scattered by the blanket.We obtained the detector sensitivity charts as a function of the position in space and frontal area of the substance to be detected

  3. AECL's research and development program in environmental science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornett, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    AECL's radiological research and development (R and D) program encompasses work on sources of radiation exposure, radionuclide transport through the environment and potential impacts on biota and on human health. The application of the radiation protection knowledge and technology developed in this program provides cradle-to-grave management for CANDU and related nuclear technologies. This document provides an overview of the Environmental Science and Technology (ES and T) program which is one of the technical areas of R and D within the radiological R and D program. The ES and T program uses science from three main areas: radiochemistry, mathematical modelling and environmental assessment. In addition to providing an overview of the program, this summary also gives specific examples of recent technical work in each of the three areas. These technical examples illustrate the applied nature of the ES and T program and the close coupling of the program to CANDU customer requirements. (author)

  4. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Security Studies Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    incoming SSP Directors. Among other notables who have called Belmont home are Vannevar Bush, Winslow Homer, Talcott Parsons , the John Birch Society...Researchers 15 Affiliates 26 Seminar Series 33 Special Events 34 Field Trip 36 Publications 41 SSP Teaching 42 Courses 48 Professional Education 50 SSP...STUDIES PROGRAM MIT SECURITY STUDIES PROGRAM SECURITY STUDIES PROGRAM 1 he Security Studies Program (SSP) is a graduate level research and educational

  5. Hydrogen highway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2008-01-01

    The USA Administration would like to consider the US power generating industry as a basis ensuring both the full-scale production of hydrogen and the widespread use of the hydrogen related technological processes into the economy [ru

  6. Performance of ultrasonic and hydrogen peroxide technologies in removal of Bisphenol A from Aqueous solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Dehghani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:BPA is a non biodegradable antioxidant that has greatly hazardous for human and animals health. and Because of the eliminating alone fewness amount of the BPA during the wastewater treatment, wastewater that contains BPA can be source of pollution in aqueous solution. The objective of this study was Performance of ultrasonic and H2O2 technologies in removal of BPA from aqueous solution. Methods:Experiments of sonochemical was carried out with use of unit ultrasonicator (Elma, which in the two power 300 and 500W, frequencies at 35 and 130KHz. Hydrogen Peroxide in concentrations at 5, 15 and 30mg/lit was applied. Initial concentration BPA at limits 2, 5, 20 and 50 mg/lit which For measuring concentration of BPA used from Spectrometer UV/VIS Lambada 25 Perkin Elmer, Shelton unit. Results:The results demonstrated that hybrid ultrasonic and peroxide Hydrogen processes with Efficiency 98.65%,  has the highest efficiency in the removal of BPA. The most decomposition rate achieved at the frequency of 130 KHz and 500W assisted by 30mg/lit H2O2 at pH 11. Also the results demonstrated that with pH increase destruction rate BPA the increased by any three processes (ultrasonic, H2O2 and both hybrid. Conclusion:The results demonstrated that hybrid ultrasonic and peroxide Hydrogen processes can be used as a clean method and friendly environment for waters treatment are contains desirable BPA.

  7. Metal hydride hydrogen and heat storage systems as enabling technology for spacecraft applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reissner, Alexander, E-mail: reissner@fotec.at [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Pawelke, Roland H.; Hummel, Stefan; Cabelka, Dusan [FOTEC Forschungs- und Technologietransfer GmbH, Viktor Kaplan Straße 2, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Gerger, Joachim [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Johannes Gutenberg-Straße 3, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Farnes, Jarle, E-mail: Jarle.farnes@prototech.no [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Vik, Arild; Wernhus, Ivar; Svendsen, Tjalve [CMR Prototech AS, Fantoftvegen 38, PO Box 6034, 5892 Bergen (Norway); Schautz, Max, E-mail: max.schautz@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands); Geneste, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.geneste@esa.int [European Space Agency, ESTEC – Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk Zh (Netherlands)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • A metal hydride tank concept for heat and hydrogen storage is presented. • The tank is part of a closed-loop reversible fuel cell system for space application. • For several engineering issues specific to the spacecraft application, solutions have been developed. • The effect of water contamination has been approximated for Ti-doped NaAlH{sub 4}. • A novel heat exchanger design has been realized by Selective Laser Melting. - Abstract: The next generation of telecommunication satellites will demand a platform payload performance in the range of 30+ kW within the next 10 years. At this high power output, a Regenerative Fuel Cell Systems (RFCS) offers an efficiency advantage in specific energy density over lithium ion batteries. However, a RFCS creates a substantial amount of heat (60–70 kJ per mol H{sub 2}) during fuel cell operation. This requires a thermal hardware that accounts for up to 50% of RFCS mass budget. Thus the initial advantage in specific energy density is reduced. A metal hydride tank for combined storage of heat and hydrogen in a RFCS may overcome this constraint. Being part of a consortium in an ongoing European Space Agency project, FOTEC is building a technology demonstrator for such a combined hydrogen and heat storage system.

  8. MLS student active learning within a "cloud" technology program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tille, Patricia M; Hall, Heather

    2011-01-01

    In November 2009, the MLS program in a large public university serving a geographically large, sparsely populated state instituted an initiative for the integration of technology enhanced teaching and learning within the curriculum. This paper is intended to provide an introduction to the system requirements and sample instructional exercises used to create an active learning technology-based classroom. Discussion includes the following: 1.) define active learning and the essential components, 2.) summarize teaching methods, technology and exercises utilized within a "cloud" technology program, 3.) describe a "cloud" enhanced classroom and programming 4.) identify active learning tools and exercises that can be implemented into laboratory science programs, and 5.) describe the evaluation and assessment of curriculum changes and student outcomes. The integration of technology in the MLS program is a continual process and is intended to provide student-driven active learning experiences.

  9. Shippingport station decommissioning project technology transfer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKernan, M.L.

    1988-01-01

    US Department of Energy (DOE) Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project (SSDP) decommissioned, decontaminated, and dismantled the world's first, nuclear fueled, commercial size, electric power plant. SSDP programmatic goal direction for technology transfer is documentation of project management and operations experience. Objective is to provide future nuclear facility decommissioning projects with pertinent SSDP performance data for project assessment, planning, and operational implementation. This paper presents a working definition for technology transfer. Direction is provided for access and availability for SSDP technology acquisition

  10. Part 2 -- current program integrating strategies and lubrication technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, B.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is the second of two that describe the Predictive Maintenance Program for rotating machinery at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The Predictive Maintenance program has been enhanced through organizational changes and improved interdisciplinary usage of technology. This paper will discuss current program strategies that have improved the interaction between the Vibration and Lube Oil programs. The open-quotes Lube Oilclose quotes view of the combined program along with case studies will then be presented

  11. Part 2 -- current program integrating strategies and lubrication technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, B.

    1996-12-01

    This paper is the second of two that describe the Predictive Maintenance Program for rotating machinery at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The Predictive Maintenance program has been enhanced through organizational changes and improved interdisciplinary usage of technology. This paper will discuss current program strategies that have improved the interaction between the Vibration and Lube Oil programs. The {open_quotes}Lube Oil{close_quotes} view of the combined program along with case studies will then be presented.

  12. 76 FR 70970 - Technology Innovation Program Advisory Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... Technology, Education, and Science (COMPETES) Act, Public Law 110-69 (August 9, 2007), 15 U.S.C. 278n, the... eminent in such fields as business, research, science and technology, engineering, education, and... Program Advisory Board AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce...

  13. Computing, Information, and Communications Technology (CICT) Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDalsem, William R.

    2003-01-01

    The Computing, Information and Communications Technology (CICT) Program's goal is to enable NASA's Scientific Research, Space Exploration, and Aerospace Technology Missions with greater mission assurance, for less cost, with increased science return through the development and use of advanced computing, information and communication technologies

  14. An Overview of Natural Gas Conversion Technologies for Co-Production of Hydrogen and Value-Added Solid Carbon Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, Robert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dagle, Vanessa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bearden, Mark D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, Jamelyn D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krause, Theodore R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ahmed, Shabbir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-11-16

    This report was prepared in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Congressional Appropriation language to support research on carbon-free production of hydrogen using new chemical processes that utilize natural gas to produce solid carbon and hydrogen. The U.S. produces 9-10 million tons of hydrogen annually with more than 95% of the hydrogen produced by steam-methane reforming (SMR) of natural gas. SMR is attractive because of its high hydrogen yield; but it also converts the carbon to carbon dioxide. Non-oxidative thermal decomposition of methane to carbon and hydrogen is an alternative to SMR and produces CO2-free hydrogen. The produced carbon can be sold as a co-product, thus providing economic credit that reduces the delivered net cost of hydrogen. The combination of producing hydrogen with potentially valuable carbon byproducts has market value in that this allows greater flexibility to match the market prices of hydrogen and carbon. That is, the higher value product can subsidize the other in pricing decisions. In this report we highlight the relevant technologies reported in the literature—primarily thermochemical and plasma conversion processes—and recent research progress and commercial activities. Longstanding technical challenges include the high energetic requirements (e.g., high temperatures and/or electricity requirements) necessary for methane activation and, for some catalytic processes, the separation of solid carbon product from the spent catalyst. We assess current and new carbon product markets that could be served given technological advances, and we discuss technical barriers and potential areas of research to address these needs. We provide preliminary economic analysis for these processes and compare to other emerging (e.g., electrolysis) and conventional (e.g., SMR) processes for hydrogen production. The overarching conclusion of this study is that the cost of hydrogen can be potentially

  15. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program: FY 2004 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2005-10-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2004 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2004. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  16. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2006 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-07-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2006 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program for Fiscal Year 2005. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  17. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program 2007 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-07-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2007 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Program from October 2006 to September 2007. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program's national laboratories (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Brookhaven National Laboratory) and university and industry partners.

  18. 78 FR 56263 - HydroGen Corp., QueryObject Systems Corp., Security Intelligence Technologies, Inc., Skins, Inc...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION [File No. 500-1] HydroGen Corp., QueryObject Systems Corp., Security Intelligence Technologies, Inc., Skins, Inc., SLM Holdings, Inc., Spring Creek Healthcare Systems... securities of Security Intelligence Technologies, Inc. because it has not filed any periodic reports since...

  19. Fuzzy Multi-actor Multi-criteria Decision Making for Sustainability Assessment of biomass-based technologies for hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Fedele, Andrea; Mason, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a sustainability assessment method to rank the prior sequence of biomass-based technologies for hydrogen production. A novel fuzzy Multi-actor Multi-criteria Decision Making method which allows multiple groups of decision-makers to use linguistic variables...... to assess the biomass-based technologies for hydrogen production has been developed. Fifteen criteria relevant to in economic, environmental, technological and social-political aspects have been used in sustainability assessment. Four biomass-based technologies including pyrolysis, conventional gasification......, supercritical water gasification and fermentative hydrogen production have been studied by the proposed method, and biomass gasification has been considered as the most sustainable scenario and can be chosen for further development....

  20. A Contemporary Preservice Technology Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Rod; Becker, Kurt; Stewardson, Gary

    2012-01-01

    In order to teach engineering education, today's engineering and technology education teachers must be equipped with lesson plans to teach engineering design, among other principles, to the 6th-12th grade levels. At Utah State University (USU), curriculum has been developed for preservice engineering and technology education teachers that…

  1. The next generation of CANDU technologies: profiling the potential for hydrogen fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    This report discusses the Next-generation CANDU Power Reactor technologies currently under development at AECL. The innovations introduced into proven CANDU technologies include a compact reactor core design, which reduces the size by a factor of one third for the same power output; improved thermal efficiency through higher-pressure steam turbines; reduced use of heavy water (one quarter of the heavy water required for existing plants), thus reducing the cost and eliminating many material handling concerns; use of slightly enriched uranium to extend fuel life to three times that of existing natural uranium fuel and additions to CANDU's inherent passive safety. With these advanced features, the capital cost of constructing the plant can be reduced by up to 40 per cent compared to existing designs. The clean, affordable CANDU-generated electricity can be used to produce hydrogen for fuel cells for the transportation sector, thereby reducing emissions from the transportation sector

  2. Overview of the Defense Programs Research and Technology Development Program for fiscal year 1993. Appendix materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-30

    The pages that follow contain summaries of the nine R&TD Program Element Plans for Fiscal Year 1993 that were completed in the Spring of 1993. The nine program elements are aggregated into three program clusters as follows: Design Sciences and Advanced Computation; Advanced Manufacturing Technologies and Capabilities; and Advanced Materials Sciences and Technology.

  3. Remote sensing education in NASA's technology transfer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    Remote sensing is a principal focus of NASA's technology transfer program activity with major attention to remote sensing education the Regional Program and the University Applications Program. Relevant activities over the past five years are reviewed and perspective on future directions is presented.

  4. Strategies for Programmed Instruction: An Educational Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, J., Ed.

    The purpose of this book is to compare, contrast, and evaluate various strategies of programed instruction (PI). The underlying view is that programed instruction implies a systematic methodological approach to education and training, an approach which bases its decisions on facts rather than value judgements. Several strategies for task analysis…

  5. Native American Training Program in Petroleum Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Winifred M.; Kokesh, Judith H.

    1999-04-27

    This report outlines a comprehensive training program for members of Native American tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The program has two components: short courses and internships. Programs are proposed for: (1) adult tribes representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings, setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry; (2) graduate and undergraduate college students who are tribal members and are studying in the appropriate fields; and (3) high school and middle school teachers, science teachers. Materials and program models already have been developed for some components of the projects. The plan is a coordinated, comprehensive effort to use existing resources to accomplish its goals. Partnerships will be established with the tribes, the BIA, tribal organizations, other government agencies, and the private sector to implement the program.

  6. Development of HyPEP, A Hydrogen Production Plant Efficiency Calculation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. H. Oh; C. B. Davis; S. R. Sherman; S. Vilim; Y. J. Lee; W. J. Lee

    2006-03-01

    The Department of Energy envisions the next generation very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) as a single-purpose or dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. The Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) of the Republic of Korea also selected VHTR for the Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration (NHDD) Project. The report will address the evaluation of hydrogen and electricity production cycle efficiencies for such systems as the VHTR and NHDD, and the optimization of system configurations. Optimization of such complex systems as VHTR and NHDD will require a large number of calculations involving a large number of operating parameter variations and many different system configurations. The research will produce (a) the HyPEP which is specifically designed to be an easy-to-use and fast running tool for the hydrogen and electricity production evaluation with flexible system layout, (b) thermal hydraulic calculations using reference design, (c) verification and validation of numerical tools used in this study, (d) transient analyses during start-up operation and off-normal operation. This project will also produce preliminary cost estimates of the major components.

  7. Program Integration for International Technology Exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rea, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, New Mexico, supports the International Technology Exchange Division (ITED) through the integration of all international activities conducted within the DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  8. CRS&SI Technology Application Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This project report presents details of research carried out by the George Mason University : Consortium under a research contract from the U.S. Department of Transportations Research : and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA), in support o...

  9. International technology identification, transfer, and program support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitchen, B.

    1993-01-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS) activities primarily address vitrification technologies being investigated with Japan and the former Soviet Union (FSU). They also support the overall management of EM's international activities

  10. The DOE safeguards and security technology development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, R.C.; Wheelock, A.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that strategic planning for safeguards and security within the Department of Energy emphasizes the contributions of advanced technologies to the achievement of Departmental protection program goals. The Safeguards and Security Technology Development Program provides state-of-the-art technologies, systems and technical services in support of the policies and programmatic requirements for the protection of Departmental assets. The Program encompasses research and development in physical security, nuclear material control and accountability, information security and personnel security, and the integration of these disciplines in advanced applications. Technology development tasks serve goals that range from the maintenance of an effective technology base to the development, testing and evaluation of applications to meet field needs. A variety of factors, from the evolving threat to reconfiguration of the DOE complex and the technical requirements of new facilities, are expected to influence safeguards and security technology requirements and development efforts. Implementation of the Program is based on the systematic identification, prioritization and alignment of technology development tasks and needs. Initiatives currently underway are aimed at enhancing technology development project management. Increased management attention is also being placed on efforts to promote the benefits of the Program through technology transfer and interagency liaison

  11. DOE/EPA sludge irradiation technology transfer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlstrom, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    The cesium-137 sludge irradiation program has successfully progressed through the phases of technology development and pilot plant evaluation and has entered the technology transfer phase. Initial technology transfer activities have identified a growing interest among wastewater engineers and public officials to learn more about the application of irradiation in sludge treatment. As a result, a formal technology transfer program has been developed. As a major activity of this program, it is planned that the US Department of Energy, working with the US Environmental Protection Agency, state and local governments, will support the placement of five to 10 sludge irradiators at selected wastewater treatment facilities throughout the United States. Facilities which may best benefit from this process technology are being identified. Technology transfer will be stimulated as engineers and wastewater officials become familiar with the evaluation and implementation of sludge irradiation at these sites

  12. HTGR generic technology program. Semiannual report ending March 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    This document reports the technical accomplishments on the HTGR Generic Technology Program at General Atomic during the first half of FY-80. It covers a period when the design direction of the National HTGR Program is in the process of an overall review. The HTGR Generic Technology Program activities have continued so as to provide the basic technology required for all HTGR applications. The activities include the need to develop an MEU fuel and the need to qualify materials and components for the higher temperatures of the gas turbine and process heat plants

  13. WORKSHOP PROGRAMMING AS PART OF TECHNOLOGICAL PREPARATION OF PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Dodok

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with application of workshop programing system - Sinumerik Operate 840D SL in technological preparation of production. Application of system in real situation pointed out on several problems and disad-vantage of system. Article contains a comparison of the effectiveness between workshop programming, ISO programming, and CAM system programming. Sinumerik Operate was used as a control system at a milling machine EMCO Concept Mill 105.

  14. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program - 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-09-01

    This FY 2012 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  15. Pathways to Commercial Success. Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2011-09-01

    This FY 2011 report updates the results of an effort to identify and characterize commercial and near-commercial (emerging) technologies and products that benefited from the support of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program and its predecessor programs within DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

  16. Development of HyPEP, A Hydrogen Production Plant Efficiency Calculation Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lee, Won Jae; Shin, Young Joon; Kim, Jong Ho; Hong, Sung Deok; Lee, Seung Wook; Hwang, Moon Kyu

    2007-12-01

    Development of HyPEP program for assessing the steady-state hydrogen production efficiency of the nuclear hydrogen production facilities was carried out. The main developmental aims of the HyPEP program are the extensive application of the GUI for enhanced user friendliness and the fast numerical solution scheme. These features are suitable for such calculations as the optimisation calculations. HyPEP was developed with the object-oriented programming techniques. The components of the facility was modelled as objects in a hierarchical structure where the inheritance property of the object oriented program were extensively applied. The Delphi program language which is based on the Object Pascal was used for the HyPEP development. The conservation equations for the thermal hydraulic flow network were setup and the numerical solution scheme was developed and implemented into HyPEP beta version. HyPEP beta version has been developed with working GUI and the numerical solution scheme implementation. Due to the premature end of this project the fully working version of HyPEP was not produced

  17. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  18. Proceedings of the 1997 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review, May 21-23, 1997, Herndon, Virginia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1997-10-01

    The research and development supported by the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on near-term transitional strategies involving fossil fuels, and on the exploration of long-term, high-risk, renewable and sustainable concepts.

  19. NASA/General Electric broad-specification fuels combustion technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    The NASA/General Electric Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology Program is being conducted to evolve and demonstrate the technology required to use broadened-properties fuels in current and next generation commercial aircraft engines. The first phase of this program, completed in 1982, involved the design and test evaluation of three different combustor concepts. All combustors were designed for the General Electric CF6-80A engine envelope and operating conditions, using Experimental Referee Broad Specification (ERBS) fuel having a fuel hydrogen content of 12.8% by weight. Several different configurations of each combustor concept were evaluated in a series of high pressure sector combustor component tests. A total of 25 sector tests were conducted during phase 1. Combustor metal temperatures, emissions, exit temperature profiles, and radiant heat flux were measured over the full range of steady-state operating conditions using four fuels having nominal hydrogen contents between 11.8 and 14%. During the current phase 2 program, the two most promising concepts from phase 1 are being further refined and evaluated. For phase 2 testing, two additional fuels representing a wider range of fluidity and volatility are also being used in combustion system tests.

  20. Validation test of advanced technology for IPV nickel-hydrogen flight cells - Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithrick, John J.; Hall, Stephen W.

    1992-01-01

    Individual pressure vessel (IPV) nickel-hydrogen technology was advanced at NASA Lewis and under Lewis contracts with the intention of improving cycle life and performance. One advancement was to use 26 percent potassium hydroxide (KOH) electrolyte to improve cycle life. Another advancement was to modify the state-of-the-art cell design to eliminate identified failure modes. The modified design is referred to as the advanced design. A breakthrough in the LEO cycle life of IPV nickel-hydrogen cells has been previously reported. The cycle life of boiler plate cells containing 26 percent KOH electrolyte was about 40,000 LEO cycles compared to 3,500 cycles for cells containing 31 percent KOH. The boiler plate test results are in the process of being validated using flight hardware and real time LEO testing. The primary function of the advanced cell is to store and deliver energy for long-term, LEO spacecraft missions. The new features of this design are: (1) use of 26 percent rather than 31 percent KOH electrolyte; (2) use of a patented catalyzed wall wick; (3) use of serrated-edge separators to facilitate gaseous oxygen and hydrogen flow within the cell, while still maintaining physical contact with the wall wick for electrolyte management; and (4) use of a floating rather than a fixed stack (state-of-the-art) to accommodate nickel electrode expansion due to charge/discharge cycling. The significant improvements resulting from these innovations are: extended cycle life; enhanced thermal, electrolyte, and oxygen management; and accommodation of nickel electrode expansion.

  1. Ex-ante environmental assessments of novel technologies - Improved caprolactam catalysis and hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roes, A.L.; Patel, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    Utrecht University has conducted a pilot sustainability assessment for the executive board of the chemistry program ACTS (Advanced Chemical Technologies for Sustainability) of the Netherlands’ Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). These assessments represent prospective, i.e. ’ex-ante’ studies

  2. The Alternate Technology Program for Aluminum Research Reactor Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlow, M.W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes the program for disposition of aluminum-based RRSNF, including the requirements for road-ready dry storage and repository disposal and the criteria to be considered in selecting among the alternative technologies

  3. Solar Energy Technologies Program Newsletter - Fourth Quarter 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2009-12-31

    The Fourth Quarter 2009 edition of the Solar Energy Technologies Program newsletter summarizes the activities for the past three months, funding opportunities, highlights from the national labs, and upcoming events.

  4. MUSICAL RADIO: THE TECHNOLOGY OF PROGRAMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bysko Maxim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The author considers the musical radio broadcasting of the XX-XXI centuries from the point of view of a technical progress. He covers the period from "before tape" era and "tape" era to the modern digital media broadcasting (as example with the Digispot II broadcast automation software. However, despite the significant changes in technics, which are expressed primarily in the extensive use of a computer automation and reduction of programming staff (often up to two or three persons: a program director, a managing editor, a music editor, the principles of the linear broadcasting structure remained identical as a whole. So, the basic structural units here are the program blocks, "clocks", blocks of clock's elements (today, these elements often filled with automated rotation.

  5. Public Perception and Acceptance of Hydrogen Technologies. An Exploratory Study; Percepcin y Aceptacion Publica de las Tecnologias del Hidrogeno. Un Estudio Exploratorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, S.; Navajas, J.

    2011-11-10

    This report presents the results of a research study with lay peoples perception regarding hydrogen technologies. This study aims to explore how to shape public perception and acceptance of hydrogen technologies in Spain and permits the identification of issues that may facilitate or interfere with its development and implementation. The results showed the existence of a large and widespread lack of knowledge towards hydrogen technologies. Hydrogen is perceived as a clean energy technology and nearby to renewable energies. However, it is still not seen as an energetic option. The main drawbacks perceived by lay people have been the lack of profitability, the slow evolution of the technology and the absence of technological developments. Furthermore, hydrogen cost and safety issues appear to play an important role in public acceptance of these technologies. (Author) 35 refs.

  6. Might More Harm Be Done than Good When Scientists and Engineers Engage with the Public about New Technology before It Is Fully Developed? The Case of Hydrogen Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaby, Paul; Clark, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    We report consultation about hydrogen energy at the Hydrogen Centre in South Wales with members of the public in the region. The Centre's research staff guided tours and outside sociologists made the independent assessment presented here. Hydrogen energy is a technology under development. The question is as follows: Does any risk to its future in…

  7. Effect of storage and LEO cycling on manufacturing technology IPV nickel-hydrogen cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithrick, John J.

    1987-01-01

    Yardney Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) 50 A-hr space weight individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen cells were evaluated. This consisted of investigating: the effect of storage and charge/discharge cycling on cell performance. For the storage test the cells were precharged with hydrogen, by the manufacturer, to a pressure of 14.5 psia. After undergoing activation and acceptance tests, the cells were discharged at C/10 rate (5A) to 0.1 V or less. The terminals were then shorted. The cells were shipped to NASA Lewis Research Center where they were stored at room temperature in the shorted condition for 1 year. After storage, the acceptance tests were repeated at NASA Lewis. A comparison of test results indicate no significant degradation in electrical performance due to 1 year storage. For the cycle life test the regime was a 90 minute low earth orbit at deep depths of discharge (80 and 60 percent). At the 80 percent DOD the three cells failed on the average at cycle 741. Failure for this test was defined to occur when the cell voltage degraded to 1 V prior to completion of the 35 min discharge. The DOD was reduced to 60 percent. The cycle life test was continued.

  8. Technology readiness levels for the new millennium program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, P. I.; Minning, C. P.; Stocky, J. F.

    2003-01-01

    NASA's New Millennium Program (NMP) seeks to advance space exploration by providing an in-space validating mechanism to verify the maturity of promising advanced technologies that cannot be adequately validated with Earth-based testing alone. In meeting this objective, NMP uses NASA Technology Readiness Levels (TRL) as key indicators of technology advancement and assesses development progress against this generalized metric. By providing an opportunity for in-space validation, NMP can mature a suitable advanced technology from TRL 4 (component and/or breadboard validation in laboratory environment) to a TRL 7 (system prototype demonstrated in an Earth-based space environment). Spaceflight technology comprises a myriad of categories, types, and functions, and as each individual technology emerges, a consistent interpretation of its specific state of technological advancement relative to other technologies is problematic.

  9. The role of a technology demonstration program for future reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktorov, A.

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive technology demonstration program is seen as an important component of the overall safety case, especially for a novel technology. The objective of such a program is defined as providing objective and auditable evidence that the technology will meet or exceed the relevant requirements. Various aspects of such a program are identified and then discussed in some details in this presentation. We will show how the need for such a program is anchored in fundamental safety principles. Attributes of the program, means of achieving its objective, roles of participants, as well as key steps are all elaborated. It will be argued that to prove a novel technology, the designer will have to combine several activities such as the use of operational experience, prototyping of the technology elements, conduct of experiments and tests under representative conditions, as well as modeling and analysis. Importance of availability of experimental facilities and qualified scientific and technical staff is emphasized. A solid technology demonstration program will facilitate and speed up regulatory evaluations of licensing applications. (author)

  10. CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGY (CAST) PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Hull, Christopher

    2014-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations.

  11. Pollution reduction technology program for turboprop engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    The reduction of CO, HC, and smoke emissions while maintaining acceptable NO(x) emissions without affecting fuel consumption, durability, maintainability, and safety was accomplished. Component combustor concept screening directed toward the demonstration of advanced combustor technology required to meet the EPA exhaust emissions standards for class P2 turboprop engines was covered. The combustion system for the Allison 501-D22A engine was used, and three combustor design concepts - reverse flow, prechamber, and staged fuel were evaluated.

  12. Toys for Tots in Your Technology and Engineering Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkeihiser, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Most technology and engineering (T&E) classes are elective, so teachers are always looking for ways to market programs, engage students, and remind administrators and school board members about the good things T&E teachers do with and for kids. In this article, the Unionville High School (PA) Technology and Engineering Department describes…

  13. Geothermal Today: 2003 Geothermal Technologies Program Highlights (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-05-01

    This outreach publication highlights milestones and accomplishments of the DOE Geothermal Technologies Program for 2003. Included in this publication are discussions of geothermal fundamentals, enhanced geothermal systems, direct-use applications, geothermal potential in Idaho, coating technology, energy conversion R&D, and the GeoPowering the West initiative.

  14. Using Technology in Reggio Emilia-Inspired Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Linda M.

    2007-01-01

    All young children need to interact with their environments to achieve maximum development and learning. Technology has great potential for supporting the learning needs of all young children in early childhood programs supported by the Reggio Emilia philosophy. This article discusses possible uses of technologies that are appropriate for young…

  15. Mexico's Program for Science and Technology, 1978 to 1982.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Edmundo

    1979-01-01

    Describes briefly the National Council for Science and Technology (CONACYT) of Mexico, and outlines Mexico's Program for Science and Technology which includes 2,489 projects in basic and applied sciences at a cost of $260 million from 1978 to 1982. (HM)

  16. Buildings R&D Breakthroughs: Technologies and Products Supported by the Building Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weakley, Steven A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the project described in this report is to identify and characterize commercially available products and emerging (near-commercial) technologies that benefited from the support of the Building Technologies Program (BTP) within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The investigation specifically focused on technology-oriented research and development (R&D) projects funded by BTP’s Emerging Technologies subprogram from 2005-2011.

  17. Buildings R&D Breakthroughs. Technologies and Products Supported by the Building Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2012-04-01

    This report identifies and characterizes commercially available products and emerging (near-commercial) technologies that benefited from the support of the Building Technologies Program (BTP) within the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The investigation specifically focused on technology-oriented research and development (R&D) projects sponsored by BTP’s Emerging Technologies subprogram from 2005-2009.

  18. Fuzzy Multi-actor Multi-criteria Decision Making for Sustainability Assessment of biomass-based technologies for hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Jingzheng; Fedele, Andrea; Mason, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop a sustainability assessment method to rank the prior sequence of biomass-based technologies for hydrogen production. A novel fuzzy Multi-actor Multi-criteria Decision Making method which allows multiple groups of decision-makers to use linguistic variables ......, supercritical water gasification and fermentative hydrogen production have been studied by the proposed method, and biomass gasification has been considered as the most sustainable scenario and can be chosen for further development.......The purpose of this paper is to develop a sustainability assessment method to rank the prior sequence of biomass-based technologies for hydrogen production. A novel fuzzy Multi-actor Multi-criteria Decision Making method which allows multiple groups of decision-makers to use linguistic variables...... to assess the biomass-based technologies for hydrogen production has been developed. Fifteen criteria relevant to in economic, environmental, technological and social-political aspects have been used in sustainability assessment. Four biomass-based technologies including pyrolysis, conventional gasification...

  19. 75 FR 15484 - Railroad Safety Technology Program Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-29

    .... Collaborative project submissions by freight and passenger carriers, suppliers, and State and local governments... Transportation to provide grants to passenger and freight rail carriers, railroad suppliers, and State and local governments for projects that have a public benefit of improved railroad safety and efficiency. The program...

  20. A continuing program for technology transfer to the apparel industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clingman, W. H.

    1971-01-01

    A six month program has been carried out to investigate various mechanisms for transferring technology to industry. This program has focused on transfer to the apparel industry through the Apparel Research Foundation. The procedure was to analyze the problem, obtain potentially relevant aerospace technology, and then transfer this technology to the industry organization. This was done in a specific case. Technology was identified relevant to stitchless joining, and this technology was transferred to the Apparel Research Foundation. The feasibility and ground rules for carrying out such activities on a broader scale were established. A specific objective was to transfer new technology from the industry organization to the industry itself. This required the establishment of an application engineering program. Another transfer mechanism tested was publication of solutions to industry problems in a format familiar to the industry. This is to be distinguished from circulating descriptions of new technology. Focus is on the industry problem and the manager is given a formula for solving it that he can follow. It was concluded that this mechanism can complement the problem statement approach to technology transfer. It is useful in achieving transfer when a large amount of application engineering is not necessary. A wide audience is immediately exposed to the technology. On the other hand, the major manufacturing problems which require a sophisticated technical solution integrating many innovations are less likely to be helped.

  1. Cosmic Origins Program Annual Technology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Bruce Thai; Neff, Susan Gale

    2015-01-01

    What is the Cosmic Origins (COR) Program? From ancient times, humans have looked up at the night sky and wondered: Are we alone? How did the universe come to be? How does the universe work? COR focuses on the second question. Scientists investigating this broad theme seek to understand the origin and evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present day, determining how the expanding universe grew into a grand cosmic web of dark matter enmeshed with galaxies and pristine gas, forming, merging, and evolving over time. COR also seeks to understand how stars and planets form from clouds in these galaxies to create the heavy elements that are essential to life starting with the first generation of stars to seed the universe, and continuing through the birth and eventual death of all subsequent generations of stars. The COR Programs purview includes the majority of the field known as astronomy, from antiquity to the present.

  2. A Research Program in Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    14 (7), 1971, 453-360. 5. Donzeau-Gouge, V., G. Kahn, and B. Lang , A Complete Machine-Checked Definition of a Simple Programming Language Using...Denotational Semantics, IRIA Laborla, Technical Report 330, October 1978. 6. Donzeau-Gouge, V., G. Kahn, and B. Lang , Formal Definition of Ada, Honeywell...May 1976. r S.-..-. . . . . . . . 12. ARPANET TENEX SERVICE T’fhttiral Staff Marion McKinley, Jr. William H. Moore Robert Hines Serge Poievitzky Edward

  3. A Research Program in Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-01

    OVERI_ AeSSRA -1 ’ Continuo on reverse side It necessary anod Identify by block number, This report summarizes the research performed under Contract OAIIC...programs. Important progress has been made in the following areas: improved user environment and interface to the verifier, extensible verification...the facilities at ISI The Institute provides 24-hour availability of TENEX systems, maintenance, and operators, continued development/ improvement

  4. DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutula, Raymond A. [DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2006-03-01

    The DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program FY 2005 Annual Report chronicles the R&D results of the program for fiscal year 2005. In particular, the report describes R&D performed by the Program’s national laboratories and university and industry partners.

  5. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  6. Marketing Social Service Programs Using Political Campaign Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Peter

    1991-01-01

    Discusses how human services agencies can use strategies and information technologies similar to those used in political campaigns to identify needs and attitudes for social services campaigns. Marketing for social services programs is described, and the use of computers for a political campaign and for a teenage pregnancy program is compared.…

  7. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described

  8. 2009 DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2009-10-01

    Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting to review the FY2008 accomplishments and FY2009 plans for the Vehicle Technologies Program, and provide an opportunity for industry, government, and academic to give inputs to DOE on the Program with a structured and formal methodology.

  9. NDE Technology Development Program for Non-Visual Volumetric Inspection Technology; Sensor Effectiveness Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, Traci L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Larche, Michael R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Denslow, Kayte M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Glass, Samuel W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-08-31

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) located in Richland, Washington, hosted and administered Sensor Effectiveness Testing that allowed four different participants to demonstrate the NDE volumetric inspection technologies that were previously demonstrated during the Technology Screening session. This document provides a Sensor Effectiveness Testing report for the final part of Phase I of a three-phase NDE Technology Development Program designed to identify and mature a system or set of non-visual volumetric NDE technologies for Hanford DST primary liner bottom inspection. Phase I of the program will baseline the performance of current or emerging non-visual volumetric NDE technologies for their ability to detect and characterize primary liner bottom flaws, and identify candidate technologies for adaptation and maturation for Phase II of the program.

  10. Computer programs for thermodynamic and transport properties of hydrogen (tabcode-II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, H. M.; Mccarty, R. D.; Hall, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    The thermodynamic and transport properties of para and equilibrium hydrogen have been programmed into a series of computer routines. Input variables are the pair's pressure-temperature and pressure-enthalpy. The programs cover the range from 1 to 5000 psia with temperatures from the triple point to 6000 R or enthalpies from minus 130 BTU/lb to 25,000 BTU/lb. Output variables are enthalpy or temperature, density, entropy, thermal conductivity, viscosity, at constant volume, the heat capacity ratio, and a heat transfer parameter. Property values on the liquid and vapor boundaries are conveniently obtained through two small routines. The programs achieve high speed by using linear interpolation in a grid of precomputed points which define the surface of the property returned.

  11. Advanced Thermionic Technology Program: summary report. Volume 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress made by the Advanced Thermionic Technology Program during the past several years. This Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, has had as its goal adapting thermionic devices to generate electricity in a terrestrial (i.e., combustion) environment. The technology has previously been developed for astronautical applications. Volume 2 (Part C) concentrates on the progress made in developing and fabricating the ''current generation'' of chemical vapor deposited hot shell thermionic converters and is addressed to those primarily concerned with today's capabilities in terrestrial thermionic technology. 30 refs., 83 figs.

  12. Usage of Technology Enhanced Educational Tools for Delivering Programming Courses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjana Ivanović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Methods and approaches behind technology enhanced learning (TEL in programming courses at a university level encourage continuous research in the last 20 years. Still there is no generally applicable way that would guarantee success. In this paper some experiences gathered during years of a technology-enhanced approach in teaching Object-Oriented Programming (OOP at two universities in two countries are presented and compared. Emphasis is given on the technology-enhanced educational tools that were selected or developed by the two institutions for teaching OOP. Different traditions and independent development at both institutions allow us to draw generally applicable conclusions and recommendations.

  13. Very Low Thrust Gaseous Oxygen-hydrogen Rocket Engine Ignition Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, Roy A.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental program was performed to determine the minimum energy per spark for reliable and repeatable ignition of gaseous oxygen (GO2) and gaseous hydrogen (GH2) in very low thrust 0.44 to 2.22-N (0.10 to 0.50-lb sub f) rocket engines or spacecraft and satellite attitude control systems (ACS) application. Initially, the testing was conducted at ambient conditions, with the results subsequently verified under vacuum conditions. An experimental breadboard electrical exciter that delivered 0.2 to 0.3 mj per spark was developed and demonstrated by repeated ignitions of a 2.22-N (0.50-lb sub f) thruster in a vacuum chamber with test durations up to 30 min.

  14. Clean coal technologies: Research, development, and demonstration program plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, has structured an integrated program for research, development, and demonstration of clean coal technologies that will enable the nation to use its plentiful domestic coal resources while meeting environmental quality requirements. The program provides the basis for making coal a low-cost, environmentally sound energy choice for electric power generation and fuels production. These programs are briefly described.

  15. Repository Technology Program activities, FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Thorpe, R.K.; Knapp, R.B.

    1989-07-01

    Our technical activities in FY 1988 included instrument selection and evaluation, calculational work, and simulator development. Near the end of the fiscal year, we began preparing several topical reports to document our results. This fiscal year, we continued developing three-dimensional numerical simulators to model coupled hydrologic-and mechanical-rock mass responses and, thus, to provide representative numerical tools for understanding and calculating these in situ processes. We also began scoping calculations in the second half of FY 1988 to evaluate ERE design criteria, but this work was redirected late in the year when the DOE/AECL Subsidiary Agreement was set aside. Our work in developing and evaluating experimental techniques focused on total pressure measurements, moisture content measurement, and tracer detection instrumentation for sealing experiments and for rock-mass-response field tests. At the end of the fiscal year, we completed a review of measurement technology for instrumenting migration/sorption tests to help define the technological requirements in these areas. By the end of FY 1988, we had completed a review of the existing codes for simulating reactive transport; we are using the results of this review to help formulate plans for future activities in this area. The following sections describe the major RTP tasks and activities at LLNL in more detail, and they include our FY 1988 accomplishments in these areas. 8 refs., 22 figs

  16. Career Educational Program at Anan College of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumoto, Yoshihiro

    The career educational program of Anan College of Technology was adopted in 2006 by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan as the Support Program for Distinctive University Education (Good Practice in Modern Educational Needs) . The original program of career education is operated for students in lower grades and the support system is provided for the recruiting activity of students in the higher grades. Students can be instilled with a sense of purpose by receiving education regarding the structure of industrial society as an early step of the curriculum.

  17. Cosmic Origins Program Annual Technology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Bruce Thai; Neff, Susan Gale

    2016-01-01

    What is the Cosmic Origins (COR) Program? From ancient times, humans have looked up at the night sky and wondered: Are we alone? How did the universe come to be? How does the universe work? COR focuses on the second question. Scientists investigating this broad theme seek to understand the origin and evolution of the universe from the Big Bang to the present day, determining how the expanding universe grew into a grand cosmic web of dark matter enmeshed with galaxies and pristine gas, forming, merging, and evolving over time.

  18. Superconducting Technology Program: Sandia 1993 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.P.

    1994-05-01

    Sandia's STP program is a four-part high-temperature superconductor (HTS) research and development program consisting of efforts in powder synthesis and process development, thallium-based HTS film development, wire and tape fabrication, and HTS motor design. The objective of this work is to develop high-temperature superconducting conductors (wire and tape) capable of meeting requirements for high-power electrical devices of interest to industry. The four research efforts currently underway are: (1) process research on the material synthesis of high-temperature superconductors; (2) investigation of the synthesis and processing of thallium-based high-temperature superconducting thick films; (3) process development and characterization of high-temperature superconducting wire and tape, and (4) cryogenic design of a high-temperature superconducting motor. This report outlines the research that has been performed during FY93 in each of these four areas. A brief background of each project is included to provide historical context and perspective. Major areas of research are described, although no attempt has been made to exhaustively include all work performed in each of these areas

  19. A model technology transfer program for independent operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeling, L.G.

    1996-08-01

    In August 1992, the Energy Research Center (ERC) at the University of Kansas was awarded a contract by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a technology transfer regional model. This report describes the development and testing of the Kansas Technology Transfer Model (KTTM) which is to be utilized as a regional model for the development of other technology transfer programs for independent operators throughout oil-producing regions in the US. It describes the linkage of the regional model with a proposed national technology transfer plan, an evaluation technique for improving and assessing the model, and the methodology which makes it adaptable on a regional basis. The report also describes management concepts helpful in managing a technology transfer program.

  20. Comparative assessment of hydrogen storage and international electricity trade for a Danish energy system with wind power and hydrogen/fuel cell technologies. Final project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, Bent (Roskilde University, Energy, Environment and Climate Group, Dept. of Environmental, Social and Spatial Change (ENSPAC) (DK)); Meibom, P.; Nielsen, Lars Henrik; Karlsson, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Systems Analysis Dept., Roskilde (DK)); Hauge Pedersen, A. (DONG Energy, Copenhagen (DK)); Lindboe, H.H.; Bregnebaek, L. (ea Energy Analysis, Copenhagen (DK))

    2008-02-15

    This report is the final outcome of a project carried out under the Danish Energy Agency's Energy Research Programme. The aims of the project can be summarized as follows: 1) Simulation of an energy system with a large share of wind power and possibly hydrogen, including economic optimization through trade at the Nordic power pool (exchange market) and/or use of hydrogen storage. The time horizon is 50 years. 2) Formulating new scenarios for situations with and without development of viable fuel cell technologies. 3) Updating software to solve the abovementioned problems. The project has identified a range of scenarios for all parts of the energy system, including most visions of possible future developments. (BA)