WorldWideScience

Sample records for technologies mobile devices

  1. Mobile devices tools and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Collins, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Mobile Devices: Tools and Technologies provides readers with an understanding of the mobile landscape available to app developers, system and network engineers, and the avid techie. As the trend of mobile technology has enabled the continuous development of ubiquitous applications, this book offers insights into tools and technologies critical to evaluating and implementing mobile strategies.The book is organized into four parts of 18 contributed chapters written by engineers in the areas of application and database development, mobile enterprise strategy, and networking and security. Througho

  2. Mobile biometric device (MBD) technology :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldridge, Chris D.

    2013-06-01

    Mobile biometric devices (MBDs) capable of both enrolling individuals in databases and performing identification checks of subjects in the field are seen as an important capability for military, law enforcement, and homeland security operations. The technology is advancing rapidly. The Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate through an Interagency Agreement with Sandia sponsored a series of pilot projects to obtain information for the first responder law enforcement community on further identification of requirements for mobile biometric device technology. Working with 62 different jurisdictions, including components of the Department of Homeland Security, Sandia delivered a series of reports on user operation of state-of-the-art mobile biometric devices. These reports included feedback information on MBD usage in both operational and exercise scenarios. The findings and conclusions of the project address both the limitations and possibilities of MBD technology to improve operations. Evidence of these possibilities can be found in the adoption of this technology by many agencies today and the cooperation of several law enforcement agencies in both participating in the pilot efforts and sharing of information about their own experiences in efforts undertaken separately.

  3. Integration of Pneumatic Technology in Powered Mobility Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveler, Brandon; Wang, Hongwu; Gebrosky, Benjamin; Grindle, Garrett G; Schneider, Urs; Cooper, Rory A

    2017-01-01

    Advances in electric motors, electronics, and control systems have enhanced the capability and drivability of electric power mobility devices over the last 60 years. Yet, battery technologies used in powered mobility devices (PMDs) have not kept pace. Recent advances in pneumatic technology, primarily the high torque, low speed design of rotary piston air motors, directly align with the needs of PMD. Pneumatic technology has advantages over battery-powered technology, including lighter weight, lower operating costs, decreased environmental impact, better reliability, and increased safety. Two prototypes were created that incorporated rotary piston air motors, high-pressure air tanks, and air-pressure regulators. Prototype 1 was created by modifying an existing electric PMD. Range tests were performed to determine the feasibility of pneumatic technology and the optimal combination of components to allow the longest range possible at acceptable speeds over ideal conditions. Using a 1.44 L air tank for feasibility testing, prototype 1 was capable of traveling 800 m, which confirmed the feasibility of pneumatic technology usage in PMDs. Prototype 2 was designed based on the testing results from prototype 1. After further optimization of prototype 2, the average maximum range was 3,150 m. Prototype 2 is up to 28.3% lighter than an equivalent size electric PMD and can be fully recharged in approximately 2 minutes. It decreases the cost of PMDs by approximately $1,500, because batteries do not need to be replaced over the lifetime of the device. The results provide justification for the use of pneumatic technology in PMDs.

  4. Left to their own devices: medical learners' use of mobile technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Fink, Patricia; Graves, Lisa; Campbell, Alanna

    2014-02-01

    Although many medical learners and teachers are using mobile technologies within medical education, there has been little evidence presented describing how they use mobile devices across a whole curriculum. The Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) introduced a new mobile device program in 2010. Incoming undergraduate medical learners received a laptop and an iPad and learners entering year three of the four-year program received a laptop and an iPhone. A survey was sent to all learners to gather information on their use of and attitudes toward these devices. A combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used to analyze the data and to generate a series of themes that synthesized student behaviors, perceptions and attitudes. Context and learner autonomy were found to be important factors with learners using multiple devices for different purposes and adopting strategic approaches to learning using these devices. The expectation that school-issued devices would be regularly and enthusiastically used to replace more traditional study media was not reflected in practice. Learners' approaches to using mobile devices are heterogeneous as is the extent to which they use them. Learners adapt their use of mobile devices to the learning cultures and contexts they find themselves in.

  5. The validity of visual acuity assessment using mobile technology devices in the primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Samuel; McAndrew, Darryl J

    2016-04-01

    The assessment of visual acuity is indicated in a number of clinical circumstances. It is commonly conducted through the use of a Snellen wall chart. Mobile technology developments and adoption rates by clinicians may potentially provide more convenient methods of assessing visual acuity. Limited data exist on the validity of these devices and applications. The objective of this study was to evaluate the assessment of distance visual acuity using mobile technology devices against the commonly used 3-metre Snellen chart in a primary care setting. A prospective quantitative comparative study was conducted at a regional medical practice. The visual acuity of 60 participants was assessed on a Snellen wall chart and two mobile technology devices (iPhone, iPad). Visual acuity intervals were converted to logarithm of minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) scores and subjected to intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) assessment. The results show a high level of general agreement between testing modality (ICC 0.917 with a 95% confidence interval of 0.887-0.940). The high level of agreement of visual acuity results between the Snellen wall chart and both mobile technology devices suggests that clinicians can use this technology with confidence in the primary care setting.

  6. A City Parking Integration System Combined with Cloud Computing Technologies and Smart Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Her-Tyan; Chen, Bing-Chang; Wang, Bo-Xun

    2016-01-01

    The current study applied cloud computing technology and smart mobile devices combined with a streaming server for parking lots to plan a city parking integration system. It is also equipped with a parking search system, parking navigation system, parking reservation service, and car retrieval service. With this system, users can quickly find…

  7. Secure messaging via the cloud and mobile devices: data security issues emerge with new technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestigiacomo, Jennifer

    2011-05-01

    The secure messaging space is alive with new innovations that are moving the industry forward. Key in this space is the push toward moving secure messaging to the cloud and pushing it out to mobile devices. Among the examples are solutions that allow physicians to receive encrypted email on mobile devices, as well as ones that allow doctors to securely text-message each other to coordinate care. However, the security issues around these emerging technologies in this very active space must be further explored.

  8. Mobile Workforce, Mobile Technology, Mobile Threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, J.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies' introduction into the world of safeguards business processes such as inspection creates tremendous opportunity for novel approaches and could result in a number of improvements to such processes. Mobile applications are certainly the wave of the future. The success of the application ecosystems has shown that users want full fidelity, highly-usable, simple purpose applications with simple installation, quick responses and, of course, access to network resources at all times. But the counterpart to opportunity is risk, and the widespread adoption of mobile technologies requires a deep understanding of the threats and vulnerabilities inherent in mobile technologies. Modern mobile devices can be characterized as small computers. As such, the threats against computing infrastructure apply to mobile devices. Meanwhile, the attributes of mobile technology that make it such an obvious benefit over traditional computing platforms all have elements of risk: pervasive, always-on networking; diverse ecosystems; lack of centralized control; constantly shifting technological foundations; intense competition among competitors in the marketplace; the scale of the installation base (from millions to billions); and many more. This paper will explore the diverse and massive environment of mobile, the number of attackers and vast opportunities for compromise. The paper will explain how mobile devices prove valuable targets to both advanced and persistent attackers as well as less-skilled casual hackers. Organized crime, national intelligence agencies, corporate espionage are all part of the landscape. (author)

  9. The impact of mobility assistive technology devices on participation for individuals with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Jordan; Ganus, Ashley; Ivey, Jon Mark; Plummer, Teresa; Eubank, Ann

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to address the gap in research and contribute to the body of knowledge on the perspectives assistive technology device users have toward their devices. Mixed methods were used to better understand the impact of mobility assistive technology devices (MATDs) on participation for individuals with disabilities. The Functional Mobility Assessment was administered in conjunction with two qualitative questions developed by the research team allowing participants to expound on the impact of their MATD experience. Participants were recruited online via the National Spinal Cord Injury Association website and in-person at Abilities Expo in Atlanta, Georgia, and the International Seating Symposium in Nashville, Tennessee. Results are consistent with findings from prior research regarding accessibility for individuals with disabilities. Corresponding findings were found in both the quantitative and qualitative data and are categorized into several major themes: environment (indoor and outdoor), surface heights, transportation, dependence, independence, quality of life and participation. Quantitative data from this study indicate that users of MATD are satisfied with the way in which their devices enable maneuvering indoors, while qualitative data suggest otherwise. Implications for healthcare practitioners are described and future recommendations are provided. Implications for Rehabilitation Healthcare professionals should advocate for proper mobility assistive technology devices (MATDs) for their patients in order to enable increased independence, safety and efficiency. Healthcare professionals must be cognizant of the impact of the environment and/or environmental barriers when prescribing MATD. Additional areas of interest for future research may include investigating the impact of MATD in association with date of onset of disability, according to diagnoses, or specific to length of time since acquiring the device.

  10. Building Evacuation with Mobile Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Merkel, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    The rapidly growing world population and increasingly dense settlements demand ever-larger and more complex buildings from today's engineers. In comparison to this technological progress, a building's equipment for emergency evacuation has been hardly developed further. This work presents a concept for a building evacuation system based on mobile devices. Furthermore, various algorithms for route planning with mobile devices and for indoor localization of mobile devices are addressed.

  11. Speech Recognition on Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Zheng-Hua; Lindberg, Børge

    2010-01-01

    The enthusiasm of deploying automatic speech recognition (ASR) on mobile devices is driven both by remarkable advances in ASR technology and by the demand for efficient user interfaces on such devices as mobile phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). This chapter presents an overview of ASR...... in the mobile context covering motivations, challenges, fundamental techniques and applications. Three ASR architectures are introduced: embedded speech recognition, distributed speech recognition and network speech recognition. Their pros and cons and implementation issues are discussed. Applications within...... command and control, text entry and search are presented with an emphasis on mobile text entry....

  12. Reverse technological waste logistics: a study of the behavior of mobile devices consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliane de Souza Vieira da Silva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electronics industry is one of the fastest growing in the world. It is estimated that 41 million tons of electronic waste, such as computers and mobile phones, is produced worldwide each year. The indiscriminate disposal of these materials has caused a lot of damage to the environment, and indirectly to human health. RL stands out as a new field of study that seeks to reintroduce these products to the economic chain or lead them to the proper disposal. This study aimed to investigate the knowledge of the administrative staff of a public educational institution in relation to the RL of mobile devices, with a sample of 142 respondents. This research is characterized as a quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional survey. The key results showed that 60% of the population surveyed acknowledge that the improper disposal of mobile devices creates environmental problems, however, only 35% acknowledge that their improper disposal also creates problems for human health. Most consumers still keep their old devices at home. The survey found that 44% of respondents do not know where to dispose of their mobile devices, highlighting the need to educate consumers about the risks, and to provide consumers with collection points for these devices.

  13. Data mining mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Mena, Jesus

    2013-01-01

    With today's consumers spending more time on their mobiles than on their PCs, new methods of empirical stochastic modeling have emerged that can provide marketers with detailed information about the products, content, and services their customers desire.Data Mining Mobile Devices defines the collection of machine-sensed environmental data pertaining to human social behavior. It explains how the integration of data mining and machine learning can enable the modeling of conversation context, proximity sensing, and geospatial location throughout large communities of mobile users

  14. Achieving sustainable smart mobile devices lifecycles through advanced re-design, reliability, and re-use and remanufacturing technology

    OpenAIRE

    Regenfelder, Max; Schischke, Karsten; Ebelt, Stefan; Slowak, André P.

    2016-01-01

    The EU-funded Horizon2020 project sustainably SMART will change the lifecycle of mobile ICT (information and communication technology) devices by developing new product design approaches. This includes enhanced end-of-life performance, re-use and remanufacturing aspects implemented on the product and printed circuit board level, as well as new re-/de-manufacturing processes with improved resource efficiency. The project will create economic advantage compared to the current end-of-life practi...

  15. Mobile Technology in Educational Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jueming; Kinshuk

    2005-01-01

    The use of computers and the Internet has successfully enabled educational institutions to provide their students and staff members with various online educational services. With the recent developments in mobile technology, further possibilities are emerging to provide such services through mobile devices such as mobile phones and PDAs. By…

  16. Application of mobile agent technology with portable information device to the maintenance support of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Ito, Yo; Sato, Hisashi; Kitamura, Masaharu

    2004-01-01

    A support system for trouble shooting activities has been developed based on the distributed DB and mobile agent technology. The main purpose of the proposed system is to provide field workers with effective functions for realizing trouble-shooting with the aid of the mobile agents, which performs data retrieval from DB and fault diagnosis. In the proposed scheme of trouble shooting support, a portable information device is utilized by the maintenance personnel, which is connected to the local data base (LDB) via wireless network. The important point is that these functions can be accessed by the field workers through wearable information device with the lower cognitive burden. The prototype system has been developed using the JAVA-based Aglets Framework SDK and applied to the actual objective system. It has been confirmed through the experiments that the developed prototype system is capable of performing the tasks to support diagnostic activities. (author)

  17. MOBILE DEVICES AND EFFECTIVE INFORMATION SECURITY

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Bernik; Blaž Markelj

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly increasing numbers of sophisticated mobile devices (smart phones, tab computers, etc.) all over the world mean that ensuring information security will only become a more pronounced problem for individuals and organizations. It’s important to effectively protect data stored on or accessed by mobile devices, and also during transmission of data between devices and between device and information system. Technological and other trends show, that the cyber threats are also rapidly developi...

  18. Five Tips for Managing Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Catlin

    2015-01-01

    The author, an outspoken advocate for using technology in the classroom, knows how important it is to establish expectations for responsible use of mobile devices. She's found that five strategies help ensure that mobile devices enhance, rather than distract from, learning. Teachers need to establish new norms that clarify responsible use,…

  19. Mobile Security: A Systems Engineering Framework for Implementing Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) Security through the Combination of Policy Management and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahadat, Nima

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid increase of smartphones and tablets, security concerns have also been on the rise. Traditionally, Information Technology (IT) departments set up devices, apply security, and monitor them. Such approaches do not apply to today's mobile devices due to a phenomenon called Bring Your Own Device or BYOD. Employees find it desirable to…

  20. MOBILE TELEVISION: UNDERSTANDING THE TECHNOLOGY AND OPPORTUNITIES

    OpenAIRE

    Omar AlSheikSalem

    2015-01-01

    Television have converged the technologies of movies and radio and now being converged with mobile phones. Mobile TV is the result of the convergence between mobile devices and television. Mobile TV is a key device and service that enrich civilization with applications, vast market and great investment. Mobile TV is an important subject that has a potential impact on leading edge technologies for promising future. In the time being Mobile TV is still in its early stages and has many potential...

  1. Forensics mobile devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milorad S. Markagić

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article gives an overview of possibilities of digitized mobile(portable devices, and methods of research data with them.Emphasis is placed on the forensic investigation of mobilephones, but are covered by other media and research for digitalprocessing, transmission and storage of information.A special emphasis was made on the software tools in carrying out the acquisition of digital data, with the aim of sending the reader on ways and methods to protect data but also knowledgewhich is the same all be found and how they can be misused for criminal purposes

  2. Data-mining analysis of the provision of mobility devices in the United States with emphasis on complex rehab technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprigle, Stephen; Johnson Taylor, Susan

    2017-11-28

    The objective of this study was to describe the provision of wheeled-mobility equipment from the perspective of a large equipment supplier in the United States. The records of clients who were prescribed a mobility device over a 6-month period were randomly sampled to product a dataset of 1,689 clients. Analysis was limited to descriptive statistics and measures of relationships. The majority of the clients were adults (72%) and female (58%) with 62% receiving a manual wheelchair. The majority of interventions (58%) included some contribution from the client or client's family. Overall, 86% of all prescribed wheelchairs were classified as complex rehab technology (CRT). About half (52%) of all interventions involved a therapist. Therapist involvement was 2.5 times more likely during CRT interventions compared to standard durable medical equipment (StdDME). The project provides a novel description of mobility-related equipment provision using a large retrospective dataset. The analysis demonstrates the utility of analyzing a large number of client interventions. The capabilities of such analyses have business, clinical, and policy implications. Combining the data available from suppliers with prospective collection of client-specific information, such as outcomes, would be a more powerful means to assess the provision of wheeled-mobility equipment.

  3. Mobile device security for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Campagna, Rich; Krishnan, Ashwin

    2011-01-01

    The information you need to avoid security threats on corporate mobile devices Mobile devices have essentially replaced computers for corporate users who are on the go and there are millions of networks that have little to no security. This essential guide walks you through the steps for securing a network and building a bulletproof framework that will protect and support mobile devices in the enterprise. Featuring real-world case scenarios, this straightforward guide shares invaluable advice for protecting mobile devices from the loss of sensitive and confidential corporate informati

  4. The use of mobile devices as assistive technology in resource-limited environments: access for learners with visual impairments in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Alan R; Masingila, Joanna O

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, the authors explore the use of mobile devices as assistive technology for students with visual impairments in resource-limited environments. This paper provides initial data and analysis from an ongoing project in Kenya using tablet devices to provide access to education and independence for university students with visual impairments in Kenya. The project is a design-based research project in which we have developed and are refining a theoretically grounded intervention--a model for developing communities of practice to support the use of mobile technology as an assistive technology. We are collecting data to assess the efficacy and improve the model as well as inform the literature that has guided the design of the intervention. In examining the impact of the use of mobile devices for the students with visual impairments, we found that the devices provide the students with (a) access to education, (b) the means to participate in everyday life and (c) the opportunity to create a community of practice. Findings from this project suggest that communities of practice are both a viable and a valuable approach for facilitating the diffusion and support of mobile devices as assistive technology for students with visual impairments in resource-limited environments. Implications for Rehabilitation The use of mobile devices as assistive technology in resource-limited environments provides students with visual impairments access to education and enhanced means to participate in everyday life. Communities of practice are both a viable and a valuable approach for facilitating the diffusion and support of mobile devices as assistive technology for students with visual impairments in resource-limited environments. Providing access to assistive technology early and consistently throughout students' schooling builds both their skill and confidence and also demonstrates the capabilities of people with visual impairments to the larger society.

  5. Security Problems of Mobile Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Beltov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article provides an overview of security problems which exist in the mobile devices. The main technologies aimed to protect the phones from various types of attacks are considered. The authors justify the necessity of developing new improved tools and methods to ensure the safety of such devices.

  6. Wireless Power for Mobile Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waffenschmidt, E.

    2011-01-01

    Wireless power transfer allows a convenient, easy to use battery charging of mobile phones and other mobile devices. No hassle with cables and plugs, just place the device on a pad and that’s it. Such asystem even has the potential to become a standard charging solution. Where are the limits for

  7. MOBILE DEVICES AND EFFECTIVE INFORMATION SECURITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Bernik

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapidly increasing numbers of sophisticated mobile devices (smart phones, tab computers, etc. all over the world mean that ensuring information security will only become a more pronounced problem for individuals and organizations. It’s important to effectively protect data stored on or accessed by mobile devices, and also during transmission of data between devices and between device and information system. Technological and other trends show, that the cyber threats are also rapidly developing and spreading. It's crucial to educate users about safe usage and to increase their awareness of security issues. Ideally, users should keep-up with technological trends and be well equipped with knowledge otherwise mobile technology will significantly increase security risks. Most important is that we start educating youth so that our next generations of employees will be part of a culture of data and information security awareness.

  8. User Experience of Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raptis, Dimitrios

    This thesis focuses on mobile devices and it specifically investigates the effect of their physical form on two perceived user experience qualities, usability and coolness. With the term mobile devices, I refer to interactive products that users interact with while being on the move......, and with the term physical form I refer to the physical elements that constitute a mobile device as a whole, such as weight, size and materials. The selected research area was addressed through two research questions, one focusing on effects of physical form on usability and the other on effects on coolness...... that the overall physical form of a mobile device has a significant effect on the perceived usability of an application: the more attractive the physical form, the higher the perceived usability. The other study validated the effect of a particular physical form element on usability and showed that the screen size...

  9. Trustworthy execution on mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Vasudevan, Amit; Newsome, James

    2013-01-01

    This brief considers the various stakeholders in today's mobile device ecosystem, and analyzes why widely-deployed hardware security primitives on mobile device platforms are inaccessible to application developers and end-users. Existing proposals are also evaluated for leveraging such primitives, and proves that they can indeed strengthen the security properties available to applications and users, without reducing the properties currently enjoyed by OEMs and network carriers. Finally, this brief makes recommendations for future research that may yield practical and deployable results.

  10. Commercial Mobile Device Technology Implementation Implications in United States Marine Corps Processes: A Case Study Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The students accessing the network are responsible for procuring their own device and complying with usage standards as well as maintaining the...capability within the Maine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF). It also specifically lays out the intent to enhance capability with regard to social media ...the productivity, and situational awareness of individuals to include members of the DOD. The increasing use of social media , smartphones, and

  11. Experience with technology dynamics of user experience with mobile media devices

    CERN Document Server

    al-Azzawi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    With a focus on gaining an empirically derived understanding of the underlying psychological dimensions and processes behind people’s experiences with technology, this book contributes to the debate of user experience (UX) within several disciplines, including HCI, design and marketing. It analyses UX dynamics at various time scales, and explores the very nature of time and meaning in the context of UX.Experience with Technology uses personal construct theory (PCT) as a theoretical and methodological starting point to this project. Major case-studies are described that examine people’s exp

  12. Device Data Protection in Mobile Healthcare Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Dasun; Rajarajan, Muttukrishnan; Rakocevic, Veselin

    The rapid growth in mobile technology makes the delivery of healthcare data and services on mobile phones a reality. However, the healthcare data is very sensitive and has to be protected against unauthorized access. While most of the development work on security of mobile healthcare today focuses on the data encryption and secure authentication in remote servers, protection of data on the mobile device itself has gained very little attention. This paper analyses the requirements and the architecture for a secure mobile capsule, specially designed to protect the data that is already on the device. The capsule is a downloadable software agent with additional functionalities to enable secure external communication with healthcare service providers, network operators and other relevant communication parties.

  13. New Technology for Microfabrication and Testing of a Thermoelectric Device for Generating Mobile Electrical Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Narashimha S.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Kutcher, Susan

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of fabrication and testing of a thermoelectric power generation module. The module was fabricated using a new "flip-chip" module assembly technique that is scalable and modular. This technique results in a low value of contact resistivity ( surfaces. Under mild testing, a power of 22 mW/sq cm was obtained from small (electrical power of practical and usable magnitude for remote applications using thermoelectric power generation technologies.

  14. Evidence Considerations for Mobile Devices in the Occupational Therapy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Erickson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile app-based device utilization, including smartphones and handheld tablets, suggests a need to evaluate evidence to guide selection and implementation of these devices in the occupational therapy process. The purpose of the research was to explore the current body of evidence in relation to mobile app-based devices and to identify factors in the use of these devices throughout the occupational therapy process. Following review of available occupational therapy profession guidelines, assistive technology literature, and available mobile device research, practitioners using mobile app-based devices in occupational therapy should consider three areas: client needs, practitioner competence, and device factors. The purpose of this guideline is to identify factors in the selection and use of mobile app-based devices throughout the occupational therapy process based on available evidence. Considerations for mobile device implementation during the occupational therapy process is addressed, including evaluating outcomes needs, matching device with the client, and identifying support needs of the client.

  15. Electronic Payments using Mobile Communication Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaij, B.D. van der; Siljee, B.I.J.; Broekhuijsen, B.J.; Ponsioen, C.; Maas, A.; Aten, R.M.; Hoepman, J.H.; Loon, J.H. van; Smit, M.

    2009-01-01

    A method of making a payment uses a first mobile communication device (1) and a second mobile communication device (2), each mobile communication device being provided with a respective near field communication unit (11, 21) and at least one of the mobile communication devices being provided with an

  16. Mobile devices, interaction, and distraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices have become an ever-present and indispensible part of our lives. Despite this pronounced ubiquity, few studies have addressed the influence of mobile devices on everyday social interaction. The purpose of this article is to examine such social ramifications. Specifically, this study...... at stake in such impaired social interaction include delayed responses, mechanical intonation, a motionless body, and a lack of eye contact. Appropriating developmental psychologist Daniel Stern’s terminology, it is suggested that this mismatch between the vitality of a person and his or her absently...

  17. Technology Review for Mobile Multimedia Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styliaras, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, the technological advancement in mobile devices has made possible the development of hypermedia applications that exploit their features. A potential application domain for mobile devices is multimedia educational applications and modules. Such modules may be shared, commented and further reused under other circumstances through the…

  18. Discovering magic of mobile technology in business: strategic marketing perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Bolat, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology penetrated all aspects of social and business existence. Studies around mobile technology mostly address the use and adoption process of mobile marketing or mobile commerce from a consumer perspective rather than from a business perspective. Another concern of majority of studies on the use of mobile technology is a focus on technical nature of mobile devices despite the fact that true magic of technology resides in its mobilisation and usage – the deployment of mobile techn...

  19. Designing of routing algorithms in autonomous distributed data transmission system for mobile computing devices with ‘WiFi-Direct’ technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, I. A.; Sherstnev, V. S.; Sherstneva, A. I.; Botygin, I. A.

    2017-02-01

    The results of the research of existent routing protocols in wireless networks and their main features are discussed in the paper. Basing on the protocol data, the routing protocols in wireless networks, including search routing algorithms and phone directory exchange algorithms, are designed with the ‘WiFi-Direct’ technology. Algorithms without IP-protocol were designed, and that enabled one to increase the efficiency of the algorithms while working only with the MAC-addresses of the devices. The developed algorithms are expected to be used in the mobile software engineering with the Android platform taken as base. Easier algorithms and formats of the well-known route protocols, rejection of the IP-protocols enables to use the developed protocols on more primitive mobile devices. Implementation of the protocols to the engineering industry enables to create data transmission networks among working places and mobile robots without any access points.

  20. Connecting Learning Spaces Using Mobile Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenli; Seow, Peter; So, Hyo-Jeong; Toh, Yancy; Looi, Chee-Kit

    2010-01-01

    The use of mobile technology can help extend children's learning spaces and enrich the learning experiences in their everyday lives where they move from one context to another, switching locations, social groups, technologies, and topics. When students have ubiquitous access to mobile devices with full connectivity, the in-situ use of the mobile…

  1. Mobile Device Usage in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcker, Jan; Honal, Andrea; Ifenthaler, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on mobile device usage of students in higher education. While more and more students embrace mobile devices in their daily life, institutions attempt to profit from those devices for educational purposes. It is therefore crucial for institutional development to identify students' needs and how mobile devices may facilitate these…

  2. Mobile technology in clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, B J; Anderson, J; Harding, T

    2017-01-01

    Technology is having a profound effect on education in the 21st century and nurse educators are being challenged to integrate technological innovation to assist students in their learning. This paper reports a study on the introduction of smart mobile technology to support student learning in the clinical environment. In a climate of collaborative inquiry, clinical lecturers and two researchers from the same department carried out a project in three phases: formation, implementation and analysis. Following the formation phase, six clinical lecturers adopted iPads to support their clinical teaching (implementation phase). At this time they also kept reflective journals. In the analysis phase a thematic analysis of the data from the journals and from a focus group found both enabling and constraining factors influenced the use of iPads by clinical lecturers. The themes categorised as enablers were: resources and technology; and, management and technology support. Those identified as barriers or constraining factors were: clinical staff engagement; and lecturer experience with technology. Student engagement and learning, and connectivity were both enabling and constraining factors. This paper concludes that the use of a mobile device such as an iPad can enhance teaching in clinical settings but that in order for such devices to be successfully integrated into clinical teaching consideration needs to be given to professional development needs, adequate resourcing and technology support. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Penetration testing using mobile devices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shelembe, S

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available et.al, 2006) ? An attempt to compromise the security of the mechanism undergoing the test, it can be host or network based (Fiocca, 2009) Difference: pen-testing and hacking is permission Its purpose is to find system vulnerabilities ? CSIR 2012... is not enough, cell-phones can hack too ? Pocket sized device is more convenient, since it is easy to carry around at anytime ? A power plug is not innocent, need to look for activity other than just traditional PCs / devices ? CSIR 2012 Slide 6 Mobile...

  4. Wiki keys on mobile devices

    OpenAIRE

    Weber, Gisela; Hagedorn, Gregor

    2010-01-01

    The development of increasingly powerful mobile devices like PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants) and Smartphones, with larger displays and greater resolution makes them increasingly suitable for identification tools available directly “in the field”. One of several approaches towards this aim in the KeyToNature project is based on wiki-stored documents. Important features of wiki-based keys, such as hidden text and media information as well as links to glossary entries are su...

  5. Adaptive Device Context Based Mobile Learning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Haitao; Lin, Jinjiao; Song, Yanwei; Liu, Fasheng

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning is e-learning delivered through mobile computing devices, which represents the next stage of computer-aided, multi-media based learning. Therefore, mobile learning is transforming the way of traditional education. However, as most current e-learning systems and their contents are not suitable for mobile devices, an approach for…

  6. Elckerlyc goes mobile: enabling technology for ECAs in mobile applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Randy; Hendrix, J.; Reidsma, Dennis; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The fast growth of computational resources and speech technology available on mobile devices makes it pos- sible for users of these devices to interact with service sys- tems through natural dialogue. These systems are sometimes perceived as social agents and presented by means of an animated

  7. Mobile Technologies in Museum Exhibitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Medić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to be up–to–date and give visitors a memorable and unique experience, museums are including usage of digital technologies in their exhibitions. Even though museums in Serbia are very important part of tourism offer, they still have traditional settings that are poorly interpreted. The majority of them have a scientific and historical review which is unattractive for various target groups of visitors and for museums it’s important to continually try out new ways in interpretation of their settings. Because technology continues to rapidly change the way we communicate, cultural institutions should adapt to new ways of communication with their visitors. This paper examines mobile technologies that can be used in museums to give visitors a different experience and transfer the knowledge innovatively. In that way it will be presented the modern concept of presentation of museum exhibitions, focusing on usage of mobile devices through mobile applications and QR codes. The paper provides the broad understanding of usage mobile technologies in museum exhibitions with its advantages and limitations. The research results can help the museums management to improve interpretation and communication with visitors and enrich the visitor experience.

  8. Teaching and Learning with Mobile Technology: A Qualitative Explorative Study about the Introduction of Tablet Devices in Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrieux, Hannelore; Vanderlinde, Ruben; Schellens, Tammy; De Marez, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates teachers’ and students’ perceptions concerning the impact of using tablet devices for teaching and learning purposes. An explorative focus group study was conducted with teachers (n = 18) and students (n = 39) in a secondary school that has implemented tablet devices since 2012. The general finding of this study shows that the use of tablet devices in the classroom setting has an impact on both teaching and learning practices. The results suggest that teachers can be divided into two categories: the innovative teachers and the instrumental teachers. Innovative teachers attempt to shift from a teacher-centered to a learning-centered approach. They have changed their teaching style by transforming lessons in accordance with the advantages tablet computers can offer. Instrumental teachers seem to use the device as a ‘book behind glass’. The distinction between the two groups has consequences for both the way courses are given and how students experience them. In general, the introduction of tablet devices entails a shift in the way students learn, as the devices provide interactive, media-rich, and exciting new environments. The results of this study indicate that policy makers should consider introducing technical and pedagogical support in order to facilitate both teachers’ and students’ understanding of the full potential of this kind of technology in education. PMID:26641454

  9. Teaching and Learning with Mobile Technology: A Qualitative Explorative Study about the Introduction of Tablet Devices in Secondary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montrieux, Hannelore; Vanderlinde, Ruben; Schellens, Tammy; De Marez, Lieven

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates teachers' and students' perceptions concerning the impact of using tablet devices for teaching and learning purposes. An explorative focus group study was conducted with teachers (n = 18) and students (n = 39) in a secondary school that has implemented tablet devices since 2012. The general finding of this study shows that the use of tablet devices in the classroom setting has an impact on both teaching and learning practices. The results suggest that teachers can be divided into two categories: the innovative teachers and the instrumental teachers. Innovative teachers attempt to shift from a teacher-centered to a learning-centered approach. They have changed their teaching style by transforming lessons in accordance with the advantages tablet computers can offer. Instrumental teachers seem to use the device as a 'book behind glass'. The distinction between the two groups has consequences for both the way courses are given and how students experience them. In general, the introduction of tablet devices entails a shift in the way students learn, as the devices provide interactive, media-rich, and exciting new environments. The results of this study indicate that policy makers should consider introducing technical and pedagogical support in order to facilitate both teachers' and students' understanding of the full potential of this kind of technology in education.

  10. Medical device integration using mobile telecommunications infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorman, Bridget A; Cockle, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    Financial pressures, an aging population, and a rising number of patients with chronic diseases, have encouraged the use of remote monitoring technologies. This usually entails at least one physiological parameter measurement for a clinician. Mobile telecommunication technologies lend themselves to this functionality, and in some cases, avoid some of the issues encountered with device integration. Moreover, the inherent characteristics of the mobile telecommunications infrastructure allow a coupling of business and clinical functions that were not possible before. Table I compares and contrasts some key aspect of device integration in and out of a healthcare facility. An HTM professional may be part of the team that acquires and/or manages a system using a mobile telecommunications technology. It is important for HTM professionals to ensure the data is in a standard format so that the interfaces across this system don't become brittle and break easily if one part changes. Moreover, the security and safety considerations of the system and the data should be a primary consideration in and y purchase, with attention given to the proper environmental and encryption mechanisms. Clinical engineers and other HTM professionals are unique in that they understand the patient/clinician/device interface and the need to ensure its safety and effectiveness regardless of geographical environment.

  11. Open source OCR framework using mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Steven Zhiying; Gilani, Syed Omer; Winkler, Stefan

    2008-02-01

    Mobile phones have evolved from passive one-to-one communication device to powerful handheld computing device. Today most new mobile phones are capable of capturing images, recording video, and browsing internet and do much more. Exciting new social applications are emerging on mobile landscape, like, business card readers, sing detectors and translators. These applications help people quickly gather the information in digital format and interpret them without the need of carrying laptops or tablet PCs. However with all these advancements we find very few open source software available for mobile phones. For instance currently there are many open source OCR engines for desktop platform but, to our knowledge, none are available on mobile platform. Keeping this in perspective we propose a complete text detection and recognition system with speech synthesis ability, using existing desktop technology. In this work we developed a complete OCR framework with subsystems from open source desktop community. This includes a popular open source OCR engine named Tesseract for text detection & recognition and Flite speech synthesis module, for adding text-to-speech ability.

  12. A mixed-method research to investigate the adoption of mobile devices and Web2.0 technologies among medical students and educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Si; Radford, Jan; Fabian, Debbie

    2016-04-19

    The past decade has witnessed the increasing adoption of Web 2.0 technologies in medical education. Recently, the notion of digital habitats, Web 2.0 supported learning environments, has also come onto the scene. While there has been initial research on the use of digital habitats for educational purposes, very limited research has examined the adoption of digital habitats by medical students and educators on mobile devices. This paper reports the Stage 1 findings of a two-staged study. The whole study aimed to develop and implement a personal digital habitat, namely digiMe, for medical students and educators at an Australian university. The first stage, however, examined the types of Web 2.0 tools and mobile devices that are being used by potential digiMe users, and reasons for their adoption. In this first stage of research, data were collected through a questionnaire and semi-structured interviews. Questionnaire data collected from 104 participants were analysed using the Predictive Analytics SoftWare (PASW). Frequencies, median and mean values were pursued. Kruskal Wallis tests were then performed to examine variations between views of different participant groups. Notes from the 6 interviews, together with responses to the open-ended section of the questionnaire, were analysed using the constructivist grounded theory approach, to generate key themes relevant to the adoption of Web 2.0 tools and mobile devices. The findings reflected the wide use of mobile devices, including both smart phones and computing tablets, by medical students and educators for learning, teaching and professional development purposes. Among the 22 types of Web 2.0 tools investigated, less than half of these tools were frequently used by the participants, this reflects the mismatch between users' desires and their actual practice. Age and occupation appeared to be the influential factors for their adoption. Easy access to information and improved communication are main purposes. This

  13. Mobile Technology for the Practice of Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Douglas J

    2016-03-01

    Recently, several technological advances have been introduced to mobile phones leading some people to refer to them as "smartphones." These changes have led to widespread consumer adoption. A similar adoption has occurred within the medical field and this revolution is changing the practice of medicine, including pathology. Several mobile applications have been published for dermatology, orthopedics, ophthalmology, neurosurgery, and clinical pathology. The applications are wide ranging, including mobile technology to increase patient engagement, self-monitoring by patients, clinical algorithm calculation, facilitation between experts to resource-poor environments. These advances have been received with mixed reviews. For anatomic pathology, mobile technology applications can be broken into 4 broad categories: (a) educational uses, (b) microscope with mobile phone, (c) mobile phone as microscope/acquisition device, and (d) miscellaneous. Using a mobile phone as an acquisition device paired with a microscope seems to be the most interesting current application because of the need for expert consultation with resource-poor environments. However, several emerging uses for mobile technology may become more prominent as the technology matures including image analysis, alternative light sources, and increased opportunities for clinician and patient engagement. The flexibility represented by mobile technology represents a burgeoning field in pathology informatics.

  14. Reading and Calculating Billing Through Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Alexandra Moreno

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article broadly describes the analysis, design and development of the system utilitarian, called “Reading and billing calculation site through mobile devices.” The application is oriented Public Services Companies, first water services, to perform part of the billing process “in place” through phones or any mobile devices compatible with Android. Will enable you to take readings of service consumption, recording new gauging, online update and control the information for users and turnover. This technology is considered as such one site billing method as through Internet is connected with the database of the company, sending and receiving date information, which makes the calculation of the billing for the reading period, bringing benefits to the client and the service generating company.

  15. Exploring Mobile Technologies for Learning Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to reveal how learners of Chinese as a foreign language use mobile technology to study Chinese outside the classroom. Researchers used sociocultural perspectives to frame the study and grounded theory to analyze data. Eleven English-speaking students who had learned Chinese for different years at a midwestern university participated in the study. They answered 23 major questions by submitting journal entries and participating in an interview. Compared with computer assisted language learning, mobile devices bring changes to tutorial functions, social computing, and gaming. Participants heavily explored tutorial functions, used mobile devices differently from computers for social computing, and showed interest in gaming. Although participants were enthusiastic about using mobile devices to learn Chinese, the number of applications they used and the variety of activities they engaged in were limited. Findings suggest that the effective incorporation of mobile devices to learn Chinese depends on collaboration and scaffolding

  16. Using a Mobile Device "App" and Proximal Remote Sensing Technologies to Assess Soil Cover Fractions on Agricultural Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laamrani, Ahmed; Pardo Lara, Renato; Berg, Aaron A; Branson, Dave; Joosse, Pamela

    2018-02-27

    Quantifying the amount of crop residue left in the field after harvest is a key issue for sustainability. Conventional assessment approaches (e.g., line-transect) are labor intensive, time-consuming and costly. Many proximal remote sensing devices and systems have been developed for agricultural applications such as cover crop and residue mapping. For instance, current mobile devices (smartphones & tablets) are usually equipped with digital cameras and global positioning systems and use applications (apps) for in-field data collection and analysis. In this study, we assess the feasibility and strength of a mobile device app developed to estimate crop residue cover. The performance of this novel technique (from here on referred to as "app" method) was compared against two point counting approaches: an established digital photograph-grid method and a new automated residue counting script developed in MATLAB at the University of Guelph. Both photograph-grid and script methods were used to count residue under 100 grid points. Residue percent cover was estimated using the app, script and photograph-grid methods on 54 vertical digital photographs (images of the ground taken from above at a height of 1.5 m) collected from eighteen fields (9 corn and 9 soybean, 3 samples each) located in southern Ontario. Results showed that residue estimates from the app method were in good agreement with those obtained from both photograph-grid and script methods (R² = 0.86 and 0.84, respectively). This study has found that the app underestimates the residue coverage by -6.3% and -10.8% when compared to the photograph-grid and script methods, respectively. With regards to residue type, soybean has a slightly lower bias than corn (i.e., -5.3% vs. -7.4%). For photos with residue app derived residue measurements are within ±5% difference (bias) of both photograph-grid- and script-derived residue measurements. These methods could therefore be used to track the recommended minimum soil

  17. Using a Mobile Device “App” and Proximal Remote Sensing Technologies to Assess Soil Cover Fractions on Agricultural Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Laamrani

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying the amount of crop residue left in the field after harvest is a key issue for sustainability. Conventional assessment approaches (e.g., line-transect are labor intensive, time-consuming and costly. Many proximal remote sensing devices and systems have been developed for agricultural applications such as cover crop and residue mapping. For instance, current mobile devices (smartphones & tablets are usually equipped with digital cameras and global positioning systems and use applications (apps for in-field data collection and analysis. In this study, we assess the feasibility and strength of a mobile device app developed to estimate crop residue cover. The performance of this novel technique (from here on referred to as “app” method was compared against two point counting approaches: an established digital photograph-grid method and a new automated residue counting script developed in MATLAB at the University of Guelph. Both photograph-grid and script methods were used to count residue under 100 grid points. Residue percent cover was estimated using the app, script and photograph-grid methods on 54 vertical digital photographs (images of the ground taken from above at a height of 1.5 m collected from eighteen fields (9 corn and 9 soybean, 3 samples each located in southern Ontario. Results showed that residue estimates from the app method were in good agreement with those obtained from both photograph–grid and script methods (R2 = 0.86 and 0.84, respectively. This study has found that the app underestimates the residue coverage by −6.3% and −10.8% when compared to the photograph-grid and script methods, respectively. With regards to residue type, soybean has a slightly lower bias than corn (i.e., −5.3% vs. −7.4%. For photos with residue <30%, the app derived residue measurements are within ±5% difference (bias of both photograph-grid- and script-derived residue measurements. These methods could therefore be used to track

  18. Mobile devices a practical guide for librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Rawlins, Ben

    2014-01-01

    As more users expect to use their mobile devices, librarians will want and need to develop the necessary skills to reach this growing user base. Mobile Devices: A Practical Guide for Librarians will aid libraries and librarians as they go through the process of planning, developing, implementing, marketing, and evaluating mobile services.

  19. Mobile technologies for every library

    CERN Document Server

    Gleason, Ann Whitney

    2015-01-01

    If you are wondering what mobile technology adoption means for your library or how to get started, Mobile Technologies for Every Library will answer your questions! This book will detail the opportunities and pitfalls in using mobile technology in libraries. It will also address platforms, options, security, and best practices for starting new mobile services programs or improving existing services. Gleason previews many useful apps for libraries. Web links and resources are also included.

  20. Investigating Daily Mobile Device Use Among University Students in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, Ahmad R.

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates daily mobile device use among Indonesian university students by using survey data collected in the first quarter of 2016. The data show that 55.49% of the students spend more than five hours a day on their mobile devices. OLS regression analysis shows that female students, owners of the most expensive smartphone or tablet, and those who access social media apps and play mobile games frequently are more likely to spend more time on their mobile devices each day. Contrary to that, those who consider themselves as laggards are less likely to do so. The findings in this study help better understand how university students in Indonesia use their mobile device and lay a foundation as part of a larger research agenda about the relationship between mobile technology and education in Indonesia.

  1. Mobile Technology Affinity in Renal Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, S; Scheel, J; Stoessel, L; Schieber, K; Jank, S; Lüker, C; Vitinius, F; Grundmann, F; Eckardt, K-U; Prokosch, H-U; Erim, Y

    Medication nonadherence is a common problem in renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Mobile health approaches to improve medication adherence are a current trend, and several medication adherence apps are available. However, it is unknown whether RTRs use these technologies and to what extent. In the present study, the mobile technology affinity of RTRs was analyzed. We hypothesized significant age differences in mobile technology affinity and that mobile technology affinity is associated with better cognitive functioning as well as higher educational level. A total of 109 RTRs (63% male) participated in the cross-sectional study, with an overall mean age of 51.8 ± 14.2 years. The study included the Technology Experience Questionnaire (TEQ) for the assessment of mobile technology affinity, a cognitive test battery, and sociodemographic data. Overall, 57.4% of the patients used a smartphone or tablet and almost 45% used apps. The TEQ sum score was 20.9 in a possible range from 6 (no affinity to technology) to 30 (very high affinity). Younger patients had significantly higher scores in mobile technology affinity. The only significant gender difference was found in having fun with using electronic devices: Men enjoyed technology more than women did. Mobile technology affinity was positively associated with cognitive functioning and educational level. Young adult patients might profit most from mobile health approaches. Furthermore, high educational level and normal cognitive functioning promote mobile technology affinity. This should be kept in mind when designing mobile technology health (mHealth) interventions for RTRs. For beneficial mHealth interventions, further research on potential barriers and desired technologic features is necessary to adapt apps to patients' needs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. An update on mobile phones interference with medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud Pashazadeh, Ali; Aghajani, Mahdi; Nabipour, Iraj; Assadi, Majid

    2013-10-01

    Mobile phones' electromagnetic interference with medical devices is an important issue for the medical safety of patients who are using life-supporting medical devices. This review mainly focuses on mobile phones' interference with implanted medical devices and with medical equipment located in critical areas of hospitals. A close look at the findings reveals that mobile phones may adversely affect the functioning of medical devices, and the specific effect and the degree of interference depend on the applied technology and the separation distance. According to the studies' findings and the authors' recommendations, besides mitigating interference, using mobile phones at a reasonable distance from medical devices and developing technology standards can lead to their effective use in hospital communication systems.

  3. An update on mobile phones interference with medical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pashazadeh, A. M.; Aghajani, M.; Nabipour, I.; Assadi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phones' electromagnetic interference with medical devices is an important issue for the medical safety of patients who are using life-supporting medical devices. This review mainly focuses on mobile phones' interference with implanted medical devices and with medical equipment located in critical areas of hospitals. A close look at the findings reveals that mobile phones may adversely affect the functioning of medical devices, and the specific effect and the degree of interference depend on the applied technology and the separation distance. According to the studies' findings and the authors' recommendations, besides mitigating interference, using mobile phones at a reasonable distance from medical devices and developing technology standards can lead to their effective use in hospital communication systems. (authors)

  4. Demographic profile of older adults using wheeled mobility devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmarkar, Amol M; Dicianno, Brad E; Cooper, Rosemarie; Collins, Diane M; Matthews, Judith T; Koontz, Alicia; Teodorski, Emily E; Cooper, Rory A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of wheeled mobility devices differed with respect to age, gender, residential setting, and health-related factors among older adults. A total of 723 adults ageing 60 and older are representing three cohorts, from nursing homes, the Center for Assistive Technology, and the wheelchair registry from the Human Engineering Research Laboratories. Wheeled mobility devices were classified into three main groups: manual wheelchairs, power wheelchairs, and scooters. Our results found factors including age, gender, diagnosis, and living settings to be associated with differences in use of manual versus powered mobility devices. Differences in use were also noted for subtypes of manual (depot, standard, and customized) and powered (scooter, standard, and customized) mobility devices, on demographic, living arrangements, and health-related factors. Consideration of demographic, health-related, and environmental factors during the prescription process may help clinicians identify the most appropriate mobility device for the user.

  5. Demographic Profile of Older Adults Using Wheeled Mobility Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol M. Karmarkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of wheeled mobility devices differed with respect to age, gender, residential setting, and health-related factors among older adults. A total of 723 adults ageing 60 and older are representing three cohorts, from nursing homes, the Center for Assistive Technology, and the wheelchair registry from the Human Engineering Research Laboratories. Wheeled mobility devices were classified into three main groups: manual wheelchairs, power wheelchairs, and scooters. Our results found factors including age, gender, diagnosis, and living settings to be associated with differences in use of manual versus powered mobility devices. Differences in use were also noted for subtypes of manual (depot, standard, and customized and powered (scooter, standard, and customized mobility devices, on demographic, living arrangements, and health-related factors. Consideration of demographic, health-related, and environmental factors during the prescription process may help clinicians identify the most appropriate mobility device for the user.

  6. Telemedicine Based on Mobile Devices and Mobile Cloud Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Lidong Wang; Cheryl Ann Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets support kinds of mobile computing and services. They can access to the cloud or offload the computation-intensive part to the cloud computing resources. Mobile cloud computing (MCC) integrates the cloud computing into the mobile environment, which extends mobile devices’ battery lifetime, improves their data storage capacity and processing power, and improves their reliability and information security. In this paper, the applications of smartphon...

  7. Personal information search on mobile devices

    OpenAIRE

    Akbas, Mehmet.

    2007-01-01

    Today's mobile devices, especially mobile phones, are comparable in computing capability and storage to the desktop computers of a few years ago. The volume and diversity of the information kept on mobile devices has continually increased and users have taken advantage of this. Since information is being stored on multiple devices, searching for and retrieving the desired information has become an important function. This thesis focuses on search with regard to Personal Information Manag...

  8. Emotional feedback for mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Seebode, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates the functional adequacy as well as the affective impression made by feedback messages on mobile devices. It presents an easily adoptable experimental setup to examine context effects on various feedback messages, and applies it to auditory, tactile and auditory-tactile feedback messages. This approach provides insights into the relationship between the affective impression and functional applicability of these messages as well as an understanding of the influence of unimodal components on the perception of multimodal feedback messages. The developed paradigm can also be extended to investigate other aspects of context and used to investigate feedback messages in modalities other than those presented. The book uses questionnaires implemented on a Smartphone, which can easily be adopted for field studies to broaden the scope even wider. Finally, the book offers guidelines for the design of system feedback.

  9. Examining the Relationship between Parental Involvement and Mobile Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Toinette M.

    Understanding how mobile devices can enhance parent/teacher communication is important because parents play an important part in their children's learning. Research on parents' use of mobile devices to communicate with their children's teachers is limited. The purpose of this cross-sectional correlational study was to determine the relationships between parents' (a) knowledge of using mobile devices, (b) general use of mobile devices, (c) purpose for using mobile devices, (d) perceived ease of using mobile devices, (e) perceived usefulness of mobile devices, (f) attitude toward using mobile devices, and (g) use of mobile devices to communicate with teachers. The study was informed by the technology acceptance model and used a participant pool of 73 parents of high school students attending a Title I high school in a large Midwestern city in the United States. Data were collected using an online survey and analyzed using Pearson's correlations. The study results indicate significant correlations between parents' use of mobile devices to communicate with teachers and knowledge of using mobile devices, purpose for using mobile devices, perceived ease of using mobile devices, perceived usefulness of mobile devices, and attitudes toward using mobile devices. These findings suggest that parental use of mobile devices to communicate with teachers can be enhanced by administrators and school personnel using strategies that consider parents' and the school culture. Social implication includes sharing the results of this study with district and school administrators who have the power to implement programs that encourage and support the use of mobile devices as a communication tool between parents and teachers, therefore increasing parental involvement and ultimately student academic success.

  10. Using internet enabled mobile devices and social networking technologies to promote exercise as an intervention for young first episode psychosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Pamela

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young people with first episode psychosis are at an increased risk for a range of poor health outcomes. In contrast to the growing body of evidence that suggests that exercise therapy may benefit the physical and mental health of people diagnosed with schizophrenia, there are no studies to date that have sought to extend the use of exercise therapy among patients with first episode psychosis. The aim of the study is to test the feasibility and acceptability of an exercise program that will be delivered via internet enabled mobile devices and social networking technologies among young people with first episode psychosis. Methods/Design This study is a qualitative pilot study being conducted at Orygen Youth Health Research Centre in Melbourne, Australia. Participants are young people aged 15-24 who are receiving clinical care at a specialist first episode psychosis treatment centre. Participants will also comprise young people from the general population. The exercise intervention is a 9-week running program, designed to gradually build a person's level of fitness to be able to run 5 kilometres (3 miles towards the end of the program. The program will be delivered via an internet enabled mobile device. Participants will be asked to post messages about their running experiences on the social networking website, and will also be asked to attend three face-to-face interviews. Discussion This paper describes the development of a qualitative study to pilot a running program coupled with the use of internet enabled mobile devices among young people with first episode psychosis. If the program is found to be feasible and acceptable to patients, it is hoped that further rigorous evaluations will ultimately lead to the introduction of exercise therapy as part of an evidence-based, multidisciplinary approach in routine clinical care.

  11. The Application of Mobile Devices in the Translation Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Hossein; Mahadi, Tengku Sepora Tengku

    2016-01-01

    While the presence of mobile electronic devices in the classroom has posed real challenges to instructors, a growing number of teachers believe they should seize the chance to improve the quality of instruction. The advent of new mobile technologies (laptops, smartphones, tablets, etc.) in the translation classroom has opened up new opportunities…

  12. Use of mobile device technology to continuously collect patient-reported symptoms during radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: A prospective feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchook, Aaron D; Tracton, Gregg; Stravers, Lori; Fleming, Mary E; Snavely, Anna C; Noe, Jeanne F; Hayes, David N; Grilley-Olson, Juneko E; Weiss, Jared M; Reeve, Bryce B; Basch, Ethan M; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2016-01-01

    Accurate assessment of toxicity allows for timely delivery of supportive measures during radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. The current paradigm requires weekly evaluation of patients by a provider. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring patient reported symptoms via mobile devices. We developed a mobile application for patients to report symptoms in 5 domains using validated questions. Patients were asked to report symptoms using a mobile device once daily during treatment or more often as needed. Clinicians reviewed patient-reported symptoms during weekly symptom management visits and patients completed surveys regarding perceptions of the utility of the mobile application. The primary outcome measure was patient compliance with mobile device reporting. Compliance is defined as number of days with a symptom report divided by number of days on study. There were 921 symptom reports collected from 22 patients during treatment. Median reporting compliance was 71% (interquartile range, 45%-80%). Median number of reports submitted per patient was 34 (interquartile range, 21-53). Median number of reports submitted by patients per week was similar throughout radiation therapy and there was significant reporting during nonclinic hours. Patients reported high satisfaction with the use of mobile devices to report symptoms. A substantial percentage of patients used mobile devices to continuously report symptoms throughout a course of radiation therapy for head and neck cancer. Future studies should evaluate the impact of mobile device symptom reporting on improving patient outcomes.

  13. Mobile Web for Pervasive environments - design webexperiences for multiple mobile devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Riisgaard

    2008-01-01

    . The architecture is developed to support desktop applications, but in this paper we describe how the architecture can be extended to mobile devices by using AJAX technology. The paper also presents an implementation and presents a number of applications for mobile devices developed with this framework.......In this paper we present an architecture for designing web pages that uses multiple mobile and stationary devices to present web content. The architecture extends standard web technology with a number of functions for expressing how web content might migrate and use multiple displays...

  14. Radiology and the mobile device: Radiology in motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panughpath, Sridhar G; Kalyanpur, Arjun

    2012-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is revolutionizing the way we communicate, interact, are entertained, and organize our lives. With healthcare in general and radiology in particular becoming increasingly digital, the use of such devices in radiologic practice is inevitable. This article reviews the current status of the use of mobile devices in the clinical practice of radiology, namely in emergency teleradiology. Technical parameters such as luminance and resolution are discussed. The article also discusses the benefits of such mobility vis-à-vis the current limitations of the technologies available

  15. Mobile Device Security: Perspectives of Future Healthcare Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Barbara; Dolezel, Diane; McLeod, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Healthcare data breaches on mobile devices continue to increase, yet the healthcare industry has not adopted mobile device security standards. This increase is disturbing because individuals are often accessing patients' protected health information on personal mobile devices, which could lead to a data breach. This deficiency led the researchers to explore the perceptions of future healthcare workers regarding mobile device security. To determine healthcare students' perspectives on mobile device security, the investigators designed and distributed a survey based on the Technology Threat Avoidance Theory. Three hundred thirty-five students participated in the survey. The data were analyzed to determine participants' perceptions about security threats, effectiveness and costs of safeguards, self-efficacy, susceptibility, severity, and their motivation and actions to secure their mobile devices. Awareness of interventions to protect mobile devices was also examined. Results indicate that while future healthcare professionals perceive the severity of threats to their mobile data, they do not feel personally susceptible. Additionally, participants were knowledgeable about security safeguards, but their knowledge of costs and problems related to the adoption of these measures was mixed. These findings indicate that increasing security awareness of healthcare professionals should be a priority.

  16. Context aware mobile application for mobile devices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masango, Mfundo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Android smart devices have become an integral part of peoples lives, having evolved beyond the capability of just sending a text message or making a call. Currently, smart devices have applications that can restrict access to other applications...

  17. Making Sense of Mobile Technology

    OpenAIRE

    David Pauleen; John Campbell; Brian Harmer; Ali Intezari

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies have facilitated a radical shift in work and private life. In this article, we seek to better understand how individual mobile technology users have made sense of these changes and adapted to them. We have used narrative enquiry and sensemaking to collect and analyze the data. The findings show that mobile technology use blurs the boundaries between work and private life, making traditional time and...

  18. A New Tool for Assessing Mobile Device Proficiency in Older Adults: The Mobile Device Proficiency Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, Nelson A; Boot, Walter R

    2018-02-01

    Mobile device proficiency is increasingly required to participate in society. Unfortunately, there still exists a digital divide between younger and older adults, especially with respect to mobile devices (i.e., tablet computers and smartphones). Training is an important goal to ensure that older adults can reap the benefits of these devices. However, efficient/effective training depends on the ability to gauge current proficiency levels. We developed a new scale to accurately assess the mobile device proficiency of older adults: the Mobile Device Proficiency Questionnaire (MDPQ). We present and validate the MDPQ and a short 16-question version of the MDPQ (MDPQ-16). The MDPQ, its subscales, and the MDPQ-16 were found to be highly reliable and valid measures of mobile device proficiency in a large sample. We conclude that the MDPQ and MDPQ-16 may serve as useful tools for facilitating mobile device training of older adults and measuring mobile device proficiency for research purposes.

  19. Financial Technologies: A Note on Mobile Payment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yee Leng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The financial market is currently disrupted by the rise of new technologies “FinTech” a short form of financial technology, which profoundly reshapes the financial intermediary structure and makes financial services more efficient. Mobile technology with Internet-enabled devices are the next logical phase of the World Wide Web a campaign such as mobile phone taking over the mass market and will fundamentally change the way products are bought and sold as well as financial services especially the mobile payment system. This research examines changes payment method in financial services, particularly those involving mobile payments that can create new channels for consumers to purchase goods and services using a mobile phone. Mobile payment application is ready to replace traditional cash, checks, credit and debit card throughout the country. In this stage of development, the current situation of mobile payment market, review the previous literature on mobile payment services, analysis use of mobile payment worldwide and various initiatives use mobile phones to offer financial services for those ‘unbanked’.

  20. Utilizing Mobile Devices to Enrich the Learning Style of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGovern, Enda F.; Luna-Nevarez, Cuauhtemoc; Baruca, Arne

    2017-01-01

    As digital technologies evolve in education, business faculty have increased access to an extensive range of mobile devices and online applications to help them inspire students' passion for learning. Adopting new digital approaches to teaching can also enhance the learning style of students who are immersed in the use of digital devices. How can…

  1. Astronomy Fun with Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilachowski, Catherine A.; Morris, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Those mobile devices your students bring to class can do more that tweet and text. Engage your students with these web-based astronomy learning tools that allow students to manipulate astronomical data to learn important concepts. The tools are HTML5, CSS3, Javascript-based applications that provide access to the content on iPad and Android tablets. With "Three Color" students can combine monochrome astronomical images taken through different color filters or in different wavelength regions into a single color image. "Star Clusters" allows students to compare images of clusters with a pre-defined template of colors and sizes to compare clusters of different ages. An adaptation of Travis Rector's "NovaSearch" allows students to examine images of the central regions of the Andromeda Galaxy to find novae and to measure the time over which the nova fades away. New additions to our suite of applications allow students to estimate the surface temperatures of exoplanets and the probability of life elsewhere in the Universe. Further information and access to these web-based tools are available at www.astro.indiana.edu/ala/.

  2. The Proliferation of Smart Devices on Mobile Cloud Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kant Hiran, Kamal; Doshi, Ruchi

    Mobile Cloud Computing (MCC) is an emerging research topic in the world of Information Technology, this trend promises to deliver and promote a wide range of advantage to it anxious markets or clients. With MCC, all the applications that exist are on a remote server enable the individual client...... machines or devices to access them. Mobile Cloud Computing in smartphone and tablets allows devices to offload functions and data resources to a cloud environment. This happening conserve the power of the smart devices or the tablets to prolong it battery longevity. This book sought to analyses how MCC...... affect individuals on smart devices as well as their views on network data. The growing demand for mobile devices and its applications are evident that MCC is the next IT trend. The book will also seek the views of people on the cost of applications and battery life of the smart devices as this directly...

  3. Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Device Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corey Thuen

    2013-01-01

    The On-Device Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Applications (ODAMA) project was started in an effort to protect mobile devices used in Industrial Control Systems (ICS) from cyber attack. Because mobile devices hide as much of the “computer” as possible, the user’s ability to assess the software running on their system is limited. The research team chose Google’s Android platform for this initial research because it is open source and it would give us freedom in our approach, including the ability to modify the mobile device’s operating system itself. The research team concluded that a Privileged Application was the right approach, and the result was ODAMA. This project is an important piece of the work to secure the expanding use of mobile devices with our nation’s critical infrastructure.

  4. Contributions of mobile technologies to addiction research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swendsen, Joel

    2016-06-01

    Mobile technologies are revolutionizing the field of mental health, and particular progress has been made in their application to addiction research and treatment. The use of smartphones and other mobile devices has been shown to be feasible with individuals addicted to any of a wide range of substances, with few biases being observed concerning the repeated monitoring of daily life experiences, craving, or substance use. From a methodological point of view, the use of mobile technologies overcomes longstanding limitations of traditional clinical research protocols, including the more accurate assessment of temporal relationships among variables, as well as the reduction in both contextual constraints and discipline-specific methodological isolation. The present article presents a conceptual review of these advances while using illustrations of research applications that are capable of overcoming specific methodological barriers. Finally, a brief review of both the benefits and risks of mobile technology use for the treatment of patients will be addressed.

  5. Evaluating Personal Assistants on Mobile devices

    OpenAIRE

    Kiseleva, Julia; de Rijke, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    The iPhone was introduced only a decade ago in 2007 but has fundamentally changed the way we interact with online information. Mobile devices differ radically from classic command-based and point-and-click user interfaces, now allowing for gesture-based interaction using fine-grained touch and swipe signals. Due to the rapid growth in the use of voice-controlled intelligent personal assistants on mobile devices, such as Microsoft's Cortana, Google Now, and Apple's Siri, mobile devices have be...

  6. Poster: Virtual reality interaction using mobile devices

    KAUST Repository

    Aseeri, Sahar A.

    2013-03-01

    In this work we aim to implement and evaluate alternative approaches for interacting with virtual environments on mobile devices for navigation, object selection and manipulation. Interaction with objects in virtual worlds using traditional input such as current state-of-the-art devices is often difficult and could diminish the immersion and sense of presence when it comes to 3D virtual environment tasks. We have developed new methods to perform different kinds of interactions using a mobile device (e.g. a smartphone) both as input device, performing selection and manipulation of objects, and as output device, utilizing the screen as an extra view (virtual camera or information display). Our hypothesis is that interaction via mobile devices facilitates simple tasks like the ones described within immersive virtual reality systems. We present here our initial implementation and result. © 2013 IEEE.

  7. Effect of mobility devices on orientation sensors that contain magnetometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendell, Cynthia; Lemaire, Edward D

    2009-01-01

    Orientation sensors containing magnetometers use the earth's magnetic field as a reference. Ferromagnetic objects may distort this magnetic field, leading to inaccurate orientation output. We explored the viability of these orientation sensors for motion analysis in an assistive mobility device rehabilitative setting. We attached two MTx orientation sensors (XSens; Enschade, the Netherlands), connected to the XBus Master data collection unit (XSens), to a plastic frame such that the relative angle between sensors was constant. We then moved a series of mobility devices in proximity to the plastic frame: two knee-ankle-foot orthoses (aluminum, stainless steel), one ankle-foot orthosis, two transtibial prostheses (exoskeletal, endoskeletal), two walkers (standard, Challenger Low Wide [Evolution Technologies; Port Coquitlam, Canada]), and two wheelchairs (Tango [OrthoFab; Quebec City, Canada], GTi [Quickie; Phoenix, Arizona]). For each mobility device, we calculated the average difference in relative angle between the baseline and peak angles for each of five trials. Errors ranged from less than 0.10 to 35.29 degrees, depending on the mobility device and frame positioning near the device. This demonstrated the large errors that can occur when magnetometer-based orientation sensors with mobility devices are used. While strategic orientation sensor placement on some mobility devices can minimize these errors to an acceptable level, testing protocols should be implemented to verify orientation sensor accuracy for these applications.

  8. Use of mobile devices for medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschorn, David S; Choudhri, Asim F; Shih, George; Kim, Woojin

    2014-12-01

    Mobile devices have fundamentally changed personal computing, with many people forgoing the desktop and even laptop computer altogether in favor of a smaller, lighter, and cheaper device with a touch screen. Doctors and patients are beginning to expect medical images to be available on these devices for consultative viewing, if not actual diagnosis. However, this raises serious concerns with regard to the ability of existing mobile devices and networks to quickly and securely move these images. Medical images often come in large sets, which can bog down a network if not conveyed in an intelligent manner, and downloaded data on a mobile device are highly vulnerable to a breach of patient confidentiality should that device become lost or stolen. Some degree of regulation is needed to ensure that the software used to view these images allows all relevant medical information to be visible and manipulated in a clinically acceptable manner. There also needs to be a quality control mechanism to ensure that a device's display accurately conveys the image content without loss of contrast detail. Furthermore, not all mobile displays are appropriate for all types of images. The smaller displays of smart phones, for example, are not well suited for viewing entire chest radiographs, no matter how small and numerous the pixels of the display may be. All of these factors should be taken into account when deciding where, when, and how to use mobile devices for the display of medical images. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Extensional rheometry with a handheld mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Kristin A.; Liedtke, Aleesha M.; Todt, Anika H.; Walker, Travis W.

    2017-06-01

    The on-site characterization of complex fluids is important for a number of academic and industrial applications. Consequently, a need exists to develop portable rheometers that can provide in the field diagnostics and serve as tools for rapid quality assurance. With the advancement of smartphone technology and the widespread global ownership of smart devices, mobile applications are attractive as platforms for rheological characterization. The present work investigates the use of a smartphone device for the extensional characterization of a series of Boger fluids composed of glycerol/water and poly(ethylene oxide), taking advantage of the increasing high-speed video capabilities (currently up to 240 Hz capture rate at 720p) of smartphone cameras. We report a noticeable difference in the characterization of samples with slight variations in polymer concentration and discuss current device limitations. Potential benefits of a handheld extensional rheometer include its use as a point-of-care diagnostic tool, especially in developing communities, as well as a simple and inexpensive tool for assessing product quality in industry.

  10. Undergraduate nurses' preferred use of mobile devices in healthcare settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth; Allen, Penny

    2015-01-01

    The growth of digital technology has created challenges for appropriate and safe use of mobile or portable devices in healthcare environments. There is perceived risk that the use of mobile technology for learning may distract from provision of patient care if used by undergraduate students during work-integrated learning. This paper reports on a study that aimed to identify differences in preferred behavior of student nurses in their use of mobile technology during and away from the clinical practice environment. A previously validated online survey was administered to students during a period of work integrated learning in a range of healthcare settings in two Australian states. Respondents agreed that mobile devices could be beneficial to patient care. Overall, students proposed they would use mobile devices for accessing information, during work integrated learning, less than when away from the workplace. The development of policy to guide the use of mobile devices, in situ, is important to the provision of safe and competent care and improved health outcomes for patients.

  11. Transform Modern Language Learning through Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Harry Grover

    2013-01-01

    College professors can transform their modern language classes through mobile devices. Their students' learning becomes more active, more personalized, more contextual, and more culturally authentic as illustrated through the author's modern language mobile learning classroom examples. In addition, their students engage in many diverse types of…

  12. Accessible Collaborative Learning Using Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Mike; Li, Yunjia; Draffan, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes accessible collaborative learning using mobile devices with mobile enhancements to Synote, the freely available, award winning, open source, web based application that makes web hosted recordings easier to access, search, manage, and exploit for all learners, teachers and other users. Notes taken live during lectures using…

  13. Creating Digital Elevation Model Using a Mobile Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, A. İ.

    2017-11-01

    DEM (Digital Elevation Models) is the best way to interpret topography on the ground. In recent years, lidar technology allows to create more accurate elevation models. However, the problem is this technology is not common all over the world. Also if Lidar data are not provided by government agencies freely, people have to pay lots of money to reach these point clouds. In this article, we will discuss how we can create digital elevation model from less accurate mobile devices' GPS data. Moreover, we will evaluate these data on the same mobile device which we collected data to reduce cost of this modeling.

  14. Mobile assistive technologies for the visually impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Lilit; Lumsden, Jo; O'Sullivan, Dympna; Bartlett, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    There are around 285 million visually impaired people worldwide, and around 370,000 people are registered as blind or partially sighted in the UK. Ongoing advances in information technology (IT) are increasing the scope for IT-based mobile assistive technologies to facilitate the independence, safety, and improved quality of life of the visually impaired. Research is being directed at making mobile phones and other handheld devices accessible via our haptic (touch) and audio sensory channels. We review research and innovation within the field of mobile assistive technology for the visually impaired and, in so doing, highlight the need for successful collaboration between clinical expertise, computer science, and domain users to realize fully the potential benefits of such technologies. We initially reflect on research that has been conducted to make mobile phones more accessible to people with vision loss. We then discuss innovative assistive applications designed for the visually impaired that are either delivered via mainstream devices and can be used while in motion (e.g., mobile phones) or are embedded within an environment that may be in motion (e.g., public transport) or within which the user may be in motion (e.g., smart homes). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mobile medical device connectivity: real world solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettus, Dan

    2004-01-01

    Mobile medical devices, such as infusion pumps, provide an important therapeutic function. They are also valuable sources of information about treatment patterns at the point of care. However, these mobile devices have been independent islands of valuable information, unable to share the data they gather with other hospital information resources on a real time basis. Although data from these devices can provide significant improvements for medical safety and vital information needed for clinical best practice development, gathering that data poses significant challenges when interfacing with hospital information systems. Mobile medical devices move from place to place as independent actors, raising a series of security and identification issues when they need to be disconnected and reconnected using traditional tethered cable connections. The continuing lack of accepted communications protocol standards, in spite of the concentrated efforts of organizations like the IEEE and the Medical Information Bus (IEEE 1073) to establish them, has made integration into the hospital information system a complex and non-standard task. The rapid spread in availability and adoption of high-speed 802.11 wireless systems in hospitals offers a realistic connectivity solution for mobile medical devices. Inspite of this, the 802.11 standard is still evolving, and current security methods designed for user-based products like PDAs and laptop computers are not ideal for unmanned mobile medical devices because they assume the availability of a human operator to authenticate a wireless session. In the absence of accepted standards, manufacturers have created practical and innovative solutions to support the collection of clinical data from mobile medical devices and the integration of that data with hospital information systems. This paper will explore the potential benefits of integrating mobile medical devices into the hospital information system, and describe the challenges in

  16. Mobile Technology and Liberal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author offers reflections on the impact of mobile technology for liberal education. These reflections are based on his own experience of incorporating iPads in his communication courses during the 2010-2011 academic year. As a member of an interdisciplinary faculty learning community on the use of mobile tablets, he explored…

  17. A world of minerals in your mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenness, Jane E.; Ober, Joyce A.; Wilkins, Aleeza M.; Gambogi, Joseph

    2016-09-15

    Mobile phones and other high-technology communications devices could not exist without mineral commodities. More than one-half of all components in a mobile device—including its electronics, display, battery, speakers, and more—are made from mined and semiprocessed materials (mineral commodities). Some mineral commodities can be recovered as byproducts during the production and processing of other commodities. As an example, bauxite is mined for its aluminum content, but gallium is recovered during the aluminum production process. The images show the ore minerals (sources) of some mineral commodities that are used to make components of a mobile device. On the reverse side, the map and table depict the major source countries producing these mineral commodities along with how these commodities are used in mobile devices. For more information on minerals, visit http://minerals.usgs.gov.

  18. Virtual Reality Interaction Using Mobile Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Aseeri, Sahar A.

    2013-07-01

    With the use of an immersive display system such as CAVE system, the user is able to realize a 3D immersive virtual environment realistically. However, interacting with virtual worlds in CAVE systems using traditional input devices to perform easy operations such as manipulation, object selection, and navigation is often difficult. This difficulty could diminish the immersion and sense of presence when it comes to 3D virtual environment tasks. Our research aims to implement and evaluate alternative approaches of interaction with immersive virtual environments on mobile devices for manipulation and object selection tasks. As many researchers have noted, using a mobile device as an interaction device has a number of advantages, including built-in display, built-in control, and touch screen facility. These advantages facilitate simple tasks within immersive virtual environments. This research proposes new methods using mobile devices like Smart-phones to perform di↵erent kinds of interactions both as an input device, (e.g. performing selection and manipulation of objects) and as an output device (e.g. utilizing the screen as an extra view for a virtual camera or information display). Moreover, we developed a prototype system to demonstrate and informally evaluate these methods. The research conclusion suggests using mobile devices as a 3D-controller. This will be a more intuitive approach to interact within the virtual environment.

  19. Towards Scalable Graph Computation on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiqi; Lin, Zhiyuan; Pienta, Robert; Kahng, Minsuk; Chau, Duen Horng

    2015-01-01

    Mobile devices have become increasingly central to our everyday activities, due to their portability, multi-touch capabilities, and ever-improving computational power. Such attractive features have spurred research interest in leveraging mobile devices for computation. We explore a novel approach that aims to use a single mobile device to perform scalable graph computation on large graphs that do not fit in the device's limited main memory, opening up the possibility of performing on-device analysis of large datasets, without relying on the cloud. Based on the familiar memory mapping capability provided by today's mobile operating systems, our approach to scale up computation is powerful and intentionally kept simple to maximize its applicability across the iOS and Android platforms. Our experiments demonstrate that an iPad mini can perform fast computation on large real graphs with as many as 272 million edges (Google+ social graph), at a speed that is only a few times slower than a 13″ Macbook Pro. Through creating a real world iOS app with this technique, we demonstrate the strong potential application for scalable graph computation on a single mobile device using our approach. PMID:25859564

  20. Towards Scalable Graph Computation on Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiqi; Lin, Zhiyuan; Pienta, Robert; Kahng, Minsuk; Chau, Duen Horng

    2014-10-01

    Mobile devices have become increasingly central to our everyday activities, due to their portability, multi-touch capabilities, and ever-improving computational power. Such attractive features have spurred research interest in leveraging mobile devices for computation. We explore a novel approach that aims to use a single mobile device to perform scalable graph computation on large graphs that do not fit in the device's limited main memory, opening up the possibility of performing on-device analysis of large datasets, without relying on the cloud. Based on the familiar memory mapping capability provided by today's mobile operating systems, our approach to scale up computation is powerful and intentionally kept simple to maximize its applicability across the iOS and Android platforms. Our experiments demonstrate that an iPad mini can perform fast computation on large real graphs with as many as 272 million edges (Google+ social graph), at a speed that is only a few times slower than a 13″ Macbook Pro. Through creating a real world iOS app with this technique, we demonstrate the strong potential application for scalable graph computation on a single mobile device using our approach.

  1. Tunable Antennas for Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morris, Art; Barrio, Samantha Caporal Del; Shin, J

    2014-01-01

    Modern mobile terminal design has been driven by the user interface and broadband connectivity. Real world RF performance has substantially fallen recently which impacts data rates, battery life and often causes lost connections. This has been caused by changing antenna location and reduced antenna...

  2. New Mobile Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Su-En; Henten, Anders

    2006-01-01

    This paper takes a look at Clayton Christensen 's theory of disruptive technologies and how Christensen's theory relates to other innovation theories. It also proposes a new layer of analysis to this theory to better link the technology analysis to the market analysis of any given technology...... product. This layer suggests that complementarity and substitutability are important criteria for technologies to be market disruptions or sustaining changes....

  3. Adaptive Text Entry for Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proschowsky, Morten Smidt

    The reduced size of many mobile devices makes it difficult to enter text with them. The text entry methods are often slow or complicated to use. This affects the performance and user experience of all applications and services on the device. This work introduces new easy-to-use text entry methods...... for mobile devices and a framework for adaptive context-aware language models. Based on analysis of current text entry methods, the requirements to the new text entry methods are established. Transparent User guided Prediction (TUP) is a text entry method for devices with one dimensional touch input. It can...... be touch sensitive wheels, sliders or similar input devices. The interaction design of TUP is done with a combination of high level task models and low level models of human motor behaviour. Three prototypes of TUP are designed and evaluated by more than 30 users. Observations from the evaluations are used...

  4. Immersive Live Event Experiences - Interactive UHDTV on Mobile Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niamut, O.A.; Thomas, G.A.; Thomas, E.D.R.; Brandenburg, R. van; D’Acunto, L.; Gregory-Clarke, R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the latest developments around tiled streaming. As an extension of HTTP adaptive streaming, it retains all the benefits of this streaming technology, while adding the possibility of interaction when consuming UHDTV on mobile devices. In particular, we discuss the underlying

  5. Live event experiences - Interactive UHDTV on mobile devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niamut, O.A.; Thomas, G.A.; Thomas, E.D.R.; Brandenburg, R. van; D'Acunto, L.; Gregory-Clarke, R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the latest developments in tiled streaming. As an extension of HTTP adaptive streaming, it retains all the benefits of this streaming technology, while adding the potential of interaction when UHDTV is consumed on mobile devices. In particular, we discuss the underlying

  6. An approach for management of mobile devices in pharmaceutical company

    OpenAIRE

    Prešeren, Tadej

    2008-01-01

    The areas of the mobile device management is developing very fast. Hence, the thesis “An approach for management of mobile devices in pharmaceutical company” introduces all key directives that should be considered when implementing mobile device management. A survey of standards and recommendations on the mobile device security has been elaborated. Relevant guidelines for security policy definition are presented with the risk analysis for mobile device usage. Furthermore, the model for mana...

  7. Location Estimation of Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil ŽIDEK

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This contribution describes mathematical model (kinematics for Mobile Robot carriage. The mathematical model is fully parametric. Model is designed universally for any measures three or four wheeled carriage. The next conditions are: back wheels are driving-wheel, front wheels change angle of Robot turning. Position of the front wheel gives the actual position of the robot. Position of the robot is described by coordinates x, y and by angle of the front wheel α in reference position. Main reason for model implementation is indoor navigation. We need some estimation of robot position especially after turning of the Robot. Next use is for outdoor navigation especially for precising GPS information.

  8. Informal learning with mobile devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berth, Mette

    The paper describes the progression of a learning experiment with high school students producing moblogs (mobile weblogs) outside of the school environment and focuses especially on the reflective aspects of the moblogs as an expression of the reflective practicum (Schön 1987, DESECO 2003). Through...... an analysis of my data I will centre my discussion around the value of this informal approach for learning purposes and discuss what kind of reflective competencies come into play here (Nesta Futurelab 2004a, 2004b). The theoretical framework for this article also draws on social learning theory (Lave...

  9. New mobile technologies and visual acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, I A T; Lok, A S L; Tarbert, C

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices have shown promise in visual assessment. Traditional acuity measurement involves retro-illuminated charts or card-based modalities. Mobile platforms bring potential to improve on both portability and objectivity. The present research activity relates to design and validation of a novel tablet-based infant acuity test. Early results in an adult cohort, with various levels of artificially degraded vision, suggest improved test-retest reliability compared with current standards for infant acuity. Future pragmatic trials will assess the value of this emerging technology in pediatric visual screening.

  10. A Phenomenological Study of Middle School Students' Self-Regulated Learning with Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doud, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    An integral part of 21st century learning for middle school students included the daily use of mobile device technology. The problem with mobile devices, full of their interactive interfaces, was how did the student personally discover which features and tools within the device will best benefit the student's style and needs, thus enhancing…

  11. THE EVOLUTION OF INTERFACE DESIGN ON MOBILE DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atila Isik

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The most typical characteristic of 21. century is the light velocity changing of technology. Dizzily developments in the field of human-robot interaction, mobile communication and education as affect all the fields of life also have an impact on art and design area. Striking increase of interest had been seen for mobile devices which are product of developing technology as tablet and mobile phone. While this increase happening at the present time user interfaces at mobile world and user practices developed as much as dominating design tendency. And became primary impotance for visual designers. This study aims utulizing future options for designers and the oppurtunities and reach a conclusions with examining evolution field of interface design spesific to mobile devices. From Skemorfizm to ordinary design and Google’s recent transition of material design principles were discussed together in this study. And this workout deal with interface design logic of users for working with new computational arificial facts devices as wearable smart objects and devices which able to connect to internet.

  12. Multiuser Collaboration with Networked Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Kam S.; Tai, Ann T.; Deng, Yong M.; Becks, Paul G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we describe a multiuser collaboration infrastructure that enables multiple mission scientists to remotely and collaboratively interact with visualization and planning software, using wireless networked personal digital assistants(PDAs) and other mobile devices. During ground operations of planetary rover and lander missions, scientists need to meet daily to review downlinked data and plan science activities. For example, scientists use the Science Activity Planner (SAP) in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission to visualize downlinked data and plan rover activities during the science meetings [1]. Computer displays are projected onto large screens in the meeting room to enable the scientists to view and discuss downlinked images and data displayed by SAP and other software applications. However, only one person can interact with the software applications because input to the computer is limited to a single mouse and keyboard. As a result, the scientists have to verbally express their intentions, such as selecting a target at a particular location on the Mars terrain image, to that person in order to interact with the applications. This constrains communication and limits the returns of science planning. Furthermore, ground operations for Mars missions are fundamentally constrained by the short turnaround time for science and engineering teams to process and analyze data, plan the next uplink, generate command sequences, and transmit the uplink to the vehicle [2]. Therefore, improving ground operations is crucial to the success of Mars missions. The multiuser collaboration infrastructure enables users to control software applications remotely and collaboratively using mobile devices. The infrastructure includes (1) human-computer interaction techniques to provide natural, fast, and accurate inputs, (2) a communications protocol to ensure reliable and efficient coordination of the input devices and host computers, (3) an application

  13. Collaborative Context Recognition for Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huuskonen, Pertti; Mäntyjärvi, Jani; Könönen, Ville

    The next wave of mobile applications is at hand. Mobile phones, PDAs, cameras, music players, and gaming gadgets are creating a connected mobile ecosystem where it is possible to implement systems with significant embedded intelligence. Such advances will make it possible to move many functions of the current PC-centric applications to the mobile domain. Since the inherent difficulties that come with mobility—limited UIs, short attention spans, power dependency, intermittent connectivity, to name but a few—are still not going away, new solutions are needed to make mobile computing satisfactory. We are facing the paradox of cramming ever more functions into our ever more portable devices, while seeking to achieve radically better usablility and semi-usable automated intelligence.

  14. Use of Mobile Devices for E-Learning in Geomatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, H.

    2015-05-01

    For the last 4 years, the School of Civil Engineering & Geosciences at Newcastle University, UK adapted mobile devices as learning approach only for undergraduate within Geomatics. All incoming students were given a mobile device as learning tool, which was supposed to be there main way to accessing teaching material. This paper will present how students adopted the mobile devices and how their learning has changed using mobile devices. It will highlight which apps can be used in a Geomatics teaching environment to engage students in their learning and teaching environment. The paper will furthermore look into apps which help students within the area of Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, such as the Autodesk 123D catch up or the Remote RDP app to remotely control surveying instrumentations, such as laser scanners. Those apps are easy tools to engage students within digital learning environment which the students are familiar with. The paper will show how students embrace the technology but also current limitation of using those within Higher education establishments, such as sufficient Wifi and student support for using mobile devices.

  15. Using Mobile Devices to Support Online Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi Caballé

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile collaborative learning is considered the next step of on-line collaborative learning by incorporating mobility as a key and breakthrough requirement. Indeed, the current wide spread of mobile devices and wireless technologies brings an enormous potential to e-learning, in terms of ubiquity, pervasiveness, personalization, flexibility, and so on. For this reason, Mobile Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning has recently grown from a minor research field to significant research projects covering a fairly variety of formal and specially informal learning settings, from schools and universities to workplaces, museums, cities and rural areas. Much of this research has shown how mobile technology can offer new opportunities for groups of learners to collaborate inside and beyond the traditional instructor-oriented educational paradigm. However, mobile technologies, when specifically applied to collaborative learning activities, are still in its infancy and many challenges arise. In addition, current research in this domain points to highly specialized study cases, uses, and experiences in specific educational settings and thus the issues addressed in the literature are found dispersed and disconnected from each other. To this end, this paper attempts to bridge relevant aspects of mobile technologies in support for collaborative learning and provides a tighter view by means of a multidimensional approach.

  16. A Comprehensive Ubiquitous Healthcare Solution on an Android™ Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Cheng Hii

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Provision of ubiquitous healthcare solutions which provide healthcare services at anytime anywhere has become more favorable nowadays due to the emphasis on healthcare awareness and also the growth of mobile wireless technologies. Following this approach, an Android™ smart phone device is proposed as a mobile monitoring terminal to observe and analyze ECG (electrocardiography waveforms from wearable ECG devices in real time under the coverage of a wireless sensor network (WSN. The exploitation of WSN in healthcare is able to substitute the complicated wired technology, moving healthcare away from a fixed location setting. As an extension to the monitoring scheme, medicine care is taken into consideration by utilizing the mobile phone as a barcode decoder, to verify and assist out-patients in the medication administration process, providing a better and more comprehensive healthcare service.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION, TEST REPORT OF MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVICES/CLEAN DIESEL TECHNOLOGIES FUEL BORNE CATALYST WITH CLEANAIR SYSTEM'S DIESEL OXIDATION CATALYST

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Fuel-Borne Catalyst with CleanAir System's Diesel Oxidation Catalyst manufactured by Clean Diesel Technologies, Inc. The technology is a fuel-borne catalyst used in ultra low sulfur d...

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION, TEST REPORT OF MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVICES: CLEAN DIESEL TECHNOLOGIES FUEL-BORNE CATALYST WITH MITSUI/PUREARTH CATALYZED WIRE MESH FILTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the Fuel-Borne Catalyst with Mitsui/PUREarth Catalyzed Wire Mesh Filter manufactured by Clean Diesel Technologies, Inc. The technology is a platinum/cerium fuel-borne catalyst in commerci...

  19. Making Sense of Mobile Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pauleen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile technologies have facilitated a radical shift in work and private life. In this article, we seek to better understand how individual mobile technology users have made sense of these changes and adapted to them. We have used narrative enquiry and sensemaking to collect and analyze the data. The findings show that mobile technology use blurs the boundaries between work and private life, making traditional time and place distinctions less relevant. Furthermore, work and private life can be integrated in ways that may be either competitive or complementary. We also observed an effect rarely discussed in the literature—the way personal and professional aspirations affect how work and private life are integrated. Implications include the need for researchers and organizations to understand the wider consequences that arise from the integration of work and private life roles.

  20. Reaching ELLs with Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullman, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This article profiles Grace Poli, a creative media specialist and technology supervisor at Union City (New Jersey) High School, who uses iPods to engage with students learning English. This area has a high population of limited-English speakers, many of whom come in to the district with no formal education. Poli was determined to find a way to use…

  1. Nanotechnologies for future mobile devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryhänen, Tapani

    2010-01-01

    ..., dirtrepellent, self-healing surface materials, and lightweight structural materials capable of adapting their shape. Portable energy storage using supercapacitor-battery hybrids based on new materials including carbon nanohorns and porous electrodes, fuel cell technologies, energy harvesting, and more efficient solar cells. Electronics an...

  2. Antenna design for mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhijun

    2017-01-01

    - Integrates state-of-the-art technologies with a special section for step-by-step antenna design - Features up-to-date bio-safety and electromagnetic compatibility regulation compliance and latest standards - Newly updated with MIMO antenna design, measurements and requirements - Accessible to readers of many levels, from introductory to specialist - Written by a practicing expert who has hired and trained numerous engineers

  3. On the Benefit of Using Mobile Technologies in Business Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Deibert, Sina; Rothlauf, Franz

    2006-01-01

    The rapid technical progress in the development of mobile devices and technologies offers new possibilities for improving and streamlining the performance of business processes. However, only few successful mobile applications exist in the business area. This paper discusses the benefits an enterprise can gain by using mobile technologies in business processes. It presents general indicators to measure the performance of business processes and shows how these indicators must be adapted to be ...

  4. Testing Framework for Mobile Device Forensics Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Anobah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The proliferation of mobile communication and computing devices, in particular smart mobile phones, is almost paralleled with the increasing number of mobile device forensics tools in the market. Each mobile forensics tool vendor, on one hand claims to have a tool that is best in terms of performance, while on the other hand each tool vendor seems to be using different standards for testing their tools and thereby defining what support means differently. To overcome this problem, a testing framework based on a series of tests ranging from basic forensics tasks such as file system reconstruction up to more complex ones countering antiforensic techniques is proposed. The framework, which is an extension of an existing effort done in 2010, prescribes a method to clearly circumscribe the term support into precise levels. It also gives an idea of the standard to be developed and accepted by the forensic community that will make it easier for forensics investigators to quickly select the most appropriate tool for a particular mobile device.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: MOBILE SOURCE RETROFIT AIR POLLUTION CONTROL DEVICES: CLEAN CLEAR FUEL TECHNOLOGIES, INC.’S, UNIVERSAL FUEL CELL

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development operates the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program to facilitate the deployment of innovative technologies through performance verification and information dissemination. Congress funds ETV in response to the belief ...

  6. Embedded Java security security for mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Debbabi, Mourad; Talhi, Chamseddine

    2007-01-01

    Java brings more functionality and versatility to the world of mobile devices, but it also introduces new security threats. This book contains a presentation of embedded Java security and presents the main components of embedded Java. It gives an idea of the platform architecture and is useful for researchers and practitioners.

  7. Biometric Authentication System on Mobile Personal Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, Q.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    We propose a secure, robust, and low-cost biometric authentication system on the mobile personal device for the personal network. The system consists of the following five key modules: 1) face detection; 2) face registration; 3) illumination normalization; 4) face verification; and 5) information

  8. Biometric authentication for a mobile personal device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, Q.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Secure access is prerequisite for a mobile personal device (MPD) in a personal network (PN). An authentication method using biometrics, specifically face, is proposed in this paper. A fast face detection and registration method based on a Viola-Jones detector is implemented, and a

  9. Wood Variety Recognition on Mobile Devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vácha, Pavel; Haindl, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, č. 93 (2013), s. 52-52 ISSN 0926-4981 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/08/0593 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : wood recognition * Markov random fields Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http:// library .utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/RO/vacha-wood variety recognition on mobile devices.pdf

  10. Face Verification for Mobile Personal Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tao, Q.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, we presented a detailed study of the face verification problem on the mobile device, covering every component of the system. The study includes face detection, registration, normalization, and verification. Furthermore, the information fusion problem is studied to verify face

  11. Enhanced biometric access control for mobile devices

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brown, Dane

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the new Digital Economy, mobile devices are increasingly 978-0-620-76756-9being used for tasks that involve sensitive and/or financial data. Hitherto, security on smartphones has not been a priority and furthermore, users tend to ignore...

  12. Mobile home automation-merging mobile value added services and home automation technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Rosendahl, Andreas; Hampe, Felix J.; Botterweck, Goetz

    2007-01-01

    non-peer-reviewed In this paper we study mobile home automation, a field that emerges from an integration of mobile application platforms and home automation technologies. In a conceptual introduction we first illustrate the need for such applications by introducing a two-dimensional conceptual model of mobility. Subsequently we suggest an architecture and discuss different options of how a user might access a mobile home automation service and the controlled devices. As another contrib...

  13. Mobile Technologies and Public Health

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-09-05

    In this podcast, Erin Edgerton, CDC, and Eric Holman, President of SmartReply, discuss why mobile technologies are an important communications tool for disseminating health messages.  Created: 9/5/2008 by National Center for Health Marketing (NCHM), Division of eHealth Marketing (DeHM).   Date Released: 1/12/2009.

  14. Mobile Technologies and Roving Reference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penner, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    As 21st century librarians, we have made apt adjustments for reaching out into the digital world, but we need to consider the students who still use library services within our walls. We can use available handheld, mobile technologies to help patrons too shy to approach the desk and free library staff to bring reference service directly to patrons.

  15. Field-Based Experiential Learning Using Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilley, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Technologies such as GPS and cellular triangulation allow location-specific content to be delivered by mobile devices, but no mechanism currently exists to associate content shared between locations in a way that guarantees the delivery of coherent and non-redundant information at every location. Thus, experiential learning via mobile devices must currently take place along a predefined path, as in the case of a self-guided tour. I developed a mobile-device-based system that allows a person to move through a space along a path of their choosing, while receiving information in a way that guarantees delivery of appropriate background and location-specific information without producing redundancy of content between locations. This is accomplished by coupling content to knowledge-concept tags that are noted as fulfilled when users take prescribed actions. Similarly, the presentation of the content is related to the fulfillment of these knowledge-concept tags through logic statements that control the presentation. Content delivery is triggered by mobile-device geolocation including GPS/cellular navigation, and sensing of low-power Bluetooth proximity beacons. Together, these features implement a process that guarantees a coherent, non-redundant educational experience throughout a space, regardless of a learner's chosen path. The app that runs on the mobile device works in tandem with a server-side database and file-serving system that can be configured through a web-based GUI, and so content creators can easily populate and configure content with the system. Once the database has been updated, the new content is immediately available to the mobile devices when they arrive at the location at which content is required. Such a system serves as a platform for the development of field-based geoscience educational experiences, in which students can organically learn about core concepts at particular locations while individually exploring a space.

  16. Mobile Game Development for Multiple Devices in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baltasar Fernández-Manjón

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Mobile learning and educational gaming are two trends that are rapidly having an increasing impact in Technology-Enhanced Learning. However, both approaches present significant technological challenges. Mobile technologies are very diverse and the market pressure pushes the continuous development of new technologies and features. On the other hand, game-based learning needs to deal with enormous development costs and the problem of allowing instructors and experts to actively participate in the game development process. Moreover, there are numerous situations where bringing both approaches together could be very useful, but this combination magnifies the technological barriers previously described. In this work we present , an authoring environment for educational adventure games that supports the production of both desktop and mobile games. This framework provides a graphical environment that allows instructors to create their own educational games with a low cost. Then, the games can be exported to multiple formats, including support for diverse types of mobile platforms. This is achieved through a modular semi-automated exportation process, which is based on mobile device profiles.

  17. Increasing physical activity with mobile devices: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanning, Jason; Mullen, Sean P; McAuley, Edward

    2012-11-21

    Regular physical activity has established physical and mental health benefits; however, merely one quarter of the U.S. adult population meets national physical activity recommendations. In an effort to engage individuals who do not meet these guidelines, researchers have utilized popular emerging technologies, including mobile devices (ie, personal digital assistants [PDAs], mobile phones). This study is the first to synthesize current research focused on the use of mobile devices for increasing physical activity. To conduct a meta-analysis of research utilizing mobile devices to influence physical activity behavior. The aims of this review were to: (1) examine the efficacy of mobile devices in the physical activity setting, (2) explore and discuss implementation of device features across studies, and (3) make recommendations for future intervention development. We searched electronic databases (PubMed, PsychINFO, SCOPUS) and identified publications through reference lists and requests to experts in the field of mobile health. Studies were included that provided original data and aimed to influence physical activity through dissemination or collection of intervention materials with a mobile device. Data were extracted to calculate effect sizes for individual studies, as were study descriptives. A random effects meta-analysis was conducted using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software suite. Study quality was assessed using the quality of execution portion of the Guide to Community Preventative Services data extraction form. Four studies were of "good" quality and seven of "fair" quality. In total, 1351 individuals participated in 11 unique studies from which 18 effects were extracted and synthesized, yielding an overall weight mean effect size of g = 0.54 (95% CI = 0.17 to 0.91, P = .01). Research utilizing mobile devices is gaining in popularity, and this study suggests that this platform is an effective means for influencing physical activity behavior. Our focus

  18. Unsupervised Power Profiling for Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Blunck, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    power savings while at the same time maintaining good quality of service. This paper proposes an unsupervised API-level method for power profiling mobile phones based on genetic algorithms. The method enables accurate profiling of the power consumption of devices and thereby provides the information......Today, power consumption is a main limitation for mobile phones. To minimize the power consumption of popular and traditionally power-hungry location-based services requires knowledge of how individual phone features consume power, so that those features can be utilized intelligently for optimal...... needed by methods that aim to minimize the power consumption of location-based and other services....

  19. Unsupervised Power Profiling for Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Blunck, Henrik

    power savings while at the same time maintaining good quality of service. This paper proposes an unsupervised API-level method for power profiling mobile phones based on genetic algorithms. The method enables accurate profiling of the power consumption of devices and thereby provides the information......Today, power consumption is a main limitation for mobile phones. To minimize the power consumption of popular and traditionally power-hungry location-based services requires knowledge of how individual phone features consume power, so that those features can be utilized intelligently for optimal...... needed by methods that aim to minimize the power consumption of location-based and other services....

  20. Liposuction devices: technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridharani, Sachin M; Broyles, Justin M; Matarasso, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Since its introduction by Illouz and others over 30 years ago, suction-assisted lipectomy/liposuction/lipoplasty has evolved tremendously and has developed into one of the most popular procedures in aesthetic plastic surgery. Liposuction is an effective procedure employed to treat localized adipose deposits in patients not suffering from generalized obesity. These accumulations of subcutaneous fat often occur in predictable distributions in both men and women. A cannula connected to a suction-generating source allows for small incisions to be strategically placed and large volumes of fat to be removed. This fat removal leads to improved harmonious balance of a patient’s physique and improved body contour. Various surgical techniques are available and have evolved as technology has improved. Current technology for liposuction includes suction-assisted lipectomy, ultrasound-assisted, power-assisted, laser-assisted, and radiofrequency-assisted. The choice of technology and technique often depends on patient characteristics and surgeon preference. The objective of this review is to provide a thorough assessment of current technologies available to plastic surgeons performing liposuction. PMID:25093000

  1. Liposuction devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shridharani SM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sachin M Shridharani,1 Justin M Broyles,2 Alan Matarasso11The Department of Plastic Surgery, Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, New York, NY, USA; 2The Department of Plastic Surgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Since its introduction by Illouz and others over 30 years ago, suction-assisted lipectomy/liposuction/lipoplasty has evolved tremendously and has developed into one of the most popular procedures in aesthetic plastic surgery. Liposuction is an effective procedure employed to treat localized adipose deposits in patients not suffering from generalized obesity. These accumulations of subcutaneous fat often occur in predictable distributions in both men and women. A cannula connected to a suction-generating source allows for small incisions to be strategically placed and large volumes of fat to be removed. This fat removal leads to improved harmonious balance of a patient's physique and improved body contour. Various surgical techniques are available and have evolved as technology has improved. Current technology for liposuction includes suction-assisted lipectomy, ultrasound-assisted, power-assisted, laser-assisted, and radiofrequency-assisted. The choice of technology and technique often depends on patient characteristics and surgeon preference. The objective of this review is to provide a thorough assessment of current technologies available to plastic surgeons performing liposuction.Keywords: laser, lipoplasty, mesotherapy, power-assisted, radiofrequency, ultrasound, water-assisted, coolsculpting

  2. Mobile Learning and Integration of Mobile Technologies in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Bhargava, Malini

    2014-01-01

    Mobile technologies have a huge potential to transform education provided these technologies are designed and implemented in such a way that they are relevant to the social and cultural context of learning. Clearly, the application, implementation, and design of mobile technology in the global educational context pose technological and…

  3. 5G technologies boosting efficient mobile learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leligou Helen C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The needs for education, learning and training proliferate primarily due to the facts that economy becomes more and more knowledge based (mandating continuous lifelong learning and people migrate among countries, which introduces the need for learning other languages, for training on different skills and learning about the new cultural and societal framework. Given that in parallel, time schedules continuously become tighter, learning through mobile devices continuously gains in popularity as it allows for learning anytime, anywhere. To increase the learning efficiency, personalisation (in terms of selecting the learning content, type and presentation and adaptation of the learning experience in real time based on the experienced affect state are key instruments. All these user requirements challenge the current network architectures and technologies. In this paper, we investigate the requirements implied by efficient mobile learning scenarios and we explore how 5G technologies currently under design/testing/validation and standardisation meet these requirements.

  4. TABLET (MOBILE TECHNOLOGY FOR PROFESSIONAL MUSIC EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunova Irina B.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights issues associated with the introduction of cloud-centric and tablet (mobile devices in music education, use of which confronts the teacher-musician fundamentally new challenges. So, it's a development of practical teaching skills with the assistance of modern technology, a search of approaches to the organization of educational process, a creation of conditions for the continuity between traditional music learning and information technologies in educational process. Authors give the characteristics of cloud computing and the perspective of its use in music schools (distance learning, sharing, cloud services, etc.. Also you can see in this article the overview of some mobile applications (for OS Android and iOS and their use in the educational process.

  5. "I Just bought my residents iPads… now what?" The integration of mobile devices into radiology resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Harprit S; Yucel, Edgar K

    2013-10-01

    This article describes how mobile technologies can improve the way we teach radiology and offers ideas to bridge the clinical gap with technology. Radiology programs across the country are purchasing iPads and other mobile devices for their residents. Many programs, however, do not have a concrete vision for how a mobile device can enhance the learning environment.

  6. Huge music archives on mobile devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, H.; Bischl, B.; Botteck, M.

    2011-01-01

    The availability of huge nonvolatile storage capacities such as flash memory allows large music archives to be maintained even in mobile devices. With the increase in size, manual organization of these archives and manual search for specific music becomes very inconvenient. Automated dynamic...... organization enables an attractive new class of applications for managing ever-increasing music databases. For these types of applications, extraction of music features as well as subsequent feature processing and music classification have to be performed. However, these are computationally intensive tasks...... and difficult to tackle on mobile platforms. Against this background, we provided an overview of algorithms for music classification as well as their computation times and other hardware-related aspects, such as power consumption on various hardware architectures. For mobile platforms such as smartphones...

  7. Mobile devices, Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, and Digital Geoscience Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, H.; De Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Bentley, C.

    2016-12-01

    Mobile devices are playing an increasing role in geoscience education. Affordances include instructor-student communication and class management in large classrooms, virtual and augmented reality applications, digital mapping, and crowd-sourcing. Mobile technologies have spawned the sub field of mobile learning or m-learning, which is defined as learning across multiple contexts, through social and content interactions. Geoscientists have traditionally engaged in non-digital mobile learning via fieldwork, but digital devices are greatly extending the possibilities, especially for non-traditional students. Smartphones and tablets are the most common devices but smart glasses such as Pivothead enable live streaming of a first-person view (see for example, https://youtu.be/gWrDaYP5w58). Virtual reality headsets such as Google Cardboard create an immersive virtual field experience and digital imagery such as GigaPan and Structure from Motion enables instructors and/or students to create virtual specimens and outcrops that are sharable across the globe. Whereas virtual reality (VR) replaces the real world with a virtual representation, augmented reality (AR) overlays digital data on the live scene visible to the user in real time. We have previously reported on our use of the AR application called FreshAiR for geoscientific "egg hunts." The popularity of Pokémon Go demonstrates the potential of AR for mobile learning in the geosciences.

  8. A scoping review on smart mobile devices and physical strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeier, Patricia

    2018-01-01

    Smart mobile devices gain increasing importance at work. Integrating these smart mobile devices into the workplace creates new opportunities and challenges for occupational health and safety. Therefore the aim of the following scoping review was to identify ergonomic challenges with the use of smart mobile devices at work with respect to physical problems. A review of 36 papers based on literature including January 2016 was conducted. Biomechanical measures in the reviewed studies demonstrated i.e., head flexion angles exceeding 20° in 20 out of 26 different conditions described. Furthermore, laterally deviated wrists were frequently noted and thumb and finger flexor muscle activities generally greater than 5% MVC were reported. The reviewed literature indicated an elevated biomechanical risk, especially for the neck, the wrists and thumb. This was due to poor posture, ongoing and intermitted muscle tension, and/or repetitive movements. Papers addressing specific risks for smartphone and tablet use in different work environments are scarce. As the technology, as well as the use of smart mobile devices is rapidly changing, further research, especially for prolonged periods in the workplace is needed.

  9. Optimization Techniques for 3D Graphics Deployment on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskela, Timo; Vatjus-Anttila, Jarkko

    2015-03-01

    3D Internet technologies are becoming essential enablers in many application areas including games, education, collaboration, navigation and social networking. The use of 3D Internet applications with mobile devices provides location-independent access and richer use context, but also performance issues. Therefore, one of the important challenges facing 3D Internet applications is the deployment of 3D graphics on mobile devices. In this article, we present an extensive survey on optimization techniques for 3D graphics deployment on mobile devices and qualitatively analyze the applicability of each technique from the standpoints of visual quality, performance and energy consumption. The analysis focuses on optimization techniques related to data-driven 3D graphics deployment, because it supports off-line use, multi-user interaction, user-created 3D graphics and creation of arbitrary 3D graphics. The outcome of the analysis facilitates the development and deployment of 3D Internet applications on mobile devices and provides guidelines for future research.

  10. Student Use of Mobile Devices in University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Neil; Rees, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly used by students in university lectures. This has resulted in controversy and the banning of mobile devices in some lectures. Although there has been some research into how students use laptop computers in lectures, there has been little investigation into the wider use of mobile devices. This study was designed to…

  11. Proactive, Preventive or Indifference? Reaction Modes of Faculty towards Use of Personal Mobile Devices in Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forkosh-Baruch, Alona; Meishar-Tal, Hagit

    2016-01-01

    Students enter classes with mobile devices and use them for learning; however, these are also distracting devices. Some teacher educators display positive attitudes; others display negative attitudes, depending on their perception of the advantages and disadvantages of mobile technology for learning. This paper represents findings of a study that…

  12. Power Management of MEMS-Based Storage Devices for Mobile Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khatib, M.G.; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2008-01-01

    Because of its small form factor, high capacity, and expected low cost, MEMS-based storage is a suitable storage technology for mobile systems. MEMS-based storage devices should also be energy efficient for deployment in mobile systems. The problem is that MEMS-based storage devices are mechanical,

  13. Integrating Touch-Enabled and Mobile Devices into Contemporary Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meletiou-Mavrotheris, Maria, Ed.; Mavrou, Katerina, Ed.; Paparistodemou, Efi, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Despite increased interest in mobile devices as learning tools, the amount of available primary research studies on their integration into mathematics teaching and learning is still relatively small due to the novelty of these technologies. "Integrating Touch-Enabled and Mobile Devices into Contemporary Mathematics Education" presents…

  14. Effectiveness of Mobile Devices on Vocabulary Learning: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Hassan Saleh

    2018-01-01

    Mobile devices are considered as the most widely used information and communication technologies. They have provided great advantages in language learning. This study reports a meta-analysis of the effectiveness of using mobile devices on vocabulary learning. A meta-analysis was conducted on research that compared the outcomes from students…

  15. Mobile health devices: will patients actually use them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ryan J; Steinberg, Dori M; Bonnet, Jonathan; Modarai, Farhad; George, Aaron; Cunningham, Traven; Mason, Markedia; Shahsahebi, Mohammad; Grambow, Steven C; Bennett, Gary G; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2016-05-01

    Although mobile health (mHealth) devices offer a unique opportunity to capture patient health data remotely, it is unclear whether patients will consistently use multiple devices simultaneously and/or if chronic disease affects adherence. Three healthy and three chronically ill participants were recruited to provide data on 11 health indicators via four devices and a diet app. The healthy participants averaged overall weekly use of 76%, compared to 16% for those with chronic illnesses. Device adherence declined across all participants during the study. Patients with chronic illnesses, with arguably the most to benefit from advanced (or increased) monitoring, may be less likely to adopt and use these devices compared to healthy individuals. Results suggest device fatigue may be a significant problem. Use of mobile technologies may have the potential to transform care delivery across populations and within individuals over time. However, devices may need to be tailored to meet the specific patient needs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Extraglottic airway devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma B

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bimla Sharma, Chand Sahai, Jayashree Sood Department of Anaesthesiology, Pain and Perioperative Medicine, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital, New Delhi, India Abstract: Extraglottic airway devices (EADs have revolutionized the field of airway management. The invention of the laryngeal mask airway was a game changer, and since then, there have been several innovations to improve the EADs in design, functionality, safety and construction material. These have ranged from changes in the shape of the mask, number of cuffs and material used, like rubber, polyvinylchloride and latex. Phthalates, which were added to the construction material in order to increase device flexibility, were later omitted when this chemical was found to have serious adverse reproductive outcomes. The various designs brought out by numerous companies manufacturing EADs resulted in the addition of several devices to the airway market. These airway devices were put to use, many of them with inadequate or no evidence base regarding their efficacy and safety. To reduce the possibility of compromising the safety of the patient, the Difficult Airway Society (DAS formed the Airway Device Evaluation Project Team (ADEPT to strengthen the evidence base for airway equipment and vet the new extraglottic devices. A preuse careful analysis of the design and structure may help in better understanding of the functionality of a particular device. In the meantime, the search for the ideal EAD continues. Keywords: extraglottic airway devices, laryngeal mask airway, other extraglottic airway devices, safety, technology update

  17. Personal Area Networks in Tactical Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    1). NFC allows a device to read radio-frequency identification ( RFID ) tags or communicate with another NFC-enabled device using a set of standards...networking technology should be used rather than an alternative method. METHOD For the first object, an Android library was written and integrated...AND SUMMARY The PAN library was designed to reduce the impact on implementing apps. Therefore, the impact on time and effort is minimal. The app only

  18. Mobile Computing: The Emerging Technology, Sensing, Challenges and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezboruah, T.

    2010-12-01

    The mobile computing is a computing system in which a computer and all necessary accessories like files and software are taken out to the field. It is a system of computing through which it is being able to use a computing device even when someone being mobile and therefore changing location. The portability is one of the important aspects of mobile computing. The mobile phones are being used to gather scientific data from remote and isolated places that could not be possible to retrieve by other means. The scientists are initiating to use mobile devices and web-based applications to systematically explore interesting scientific aspects of their surroundings, ranging from climate change, environmental pollution to earthquake monitoring. This mobile revolution enables new ideas and innovations to spread out more quickly and efficiently. Here we will discuss in brief about the mobile computing technology, its sensing, challenges and the applications. (author)

  19. Combining internet technology and mobile phones for emergency response management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palsson, S.E.

    2002-12-01

    The report is intended for persons involved in radiological emergency response management. An introduction is given to the technical basis of the mobile Internet and ongoing development summarised. Examples are given describing how mobile Internet technology has been used to improve monitoring media coverage of incidents and events, and a test is described where web based information was selectively processed and made available to WAP enabled mobile phones. The report concludes with recommendations stressing the need for following mobile Internet developments and taking them into account when designing web applications for radiological response management. Doing so can make web based material accessible to mobile devices at minimal additional cost. (au)

  20. Transmitting patient and device data via GSM--central management for decentral mobile medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmor, T; Schöchlin, J; Bolz, A

    2002-01-01

    Equipping medical devices with long range telemetry opens completely new possibilities for emergency response, home care and remote diagnosis. Mobile communications nowadays seem to be a generally accepted part of our modern world, but bridging the gap between new (consumer-) technologies and medical devices still is a challenge today. Providing a telemetry link (GSM) is just the trivial part--ensuring security, reliability and service management are the more critical tasks that need to be addressed. Therefore, a complete system concept consists of an automatic fleet management (e.g. periodic device-initiated service calls) as well as customer relationship management (CRM), including technical service and a trouble-ticket system.

  1. Smart dental practice: capitalising on smart mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plangger, K; Bredican, J; Mills, A J; Armstrong, J

    2015-08-14

    To keep pace with consumer adoption of smart mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, and the applications ('apps') developed for these devices, dental professionals should consider how this technology could be used to simultaneously improve both patient service experiences and dental practice management. Using U-Commerce as a theoretical lens, this article discusses the potential value of smart mobile technology to the dental practice context, with a particular focus on the unique and customisable capabilities of apps. To take full advantage of this technology, a process is outlined for identifying and designing bespoke dental apps that takes into account the unique advantages of these devices. Dental practices, with increasing financial and competitive pressures, may improve the efficiency and profitability of operations and better manage patients, employees and stakeholders by integrating smart mobile technology.

  2. Agile application development for mobile devices. Case study: Mobile taximeter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica María Babativa Goyeneche

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Context: Globalization has affected all productive sectors and in particular the software industry, which has required the development of new methodologies to suit the speed of the changes and allow quickly build products that meet the requirements of the customers. On the other hand, the GPS technology, 4G connectivity and integration of social networks that have the most current mobile phones have opened a large field of application, particularly in the area of the transport, mobility and citizen complaint, whose development can be successfully addressed through an agile methodology. Method: Agile methodology Scrum was used for the development of a mobile application on the Android operating system and GPS technology, which allows a Bogota taxi user to monitor the route and send a complaint to the social network Twitter in case of nonconformity. Some UML models were used for analysis and design of the application, and a confidence interval was used to validate the results. Results: Prototype of a mobile taximeter developed with an agile methodology that meets quality characteristics, extensibility and maintainability. T-student distribution was used to validate the measurement of the prototype on 50 samples, concluding that the difference between the measurement of a real taximeter and our mobile taximeter is on average 2 units with a standard deviation of 1,39 units. Conclusions: It is shown that with the agile development can be combined with UML modeling tools and statistical validation techniques for quality products that do not violate, but on the contrary, that reaffirm the agile development principles.

  3. The Analysis of New Generation Mobile Device Dependencies of Students in Faculty of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korucu, Agah Tugrul; Usta, Ertugrul

    2016-01-01

    The development of technology brought about some advantages as well as particular disadvantages. Smart phones which are new generation mobile devices are technological tools for meeting certain needs such as entertainment, social media, realization of daily routines and usage for educational purposes. The facts that new generation mobile devices…

  4. Investigating Mobile Devices Integration in Higher Education in Cyprus: Faculty Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikleia Eteokleous

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices are everywhere and mobile learning has emerged as a potential educational environment; however it is relatively new to Cyprus educational system. The purpose of this research work is to assess and determine the readiness; and evaluate the viability of integrating mobile technology in Cyprus higher education level. To address the above, a mixed method approach is employed making use of quantitative and qualitative data from faculty members working in three private universities in Cyprus. Faculty reactions were mixed with some of them seeing the benefits for mobile learning while others have doubts. The results summarize the technological and pedagogical aspects to be considered prior integrating mobile devices. Additionally, the study supports that one of the major barriers to educators is the lack of understanding regarding mobile devices integration in the teaching and learning process. Finally, there is a need to develop well-defined and well-structured requirements for mobile integration in the classroom.

  5. Connecting Health and Technology (CHAT): protocol of a randomized controlled trial to improve nutrition behaviours using mobile devices and tailored text messaging in young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasing intakes of fruits and vegetables intake, in tandem with reducing consumption of energy-dense and nutrient poor foods and beverages are dietary priorities to prevent chronic disease. Although most adults do not eat enough fruit and vegetables, teenagers and young adults tend to have the lowest intakes. Young adults typically consume a diet which is inconsistent with the dietary recommendations. Yet little is known about the best approaches to improve dietary intakes and behaviours among this group. This randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of using a mobile device to assess dietary intake, provide tailored dietary feedback and text messages to motivate changes in fruit, vegetable and junk food consumption among young adults. Methods/design The CHAT project will involve the development of the mobile device food record (MDFR), and evaluation of dietary feedback and implementation of a 6-month intervention in young adults aged 18 to 30 years. The participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups (1) Intervention Group 1: MDFR + Text Messages + Dietary Feedback; (2) Intervention Group 2: MDFR + Dietary Feedback; (3) Control Group 3: MDFR, no feedback. All groups will undertake a 3-day dietary record using the MDFR but only the Intervention Groups 1 and 2 will receive tailored dietary feedback at baseline and at 6-months which will consist of assessment of serves of fruits, vegetables and junk food in comparison to dietary recommendations. Tailored nutrition text messages will be sent to Intervention Group 1 over the 6 months. Data will be collected at baseline and again at the 6-month completion. Discussion This trial will test if applications running on mobile devices have potential to assess diet, provide tailored feedback and nutrition messages as an effective way of improving fruit and vegetable consumption and reducing energy-dense nutrient poor foods in young adults. The CHAT project will assess the

  6. Connecting Health and Technology (CHAT): protocol of a randomized controlled trial to improve nutrition behaviours using mobile devices and tailored text messaging in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Deborah A; Pollard, Christina M; Howat, Peter; Delp, Edward J; Pickering, Mark; Kerr, Katherine R; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Pratt, Iain S; Wright, Janine; Boushey, Carol J

    2012-06-22

    Increasing intakes of fruits and vegetables intake, in tandem with reducing consumption of energy-dense and nutrient poor foods and beverages are dietary priorities to prevent chronic disease. Although most adults do not eat enough fruit and vegetables, teenagers and young adults tend to have the lowest intakes. Young adults typically consume a diet which is inconsistent with the dietary recommendations. Yet little is known about the best approaches to improve dietary intakes and behaviours among this group. This randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of using a mobile device to assess dietary intake, provide tailored dietary feedback and text messages to motivate changes in fruit, vegetable and junk food consumption among young adults. The CHAT project will involve the development of the mobile device food record (MDFR), and evaluation of dietary feedback and implementation of a 6-month intervention in young adults aged 18 to 30 years. The participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups (1) Intervention Group 1: MDFR + Text Messages + Dietary Feedback; (2) Intervention Group 2: MDFR + Dietary Feedback; (3) Control Group 3: MDFR, no feedback. All groups will undertake a 3-day dietary record using the MDFR but only the Intervention Groups 1 and 2 will receive tailored dietary feedback at baseline and at 6-months which will consist of assessment of serves of fruits, vegetables and junk food in comparison to dietary recommendations. Tailored nutrition text messages will be sent to Intervention Group 1 over the 6 months. Data will be collected at baseline and again at the 6-month completion. This trial will test if applications running on mobile devices have potential to assess diet, provide tailored feedback and nutrition messages as an effective way of improving fruit and vegetable consumption and reducing energy-dense nutrient poor foods in young adults. The CHAT project will assess the impact of the intervention on behavioural

  7. Connecting Health and Technology (CHAT: protocol of a randomized controlled trial to improve nutrition behaviours using mobile devices and tailored text messaging in young adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerr Deborah A

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing intakes of fruits and vegetables intake, in tandem with reducing consumption of energy-dense and nutrient poor foods and beverages are dietary priorities to prevent chronic disease. Although most adults do not eat enough fruit and vegetables, teenagers and young adults tend to have the lowest intakes. Young adults typically consume a diet which is inconsistent with the dietary recommendations. Yet little is known about the best approaches to improve dietary intakes and behaviours among this group. This randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of using a mobile device to assess dietary intake, provide tailored dietary feedback and text messages to motivate changes in fruit, vegetable and junk food consumption among young adults. Methods/design The CHAT project will involve the development of the mobile device food record (MDFR, and evaluation of dietary feedback and implementation of a 6-month intervention in young adults aged 18 to 30 years. The participants will be randomly assigned to one of three groups (1 Intervention Group 1: MDFR + Text Messages + Dietary Feedback; (2 Intervention Group 2: MDFR + Dietary Feedback; (3 Control Group 3: MDFR, no feedback. All groups will undertake a 3-day dietary record using the MDFR but only the Intervention Groups 1 and 2 will receive tailored dietary feedback at baseline and at 6-months which will consist of assessment of serves of fruits, vegetables and junk food in comparison to dietary recommendations. Tailored nutrition text messages will be sent to Intervention Group 1 over the 6 months. Data will be collected at baseline and again at the 6-month completion. Discussion This trial will test if applications running on mobile devices have potential to assess diet, provide tailored feedback and nutrition messages as an effective way of improving fruit and vegetable consumption and reducing energy-dense nutrient poor foods in young adults. The CHAT

  8. A new challenge for advertising on mobile devices: Social TV

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia Quintas-Froufe; Ana González-Neira

    2015-01-01

    Mobile device advertising is a rapidly growing market due to the penetration of mobile devices in Spanish society. Advertising communication in this digital ecosystem continually poses new challenges. One of these - the subject of this proposal - is the link-up between mobile advertising with social TV. It opens up new possibilities for the development of advertising strategies on mobile devices.The aim of this paper is to describe the challenges faced by the Spanish advertising industry with...

  9. Observations on Power-Efficiency Trends in Mobile Communication Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Jyrkkä

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Computing solutions used in mobile communications equipment are similar to those in personal and mainframe computers. The key differences between the implementations at chip level are the low leakage silicon technology and lower clock frequency used in mobile devices. The hardware and software architectures, including the operating system principles, are strikingly similar, although the mobile computing systems tend to rely more on hardware accelerators. As the performance expectations of mobile devices are increasing towards the personal computer level and beyond, power efficiency is becoming a major bottleneck. So far, the improvements of the silicon processes in mobile phones have been exploited by software designers to increase functionality and to cut development time, while usage times, and energy efficiency, have been kept at levels that satisfy the customers. Here we explain some of the observed developments and consider means of improving energy efficiency. We show that both processor and software architectures have a big impact on power consumption. Properly targeted research is needed to find the means to explicitly optimize system designs for energy efficiency, rather than maximize the nominal throughputs of the processor cores used.

  10. Observations on Power-Efficiency Trends in Mobile Communication Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrkkä Kari

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Computing solutions used in mobile communications equipment are similar to those in personal and mainframe computers. The key differences between the implementations at chip level are the low leakage silicon technology and lower clock frequency used in mobile devices. The hardware and software architectures, including the operating system principles, are strikingly similar, although the mobile computing systems tend to rely more on hardware accelerators. As the performance expectations of mobile devices are increasing towards the personal computer level and beyond, power efficiency is becoming a major bottleneck. So far, the improvements of the silicon processes in mobile phones have been exploited by software designers to increase functionality and to cut development time, while usage times, and energy efficiency, have been kept at levels that satisfy the customers. Here we explain some of the observed developments and consider means of improving energy efficiency. We show that both processor and software architectures have a big impact on power consumption. Properly targeted research is needed to find the means to explicitly optimize system designs for energy efficiency, rather than maximize the nominal throughputs of the processor cores used.

  11. Experience-Sampling Methodology with a Mobile Device in Fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castilla Diana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the usability studies conducted in the development of an experience-sampling methodology (ESM system running in a mobile device. The goal of the system is to improve the accuracy and ecology in gathering daily self-report data in individuals suffering a chronic pain condition, fibromyalgia. The usability studies showed that the developed software to conduct ESM with mobile devices (smartphones, cell phones can be successfully used by individuals with fibromyalgia of different ages and with low level of expertise in the use of information and communication technologies. 100% of users completed the tasks successfully, although some have completely illiterate. Also there seems to be a clear difference in the way of interaction obtained in the two studies carried out.

  12. Developing Digital Privacy: Children's Moral Judgments Concerning Mobile GPS Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Susan A; Martinez, Megan; Davidson, Natalie S; Noles, Nicholaus S

    2018-01-01

    New technology poses new moral problems for children to consider. We examined whether children deem object tracking with a mobile GPS device to be a property right. In three experiments, 329 children (4-10 years) and adults were asked whether it is acceptable to track the location of either one's own or another person's possessions using a mobile GPS device. Young children, like adults, viewed object tracking as relatively more acceptable for owners than nonowners. However, whereas adults expressed negative evaluations of someone tracking another person's possessions, young children expressed positive evaluations of this behavior. These divergent moral judgments of digital tracking at different ages have profound implications for how concepts of digital privacy develop and for the digital security of children. © 2017 The Authors. Child Development © 2017 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  13. OER in the Mobile Era: Content Repositories’ Features for Mobile Devices and Future Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Tabuenca, Bernardo; Drachsler, Hendrik; Ternier, Stefaan; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Tabuenca, B., Drachsler, H., Ternier, S., & Specht, M. (2012, December). OER in the Mobile Era: Content Repositories’ Features for Mobile Devices and Future Trends. Europe eleaning papers, [Special issue] Mobile learning 2012.

  14. Features of Mobile Devices and Its Implications into Education: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Derya IŞIK

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Computers have changed such as the size, weight and usefulness, and they have become portable devices with the developing technology. This has led to the creation of mobile learning concepts. Devices supporting mobile learning are called mobile devices such as PDAs, Smart Phones, Netbooks, and Tablet PC etc. Computers use in educational environments as it is devices that enrich the educational process, grant to a student-centered education, and facilitate access to sources of information, support individual and lifelong learning. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the education supported of mobile devices and to use of mobile devices in education. For this purpose, the literature examined is about the subject and the data obtained from literature have been discussion under the headings, reading, writing, communication, interaction and integration.

  15. The state of ergonomics for mobile computing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennerlein, Jack T

    2015-01-01

    Because mobile computing technologies, such as notebook computers, smart mobile phones, and tablet computers afford users many different configurations through their intended mobility, there is concern about their effects on musculoskeletal pain and a need for usage recommendations. Therefore the main goal of this paper to determine which best practices surrounding the use of mobile computing devices can be gleaned from current field and laboratory studies of mobile computing devices. An expert review was completed. Field studies have documented various user configurations, which often include non-neutral postures, that users adopt when using mobile technology, along with some evidence suggesting that longer duration of use is associated with more discomfort. It is therefore prudent for users to take advantage of their mobility and not get stuck in any given posture for too long. The use of accessories such as appropriate cases or riser stands, as well as external keyboards and pointing devices, can also improve postures and comfort. Overall, the state of ergonomics for mobile technology is a work in progress and there are more research questions to be addressed.

  16. 30 CFR 77.410 - Mobile equipment; automatic warning devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mobile equipment; automatic warning devices. 77... UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Safeguards for Mechanical Equipment § 77.410 Mobile equipment; automatic warning devices. (a) Mobile equipment such as front-end loaders, forklifts, tractors, graders, and trucks, except...

  17. Mobile Sensor Technologies Being Developed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Lawrence C.; Oberle, Lawrence G.

    2003-01-01

    central command location. Web-based control and interrogation of similar mobile sensor platforms have also been demonstrated. Expected applications of this technology include robotic planetary exploration, astronaut-to-equipment communication, and remote aerospace engine inspections.

  18. Towards Interaction Around Unmodified Camera-equipped Mobile Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Grubert, Jens; Ofek, Eyal; Pahud, Michel; Kranz, Matthias; Schmalstieg, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Around-device interaction promises to extend the input space of mobile and wearable devices beyond the common but restricted touchscreen. So far, most around-device interaction approaches rely on instrumenting the device or the environment with additional sensors. We believe, that the full potential of ordinary cameras, specifically user-facing cameras, which are integrated in most mobile devices today, are not used to their full potential, yet. We To this end, we present a novel approach for...

  19. Leveraging mobile computing and communication technologies in education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Annan, Nana Kofi

    these ubiquitous ICTs can be used to facilitate teaching and learning, based on a conceptual framework, which uses mobile learning platform to supplement traditional face-to-face method of education. The study uses both qualitative and quantitative data with action research as the strategy of inquiry. The study......The emergence of mobile computing and communication technologies has come with it, an unprecedented transformation in digitalising every aspect of human activities. This transformation has brought about a high degree of mobility in the way knowledge is constructed, processed, stored...... and disseminated through the use of portable information and communication technologies (ICTs) such as smart phones, tablets, personal computers and laptop computers. These mobile devices use mobile communication infrastructure to promote the mobility affordances for human activities anywhere and anytime. Although...

  20. One-to-One Mobile Technology in High School Physics Classrooms: Understanding Its Use and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiaoming; Zhang, Meilan; Li, Min

    2018-01-01

    This study examined ways in which high school students used mobile devices in physics classrooms and after school, and the impact of in-class and after-school mobile technology use on their physics learning performance and interest. We collected data from 803 high school freshmen in China after they had used mobile devices for over five months. A…

  1. The impact of mobile technologies on tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Vítek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    The subject of this bachelor's thesis is mobile technology and its importance in tourism. Its aim is to determine how does mobile technology influence tourism, how can these technologies be used in practice and what are the possibilities for future use.

  2. Introducing Mobile Technology in Graduate Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gopesh; Chhajed, Dilip; Hong, Seung Won; Scagnoli, Norma

    2014-01-01

    The insertion of mobile technology in educational settings is becoming more prevalent, making it important to understand the effectiveness of such technology in enhancing students' learning and engagement. This article is based on research conducted to study the effects of the use of mobile technology--specifically iPads--by students in a graduate…

  3. Framework for the Integration of Mobile Device Features in PLM

    OpenAIRE

    Hopf, Jens Michael

    2016-01-01

    Currently, companies have covered their business processes with stationary workstations while mobile business applications have limited relevance. Companies can cover their overall business processes more time-efficiently and cost-effectively when they integrate mobile users in workflows using mobile device features. The objective is a framework that can be used to model and control business applications for PLM processes using mobile device features to allow a totally new user experience.

  4. Technology for the Next-Generation-Mobile User Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delagi, Greg

    The current mobile-handset market is a vital and growing one, being driven by technology advances, including increased bandwidth and processing performance, as well as reduced power consumption and improved screen technologies. The 3G/4G handsets of today are multimedia internet devices with increased screen size, HD video and gaming, interactive touch screens, HD camera and camcorders, as well as incredible social, entertainment, and productivity applications. While mobile-technology advancements to date have made us more social in many ways, new advancements over the next decade will bring us to the next level, allowing mobile users to experience new types of "virtual" social interactions with all the senses. The mobile handsets of the future will be smart autonomous-lifestyle devices with a multitude of incorporated sensors, applications and display options, all designed to make your life easier and more productive! With future display media, including 3D imaging, virtual interaction and conferencing will be possible, making every call feel like you are in the same room, providing an experience far beyond today's video conferencing technology. 3D touch-screen with integrated image-projection technologies will work in conjunction with gesturing to bring a new era of intuitive mobile device applications, interaction, and information sharing. Looking to the future, there are many challenges to be faced in delivering a smart mobile companion device that will meet the user demands. One demand will be for the availability of new and compelling services, and features on the "mobile companion". These mobile companions will be more than just Internet devices, and will function as on-the-go workstations, allowing users to function as if they were sitting in front of their computer in the office or at home. The massive amounts of data that will be transmitted through, to and from these mobile companions will require immense improvements in system performance, including

  5. Comparing Two Tools for Mobile-Device Forensics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This is where automatic triaging and categorization comes into play [20]. Work on datamining andmachine learning has helped advance the ability to...triage mobile devices and more efficiently find the content that would be of value on mobile devices [20]. Machine learning and data mining algorithms...mobile device images. Conversion was performed using an existing Python script that was written by Riqui Schwamm and Dr. Neil C. Rowe from NPS. "DFXML

  6. Dynamic Path Exploration on Mobile Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Birsak, Michael

    2017-03-31

    We present a novel framework for visualizing routes on mobile devices. Our framework is suitable for helping users explore their environment. First, given a starting point and a maximum route length, the system retrieves nearby points of interest (POIs). Second, we automatically compute an attractive walking path through the environment trying to pass by as many highly ranked POIs as possible. Third, we automatically compute a route visualization that shows the current user position, POI locations via pins, and detail lenses for more information about the POIs. The visualization is an animation of an orthographic map view that follows the current user position. We propose an optimization based on a binary integer program (BIP) that models multiple requirements for an effective placement of detail lenses. We show that our path computation method outperforms recently proposed methods and we evaluate the overall impact of our framework in two user studies.

  7. International Conference on Mobile and Wireless Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wattanapongsakorn, Naruemon; Joukov, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the peer-reviewed contributions of ICMWT2016, an international conference devoted to mobile and wireless technology. Researchers and professionals from academia and industry met to discuss the cutting-edge developments in the field. The book includes papers on mobile and wireless networks, the increasingly important security issues, data management, as well as the latest developments in mobile software development.

  8. Network Resource Awareness and Prediction on Mobile Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peddemors, A.J.H.

    2009-01-01

    In the past several years, personal mobile devices have developed rapidly as versatile computing platforms, capable of installing and running many different applications. Often, these devices are equipped with multiple (wireless) network interfaces supporting internet access through one or more

  9. Comparative Study of Elementary and Secondary Teacher Perceptions of Mobile Technology in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jong, David; Grundmeyer, Trent; Anderson, Chad

    2018-01-01

    More and more schools are implementing a 1:1 mobile device initiative for their students because the future of learning will have technology embedded within the curriculum. Teachers are often given the direction to utilize mobile devices in the classroom, but quite often educators do not understand the significance of this technology or agree with…

  10. Mobility management principle, technology and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Shanzhi; Hu, Bo; Ai, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This is the first book devoted to mobility management, covering the important principles, technologies and applications of mobility management based on years of academic research and industry experiences. The content is organized according to the reference models proposed by the authors, and emphasizes on technical principles rather than protocol details; a systematic and comprehensive introduction is presented yet without losing focuses; the existing technologies in cellular system, mobile Internet and IMS/SIP are also extensively compared. This book can be an indispensable reference for mobile communication engineers, computer network engineers, researchers and anyone else involved in academic, industrial and standardization activities on mobility management.

  11. An Efficient and Secure m-IPS Scheme of Mobile Devices for Human-Centric Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Sik Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent rapid developments in wireless and mobile IT technologies have led to their application in many real-life areas, such as disasters, home networks, mobile social networks, medical services, industry, schools, and the military. Business/work environments have become wire/wireless, integrated with wireless networks. Although the increase in the use of mobile devices that can use wireless networks increases work efficiency and provides greater convenience, wireless access to networks represents a security threat. Currently, wireless intrusion prevention systems (IPSs are used to prevent wireless security threats. However, these are not an ideal security measure for businesses that utilize mobile devices because they do not take account of temporal-spatial and role information factors. Therefore, in this paper, an efficient and secure mobile-IPS (m-IPS is proposed for businesses utilizing mobile devices in mobile environments for human-centric computing. The m-IPS system incorporates temporal-spatial awareness in human-centric computing with various mobile devices and checks users’ temporal spatial information, profiles, and role information to provide precise access control. And it also can extend application of m-IPS to the Internet of things (IoT, which is one of the important advanced technologies for supporting human-centric computing environment completely, for real ubiquitous field with mobile devices.

  12. Patterns of mobile device use by caregivers and children during meals in fast food restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radesky, Jenny S; Kistin, Caroline J; Zuckerman, Barry; Nitzberg, Katie; Gross, Jamie; Kaplan-Sanoff, Margot; Augustyn, Marilyn; Silverstein, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Mobile devices are a ubiquitous part of American life, yet how families use this technology has not been studied. We aimed to describe naturalistic patterns of mobile device use by caregivers and children to generate hypotheses about its effects on caregiver-child interaction. Using nonparticipant observational methods, we observed 55 caregivers eating with 1 or more young children in fast food restaurants in a single metropolitan area. Observers wrote detailed field notes, continuously describing all aspects of mobile device use and child and caregiver behavior during the meal. Field notes were then subjected to qualitative analysis using grounded theory methods to identify common themes of device use. Forty caregivers used devices during their meal. The dominant theme salient to mobile device use and caregiver-child interaction was the degree of absorption in devices caregivers exhibited. Absorption was conceptualized as the extent to which primary engagement was with the device, rather than the child, and was determined by frequency, duration, and modality of device use; child response to caregiver use, which ranged from entertaining themselves to escalating bids for attention, and how caregivers managed this behavior; and separate versus shared use of devices. Highly absorbed caregivers often responded harshly to child misbehavior. We documented a range of patterns of mobile device use, characterized by varying degrees of absorption. These themes may be used as a foundation for coding schemes in quantitative studies exploring device use and child outcomes.

  13. Mobile devices in the operating rooms: intended and unintended consequences for nurses’ work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sergeeva, A.; Aij, K.H.; van den Hooff, B.J.; Huysman, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the results of a case study of the consequences of mobile device use for the work practices of operating room nurses. The study identifies different patterns of mobile technology use by operating room nurses, including both work-related and non-work-related use. These patterns

  14. Patterns and Effectiveness of Mobile Device Usage by Japanese Undergraduates for L2 Acquisition Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, James W.; Lambacher, Stephen G.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile technologies, such as smartphones and tablets, are rapidly gaining popularity as an effective means to enhance foreign language learning. However, does the incorporation of these mobile devices really benefit the learner or simply satisfy the instructor's need to be innovative and ahead of the learning curve? The present study seeks to…

  15. Advances in mobile mapping technology

    CERN Document Server

    Tao; Li, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing availability of low-cost and portable sensors, mobile mapping has become more dynamic, and even pervasive. The book addresses a wide variety of research issues in the mobile mapping community, ranging from system development to sensor integration, imaging algorithms and mobile GIS applications.

  16. Utilization of Remote Experimentation in Mobile Devices for Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Rochadel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors intend to demonstrate the utilization of remote experimentation (RE using mobile computational devices in the Science areas of the elementary school, with the purpose to develop practices that will help in the assimilation process of the subjects taught in classroom seeking to interlink them with the daily students’ activities. Allying mobility with RE we intend to minimize the space-temporal barrier giving more availability and speed in the information access. The implemented architecture utilizes technologies and freely distributed softwares with open code resources besides remote experiments developed in the Laboratory of Remote Experimentation (RExLab of Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC, in Brazil, through the physical computation platform of the “open hardware” of construction of our own. The utilization of open code computational tools and the integration of hardware to the 3D virtual worlds, accessible through mobile devices, give to the project an innovative face with a high potential for reproducibility and reusability.

  17. A comparison of usability factors of four mobile devices for accessing healthcare information by adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, B; Lee, Y; Rodriguez, M; Tiase, V; Schnall, R

    2012-01-01

    Mobile health (mHealth) is a growing field aimed at developing mobile information and communication technologies for healthcare. Adolescents are known for their ubiquitous use of mobile technologies in everyday life. However, the use of mHealth tools among adolescents is not well described. We examined the usability of four commonly used mobile devices (an iPhone, an Android with touchscreen keyboard, an Android with built-in keyboard, and an iPad) for accessing healthcare information among a group of urban-dwelling adolescents. Guided by the FITT (Fit between Individuals, Task, and Technology) framework, a thinkaloud protocol was combined with a questionnaire to describe usability on three dimensions: 1) task-technology fit; 2) individual-technology fit; and 3) individual-task fit. For task-technology fit, we compared the efficiency, and effectiveness of each of the devices tested and found that the iPhone was the most usable had the fewest errors and prompts and had the lowest mean overall task time For individual-task fit, we compared efficiency and learnability measures by website tasks and found no statistically significant effect on tasks steps, task time and number of errors. Following our comparison of success rates by website tasks, we compared the difference between two mobile applications which were used for diet tracking and found statistically significant effect on tasks steps, task time and number of errors. For individual-technology fit, interface quality was significantly different across devices indicating that this is an important factor to be considered in developing future mobile devices. All of our users were able to complete all of the tasks, however the time needed to complete the tasks was significantly different by mobile device and mHealth application. Future design of mobile technology and mHealth applications should place particular importance on interface quality.

  18. Preservice Teachers' Experiences on Accessing Course Materials Using Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Zafer; Unal, Aslihan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates and reports the first time experiences of mobile device users accessing the course materials on both the web and mobile version of course management system (Web Moodle & Mobile Moodle) during an online course offered at the University of South Florida, St. Petersburg College of Education.

  19. Monitoring mobility assistive device use in post-stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boissy, Patrice; Hester, Todd; Sherrill, Delsey

    2007-01-01

    Mobility assistive devices (MAD) such as canes can improve mobility and allow independence in the performance of mobility-related tasks. The use of MAD is often prescribed for stroke survivors. Despite their acknowledged qualities, MAD in real life conditions are typically underutilized, misused ...

  20. User assistance for multitasking with interruptions on a mobile device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagata, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    Issues users have with use of the web on a mobile device can be attributed to difficulties with the mobile interface. A major challenge that we address is improving the user experience for handling of interruptions and multitasking when using the web in a mobile context. The usability issues with a

  1. User Assistance for Multitasking with Interruptions on a Mobile Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagata, S.F.

    2006-01-01

    Issues users have with use of the web on a mobile device can be attributed to difficulties with the mobile interface. A major challenge that we address is improving the user experience for handling of interruptions and multitasking when using the web in a mobile context. The usability issues with a

  2. Risks of carcinogenesis from electromagnetic radiation of mobile telephony devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymenko, I; Sidorik, E

    2010-07-01

    Intensive implementation of mobile telephony technology in everyday human life during last two decades has given a possibility for epidemiological estimation of long-term effects of chronic exposure of human organism to low-intensive microwave (MW) radiation. Latest epidemiological data reveal a significant increase in risk of development of some types of tumors in chronic (over 10 years) users of mobile phone. It was detected a significant increase in incidence of brain tumors (glioma, acoustic neuroma, meningioma), parotid gland tumor, seminoma in long-term users of mobile phone, especially in cases of ipsilateral use (case-control odds ratios from 1.3 up to 6.1). Two epidemiological studies have indicated a significant increase of cancer incidence in people living close to the mobile telephony base station as compared with the population from distant area. These data raise a question of adequacy of modern safety limits of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) exposure for humans. For today the limits were based solely on the conception of thermal mechanism of biological effects of RF/MW radiation. Meantime the latest experimental data indicate the significant metabolic changes in living cell under the low-intensive (non-thermal) EMR exposure. Among reproducible biological effects of low-intensive MWs are reactive oxygen species overproduction, heat shock proteins expression, DNA damages, apoptosis. The lack of generally accepted mechanism of biological effects of low-intensive non-ionizing radiation doesn't permit to disregard the obvious epidemiological and experimental data of its biological activity. Practical steps must be done for reasonable limitation of excessive EMR exposure, along with the implementation of new safety limits of mobile telephony devices radiation, and new technological decisions, which would take out the source of radiation from human brain.

  3. Improving vaccine registries through mobile technologies: a vision for mobile enhanced Immunization information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kumanan; Atkinson, Katherine M; Deeks, Shelley L; Crowcroft, Natasha S

    2016-01-01

    Immunization registries or information systems are critical to improving the quality and evaluating the ongoing success of immunization programs. However, the completeness of these systems is challenged by a myriad of factors including the fragmentation of vaccine administration, increasing mobility of individuals, new vaccine development, use of multiple products, and increasingly frequent changes in recommendations. Mobile technologies could offer a solution, which mitigates some of these challenges. Engaging individuals to have more control of their own immunization information using their mobile devices could improve the timeliness and accuracy of data in central immunization information systems. Other opportunities presented by mobile technologies that could be exploited to improve immunization information systems include mobile reporting of adverse events following immunization, the capacity to scan 2D barcodes, and enabling bidirectional communication between individuals and public health officials. Challenges to utilizing mobile solutions include ensuring privacy of data, access, and equity concerns, obtaining consent and ensuring adoption of technology at sufficiently high rates. By empowering individuals with their own health information, mobile technologies can also serve as a mechanism to transfer immunization information as individuals cross local, regional, and national borders. Ultimately, mobile enhanced immunization information systems can help realize the goal of the individual, the healthcare provider, and public health officials always having access to the same immunization information. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Mobile Technologies for Parent/Child Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarosh, Svetlana; Davis, Hilary; Modlitba, Paulina

    2009-01-01

    Children are one of the largest new user groups of mobile technology -- from phones to micro-laptops to electronic toys. These products are both lauded and criticized, especially when it comes to their role in education and learning. The need has never been greater to understand how...... these technologies are being designed and to evaluate their impact worldwide. Mobile Technology for Children brings together contributions from leaders in industry, non-profit organizations, and academia to offer practical solutions for the design and the future of mobile technology for children....

  5. Mobile Technologies & Academics: Do Students Use Mobile Technologies in Their Academic Lives and are Librarians Ready to Meet this Challenge?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Dresselhaus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report on two surveys and offer an introductory plan that librarians may use to begin implementing mobile access to selected library databases and services. Results from the first survey helped us to gain insight into where students at Utah State University (USU in Logan, Utah, stand regarding their use of mobile devices for academic activities in general and their desire for access to library services and resources in particular. A second survey, conducted with librarians, gave us an idea of the extent to which responding libraries offer mobile access, their future plans for mobile implementation, and their opinions about whether and how mobile technologies may be useful to library patrons. In the last segment of the paper, we outline steps librarians can take as they “go mobile.”

  6. Optimizing MEMS-Based Storage Devices for Mobile Battery-Powered Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khatib, M.G.; Hartel, Pieter H.

    An emerging storage technology, called MEMS-based storage, promises nonvolatile storage devices with ultrahigh density, high rigidity, a small form factor, and low cost. For these reasons, MEMS-based storage devices are suitable for battery-powered mobile systems such as PDAs. For deployment in such

  7. Relationships between Access to Mobile Devices, Student Self-Directed Learning, and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Scott R.; Reeve, Ed; Veon, Raymond; Goodridge, Wade; Lee, Victor; Nadelson, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Today's students are growing up in a world of constant connectivity, instant information, and ever-changing technological advancements. The increasingly ubiquitous nature of mobile devices among K-12 students has led many to argue for and against the inclusion of these devices in K-12 classrooms. Arguments in favor cite instant access to…

  8. Mobile Technologies in Schools: The Student Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Emma-Leigh; Robertson, Neville; Sargisson, Rebecca J.

    2017-01-01

    Intermediate and high school students spend a large amount of time using mobile devices (Lauricella, Cingel, Blackwell, Wartella, & Conway, 2014), and such devices are increasingly being integrated into our school system. We conducted a series of student-led focus groups, with this early adolescent cohort, in order to better understand their…

  9. USE OF MOBILE TECHNOLOGY IN BANKING SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIN ISAC

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology and applications of mobile phones offer many opportunities for businesses, they also presenting a continuous development and new challenges. Although this service is currently viewed with reluctance by customers, banks need to overcome this drawback and understand how this service can be combined with other alternative channels such as social media, to create value for customers. In this paper I presented information about present and perspectives in mobile applications industry, what can a mobile application do in banking, banking mobile applications in Romania, mobile banking applications worldwide.

  10. Missed Opportunity? Leveraging Mobile Technology to Reduce Racial Health Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Rashawn; Sewell, Abigail A; Gilbert, Keon L; Roberts, Jennifer D

    2017-10-01

    Blacks and Latinos are less likely than whites to access health insurance and utilize health care. One way to overcome some of these racial barriers to health equity may be through advances in technology that allow people to access and utilize health care in innovative ways. Yet, little research has focused on whether the racial gap that exists for health care utilization also exists for accessing health information online and through mobile technologies. Using data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS), we examine racial differences in obtaining health information online via mobile devices. We find that blacks and Latinos are more likely to trust online newspapers to get health information than whites. Minorities who have access to a mobile device are more likely to rely on the Internet for health information in a time of strong need. Federally insured individuals who are connected to mobile devices have the highest probability of reliance on the Internet as a go-to source of health information. We conclude by discussing the importance of mobile technologies for health policy, particularly related to developing health literacy, improving health outcomes, and contributing to reducing health disparities by race and health insurance status. Copyright © 2017 by Duke University Press.

  11. Mobile Technologies for Parent/Child Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarosh, Svetlana; Davis, Hilary; Modlitba, Paulina

    2009-01-01

    Children are one of the largest new user groups of mobile technology -- from phones to micro-laptops to electronic toys. These products are both lauded and criticized, especially when it comes to their role in education and learning. The need has never been greater to understand how these technol......Children are one of the largest new user groups of mobile technology -- from phones to micro-laptops to electronic toys. These products are both lauded and criticized, especially when it comes to their role in education and learning. The need has never been greater to understand how...... these technologies are being designed and to evaluate their impact worldwide. Mobile Technology for Children brings together contributions from leaders in industry, non-profit organizations, and academia to offer practical solutions for the design and the future of mobile technology for children....

  12. Mobile technologies in progress of teaching and learning: teaching mobility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osmar Hélio Alves Araújo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is a survey of basic education teachers in the municipality of Iguatu/CE and aimed to verify if teachers use mobile technology in the classroom as an educational resource, as well as investigate to what extent the professional qualifications of these professionals drives an authentic, autonomous teaching action before the harvest of mobile technologies. The subjects are teachers who work in elementary school. Methodologically, constitutes in a field research, with retaining the qualitative approach, aiming to enhance the school in contemporary times is addressed by changes brought to the company by the technological revolution, especially the proliferation of mobile technologies, which are driving changes in processes teaching and learning. We used semi structured and reflective interview as a technique for data collection. They have as the theoretical studies of Alarcão (2001, Freire (1987, 1992, 2001, Libâneo (2001, 2002, 2005, 2011, Nóvoa (2009, Tardif (2001 UNESCO (2013, Veen and Vrakking (2009. The results of the research showed that teachers, for the most part, do not use the apparatus of mobile technologies in pedagogical practice, and point to the picture of insufficient professional qualification for a teaching practice in the context of safe and educationally effectively technologies. However, this split ends, so in need of a continuous training process that deepens also in reality and knowledge that teachers have. As regard as pillars the changes that the current social context has experienced, among which we highlight the technological changes that proliferate dramatically.

  13. A new challenge for advertising on mobile devices: Social TV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Quintas-Froufe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile device advertising is a rapidly growing market due to the penetration of mobile devices in Spanish society. Advertising communication in this digital ecosystem continually poses new challenges. One of these - the subject of this proposal - is the link-up between mobile advertising with social TV. It opens up new possibilities for the development of advertising strategies on mobile devices.The aim of this paper is to describe the challenges faced by the Spanish advertising industry with the recent introduction of Social TV. Spain has one of the most developed Social TV sectors in Europe. It will provide a global overview of this new reality and uncover the new possibilities and main challenges for the development of advertising strategies for mobile devices. To this end we propose an examination of the perception of two of Spain’s major broadcasting empires, Atresmedia and Mediaset España, of this phenomenon.

  14. Mobilizing Senior Citizens in Co-Design of Mobile Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmborg, Lone; Gronvall, Erik; Messeter, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    This paper disseminates work from the European Give&Take project, which aims at co-designing service sharing among senior citizens based on a mobile and distributed platform. With this project as a frame, our paper addresses methodological considerations of participation in co-design for ageing....... Based on the notions of design culture, communities of everyday practice and situated elderliness we present accounts from two European countries, and discuss methodological issues related to mobilizing senior citizens in co-design work as they have manifested themselves and influenced the Give......&Take project. Challenges for mobilization are identified, based on an analysis of attitudes and values among design researchers and senior citizens. This analysis lead us to identify and discuss three strategies for mobilizing senior citizens in co-design of mobile technology: 1) Understanding being ‘elderly...

  15. Technologies of Mobility in the Americas: Introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vannini, Phillip; Budd, Lucy; Jensen, Ole B.

    2012-01-01

    Technics, technicians, and techniques form the three basic cornerstones of what this book is about. Whether it is cell phones or airplanes, passengers or magazine advertisements, what the chapters collected here have in common is a basic orientation towards technology as a set of relations....... This relational approach to technology demonstrates that technology is neither a utopian nor a dystopian force driving the universe towards progress or involution. For all the contributors to this book, what mobile communication technologies like smart phones and spatial mobility technologies like cars and ferry...

  16. Mobile authentication and access: any time, any place, any device?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Williams

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The move from IP-based authentication to that of federated access has seen the sector support single sign-on to web-based resources, but the simplified user experience is at risk due to the rapid growth of mobile platforms and increasing variety of accompanying access methods for such devices. The user authentication experience on mobile devices is often further complicated by the poor discovery and delivery design of websites. While the introduction of tools such as Raptor permit accurate tracking of usage statistics via the UK Access Management Federation, the variety of mobile authentication methods such as native apps on devices and device paring pose additional challenges to librarians trying to gather a complete picture of resource use within their institution. In this article we examine the access challenges posed by the explosion of mobile device use.

  17. Mobile phone social harms (mobile phone, communicative device or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the human inventions created in order to facilitate life but it became scourge for him is mobile phone. Ignorance on quality of using mobile phone and conscious use of it in inappropriate way will have consequences that it seems that it gradually becomes as social problem and harm. Author of this paper aims to warns ...

  18. Virtual reality for mobility devices: training applications and clinical research: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erren-Wolters, Cathelijne V.; van Dijk, Henk; de Kort, Alexander C.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Jannink, M.J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Virtual reality technology is an emerging technology that possibly can address the problems encountered in training (elderly) people to handle a mobility device. The objective of this review was to study different virtual reality training applications as well as their clinical implication for

  19. Technological Preferences, Levels of Utilization and Attitude of Students Towards Mobile Learning Technologies in Chartered Universities, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gitumu Mugo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The affordances of mobile technologies are being felt in many sectors of world’s economy including university education. By solving the limitations of fixed instructional technologies, mobile technologies have received ready acceptance in the education place. The purpose of the study was to investigate the student technological preferences, their levels of utilization as well as attitudes toward mobile technologies. The target population was 30,752 third year undergraduate students in Kenyan Universities. The participants (n = 375 were selected by systematic random sampling. They provided data using self-fill questionnaires. Results indicated that the smartphone was the most popular mobile device; Tecno was the most preferred handset brand; and Android was the most popular operating system. Safaricom was the dominant service provider amongst the student population. Regarding the levels of utilization of mobile technologies by students, it was concluded that though students use their mobile devices sufficiently, the use of the devices for accessing teaching and learning content was considerably low. On the attitude of students towards mobile technologies, it was observed that a sizeable number of students preferred to use the technologies over other existing instructional technologies. The findings of this study will be useful to instructional technologists, education policy makers, mobile handset manufacturers, mobile service providers and university managers as they partner to roll out digital learning infrastructure for Kenyan tertiary education.

  20. Mobile communications technology: The singular factor responsible ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigated the factors responsible for the growth of Internet usage on the African continent. The principal finding was that increasing growth of Internet usage is also down to one singular factor: mobile communications technology. The proliferation of mobile phone usage in Africa has resulted in the sustained ...

  1. A Remote User Authentication Scheme with Anonymity for Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soobok Shin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid growth of information technologies, mobile devices have been utilized in a variety of services such as e-commerce. When a remote server provides such e-commerce services to a user, it must verify the legitimacy of the user over an insecure communication channel. Therefore, remote user authentication has been widely deployed to verify the legitimacy of remote user login requests using mobile devices like smart cards. In this paper we propose a smart card-based authentication scheme that provides both user anonymity and mutual authentication between a remote server and a user. The proposed authentication scheme is a simple and efficient system applicable to the limited resource and low computing performance of the smart card. The proposed scheme provides not only resilience to potential attacks in the smart card-based authentication scheme, but also secure authentication functions. A smart card performs a simple one-way hash function, the operations of exclusive-or and concatenation in the authentication phase of the proposed scheme. The proposed scheme also provides user anonymity using a dynamic identity and key agreement, and secure password change.

  2. Improving diabetes management with mobile health technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieverdes, John C; Treiber, Frank; Jenkins, Carolyn

    2013-04-01

    Diabetes affects 25.8 million persons in the United States, and these persons make more than 35 million ambulatory care visits annually. Yet, less than half of persons with diabetes meet the recommended levels of A1C, blood pressure and lipid control. One innovative approach is to use mobile health technologies to help patients better manage their diabetes and related conditions, and 85% to 90% of patients have access to mobile health technology. A brief review of the guidelines for diabetes care and mobile health technology that can support the guidelines are reported related to (1) glycemic control and self-monitoring of blood glucose, (2) pharmacological approaches and medication management, (3) medical nutrition therapy, (4) physical activity and resistance training, (5) weight loss, (6) diabetes self-management education and (7) blood pressure control and hypertension. The patient and provider are encouraged to explore possibilities for mobile health technologies that can support behavior change.

  3. Using Mobile Devices in Physical Education to Enhance Learning and Physical Activity for At-Risk Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbone, Anne; Perez, Samantha L.; Virgilio, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to illustrate how a physical education program uses mobile devices to motivate at-risk girls attending an urban charter school. Permitting students to use mobile devices in physical education gives students a "technological freedom" that has been removed in other contexts. The apps described in this article…

  4. Using Mobile Devices and the Adobe Connect Web Conferencing Tool in the Assessment of EFL Student Teacher Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolona Lopez, Maria del Carmen; Ortiz, Margarita Elizabeth; Allen, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a project to use mobile devices and video conferencing technology in the assessment of student English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teacher performance on teaching practice in Ecuador. With the increasing availability of mobile devices with video recording facilities, it has become easier for trainers to capture teacher…

  5. 77 FR 35427 - Certain Mobile Devices, Associated Software, and Components Thereof Final Determination of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-744] Certain Mobile Devices, Associated... importation of certain mobile devices, associated software, and components thereof by reason of infringement... importation of certain mobile devices, associated software, and components thereof containing same by reason...

  6. No Free Charge Theorem: a Covert Channel via USB Charging Cable on Mobile Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Spolaor, Riccardo; Abudahi, Laila; Moonsamy, Veelasha; Conti, Mauro; Poovendran, Radha

    2016-01-01

    More and more people are regularly using mobile and battery-powered handsets, such as smartphones and tablets. At the same time, thanks to the technological innovation and to the high user demands, those devices are integrating extensive functionalities and developers are writing battery-draining apps, which results in a surge of energy consumption of these devices. This scenario leads many people to often look for opportunities to charge their devices at public charging stations: the presenc...

  7. Exposure and Use of Mobile Media Devices by Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabali, Hilda K; Irigoyen, Matilde M; Nunez-Davis, Rosemary; Budacki, Jennifer G; Mohanty, Sweta H; Leister, Kristin P; Bonner, Robert L

    2015-12-01

    Research on children's use of mobile media devices lags behind its adoption. The objective of this study was to examine young children's exposure to and use of mobile media devices. Cross-sectional study of 350 children aged 6 months to 4 years seen October to November 2014 at a pediatric clinic in an urban, low-income, minority community. The survey was adapted from Common Sense Media's 2013 nationwide survey. Most households had television (97%), tablets (83%), and smartphones (77%). At age 4, half the children had their own television and three-fourths their own mobile device. Almost all children (96.6%) used mobile devices, and most started using before age 1. Parents gave children devices when doing house chores (70%), to keep them calm (65%), and at bedtime (29%). At age 2, most children used a device daily and spent comparable screen time on television and mobile devices. Most 3- and 4-year-olds used devices without help, and one-third engaged in media multitasking. Content delivery applications such as YouTube and Netflix were popular. Child ownership of device, age at first use, and daily use were not associated with ethnicity or parent education. Young children in an urban, low-income, minority community had almost universal exposure to mobile devices, and most had their own device by age 4. The patterns of use suggest early adoption, frequent and independent use, and media multitasking. Studies are urgently needed to update recommendations for families and providers on the use of mobile media by young children. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. A Karaoke System with Real-Time Media Merging and Sharing Functions for a Cloud-Computing-Integrated Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Her-Tyan Yeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices such as personal digital assistants (PDAs, smartphones, and tablets have increased in popularity and are extremely efficient for work-related, social, and entertainment uses. Popular entertainment services have also attracted substantial attention. Thus, relevant industries have exerted considerable efforts in establishing a method by which mobile devices can be used to develop excellent and convenient entertainment services. Because cloud-computing technology is mature and possesses a strong computing processing capacity, integrating this technology into the entertainment service function in mobile devices can reduce the data load on a system and maintain mobile device performances. This study combines cloud computing with a mobile device to design a karaoke system that contains real-time media merging and sharing functions. This system enables users to download music videos (MVs from their mobile device and sing and record their singing by using the device. They can upload the recorded song to the cloud server where it is merged with real-time media. Subsequently, by employing a media streaming technology, users can store their personal MVs in their mobile device or computer and instantaneously share these videos with others on the Internet. Through this process, people can instantly watch shared videos, enjoy the leisure and entertainment effects of mobile devices, and satisfy their desire for singing.

  9. Examining Preservice Elementary Teachers' Technology Self-Efficacy: Impact of Mobile Technology-Based Physics Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Deepika; Chandrasekhar, Meera; Kosztin, Dorina; Steinhoff, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    While iPads and other mobile devices are gaining popularity in educational settings, challenges associated with teachers' use of technology continue to hold true. Preparing preservice teachers within teacher preparation programs to gain experience learning and teaching science using mobile technologies is critical for them to develop positive…

  10. Parallel Processing of Images in Mobile Devices using BOINC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curiel Mariela

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Medical image processing helps health professionals make decisions for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Since some algorithms for processing images require substantial amounts of resources, one could take advantage of distributed or parallel computing. A mobile grid can be an adequate computing infrastructure for this problem. A mobile grid is a grid that includes mobile devices as resource providers. In a previous step of this research, we selected BOINC as the infrastructure to build our mobile grid. However, parallel processing of images in mobile devices poses at least two important challenges: the execution of standard libraries for processing images and obtaining adequate performance when compared to desktop computers grids. By the time we started our research, the use of BOINC in mobile devices also involved two issues: a the execution of programs in mobile devices required to modify the code to insert calls to the BOINC API, and b the division of the image among the mobile devices as well as its merging required additional code in some BOINC components. This article presents answers to these four challenges.

  11. Parallel Processing of Images in Mobile Devices using BOINC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel, Mariela; Calle, David F.; Santamaría, Alfredo S.; Suarez, David F.; Flórez, Leonardo

    2018-04-01

    Medical image processing helps health professionals make decisions for the diagnosis and treatment of patients. Since some algorithms for processing images require substantial amounts of resources, one could take advantage of distributed or parallel computing. A mobile grid can be an adequate computing infrastructure for this problem. A mobile grid is a grid that includes mobile devices as resource providers. In a previous step of this research, we selected BOINC as the infrastructure to build our mobile grid. However, parallel processing of images in mobile devices poses at least two important challenges: the execution of standard libraries for processing images and obtaining adequate performance when compared to desktop computers grids. By the time we started our research, the use of BOINC in mobile devices also involved two issues: a) the execution of programs in mobile devices required to modify the code to insert calls to the BOINC API, and b) the division of the image among the mobile devices as well as its merging required additional code in some BOINC components. This article presents answers to these four challenges.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION--TEST REPORT OF MOBILE SOURCE EMISSION CONTROL DEVICES, FLINT HILLS RESOURCES, LP, CCD15010 DIESEL FUEL FORMULATION WITH HITEC4121 ADDITIVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. ETV seeks to ach...

  13. From Sharing to Experimenting: How Mobile Technologies Are Helping Ordinary Citizens Regain Their Positions as Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devisch, Oswald; Veestraeten, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Citizen science is a term used to describe the engagement of ordinary citizens in scientific tasks like observation, measurement, and computation. A series of technological innovations, such as the Internet, the upgrade of mobile phones from communication devices to networked mobile personal measurement devices, and the introduction of…

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION--TEST REPORT OF MOBILE SOURCE EMISSION CONTROL DEVICES, CUMMINS EMISSION SOLUTIONS AND CUMMINS FILTRATION DIESEL OXIDATION CATALYST AND CLOSED CRANKCASE VENTILATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA has created the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program. ETV seeks to provide high-quality, peer-reviewed data on technology performance. The Air Pollution Control Technology (APCT) Verification Center, a center under the ETV Program, is operated by Res...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION: TEST REPORT OF MOBILE SOURCE EMISSION CONTROL DEVICES--PUREM NORTH AMERICA LLC, PMF GREENTEC 1004205.00.0 DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTER

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. EPA has created the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program to provide high quality, peer reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the design, distribution, financing, permitting, purchase, and use of environmental technologies. The Air Po...

  16. New Trends in Mobile Technology Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu Cojocaru

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The mobile device market proved one of the most dynamic, with the leader in intelligent phones changing at least four times during the last decade. At least one important acquisition was registered during 2013 (when Microsoft bought Nokia’s mobile phone division and this event is slated to induce major shifts within the structure of this market. With this story we aim to provide information related to trends foreseen for this market.

  17. Composing Networks: Writing Practices on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarts, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article is an investigation of composing practices through which people create networks with mobile phones. By looking through the lens of actor-network theory, the author portrays the networking activity of mobile phone users as translation, what Latour describes as an infralanguage to which different disciplinary perspectives can be…

  18. Mobile devices in medicine: a survey of how medical students, residents, and faculty use smartphones and other mobile devices to find information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boruff, Jill T; Storie, Dale

    2014-01-01

    The research investigated the extent to which students, residents, and faculty members in Canadian medical faculties use mobile devices, such as smartphones (e.g., iPhone, Android, Blackberry) and tablet computers (e.g., iPad), to answer clinical questions and find medical information. The results of this study will inform how health libraries can effectively support mobile technology and collections. An electronic survey was distributed by medical librarians at four Canadian universities to medical students, residents, and faculty members via departmental email discussion lists, personal contacts, and relevant websites. It investigated the types of information sought, facilitators to mobile device use in medical information seeking, barriers to access, support needs, familiarity with institutionally licensed resources, and most frequently used resources. The survey of 1,210 respondents indicated widespread use of smartphones and tablets in clinical settings in 4 Canadian universities. Third- and fourth-year undergraduate students (i.e., those in their clinical clerkships) and medical residents, compared to other graduate students and faculty, used their mobile devices more often, used them for a broader range of activities, and purchased more resources for their devices. Technological and intellectual barriers do not seem to prevent medical trainees and faculty from regularly using mobile devices for their medical information searches; however, barriers to access and lack of awareness might keep them from using reliable, library-licensed resources. Libraries should focus on providing access to a smaller number of highly used mobile resources instead of a huge collection until library-licensed mobile resources have streamlined authentication processes.

  19. Use of mobile assessment technologies in inpatient psychiatric settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimhy, David; Vakhrusheva, Julia; Liu, Ying; Wang, Yuanjia

    2014-08-01

    Mobile electronic devices (i.e., PDAs, cellphones) have been used successfully as part of research studies of individuals with severe mental illness living in the community. More recently, efforts have been made to incorporate such technologies into outpatient treatments. However, few attempts have been made to date to employ such mobile devices among hospitalized psychiatric patients. In this article, we evaluate the potential use of such devices in inpatient psychiatric settings using 33 hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. Employing an Experience Sampling Method approach, we provide support for the feasibility of using such devices, along with examples of potentially clinically-relevant information that can be obtained using such technologies, including assessment of fluctuations in the severity of psychotic symptoms and negative mood in relation to social context, unit location, and time of day. Following these examples, we discuss issues related to the potential use of mobile electronic devices by patients hospitalized at inpatient psychiatric settings including issues related to patients' compliance, assessment schedules, questionnaire development, confidentiality issues, as well as selection of appropriate software/hardware. Finally, we delineate some issues and areas of inquiry requiring additional research and development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Mobile marketing for mobile games

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Giang

    2016-01-01

    Highly developed mobile technology and devices enable the rise of mobile game industry and mobile marketing. Hence mobile marketing for mobile game is an essential key for a mobile game success. Even though there are many articles on marketing for mobile games, there is a need of highly understanding mobile marketing strategies, how to launch a mobile campaign for a mobile game. Besides that, it is essential to understand the relationship between mobile advertising and users behaviours. There...

  1. Parent Scaffolding of Young Children When Engaged With Mobile Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen eWood

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Shared parent-child experiences while engaged with an iPad™ were examined to determine if and then how parents interact with their children when using mobile digital devices. In total, 104 parent-child dyads participated in an observation session where parent-child interactions using the touchscreen tablet device were video recorded in order to observe first-hand the supports and exchanges between parent and child (age range 46.21- 75.9 months. Results indicate that parents provide a great deal of support to their children while interacting with the touchscreen tablet device including verbal, emotional-verbal, physical and emotional-physical supports. The types of support offered did not differ as a function of parent gender or experience with mobile devices (users versus non-users. Overall, parents rated their own experience engaging with the touchscreen tablet and that of their child’s positively. Additional survey measures assessed parents’ perceptions of their child’s technology use and attitudes regarding optimal ages and conditions for introducing and using technology. Most parents indicated a preference for very early introduction to mobile technologies. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  2. Mobile Data Technology for Small Businesses: needs, uses and adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Harker

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The technological environment in which Australian SMEs operate can be best described as dynamic and vital. The rate of technological change provides the SME owner/manger a complex and challenging operational context. Wireless applications are being developed that provide mobile devices with Internet content and E-business services. In Australia, the adoption of commerce by large organisations has been relatively high, however, the same cannot be said for SMEs, where adoption has been slower than other developed countries. In contrast, however, mobile telephone adoption and diffusion is relatively high by SMEs. Will SMEs who have been reluctant to adopt ecommerce technologies in the past be more ready to go on-line with the merging of the Internet and mobile data technologies? This exploratory study identifies attitudes, perceptions and issues for mobile data technologies by regional SME owner/managers across a range of industry sectors. The major issues include the sector the firm belongs to, the current adoption status of the firm, the level of mistrust of the IT industry, the cost of the technologies, and the applications and attributes of the technologies.

  3. User driven innovation in mobile technologies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Casper Schultz; Koch, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Developing dedicated mobile technology systems for AEC demands the introduction of user driven innovation. A Danish research project collected international examples and user-experiences of mobile and handheld ICT in the building industry i.a. by reading off the functionality of the mobile...... technology systems relying on the concept of affordance. This paper examines how innovation processes mediate between user orientations and technology offers. There is a great potential for mobile handheld ICT-systems to support numerous work processes in the AEC-industry and this can be substantiated...... by systems already in function. Stories of prior business successes can be an important tool to ensure further innovative investments since lack of enterprise strategies is often an obstacle for innovation, especially user driven. Both small and large software houses develops dedicated software for coupling...

  4. Development of a mini-mobile digital radiography system by using wireless smart devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chang-Won; Joo, Su-Chong; Ryu, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Kyong-Woo; Yoon, Kwon-Ha

    2014-08-01

    The current technologies that trend in digital radiology (DR) are toward systems using portable smart mobile as patient-centered care. We aimed to develop a mini-mobile DR system by using smart devices for wireless connection into medical information systems. We developed a mini-mobile DR system consisting of an X-ray source and a Complementary Metal-Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) sensor based on a flat panel detector for small-field diagnostics in patients. It is used instead of the systems that are difficult to perform with a fixed traditional device. We also designed a method for embedded systems in the development of portable DR systems. The external interface used the fast and stable IEEE 802.11n wireless protocol, and we adapted the device for connections with Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) and smart devices. The smart device could display images on an external monitor other than the monitor in the DR system. The communication modules, main control board, and external interface supporting smart devices were implemented. Further, a smart viewer based on the external interface was developed to display image files on various smart devices. In addition, the advantage of operators is to reduce radiation dose when using remote smart devices. It is integrated with smart devices that can provide X-ray imaging services anywhere. With this technology, it can permit image observation on a smart device from a remote location by connecting to the external interface. We evaluated the response time of the mini-mobile DR system to compare to mobile PACS. The experimental results show that our system outperforms conventional mobile PACS in this regard.

  5. The Complexities of Developing Accessible Web Content for Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Richard

    This paper is concerned with the development of accessible mobile content and the complexities that arise during this process. The paper gives an overview of the popularity and advantages of mobile devices before tackling the issues surrounding content development, particularly within an educational context. The paper concludes with an overview of an application that was developed for higher education students within a UK college that had a mobile counterpart, allowing the artefact to transcend the typical desktop environment.

  6. Using Mobile Devices to Connect Teachers and Museum Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delen, Ibrahim; Krajcik, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    The use of mobile devices is increasing rapidly as a potential tool for science teaching. In this study, five educators (three middle school teachers and two museum educators) used a mobile application that supported the development of a driving question. Previous studies have noted that teachers make little effort to connect learning experiences…

  7. Learning English Using Children's Stories in Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, Nadire; Ibrahim, Dogan

    2017-01-01

    The topic of this paper is to describe the development of an interactive application that can be used in teaching English as a second language using children's stories in mobile devices. The aim of this experimental study has been to find out the potential of using the developed interactive mobile application in improving the learning skills such…

  8. Mobile computing device as tools for college student education: a case on flashcards application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Congying

    2012-04-01

    Traditionally, college students always use flash cards as a tool to remember massive knowledge, such as nomenclature, structures, and reactions in chemistry. Educational and information technology have enabled flashcards viewed on computers, like Slides and PowerPoint, works as tunnels of drilling and feedback for the learners. The current generation of students is more capable of information technology and mobile computing devices. For example, they use their Mobile phones much more intensively everyday day. Trends of using Mobile phone as an educational tool is analyzed and a educational technology initiative is proposed, which use Mobile phone flash cards applications to help students learn biology and chemistry. Experiments show that users responded positively to these mobile flash cards.

  9. One-Time URL: A Proximity Security Mechanism between Internet of Things and Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Antonio; Dormido, Raquel; Duro, Natividad; González, Víctor

    2016-10-13

    The aim of this paper is to determine the physical proximity of connected things when they are accessed from a smartphone. Links between connected things and mobile communication devices are temporarily created by means of dynamic URLs (uniform resource locators) which may be easily discovered with pervasive short-range radio frequency technologies available on smartphones. In addition, a multi cross domain silent logging mechanism to allow people to interact with their surrounding connected things from their mobile communication devices is presented. The proposed mechanisms are based in web standards technologies, evolving our social network of Internet of Things towards the so-called Web of Things.

  10. Middle School Student Perceptions and Actual Use of Mobile Devices: Highlighting Disconnects in Student Planned and Actual Usage of Mobile Devices in Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomew, Scott R.; Reeve, Edward

    2018-01-01

    Discussion surrounding the inclusion of mobile devices in K-12 classrooms has escalated since the early 2000s, and the literature base dedicated to mobile devices, mobile-learning, and e-learning has likewise grown. The majority of the research related to mobile devices and their inclusion in educational settings has largely revolved around…

  11. Mobile technologies and supply chain management - lessons for the hospitality industry

    OpenAIRE

    Car, Tomislav; Pilepić, Ljubica; Šimunić, Mislav

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to define preconditions and integration capabilities of the mobile business in supply chain management (SCM) in the hospitality industry via mobile devices and mobile applications. The aims of this paper are to reflect on what mobile technology has to offer and to draw attention to the role of mobile applications and their use in the SCM. Although mobile technologies are present in almost all areas, they are not used to their full potential. Design – The...

  12. Method and device for ion mobility separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Garimella, Sandilya V. B.; Smith, Richard D.

    2017-07-11

    Methods and devices for ion separations or manipulations in gas phase are disclosed. The device includes a single non-planar surface. Arrays of electrodes are coupled to the surface. A combination of RF and DC voltages are applied to the arrays of electrodes to create confining and driving fields that move ions through the device. The DC voltages are static DC voltages or time-dependent DC potentials or waveforms.

  13. Teacher perceptions of usefulness of mobile learning devices in rural secondary science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Lisa

    The internet and easy accessibility to a wide range of digital content has created the necessity for teachers to embrace and integrate digitial media in their curriculums. Although there is a call for digital media integration in curriculum by current learning standards, rural schools continue to have access to fewer resources due to limited budgets, potentially preventing teachers from having access to the most current technology and science instructional materials. This dissertation identifies the perceptions rural secondary science teachers have on the usefulness of mobile learning devices in the science classroom. The successes and challenges in using mobile learning devices in the secondary classroom were also explored. Throughout this research, teachers generally supported the integration of mobile devices in the classroom, while harboring some concerns relating to student distractability and the time required for integrating mobile devices in exisiting curriculum. Quantitative and qualitative data collected through surveys, interviews, and classroom observations revealed that teachers perceive that mobile devices bring benefits such as ease of communication and easy access to digitial information. However, there are perceived challenges with the ability to effectively communicate complex scientific information via mobile devices, distractibility of students, and the time required to develop effective curriculum to integrate digital media into the secondary science classroom.

  14. Project inspection using mobile technology - phase II : assessing the impacts of mobile technology on project inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    As mobile technology becomes widely available and affordable, transportation agencies can use this : technology to streamline operations involved within project inspection. This research, conducted in two : phases, identified opportunities for proces...

  15. Appropriating Technologies for Contextual Knowledge: Mobile Personal Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwell, Graham; Cook, John; Ravenscroft, Andrew

    The development of Technology Enhanced Learning has been dominated by the education paradigm. However social software and new forms of knowledge development and collaborative meaning making are challenging such domination. Technology is increasingly being used to mediate the development of work process knowledge and these processes are leading to the evolution of rhizomatic forms of community based knowledge development. Technologies can support different forms of contextual knowledge development through Personal Learning Environments. The appropriation or shaping of technologies to develop Personal Learning Environments may be seen as an outcome of learning in itself. Mobile devices have the potential to support situated and context based learning, as exemplified in projects undertaken at London Metropolitan University. This work provides the basis for the development of a Work Orientated MoBile Learning Environment (WOMBLE).

  16. Mobile Devices and Insomnia: Understanding Risks and Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Mohammed N.; Nock, Rebecca; Gooneratne, Nalaka S.

    2015-01-01

    Mobile devices (smartphones and tablet computers) have become widely prevalent due to rapid improvements in function and decreasing costs. As of 2014, 90 % of US adults have a mobile phone, with 58 % having a smartphone, 32 % owning some type of e-reader, and 42 % of US adults owning a tablet computer. Mobile devices are particularly well-suited for the study of common conditions such as sleep difficulties because of their ubiquity. Around 35 to 49 % of the US adult population have problems f...

  17. Fingerprinting Mobile Devices Using Personalized Configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurtz Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, Apple removed access to various device hardware identifiers that were frequently misused by iOS third-party apps to track users. We are, therefore, now studying the extent to which users of smartphones can still be uniquely identified simply through their personalized device configurations. Using Apple’s iOS as an example, we show how a device fingerprint can be computed using 29 different configuration features. These features can be queried from arbitrary thirdparty apps via the official SDK. Experimental evaluations based on almost 13,000 fingerprints from approximately 8,000 different real-world devices show that (1 all fingerprints are unique and distinguishable; and (2 utilizing a supervised learning approach allows returning users or their devices to be recognized with a total accuracy of 97% over time

  18. Creating a Content Strategy for Mobile Devices in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Students' access to smartphones continues to grow. Use of tablets and e-readers continues to grow in the classroom. Whenever a large purchase of mobile devices is made for education, the very next question asked is, "Now what?" It is the planning for and using of the devices as part of an overall approach to the curriculum, locally, that…

  19. Detection of falls using accelerometers and mobile phone technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond Y W; Carlisle, Alison J

    2011-11-01

    to study the sensitivity and specificity of fall detection using mobile phone technology. an experimental investigation using motion signals detected by the mobile phone. the research was conducted in a laboratory setting, and 18 healthy adults (12 males and 6 females; age = 29 ± 8.7 years) were recruited. each participant was requested to perform three trials of four different types of simulated falls (forwards, backwards, lateral left and lateral right) and eight other everyday activities (sit-to-stand, stand-to-sit, level walking, walking up- and downstairs, answering the phone, picking up an object and getting up from supine). Acceleration was measured using two devices, a mobile phone and an independent accelerometer attached to the waist of the participants. Bland-Altman analysis shows a higher degree of agreement between the data recorded by the two devices. Using individual upper and lower detection thresholds, the specificity and sensitivity for mobile phone were 0.81 and 0.77, respectively, and for external accelerometer they were 0.82 and 0.96, respectively. fall detection using a mobile phone is a feasible and highly attractive technology for older adults, especially those living alone. It may be best achieved with an accelerometer attached to the waist, which transmits signals wirelessly to a phone.

  20. ESR paper on the proper use of mobile devices in radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Mobile devices (smartphones, tablets, etc.) have become key methods of communication, data access and data sharing for the population in the past decade. The technological capabilities of these devices have expanded very rapidly; for example, their in-built cameras have largely replaced conventional cameras. Their processing power is often sufficient to handle the large data sets of radiology studies and to manipulate images and studies directly on hand-held devices. Thus, they can be used to transmit and view radiology studies, often in locations remote from the source of the imaging data. They are not recommended for primary interpretation of radiology studies, but they facilitate sharing of studies for second opinions, viewing of studies and reports by clinicians at the bedside, etc. Other potential applications include remote participation in educational activity (e.g. webinars) and consultation of online educational content, e-books, journals and reference sources. Social-networking applications can be used for exchanging professional information and teaching. Users of mobile device must be aware of the vulnerabilities and dangers of their use, in particular regarding the potential for inappropriate sharing of confidential patient information, and must take appropriate steps to protect confidential data. • Mobile devices have revolutionized communication in the past decade, and are now ubiquitous. • Mobile devices have sufficient processing power to manipulate and display large data sets of radiological images. • Mobile devices allow transmission & sharing of radiologic studies for purposes of second opinions, bedside review of images, teaching, etc. • Mobile devices are currently not recommended as tools for primary interpretation of radiologic studies. • The use of mobile devices for image and data transmission carries risks, especially regarding confidentiality, which must be considered.

  1. Mobile Devices and Insomnia: Understanding Risks and Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed N; Nock, Rebecca; Gooneratne, Nalaka S

    2015-12-01

    Mobile devices (smartphones and tablet computers) have become widely prevalent due to rapid improvements in function and decreasing costs. As of 2014, 90 % of US adults have a mobile phone, with 58 % having a smartphone, 32 % owning some type of e-reader, and 42 % of US adults owning a tablet computer. Mobile devices are particularly well-suited for the study of common conditions such as sleep difficulties because of their ubiquity. Around 35 to 49 % of the US adult population have problems falling asleep or have daytime sleepiness. These sleep disorders are often under-recognized because of patient-physician communication difficulties, low rates of medical awareness resulting in underreporting of insomnia symptoms, and limited primary care physician (PCP) training in insomnia recognition. Mobile devices have the potential to bridge some of these gaps, but they can also lead to sleep difficulties when used inappropriately.

  2. Trends In Academic Content for Mobile Devices [video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan D'Agostino

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This presentation by Sarah Forbes and Dan D'Agostino was given at the Ontario Library Association's Super Conference in Toronto, Ontario, on February 3, 2012. Session Abstract from the Super Conference Program: As ownership of mobile devices continues to proliferate, libraries are finding it difficult to provide academic content that works well in the mobile world. Discover how various e-book and e-journal formats can be made to work with mobile devices of all kinds, and will explore the next generation of digital content designed for mobile devices – new formats that may re-invent how information is used by readers. Partnership would like to thank the authors and the Ontario Library Association for their generous permission to publish an Open Access version of this conference session. This is one of several Super Conference 2012 video presentations available for purchase from Super Conference: the Virtual Experience - http://ola.scholarlab.ca/.

  3. Security Issues for Information Quality on Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Ramona ANDRISESCU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices are used everywhere, from making acall to store huge volume of information. But together withdevices shrinking and rise of storage space on a single device webring to mind the problem of trusting the stored information.Trusting the information and assuring its quality meansknowing the security threats these devices face and measuresthat should be taken. Many questions rise from here like “Whathappens when a mobile device is used by several persons andespecially employees?”, “Is that information reliable andoriginal?”, “Who is responsible for a device and its security?”.We are going to see in this paper that information quality can beassured even on portable devices by using the adequate securitymeasures.

  4. Audio Technology and Mobile Human Computer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chamberlain, Alan; Bødker, Mads; Hazzard, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Audio-based mobile technology is opening up a range of new interactive possibilities. This paper brings some of those possibilities to light by offering a range of perspectives based in this area. It is not only the technical systems that are developing, but novel approaches to the design...... and understanding of audio-based mobile systems are evolving to offer new perspectives on interaction and design and support such systems to be applied in areas, such as the humanities....

  5. Mobile devices and computing cloud resources allocation for interactive applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk Henryk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Using mobile devices such as smartphones or iPads for various interactive applications is currently very common. In the case of complex applications, e.g. chess games, the capabilities of these devices are insufficient to run the application in real time. One of the solutions is to use cloud computing. However, there is an optimization problem of mobile device and cloud resources allocation. An iterative heuristic algorithm for application distribution is proposed. The algorithm minimizes the energy cost of application execution with constrained execution time.

  6. A Comparative Study of Spreadsheet Applications on Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veera V. S. M. Chintapalli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in mobile screen sizes and feature enhancement for mobile applications have increased the number of users accessing spreadsheets on mobile devices. This paper reports a comparative usability study on four popular mobile spreadsheet applications: OfficeSuite Viewer 6, Documents To Go, ThinkFree Online, and Google Drive. We compare them against three categories of usability criteria: visibility; navigation, scrolling, and feedback; and interaction, satisfaction, simplicity, and convenience. Measures for each criterion were derived in a survey. Questionnaires were designed to address the measures based on the comparative criteria provided in the analysis.

  7. Mobile health: a synopsis and comment on "Increasing physical activity with mobile devices: a meta-analysis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Winter; Hoffman, Sara; Thornton, Louise

    2014-03-01

    We offer a synopsis and commentary on J. Fanning and colleagues' article "Increasing Physical Activity with Mobile Devices: A Meta-Analysis" published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research. Although regular physical activity has a range of benefits, very few adults in the USA meet recommended guidelines for daily physical activity. The meta-analysis of Fanning et al. (2012) aimed to synthesize the results of research using mobile devices to increase physical activity. Their review identified 11 studies that used mobile technologies, including short message service (SMS), apps, or personal digital assistant (PDA) to improve physical activity behaviors among participants. Fanning et al. conclude that while literature in this area is limited to date, there is initial support for the efficacy of mobile-based interventions for improving physical activity. Included studies varied greatly, and the majority used only SMS to influence physical behaviors, meaning generalization of results to other forms of mobile technologies may be premature. This review does, however, provide a foundation for understanding how mobile-based interventions may be used efficaciously for the development of future interventions to improve health behaviors.

  8. Environmental Technology Verification: Test Report of Mobile Source Emission Control Devices--Johnson Matthey PCRT2 1000, Version 2, Filter + Diesel Oxidation Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Johnson Matthey PCRT2 1000, v.2 system is a partial continuously regenerating technology (PCRT) system that consists of a flow-through partial filter combined with a DOC. The system is designed for low temperature exhaust resulting from intermittent loads from medium and heav...

  9. Mobile communication devices causing interference in invasive and noninvasive ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Bao P; Nel, Pierre R; Gjevre, John A

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess if common mobile communication systems would cause significant interference on mechanical ventilation devices and at what distances would such interference occur. We tested all the invasive and noninvasive ventilatory devices used within our region. This consisted of 2 adult mechanical ventilators, 1 portable ventilator, 2 pediatric ventilators, and 2 noninvasive positive pressure ventilatory devices. We operated the mobile devices from the 2 cellular communication systems (digital) and 1 2-way radio system used in our province at varying distances from the ventilators and looked at any interference they created. We tested the 2-way radio system, which had a fixed operation power output of 3.0 watts, the Global Systems for Mobile Communication cellular system, which had a maximum power output of 2.0 watts and the Time Division Multiple Access cellular system, which had a maximum power output of 0.2 watts on our ventilators. The ventilators were ventilating a plastic lung at fixed settings. The mobile communication devices were tested at varying distances starting at zero meter from the ventilator and in all operation modes. The 2-way radio caused the most interference on some of the ventilators, but the maximum distance of interference was 1.0 m. The Global Systems for Mobile Communication system caused significant interference only at 0 m and minor interference at 0.5 m on only 1 ventilator. The Time Division Multiple Access system caused no interference at all. Significant interference consisted of a dramatic rise and fluctuation of the respiratory rate, pressure, and positive end-expiratory pressure of the ventilators with no normalization when the mobile device was removed. From our experiment on our ventilators with the communication systems used in our province, we conclude that mobile communication devices such as cellular phones and 2-way radios are safe and cause no interference unless operated at very close distances of

  10. Mobile Device Trends in Orthopedic Surgery: Rapid Change and Future Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrawis, John P; Muzykewicz, David A; Franko, Orrin I

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly becoming integral communication and clinical tools. Monitoring the prevalence and utilization characteristics of surgeons and trainees is critical to understanding how these new technologies can be best used in practice. The authors conducted a prospective Internet-based survey over 7 time points from August 2010 to August 2014 at all nationwide American Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited orthopedic programs. The survey questionnaire was designed to evaluate the use of devices and mobile applications (apps) among trainees and physicians in the clinical setting. Results were analyzed and summarized for orthopedic surgeons and trainees. During the 48-month period, there were 7 time points with 467, 622, 329, 223, 237, 111, and 134 responses. Mobile device use in the clinical setting increased across all fields and levels of training during the study period. Orthopedic trainees increased their use of Smartphone apps in the clinical setting from 60% to 84%, whereas attending use increased from 41% to 61%. During this time frame, use of Apple/Android platforms increased from 45%/13% to 85%/15%, respectively. At all time points, 70% of orthopedic surgeons believed their institution/hospital should support mobile device use. As measured over a 48-month period, mobile devices have become an ubiquitous tool in the clinical setting among orthopedic surgeons and trainees. The authors expect these trends to continue and encourage providers and trainees to be aware of the limitations and risks inherent with new technology. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Collaborative Technologies: Crossing the Device Divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2013-01-01

    When school district leaders talk about the potential benefits of "bring your own device" (BYOD) programs, they often mention budget savings and promoting personalized mobile learning. They note that BYOD can expand the boundaries of learning beyond the classroom, however, not many of these leaders mention enhanced student collaboration…

  12. Design of a multimedia gateway for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hens, Raf; Goeminne, Nico; Van Hoecke, Sofie; Verdickt, Tom; Bouve, Thomas; Gielen, Frank; Demeester, Piet

    2005-03-01

    Although mobile users are currently offered a lot more capabilities on their mobile devices, they still experience some limitations. They can surf the Internet, read their e-mail and receive MMS messages, but they have limited processing power, storage capacity and bandwidth and are limited in their access to peripherals (e.g. printers). We have designed and implemented a multimedia gateway for mobile devices that reduces these limitations. It gives the mobile devices transparent access to high capacity devices connected to the gateway, which is built around a central, modularly extensible server that can run on any PC or home gateway. It manages two sets of modules: one set offering the actual services and another set handling the IP-based wireless interaction with the client applications on the mobile devices. These modules can be added and removed dynamically, offering new services on the fly. Currently services for storage, printing, domotics and playing music are provided. Others can easily be added later on. This paper discusses the architecture and development, the management of modules, the actual services and their benefits. Besides a proprietary implementation, it also looks into OSGi and how both platforms compare to each other, concerning design, architecture, ease of development, functionality, ...

  13. Scalable Video Streaming Relay for Smart Mobile Devices in Wireless Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dongwoo; Je, Huigwang; Kim, Hyeonwoo; Ju, Hongtaek; An, Donghyeok

    2016-01-01

    Recently, smart mobile devices and wireless communication technologies such as WiFi, third generation (3G), and long-term evolution (LTE) have been rapidly deployed. Many smart mobile device users can access the Internet wirelessly, which has increased mobile traffic. In 2014, more than half of the mobile traffic around the world was devoted to satisfying the increased demand for the video streaming. In this paper, we propose a scalable video streaming relay scheme. Because many collisions degrade the scalability of video streaming, we first separate networks to prevent excessive contention between devices. In addition, the member device controls the video download rate in order to adapt to video playback. If the data are sufficiently buffered, the member device stops the download. If not, it requests additional video data. We implemented apps to evaluate the proposed scheme and conducted experiments with smart mobile devices. The results showed that our scheme improves the scalability of video streaming in a wireless local area network (WLAN).

  14. Scalable Video Streaming Relay for Smart Mobile Devices in Wireless Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Dongwoo; Je, Huigwang; Kim, Hyeonwoo; Ju, Hongtaek; An, Donghyeok

    2016-01-01

    Recently, smart mobile devices and wireless communication technologies such as WiFi, third generation (3G), and long-term evolution (LTE) have been rapidly deployed. Many smart mobile device users can access the Internet wirelessly, which has increased mobile traffic. In 2014, more than half of the mobile traffic around the world was devoted to satisfying the increased demand for the video streaming. In this paper, we propose a scalable video streaming relay scheme. Because many collisions degrade the scalability of video streaming, we first separate networks to prevent excessive contention between devices. In addition, the member device controls the video download rate in order to adapt to video playback. If the data are sufficiently buffered, the member device stops the download. If not, it requests additional video data. We implemented apps to evaluate the proposed scheme and conducted experiments with smart mobile devices. The results showed that our scheme improves the scalability of video streaming in a wireless local area network (WLAN). PMID:27907113

  15. MedlinePlus FAQ: Will MedlinePlus work on my mobile device?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mobile.html Question: Will MedlinePlus work on my mobile device? To use the sharing features on this page, ... Some video content might not play on your mobile device. See our FAQ on playing videos on phones ...

  16. Teachers' Attitudes toward the Usage of Mobile Devices in EFL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Ali; Akbarov, Azamat

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, technology is developing in a geometrically progressive manner. Its usage in different social areas is an imperative, rather than a choice. As expected, digital devices are applicable in the educational context, as well. Hence, the scope of the present study is to examine attitudes toward mobile learning among English teachers. For this…

  17. Workload-Based Configuration of MEMS-Based Storage Devices for Mobile Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khatib, M.G.; Miller, E.L.; Hartel, Pieter H.

    2008-01-01

    Because of its small form factor, high capacity, and expected low cost, MEMS-based storage is a suitable storage technology for mobile systems. However, flash memory may outperform MEMS-based storage in terms of performance, and energy-efficiency. The problem is that MEMS-based storage devices have

  18. Developing Digital Fluency through Ubiquitous Mobile Devices: Findings from a Small-Scale Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, RuoLan; Wiesemes, Rolf; Gibbons, Cathy

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Visual Learning Lab's initiative of promoting visual learning supported through technologies in Higher Education, this VLL funded study explored part-time mature doctoral students' use and perceptions of a mobile device in support of their research activities. The study was conducted by the Graduate School in collaboration with the…

  19. Investigating the Role of Mobile Devices in a Blended Pre-Service Teacher Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Norman; Lawrence, Kimberley

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to investigate if and how mobile devices could be used to support the required program outcomes in a blended pre-service teacher education degree. All students enrolled in an educational technology course during the fall 2011 semester were provided with ViewSonic tablets. Through faculty interviews, student…

  20. VR technologies in mobile applications

    OpenAIRE

    Rauličkis, Karolis

    2018-01-01

    Created educational virtual reality game was developed for MIF VU bachelor thesis. Game's objective is to teach player information technology topics in native language. Upon starting the game, player can choose theme and number of questions he/she would like to answer, pick a 360 degree video to watch or check leaderboard. Possible themes are created in a circle format around player, 30 at time (for more themes, a NEXT button is added). Most of games features are dynamically created, meaning ...

  1. Video capture on student-owned mobile devices to facilitate psychomotor skills acquisition: A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinck, Glori; Bergmann, Thomas F

    2013-01-01

    Objective : We evaluated the feasibility of using mobile device technology to allow students to record their own psychomotor skills so that these recordings can be used for self-reflection and formative evaluation. Methods : Students were given the choice of using DVD recorders, zip drive video capture equipment, or their personal mobile phone, device, or digital camera to record specific psychomotor skills. During the last week of the term, they were asked to complete a 9-question survey regarding their recording experience, including details of mobile phone ownership, technology preferences, technical difficulties, and satisfaction with the recording experience and video critique process. Results : Of those completing the survey, 83% currently owned a mobile phone with video capability. Of the mobile phone owners 62% reported having email capability on their phone and that they could transfer their video recording successfully to their computer, making it available for upload to the learning management system. Viewing the video recording of the psychomotor skill was valuable to 88% of respondents. Conclusions : Our results suggest that mobile phones are a viable technology to use for the video capture and critique of psychomotor skills, as most students own this technology and their satisfaction with this method is high.

  2. Remote Wiping and Secure Deletion on Mobile Devices: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leom, Ming Di; Choo, Kim-Kwang Raymond; Hunt, Ray

    2016-11-01

    Mobile devices have become ubiquitous in almost every sector of both private and commercial endeavors. As a result of such widespread use in everyday life, many users knowingly and unknowingly save significant amounts of personal and/or commercial data on these mobile devices. Thus, loss of mobile devices through accident or theft can expose users-and their businesses-to significant personal and corporate cost. To mitigate this data leakage issue, remote wiping features have been introduced to modern mobile devices. Given the destructive nature of such a feature, however, it may be subject to criminal exploitation (e.g., a criminal exploiting one or more vulnerabilities to issue a remote wiping command to the victim's device). To obtain a better understanding of remote wiping, we survey the literature, focusing on existing approaches to secure flash storage deletion and provide a critical analysis and comparison of a variety of published research in this area. In support of our analysis, we further provide prototype experimental results for three Android devices, thus providing both a theoretical and applied focus to this article as well as providing directions for further research. © 2016 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. How Does the Use of Mobile Devices Affect Teachers' Perceptions on Mobile Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Joong; Kim, Daesang; Choi, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the potential impact and effectiveness of mobile learning in the context of a flipped classroom and also address implications for future curriculum design. The researchers developed a mathematics curriculum featuring the use of mobile devices in the context of a flipped classroom. Thirty pre-service…

  4. A Multi-Technology Communication Platform for Urban Mobile Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Almeida

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A common concern in smart cities is the focus on sensing procedures to provide city-wide information to city managers and citizens. To meet the growing demands of smart cities, the network must provide the ability to handle a large number of mobile sensors/devices, with high heterogeneity and unpredictable mobility, by collecting and delivering the sensed information for future treatment. This work proposes a multi-wireless technology communication platform for opportunistic data gathering and data exchange with respect to smart cities. Through the implementation of a proprietary long-range (LoRa network and an urban sensor network, our platform addresses the heterogeneity of Internet of Things (IoT devices while conferring communications in an opportunistic manner, increasing the interoperability of our platform. It implements and evaluates a medium access communication (MAC protocol for LoRa networks with multiple gateways. It also implements mobile Opportunistic VEhicular (mOVE, a delay-tolerant network (DTN-based architecture to address the mobility dimension. The platform provides vehicle-to-everything (V2X communication with support for highly reliable and actionable information flows. Moreover, taking into account the high mobility pattern that a smart city scenario presents, we propose and evaluate two forwarding strategies for the opportunistic sensor network.

  5. A Multi-Technology Communication Platform for Urban Mobile Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Rodrigo; Oliveira, Rui; Luís, Miguel; Senna, Carlos; Sargento, Susana

    2018-04-12

    A common concern in smart cities is the focus on sensing procedures to provide city-wide information to city managers and citizens. To meet the growing demands of smart cities, the network must provide the ability to handle a large number of mobile sensors/devices, with high heterogeneity and unpredictable mobility, by collecting and delivering the sensed information for future treatment. This work proposes a multi-wireless technology communication platform for opportunistic data gathering and data exchange with respect to smart cities. Through the implementation of a proprietary long-range (LoRa) network and an urban sensor network, our platform addresses the heterogeneity of Internet of Things (IoT) devices while conferring communications in an opportunistic manner, increasing the interoperability of our platform. It implements and evaluates a medium access communication (MAC) protocol for LoRa networks with multiple gateways. It also implements mobile Opportunistic VEhicular (mOVE), a delay-tolerant network (DTN)-based architecture to address the mobility dimension. The platform provides vehicle-to-everything (V2X) communication with support for highly reliable and actionable information flows. Moreover, taking into account the high mobility pattern that a smart city scenario presents, we propose and evaluate two forwarding strategies for the opportunistic sensor network.

  6. Human movement activity classification approaches that use wearable sensors and mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaghyan, Sahak; Sarukhanyan, Hakob; Akopian, David

    2013-03-01

    Cell phones and other mobile devices become part of human culture and change activity and lifestyle patterns. Mobile phone technology continuously evolves and incorporates more and more sensors for enabling advanced applications. Latest generations of smart phones incorporate GPS and WLAN location finding modules, vision cameras, microphones, accelerometers, temperature sensors etc. The availability of these sensors in mass-market communication devices creates exciting new opportunities for data mining applications. Particularly healthcare applications exploiting build-in sensors are very promising. This paper reviews different approaches of human activity recognition.

  7. Mobile computing device configured to compute irradiance, glint, and glare of the sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipin P; Ho, Clifford K; Khalsa, Siri Sahib

    2014-03-11

    Described herein are technologies pertaining to computing the solar irradiance distribution on a surface of a receiver in a concentrating solar power system or glint/glare emitted from a reflective entity. A mobile computing device includes at least one camera that captures images of the Sun and the entity of interest, wherein the images have pluralities of pixels having respective pluralities of intensity values. Based upon the intensity values of the pixels in the respective images, the solar irradiance distribution on the surface of the entity or glint/glare corresponding to the entity is computed by the mobile computing device.

  8. Adaptive Media Streaming to Mobile Devices: Challenges, Enhancements, and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Evensen, Kristian; Kupka, Tomas; Riiser, Haakon; Ni, Pengpeng; Eg, Ragnhild; Griwodz, Carsten; Halvorsen, Pål

    2014-01-01

    Video streaming is predicted to become the dominating traffic in mobile broadband networks. At the same time, adaptive HTTP streaming is developing into the preferred way of streaming media over the Internet. In this paper, we evaluate how different components of a streaming system can be optimized when serving content to mobile devices in particular. We first analyze the media traffic from a Norwegian network and media provider. Based on our findings, we outline benefits and chal...

  9. Mobile Haptic Technology Development through Artistic Exploration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuartielles, David; Göransson, Andreas; Olsson, Tony

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates how artistic explorations can be useful for the development of mobile haptic technology. It presents an alternative framework of design for wearable haptics that contributes to the building of haptic communities outside specialized research contexts. The paper also present...

  10. Fostering reflective practice with mobile technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo; Verpoorten, Dominique; Ternier, Stefaan; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Tabuenca, B., Verpoorten, D., Ternier, S., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2012). Fostering reflective practice with mobile technologies. In A. Moore, V. Pammer, L. Pannese, M. Prilla, K. Rajagopal, W. Reinhardt, Th. D. Ullman, & Ch. Voigt (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Awareness and

  11. Use of Mobile Phone Technology in Educa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR Nneka

    2015-04-14

    Apr 14, 2015 ... also pave way for a new pedagogical approach where there is unparalleled ability to spread knowledge and disseminate information. This research adopted a survey design which sought information from respondents on the Use of Mobile phone. Technology in Education for Easy Accessibility of ...

  12. 77 FR 35336 - Privacy and Security of Information Stored on Mobile Communications Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-13

    ... Security of Information Stored on Mobile Communications Devices AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission...' mobile communications devices and the application of existing privacy and security requirements to that..., integrating, and updating the device's operating system, preinstalled software, and security capabilities; the...

  13. Software test attacks to break mobile and embedded devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hagar, Jon Duncan

    2013-01-01

    Address Errors before Users Find Them Using a mix-and-match approach, Software Test Attacks to Break Mobile and Embedded Devices presents an attack basis for testing mobile and embedded systems. Designed for testers working in the ever-expanding world of ""smart"" devices driven by software, the book focuses on attack-based testing that can be used by individuals and teams. The numerous test attacks show you when a software product does not work (i.e., has bugs) and provide you with information about the software product under test. The book guides you step by step starting with the basics. It

  14. Measurement campaign on connectivity of mesh networks formed by mobile devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietrarca, Beatrice; Sasso, Giovanni; Perrucci, Gian Paolo

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a measurement campaign on the connectivity level of mobile devices using Bluetooth (BT) to form cooperative mobile mesh networks. Such mobile mesh networks composed of mobile devices are the basis for any peer-to-peer communication like wireless grids or social...... some statistics of the size of the mesh network and type of constituent nodes. This information is essential for analyzing and devising cooperative strategies among the terminals of mesh networks in different scenarios....... networks. The results represent typically worst-case situations, as more and more people tend to switch off their short-range technology due to the battery consumption and the possible attacks. We explore typical public places like airports, convention centers, shopping malls and bars and extract from them...

  15. Measurement campaign on connectivity of mesh networks formed by mobile devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietrarca, Beatrice; Sasso, Giovanni; Perrucci, Gian Paolo

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a measurement campaign on the connectivity level of mobile devices using Bluetooth (BT) to form cooperative mobile mesh networks. Such mobile mesh networks composed of mobile devices are the basis for any peer-to-peer communication like wireless grids or social...... networks. The results represent typically worst-case situations, as more and more people tend to switch off their short-range technology due to the battery consumption and the possible attacks. We explore typical public places like airports, convention centers, shopping malls and bars and extract from them...... some statistics of the size of the mesh network and type of constituent nodes. This information is essential for analyzing and devising cooperative strategies among the terminals of mesh networks in different scenarios....

  16. Mobile Technosoma: some phenomenological reflections on itinerant media devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Richardson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Today’s handheld devices are becoming increasingly multifunctional, portable and interactive technospaces which enfold (and unfold an assortment of media forms. This transformation requires a critical approach that considers mobile media as more than telecommunications tools, but also as hybrid new media interfaces. This article presents some initial thoughts pre-empting a larger research project on the phenomenology of mobile media. From a phenomenological perspective, each body-tool relation induces its own technosoma, or specific ways of ‘being-with-equipment’ in a Heideggerian sense; in this conceptual framework, I explore some of the medium specific and intercorporeal effects of the mobile phone.

  17. Low-temperature mobility measurements on CMOS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairpetian, A.; Gitlin, D.; Viswanathan, C.R.

    1989-01-01

    The surface channel mobility of carriers in eta- and rho-MOS transistors fabricated in a CMOS process was accurately determined at low temperatures down to 5 Κ. The mobility was obtained by an accurate measurement of the inversion charge density using a split C-V technique and the conductance at low drain voltages. The split C-V technique was validated at all temperatures using a one-dimensional Poisson solver (MOSCAP), which was modified for low-temperature application. The mobility dependence on the perpendicular electric field for different substrate bias values appears to have different temperature dependence for eta- and rho-channel devices. The electron mobility increases with a decrease in temperature at all gate voltages. On the other hand, the hole mobility exhibits a different temperature behavior depending upon whether the gate voltage corresponds to strong inversion or is near threshold

  18. Development of technologically important crystals and devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.G.; Tyagi, M.; Desai, D.G.; Singh, A.K.; Tiwari, Babita; Sen, Shashwati; Chauhan, A.K.; Gadkari, S.C.

    2011-01-01

    Device-grade single crystals of technologically important materials for use as scintillators in nuclear radiation detection, lasers and optical devices are grown in Crystal Technology Section of the Technical Physics Division. The expertise has been developed to establish crystal growth processes and design and fabricate crystal growth equipment. In addition, single crystals of new materials to be used in neutron and gamma detection are also being studied and developed currently. The processing, characterization and testing of devices are carried out using in-house facilities as well as in collaboration with other Divisions. (author)

  19. Short-Range Cooperation of Mobile Devices for Energy-Efficient Vertical Handovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenofon Foukas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of multiple collocated wireless networks using heterogeneous technologies and the multiaccess support of contemporary mobile devices have allowed wireless connectivity optimization, enabled through vertical handover (VHO operations. However, this comes at high energy consumption on the mobile device due to the inherently expensive nature of some of the involved operations. This work proposes exploiting short-range cooperation among collocated mobile devices to improve the energy efficiency of vertical handover operations. The proactive exchange of handover-related information through low-energy short-range communication technologies, like Bluetooth, can help in eliminating expensive signaling steps when the need for a VHO arises. A model is developed for capturing the mean energy expenditure of such an optimized VHO scheme in terms of relevant factors by means of closed-form expressions. The descriptive power of the model is demonstrated by investigating various typical usage scenarios and is validated through simulations. It is shown that the proposed scheme has superior performance in several realistic usage scenarios considering important relevant factors, including network availability, the local density of mobile devices, and the range of the cooperation technology. Finally, the paper explores cost/benefit trade-offs associated with the short-range cooperation protocol. It is demonstrated that the protocol may be parametrized so that the trade-off becomes nearly optimized and the cost is maintained affordable for a wide range of operational scenarios.

  20. Solving Real-Life Problems: Future Mobile Technology Sophistication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FARHAN SHAFIQ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Almost all the human being real life concerned domains are taking advantage of latest technologies for enhancing their process, procedures and operations. This integration of technological innovations provides ease of access, flexibility, transparency, reliability and speed for the concerned process and procedures. Rapid growth of ICT (Information and Communication Technology and MT (Mobile Technology provides opportunity to redesign and reengineered the human routines? life activities process and procedures. Technology integration and adoption in routine life activities may serves compensatory mechanism to assist the population in different manner such as monitoring older adults and children at homes, provides security assistance, monitoring and recording patients vital signs automatically, controlling and monitoring equipments and devices, providing assistance in shopping, banking and education as well. Disasters happened suddenly, destroy everything indiscriminately. Adoption and integration of latest technologies including ICT and MT can enhance the current disaster management process, procedures and operations. This research study focuses the impacts of latest and emerging technology trends in routine life activities and surrounds their potential strength to improve and enhance disaster management activities. MT is providing a promising platform for facilitating people to enhance their routine life activities. This research argue that integration and adoption of mobile computing in disaster management domain can enhance disaster management activities with promising minimizing error, quick information assembling, quick response based on technology manipulation and prioritizing action.

  1. Solving real-life problems: future mobile technology sophistication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shafiq, F.; Ahsan, K.; Nadeem, A.

    2016-01-01

    Almost all the human being real life concerned domains are taking advantage of latest technologies for enhancing their process, procedures and operations. This integration of technological innovations provides ease of access, flexibility, transparency, reliability and speed for the concerned process and procedures. Rapid growth of ICT (Information and Communication Technology) and MT (Mobile Technology) provides opportunity to redesign and re-engineered the human routines life activities process and procedures. Technology integration and adoption in routine life activities may serves compensatory mechanism to assist the population in different manner such as monitoring older adults and children at homes, provides security assistance, monitoring and recording patients vital signs automatically, controlling and monitoring equipments and devices, providing assistance in shopping, banking and education as well. Disasters happened suddenly, destroy everything indiscriminately. Adoption and integration of latest technologies including ICT and MT can enhance the current disaster management process, procedures and operations. This research study focuses the impacts of latest and emerging technology trends in routine life activities and surrounds their potential strength to improve and enhance disaster management activities. MT is providing a promising platform for facilitating people to enhance their routine life activities. This research argue that integration and adoption of mobile computing in disaster management domain can enhance disaster management activities with promising minimizing error, quick information assembling, quick response based on technology manipulation and prioritizing action. (author)

  2. Vacuum Technology for Superconducting Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chiggiato, P

    2014-01-01

    The basic notions of vacuum technology for superconducting applications are presented, with an emphasis on mass and heat transport in free molecular regimes. The working principles and practical details of turbomolecular pumps and cryopumps are introduced. The specific case of the Large Hadron Collider’s cryogenic vacuum system is briefly reviewed.

  3. Generating hydrogen for mobile devices; Wasserstofferzeugung fuer die mobile Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, W. [Vodafone Pilotentwicklung GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    In future vehicles, more and more functions will be powered by electricity. These are for example ''steer by wire'', ''break by wire'', air conditioning and infotainment. This growing demand for electricity is a new challenge for the automotive industry. The so called APU (auxilliary power unit) is a convincing solution. This power generating unit based on fuel cell technology will provide electrical power in all operation situations. The article deals with the main focus of P{sup 21}-power for the 21st century, the Mannesmann Fuel Cell Product Center of the Vodafone Pilotentwicklung. (orig.)

  4. Natural Environment Illumination: Coherent Interactive Augmented Reality for Mobile and Non-Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmer, Kai; Jendersie, Johannes; Grosch, Thorsten

    2017-11-01

    Augmented Reality offers many applications today, especially on mobile devices. Due to the lack of mobile hardware for illumination measurements, photorealistic rendering with consistent appearance of virtual objects is still an area of active research. In this paper, we present a full two-stage pipeline for environment acquisition and augmentation of live camera images using a mobile device with a depth sensor. We show how to directly work on a recorded 3D point cloud of the real environment containing high dynamic range color values. For unknown and automatically changing camera settings, a color compensation method is introduced. Based on this, we show photorealistic augmentations using variants of differential light simulation techniques. The presented methods are tailored for mobile devices and run at interactive frame rates. However, our methods are scalable to trade performance for quality and can produce quality renderings on desktop hardware.

  5. CMOS MEMS Fabrication Technologies and Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Qu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor MEMS (micro-electro-mechanical systems fabrication technologies and enabled micro devices of various sensors and actuators. The technologies are classified based on the sequence of the fabrication of CMOS circuitry and MEMS elements, while SOI (silicon-on-insulator CMOS MEMS are introduced separately. Introduction of associated devices follows the description of the respective CMOS MEMS technologies. Due to the vast array of CMOS MEMS devices, this review focuses only on the most typical MEMS sensors and actuators including pressure sensors, inertial sensors, frequency reference devices and actuators utilizing different physics effects and the fabrication processes introduced. Moreover, the incorporation of MEMS and CMOS is limited to monolithic integration, meaning wafer-bonding-based stacking and other integration approaches, despite their advantages, are excluded from the discussion. Both competitive industrial products and state-of-the-art research results on CMOS MEMS are covered.

  6. Mobile Genome Express (MGE: A comprehensive automatic genetic analyses pipeline with a mobile device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Hee Yoon

    Full Text Available The development of next-generation sequencing (NGS technology allows to sequence whole exomes or genome. However, data analysis is still the biggest bottleneck for its wide implementation. Most laboratories still depend on manual procedures for data handling and analyses, which translates into a delay and decreased efficiency in the delivery of NGS results to doctors and patients. Thus, there is high demand for developing an automatic and an easy-to-use NGS data analyses system. We developed comprehensive, automatic genetic analyses controller named Mobile Genome Express (MGE that works in smartphones or other mobile devices. MGE can handle all the steps for genetic analyses, such as: sample information submission, sequencing run quality check from the sequencer, secured data transfer and results review. We sequenced an Actrometrix control DNA containing multiple proven human mutations using a targeted sequencing panel, and the whole analysis was managed by MGE, and its data reviewing program called ELECTRO. All steps were processed automatically except for the final sequencing review procedure with ELECTRO to confirm mutations. The data analysis process was completed within several hours. We confirmed the mutations that we have identified were consistent with our previous results obtained by using multi-step, manual pipelines.

  7. Mobile devices and weak ties: a study of vision impairments and workplace access in Bangalore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Joyojeet; Lakshmanan, Meera

    2015-07-01

    To explore ways in which social and economic interactions are changed by access to mobile telephony. This is a mixed-methods study of mobile phone use among 52 urban professionals with vision impairments in Bangalore, India. Interviews and survey results indicated that mobile devices, specifically those with adaptive technology software, play a vital role as multi-purpose devices that enable people with disabilities to navigate economically and socially in an environment where accessibility remains a significant challenge. We found that mobile devices play a central role in enabling and sustaining weak ties, but also that these weak ties have important gender-specific implications. We found that women have less access to weak ties than men, which impacts women's access to assistive technology (AT). This has potential implications for women's sense of safety and independence, both of which are strongly related to AT access. Implications for Rehabilitation Adaptive technologies increase individuals' ability to keep in contact with casual connections or weak ties through phone calls or social media. Men tend to have stronger access to weak ties than women in India due to cultural impediments to independent access to public spaces. Weak ties are an important source of assistive technology (AT) due to the high rate of resale of used AT, typically through informal networks.

  8. Exploring the Early Universe on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocevski, Dale; McGrath, E. J.; CANDELS Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The widespread adoption of smart phones and tablet computers has the potential to revolutionize the way in which educational material is shared with the general public. As part of the outreach effort for the CANDELS survey, we have developed a free interactive astronomy education application named Hubble Universe for iPad and iPhone devices. The application focuses on extragalactic science topics related to the CANDELS legacy survey, which is documenting galaxy evolution in the early universe. I will provide an overview of the application, which contains a wide range of interactive content, including 3D models of astrophysical phenomenon, informative diagrams and computer simulations. I will discuss how the application can be used to enhance classroom learning both by providing a database of interactive media and by encouraging students to explore astronomical topics away from traditional settings like the classroom or the desktop computer.

  9. Extending access to remote labs from mobile devices in educational contexts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Rochadel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes how to extend the access to remote experiments from mobile devices, aiming to better engage digital native students who expect a more interactive and ubiquitous access mode. The extension is based on features of HTML5 and the jQuery Mobile framework, which allow accessing the experiments from different operating systems via the browser or native applications. As a result, users have a richer interaction mode with the experiments, which includes access from simple hand-held devices such as smartphones and PDAs. Extending the access to remote experiments, from simple devices, enables its use in other educational stages, such as high schools, where teachers struggle to engage students in STEM learning. By enabling students to use their everyday "technological companions", e.g. cellular phones, to access remote experiments, we seek to increase the educational value of this technology-enhanced learning resource.

  10. Wireless power transfer for electric vehicles and mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Rim, Chun T

    2017-01-01

    From mobile, cable-free re-charging of electric vehicles, smart phones and laptops to collecting solar electricity from orbiting solar farms, wireless power transfer (WPT) technologies offer consumers and society enormous benefits. Written by innovators in the field, this comprehensive resource explains the fundamental principles and latest advances in WPT and illustrates key applications of this emergent technology.

  11. Vibration Signaling in Mobile Devices for Emergency Alerting: A Study with Deaf Evaluators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkins, Judith; Tucker, Paula E.; Williams, Norman; Sauro, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    In the United States, a nationwide Commercial Mobile Alert Service (CMAS) is being planned to alert cellular mobile device subscribers to emergencies occurring near the location of the mobile device. The plan specifies a unique audio attention signal as well as a unique vibration attention signal (for mobile devices set to vibrate) to identify…

  12. An experiment with content distribution methods in touchscreen mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lopez, Eva; Garcia-Cabot, Antonio; de-Marcos, Luis

    2015-09-01

    This paper compares the usability of three different content distribution methods (scrolling, paging and internal links) in touchscreen mobile devices as means to display web documents. Usability is operationalized in terms of effectiveness, efficiency and user satisfaction. These dimensions are then measured in an experiment (N = 23) in which users are required to find words in regular-length web documents. Results suggest that scrolling is statistically better in terms of efficiency and user satisfaction. It is also found to be more effective but results were not significant. Our findings are also compared with existing literature to propose the following guideline: "try to use vertical scrolling in web pages for mobile devices instead of paging or internal links, except when the content is too large, then paging is recommended". With an ever increasing number of touchscreen web-enabled mobile devices, this new guideline can be relevant for content developers targeting the mobile web as well as institutions trying to improve the usability of their content for mobile platforms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  13. Mobile Technology in Second Language Classrooms: Insights into Its Uses, Pedagogical Implications, and Teacher Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Praag, Benjamin; Sanchez, Hugo Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Adopting a multiple-case, multiple-method design, this study investigates mobile technology use in the practices of three experienced second language teachers. The findings, based on an analysis of the teachers' rationales, stated beliefs and classroom actions, show that the teachers tend to prohibit or reluctantly tolerate mobile device usage,…

  14. Examining Informal Learning Using Mobile Devices in the Healthcare Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlman, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    The study of workplace learning and informal learning are not new to adult education and pedagogy. However, the use of mobile devices as learning tools for informal learning in the workplace is an understudied area. Using theories on informal learning and constructivism as a framework, this paper explores informal learning of registered nurses…

  15. How Mobile Devices Affect Students According to Teachers' Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumaoglu, Gonca Kizilkaya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine teachers' beliefs concerning the effects on students using mobile devices, and to determine whether these beliefs vary according to the demographic characteristics and Internet usage purposes. For this purpose, a demographic information questionnaire and the scale developed by Diker Coskun & Kizilkaya…

  16. Using Mobile Devices for Motor-Learning Laboratory Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kory

    2014-01-01

    When teaching motor-learning concepts, laboratory experiments can be valuable tools for promoting learning. In certain circumstances, traditional laboratory exercises are often impractical due to facilities, time, or cost. Inexpensive or free applications (apps) that run on mobile devices can serve as useful alternatives. This article details…

  17. The Impact of Digital Mobile Devices in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevillano-García, M.ª Luisa; Vázquez-Cano, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    This research examined the acceptance, incidence, and use of digital mobile devices (tablets and smartphones) among university students in the European Higher Education Area (EHEA). The research was contextualized in a sample of 419 students from three Spanish public universities. Through a quantitative methodology, we identified the factors and…

  18. Generic Dynamic Environment Perception Using Smart Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danescu, Radu; Itu, Razvan; Petrovai, Andra

    2016-10-17

    The driving environment is complex and dynamic, and the attention of the driver is continuously challenged, therefore computer based assistance achieved by processing image and sensor data may increase traffic safety. While active sensors and stereovision have the advantage of obtaining 3D data directly, monocular vision is easy to set up, and can benefit from the increasing computational power of smart mobile devices, and from the fact that almost all of them come with an embedded camera. Several driving assistance application are available for mobile devices, but they are mostly targeted for simple scenarios and a limited range of obstacle shapes and poses. This paper presents a technique for generic, shape independent real-time obstacle detection for mobile devices, based on a dynamic, free form 3D representation of the environment: the particle based occupancy grid. Images acquired in real time from the smart mobile device's camera are processed by removing the perspective effect and segmenting the resulted bird-eye view image to identify candidate obstacle areas, which are then used to update the occupancy grid. The occupancy grid tracked cells are grouped into obstacles depicted as cuboids having position, size, orientation and speed. The easy to set up system is able to reliably detect most obstacles in urban traffic, and its measurement accuracy is comparable to a stereovision system.

  19. Network Coding Opportunities for Wireless Grids Formed by Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karsten Fyhn; Madsen, Tatiana Kozlova; Fitzek, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Wireless grids have potential in sharing communication, computational and storage resources making these networks more powerful, more robust, and less cost intensive. However, to enjoy the benefits of cooperative resource sharing, a number of issues should be addressed and the cost of the wireles...... implementation demonstrates the feasibility of network coding for wireless grids formed by mobile devices....

  20. Urbmobi. A mobile measurement device for urban environmental monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, E.J.; Mark, P.J. van der; Nieuwkoop, E.

    2014-01-01

    Within the Urbmobi research project, a novel mobile measurement device is developed for urban areas. It provides temporally and spatially distributed environmental data and fulfills the need for monitoring at various places without the costs for a large number of fixed measurement stations. Urbmobi

  1. Mobile Devices and Apps as Accelerators for OER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vries, Fred; Thuss, Frank

    2013-01-01

    De Vries, F., & Thuss, F. (2013). Mobile Devices and Apps as accelerators for OER. In R. Jacobi, H. Jelgerhuis, & N. Van der Woert (Eds.), Trendreport Open Educational Resources 2013 (pp. 49-52). Utrecht: SURF Foundation - Special Interest Group Open Educational Resources SURF.

  2. Using Mobile Device Samples to Estimate Traffic Volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    In this project, TTI worked with StreetLight Data to evaluate a beta version of its traffic volume estimates derived from global positioning system (GPS)-based mobile devices. TTI evaluated the accuracy of average annual daily traffic (AADT) volume :...

  3. Screen Time: Alumni Magazines Have Their Designs on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Alumni magazines have their designs on mobile devices. The efforts are tied together, no matter the platform, by a desire for the magazine to be where its readers are and a spirit of experimentation that is akin to what is happening with social media. None of the magazine editors went into this process with any numerical expectations for…

  4. Object tracking on mobile devices using binary descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savakis, Andreas; Quraishi, Mohammad Faiz; Minnehan, Breton

    2015-03-01

    With the growing ubiquity of mobile devices, advanced applications are relying on computer vision techniques to provide novel experiences for users. Currently, few tracking approaches take into consideration the resource constraints on mobile devices. Designing efficient tracking algorithms and optimizing performance for mobile devices can result in better and more efficient tracking for applications, such as augmented reality. In this paper, we use binary descriptors, including Fast Retina Keypoint (FREAK), Oriented FAST and Rotated BRIEF (ORB), Binary Robust Independent Features (BRIEF), and Binary Robust Invariant Scalable Keypoints (BRISK) to obtain real time tracking performance on mobile devices. We consider both Google's Android and Apple's iOS operating systems to implement our tracking approach. The Android implementation is done using Android's Native Development Kit (NDK), which gives the performance benefits of using native code as well as access to legacy libraries. The iOS implementation was created using both the native Objective-C and the C++ programing languages. We also introduce simplified versions of the BRIEF and BRISK descriptors that improve processing speed without compromising tracking accuracy.

  5. Multimodal approaches to use mobile, digital devices in learning practies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    that support and facilitate the processes of transforming experiences into theoretical knowledge. I argue that this didactic concept enhances a sensitive cognition based on rationality as described by the philosopher Baumgarten (1750). Furthermore, I argue that the emergence of mobile digital devices...

  6. Accuracy Enhancements for Positioning of Mobile Devices in Wireless Communication Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueiras, Joao

    Positioning of mobile devices in wireless communication networks is nowadays being intensively investigated due to the combined benefit of location information and communication. Typical solutions for such scenario rely on robust algorithms that estimate position from indirect measurements...... systems. Since the measurement sampling is also important for tracking moving devices, the first analysis concerns the latency time for obtaining location information in short-range ad-hoc networks. Bluetooth is the elected technology since it is an actual example of such kind of networks. Simulations......, tracking wireless devices is a challenging problem. In order to get better results, we propose a solution which restricts the movement models of the mobile devices. This restriction, by relying on the assumption that users typically move in segment-wise linear trajectories, outperforms the standard...

  7. The UX of amila pregnancy on mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.; Fadzil, Najdawati Mohd; Hassan, Norhasizasuriati Mohd

    2017-10-01

    The increased use of mobile devices has led to an upsurge in the number of mobile applications. This makes the usability of these applications a very crucial and critical issue. The Amila Pregnancy mobile app is revolutionizing the delivery of healthcare services to pregnancy woman across the globe and is increasingly becoming beneficial in their daily life. Only a few digital interventions have been developed for pregnant woman, and little is known about the acceptability and usability of such mobile apps that provide assistance to pregnant women. Usability comprises everything that is connected with the intuitive and efficient handling of user interaction with human-made devices. This paper reports the result of a usability evaluation for Amila Pregnancy mobile application. In the study five attributes of perceived usability was measured following Jakob Nielsen principles, namely: effectiveness, efficiency, learnability, memorability and satisfaction. In addition, performance metrics were also captured. The results reveal the difficulty users had in interpreting displayed icon, locating the information provided, re-finding it and in navigating through the mobile app. The study suggests that the main menu of the app need to be further improved upon to enhance its usability.

  8. Multivariate spatiotemporal visualizations for mobile devices in Flyover Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, S.; Thorn, R.; Myrbo, A.; Roth, R.; Goring, S. J.; Williams, J.

    2017-12-01

    Visualizing and interacting with complex multivariate and spatiotemporal datasets on mobile devices is challenging due to their smaller screens, reduced processing power, and limited data connectivity. Pollen data require visualizing pollen assemblages spatially, temporally, and across multiple taxa to understand plant community dynamics through time. Drawing from cartography, information visualization, and paleoecology, we have created new mobile-first visualization techniques that represent multiple taxa across many sites and enable user interaction. Using pollen datasets from the Neotoma Paleoecology Database as a case study, the visualization techniques allow ecological patterns and trends to be quickly understood on a mobile device compared to traditional pollen diagrams and maps. This flexible visualization system can be used for datasets beyond pollen, with the only requirements being point-based localities and multiple variables changing through time or depth.

  9. Developing E-learning Courses for Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Szabados

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent and rapid development of mobile devices and the increasing popularity of e learning have created a demand for mobile learning packages and environments. We have analyzed the possibilities of adapting the existing content for mobile devices, and have implemented two fundamentally different systems to satisfy the demand that has arisen. One of the systems creates e learning courses from existing materials and adapts them to the specified platform (this system realizes the functionalities of the Content Management System. The other system is a modified version of the Moodle Learning Management System, which can adapt existing courses right before displaying them. This paper discuses the fundamentals of e learning, the design considerations and investigates various methods of scalable video coding. Finally the realization details of the two systems are presented. 

  10. 2nd International Conference on Mobile and Wireless Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wattanapongsakorn, Naruemon

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a snapshot of the current state-of-the-art in the fields of mobile and wireless technology, security and applications.  The proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on Mobile and Wireless Technology (ICMWT2015), it represents the outcome of a unique platform for researchers and practitioners from academia and industry to share cutting-edge developments in the field of mobile and wireless science technology, including those working on data management and mobile security.   The contributions presented here describe the latest academic and industrial research from the international mobile and wireless community.  The scope covers four major topical areas: mobile and wireless networks and applications; security in mobile and wireless technology; mobile data management and applications; and mobile software.  The book will be a valuable reference for current researchers in academia and industry, and a useful resource for graduate-level students working on mobile and wireless technology...

  11. Optimizing IEEE 802.11i resource and security essentials for mobile and stationary devices

    CERN Document Server

    Amiri, IS; Saberi, Iman

    2014-01-01

    In the past decade, the number of wireless devices has grown exponentially. Decades ago, all systems were wired computer systems. Wireless technology was not accessible in mobile and portable devices until in recent years, and has followed a variety of methods for encryption and resource management. The purpose of the research in Optimizing IEE 802.11i Resources and Security Essentials is to determine the issues of the performance in current encryption methods in AES-CCMP in different types of devices and handle it so that an optimized resource usage would be achieved with the required securi

  12. Nightmares with Mobile Devices Are Just Around the Corner!

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt Derr

    2007-03-01

    Mobile Devices (MDs) such as Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs), smart phones, handheld personal computers, and Tablet PCs, are proliferating in the marketplace. Cheap and ubiquitous mobile computing devices represent computing’s fifth wave [1], bringing about new opportunities in the marketplace. As MDs become more powerful and commonplace with ubiquitous connectivity, the line that currently divides these handheld devices from typical network computers will become very unclear. Mobile devices have become integrated into the business processes of both government and commercial institutions. MDs are small, portable, and able to store large amounts of information. The breadth of communication options (infrared, wireless, docking station) for MDs introduces many security risks. Some of the problems associated with MDs are: easy to loose, misplace, or have stolen, potential loss/comprise of company data (user ids, passwords, contacts, sensitive documentation, credit card numbers), increases the opportunity for a backdoor into an enterprise’s network, lack of authentication and limited logging capability. The use of these devices poses a risk to the security of an organization.

  13. Fostering learners' interaction with content: A learner-centered mobile device interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdous, M.

    2015-12-01

    With the ever-increasing omnipresence of mobile devices in student life, leveraging smart devices to foster students' interaction with course content is critical. Following a learner-centered design iterative approach, we designed a mobile interface that may enable learners to access and interact with online course content efficiently and intuitively. Our design process leveraged recent technologies, such as bootstrap, Google's Material Design, HTML5, and JavaScript to design an intuitive, efficient, and portable mobile interface with a variety of built-in features, including context sensitive bookmarking, searching, progress tracking, captioning, and transcript display. The mobile interface also offers students the ability to ask context-related questions and to complete self-checks as they watch audio/video presentations. Our design process involved ongoing iterative feedback from learners, allowing us to refine and tweak the interface to provide learners with a unified experience across platforms and devices. The innovative combination of technologies built around well-structured and well-designed content seems to provide an effective learning experience to mobile learners. Early feedback indicates a high level of satisfaction with the interface's efficiency, intuitiveness, and robustness from both students and faculty.

  14. Persuasive Mobile Device Sound Sensing in a Classroom Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arttu Perttula

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an idea on how to utilize mobile phones to support learning in the classroom. The paper also tries to initiate discussion on whether we can create new kinds of learning applications using mobile devices and whether this could be the way we should proceed in developing 21st century learning applications. In this study, a mobile phone is programmed to function as a collective sound sensor. To achieve an appropriate learning atmosphere, the designed system attempts to maintain the noise level at a comfortable tolerance level in the classroom. The main aim of the mobile application is to change student behaviour through persuasive visualizations. The prototype application was piloted during spring 2012 with a total of 72 students and two teachers. The results, based on observations and interviews, are promising and several subjects for future work arose during the pilot study.

  15. RFID technology for human implant devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Hervé

    2011-09-01

    This article presents an overview on Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology for human implants and investigates the technological feasibility of such implants for locating and tracking persons or for remotely controlling human biological functions. Published results on the miniaturization of implantable passive RFID devices are reported as well as a discussion on the choice of the transmission frequency in wireless communication between a passive RFID device implanted inside human body and an off-body interrogator. The two techniques (i.e., inductive coupling and electromagnetic coupling) currently used for wirelessly supplying power to and read data from a passive implantable RFID device are described and some documented biomedical and therapeutic applications of human RFID-implant devices are finally reported.

  16. Can E-Payment Systems Revolutionize Finance of the Less Developed Countries? The Case of Mobile Payment Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmi Hamdi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological progress in mobile industry makes mobile phones the most adopted technology of the last decade by the rich as well as poor. Mobile phones were at first intended for voice communication; nowadays they are used for sending and receiving information and they provide many advanced services to their users. Recent generation of mobile phones allows consumers to carry out transactions in the real and the virtual world by the use of mobile devices through mobile network. It is done by using mobile device such as Cell phone or PDA which is connected to payment access using mobile operator network. The aim of this paper is to analyze the technological evolution of mobile phones and to identify the macroeconomic consequences of their introduction into the financial sector.

  17. Accessibility of Mobile Devices for Visually Impaired Users: An Evaluation of the Screen-Reader VoiceOver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaradottir, Berglind; Håland, Jarle; Martinez, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    A mobile device's touchscreen allows users to use a choreography of hand gestures to interact with the user interface. A screen reader on a mobile device is designed to support the interaction of visually disabled users while using gestures. This paper presents an evaluation of VoiceOver, a screen reader in Apple Inc. products. The evaluation was a part of the research project "Visually impaired users touching the screen - a user evaluation of assistive technology".

  18. Characterizing Information Processing With a Mobile Device: Measurement of Simple and Choice Reaction Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Daniel; Linder, Susan; Hirsch, Joshua; Dey, Tanujit; Kana, Daniel; Ringenbach, Shannon; Schindler, David; Alberts, Jay

    2017-10-01

    Information processing is typically evaluated using simple reaction time (SRT) and choice reaction time (CRT) paradigms in which a specific response is initiated following a given stimulus. The measurement of reaction time (RT) has evolved from monitoring the timing of mechanical switches to computerized paradigms. The proliferation of mobile devices with touch screens makes them a natural next technological approach to assess information processing. The aims of this study were to determine the validity and reliability of using of a mobile device (Apple iPad or iTouch) to accurately measure RT. Sixty healthy young adults completed SRT and CRT tasks using a traditional test platform and mobile platforms on two occasions. The SRT was similar across test modality: 300, 287, and 280 milliseconds (ms) for the traditional, iPad, and iTouch, respectively. The CRT was similar within mobile devices, though slightly faster on the traditional: 359, 408, and 384 ms for traditional, iPad, and iTouch, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from 0.79 to 0.85 for SRT and from 0.75 to 0.83 for CRT. The similarity and reliability of SRT across platforms and consistency of SRT and CRT across test conditions indicate that mobile devices provide the next generation of assessment platforms for information processing.

  19. An Optimal Mobile Service for Telecare Data Synchronization using a Role-based Access Control Model and Mobile Peer-to-Peer Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Chih-Kun; Lin, Zheng-Hua

    2015-09-01

    The progress of information and communication technologies (ICT) has promoted the development of healthcare which has enabled the exchange of resources and services between organizations. Organizations want to integrate mobile devices into their hospital information systems (HIS) due to the convenience to employees who are then able to perform specific healthcare processes from any location. The collection and merage of healthcare data from discrete mobile devices are worth exploring possible ways for further use, especially in remote districts without public data network (PDN) to connect the HIS. In this study, we propose an optimal mobile service which automatically synchronizes the telecare file resources among discrete mobile devices. The proposed service enforces some technical methods. The role-based access control model defines the telecare file resources accessing mechanism; the symmetric data encryption method protects telecare file resources transmitted over a mobile peer-to-peer network. The multi-criteria decision analysis method, ELECTRE (Elimination Et Choice Translating Reality), evaluates multiple criteria of the candidates' mobile devices to determine a ranking order. This optimizes the synchronization of telecare file resources among discrete mobile devices. A prototype system is implemented to examine the proposed mobile service. The results of the experiment show that the proposed mobile service can automatically and effectively synchronize telecare file resources among discrete mobile devices. The contribution of this experiment is to provide an optimal mobile service that enhances the security of telecare file resource synchronization and strengthens an organization's mobility.

  20. Mobile technologies as a health care tool

    CERN Document Server

    Arslan, Pelin

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a state-of-the-art overview of the available and emerging mobile technologies and explores how these technologies can serve as support tools in enhancing user participation in health care and promoting well-being in the daily lives of individuals, thereby reducing the burden of chronic disease on the health care system. The analysis is supported by presentation of a variety of case studies on the ways in which mobile technologies can be used to increase connectivity with health care providers and relevant others in order to promote healthy lifestyles and improve service provision. Detailed information is also provided on a sample project in which a set of tools has been used by teens at risk of obesity to record their sociopsychological environment and everyday health routines. Specifically, it is evaluated whether video diaries, created using a mobile platform and shared in real time via a social network, assist subjects in confronting obesity as a chronic disease. The book will be of inte...

  1. Distance adaptive three-dimensional display based on mobile portable devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiao-lei; Sang, Xin-zhu; Yan, Bin-bin; Yuan, Jin-hui

    2013-08-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) display can offer the viewer the realism, which is the candidate for the next-generation imaging. 3D display technology without wearing glasses has become research focus. Currently the display of mobile devices is evolved towards 3D. Mobile devices limit the viewing range due to their mass production as well as the algorithm of relative fixity. Only in the area can be achieved a good viewing experience, which leads to the inconvenience for the viewer. The distance adaptive three-dimensional display based on mobile devices is presented. We analyzed the relationship between the viewing distance and the number of pixels for each viewpoint. Based on the viewing distance detected by sensor, the proposed method automatically adjusts the pixels for each viewpoint to accommodate different viewing distance for mobile portable devices. So the method realizes the adaptive distance between the viewer and the device, The experience of viewing 3D images is also improved, as well as the viewing areas is expanded. The crosstalk and the normalized brightness of the 3D picture after restructuring in different distance are measured. Experimental results show that the algorithm with matching parallax barrier can achieve a good 3D view experience at the different distances.

  2. Use of mobile technology in a community mental health setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Gretl; Druss, Benjamin; Pina, Jamie; Lally, Cathy; Conde, Mark

    2016-10-01

    mHealth holds promise in transforming care for people with serious mental illness (SMI) and other disadvantaged populations. However, information about the rates of smartphone ownership and usage of mobile health apps among people with SMI is limited. The objective of this research is to examine the current ownership, usage patterns, and existing barriers to mobile health interventions for people with SMI treated in a public sector community mental health setting and to compare the findings with national usage patterns from the general population. A survey was conducted to determine rates of ownership of smartphone devices among people with SMI. Surveys were administered to 100 patients with SMI at an outpatient psychiatric clinic. Results were compared with respondents to the 2012 Pew Survey of mobile phone usage. A total of 85% of participants reported that they owned a cell phone; of those, 37% reported that they owned a smartphone, as compared with 53% of respondents to the Pew Survey and 44% of socioeconomically disadvantaged respondents to the Pew Survey. While cell phone ownership is common among people with SMI, their adoption of smartphone technology lags behind that of the general population primarily due to cost barriers. Efforts to use mHealth in these populations need to recognize current mobile ownership patterns while planning for anticipated expansion of new technologies to poor populations as cost barriers are reduced in the coming years. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Accessing best practice resources using mobile technology in an undergraduate nursing program: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Elizabeth G; Medves, Jennifer; Vandenkerkhof, Elizabeth G

    2015-03-01

    Mobile technology presents new opportunities for nursing education and ultimately the provision of nursing care. The aim of this study was to explore the utility of mobile technology in undergraduate nursing education. In this evaluation study, undergraduate nursing students were provided with iPod Touch devices containing best practice guidelines. Computer self-efficacy was assessed, and the Theory of Planned Behavior was used to identify potential predictors of the use of mobile technology. Questionnaires were completed at baseline (n = 33) and postimplementation (n = 23). Feedback on feasibility issues was recorded throughout the study period. Students generally found the devices useful, and few technical problems were identified; however, lack of skill in using the devices and lack of support from staff in the clinical setting were commonly identified issues. Self-efficacy scores were high throughout the study. Attitudes, perceptions of the desirability of use, perceived personal control over use, and intentions of using the device were lower postimplementation than at baseline. Attitude toward the technology predicted intention to use the device after graduation. Mobile technology may promote evidence-informed practice; however, supporting students' acquisition of related skills may optimize use. Successful integration of mobile technology into practice requires attention to factors that affect student attitudes.

  4. Handbook of terahertz technologies devices and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Ho-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Terahertz waves, which lie in the frequency range of 0.1-10 THz, have long been investigated in a few limited fields, such as astronomy, because of a lack of devices for their generation and detection. Several technical breakthroughs made over the last couple of decades now allow us to radiate and detect terahertz waves more easily, which has triggered the search for new uses of terahertz waves in many fields, such as bioscience, security, and information and communications technology. The book covers some of the technical breakthroughs in terms of device technologies. It discusses not only th

  5. Using Mobile Devices to Connect Teachers and Museum Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delen, Ibrahim; Krajcik, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    The use of mobile devices is increasing rapidly as a potential tool for science teaching. In this study, five educators (three middle school teachers and two museum educators) used a mobile application that supported the development of a driving question. Previous studies have noted that teachers make little effort to connect learning experiences between classrooms and museums, and few studies have focused on creating connections between teachers and museum educators. In this study, teachers and museum educators created an investigation together by designing a driving question in conjunction with the research group before field trips. During field trips, students collected their own data using iPods or iPads to take pictures or record videos of the exhibits. When students returned to the school, they used the museum data with their peers as they tried to answer the driving question. After completing the field trips, five educators were interviewed to investigate their experiences with designing driving questions and using mobile devices. Besides supporting students in data collection during the field trip, using mobile devices helped teachers to get the museum back to the classroom. Designing the driving question supported museum educators and teachers to plan the field trip collaboratively.

  6. Colorimetric Characterization of Mobile Devices for Vision Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fez, Dolores; Luque, Maria José; García-Domene, Maria Carmen; Camps, Vicente; Piñero, David

    2016-01-01

    Available applications for vision testing in mobile devices usually do not include detailed setup instructions, sacrificing rigor to obtain portability and ease of use. In particular, colorimetric characterization processes are generally obviated. We show that different mobile devices differ also in colorimetric profile and that those differences limit the range of applications for which they are most adequate. The color reproduction characteristics of four mobile devices, two smartphones (Samsung Galaxy S4, iPhone 4s) and two tablets (Samsung Galaxy Tab 3, iPad 4), have been evaluated using two procedures: 3D LUT (Look Up Table) and a linear model assuming primary constancy and independence of the channels. The color reproduction errors have been computed with the CIEDE2000 color difference formula. There is good constancy of primaries but large deviations of additivity. The 3D LUT characterization yields smaller reproduction errors and dispersions for the Tab 3 and iPhone 4 devices, but for the iPad 4 and S4, both models are equally good. The smallest reproduction errors occur with both Apple devices, although the iPad 4 has the highest number of outliers of all devices with both colorimetric characterizations. Even though there is good constancy of primaries, the large deviations of additivity exhibited by the devices and the larger reproduction errors make any characterization based on channel independence not recommendable. The smartphone screens show, in average, the best color reproduction performance, particularly the iPhone 4, and therefore, they are more adequate for applications requiring precise color reproduction.

  7. Secure, Mobile, Wireless Network Technology Designed, Developed, and Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.; Paulsen, Phillip E.

    2004-01-01

    The inability to seamlessly disseminate data securely over a high-integrity, wireless broadband network has been identified as a primary technical barrier to providing an order-of-magnitude increase in aviation capacity and safety. Secure, autonomous communications to and from aircraft will enable advanced, automated, data-intensive air traffic management concepts, increase National Air Space (NAS) capacity, and potentially reduce the overall cost of air travel operations. For the first time ever, secure, mobile, network technology was designed, developed, and demonstrated with state-ofthe- art protocols and applications by a diverse, cooperative Government-industry team led by the NASA Glenn Research Center. This revolutionary technology solution will make fundamentally new airplane system capabilities possible by enabling secure, seamless network connections from platforms in motion (e.g., cars, ships, aircraft, and satellites) to existing terrestrial systems without the need for manual reconfiguration. Called Mobile Router, the new technology autonomously connects and configures networks as they traverse from one operating theater to another. The Mobile Router demonstration aboard the Neah Bay, a U.S. Coast Guard vessel stationed in Cleveland, Ohio, accomplished secure, seamless interoperability of mobile network systems across multiple domains without manual system reconfiguration. The Neah Bay was chosen because of its low cost and communications mission similarity to low-Earth-orbiting satellite platforms. This technology was successfully advanced from technology readiness level (TRL) 2 (concept and/or application formation) to TRL 6 (system model or prototype demonstration in a relevant environment). The secure, seamless interoperability offered by the Mobile Router and encryption device will enable several new, vehicle-specific and systemwide technologies to perform such things as remote, autonomous aircraft performance monitoring and early detection and

  8. Virtual instrumentation on mobile devices for deployment in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Marcos Santana; Santos, Isaac Jose A. Luquetti dos; Jesus, Miller F. de; Sant'Anna, Claudio Reis de; Szabo, Andre Pedro; Carvalho, Paulo Victor R. de

    2013-01-01

    The virtual instrumentation can be defined as a layer of software and hardware, added to a general purpose computer, so that users can interact with the computer in the same way that they interacted with traditional electronic instruments such as oscilloscopes, multi-meters and signal generators, and may add other functions defined by software. The virtual instrumentation gets a new integration environment, little explored yet, with the great growth that occurred in the mobile devices area. Nowadays it is possible to take measurements in more places by combining mobile devices with data acquisition hardware to create extremely portable and interconnected measurement systems. This paper shows the development of software and hardware that make possible the use of instrumentation on mobile devices for monitoring nuclear installations. It's presented the hardware and the application software for data acquisition of radiation monitors, developed to iOS devices. It's also shown the possibilities of hardware and software to develop near real-time data transfer to and from the field in nuclear installations, with benefits in efficiency, safety and productivity. (author)

  9. Moving Bravely towards Mobile Learning: Iranian Students' Use of Mobile Devices for Learning English as a Foreign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashtestani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, students have shown growing interest in mobile learning and the use of mobile devices for learning English as a foreign language (EFL). However, it appears that further research needs to be undertaken to identify students' use of mobile devices and their attitudes towards them, especially in developing countries. To achieve this…

  10. Organisational Capabilities Required for Enabling Employee Mobility through Bring- Your-Own-Device Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toperesu B-Abee

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mobile device adoption is on the rise and people are increasingly using mobile devices as a part of their lives. Studies have shown that people can use mobile devices to perform their work duties from anywhere. Organisations are now exploring ways of enabling and supporting mobility for employees’ mobile devices, including BYOD (Bring-Your-Own-Device policies. Objective: The objective of this study is to identify the main capabilities required for enterprise mobility. Methods/Approach: This qualitative research study presents empirical results based on interviews with selected senior IS managers of large organizations. Results: The main findings of this study suggest that information security and mobile device management are among the main capabilities required for enterprise mobility. Conclusions: Enterprise mobility is an emerging field which has received very little research attention. More research in the field will help organisations make informed decisions on how to increase productivity, sales and efficiency while achieving employee satisfaction through enterprise mobility.

  11. Mobile health a technology road map

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive report on the technological aspects of Mobile Health (mHealth) and discusses the main challenges and future directions in the field. It is divided into eight parts:  (1) preventive and curative medicine;  (2) remote health monitoring; (3) interoperability; (4) framework, architecture, and software/hardware systems;  (5) cloud applications; (6) radio technologies and applications; (7) communication networks and systems; and (8) security and privacy mechanisms. The first two parts cover sensor-based and bedside systems for remotely monitoring patients’ health condition, which aim at preventing the development of health problems and managing the prognosis of acute and chronic diseases. The related chapters discuss how new sensing and wireless technologies can offer accurate and cost-effective means for monitoring and evaluating behavior of individuals with dementia and psychiatric disorders, such as wandering behavior and sleep impairments. The following two parts focus on a...

  12. 78 FR 34132 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Docket No 2958] Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof; Correction to Notice of Receipt of Complaint; Solicitation... of complaint entitled Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and...

  13. 77 FR 15390 - Certain Mobile Electronic Devices Incorporating Haptics; Receipt of Amended Complaint...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [DN 2875] Certain Mobile Electronic Devices Incorporating Haptics.... International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received an amended complaint entitled Certain Mobile Electronic Devices...

  14. Transformation of Teacher Practice Using Mobile Technology with One-to-One Classes: M-Learning Pedagogical Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    The rapid global uptake of mobile technology is reflected in pioneering New Zealand schools. Teachers of classes where each student uses a mobile device were surveyed on how frequently they use various mobile learning activities and asked to describe the new pedagogical opportunities it offers. The teachers' m-learning pedagogical approaches and…

  15. C-RAM: breaking mobile device memory barriers using the cloud

    OpenAIRE

    Pamboris, A; Pietzuch, P

    2015-01-01

    ?Mobile applications are constrained by the available memory of mobile devices. We present C-RAM, a system that uses cloud-based memory to extend the memory of mobile devices. It splits application state and its associated computation between a mobile device and a cloud node to allow applications to consume more memory, while minimising the performance impact. C-RAM thus enables developers to realise new applications or port legacy desktop applications with a large memory footprint to mobile ...

  16. News from the Library: PressDisplay on mobile devices!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2013-01-01

    You are probably already using PressDisplay to read newspapers online, but for those of you who are not yet aware of this service, PressDisplay is an online portal where you can browse and read online articles from more than 1,900 newspapers from 95 countries, as soon as they are published.   Whether you are an experienced user or a beginner, we have good news concerning PressDisplay: our license now permits you to download complete newspaper issues to your mobile devices and read them offline wherever you like. To do that, you have to use the mobile app PressReader. Instructions on how to install the PressReader app are available here: For Ipad For Android smartphone For Android tablet For Windows 8 devices For BlackBerry Playbook For Android eReader Your feedback is welcome! Please contact us by e-mail.

  17. Mobile Devices and GPU Parallelism in Ionospheric Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascharka, D.; Pankratius, V.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific data acquisition in the field is often constrained by data transfer backchannels to analysis environments. Geoscientists are therefore facing practical bottlenecks with increasing sensor density and variety. Mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, offer promising solutions to key problems in scientific data acquisition, pre-processing, and validation by providing advanced capabilities in the field. This is due to affordable network connectivity options and the increasing mobile computational power. This contribution exemplifies a scenario faced by scientists in the field and presents the "Mahali TEC Processing App" developed in the context of the NSF-funded Mahali project. Aimed at atmospheric science and the study of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC), this app is able to gather data from various dual-frequency GPS receivers. It demonstrates parsing of full-day RINEX files on mobile devices and on-the-fly computation of vertical TEC values based on satellite ephemeris models that are obtained from NASA. Our experiments show how parallel computing on the mobile device GPU enables fast processing and visualization of up to 2 million datapoints in real-time using OpenGL. GPS receiver bias is estimated through minimum TEC approximations that can be interactively adjusted by scientists in the graphical user interface. Scientists can also perform approximate computations for "quickviews" to reduce CPU processing time and memory consumption. In the final stage of our mobile processing pipeline, scientists can upload data to the cloud for further processing. Acknowledgements: The Mahali project (http://mahali.mit.edu) is funded by the NSF INSPIRE grant no. AGS-1343967 (PI: V. Pankratius). We would like to acknowledge our collaborators at Boston College, Virginia Tech, Johns Hopkins University, Colorado State University, as well as the support of UNAVCO for loans of dual-frequency GPS receivers for use in this project, and Intel for loans of

  18. Virtual reality for mobility devices: training applications and clinical results: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erren-Wolters, Catelijne Victorien; van Dijk, Henk; de Kort, Alexander C; Ijzerman, Maarten J; Jannink, Michiel J

    2007-06-01

    Virtual reality technology is an emerging technology that possibly can address the problems encountered in training (elderly) people to handle a mobility device. The objective of this review was to study different virtual reality training applications as well as their clinical implication for patients with mobility problems. Computerized literature searches were performed using the MEDLINE, Cochrane, CIRRIE and REHABDATA databases. This resulted in eight peer reviewed journal articles. The included studies could be divided into three categories, on the basis of their study objective. Five studies were related to training driving skills, two to physical exercise training and one to leisure activity. This review suggests that virtual reality is a potentially useful means to improve the use of a mobility device, in training one's driving skills, for keeping up the physical condition and also in a way of leisure time activity. Although this field of research appears to be in its early stages, the included studies pointed out a promising transfer of training in a virtual environment to the real-life use of mobility devices.

  19. Personal Digital Rights Management for Mobile Cellular Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Siddharth; Carbunar, Bogdan; Sion, Radu; Vasudevan, Venu

    Driven by an unparalleled advance in network infrastructure support as well as a boom in the number of interconnected personal communication, computation and storage devices, the modern mobile customer experience has become increasingly compelling. Traditional barriers between the roles of information consumer and producer have disappeared. Users increasingly produce and distribute valuable and often personal content such as pictures and free or purchased copyrighted media. It becomes essential to enable user-level DRM controls for content access, data integrity and rights management.

  20. Content Sharing using Smart Mobile Devices in Irregular Meeting Places

    OpenAIRE

    SHAHRIAR KAISAR

    2018-01-01

    The evolution of smart mobile devices has significantly impacted the way people access and share contents. Existing content sharing schemes require an Internet connection to be always available. However, many places lack Internet connectivity and Internet traffic is also increasing at a rapid speed. Therefore, to alleviate the requirement of having such a persistent connection, this thesis presents novel decentralized content sharing techniques, specifically targeting tourist spot type scenar...

  1. Mobile technology in health information systems - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X-Y; Zhang, P-Y

    2016-05-01

    Mobile technology is getting involved in every sphere of life including medical health care. There has been an immense upsurge in mobile phone-based health innovations these days. The expansion of mobile phone networks and the proliferation of inexpensive mobile handsets have made the digital information and communication technology capabilities very handy for the people to exploit if for any utility including health care. The mobile phone based innovations are able to transform weak and under performing health information system into more modern and efficient information system. The present review article will enlighten all these aspects of mobile technology in health care.

  2. Use and Acceptance of Mobile Technology by Hospital Nurses in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeer, Regina; Behrends, Marianne; Kupka, Thomas; Meyenburg-Altwarg, Iris; Marschollek, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure and describe user behavior, information and communication technology (ICT) competence and technology acceptance of hospital nurses. 36 nurses received for six weeks a mobile phone or a tablet pc with mobile application and answered one questionnaire before and after the six weeks. The participating nurses show a high technology acceptance and private daily use of technologies. Younger participants judge their ICT competency higher than older nurses. The perceived ease of use is significantly higher in younger participants. The perceived usefulness was evaluated heterogeneously. Despite the barriers mobile technology is perceived as useful for nurses in their daily work. Factors influencing personal, institutional and device acceptance were determined in this study and can be helpful to facilitate the process of implementation of mobile technology.

  3. Physicians interrupted by mobile devices in hospitals: understanding the interaction between devices, roles, and duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solvoll, Terje; Scholl, Jeremiah; Hartvigsen, Gunnar

    2013-03-07

    A common denominator of modern hospitals is a variety of communication problems. In particular, interruptions from mobile communication devices are a cause of great concern for many physicians. To characterize how interruptions from mobile devices disturb physicians in their daily work. The gathered knowledge will be subsequently used as input for the design and development of a context-sensitive communication system for mobile communications suitable for hospitals. This study adheres to an ethnographic and interpretive field research approach. The data gathering consisted of participant observations, non-structured and mostly ad hoc interviews, and open-ended discussions with a selected group of physicians. Eleven physicians were observed for a total of 135 hours during May and June 2009. The study demonstrates to what degree physicians are interrupted by mobile devices in their daily work and in which situations they are interrupted, such as surgery, examinations, and during patients/relatives high-importance level conversations. The participants in the study expected, and also indicated, that wireless phones probably led to more interruptions immediately after their introduction in a clinic, when compared to a pager, but this changed after a short while. The unpleasant feeling experienced by the caller when interrupting someone by calling them differs compared to sending a page message, which leaves it up to the receiver when to return the call. Mobile devices, which frequently interrupt physicians in hospitals, are a problem for both physicians and patients. The results from this study contribute to knowledge being used as input for designing and developing a prototype for a context-sensitive communication system for mobile communication suitable for hospitals. We combined these findings with results from earlier studies and also involved actual users to develop the prototype, CallMeSmart. This system intends to reduce such interruptions and at the same time

  4. mORCA: sailing bioinformatics world with mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Del-Pino, Sergio; Falgueras, Juan; Perez-Wohlfeil, Esteban; Trelles, Oswaldo

    2018-03-01

    Nearly 10 years have passed since the first mobile apps appeared. Given the fact that bioinformatics is a web-based world and that mobile devices are endowed with web-browsers, it seemed natural that bioinformatics would transit from personal computers to mobile devices but nothing could be further from the truth. The transition demands new paradigms, designs and novel implementations. Throughout an in-depth analysis of requirements of existing bioinformatics applications we designed and deployed an easy-to-use web-based lightweight mobile client. Such client is able to browse, select, compose automatically interface parameters, invoke services and monitor the execution of Web Services using the service's metadata stored in catalogs or repositories. mORCA is available at http://bitlab-es.com/morca/app as a web-app. It is also available in the App store by Apple and Play Store by Google. The software will be available for at least 2 years. ortrelles@uma.es. Source code, final web-app, training material and documentation is available at http://bitlab-es.com/morca. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Mobile Technologies Enhance the E-Learning Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Keh-Wen

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the mobile technologies that enhance the E-Learning opportunity, examine the educational benefits and implementation issues in mobile learning, discuss the guidelines for implementing effective mobile learning, identify the current application and operation of mobile learning, and discuss the future of…

  6. Exploration of the affordances of mobile devices in integrating theory and clinical practice in an undergraduate nursing programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, Juliana J; Bozalek, Vivienne

    2015-01-01

    Promoting the quality and effectiveness of nursing education is an important factor, given the increased demand for nursing professionals. It is important to establish learning environments that provide personalised guidance and feedback to students about their practical skills and application of their theoretical knowledge. To explore and describe the knowledge and points of view of students and educators about introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme. The qualitative design used Tesch's (1990) steps of descriptive data analysis to complete thematic analysis of the data collected in focus group discussions (FGDs) and individual interviews to identify themes. Themes identified from the students’ FGDs and individual interviews included: mobile devices as a communication tool; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; WhatsApp as a method of communication; nurses as role-models in the clinical setting; setting personal boundaries; and impact of mobile devices in clinical practice on professionalism. Themes identified from the FGD, individual interviews and a discussion session held with educators included: peer learning via mobile devices; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; the mobile device as a positive learning method; students need practical guidance; and ethical concerns in clinical facilities about Internet access and use of mobile devices. The research project established an understanding of the knowledge and points of view of students and educators regarding introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme with the aim of enhancing integration of theory and clinical practice through use of mobile devices.

  7. Exploration of the affordances of mobile devices in integrating theory and clinical practice in an undergraduate nursing programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemse, Juliana J; Bozalek, Vivienne

    2015-09-28

    Promoting the quality and effectiveness of nursing education is an important factor, given the increased demand for nursing professionals. It is important to establish learning environments that provide personalised guidance and feedback to students about their practical skills and application of their theoretical knowledge. To explore and describe the knowledge and points of view of students and educators about introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme. The qualitative design used Tesch's (1990) steps of descriptive data analysis to complete thematic analysis of the data collected in focus group discussions (FGDs) andindividual interviews to identify themes. Themes identified from the students' FGDs and individual interviews included:mobile devices as a communication tool; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; WhatsApp as a method of communication; nurses as role-models in the clinical setting; setting personal boundaries; and impact of mobile devices in clinical practiceon professionalism. Themes identified from the FGD, individual interviews and a discussion session held with educators included: peer learning via mobile devices; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; the mobile device as a positive learning method; students need practical guidance; and ethical concerns in clinical facilities about Internet access and use of mobile devices. The research project established an understanding of the knowledge and points of view of students and educators regarding introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme with the aim of enhancing integration of theory and clinical practice through use of mobile devices.

  8. Developing a Mobile Application via Bluetooth Wireless Technology for Enhancing Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar A. Idwan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents Mobile application via Bluetooth wireless technology (MAvBT that enhance the student portal in universities by connecting students' mobile phone devices to a server application that benefit from the devices Bluetooth technology and the storage abilities. MAvBT enables students to retrieve their information with minimum time and anywhere ranging from 100m up to 1Km and it facilitate the communication with instructors outside the office hours. This system consists of computer application (Server Application installed on a Bluetooth enabled computer, Mobile application (client application installed on students’ mobile phone devices, and a website that enable the instructors to edit their materials or enable the demonstrator to get some important reports. Experimental results show that the proposed system is faster, effortless, and cheaper.

  9. Educational Multimedia Profiling Recommendations for Device-Aware Adaptive Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Arghir-Nicolae; Ghergulescu, Ioana; Muntean, Cristina Hava

    2014-01-01

    Mobile learning is seeing a fast adoption with the increasing availability and affordability of mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets. As the creation and consumption of educational multimedia content on mobile devices is also increasing fast, educators and mobile learning providers are faced with the challenge to adapt multimedia type…

  10. Mobile Resource Use in a Distance Learning Population: What Are They Really Doing on Those Devices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebb, Billie Anne; Young, Zach

    2014-01-01

    Mobile device use has been soaring in recent years in all user groups. Mobile learning is no longer an optional activity for academic institutions, but a necessary endeavor. Developing a curriculum around mobile learning is essential, particularly for distance-based, non-traditional students. Understanding how students use their mobile devices is…

  11. Technologies for learning? An actor-network theory critique of ‘affordances' in research on mobile learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gale Parchoma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available How is the link between learner and technology made in mobile learning? Whatis the value of the concept of ‘affordances'? And how does research articulatingthis concept act to position mobile devices as ‘technologies for learning'? Thisliterature review used both unstructured and structured search samples of publishedresearch on mobile learning to critically evaluate the prevalence and influenceof the concept of the affordances of mobile technologies. Actor-networktheory is drawn on as a theoretical lens through which to critically considerhow this concept is articulated, and in particular to explore the way it positionsand controls mobile devices as technologies for learning. Parallels in contemporaryaccounts of mobile learning are drawn with classifications of previous discoursesaround the introduction of computers into schools. An alternativeagenda for mobile learning research is suggested with a focus on authentic andinformal contexts rather than controlled experiments.

  12. {SW}ARMED: Captive Portals, Mobile Devices, and Audience Participation in Multi-User Music Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Hindle, Abram

    2013-01-01

    Audience participation in computer music has long been limited byresources such as sensor technology or the material goods necessary toshare such an instrument. A recent paradigm is to take advantageof the incredible popularity of the smart-phone, a pocket sizedcomputer, and other mobile devices, to provide the audience aninterface into a computer music instrument. In this paper we discuss amethod of sharing a computer music instrument's interface with anaudience to allow them to interact via...

  13. Real-time Identification System using Mobile Hand-held Devices: Mobile Biometrics Evaluation Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    often utilized in face recognition systems are those least likely to change significantly over time: upper ridges of the eye sockets , areas around the...encode iris data. Achieving correct focal length and shielding from ambient IR illumination is a difficult challenge for mobile devices. Iris

  14. An Exploration of Pre-Service Teachers' Intention to Use Mobile Devices for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jung Won; Shen, Ying W.; Kale, Ugur; Cullen, Theresa A.

    2015-01-01

    Teachers in the US have been increasingly adopting mobile devices for teaching, but little research has examined how pre-service teachers perceive mobile device integration in classrooms. To address this issue, the study developed a research model that explained factors affecting pre-service teachers' intention to use mobile devices and the…

  15. 78 FR 6835 - Certain Mobile Handset Devices and Related Touch Keyboard Software; Institution of Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-864] Certain Mobile Handset Devices and... importation of certain mobile handset devices and related touch keyboard software by reason of infringement of... certain mobile handset devices and related touch keyboard software that infringe one or more of claims 36...

  16. 77 FR 26041 - Certain Cameras and Mobile Devices, Related Software and Firmware, and Components Thereof and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-02

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Inv. No. 337-TA-842] Certain Cameras and Mobile Devices, Related... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain cameras and mobile devices... after importation of certain cameras and mobile devices, related software and firmware, and components...

  17. 77 FR 20417 - Certain Cameras and Mobile Devices, Related Software and Firmware, and Components Thereof and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [DN 2891] Certain Cameras and Mobile Devices, Related Software and... complaint entitled Certain Cameras and Mobile Devices, Related Software and Firmware, and Components Thereof... cameras and mobile devices, related software and firmware, and components thereof and products containing...

  18. An application to estimate the cyber-risk detection skill of mobile device users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaff, Guillaume; Harpes, Carlo; Martin, Romain; Junger, Marianne; Berntzen, Lasse; Böhm, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    According to experts’ predictions, mobile devices (smartphones, tablet computers) will replace the widespread personal computer by 2017 for personal and work tasks (emergence of BYOD). In parallel, the expert community has observed an increase of cyber-attacks against mobile devices. Mobile device

  19. The Need to Address Mobile Device Security in the Higher Education IT Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Karen P.; Harris, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile devices, including smartphones and tablets, enable users to access corporate data from anywhere. In 2013, people will purchase 1.2 billion mobile devices, surpassing personal computers as the most common method for accessing the Internet. However, security of these mobile devices is a major concern for organizations. The two leading…

  20. Use of Mobile Devices: A Case Study with Children from Kuwait and the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Fatimah A.; Yateem, Azizah K.

    2018-01-01

    This study explored children's usage and understandings about mobile devices. The study included 112 children aged 3-5 years, of whom 53 children lived in Kuwait and 59 children lived in the United States. The children were interviewed about their access to and usage of mobile devices, about how they learned to use mobile devices, and the actions…

  1. Mobile Devices: Toys or Learning Tools for the 21st Century Teenagers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Ch'ng Lay; Samsudin, Zarina

    2014-01-01

    Learning is interwoven in daily life and so it can be take place at anytime and anywhere by using mobile device. In the 21st century, mobile devices have become ubiquitous, affordable and accessible for the teenagers. The teenagers have the opportunity to perform the learning activities by using the mobile devices. However, what are they used…

  2. Patterns of Mobile Technology Use in Teaching: The Teacher Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Tami

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile learning spaces is an opportunity to break the boundaries of the classroom and to prepare teacher-educators and pre-service teachers for future school classes. The purpose of this study is to examine the implementation of mobile technology and usage patterns in the mobile technology space among lecturers in a teacher education…

  3. Mobile Computing and Ubiquitous Networking: Concepts, Technologies and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Samuel

    2001-01-01

    Analyzes concepts, technologies and challenges related to mobile computing and networking. Defines basic concepts of cellular systems. Describes the evolution of wireless technologies that constitute the foundations of mobile computing and ubiquitous networking. Presents characterization and issues of mobile computing. Analyzes economical and…

  4. Enhancing Field Research Methods with Mobile Survey Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the experience of undergraduate students using mobile devices and a commercial application, iSurvey, to conduct a neighborhood survey. Mobile devices offer benefits for enhancing student learning and engagement. This field exercise created the opportunity for classroom discussions on the practicalities of urban research, the…

  5. Design and evaluation of a telemonitoring concept based on NFC-enabled mobile phones and sensor devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Jürgen; Kumpusch, Hannes; Hayn, Dieter; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Schreier, Günter

    2012-01-01

    Utilization of information and communication technologies such as mobile phones and wireless sensor networks becomes more and more common in the field of telemonitoring for chronic diseases. Providing elderly people with a mobile-phone-based patient terminal requires a barrier-free design of the overall user interface including the setup of wireless communication links to sensor devices. To easily manage the connection between a mobile phone and wireless sensor devices, a concept based on the combination of Bluetooth and near-field communication technology has been developed. It allows us initiating communication between two devices just by bringing them close together for a few seconds without manually configuring the communication link. This concept has been piloted with a sensor device and evaluated in terms of usability and feasibility. Results indicate that this solution has the potential to simplify the handling of wireless sensor networks for people with limited technical skills.

  6. Diamond semiconductor technology for RF device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, Yasar; Esame, Onur; Tekin, Ibrahim; Kang, Weng P.; Davidson, Jimmy L.

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive review of diamond electronics from the RF perspective. Our aim was to find and present the potential, limitations and current status of diamond semiconductor devices as well as to investigate its suitability for RF device applications. While doing this, we briefly analysed the physics and chemistry of CVD diamond process for a better understanding of the reasons for the technological challenges of diamond material. This leads to Figure of Merit definitions which forms the basis for a technology choice in an RF device/system (such as transceiver or receiver) structure. Based on our literature survey, we concluded that, despite the technological challenges and few mentioned examples, diamond can seriously be considered as a base material for RF electronics, especially RF power circuits, where the important parameters are high speed, high power density, efficient thermal management and low signal loss in high power/frequencies. Simulation and experimental results are highly regarded for the surface acoustic wave (SAW) and field emission (FE) devices which already occupies space in the RF market and are likely to replace their conventional counterparts. Field effect transistors (FETs) are the most promising active devices and extremely high power densities are extracted (up to 30 W/mm). By the surface channel FET approach 81 GHz operation is developed. Bipolar devices are also promising if the deep doping problem can be solved for operation at room temperature. Pressure, thermal, chemical and acceleration sensors have already been demonstrated using micromachining/MEMS approach, but need more experimental results to better exploit thermal, physical/chemical and electronic properties of diamond.

  7. Use of Mobile Devices to Access Resources Among Health Professions Students: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Misa; Wu, Wendy; Qiu, Maylene; Zhang, Yingting; Wu, Lin; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review examines types of mobile devices used by health professions students, kinds of resources and tools accessed via mobile devices, and reasons for using the devices to access the resources and tools. The review included 20 studies selected from articles published in English between January 2010 and April 2015, retrieved from PubMed and other sources. Data extracted included participants, study designs, mobile devices used, mobile resources/apps accessed, outcome measures, and advantages of and barriers to using mobile devices. The review indicates significant variability across the studies in terms of research methods, types of mobile programs implemented, resources accessed, and outcomes. There were beneficial effects of using mobile devices to access resources as well as conspicuous challenges or barriers in using mobile devices.

  8. Channel Access and Power Control for Mobile Crowdsourcing in Device-to-Device Underlaid Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Ma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available With the access of a myriad of smart handheld devices in cellular networks, mobile crowdsourcing becomes increasingly popular, which can leverage omnipresent mobile devices to promote the complicated crowdsourcing tasks. Device-to-device (D2D communication is highly desired in mobile crowdsourcing when cellular communications are costly. The D2D cellular network is more preferable for mobile crowdsourcing than conventional cellular network. Therefore, this paper addresses the channel access and power control problem in the D2D underlaid cellular networks. We propose a novel semidistributed network-assisted power and a channel access control scheme for D2D user equipment (DUE pieces. It can control the interference from DUE pieces to the cellular user accurately and has low information feedback overhead. For the proposed scheme, the stochastic geometry tool is employed and analytic expressions are derived for the coverage probabilities of both the cellular link and D2D links. We analyze the impact of key system parameters on the proposed scheme. The Pareto optimal access threshold maximizing the total area spectral efficiency is obtained. Unlike the existing works, the performances of the cellular link and D2D links are both considered. Simulation results show that the proposed method can improve the total area spectral efficiency significantly compared to existing schemes.

  9. Assessment of mobile device and SMS Use for Diet and Exercise Information Among Rural Mexican-American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jennifer L; Champion, Jane Dimmitt

    2014-01-01

    This is a pilot study regarding the use of mobile technology and short message service (SMS) for diet and exercise among rural Mexican American adolescents (RMAA). Authors used convenience sampling to recruit RMAA seeking care at a rural healthcare clinic and conducted three focus groups (n=12). Content analysis was used to identify categories and subcategories. Participants applied diet and exercise information in their lives based on an interaction with community and through the use of use mobile devices. Culturally sensitive use of mobile devices and SMS may be a tool to provide rural adolescent populations with resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Let's Meet at the Mobile - Learning Dialogs with a Video Conferencing Software for Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans L. Cycon

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobile phones and related gadgets in networks are omnipresent at our students, advertising itself as the platform for mobile, pervasive learning. Currently, these devices rapidly open and enhance, being soon able to serve as a major platform for rich, open multimedia applications and communication. In this report we introduce a video conferencing software, which seamlessly integrates mobile with stationary users into fully distributed multi-party conversations. Following the paradigm of flexible, user-initiated group communication, we present an integrated solution, which scales well for medium-size conferences and accounts for the heterogeneous nature of mobile and stationary participants. This approach allows for a spontaneous, location independent establishment of video dialogs, which is of particular importance in interactive learning scenarios. The work is based on a highly optimized realization of a H.264 codec.

  11. TILT-BASED PREDICTIVE TEXT INPUT CONCEPT FOR MOBILE DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Badurowicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper authors are introducing the concept of usage of physical orientation of a mobile device, calculated using built-in environmental sensors like accelerometer, gyroscope and magnetometer for detection of tilting gesture. This gesture is used as an acceptance factor for the two next probable word solutions suggested to the user during text input. By performing the device tilt, the first or second word is being automatically put into the desired text field and new prediction is performed. The text predictions are calculated and stored directly on the device to maintain privacy protection. The founding concept of the software is being presented, as well as initial considerations and further plans. This solution is recommended especially to smartphone manufacturers like Microsoft, Samsung and Apple to deploy in their latest models.

  12. Mobile Assisted Language Learning: Review of the Recent Applications of Emerging Mobile Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jaeseok

    2013-01-01

    As mobile computing technologies have been more powerful and inclusive in people's daily life, the issue of mobile assisted language learning (MALL) has also been widely explored in CALL research. Many researches on MALL consider the emerging mobile technologies have considerable potentials for the effective language learning. This review study…

  13. Streamlining machine learning in mobile devices for remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronel, Andrei D.; Estuar, Ma. Regina E.; Garcia, Kyle Kristopher P.; Dela Cruz, Bon Lemuel T.; Torrijos, Jose Emmanuel; Lim, Hadrian Paulo M.; Abu, Patricia Angela R.; Victorino, John Noel C.

    2017-09-01

    Mobile devices have been at the forefront of Intelligent Farming because of its ubiquitous nature. Applications on precision farming have been developed on smartphones to allow small farms to monitor environmental parameters surrounding crops. Mobile devices are used for most of these applications, collecting data to be sent to the cloud for storage, analysis, modeling and visualization. However, with the issue of weak and intermittent connectivity in geographically challenged areas of the Philippines, the solution is to provide analysis on the phone itself. Given this, the farmer gets a real time response after data submission. Though Machine Learning is promising, hardware constraints in mobile devices limit the computational capabilities, making model development on the phone restricted and challenging. This study discusses the development of a Machine Learning based mobile application using OpenCV libraries. The objective is to enable the detection of Fusarium oxysporum cubense (Foc) in juvenile and asymptomatic bananas using images of plant parts and microscopic samples as input. Image datasets of attached, unattached, dorsal, and ventral views of leaves were acquired through sampling protocols. Images of raw and stained specimens from soil surrounding the plant, and sap from the plant resulted to stained and unstained samples respectively. Segmentation and feature extraction techniques were applied to all images. Initial findings show no significant differences among the different feature extraction techniques. For differentiating infected from non-infected leaves, KNN yields highest average accuracy, as opposed to Naive Bayes and SVM. For microscopic images using MSER feature extraction, KNN has been tested as having a better accuracy than SVM or Naive-Bayes.

  14. Mobile technology in nursing education: where do we go from here? A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Janet

    2015-05-01

    The International Council of Nurses (ICN), Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing (STTI), and many National Nurses Associations (NNAs), have called for the integration of information technology into nursing curriculums to prepare nursing students for the current practice environment which requires access to large amounts of information to provide evidence-based patient care. Nurse educators have begun to address the integration of technology in nursing curriculum, but are the available tools, in particular, mobile devices loaded with informational applications, being maximized? Literature Review Aims The aims of this literature review are to 1) explore the literature written on the use of mobile technology in nursing education; 2) methodically discuss the benefits and concerns involved in using mobile technology in nursing education; and 3) consider strategies for enhancing the use of mobile technology in nursing education. Review Methods A search was conducted on the use of mobile technology in nursing programs in Academic Search Complete, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Medline with Full Text, and Medline Journals. Seventeen studies, published within the last five years in peer-reviewed journals regarding the mobile technology in nursing programs were identified. Findings Although many nursing programs have implemented the use of mobile technology in the clinical, classroom, and laboratory settings, more work needs to be done to overcome the concerns related to: cost, lack of IT support, lack of faculty acceptance and role-modeling, lack of structured assignments and/or activities designed to encourage the implementation of mobile devices; and constraints on their use in clinical settings. While much has been done to incorporate the use of mobile technology in nursing curriculum, nurse educators are encouraged to develop strategies to overcome the concerns noted. Possible strategies to overcome the concerns are

  15. A service protocol for post-processing of medical images on the mobile device

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Longjun; Ming, Xing; Xu, Lang; Liu, Qian

    2014-03-01

    With computing capability and display size growing, the mobile device has been used as a tool to help clinicians view patient information and medical images anywhere and anytime. It is uneasy and time-consuming for transferring medical images with large data size from picture archiving and communication system to mobile client, since the wireless network is unstable and limited by bandwidth. Besides, limited by computing capability, memory and power endurance, it is hard to provide a satisfactory quality of experience for radiologists to handle some complex post-processing of medical images on the mobile device, such as real-time direct interactive three-dimensional visualization. In this work, remote rendering technology is employed to implement the post-processing of medical images instead of local rendering, and a service protocol is developed to standardize the communication between the render server and mobile client. In order to make mobile devices with different platforms be able to access post-processing of medical images, the Extensible Markup Language is taken to describe this protocol, which contains four main parts: user authentication, medical image query/ retrieval, 2D post-processing (e.g. window leveling, pixel values obtained) and 3D post-processing (e.g. maximum intensity projection, multi-planar reconstruction, curved planar reformation and direct volume rendering). And then an instance is implemented to verify the protocol. This instance can support the mobile device access post-processing of medical image services on the render server via a client application or on the web page.

  16. The Use of Mobile Devices and Online Services by German Veterinary Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Kasch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The research question of our study was to determine the adoption and use of mobile devices and online services by veterinary students.Background: New technologies support learning, communication and information transfer during the pre-professional years and the professional lifetime. Hence, mobile devices may also be a feasible tool for information access for the practitioner at any place and any time, and consequently may support better informed clinical decision making.Evidentiary value: We conducted a survey among 124 German veterinary medical students in their third year with a median age of 23.0 years.Methods: The survey was conducted during a lecture and contained 10 questions with preset answers to be ticked and a free text comment section. Participation was voluntary and data processing was performed anonymously.  Results: According to the answers of surveyed third year students 84.7% used a smartphone as a mobile device. The vast majority of the veterinary students used Google, Facebook and WhatsApp besides other applications.  Conclusion: Most students are familiar with mobile devices and the use of social media and information tools. Thus, new learning strategies could be developed and applied that encompass mobile online learning and information access. These strategies could help to better address different learning types, provide sufficient interactivity and feedback and enable veterinarians to seek and share information via the internet. However, despite promising results reporting a positive educational effect, these perceptions need to be validated in further research. In addition, it should be assessed in future surveys if veterinarians would use mobile online access to scientific data or Knowledge Summaries for better informed decision making in practice.Application: Veterinary students, and thus the next generation of veterinary practitioners, are using mobile devices to a high extent. This paves the way

  17. Mobile Devices: A Distraction, or a Useful Tool to Engage Nursing Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Cara; Nakashima, Hannah

    2018-03-01

    Engaging nursing students in theoretical courses, such as research, can be challenging. Innovative instructional strategies are essential to engage nursing students in theoretical nursing courses. This article describes an educational innovation using technology as a tool in an undergraduate nursing research class. All students in the course received iPads for the semester. Lecture material was presented in class using Nearpod, an interactive presentation embedded with slides, multimedia components, and learning activities. Students reported that using the mobile technology helped them minimize off-task activities, interact more with each other and the instructor, solve problems in the class, and develop skills and confidence related to their career. Allowing device use in the classroom, such as iPads and interactive mobile applications, can be a useful learning tool. Intentional use of technology and pedagogy can increase engagement and interaction with students. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(3):170-173.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. SoK: Privacy on Mobile Devices – It’s Complicated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spensky Chad

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern mobile devices place a wide variety of sensors and services within the personal space of their users. As a result, these devices are capable of transparently monitoring many sensitive aspects of these users’ lives (e.g., location, health, or correspondences. Users typically trade access to this data for convenient applications and features, in many cases without a full appreciation of the nature and extent of the information that they are exposing to a variety of third parties. Nevertheless, studies show that users remain concerned about their privacy and vendors have similarly been increasing their utilization of privacy-preserving technologies in these devices. Still, despite significant efforts, these technologies continue to fail in fundamental ways, leaving users’ private data exposed.

  19. A Text-Independent Speaker Authentication System for Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florentin Thullier

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a text independent speaker authentication method adapted to mobile devices. Special attention was placed on delivering a fully operational application, which admits a sufficient reliability level and an efficient functioning. To this end, we have excluded the need for any network communication. Hence, we opted for the completion of both the training and the identification processes directly on the mobile device through the extraction of linear prediction cepstral coefficients and the naive Bayes algorithm as the classifier. Furthermore, the authentication decision is enhanced to overcome misidentification through access privileges that the user should attribute to each application beforehand. To evaluate the proposed authentication system, eleven participants were involved in the experiment, conducted in quiet and noisy environments. Public speech corpora were also employed to compare this implementation to existing methods. Results were efficient regarding mobile resources’ consumption. The overall classification performance obtained was accurate with a small number of samples. Then, it appeared that our authentication system might be used as a first security layer, but also as part of a multilayer authentication, or as a fall-back mechanism.

  20. Inferring Human Activity in Mobile Devices by Computing Multiple Contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruizhi; Chu, Tianxing; Liu, Keqiang; Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Yuwei

    2015-08-28

    This paper introduces a framework for inferring human activities in mobile devices by computing spatial contexts, temporal contexts, spatiotemporal contexts, and user contexts. A spatial context is a significant location that is defined as a geofence, which can be a node associated with a circle, or a polygon; a temporal context contains time-related information that can be e.g., a local time tag, a time difference between geographical locations, or a timespan; a spatiotemporal context is defined as a dwelling length at a particular spatial context; and a user context includes user-related information that can be the user's mobility contexts, environmental contexts, psychological contexts or social contexts. Using the measurements of the built-in sensors and radio signals in mobile devices, we can snapshot a contextual tuple for every second including aforementioned contexts. Giving a contextual tuple, the framework evaluates the posteriori probability of each candidate activity in real-time using a Naïve Bayes classifier. A large dataset containing 710,436 contextual tuples has been recorded for one week from an experiment carried out at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi with three participants. The test results demonstrate that the multi-context solution significantly outperforms the spatial-context-only solution. A classification accuracy of 61.7% is achieved for the spatial-context-only solution, while 88.8% is achieved for the multi-context solution.

  1. Mobile Technology Use Across Age Groups in Patients Eligible for Cardiac Rehabilitation: Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robyn; Roach, Kellie; Sadler, Leonie; Glinatsis, Helen; Belshaw, Julie; Kirkness, Ann; Zhang, Ling; Gallagher, Patrick; Paull, Glenn; Gao, Yan; Partridge, Stephanie Ruth; Parker, Helen; Neubeck, Lis

    2017-10-24

    Emerging evidence indicates mobile technology-based strategies may improve access to secondary prevention and reduce risk factors in cardiac patients. However, little is known about cardiac patients' use of mobile technology, particularly for health reasons and whether the usage varies across patient demographics. This study aimed to describe cardiac patients' use of mobile technology and to determine variations between age groups after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence with using mobile technology. Cardiac patients eligible for attending cardiac rehabilitation were recruited from 9 hospital and community sites across metropolitan and rural settings in New South Wales, Australia. Participants completed a survey on the use of mobile technology devices, features used, confidence with using mobile technology, willingness and interest in learning, and health-related use. The sample (N=282) had a mean age of 66.5 (standard deviation [SD] 10.6) years, 71.9% (203/282) were male, and 79.0% (223/282) lived in a metropolitan area. The most common diagnoses were percutaneous coronary intervention (33.3%, 94/282) and myocardial infarction (22.7%, 64/282). The majority (91.1%, 257/282) used at least one type of technology device, 70.9% (200/282) used mobile technology (mobile phone/tablet), and 31.9% (90/282) used all types. Technology was used by 54.6% (154/282) for health purposes, most often to access information on health conditions (41.4%, 117/282) and medications (34.8%, 98/282). Age had an important independent association with the use of mobile technology after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence. The youngest group (mobile technology than the oldest (>69 years) age group (odds ratio [OR] 4.45, 95% CI 1.46-13.55), 5 times more likely to use mobile apps (OR 5.00, 95% CI 2.01-12.44), and 3 times more likely to use technology for health-related reasons (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.34-8.18). Compared with the older group, the middle age group (56

  2. Inhalation drug delivery devices: technology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim M

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mariam Ibrahim, Rahul Verma, Lucila Garcia-ContrerasDepartment of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USAAbstract: The pulmonary route of administration has proven to be effective in local and systemic delivery of miscellaneous drugs and biopharmaceuticals to treat pulmonary and non-pulmonary diseases. A successful pulmonary administration requires a harmonic interaction between the drug formulation, the inhaler device, and the patient. However, the biggest single problem that accounts for the lack of desired effect or adverse outcomes is the incorrect use of the device due to lack of training in how to use the device or how to coordinate actuation and aerosol inhalation. This review summarizes the structural and mechanical features of aerosol delivery devices with respect to mechanisms of aerosol generation, their use with different formulations, and their advantages and limitations. A technological update of the current state-of-the-art designs proposed to overcome current challenges of existing devices is also provided.Keywords: pulmonary delivery, asthma, nebulizers, metered dose inhaler, dry powder inhaler

  3. iPads, mobile technologies, and communication applications: a survey of family wants, needs, and preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meder, Allison M; Wegner, Jane R

    2015-03-01

    Families of children with communication disabilities were surveyed to explore wants and preferences relative to mobile media technology, including iPads, as a form of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The families surveyed reported wanting information and support from professionals, including speech language pathologists (SLPs), who are knowledgeable about AAC. These families wanted devices to meet their children's individual needs and reported that ease of use and affordability were the most influential characteristics in the purchase of mobile media devices and communication applications. SLPs who understand family decision making can utilize collaborative clinical decision making that respects families' wants and needs, while also focusing on device feature matching and family education.

  4. Creating a Prototype Web Application for Spacecraft Real-Time Data Visualization on Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jeremy S.; Irving, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Mobile devices (smart phones, tablets) have become commonplace among almost all sectors of the workforce, especially in the technical and scientific communities. These devices provide individuals the ability to be constantly connected to any area of interest they may have, whenever and wherever they are located. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) is attempting to take advantage of this constant connectivity to extend the data visualization component of the Payload Operations and Integration Center (POIC) to a person's mobile device. POIC users currently have a rather unique capability to create custom user interfaces in order to view International Space Station (ISS) payload health and status telemetry. These displays are used at various console positions within the POIC. The Software Engineering team has created a Mobile Display capability that will allow authenticated users to view the same displays created for the console positions on the mobile device of their choice. Utilizing modern technologies including ASP.net, JavaScript, and HTML5, we have created a web application that renders the user's displays in any modern desktop or mobile web browser, regardless of the operating system on the device. Additionally, the application is device aware which enables it to render its configuration and selection menus with themes that correspond to the particular device. The Mobile Display application uses a communication mechanism known as signalR to push updates to the web client. This communication mechanism automatically detects the best communication protocol between the client and server and also manages disconnections and reconnections of the client to the server. One benefit of this application is that the user can monitor important telemetry even while away from their console position. If expanded to the scientific community, this application would allow a scientist to view a snapshot of the state of their particular experiment at any time or place

  5. Using Video Modeling and Mobile Technology to Teach Social Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haydon, Todd; Musti-Rao, Shobana; McCune, Ashley; Clouse, Diane E.; McCoy, Dacia M.; Kalra, Hilary D.; Hawkins, Renee O.

    2017-01-01

    There has been growing interest in the field of education regarding the use of technology in classrooms to improve student outcomes. Specifically, researchers have demonstrated positive outcomes for using mobile technology with students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Fewer studies have used mobile technology with students with emotional and…

  6. Nurses' use of mobile devices to access information in health care environments in australia: a survey of undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth; Allen, Penny

    2014-12-10

    The growth of digital technology has created challenges for safe and appropriate use of mobile or portable devices during work-integrated learning (WIL) in health care environments. Personal and professional use of technology has outpaced the development of policy or codes of practice for guiding its use at the workplace. There is a perceived risk that portable devices may distract from provision of patient or client care if used by health professionals or students during employment or WIL. This study aimed to identify differences in behavior of undergraduate nurses in accessing information, using a portable or mobile device, when undertaking WIL compared to other non-work situations. A validated online survey was administered to students while on placement in a range of health care settings in two Australian states. There were 84 respondents, with 56% (n=47) reporting access to a mobile or portable device. Differences in use of a mobile device away from, compared with during WIL, were observed for non-work related activities such as messaging (Pmobile learning is being undertaken, in situ, by the next generation of nurses who expect easy access to mobile or portable devices at the workplace, to ensure safe and competent care is delivered to their patients.

  7. Effectiveness of mobile electronic devices in weight loss among overweight and obese populations: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhar, Bushra; Jones, Jessica; Ronksley, Paul E; Armstrong, Marni J; Caird, Jeff; Rabi, Doreen

    2014-01-01

    Mobile electronic devices, such as mobile phones and PDAs, have emerged as potentially useful tools in the facilitation and maintenance of weight loss. While RCTs have demonstrated a positive impact of mobile interventions, the extent to which mobile electronic devices are more effective than usual care methods is still being debated. Electronic databases were systematically searched for RCTs evaluating the effectiveness of mobile electronic device interventions among overweight and obese adults. Weighted mean difference for change in body weight was the primary outcome. The search strategy yielded 559 citations and of the 108 potentially relevant studies, six met the criteria. A total of 632 participants were included in the six studies reporting a mean change in body weight. Using a random-effects model, the WMD for the effect of using mobile electronic devices on reduction in body weight was -1.09 kg (95% CI -2.12, -0.05). When stratified by the type of mobile electronic device used, it suggests that interventions using mobile phones were effective at achieving weight loss, WMD = -1.78 kg (95% CI -2.92, -0.63). This systematic review and meta-analysis suggests that mobile electronic devices have the potential to facilitate weight loss in overweight and obese populations, but further work is needed to understand if these interventions have sustained benefit and how we can make these mHealth tools most effective on a large scale. As the field of healthcare increasingly utilizes novel mobile technologies, the focus must not be on any one specific device but on the best possible use of these tools to measure and understand behavior. As mobile electronic devices continue to increase in popularity and the associated technology continues to advance, the potential for the use of mobile devices in global healthcare is enormous. More RCTs with larger sample sizes need to be conducted to look at the cost-effectiveness, technical and financial feasibility of adapting such m

  8. Using mobile technology to conduct epidemiological investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onicio Batista Leal Neto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : The aim of this study was to report the experience of an epidemiological field survey for which data were collected and analyzed using tablets. METHODS : The devices used Epi Info 7 (Android version, which has been modeled a database with variables of the traditional form. RESULTS : Twenty-one households were randomly selected in the study area; 75 residents were registered and completed household interviews with socioeconomic and environmental risk variables. CONCLUSIONS : This new technology is a valuable tool for collecting and analyzing data from the field, with advantageous benefits to epidemiological surveys.

  9. Assessment of a prototype for the Systemization of Nursing Care on a mobile device 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Laura Cristhiane Mendonça; dos Santos, Sérgio Ribeiro; Medeiros, Ana Lúcia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: assess a prototype for use on mobile devices that permits registering data for the Systemization of Nursing Care at a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Method: an exploratory and descriptive study was undertaken, characterized as an applied methodological research, developed at a teaching hospital. Results: the mobile technology the nurses at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit use was positive, although some reported they faced difficulties to manage it, while others with experience in using mobile devices did not face problems to use it. The application has the functions needed for the Systematization of Nursing Care at the unit, but changes were suggested in the interface of the screens, some data collection terms and parameters the application offers. The main contributions of the software were: agility in the development and documentation of the systemization, freedom to move, standardization of infant assessment, optimization of time to develop bureaucratic activities, possibilities to recover information and reduction of physical space the registers occupy. Conclusion: prototype software for the Systemization of Nursing Care with mobile technology permits flexibility for the nurses to register their activities, as the data can be collected at the bedside. PMID:27384467

  10. Lessons learned: mobile device encryption in the academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusche, Kristopher P

    2009-01-01

    The academic medical center is faced with the unique challenge of meeting the multi-faceted needs of both a modern healthcare organization and an academic institution, The need for security to protect patient information must be balanced by the academic freedoms expected in the college setting. The Albany Medical Center, consisting of the Albany Medical College and the Albany Medical Center Hospital, was challenged with implementing a solution that would preserve the availability, integrity and confidentiality of business, patient and research data stored on mobile devices. To solve this problem, Albany Medical Center implemented a mobile encryption suite across the enterprise. Such an implementation comes with complexities, from performance across multiple generations of computers and operating systems, to diversity of application use mode and end user adoption, all of which requires thoughtful policy and standards creation, understanding of regulations, and a willingness and ability to work through such diverse needs.

  11. Review of mobile communication devices as potential reservoirs of nosocomial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, R R W; Verran, J; Damani, N N; Gibb, A P

    2009-04-01

    Innovation in mobile communication technology has provided novel approaches to the delivery of healthcare and improvements in the speed and quality of routine medical communication. Bacterial contamination of mobile communication devices (MCDs) could be an important issue affecting the implementation of effective infection control measures and might have an impact on efforts to reduce cross-contamination. This review examines recent studies reporting bacterial contamination of MCDs, most demonstrating that 9-25% of MCDs are contaminated with pathogenic bacteria. We examine previously investigated risk factors for MCD contamination in addition to work on surface decontamination of the device. Recommendations to reduce contamination risks include staff education, strict hand hygiene measures, guidelines on device cleaning and consideration of the restrictions regarding use of mobile phone technology in certain high risk areas, for example, operating theatres, intensive care units and burns units. Further work is required to evaluate the benefit of such interventions on MCD contamination and to determine whether a link exists between contamination and subsequent patient infection.

  12. Use of mobile devices in community health care: barriers and solutions to implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Mobile devices allow clinicians to access electronic clinical systems away from traditional base locations. They have contributed to increased productivity and efficiency, and clinical staff also cite benefits to patient care. A selection of NHS trusts have participated in a national pilot to explore the benefits and drawbacks of this technology. Clinical engagement with frontline staff is essential to ensure the staff feel valued, listened to, and fully involved to ensure any change to existing practice is successful. Moreover, the training needs of the workforce require careful consideration. The provision of information technology (IT) support services is fundamental to ensure that staff receive the necessary assistance with any functionality issues they may experience with mobile devices to minimise the effect on clinical practice. Variability in internet connectivity may present as a challenge to clinical staff, and the benefits of complimentary offline working solutions should be considered. Barriers to the successful use of mobile devices should be reported as this may have a negative clinical effect on the safe delivery of patient care. Clinical staff need to be mindful of their obligations in relation to information governance, and should appreciate that the same consideration needs to be given to both paper and electronic records.

  13. Using mobile technology with individuals with aphasia: native iPad features and everyday apps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Gretchen; Dittelman, Janice

    2014-02-01

    The use of mobile technology, including smartphones and tablet devices, is a growing trend among adults nationwide, and its potential use in aphasia rehabilitation has generated widespread interest. Despite this trend, adults living with disability are less likely than other adults to go online. Complicating things further, most adults living with aphasia come from a generation where computers and technology were not an integral part of their lives. Additionally, training adults with aphasia requires a different approach than training those in the same age bracket without a disability. This article describes the mobile technology program at the Adler Aphasia Center in Maywood, New Jersey. The goal of this program is to improve access to mobile technology for people with aphasia. The use of mobile devices is the focus of the article. Mobile technology concepts and skills needed to establish a strong foundation for successful iPad (Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) use are suggested. We discuss how apps may be used to support aphasia therapy with a focus on apps that are native to the iPad and on other apps that were not specifically developed for aphasia rehabilitation. Challenges in implementing a mobile technology program for people with aphasia and individual member success stories are included. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. Use and perceived benefits of mobile devices by physicians in preventing adverse drug events in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handler, Steven M; Boyce, Richard D; Ligons, Frank M; Perera, Subashan; Nace, David A; Hochheiser, Harry

    2013-12-01

    Although mobile devices equipped with drug reference software may help prevent adverse drug events (ADEs) in the nursing home (NH) by providing medication information at the point of care, little is known about their use and perceived benefits. The goal of this study was to conduct a survey of a nationally representative sample of NH physicians to quantify the use and perceived benefits of mobile devices in preventing ADEs in the NH setting. We surveyed physicians who attended the 2010 American Medical Directors Association Annual Symposium about their use of mobile devices, and beliefs about the effectiveness of drug reference software in preventing ADEs. The overall net valid response rate was 70% (558/800) with 42% (236/558) using mobile devices to assist with prescribing in the NH. Physicians with 15 or fewer years of clinical experience were 67% more likely to be mobile device users, compared with those with more than 15 years of clinical experience (odds ratio = 1.68; 95% confidence interval = 1.17-2.41; P = .005). For those who used a mobile device to assist with prescribing, almost all (98%) reported performing an average of 1 or more drug look-ups per day, performed an average of 1 to 2 lookups per day for potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs), and most (88%) believed that drug reference software had helped to prevent at least 1 potential ADE in the preceding 4-week period. The proportion of NH physicians who use mobile devices with drug reference software, although significant, is lower than in other clinical environments. Our results suggest that NH physicians who use mobile devices equipped with drug reference software believe they are helpful for reducing ADEs. Further research is needed to better characterize the facilitators and barriers to adoption of the technology in the NH and its precise impact on NH ADEs. Copyright © 2013 American Medical Directors Association, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Mobile device at school: rethinking environments and methodologies in the Italian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Garavaglia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This article discusses some recent studies that allow us to understand the importance of analyzing the educational needs in the conceiving of the digital classroom and its possible redefinitions in the learning and methods environment. This paper also proposes a reflection on the implementation of innovative educational environments and settings through mobile technologies in Italian schools. Recently, the focus on active teaching and informal learning with the integration of mobile devices has reflected in the current Flipped Lesson and in the Episodes of Situated Learning EAL, some of the most interesting methods to support the renovation of school practice. These methods are based on group work both in the classroom and at home with digital devices and BYOD Bring Your Own Device model. Choosing the right teaching method to the current challenges is fundamental in a society where the use of the internet increases every day and the possibility of being always connected provides diffuse learning processes. Keywords: School. Device mobile. Learning.

  16. Energy management in mobile devices with the cinder operating system

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, Arjun

    2011-01-01

    We argue that controlling energy allocation is an increasingly useful and important feature for operating systems, especially on mobile devices. We present two new low-level abstractions in the Cinder operating system, reserves and taps, which store and distribute energy for application use. We identify three key properties of control - isolation, delegation, and subdivision - and show how using these abstractions can achieve them. We also show how the architecture of the HiStar information-flow control kernel lends itself well to energy control. We prototype and evaluate Cinder on a popular smartphone, the Android G1. Copyright © 2011 ACM.

  17. Neural Networks through Shared Maps in Mobile Devices

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    William Raveane

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a hybrid system composed of a convolutional neural network and a discrete graphical model for image recognition. This system improves upon traditional sliding window techniques for analysis of an image larger than the training data by effectively processing the full input scene through the neural network in less time. The final result is then inferred from the neural network output through energy minimization to reach a more precize localization than what traditional maximum value class comparisons yield. These results are apt for applying this process in a mobile device for real time image recognition.

  18. Effects of Personal Traits on Generation Y Consumers' Attitudes Toward the Use of Mobile Devices for Communication and Commerce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihyun Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of young adult consumers' personal traits (high-tech involvement, experiment proclivity, and fashion/brand leadership on their perceptions of and attitudes toward using mobile devices for communications and commerce. The integrated stimulus-organism-responses paradigm (Fiore & Kim, 2007 served as the overarching framework, combining the uses and gratifications theory (Blumler & Katz, 1974 and the extended technology acceptance model (Kim, Ma, & Park, 2009. A convenience sample of 504 college students in 2 U. S. universities provided usable responses to our survey. Causal modeling analysis results showed that personal trait variables had significant impacts on the perceived ease of use, usefulness, and enjoyment, and attitudes toward mobile communication and mobile commerce. Findings also suggested that three perception variables positively influenced attitudes toward using mobile devices for communication as well as for commerce. This study provides empirical evidence of the potential of mobile commerce among young adult consumers.

  19. MOBILE TECHNOLOGY AIDED FIELD SALES PROCESS MANAGEMENT WIYH DYNAMICS ANYWHERE FOR MICROSOFT DYNAMIC NAV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Sándor

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of information society, globalisation, made great changes concerning the human-computer relationship. Mobile technology gives new perspectives for the administration of enterprises and decision making. Microsoft Dynamics NAV is not only a software capable to model the various activities of a firm through the desktop platform, but with a properly developed user interface which is optimised for a mobile device, the possibilities of the use of this ERP software can be broadened with workflows characterised with great distances. In this study I show how a field sales workflow can be modelled and managed by me with the software environment “NAV Anywhere Framework”. The survey gives a closer look at both a suggestible administrative process for an imagined workflow and its technical management on a mobile device. For my development creates specialised and dynamic web pages for a mobile device, it can be accessible from a lot of types of smart phones and tablet computers.

  20. Technological Diversity: A Case Study into Language Learners' Mobile Technology Use Inside and Outside the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brick, Billy; Cervi-Wilson, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    The speed of technological advance in the mobile phone, netbook and tablet markets has meant that learners increasingly have access to digital devices capable of enhancing their learning experience. This case study reports on how language learners, taking Italian as an option on the Institution Wide Languages Programme (IWLP) at Coventry…

  1. Mobile Devices and Mobile Learning: Shifting the Mindset of Teachers and Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philippa K.; Grant, Lynn; Conway, Clare; Narayan, Vickel

    2016-01-01

    Incorporating new media technologies that enable mobile learning to be part of educational practice poses challenges to those used to teaching in a traditional classroom environment. In this article three lecturers and a learning advisor from a New Zealand university reflect on their experiences in the progressive redesign of a Bachelor of Arts…

  2. Willingness to Exchange Health Information via Mobile Devices: Findings From a Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Katrina J; Yu, Mandi; Riley, William T; Patel, Vaishali; Hughes, Penelope; Marchesini, Kathryn; Atienza, Audie A

    2016-01-01

    The rapid proliferation of mobile devices offers unprecedented opportunities for patients and health care professionals to exchange health information electronically, but little is known about patients' willingness to exchange various types of health information using these devices. We examined willingness to exchange different types of health information via mobile devices, and assessed whether sociodemographic characteristics and trust in clinicians were associated with willingness in a nationally representative sample. We analyzed data for 3,165 patients captured in the 2013 Health Information National Trends Survey. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was conducted to test differences in willingness. Ordinal logistic regression analysis assessed correlates of willingness to exchange 9 types of information separately. Participants were very willing to exchange appointment reminders (odds ratio [OR] = 6.66; 95% CI, 5.68-7.81), general health tips (OR = 2.03; 95% CI, 1.74-2.38), medication reminders (OR = 2.73; 95% CI, 2.35-3.19), laboratory/test results (OR = 1.76; 95% CI, 1.62-1.92), vital signs (OR = 1.63; 95% CI, 1.48-1.80), lifestyle behaviors (OR = 1.40; 95% CI, 1.24-1.58), and symptoms (OR = 1.62; 95% CI, 1.46-1.79) as compared with diagnostic information. Older adults had lower odds of being more willing to exchange any type of information. Education, income, and trust in health care professional information correlated with willingness to exchange certain types of information. Respondents were less willing to exchange via mobile devices information that may be considered sensitive or complex. Age, socioeconomic factors, and trust in professional information were associated with willingness to engage in mobile health information exchange. Both information type and demographic group should be considered when developing and tailoring mobile technologies for patient-clinician communication. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  3. Novel developments in mobile sensing based on the integration of microfluidic devices and smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2016-03-21

    Portable electronic devices and wireless communication systems enable a broad range of applications such as environmental and food safety monitoring, personalized medicine and healthcare management. Particularly, hybrid smartphone and microfluidic devices provide an integrated solution for the new generation of mobile sensing applications. Such mobile sensing based on microfluidic devices (broadly defined) and smartphones (MS(2)) offers a mobile laboratory for performing a wide range of bio-chemical detection and analysis functions such as water and food quality analysis, routine health tests and disease diagnosis. MS(2) offers significant advantages over traditional platforms in terms of test speed and control, low cost, mobility, ease-of-operation and data management. These improvements put MS(2) in a promising position in the fields of interdisciplinary basic and applied research. In particular, MS(2) enables applications to remote in-field testing, homecare, and healthcare in low-resource areas. The marriage of smartphones and microfluidic devices offers a powerful on-chip operating platform to enable various bio-chemical tests, remote sensing, data analysis and management in a mobile fashion. The implications of such integration are beyond telecommunication and microfluidic-related research and technology development. In this review, we will first provide the general background of microfluidic-based sensing, smartphone-based sensing, and their integration. Then, we will focus on several key application areas of MS(2) by systematically reviewing the important literature in each area. We will conclude by discussing our perspectives on the opportunities, issues and future directions of this emerging novel field.

  4. FreshAiR and Field Studies—Augmenting Geological Reality with Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paor, D. G.; Crompton, H.; Dunleavy, M.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decade, mobile devices have fomented a revolution in geological mapping. Present Clinton set the stage for this revolution in the year 2000 when he ordered a cessation to Selective Availability, making reliable GPS available for civilian use. Geologists began using personal digital assistants and ruggedized tablet PCs for geolocation and data recording and the pace of change accelerated with the development of mobile apps such as Google Maps, digital notebooks, and digital compass-clinometers. Despite these changes in map-making technologies, most students continue to learn geology in the field the old-fashioned way, by following a field trip leader as a group and trying to hear and understand lecturettes at the outcrop. In this presentation, we demonstrate the potential of a new Augment Reality (AR) mobile app called "FreshAiR" to change fundamentally the way content-knowledge and learning objectives are delivered to students in the field. FreshAiR, which was developed by co-author and ODU alumnus M.D., triggers content delivery to mobile devices based on proximity. Students holding their mobile devices to the horizon see trigger points superimposed on the field of view of the device's built-in camera. When they walk towards the trigger, information about the location pops up. This can include text, images, movies, and quiz questions (multiple choice and fill-in-the-blank). Students can use the app to reinforce the field trip leader's presentations or they can visit outcrops individuals at different times. This creates the possibility for asynchronous field class, a concept that has profound implications for distance education in the geosciences.

  5. Novel Developments of Mobile Sensing Based on the Integration of Microfluidic Devices and Smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Peretz-Soroka, Hagit; Liu, Yong; Lin, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Portable electronic devices and wireless communication systems enable a broad range of applications such as environmental and food safety monitoring, personalized medicine and healthcare management. Particularly, hybrid smartphone and microfluidic devices provide an integrated solution for the new generation of mobile sensing applications. Such mobile sensing based on microfluidic devices (broadly defined) and smartphones (MS2) offers a mobile laboratory for performing a wide range of bio-chemical detection and analysis functions such as water and food quality analysis, routine health tests and disease diagnosis. MS2 offers significant advantages over traditional platforms in terms of test speed and control, low cost, mobility, ease-of-operation and data management. These improvements put MS2 in a promising position in the fields of interdisciplinary basic and applied research. In particular, MS2 enables applications to remote infield testing, homecare, and healthcare in low-resource areas. The marriage of smartphones and microfluidic devices offers a powerful on-chip operating platform to enable various bio-chemical tests, remote sensing, data analysis and management in a mobile fashion. The implications of such integration are beyond telecommunication and microfluidic-related research and technology development. In this review, we will first provide the general background of microfluidic-based sensing, smartphone-based sensing, and their integration. Then, we will focus on several key application areas of MS2 by systematically reviewing the important literature in each area. We will conclude by discussing our perspectives on the opportunities, issues and future directions of this emerging novel field. PMID:26899264

  6. Innovations in Environmental Monitoring Using Mobile Phone Technology – A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Aitkenhead

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the use of mobile phones and tablets for personal communication has increased dramatically, with over 1 billion smartphones out of a total of 5 billion mobile phones worldwide. The infrastructure and technology underlying these devices has improved to a level where it is now possible to integrate sensor technology directly and use them to acquire new data. Given the available resources and the number of technical challenges that have already been overcome, it would seem a natural progression to use mobile communication technology for field-based environmental monitoring. In this work, we review existing technology for acquiring, processing and reporting on environmental data in the field. The objective is to demonstrate whether or not it is possible to use off-the-shelf technology for environmental monitoring. We show several levels at which this challenge is being approached, and discuss examples of technology that have been produced.

  7. Mobile Device Accuracy for Step Counting Across Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modave, François; Guo, Yi; Bian, Jiang; Gurka, Matthew J; Parish, Alice; Smith, Megan D; Lee, Alexandra M; Buford, Thomas W

    2017-06-28

    Only one in five American meets the physical activity recommendations of the Department of Health and Human Services. The proliferation of wearable devices and smartphones for physical activity tracking has led to an increasing number of interventions designed to facilitate regular physical activity, in particular to address the obesity epidemic, but also for cardiovascular disease patients, cancer survivors, and older adults. However, the inconsistent findings pertaining to the accuracy of wearable devices for step counting needs to be addressed, as well as factors known to affect gait (and thus potentially impact accuracy) such as age, body mass index (BMI), or leading arm. We aim to assess the accuracy of recent mobile devices for counting steps, across three different age groups. We recruited 60 participants in three age groups: 18-39 years, 40-64 years, and 65-84 years, who completed two separate 1000 step walks on a treadmill at a self-selected speed between 2 and 3 miles per hour. We tested two smartphones attached on each side of the waist, and five wrist-based devices worn on both wrists (2 devices on one wrist and 3 devices on the other), as well as the Actigraph wGT3X-BT, and swapped sides between each walk. All devices were swapped dominant-to-nondominant side and vice-versa between the two 1000 step walks. The number of steps was recorded with a tally counter. Age, sex, height, weight, and dominant hand were self-reported by each participant. Among the 60 participants, 36 were female (60%) and 54 were right-handed (90%). Median age was 53 years (min=19, max=83), median BMI was 24.1 (min=18.4, max=39.6). There was no significant difference in left- and right-hand step counts by device. Our analyses show that the Fitbit Surge significantly undercounted steps across all age groups. Samsung Gear S2 significantly undercounted steps only for participants among the 40-64 year age group. Finally, the Nexus 6P significantly undercounted steps for the group

  8. In the Palm of Your Hand - Normalizing the Use of Mobile Technology for Nurse Practitioner Education and Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Kimberley; Park, Caroline; Fraser, Shawn; Rich, Mariann; MacKenzie, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile devices by nurse practitioners (NPs) to meet an evolving technological landscape is expanding rapidly. A longitudinal study of the ways NP students "normalize" the use of mobile devices in clinical education was completed. This study used researcher-designed survey tools, including sociodemographic questions, and the numerical picture was augmented and interpreted in light of the textual data in the form of selected interviews. Data indicate that mobile technology is normalized in the social realm but still developing in the clinical realm. Progress is hindered by non-modelling by faculty, inconsistent healthcare policy and lack of understanding of the affordances available through this technology. Overall, mobile technology is utilized and normalized in practice; this in turn has influenced their ability to prepare students for practice. Data presented can assist educators and clinicians alike in developing a more fulsome understanding on how to appropriately incorporate mobile technology into education and practice.

  9. Individual and Technological Factors Affecting Undergraduates' Use of Mobile Technology in University of Ilorin, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olufunmilola Ogulande, Oyeronke; Oladimeji Olafare, Festus; Ayuba Sakaba, Dabo

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation and utilization of handheld mobile technology among undergraduates for mobile learning cannot be underestimated. This study was geared towards investigating individual and technological factors affecting the perceived usefulness of mobile technology by undergraduates in university of Ilorin, Nigeria. The study was a descriptive…

  10. Students' Use of Mobile Technologies: Motivational Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baytiyeh, Hoda

    2018-01-01

    Mobile technologies are all-pervasive in the current digital generation, and college students rely on their mobile phones to communicate on a daily basis. In the midst of the myriad of applications available to download on the mobile, some tools have become more well-known and more often adopted than others. An example of such a tool is WhatsApp,…

  11. An Exploration and Evaluation of the Attitudes and Perceptions of Students toward Use of Mobile Technology in Higher Education in the Kingdom of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allathkani, Mahmoud A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the growth and use of mobile internet devices in many parts of the world, including the US, UK, and other countries, Jordanian universities have remained resistant regarding adoption of such technology. Many reasons exist behind this specific resistance in implementing mobile learning technology: cost of the devices, distractibility caused…

  12. The Pitfalls of Mobile Devices in Learning: A Different View and Implications for Pedagogical Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Yu-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Studies have been devoted to the design, implementation, and evaluation of mobile learning in practice. A common issue among students' responses toward this type of learning concerns the pitfalls of mobile devices, including small screen, limited input options, and low computational power. As a result, mobile devices are not always perceived by…

  13. Student Use of Mobile Devices in Course Evaluation: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Matthew V.

    2013-01-01

    A 2012 survey of higher education found that 27% of colleges and universities were "mobile ready", that is, allowing students to complete course evaluations via mobile devices, and 26% of schools planned to allow the use of mobile devices for course evaluations within the next year. The purpose of this study was to prepare for this…

  14. 77 FR 65413 - Certain Cameras and Mobile Devices, Related Software and Firmware, and Components Thereof and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-26

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-842] Certain Cameras and Mobile Devices... after importation of certain cameras and mobile devices, related software and firmware, and components..., New York; Sony Electronics Inc. of San Diego, California; Sony Mobile Communications AB of London...

  15. Advanced CMOS device technologies for 45 nm node and below

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Veloso, T. Hoffmann, A. Lauwers, H. Yu, S. Severi, E. Augendre, S. Kubicek, P. Verheyen, N. Collaert, P. Absil, M. Jurczak and S. Biesemans

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We review and discuss the latest developments and technology options for 45 nm node and below, with scaled planar bulk MOSFETs and MuGFETs as emerging devices. One of the main metal gate (MG candidates for scaled CMOS technologies are fully silicided (FUSI gates. In this work, by means of a selective and controlled poly etch-back integration process, dual work-function Ni-based FUSI/HfSiON CMOS circuits with record ring oscillator performance (high-VT are reported (17 ps at VDD=1.1 V and 20 pA/μm Ioff, meeting the ITRS 45 nm node requirement for low-power (LP CMOS. Compatibility of FUSI and other MG with known stress boosters like stressed CESL (contact-etch-stop-layer with high intrinsic stress or embedded SiGe in the pMOS S/D regions is validated. To obtain MuGFET devices that are competitive, as compared to conventional planar bulk devices, and that meet the stringent drive and leakage current requirements for the 32 nm node and beyond, higher channel mobilities are required. Results obtained by several strain engineering methods are presented here.

  16. HyPR Device: Mobile Support for Hybrid Patient Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2014-01-01

    of configuration problems related to finding, using and aligning the paper and electronic patient record. In this paper, we describe the exploration into the Hybrid Patient Record (HyPR) concept. Based on design requirements derived from a field study, followed by a design study using a technology probe, we...... introduce the HyPR Device, a device that merges the paper and electronic patient record into one system. We provide results from a clinical simulation with eight clinicians and discuss the functional, design and infrastructural requirements of such hybrid patient records. Our study suggests that the HyPR...

  17. The role of mobile devices in doctor-patient communication: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashgary, Abdullah; Alsolaimani, Roaa; Mosli, Mahmoud; Faraj, Samer

    2017-09-01

    Introduction In the last few years, the use of telecommunication and mobile technology has grown significantly. This has led to a notable increase in the utilization of this telecommunication in healthcare, namely phone calls and text messaging (SMS). However, evaluating its global impact on improving healthcare processes and outcomes demands a more comprehensive assessment. In this study, we focused on the role of mobile devices via phone calls and SMS in patient-doctor communication, and aimed to assess its impact on various health outcomes. Methods Major databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Global Health, and Cochrane CENTRAL, were searched for clinical trials that investigated mobile-device technology in any facet of doctor-patient communication published between 1990 and April 2015. A meta-analysis was performed where appropriate. Results Sixty-two articles met our inclusion criteria. Of those, 23 articles investigated mobile appointment reminder technologies, 19 investigated medication adherence, 20 investigated disease-control interventions, and two investigated test-result reporting. Patients who received an appointment reminder were 10% less likely to miss an appointment (relative risk [RR] = 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-1.15). Mobile interventions increased medication adherence by 22% (RR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.09-1.36). Ten of 20 studies examining disease control reported statistically significant reductions in clinically meaningful endpoints. The use of mobile-device interventions improved forced expiratory volume in one second and hemoglobin A1c percentage in meta-analyses. Conclusion The use of mobile-device technologies exerted modest improvements in communication and health outcomes. Further research is needed to determine the true effect of these technologies on doctor-patient communication.

  18. Art and design: relations between creation and reception in the context of the mobile devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Tavares

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to undertand how the receptor might be affected in the consumption of contemporary cultural products, specifically, those works of art and design generated from digital media. Thus, the reading strategies previously proposed on the configuration of the objects studied were investigated, in order to understand how the different receptive practices were structured, considering the horizons of expectation which circumscribe the objects created from the use of mobile devices and decoding technology markers. First, you will see a discussion about these mobile media, and, second, a Peircean approach to rating and taking into account the forms of presentation of the objects studied. The paper classifies and rates these objects, assuming the dominance of interaction inherent to the poetic-technological proposals adopted.

  19. Use of mobile learning technology among final year medical students in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masika, Moses Muia; Omondi, Gregory Barnabas; Natembeya, Dennis Simiyu; Mugane, Ephraim Mwatha; Bosire, Kefa Ogonyo; Kibwage, Isaac Ongubo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Mobile phone penetration has increased exponentially over the last decade as has its application in nearly all spheres of life including health and medical education. This study aimed at assessing the use of mobile learning technology and its challenges among final year undergraduate students in the College of Health sciences, University of Nairobi. Methods This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted among final year undergraduate students at the University of Nairobi, College of Health Sciences. Self-administered, anonymous questionnaires were issued to all final year students in their lecture rooms after obtaining informed consent. Data on demographics, mobile device ownership and mobile learning technology use and its challenges was collected. Data entry and analysis was done using SPSS®. Chi-square and t-test were used for bivariate analysis. Results We had 292 respondents; 62% were medical students, 16% were nursing students, 13% were pharmacy students and 9% were dental surgery students. The majority were female (59%) and the average age was 24 years. Eighty eight percent (88%) of the respondents owned a smart device and nearly all of them used it for learning. 64% of the respondents used medical mobile applications. The main challenges were lack of a smart device, lack of technical know-how in accessing or using apps, sub-optimal internet access, cost of acquiring apps and limited device memory. Conclusion Mobile learning is increasingly popular among medical students and should be leveraged in promoting access and quality of medical education. PMID:26327964

  20. Use of mobile learning technology among final year medical students in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masika, Moses Muia; Omondi, Gregory Barnabas; Natembeya, Dennis Simiyu; Mugane, Ephraim Mwatha; Bosire, Kefa Ogonyo; Kibwage, Isaac Ongubo

    2015-01-01

    Mobile phone penetration has increased exponentially over the last decade as has its application in nearly all spheres of life including health and medical education. This study aimed at assessing the use of mobile learning technology and its challenges among final year undergraduate students in the College of Health sciences, University of Nairobi. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study conducted among final year undergraduate students at the University of Nairobi, College of Health Sciences. Self-administered, anonymous questionnaires were issued to all final year students in their lecture rooms after obtaining informed consent. Data on demographics, mobile device ownership and mobile learning technology use and its challenges was collected. Data entry and analysis was done using SPSS(®). Chi-square and t-test were used for bivariate analysis. We had 292 respondents; 62% were medical students, 16% were nursing students, 13% were pharmacy students and 9% were dental surgery students. The majority were female (59%) and the average age was 24 years. Eighty eight percent (88%) of the respondents owned a smart device and nearly all of them used it for learning. 64% of the respondents used medical mobile applications. The main challenges were lack of a smart device, lack of technical know-how in accessing or using apps, sub-optimal internet access, cost of acquiring apps and limited device memory. Mobile learning is increasingly popular among medical students and should be leveraged in promoting access and quality of medical education.

  1. A Middleware Based Approach to Dynamically Deploy Location Based Services onto Heterogeneous Mobile Devices Using Bluetooth in Indoor Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Pampa; Sen, Rijurekha; Das, Pradip K.

    Several methods for providing location based service (LBS) to mobile devices in indoor environment using wireless technologies like WLAN, RFID and Bluetooth have been proposed, implemented and evaluated. However, most of them do not focus on heterogeneity of mobile platforms, memory constraint of mobile devices, the adaptability of client or device to the new services it discovers whenever it reaches a new location. In this paper, we have proposed a Middleware based approach of LBS provision in the indoor environment, where a Bluetooth enabled Base Station (BS) detects Bluetooth enabled mobile devices and pushes a proper client application only to those devices that belong to some registered subscriber of LBS. This dynamic deployment enables the mobile clients to access any new service without having preinstalled interface to that service beforehand and thus the client's memory consumption is reduced. Our proposed work also addresses the other issues like authenticating the clients before providing them LBSs and introducing paid services. We have evaluated its performance in term of file transfer time with respect to file size and throughput with respect to distance. Experimental results on service consumption time by the mobile client for different services are also presented.

  2. Performance Analysis of Nomadic Mobile Services on Multi-homed Handheld Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawar, P.; van Beijnum, Bernhard J.F.; van Sinderen, Marten J.; Aggarwal, Akshai; De Clercq, Frederic

    2007-01-01

    Compared to their predecessors, the current generation handheld mobile devices possess higher processing power, increased memory and new multi-homing capabilities. These features combined with the widespread acceptance and use of these devices result in a situation where mobile devices are no longer

  3. Conjoint Analysis for Mobile Devices for Ubiquitous Learning in Higher Education: The Korean Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeongjik

    2013-01-01

    Despite the increasing importance of mobile devices in education, the essential features of these devices for ubiquitous learning have not been empirically addressed. This study empirically investigated the necessary conditions for using mobile devices as an educational tool for ubiquitous learning in higher education by a conjoint method. The…

  4. Mobile Devices, Learning and Clinical Workplaces: Medical Student Use of Smartphones in Parisian Hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Megan; Scott, Karen M.; Chauffeté-Manillier, Martine; Lenne, Frédéric; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Mobile devices are ubiquitous worldwide, including in hospitals. "Just in time" learning provided by these devices is important for students. We investigated current use of, and learning with, smartphones and other mobile devices by medical students in Parisian hospitals. A survey with quantitative and qualitative items previously used…

  5. Teaching and Learning with Mobile Computing Devices: Case Study in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Michael M.; Tamim, Suha; Brown, Dorian B.; Sweeney, Joseph P.; Ferguson, Fatima K.; Jones, Lakavious B.

    2015-01-01

    While ownership of mobile computing devices, such as cellphones, smartphones, and tablet computers, has been rapid, the adoption of these devices in K-12 classrooms has been measured. Some schools and individual teachers have integrated mobile devices to support teaching and learning. The purpose of this qualitative research was to describe the…

  6. Indoor Mobile Optical Wireless Antennas for Portable Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, Syam Sundar

    A high demand for increasing need for bandwidth and data rates has paved way for optical fiber and optical wireless communications into last mile solutions for optical communications. This dissertation focuses on providing a solution to obtain Optical Wireless (OW) for indoor mobile portable devices. A new optical antenna model is proposed for such portable devices. Optical sweeping in 3D using Acousto Optics Cell Arrays (AOCAs) is proposed. This Opto-electronic method provides better coverage area for Line Of Sight optical link establishment and reconnection. The proposed method also has superior and precise beam divergence manipulation capabilities. Its geometry, coverage area and mobility are analyzed. Indoor dimensions of Height (5m), Width (20m), and Length (20m) are considered. The optical antenna can sweep through the hemispherical shape in the direction of optical beam focal plane using AOCAs. The link budget analysis is done using commercially available component ratings and the optical power for the entire coverage area of the optical antenna is found to be higher than the receiver's minimum sensitivity. The limitations on the nodes such as size and power consumption are studied and the model is designed to run efficiently on power ratings of the portable device battery. The proposed optical antenna can be fabricated in the form of a cube of size 2x2x2 mm. The optical power usage at any given time ranges from 50 mW to 0.5W. The bit error rates from SNR calculations are found to be around 10-10 at data rates of up to 4 Gbps. The Line of Sight (LOS) connection time and reestablishment time ranges from 4 to 7 mus depending on the AOCA process time. VCSEL transceiver optical characteristics are simulated to verify the validity of the model.

  7. The Technology Acceptance of Mobile Applications in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Mark Anthony; Camilleri, Adriana Caterina

    2017-01-01

    This research explores the educators' attitudes and behavioural intention toward mobile applications. The methodology integrates measures from "the pace of technological innovativeness" and the "technology acceptance model" to understand the rationale for further investment in mobile learning (m-learning). A quantitative study…

  8. A CHAT Perspective on Mobile Technology in Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenild, Kåre; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    ’s development is not yet fully covered. In this paper we argue that mobile technology is a valuable resource in K-12 education. Based on CHAT theory, we argue that mobile technology potentially mediates subject matter knowledge and everyday knowledge and thereby supports the child to acquire valuable...

  9. Third-year medical students' knowledge of privacy and security issues concerning mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whipple, Elizabeth C; Allgood, Kacy L; Larue, Elizabeth M

    2012-01-01

    The use of mobile devices are ubiquitous in medical-care professional settings, but information on privacy and security concerns of mobile devices for medical students is scarce. To gain baseline information about third-year medical students' mobile device use and knowledge of privacy and security issues concerning mobile devices. We surveyed 67 third-year medical students at a Midwestern university on their use of mobile devices and knowledge of how to protect information available through mobile devices. Students were also presented with clinical scenarios to rate their level of concern in regards to privacy and security of information. The most used features of mobile devices were: voice-to-voice (100%), text messaging (SMS) (94%), Internet (76.9%), and email (69.3%). For locking of one's personal mobile phone, 54.1% never physically lock their phone, and 58% never electronically lock their personal PDA. Scenarios considering definitely privacy concerns include emailing patient information intact (66.7%), and posting de-identified information on YouTube (45.2%) or Facebook (42.2%). As the ease of sharing data increases with the use of mobile devices, students need more education and training on possible privacy and security risks posed with mobile devices.

  10. CLOUD PRINTING: AN INNOVATINE TECHNOLOGY USING MOBILE PHONE

    OpenAIRE

    Shammi Mehra*1, Azad Singh2 & Sandeep Boora3

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, cloud printing is becoming a popular topic in the field of communication and the organizations (public or private) are shifting their physical infrastructure to cloud storage. Mobile phones are the dominant access device for consumer and have been an essential part of life. Mobile phones with smart features are the recent driver behind the cloud printing. Now mobile phones can be attached wirelessly to the printers from any location and anytime in the world via cloud technolo...

  11. Adaptive Monocular Visual-Inertial SLAM for Real-Time Augmented Reality Applications in Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Jin-Chun; Kim, Shin-Dug

    2017-11-07

    Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) is emerging as a prominent issue in computer vision and next-generation core technology for robots, autonomous navigation and augmented reality. In augmented reality applications, fast camera pose estimation and true scale are important. In this paper, we present an adaptive monocular visual-inertial SLAM method for real-time augmented reality applications in mobile devices. First, the SLAM system is implemented based on the visual-inertial odometry method that combines data from a mobile device camera and inertial measurement unit sensor. Second, we present an optical-flow-based fast visual odometry method for real-time camera pose estimation. Finally, an adaptive monocular visual-inertial SLAM is implemented by presenting an adaptive execution module that dynamically selects visual-inertial odometry or optical-flow-based fast visual odometry. Experimental results show that the average translation root-mean-square error of keyframe trajectory is approximately 0.0617 m with the EuRoC dataset. The average tracking time is reduced by 7.8%, 12.9%, and 18.8% when different level-set adaptive policies are applied. Moreover, we conducted experiments with real mobile device sensors, and the results demonstrate the effectiveness of performance improvement using the proposed method.

  12. Towards a Fraud-Prevention Framework for Software Defined Radio Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brawerman Alessandro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The superior reconfigurability of software defined radio mobile devices has made it the most promising technology on the wireless network and in the communication industry. Despite several advantages, there are still a lot to discuss regarding security, for instance, the radio configuration data download, storage and installation, user's privacy, and cloning. The objective of this paper is to present a fraud-prevention framework for software defined radio mobile devices that enhances overall security through the use of new pieces of hardware, modules, and protocols. The framework offers security monitoring against malicious attacks and viruses, protects sensitive information, creates and protects an identity for the system, employs a secure protocol for radio configuration download, and finally, establishes an anticloning scheme, which besides guaranteeing that no units can be cloned over the air, also elevates the level of difficulty to clone units if the attacker has physical access to the mobile device. Even if cloned units exist, the anticloning scheme is able to identify and deny services to those units. Preliminary experiments and proofs that analyze the correctness of the fraud-prevention framework are also presented.

  13. Factors Affecting Nursing Students' Readiness and Perceptions Toward the Use of Mobile Technologies for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayim, Nese; Ozel, Deniz

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the current usage of mobile devices, preferences of mobile learning environments and examine the readiness of nursing students in a public university. In order to investigate preferences and attitudes with respect to mobile technology use in nursing education, 387 students at a state university have been surveyed. It has been observed that while students preferred their current portable laptops, those in higher classes were more inclined to favor mobile phones. The common problems of battery life and high cost of communication, both in smartphones and tablet systems, suggest that hardware quality and financial constraints seem to be two main factors in determining these technologies. While more than half of students expressed readiness for mobile learning, one quarter indicated indecision. Through multivariate regression analysis, readiness to use mobile learning can be described in terms of perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, personal innovativeness, self-management of learning, perceived device limitation, and availability. Class level, perceived ease of use, personal innovativeness, and self-management of learning explain intention to use mobile learning. Findings obtained from these results can provide guidance in the development and application of mobile learning systems.

  14. Project inspection using mobile technology - phase I : an investigation into existing business processes and areas for improvement using mobile technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    As mobile technology becomes widely available and affordable, transportation agencies can use this technology to : streamline operations involved within project inspection. This research, conducted in two phases, identified : opportunities for proces...

  15. Consumer connectivity in a complex, technology-enabled, and mobile-oriented world with smart products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, Peter C.; Stephen, Andrew T.; Kannan, P.K.; Luo, Xueming; Abishek, Vibhanshu; Andrews, Michelle; Bart, Yakov; Datta, Hannes; Fong, Nathan M.; Hoffman, Donna L.; Hu, Mandy; Novak, Thomas P.; Rand, William; Zhang, Yuchi

    2017-01-01

    Today’s consumers are immersed in a vast and complex array of networks. Each network features an interconnected mesh of people and firms, and now, with the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT), also objects. Technology (particularly mobile devices) enables such connections, and facilitates many

  16. Consumer Connectivity in a Complex, Technology-enabled, and Mobile-oriented World with Smart Products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, Peter C.; Stephen, Andrew T.; Kannan, P. K.; Luo, Xueming; Abhishek, Vibhanshu; Andrews, Michelle; Bart, Yakov; Datta, Hannes; Fong, Nathan; Hoffman, Donna L.; Hu, Mandy Mantian; Novak, Tom; Rand, William; Zhang, Yuchi

    2017-01-01

    Today's consumers are immersed in a vast and complex array of networks. Each network features an interconnected mesh of people and firms, and now, with the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT), also objects. Technology (particularly mobile devices) enables such connections, and facilitates many

  17. Reengineering a PC-based System into the Mobile Device Product Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weishan; Jarzabek, Stanislaw; Loughran, Neil

    2003-01-01

    There is a growing demand to port existing PC-based software systems to mobile device platforms. Systems running on mobile devices share basic characteristics with their PC-based counterparts, but differ from them in details of user interfaces, application models, etc. Systems running on mobile...... devices must also perform well using less memory than PC-based systems. Mobile devices themselves are different from each other in many ways, too. We describe how we made an existing PC-based City Guide System available on a wide range of mobile devices, in a cost-effective way. We applied "reengineering...... into a product line architecture" approach to achieve the goal. Our product line architecture facilitates reuse via generation. We generate specific City Guide Systems for target platforms including PC, Pocket PC and other mobile devices, from generic meta-components that form the City Guide System product line...

  18. Illumination modelling of a mobile device environment for effective use in driving mobile apps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marhoubi, Asmaa H.; Saravi, Sara; Edirisinghe, Eran A.; Bez, Helmut E.

    2015-05-01

    The present generation of Ambient Light Sensors (ALS) of a mobile handheld device suffer from two practical shortcomings. The ALSs are narrow angle, i.e. they respond effectively only within a narrow angle of operation and there is a latency of operation. As a result mobile applications that operate based on the ALS readings could perform sub-optimally especially when operated in environments with non-uniform illumination. The applications will either adopt with unacceptable levels of latency or/and may demonstrate a discrete nature of operation. In this paper we propose a framework to predict the ambient illumination of an environment in which a mobile device is present. The predictions are based on an illumination model that is developed based on a small number of readings taken during an application calibration stage. We use a machine learning based approach in developing the models. Five different regression models were developed, implemented and compared based on Polynomial, Gaussian, Sum of Sine, Fourier and Smoothing Spline functions. Approaches to remove noisy data, missing values and outliers were used prior to the modelling stage to remove their negative effects on modelling. The prediction accuracy for all models were found to be above 0.99 when measured using R-Squared test with the best performance being from Smoothing Spline. In this paper we will discuss mathematical complexity of each model and investigate how to make compromises in finding the best model.

  19. Addressing challenges for youths with mobility devices in winter conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Ernesto; Lindsay, Sally; Edwards, Geoffrey; Howell, Lori; Vincent, Claude; Yantzi, Nicole; Gauthier, Véronique

    2018-01-01

    Winter-related research about the experience of navigating in the urban context has mostly focused on the elderly population with physical disabilities. The aim of this project was to explore potential design solutions to enhance young people's mobility devices and the built environment to improve accessibility and participation in winter. A multi-method qualitative design process included the following steps: (1) in-depth interviews; (2) photo elicitation; (3) individual co-design sessions; and (4) group co-design sessions (i.e., focus group). The participants were 13 youths (nine males and four females), aged 12-21, who used a wheelchair (12 power chair users and one manual wheelchair), for some with their parents, others without their parents, according to the parents' willingness to participate or not in the study (n = 13). The first two authors conducted group co-design sessions with mechanical engineers and therapists/clinicians in two Canadian cities to discuss the feasibility of the designs. Results (findings): The youths and their parents reported different winter-related challenges and proposed specific design solutions to enhance their participation and inclusion in winter activities. Seven of these designs were presented at two group co-design sessions of therapists/clinicians and engineers. Two designs were found to be feasible: (1) a traction device for wheelchairs in snow and (2) a mat made of rollers to clean snow and dirt from tires. The results of this research highlight the frustrations and challenges youths who use wheelchairs encounter in winter and a need for new solutions to ensure greater accessibility in winter. Therapists/clinicians and designers should address winter-related accessibility problems in areas with abundant snow. Implications for Rehabilitation Several studies show that current urban contexts do not necessarily respond accurately to the needs of individuals with limited mobility. Winter-related research about the

  20. A stand-alone tidal prediction application for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Han; Fan, Ren-Ye; Yang, Yi-Chung

    2017-04-01

    It is essential for people conducting fishing, leisure, or research activities at the coasts to have timely and handy tidal information. Although tidal information can be found easily on the internet or using mobile device applications, this information is all applicable for only certain specific locations, not anywhere on the coast, and they need an internet connection. We have developed an application for Android devices, which allows the user to obtain hourly tidal height anywhere on the coast for the next 24 hours without having to have any internet connection. All the necessary information needed for the tidal height calculation is stored in the application. To develop this application, we first simulate tides in the Taiwan Sea using the hydrodynamic model (MIKE21 HD) developed by the DHI. The simulation domain covers the whole coast of Taiwan and the surrounding seas with a grid size of 1 km by 1 km. This grid size allows us to calculate tides with high spatial resolution. The boundary conditions for the simulation domain were obtained from the Tidal Model Driver of the Oregon State University, using its tidal constants of eight constituents: M2, S2, N2, K2, K1, O1, P1, and Q1. The simulation calculates tides for 183 days so that the tidal constants for the above eight constituents of each water grid can be extracted by harmonic analysis. Using the calculated tidal constants, we can predict the tides in each grid of our simulation domain, which is useful when one needs the tidal information for any location in the Taiwan Sea. However, for the mobile application, we only store the eight tidal constants for the water grids on the coast. Once the user activates the application, it reads the longitude and latitude from the GPS sensor in the mobile device and finds the nearest coastal grid which has our tidal constants. Then, the application calculates tidal height variation based on the harmonic analysis. The application also allows the user to input location and

  1. The Networked Naturalist - Mobile devices for Citizen Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrin, D.; Graham, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Citizen science projects engage individual volunteers or groups to observe, measure, and contribute data to scientific studies. CENS is developing mobile phone and web-based tools for formal and informal observation of ecosystems. We are collaborating with national environmental education campaigns, such as Project BudBurst, and with the National Park Service to increase participation in citizen scientist campaigns and to support park service personnel in day to day data gathering. The overarching goals of the Networked Naturalist set of projects are to enhance participatory learning experiences through citizen science campaigns and to facilitate scientific and environmental data collection. Our experience with volunteers at UCLA and at the National Park Service has demonstrated that mobile phones are an efficient, effective and engaging method for collecting environmental and location data and hold great potential for both raising public awareness of environmental issues and collecting data that is valuable for both ecosystem management and research. CENS is an NSF-funded Science and Technology Center and this project represents collaboration among ecologists, computer scientist, and statisticians. Our mobile applications are free for download on Android and iPhone App stores and the source code is made available through open source licenses.

  2. Pharmacy students' use and perceptions of Apple mobile devices incorporated into a basic health science laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jennifer E; Richard, Craig A H

    To describe pharmacy students' use of mobile devices in a basic health science laboratory and to report the students' perceptions on how solving cases with their mobile devices influenced their attitudes, abilities, and view on the use of mobile devices as tools for pharmacists. First-year pharmacy students utilized mobile devices to solve clinical case studies in a basic health sciences laboratory. A pre-survey and two post-surveys were administered to assess the students' comfort, awareness, use, and perceptions on the use of their mobile devices and apps. The pre-survey and first post-survey each had a response rate of 99%, and the second post-survey had a response rate of 100%. In comparing the pre-survey and first post-survey data, there was a statistically significant increase in the number of students that agreed or strongly agreed that they were more comfortable utilizing their mobile device (p = 0.025), they were more aware of apps for pharmacists (p mobile devices, to be more aware of apps that can be useful for pharmacists, and to be more agreeable with mobile device utilization by pharmacists in improving patient care. In addition, the second post-survey also demonstrated that 84% of students responded that using their mobile devices to solve the cases influenced them to either use their mobile device in a clinical setting for a clinical and/or pharmacy-related purpose for the first time or to use it more frequently for this purpose. The use of mobile devices to solve clinical cases in a first-year basic health science laboratory course was perceived as beneficial by students and influenced them to utilize their mobile device even more in a pharmacy practice setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Insecure Network, Unknown Connection: Understanding Wi-Fi Privacy Assumptions of Mobile Device Users

    OpenAIRE

    Bonné, Bram; Rovelo Ruiz, Gustavo; Quax, Peter; Lamotte, Wim

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones and other mobile devices have proliferated in the past five years. The expectation of mobile device users to always be online has led to Wi-Fi networks being offered by a variety of providers. Using these networks introduces multiple security risks. In this work, we assess to what extent the privacy stance of mobile device users corresponds with their actual behavior by conducting a study with 108 participants. Our methodology consists of monitoring Wi-Fi networks that the partici...

  4. Feedback about Astronomical Application Developments for Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaff, A.; Boch, T.; Fernique, P.; Houpin, R.; Kaestlé, V.; Royer, M.; Scheffmann, J.; Weiler, A.

    2013-10-01

    Within a few years, Smartphones have become the standard for mobile telephony, and we are now witnessing a rapid development of Internet tablets. These mobile devices have enough powerful hardware features to run more and more complex applications. In the field of astronomy it is not only possible to use these tools to access data via a simple browser, but also to develop native applications reusing libraries (Java for Android, Objective-C for iOS) developed for desktops. We have been working for two years on mobile application development and we now have the skills in native iOS and Android development, Web development (especially HTML5, JavaScript, CSS3) and conversion tools (PhoneGap) from Web development to native applications. The biggest change comes from human/computer interaction that is radically changed by the use of multitouch. This interaction requires a redesign of interfaces to take advantage of new features (simultaneous selections in different parts of the screen, etc.). In the case of native applications, the distribution is usually done through online stores (App Store, Google Play, etc.) which gives visibility to a wider audience. Our approach is not only to perform testing of materials and developing of prototypes, but also operational applications. The native application development is costly in development time, but the possibilities are broader because it is possible to use native hardware such as the gyroscope and the accelerometer, to point out an object in the sky. Development depends on the Web browser and the rendering and performance are often very different between different browsers. It is also possible to convert Web developments to native applications, but currently it is better to restrict this possibility to light applications in terms of functionality. Developments in HTML5 are promising but are far behind those available on desktops. HTML5 has the advantage of allowing development independent from the evolution of the mobile

  5. Assessing the Introduction of Mobile Banking in Jordan Using Technology Acceptance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed-issa R Jaradat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuously growing number of mobile users demonstrates that more and more users seek to benefit from the freedom afforded without the need for cables, time and place. The mobility is the driving force behind the new global economy, with mobile banking, banks offer a new revolutionize services and giving their consumers more options than ever before. This study aimed to: (1 Investigate consumers' expectations and attitudes towards mobile banking in Jordan. (2 Identify the problems that organizations and consumers encounter while adopting or using mobile banking. (3 Measure the level of consumers’ perceived usefulness (PU, perceived ease of use (PEOU, attitude towards using (ATU, behavioral intention to use (BI, and the actual use (AU of mobile banking. Data for this study have been collected using a questionnaire containing 44 questions. Out of 325 questionnaires that have been distributed, 275 are returned (84.6%. As a result of this study it appeared that if consumers have positive Attitudes towards mobile banking, they would rely on it to conduct their banking transactions. This study finds that Jordanian consumers rely on wireless devices (Mobile for their banking transactions, which leads to the actual use of this new technology, taking into consideration trust as a factor that could affect the success of using mobile banking in Jordan. This study gives quantified indicators about mobile banking and a model that might help in understanding the mobile banking environment in Jordan.

  6. Nuclear Safety in A Post-Fukushima ERDA: Moving Forward with smart Mobile Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, J. H.; Suh, K. Y.

    2012-01-01

    The so-called smart mobile technology refers to the know-how that is being applied to smart phones and smart pads such as ipa and Galaxy Tab, just to name a few. According to Gardner, 280 million smart phones were purchased in year 2010, and another 500 million will be sold in 2013. For the smart pad, the number was 7 million in 2010 and over 30 million pad shall be picked up by buyers. Smart devices are charging the individuals, corporate and societies in the world with '3a' meaning real time, infinite reach of information and communication beating the space limitation. Smart devices are tethered to the Global Positioning System (GPS), high resolution camera, touch sensor Graphic User Interface (GUI), gyro sensor for inclination information, motion sensor, voice recognition, face recognition, cloud, and so forth. These technologies bring about the remote office so that people not only work in their offices but communicate with concurrent information through the Social Networking Service (SNS), build their social relationship, and enjoy their free time with various entertainment mobile applications. These changes signify the strongest information power since the computing history began. The smart mobile technology can also bestow a boost to congested nuclear power industry due to the recent Fukushima Decah nuclear power plants (NPPs) accident. At first, the mobile office and cloud technology will endow the biggest variety to let US manage and access to the desired information anytime and anywhere. The display panel and camera built in the smart mobile device can make the augmented reality (AR) possible to nuclear power industry. For example, the smart mobile devices can be utilized to support the product assembly process in manufacturing company relevant to NPPs. Compared to previous assembly work that is coming and going to find the tools, one can accomplish the assembly process without wasting time, watching manual at the same time at the spot. Experienced

  7. Electronic data capture platform for clinical research based on mobile phones and near field communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morak, Jürgen; Schwetz, Verena; Hayn, Dieter; Fruhwald, Friedrich; Schreier, Gunter

    2008-01-01

    Electronic data capture systems support data acquisition for clinical research and enable the evaluation of new investigational medical devices. In case of evaluating a device the most challenging part is the user interface i.e. the solution how to acquire the data within a clinical setting and to synchronize them with a web-based data centre. The aim of this paper is to describe the development of an electronic data capture system with a mobile data input solution based on mobile phones and Near Field Communication technology. This system was evaluated within a real clinical setting and demonstrated high usability, security and reliability.

  8. Smart Health Surveillance with Automated Database Using Android Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anitha Karthi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Smart Health Surveillance system is to measure and display the Electrocardiogram (ECG and temperature of patient’s body continuously and also to communicate to the doctor. The system measures ECG using infrared sensor and the temperatures at oral and wrist of the patient using temperature sensors. Microcontroller, receives the data from the sensors, displays the same and communicates to the web server automatically. In the existing system, patient’s vital parameters are obtained and the obtained values are entered into database and then uploaded into a web-based server manually. The existing system has no alert signal, during abnormal condition to the surrounding and to the doctor. The proposed system consists of a visualization module of the server program, which graphically displays the recorded biomedical signals on android mobile devices used by doctors at the receiver end. It also gives a buzzer or an alarm in case of abnormal condition of the patient.

  9. Autonomy and Housing Accessibility Among Powered Mobility Device Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Åse; Lexell, Eva Månsson; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To describe environmental barriers, accessibility problems, and powered mobility device (PMD) users’ autonomy indoors and outdoors; to determine the home environmental barriers that generated the most housing accessibility problems indoors, at entrances, and in the close exterior surroundings; and to examine personal factors and environmental components and their association with indoor and outdoor autonomy. METHOD. This cross-sectional study was based on data collected from a sample of 48 PMD users with a spinal cord injury (SCI) using the Impact of Participation and Autonomy and the Housing Enabler instruments. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used. RESULTS. More years living with SCI predicted less restriction in autonomy indoors, whereas more functional limitations and accessibility problems related to entrance doors predicted more restriction in autonomy outdoors. CONCLUSION. To enable optimized PMD use, practitioners must pay attention to the relationship between client autonomy and housing accessibility problems. PMID:26356666

  10. Low complexity smile detection technique for mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaselli, Valeria; Guarnera, Mirko; Marchisio, Claudio Domenico; Moro, Simone

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a low complexity smile detection technique, able to detect smiles in a variety of light conditions, face positions, image resolutions. The proposed approach firstly detects the faces in the image, then applies almost cost-free mouth detection, extracts features from this region and finally classifies between smiling and nonsmiling stages. In this paper different feature extraction methods and classification techniques are analyzed from both the performance and computational complexity standpoints. The best compromise between performances and complexity is represented by a combined approach which exploits both a shape feature and a texture feature and uses the Mahalanobis distance based classifier. This solution achieves good performances with very low complexity, being suitable for an implementation on mobile devices.

  11. Establishment and application of Competitive Intelligence System in Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anass El Haddadi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The strategy concept has changed dramatically: from a long range planning to strategic planning then to strategic responsiveness. This response implies moving from a concept of change to a concept of continuous evolution. In our context, the competitive intelligence system presented aims to improve decision‐making in all aspects of business life, particularly for offensive and innovative decisions. In the paper we present XPlor EveryWhere, our competitive intelligence system based on a multidimensional analysis model for mobile devices. The objective of this system is to capture the information environment in all dimensions of a decision problem, with the exploitation of information by analyzing the evolution of their interactions

  12. Use of mobile learning technology among final year medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main challenges were lack of a smart device, lack of technical know-how in accessing or using apps, sub-optimal internet access, cost of acquiring apps and limited device memory. Conclusion: Mobile learning is increasingly popular among medical students and should be leveraged in promoting access and quality of ...

  13. Educational research between on devices and mobile learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martiniello Lucia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The great potential of mobile learning devices hooks up these new contexts that are, above all, cultural and social, but also organisational and relational, forcing us to reconsider fundamental themes of pedagogical discourse. Among these themes, the first must be the construction of the student’s identity and, connected to this, the issue of personalised education. Let us consider, for instance, the by-now familiar distinction between formal, informal and non-formal. Compared with formal learning, we have always considered the two conditions of informal and non-formal education as independent or at least parallel, but essentially distinct and fundamentally different. In the moment in which teaching is done through mobility, and therefore with the effects of interference in contexts completely different from those that are somewhat predictable by the designer of distance learning, can we still think of a "distinction" between formal and informal or, at least, should we not assume a sort of context cross-breeding?

  14. A Mobile Device System for Early Warning of ECG Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Szczepański

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid increase in computational power of mobile devices the amount of ambient intelligence-based smart environment systems has increased greatly in recent years. A proposition of such a solution is described in this paper, namely real time monitoring of an electrocardiogram (ECG signal during everyday activities for identification of life threatening situations. The paper, being both research and review, describes previous work of the authors, current state of the art in the context of the authors’ work and the proposed aforementioned system. Although parts of the solution were described in earlier publications of the authors, the whole concept is presented completely for the first time along with the prototype implementation on mobile device—a Windows 8 tablet with Modern UI. The system has three main purposes. The first goal is the detection of sudden rapid cardiac malfunctions and informing the people in the patient’s surroundings, family and friends and the nearest emergency station about the deteriorating health of the monitored person. The second goal is a monitoring of ECG signals under non-clinical conditions to detect anomalies that are typically not found during diagnostic tests. The third goal is to register and analyze repeatable, long-term disturbances in the regular signal and finding their patterns.

  15. Development of maintenance support system using portable device and mobile agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hisashi; Ito, Yo; Takahashi, Makoto; Kitamura, Masaharu; Ohi, Tadashi; Wu, Wei

    2004-01-01

    The framework of intelligent support system for the maintenance of nuclear power plant is proposed in this paper with emphasis on the combined use of a portable device and intelligent information processing. The purpose of this system is the realization of flexible inspection process and effective diagnosis process to be performed on-site. The prototype system has been implemented for the experimental facility with mobile-agent technology and PDA (personal digital assistant) to show the basic functionality of the proposed framework. The results of the scenario-based and function-based evaluation showed that the proposed framework is effective for the data management for the maintenance activities. (author)

  16. Characterization of Unipolar Power Devices Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Harmatha

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The quality of momentus technological steps in unipolar power devices manufactoring was examine by means of capacitance and current measurements using a metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors (MOS-C. From the low- (If and high-frequency (hf capacitance-voltage (C-V curves, the effective defect charge and energy distribution of Si-SiO2 interface trap density were extracted, respectively. performin non-steady capacitance-time (C-t and the time domain constant-capacitance (cC-t at well as deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS techniques we have analysed electrically active that generation parameters are mostly influenced by traps at the Si-SiO2 interface. Moreover, breakdown voltage measurement confirms high quality and homogeneity of thermal oxide. Low density of carrier traps was achieved by intrinsic gettering technique.

  17. 78 FR 70320 - Certain Mobile Handset Devices and Related Touch Keyboard Software; Commission Determination Not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-864] Certain Mobile Handset Devices and Related Touch Keyboard Software; Commission Determination Not To Review an Initial Determination... and Personal Communications Devices, LLC (``PCD'') of Hauppauge, New York as respondents. PCD has been...

  18. Exploration of the affordances of mobile devices in integrating theory and clinical practice in an undergraduate nursing programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana J. Willemse

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Promoting the quality and effectiveness of nursing education is an important factor, given the increased demand for nursing professionals. It is important to establish learning environments that provide personalised guidance and feedback to students about their practical skills and application of their theoretical knowledge. Objective: To explore and describe the knowledge and points of view of students and educators about introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme. Method: The qualitative design used Tesch’s (1990 steps of descriptive data analysis to complete thematic analysis of the data collected in focus group discussions (FGDs andindividual interviews to identify themes. Results: Themes identified from the students’ FGDs and individual interviews included:mobile devices as a communication tool; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; WhatsApp as a method of communication; nurses as role-models in the clinical setting; setting personal boundaries; and impact of mobile devices in clinical practiceon professionalism. Themes identified from the FGD, individual interviews and a discussion session held with educators included: peer learning via mobile devices; email, WhatsApp and Facebook as methods of communication; the mobile device as a positive learning method; students need practical guidance; and ethical concerns in clinical facilities about Internet access and use of mobile devices. Conclusion: The research project established an understanding of the knowledge and points of view of students and educators regarding introduction of new technologies into an undergraduate nursing programme with the aim of enhancing integration of theory and clinical practice through use of mobile devices.

  19. Modelling a soft composite accumulator for human mobility assist devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Robert; Doumit, Marc

    2018-04-01

    Research in the field of human mobility assist devices, aiming to reduce the metabolic cost of daily activities, is seeing the benefits of the exclusive use of accumulators to store and release energy during the gait cycle. The Pneumatic Artificial Muscle, used in a passive state, has proven to be a superior choice for these devices when compared to its alternatives, however, challenges regarding muscle pressure dissipation and a limited elongation potential have been identified. A recently developed, novel Soft Composite material has been shown to experimentally replicate the distinctive mechanical behaviour of the Pneumatic Artificial Muscle, without the need for internal pressurization. This paper presents two separate constitutive models to provide a closer insight into the behaviour of these Soft Composite accumulators. Both models were derived from methods involving finite elasticity theory and employed either a structural strain energy function of Holzapfel, Gasser, and Ogden's type or a phenomenological strain energy function of Fung's type. Both models were in good agreement with the experimental data that were collected through a modified extension-inflation test and, therefore, provide a basis for further examination as a Soft Composite design model. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mobile technology for obesity prevention: a randomized pilot study in racial- and ethnic-minority girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollen, Nicole L; Mayo, Matthew S; Carlson, Susan E; Rapoff, Michael A; Goggin, Kathy J; Ellerbeck, Edward F

    2014-04-01

    Mobile technologies have wide-scale reach and disseminability, but no known studies have examined mobile technologies as a stand-alone tool to improve obesity-related behaviors of at-risk youth. To test a 12-week mobile technology intervention for use and estimate effect sizes for a fully powered trial. Fifty-one low-income, racial/ethnic-minority girls aged 9-14 years were randomized to a mobile technology (n=26) or control (n=25) condition. Both conditions lasted 12 weeks and targeted fruits/vegetables (FVs; Weeks 1-4); sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs; Weeks 5-8), and screen time (Weeks 9-12). The mobile intervention prompted real-time goal setting and self-monitoring and provided tips, feedback, and positive reinforcement related to the target behaviors. Controls received the same content in a written manual but no prompting. Outcomes included device utilization and effect size estimates of FVs, SSBs, screen time, and BMI. Data were collected and analyzed in 2011-2012. Mobile technology girls used the program on 63% of days and exhibited trends toward increased FVs (+0.88, p=0.08) and decreased SSBs (-0.33, p=0.09). The adjusted difference between groups of 1.0 servings of FVs (p=0.13) and 0.35 servings of SSBs (p=0.25) indicated small to moderate effects of the intervention (Cohen's d=0.44 and -0.34, respectively). No differences were observed for screen time or BMI. A stand-alone mobile app may produce small to moderate effects for FVs and SSBs. Given the extensive reach of mobile devices, this pilot study demonstrates the need for larger-scale testing of similar programs to address obesity-related behaviors in high-risk youth. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Environmental settings and families' socioeconomic status influence mobility and the use of mobility devices by children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria C. R. Cury

    Full Text Available Functional mobility of children with cerebral palsy (CP is influenced by personal and environmental factors, serving as barriers and/or facilitators and impacting on children's strategies and functional outcome. OBJECTIVES: To describe typical mobility methods used by children with CP at home, school and community and to compare them across family's socioeconomic levels (SES. METHODS: The Functional Mobility Scale was used to assess mobility of 113 children with CP of high and low SES at home, school, and community. RESULTS: Differences in mobility methods of participants classified as Gross Motor Function Classification System levels II, III and IV were found between home and community. For levels III and IV, differences were also found between home and school. At home, participants from higher SES used wheelchairs more frequently while those from lower SES used floor mobility (crawling. CONCLUSIONS: Environmental settings and families' socioeconomic status influence mobility and use of mobility devices by children with CP.

  2. Patients welcome the Sickle Cell Disease Mobile Application to Record Symptoms via Technology (SMART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirmish; Jonassaint, Jude; De Castro, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The widespread use of mobile phones among patients provides a unique opportunity for the development of mobile health intervention designed specifically for sickle cell disease, which will improve self-management as well as health care delivery. Our objective was to determine the receptiveness of patients with sickle cell disease to technology and a mobile application (app) designed for sickle cell disease. Phase I included 100 patients who completed a survey inquiring about receptiveness to technology and use of mobile devices to self-manage and communicate with providers. Phase II surveyed 17 additional patients who tested a newly developed sickle cell disease app, to report its usability and utility. In Phase I, on a 0-10 Likert scale where 0 is not comfortable, and 10 is extremely comfortable, 87.0% of participants reported >5 comfort level using a mobile device for health care management. Participants were comfortable with texting (81.0%) and emailing (77.0%) but not with social media (40.0%). Most participants (84.0%) owned computer devices (desktops, laptops, tablets, or iPads), and 92.0% owned mobile devices. In Phase II, participants reported that the app tested was useful to track pain (88.0%), and 94.0% reported that it was easy to use, practical, and useful for health self-management. All reported that the app was useful to help one communicate with providers. Following the use of our app, patients found it an extremely valuable tool for tracking pain, health management, and communicating with providers. We conclude that mobile technology might provide an appropriate venue for sickle cell disease healthcare management.

  3. Using technology to promote mobile learning: engaging students with cell phones in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Meigan; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in cell phone technology have impacted every aspect of society. Individuals have instant access to social networks, Web sites, and applications. Faculty need to consider using these mobile devices to enrich the classroom. The authors discuss how they successfully designed and incorporated cell phone learning activities into their classrooms. Teaching-learning strategies using cell phone technology and recommendations for overcoming challenges associated with cell phone use in the classroom are discussed.

  4. Doctors' use of mobile devices in the clinical setting: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerminathan, Arany; Harrison, Amanda; Phelps, Megan; Alexander, Shirley; Scott, Karen M

    2017-03-01

    Mobile device use has become almost ubiquitous in daily life and therefore includes use by doctors in clinical settings. There has been little study as to the patterns of use and impact this has on doctors in the workplace and how negatively or positively it impacts at the point of care. To explore how doctors use mobile devices in the clinical setting and understand drivers for use. A mixed methods study was used with doctors in a paediatric and adult teaching hospital in 2013. A paper-based survey examined mobile device usage data by doctors in the clinical setting. Focus groups explored doctors' reasons for using or refraining from using mobile devices in the clinical setting, and their attitudes about others' use. The survey, completed by 109 doctors, showed that 91% owned a smartphone and 88% used their mobile devices frequently in the clinical setting. Trainees were more likely than consultants to use their mobile devices for learning and accessing information related to patient care, as well as for personal communication unrelated to work. Focus group data highlighted a range of factors that influenced doctors to use personal mobile devices in the clinical setting, including convenience for medical photography, and factors that limited use. Distraction in the clinical setting due to use of mobile devices was a key issue. Personal experience and confidence in using mobile devices affected their use, and was guided by role modelling and expectations within a medical team. Doctors use mobile devices to enhance efficiency in the workplace. In the current environment, doctors are making their own decisions based on balancing the risks and benefits of using mobile devices in the clinical setting. There is a need for guidelines around acceptable and ethical use that is patient-centred and that respects patient privacy. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  5. Intuitive balance-based mobility interfaces - A framework for understanding balance as input in personal mobility devices

    OpenAIRE

    Rem, Aleksander

    2015-01-01

    This thesis examines how balance as input is used as a modality when controlling a personal mobility device. Through a user-centered design approach, we designed and built a fully functional mobility device prototype that uses balance as its only form of user input. We used an online survey for gathering needs and requirements, and created several design concepts and paper sketches through a focus group and design workshop. A balance controlled electric skateboard was chosen for further devel...

  6. Context-Aware Middleware Support for the Nomadic Mobile Services on Multi-homed Handheld Mobile Devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pawar, Pravin; van Beijnum, Bert-Jan; Peddemors, Arjan; van Halteren, Aart

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, a variety ofhandheld mobile devices are capable of connecting to the Internet using multiple network interfaces. This is referred to as multi-homing. In addition to this, enriched computation resources allow them to host nomadic mobile services and provide these services to the clients

  7. Mobile phone-based biosensing: An emerging "diagnostic and communication" technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-González, Daniel; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-06-15

    In this review we discuss recent developments on the use of mobile phones and similar devices for biosensing applications in which diagnostics and communications are coupled. Owing to the capabilities of mobile phones (their cameras, connectivity, portability, etc.) and to advances in biosensing, the coupling of these two technologies is enabling portable and user-friendly analytical devices. Any user can now perform quick, robust and easy (bio)assays anywhere and at any time. Among the most widely reported of such devices are paper-based platforms. Herein we provide an overview of a broad range of biosensing possibilities, from optical to electrochemical measurements; explore the various reported designs for adapters; and consider future opportunities for this technology in fields such as health diagnostics, safety & security, and environment monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. "Design for Somebody" - Approach Enabling Mobile Technology Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirkka, Andrew; Merilampi, Sari; Koivisto, Antti; Tommiska, Janika; Saarinen, Tatu-Pekka

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents case examples of Design for Somebody (DfS) philosophy used both in developing novel technologies and modifying existing main stream technologies applicable for users with special needs. DfS embodies variety of mobile technology approaches to generate personalised means to enable and motivate physical, cognitive and social skills development.

  9. [A wireless mobile monitoring system based on bluetooth technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shou-jun; Wu, Kai; Wu, Xiao-Ming

    2006-09-01

    This paper presents a wireless mobile monitoring system based on Bluetooth technology. This system realizes the remote mobile monitoring of multiple physiological parameters, and has the characters of easy use, low cost, good reliability and strong capability of anti-jamming.

  10. Development of a Math Input Interface with Flick Operation for Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Nakahara, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    Developing online test environments for e-learning for mobile devices will be useful to increase drill practice opportunities. In order to provide a drill practice environment for calculus using an online math test system, such as STACK, we develop a flickable math input interface that can be easily used on mobile devices. The number of taps…

  11. World Language Students' Ethnographic Investigations of Culture through Mobile Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Harry G.; Tuttle, Lori A.

    2017-01-01

    World language teachers can transform how their students learn culture through the use of mobile devices. When world language students use their mobile devices to access authentic current culture, they go from being passive receivers of culture to active cultural investigators. These students go from learning thin surface culture to exploring…

  12. 77 FR 49458 - Certain Mobile Electronic Devices Incorporating Haptics; Amendment of the Complaint and Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-834] Certain Mobile Electronic Devices Incorporating Haptics; Amendment of the Complaint and Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S. International Trade... certain mobile electronic devices incorporating haptics, by reason of the infringement of claims of six...

  13. Age-Related Differences in the Initial Usability of Mobile Device Icons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Rock; McGrenere, Joanna; Graf, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mobile devices offer much potential to support older adults (age 65+). However, older adults have been relatively slow to adopt mobile devices. Although much ongoing HCI research has examined usability problems to address this issue, little work has looked at whether existing graphical icons are harder to use for this population compared with…

  14. Pubcast and Genecast: Browsing and Exploring Publications and Associated Curated Content in Biology Through Mobile Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldweber, Scott; Theodore, Jamal; Torcivia-Rodriguez, John; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2017-01-01

    Services such as Facebook, Amazon, and eBay were once solely accessed from stationary computers. These web services are now being used increasingly on mobile devices. We acknowledge this new reality by providing users a way to access publications and a curated cancer mutation database on their mobile device with daily automated updates. http://hive. biochemistry.gwu.edu/tools/HivePubcast.

  15. Very old Swedish women's experiences of mobility devices in everyday occupation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Löfqvist, Charlotte; Nygren, Carita; Brandt, Ase

    2009-01-01

    . Personal factors such as ability to adjust and adapt to different situations seem to be crucial for optimal mobility device use. Strategies and adaptive behavior were developed over the years while striving for maintained independence and participation. The use of mobility devices was described...

  16. Usage of mobile-devices for recreation among the millenial generation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... investigate the usage of mobile devices for recreation purposes among the millennial generation. A self-structured questionnaire was used for data collection. A factor analytical study revealed six mobile-device recreation dimensions, namely; entertainment, addiction, impulsivity, subjective norms, health and quality of life ...

  17. Emerging materials and devices in spintronic integrated circuits for energy-smart mobile computing and connectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, S.H.; Lee, K.

    2013-01-01

    A spintronic integrated circuit (IC) is made of a combination of a semiconductor IC and a dense array of nanometer-scale magnetic tunnel junctions. This emerging field is of growing scientific and engineering interest, owing to its potential to bring disruptive device innovation to the world of electronics. This technology is currently being pursued not only for scalable non-volatile spin-transfer-torque magnetoresistive random access memory, but also for various forms of non-volatile logic (Spin-Logic). This paper reviews recent advances in spintronic IC. Key discoveries and breakthroughs in materials and devices are highlighted in light of the broader perspective of their application in low-energy mobile computing and connectivity systems, which have emerged as leading drivers for the prevailing electronics ecosystem

  18. Plug-and-Design: Bringing a Design Environment to a Mobile Device

    OpenAIRE

    MESKENS, Jan; LUYTEN, Kris; CONINX, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the large amount of mobile devices that continue to appear on the consumer market, mobile user interface design becomes increasingly important. The major issue with many existing mobile user interface design approaches is the time and effort that is needed to deploy a user interface design to the target device. In order to address this issue, we propose the plug-and-design tool that relies on a continuous multi-device mouse pointer to design user interfaces directly on the mobile targe...

  19. Plug-and-Design: Embracing Mobile Devices as Part of the Design Environment

    OpenAIRE

    MESKENS, Jan; LUYTEN, Kris; CONINX, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Due to the large amount of mobile devices that continue to appear on the consumer market, mobile user interface design becomes increasingly important. The major issue with many existing mobile user interface design approaches is the time and effort that is needed to deploy a user interface design to the target device. In order to address this issue, we propose the plug-and-design tool that relies on a continuous multi-device mouse pointer to design user interfaces directly on the mobile targe...

  20. Usability Testing of a Collaborative and Interactive University on a Mobile Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin McArdle

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - The use of mobile devices for delivering learning tools is an attractive concept. Termed mobile learning (m-learning, this new technology allows people to participate in learning activities without being tied to a fixed location and provides users with convenient and flexible access to learning resources anytime and anywhere. While many m-learning applications have been developed to date, most provide tools to help students’ with specific learning tasks rather than a general interface to online courses. Few sup-port online learning communities or allow users to download multimedia learning content. These features would engage mobile users and enable them to interact with one another, thus allowing them to participate in group learning activities despite their changing location. In this article, we describe an m-learning system which we have developed which aims to incorporate these facilities. This system provides access to multimedia learning resources and supports mobile users in an interactive synchronous learning environment with their desktop peers. Details of the evaluation techniques which we utilised to appraise the system are provided and the results are presented. Feedback suggests that the features offered by our system are beneficial for collaborative m-learning.