WorldWideScience

Sample records for technologies field scale

  1. Personal Professional Development Efforts Scale for Science and Technology Teachers Regarding Their Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Aysegül; Balbag, Mustafa Zafer

    2016-01-01

    This study has developed "Personal Professional Development Efforts Scale for Science and Technology Teachers Regarding Their Fields". Exploratory factor analysis of the scale has been conducted based on the data collected from 200 science and technology teachers across Turkey. The scale has been observed through varimax rotation method,…

  2. A design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of the viscous barrier technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moridis, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States); Yen, P. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States); Persoff, P.; Finsterle, S.; Williams, P.; Myer, L.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This report is the design study for a medium-scale field demonstration of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory`s new subsurface containment technology for waste isolation using a new generation of barrier liquids. The test site is located in central California in a quarry owned by the Los Banos Gravel Company in Los Banos, California, in heterogeneous unsaturated deposits of sand, silt, and -ravel typical of many of the and DOE cleanup sites and particularly analogous to the Hanford site. The coals of the field demonstration are (a) to demonstrate the ability to create a continuous subsurface barrier isolating a medium-scale volume (30 ft long by 30 ft wide by 20 ft deep, i.e. 1/10th to 1/8th the size of a buried tank at the Hanford Reservation) in the subsurface, and (b) to demonstrate the continuity, performance, and integrity of the barrier.

  3. Smouldering Remediation (STAR) Technology: Field Pilot Tests and First Full Scale Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhard, J.; Kinsman, L.; Torero, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    STAR (Self-sustaining Treatment for Active Remediation) is an innovative remediation technology based on the principles of smoldering combustion where the contaminants are the fuel. The self-sustaining aspect means that a single, local ignition event can result in many days of contaminant destruction in situ. Presented research to date has focused on bench scale experiments, numerical modelling and process understanding. Presented here is the maturation of the in situ technology, including three field pilot tests and a full-scale implementation to treat coal tar-impacted soils. The first pilot determined a Radius of Influence (ROI) for a single ignition of approximately eight feet with an average propagation rate of the reaction of approximately one foot per day. TPH concentrations in soils were reduced from 10,000 milligrams per kilogram to a few hundred milligrams per kilogram. The second pilot was conducted in an area of significant void spaces created through the anthropogenic deposition of clay bricks and tiles. The void spaces led to pre-mature termination of the combustion reaction, limiting ROI and the effectiveness of the technology in this setting. The third case study involved the pilot testing, design, and full-scale implementation of STAR at a 37-acre former chemical manufacturing facility. Three phases of pilot testing were conducted within two hydrogeologic units at the site (i.e., surficial fill and deep alluvial sand units). Pilot testing within the fill demonstrated self-sustained coal tar destruction rates in excess of 800 kg/day supported through air injection at a single well. Deep sand unit testing (twenty-five feet below the water table) resulted in the treatment of a targeted six-foot layer of impacted fine sands to a radial distance of approximately twelve feet. These results (and additional parameters) were used to develop a full-scale STAR design consisting of approximately 1500 surficial fill ignition points and 500 deep sand ignition

  4. Sandia Wake Imaging System Field Test Report: 2015 Deployment at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naughton, Brian Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Herges, Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report presents the objectives, configuration, procedures, reporting , roles , and responsibilities and subsequent results for the field demonstration of the Sandia Wake Imaging System (SWIS) at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility near Lubbock, Texas in June and July 2015.

  5. Small scale sanitation technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, W; Ho, G

    2005-01-01

    Small scale systems can improve the sustainability of sanitation systems as they more easily close the water and nutrient loops. They also provide alternate solutions to centrally managed large scale infrastructures. Appropriate sanitation provision can improve the lives of people with inadequate sanitation through health benefits, reuse products as well as reduce ecological impacts. In the literature there seems to be no compilation of a wide range of available onsite sanitation systems around the world that encompasses black and greywater treatment plus stand-alone dry and urine separation toilet systems. Seventy technologies have been identified and classified according to the different waste source streams. Sub-classification based on major treatment methods included aerobic digestion, composting and vermicomposting, anaerobic digestion, sand/soil/peat filtration and constructed wetlands. Potential users or suppliers of sanitation systems can choose from wide range of technologies available and examine the different treatment principles used in the technologies. Sanitation systems need to be selected according to the local social, economic and environmental conditions and should aim to be sustainable.

  6. New technology for scale squeeze treatments on high water cut wells on Statoil Heidrun and Norne fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Michael; Heath, Steve; Selle, Olav M.; Haavind, Frode; Springer, Martin; Auflem, Inge H.; Clark, Graham; Strachan, Catherine; Oedegaard, Bent

    2006-03-15

    The Heidrun and Norne fields are located in the Haltenbanken area offshore Mid-Norway. The reservoir temperatures are 85 deg-88 deg C and 98 deg C respectively, and the reservoir pressure is close to hydrostatic pressure of approx. 250Bar for both fields. Seawater injection is utilised on both Heidrun and Norne to maintain reservoir support and with Ba levels averaging 80-90ppm and 200-300ppm in the Norne and Heidrun formation brines, moderate to harsh barium sulphate scale challenges have been identified. The barium sulphate scale challenge has been routinely controlled by the use of aqueous based scale squeeze treatments. However, on high water cut and low reservoir pressure wells, lifting problems have been encountered post squeeze treatments. Hybrid treatments with diesel pre-flush and over flush have been slow in returning the wells to full production post squeeze treatment. The challenge was therefore to develop a low-density scale inhibitor (less than 0.94) that will aid well re-start post squeeze treatment. This product would also need to be environmentally friendly, compatible with produced fluids and non-emulsifying, be effectively retained and released, and provide a good level of inhibition against barium sulphate scale. This paper will highlight the details of the laboratory development of the low-density scale inhibitor and, in addition, will present details of the deployment of the low density product in wells with lifting problems on Heidrun and Norne. (Author) (tk)

  7. Summary report on close-coupled subsurface barrier technology: Initial field trials to full-scale demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiser, J.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Environmental and Waste Technology Center; Dwyer, B. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-09-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate the installation and measure the performance of a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional, low-cost, cement-grout containment barrier followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement-polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of the issues concerning the use of polymers to laboratory compatibility and performance measurements of various polymer systems to a pilot-scale, single column injection at Sandia to full-scale demonstration. The feasibility of the close-coupled barrier concept was proven in a full-scale cold demonstration at Hanford, Washington and then moved to the final stage with a full-scale demonstration at an actual remediation site at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). At the Hanford demonstration the composite barrier was emplaced around and beneath a 20,000 liter tank. The secondary cement layer was constructed using conventional jet grouting techniques. Drilling was completed at a 45{degree} angle to the ground, forming a cone-shaped barrier. The primary barrier was placed by panel jet-grouting with a dual-wall drill stem using a two part polymer grout. The polymer chosen was a high molecular weight acrylic. At the BNL demonstration a V-trough barrier was installed using a conventional cement grout for the secondary layer and an acrylic-gel polymer for the primary layer. Construction techniques were identical to the Hanford installation. This report summarizes the technology development from pilot- to full-scale demonstrations and presents some of the performance and quality achievements attained.

  8. A Study to Develop an Industrial-Scale, Computer-Controlled High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) System to Assist in Commercializing the Novel, Enabling HMFP Manufacturing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludtka, Gail Mackiewicz- [ORNL; Chourey, Aashish [American Magnetics Inc.

    2010-08-01

    As the original magnet designer and manufacturer of ORNL s 9T, 5-inch ID bore magnet, American Magnetics Inc. (AMI) has collaborated with ORNL s Materials Processing Group s and this partnership has been instrumental in the development of our unique thermo-magnetic facilities and expertise. Consequently, AMI and ORNL have realized that the commercial implementation of the High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) technology will require the evolution of robust, automated superconducting (SC) magnet systems that will be cost-effective and easy to operate in an industrial environment. The goal of this project and CRADA is to significantly expedite the timeline for implementing this revolutionary and pervasive cross-cutting technology for future US produced industrial components. The successful completion of this project is anticipated to significantly assist in the timely commercialization and licensing of our HMFP intellectual property for a broad spectrum of industries; and to open up a new market for AMI. One notable outcome of this project is that the ThermoMagnetic Processing Technology WON a prestigious 2009 R&D 100 Awards. This award acknowledges and recognizes our TMP Technology as one of the top 100 innovative US technologies in 2009. By successfully establishing the design requirements for a commercial scale magnetic processing system, this project effort has accomplished a key first step in facilitating the building and demonstration of a superconducting magnetic processing coil, enabling the transition of the High Magnetic Field Processing Technology beyond a laboratory novelty into a commercially viable and industrially scalable Manufacturing Technology.

  9. A Study to Develop an Industrial-Scale, Computer-Controlled High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) System to Assist in Commercializing the Novel, Enabling HMFP Manufacturing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutdka, G. M.; Chourey, A. (American Magnetics, Inc.)

    2010-05-12

    As the original magnet designer and manufacturer of ORNL’s 9T, 5-inch ID bore magnet, American Magnetics Inc. (AMI) has collaborated with ORNL’s Materials Processing Group’s and this partnership has been instrumental in the development of our unique thermo-magnetic facilities and expertise. Consequently, AMI and ORNL have realized that the commercial implementation of the High Magnetic Field Processing (HMFP) technology will require the evolution of robust, automated superconducting (SC) magnet systems that will be cost-effective and easy to operate in an industrial environment. The goal of this project and CRADA is to significantly expedite the timeline for implementing this revolutionary and pervasive cross-cutting technology for future US produced industrial components. The successful completion of this project is anticipated to significantly assist in the timely commercialization and licensing of our HMFP intellectual property for a broad spectrum of industries; and to open up a new market for AMI. One notable outcome of this project is that the ThermoMagnetic Processing Technology WON a prestigious 2009 R&D 100 Awards. This award acknowledges and recognizes our TMP Technology as one of the top 100 innovative US technologies in 2009. By successfully establishing the design requirements for a commercial scale magnetic processing system, this project effort has accomplished a key first step in facilitating the building and demonstration of a superconducting magnetic processing coil, enabling the transition of the High Magnetic Field Processing Technology beyond a laboratory novelty into a commercially viable and industrially scalable Manufacturing Technology.

  10. Scaled CMOS Technology Reliability Users Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The desire to assess the reliability of emerging scaled microelectronics technologies through faster reliability trials and more accurate acceleration models is the precursor for further research and experimentation in this relevant field. The effect of semiconductor scaling on microelectronics product reliability is an important aspect to the high reliability application user. From the perspective of a customer or user, who in many cases must deal with very limited, if any, manufacturer's reliability data to assess the product for a highly-reliable application, product-level testing is critical in the characterization and reliability assessment of advanced nanometer semiconductor scaling effects on microelectronics reliability. A methodology on how to accomplish this and techniques for deriving the expected product-level reliability on commercial memory products are provided.Competing mechanism theory and the multiple failure mechanism model are applied to the experimental results of scaled SDRAM products. Accelerated stress testing at multiple conditions is applied at the product level of several scaled memory products to assess the performance degradation and product reliability. Acceleration models are derived for each case. For several scaled SDRAM products, retention time degradation is studied and two distinct soft error populations are observed with each technology generation: early breakdown, characterized by randomly distributed weak bits with Weibull slope (beta)=1, and a main population breakdown with an increasing failure rate. Retention time soft error rates are calculated and a multiple failure mechanism acceleration model with parameters is derived for each technology. Defect densities are calculated and reflect a decreasing trend in the percentage of random defective bits for each successive product generation. A normalized soft error failure rate of the memory data retention time in FIT/Gb and FIT/cm2 for several scaled SDRAM generations is

  11. Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli acute paralysis virus disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera: Apidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Hunter

    Full Text Available The importance of honey bees to the world economy far surpasses their contribution in terms of honey production; they are responsible for up to 30% of the world's food production through pollination of crops. Since fall 2006, honey bees in the U.S. have faced a serious population decline, due in part to a phenomenon called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD, which is a disease syndrome that is likely caused by several factors. Data from an initial study in which investigators compared pathogens in honey bees affected by CCD suggested a putative role for Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus, IAPV. This is a single stranded RNA virus with no DNA stage placed taxonomically within the family Dicistroviridae. Although subsequent studies have failed to find IAPV in all CCD diagnosed colonies, IAPV has been shown to cause honey bee mortality. RNA interference technology (RNAi has been used successfully to silence endogenous insect (including honey bee genes both by injection and feeding. Moreover, RNAi was shown to prevent bees from succumbing to infection from IAPV under laboratory conditions. In the current study IAPV specific homologous dsRNA was used in the field, under natural beekeeping conditions in order to prevent mortality and improve the overall health of bees infected with IAPV. This controlled study included a total of 160 honey bee hives in two discrete climates, seasons and geographical locations (Florida and Pennsylvania. To our knowledge, this is the first successful large-scale real world use of RNAi for disease control.

  12. Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli acute paralysis virus disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Wayne; Ellis, James; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Hayes, Jerry; Westervelt, Dave; Glick, Eitan; Williams, Michael; Sela, Ilan; Maori, Eyal; Pettis, Jeffery; Cox-Foster, Diana; Paldi, Nitzan

    2010-12-23

    The importance of honey bees to the world economy far surpasses their contribution in terms of honey production; they are responsible for up to 30% of the world's food production through pollination of crops. Since fall 2006, honey bees in the U.S. have faced a serious population decline, due in part to a phenomenon called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), which is a disease syndrome that is likely caused by several factors. Data from an initial study in which investigators compared pathogens in honey bees affected by CCD suggested a putative role for Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus, IAPV. This is a single stranded RNA virus with no DNA stage placed taxonomically within the family Dicistroviridae. Although subsequent studies have failed to find IAPV in all CCD diagnosed colonies, IAPV has been shown to cause honey bee mortality. RNA interference technology (RNAi) has been used successfully to silence endogenous insect (including honey bee) genes both by injection and feeding. Moreover, RNAi was shown to prevent bees from succumbing to infection from IAPV under laboratory conditions. In the current study IAPV specific homologous dsRNA was used in the field, under natural beekeeping conditions in order to prevent mortality and improve the overall health of bees infected with IAPV. This controlled study included a total of 160 honey bee hives in two discrete climates, seasons and geographical locations (Florida and Pennsylvania). To our knowledge, this is the first successful large-scale real world use of RNAi for disease control.

  13. Large-Scale Field Application of RNAi Technology Reducing Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus Disease in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Wayne; Ellis, James; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Hayes, Jerry; Westervelt, Dave; Glick, Eitan; Williams, Michael; Sela, Ilan; Maori, Eyal; Pettis, Jeffery; Cox-Foster, Diana; Paldi, Nitzan

    2010-01-01

    The importance of honey bees to the world economy far surpasses their contribution in terms of honey production; they are responsible for up to 30% of the world's food production through pollination of crops. Since fall 2006, honey bees in the U.S. have faced a serious population decline, due in part to a phenomenon called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), which is a disease syndrome that is likely caused by several factors. Data from an initial study in which investigators compared pathogens in honey bees affected by CCD suggested a putative role for Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus, IAPV. This is a single stranded RNA virus with no DNA stage placed taxonomically within the family Dicistroviridae. Although subsequent studies have failed to find IAPV in all CCD diagnosed colonies, IAPV has been shown to cause honey bee mortality. RNA interference technology (RNAi) has been used successfully to silence endogenous insect (including honey bee) genes both by injection and feeding. Moreover, RNAi was shown to prevent bees from succumbing to infection from IAPV under laboratory conditions. In the current study IAPV specific homologous dsRNA was used in the field, under natural beekeeping conditions in order to prevent mortality and improve the overall health of bees infected with IAPV. This controlled study included a total of 160 honey bee hives in two discrete climates, seasons and geographical locations (Florida and Pennsylvania). To our knowledge, this is the first successful large-scale real world use of RNAi for disease control. PMID:21203478

  14. Digital Technology for Geological Field Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rourke, Peter; Smith, Stuart; Vaughan, Alan; Ellis, Jenny

    2014-05-01

    The amount of time that students and professionals spend in the field has reduced over the past 25 years (Gibbs, 2012). Recent advances in technology are changing the way students and professionals are able to conduct geological field study. Applications such as Midland Valley Exploration's FieldMove Clino now allow the geologist to use their smartphone as a fast, georeferenced measuring device compared with a traditional compass-clinometer. Although we support the view that an understanding of field mapping and model building, taught at university level, is essential to give the geologist the ability to think in three and four dimensions, new technologies that automate the ability to digitise and visualise data in the field lead to a better appreciation of the geometry, scale, and evolution of geological structures and trapping mechanisms that will be encountered during a career in industry. The majority of future industry professionals own a smartphone or tablet device: A recent study found that four-fifths of new students own a smartphone and one-fifth own a tablet device (UCAS Media, 2013). This figure is increasing with each new intake of geoscience students. With the increased availability and affordability of smartphone and tablet devices, new techniques are being examined for digital data collection in the field. If the trend continues that geoscience students are likely to spend less time in the field than their predecessors, then the time available must be spent as effectively as possible. Digital devices allow students and professionals alike to optimise the time spent in the field, allowing more time to think about geological relationships, and highlighting areas of uncertainty that can be studied further. This poster will examine the use of new digital smartphone and tablet devices for the collection of geological field data.

  15. Biomass for energy - small scale technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvesen, F.; Joergensen, P.F. [KanEnergi, Rud (Norway)

    1997-12-31

    The bioenergy markets and potential in EU region, the different types of biofuels, the energy technology, and the relevant applications of these for small-scale energy production are reviewed in this presentation

  16. Instructional Technology: The Research Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagne, Robert M.

    1986-01-01

    Reflects upon opportunities for research in instructional technology provided by present state of media hardware technology and educational requirements. Prospects for research in incidental learning, including learning from television, are discussed, as well as traditional learning research on intentional learning, including possibilities for…

  17. Development of an integrated in-situ remediation technology. Topical report for task No. 12 and 13 entitled: Large scale field test of the Lasagna{trademark} process, September 26, 1994--May 25, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Athmer, C.J.; Ho, Sa V.; Hughes, B.M. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Contamination in low permeability soils poses a significant technical challenge to in-situ remediation efforts. Poor accessibility to the contaminants and difficulty in delivery of treatment reagents have rendered existing in-situ treatments such as bioremediation, vapor extraction, pump and treat rather ineffective when applied to low permeability soils present at many contaminated sites. This technology is an integrated in-situ treatment in which established geotechnical methods are used to instant degradation zones directly in the contaminated soil and electroosmosis is utilized to move the contaminants back and forth through those zones until the treatment is completed. This topical report summarizes the results of the field experiment conducted at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Paducah, KY. The test site covered 15 feet wide by 10 feet across and 15 feet deep with steel panels as electrodes and wickdrains containing granular activated carbon as treatment zone& The electrodes and treatment zones were installed utilizing innovative adaptation of existing emplacement technologies. The unit was operated for four months, flushing TCE by electroosmosis from the soil into the treatment zones where it was trapped by the activated carbon. The scale up from laboratory units to this field scale was very successful with respect to electrical parameters as weft as electroosmotic flow. Soil samples taken throughout the site before and after the test showed over 98% TCE removal, with most samples showing greater than 99% removal.

  18. Capturing field-scale variability in crop performance across a regional-scale climosequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, E. S.; Poggio, M.; Anderson, T. R.; Gasch, C.; Yourek, M. A.; Ward, N. K.; Magney, T. S.; Brown, D. J.; Huggins, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    With the increasing availability of variable rate technology for applying fertilizers and other agrichemicals in dryland agricultural production systems there is a growing need to better capture and understand the processes driving field scale variability in crop yield and soil water. This need for a better understanding of field scale variability has led to the recent designation of the R. J. Cook Agronomy Farm (CAF) (Pullman, WA, USA) as a United States Department of Agriculture Long-Term Agro-Ecosystem Research (LTAR) site. Field scale variability at the CAF is closely monitored using extensive environmental sensor networks and intensive hand sampling. As investigating land-soil-water dynamics at CAF is essential for improving precision agriculture, transferring this knowledge across the regional-scale climosequence is challenging. In this study we describe the hydropedologic functioning of the CAF in relation to five extensively instrumented field sites located within 50 km in the same climatic region. The formation of restrictive argillic soil horizons in the wetter, cooler eastern edge of the region results in the development of extensive perched water tables, surface saturation, and surface runoff, whereas excess water is not an issue in the warmer, drier, western edge of the region. Similarly, crop and tillage management varies across the region as well. We discuss the implications of these regional differences on field scale management decisions and demonstrate how we are using proximal soil sensing and remote sensing imagery to better understand and capture field scale variability at a particular field site.

  19. Large-scale field application of RNAi technology reducing Israeli Acute Paralysis Virus Disease in honey bees (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera; Apidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present the first successful use of RNAi under a large-scale real-world application for disease control. Israeli acute paralysis virus, IAPV, has been linked as a contributing factor in coolly collapse, CCD, of honey bees. IAPV specific homologous dsRNA were designed to reduce impacts from IAPV i...

  20. Tunneling field effect transistor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Mansun

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a single-source reference to the state-of-the art in tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs). Readers will learn the TFETs physics from advanced atomistic simulations, the TFETs fabrication process and the important roles that TFETs will play in enabling integrated circuit designs for power efficiency. · Provides comprehensive reference to tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs); · Covers all aspects of TFETs, from device process to modeling and applications; · Enables design of power-efficient integrated circuits, with low power consumption TFETs.

  1. Scaling of sand flux over bedforms- experiments to field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, B. J.; Mahon, R. C.; Ashley, T.; Alexander, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Bed forms are one of the few geomorphic phenomena whose field and laboratory geometric scales have significant overlap. This is similarly true for scales of sediment transport. Whether in the lab or field, at low transport stages and high Rouse numbers where suspension is minimal, sand fluxes scale nonlinearly with transport stage. At high transport stages, and low Rouse numbers where suspension is substantial, sand transport scales with rouse number. In intermediate cases deformation of bed forms is a direct result of the exchange of sediment between the classically suspended and bed load volumes. These parameters are straightforwardly measured in the laboratory. However, practical difficulties and cost ineffectiveness often exclude bed-sediment measurements from studies and monitoring efforts aimed at estimating sediment loads in rivers. An alternative to direct sampling is through the measurement of evolution of bed topography constrained by sediment-mass conservation. Historically, the topographic-evolution approach has been limited to systems with negligible transport of sand in suspension. As was shown decades ago, pure bed load transport is responsible for the mean migration of trains of bed forms when no sediment is exchanged between individual bed forms. In contrast, the component of bed-material load that moves in suspension is responsible for changes in the size, shape, and spacing of evolving bed forms; collectively this is called deformation. The difference between bed-load flux and bed-material-load flux equals the flux of suspended bed material. We give a partial demonstration of this using available field and laboratory data and comparing them across geometric and sediment transport scales.

  2. Vector Field Visual Data Analysis Technologies for Petascale Computational Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garth, Christoph; Deines, Eduard; Joy, Kenneth I.; Bethel, E. Wes; Childs, Hank; Weber, Gunther; Ahern, Sean; Pugmire, Dave; Sanderson, Allen; Johnson, Chris

    2009-11-13

    State-of-the-art computational science simulations generate large-scale vector field data sets. Visualization and analysis is a key aspect of obtaining insight into these data sets and represents an important challenge. This article discusses possibilities and challenges of modern vector field visualization and focuses on methods and techniques developed in the SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET) and deployed in the open-source visualization tool, VisIt.

  3. Statistical scaling properties of planetary topographic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landais, François; Schmidt, Frederic; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2016-10-01

    The massive acquisition of altimetric data in the solar system has motivated numerous analysis of the topography of planets, in particular the surface roughness. Many statistical indicators have been proposed and widely explored in order to study the surface of plantets. Useful informations have been obtained by the use of those indicators but they often have the disadvantage of been defined at a given scale. By construction, they do not directly take into account the well-established scale symmetry that generally occurs in the case of natural surfaces. Indeed, topography can not be interpreted as a stationary field, meaning that statistical parameters like the mean or the standard deviation exhibit a dependence toward scales. This subject has been widely studied in the past, parallel to the development of the notion of fractals. It is now well established that topography is often efficiently modelled by fractal simulations. More interestingly, the fractal theory provides a mathematical formalism to describe the scale dependence of statistical parameters toward scales. It turns out that simple power-law relations efficiently approach the variability of planetary surfaces.However, The observed intermittency (spatial dependance of the scaling laws) apparently rejects the idea of a global description of any topographic field at the planetary scale. Still, modern developments in the fractal theory might be able to give full account to the observed variability and intermittency. It is possible to extent the fractal interpretation of topography to a multifractal statistical object requiring an infinite number of fractal dimensions (one for each statistical moment order). In the present study, we analyse the global scaling laws of topography for different body in the solar system in order to test the multifractal formalism. We then compare the fractal and multifractal parameters form a body to the other. We demonstrate that a change of processes governing the global

  4. Massive Gauge Fields and the Planck Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, G D

    2004-01-01

    The present work is devoted to massive gauge fields in special relativity with two fundamental constants-the velocity of light, and the Planck length, so called doubly special relativity (DSR). The two invariant scales are accounted for by properly modified boost parameters. Within above framework we construct the vector potential as the (1/2,0)x(0,1/2) direct product, build the associated field strength tensor together with the Dirac spinors and use them to calculate various observables as functions of the Planck length.

  5. Advanced sensing technology in environmental field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakida, Shin-ichi

    2009-01-01

    Before the introduction of advanced sensing technology in environmental fields, environmental issues were discussed as several categories, such as local environmental issues in the 1970s, global environmental issues in the 1980s, living environmental issues in the 2000s and environmental stress issues in near future, which are of increasing interest in Japan. Using advanced sensing technologies, such as electrochemical sensors, chemically-sensitive field-effect transistors (ChemFETs) based on micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS) micromachining technology and subsequently electrophoretic separation and microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip using MEMS technology, we have steered several kinds of environmental monitoring projects timely in response to the environmental issues for over the last 25 years. Among the local environmental issues, the global environmental issues and the living environmental issues, some fruits of R&D project will be introduced. Finally, our latest concern of the environmental stress monitoring was discussed and preliminary results were also introduced.

  6. High magnetic fields science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Miura, Noboru

    2003-01-01

    This three-volume book provides a comprehensive review of experiments in very strong magnetic fields that can only be generated with very special magnets. The first volume is entirely devoted to the technology of laboratory magnets: permanent, superconducting, high-power water-cooled and hybrid; pulsed magnets, both nondestructive and destructive (megagauss fields). Volumes 2 and 3 contain reviews of the different areas of research where strong magnetic fields are an essential research tool. These volumes deal primarily with solid-state physics; other research areas covered are biological syst

  7. Near Field Communication: Technology and Market Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Arcese

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the different hi-tech content domains, the telecommunications industry is one of the most relevant, in particular for the Italian economy. Moreover, Near Field Communication (NFC represents an example of innovative production and a technological introduction in the telecommunications context. It has a threefold function: card emulator, peer-to-peer communication and digital content access, and it could be pervasively integrated in many different domains, especially in the mobile payment one. The increasing attention on NFC technology from the academic community has improved an analysis on the changes and the development perspective about mobile payments. It has considered the work done by the GSMA (Global System for Mobile Communications Association and the NFC Forum in recent years. This study starts from an analysis of the scientific contributions to Near Field Communication and how the main researches on this topic were conceived. Our focus is on the diffusion rates, the adoption rates and the technology life cycle. After that, we analyze the technical-economical elements of NFC. Finally, this work presents the state of art of the improvements to this technology with a deeper focus on NFC technologies applied to the tourism industry. In this way, we have done a case analysis that shows some of the NFC existent applications linked to each stage of the tourism value chain.

  8. Predicting bioremediation of hydrocarbons: laboratory to field scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diplock, E E; Mardlin, D P; Killham, K S; Paton, G I

    2009-06-01

    There are strong drivers to increasingly adopt bioremediation as an effective technique for risk reduction of hydrocarbon impacted soils. Researchers often rely solely on chemical data to assess bioremediation efficiently, without making use of the numerous biological techniques for assessing microbial performance. Where used, laboratory experiments must be effectively extrapolated to the field scale. The aim of this research was to test laboratory derived data and move to the field scale. In this research, the remediation of over thirty hydrocarbon sites was studied in the laboratory using a range of analytical techniques. At elevated concentrations, the rate of degradation was best described by respiration and the total hydrocarbon concentration in soil. The number of bacterial degraders and heterotrophs as well as quantification of the bioavailable fraction allowed an estimation of how bioremediation would progress. The response of microbial biosensors proved a useful predictor of bioremediation in the absence of other microbial data. Field-scale trials on average took three times as long to reach the same endpoint as the laboratory trial. It is essential that practitioners justify the nature and frequency of sampling when managing remediation projects and estimations can be made using laboratory derived data. The value of bioremediation will be realised when those that practice the technology can offer transparent lines of evidence to explain their decisions.

  9. Field transportable beta spectrometer. Innovative technology summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The objective of the Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) is to select and demonstrate potentially beneficial technologies at the Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL) Chicago Pile-5 Test Reactor (CP-5). The purpose of the LSDP is to demonstrate that by using innovative and improved deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) technologies from various sources, significant benefits can be achieved when compared to baseline D and D technologies. One such capability being addressed by the D and D Focus Area is rapid characterization for facility contaminants. The technology was field demonstrated during the period January 7 through January 9, 1997, and offers several potential benefits, including faster turn-around time, cost reduction, and reduction in secondary waste. This report describes a PC controlled, field-transportable beta counter-spectrometer which uses solid scintillation coincident counting and low-noise photomultiplier tubes to count element-selective filters and other solid media. The dry scintillation counter used in combination with an element-selective technology eliminates the mess and disposal costs of liquid scintillation cocktails. Software in the instrument provides real-time spectral analysis. The instrument can detect and measure Tc-99, Sr-90, and other beta emitters reaching detection limits in the 20 pCi range (with shielding). Full analysis can be achieved in 30 minutes. The potential advantages of a field-portable beta counter-spectrometer include the savings gained from field generated results. The basis for decision-making is provided with a rapid turnaround analysis in the field. This technology would be competitive with the radiometric analysis done in fixed laboratories and the associated chain of custody operations.

  10. Mechanisation of large-scale agricultural fields in developing countries - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwude, Daniel I; Abdulstter, Rafia; Gomes, Chandima; Hashim, Norhashila

    2016-09-01

    Mechanisation of large-scale agricultural fields often requires the application of modern technologies such as mechanical power, automation, control and robotics. These technologies are generally associated with relatively well developed economies. The application of these technologies in some developing countries in Africa and Asia is limited by factors such as technology compatibility with the environment, availability of resources to facilitate the technology adoption, cost of technology purchase, government policies, adequacy of technology and appropriateness in addressing the needs of the population. As a result, many of the available resources have been used inadequately by farmers, who continue to rely mostly on conventional means of agricultural production, using traditional tools and equipment in most cases. This has led to low productivity and high cost of production among others. Therefore this paper attempts to evaluate the application of present day technology and its limitations to the advancement of large-scale mechanisation in developing countries of Africa and Asia. Particular emphasis is given to a general understanding of the various levels of mechanisation, present day technology, its management and application to large-scale agricultural fields. This review also focuses on/gives emphasis to future outlook that will enable a gradual, evolutionary and sustainable technological change. The study concludes that large-scale-agricultural farm mechanisation for sustainable food production in Africa and Asia must be anchored on a coherent strategy based on the actual needs and priorities of the large-scale farmers. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Field-scale experiments reveal persistent yield gaps in low-input and organic cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchenko, Alexandra N.; Snapp, Sieglinde S.; Robertson, G. Philip

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of production-system performance is largely based on observations at the experimental plot scale. Although yield gaps between plot-scale and field-scale research are widely acknowledged, their extent and persistence have not been experimentally examined in a systematic manner. At a site in southwest Michigan, we conducted a 6-y experiment to test the accuracy with which plot-scale crop-yield results can inform field-scale conclusions. We compared conventional versus alternative, that is, reduced-input and biologically based–organic, management practices for a corn–soybean–wheat rotation in a randomized complete block-design experiment, using 27 commercial-size agricultural fields. Nearby plot-scale experiments (0.02-ha to 1.0-ha plots) provided a comparison of plot versus field performance. We found that plot-scale yields well matched field-scale yields for conventional management but not for alternative systems. For all three crops, at the plot scale, reduced-input and conventional managements produced similar yields; at the field scale, reduced-input yields were lower than conventional. For soybeans at the plot scale, biological and conventional managements produced similar yields; at the field scale, biological yielded less than conventional. For corn, biological management produced lower yields than conventional in both plot- and field-scale experiments. Wheat yields appeared to be less affected by the experimental scale than corn and soybean. Conventional management was more resilient to field-scale challenges than alternative practices, which were more dependent on timely management interventions; in particular, mechanical weed control. Results underscore the need for much wider adoption of field-scale experimentation when assessing new technologies and production-system performance, especially as related to closing yield gaps in organic farming and in low-resourced systems typical of much of the developing world. PMID:28096409

  12. ELECTRIC FIELD SENSORS BASED ON MEMS TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Chao; Xia Shanhong; Deng Kai; Bai Qiang; Chen Shaofeng

    2005-01-01

    The design and optimization of two types of novel miniature vibrating Electric Field Sensors (EFSs) based on Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology are presented.They have different structures and vibrating modes. The volume is much smaller than other types of charge-induced EFSs such as field-mills. As miniaturizing, the induced signal is reduced enormously and a high sensitive circuit is needed to detect it. Elaborately designed electrodes can increase the amplitude of the output current, making the detecting circuit simplified and improving the signal-to-noise ratio. Computer simulations for different structural parameters of the EFSs and vibrating methods have been carried out by Finite Element Method (FEM). It is proved that the new structures are realizable and the output signals are detectable.

  13. SEWGS Technology is Now Ready for Scale-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jansen, D.; Van Selow, E.; Cobden, P. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN (Netherlands); Manzolini, G.; Macchi, E.; Gazzani, M. [Politecnico di Milano PTM, Dipartimento di Energia (Italy); Blom, R.; Henriksen, P.P. [SINTEF, Trondheim (Norway); Beavis, R. [BP Alternative Energy (United Kingdom); Wright, A. [Air products PLC (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    In the FP7 project CAESAR, Air Products, BP, ECN, SINTEF and Politecnico di Milano worked together in the further development of the SEWGS process with the objective to reduce the energy penalty and the costs per ton of CO2 avoided to less than 25 euro through optimization of sorbent materials, reactor and process design and smart integration of the SEWGS unit in a combined cycle power plant. The most promising applications for the SEWGS technology are IGCC power plants and in combined cycles power plants fuelled with blast furnace top gas. Extensive sorbent development work resulted in a new sorbent called ALKASORB+ with a high capacity resulting in cost of CO2 avoided for the IGCC application of 23 euro. This is a reduction of almost 40% compared to the Selexol capture case. Since ALKASORB+ requires much less steam in the regeneration, the specific primary energy consumption is reduced to 44% below the specific energy consumption for the Selexol (2.08 versus 3.71 MJLHV/kgCO2). From a technical point of view SEWGS is ready to move to the next development level, which is a pilot plant installation with a capacity of 35 ton CO2 per day. This is over 500 times larger than the current ECN's multi column SEWGS installation, but still 50 times smaller than an envisaged commercial scale installation. The pilot plant will prove the technology under field conditions and at a sufficiently large scale to enable further up-scaling, delivering both the basic design and investment costs of a full scale SEWGS demonstration plant.

  14. Reliability and predictive validity of the Food Technology Neophobia Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, G; Kermarrec, C; Sable, T; Cox, D N

    2010-04-01

    The recently developed Food Technology Neophobia Scale (FTNS) was further tested to assess scale reliability. On 2 occasions, 131 consumers responded to the FTNS, technologies descriptions and 'willingness to try' food technologies for 7 products. In the second session, they were offered foods to taste. 'Information seeking' was measured as a potential confounder of stability. The intra-class correlation was 0.86 and there was no difference between the FTNS scores (p>0.05). Correlations with 'willingness to try' novel technologies were -0.39 to -0.58. The FTNS is confirmed as a reliable and predictive measure of responses to novel food technologies.

  15. Development of Teacher Attitude Scale towards the Field Trip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortop, Hasan Said

    2012-01-01

    A field trip is an excursion by group of students with teachers to a place away from classroom such as natural field, science center, and zoo. So, it is an important tool for renewable energy education. This study was carried out to develop a new scale for measuring teacher attitudes towards the field trip. Teacher attitude scale towards the field…

  16. Applications of GPS technologies to field sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aughey, Robert J

    2011-09-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) technology was made possible after the invention of the atomic clock. The first suggestion that GPS could be used to assess the physical activity of humans followed some 40 y later. There was a rapid uptake of GPS technology, with the literature concentrating on validation studies and the measurement of steady-state movement. The first attempts were made to validate GPS for field sport applications in 2006. While GPS has been validated for applications for team sports, some doubts continue to exist on the appropriateness of GPS for measuring short high-velocity movements. Thus, GPS has been applied extensively in Australian football, cricket, hockey, rugby union and league, and soccer. There is extensive information on the activity profile of athletes from field sports in the literature stemming from GPS, and this includes total distance covered by players and distance in velocity bands. Global positioning systems have also been applied to detect fatigue in matches, identify periods of most intense play, different activity profiles by position, competition level, and sport. More recent research has integrated GPS data with the physical capacity or fitness test score of athletes, game-specific tasks, or tactical or strategic information. The future of GPS analysis will involve further miniaturization of devices, longer battery life, and integration of other inertial sensor data to more effectively quantify the effort of athletes.

  17. Scaling in stratocumulus fields: an emergent property

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Tianle

    2015-01-01

    Marine stratocumulus clouds play a critical role in the Earth's climate system. They display an amazing array of complex behaviors at many different spatiotemporal scales. Precipitation in these clouds is in general very light, but it is vital for clouds' systematic evolution and organization. Here we identify areas of high liquid water path within these clouds as potentially precipitating, or pouches. They are breeding grounds for stratocumuli to change their organization form. We show, using different satellite data sets, that the size distribution of these pouches show a universal scaling. We argue that such scaling is an emergent property of the cloud system, which results from numbers interactions at the microscopic scale.

  18. Large scale photovoltaic field trials. Second technical report: monitoring phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-09-15

    This report provides an update on the Large-Scale Building Integrated Photovoltaic Field Trials (LS-BIPV FT) programme commissioned by the Department of Trade and Industry (Department for Business, Enterprise and Industry; BERR). It provides detailed profiles of the 12 projects making up this programme, which is part of the UK programme on photovoltaics and has run in parallel with the Domestic Field Trial. These field trials aim to record the experience and use the lessons learnt to raise awareness of, and confidence in, the technology and increase UK capabilities. The projects involved: the visitor centre at the Gaia Energy Centre in Cornwall; a community church hall in London; council offices in West Oxfordshire; a sports science centre at Gloucester University; the visitor centre at Cotswold Water Park; the headquarters of the Insolvency Service; a Welsh Development Agency building; an athletics centre in Birmingham; a research facility at the University of East Anglia; a primary school in Belfast; and Barnstable civic centre in Devon. The report describes the aims of the field trials, monitoring issues, performance, observations and trends, lessons learnt and the results of occupancy surveys.

  19. Field application of pathogen detection technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Call, Douglas R.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Colburn, Heather A.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Jarman, Kristin H.

    2016-06-29

    Over the last 10 years there has been a significant increase in commercial products designed for field-based detection of microbial pathogens. This is due, in part, to the anthrax attacks in the United States in 2001, and the need for first responders to quickly identify the composition of suspected white powders and other potential biothreats. Demand for rapid detection is also driven by the need to ensure safe food, water, and environmental systems. From a technology perspective, rapid identification methods have largely capitalized on PCR and other molecular recognition techniques that can be deployed as robust field instrumentation. Examples of the relevant needs include the ability to: 1) declare a water distribution system free of microbial pathogens after a pipe/main break repair; 2) assess risks of contamination such as when produce production and processing plants are located near concentrated animal feeing operations; 3) evaluate the safety of ready-to-eat products; 4) determine the extent of potential serious disease outbreaks in remote and/or disaster stricken areas where access to clinical laboratories is not an immediate option; and 5) quickly assess credible biological terrorism events. Many of the principles underlying rapid detection methods are derived from methods for environmental microbiology, but there is a dearth of literature describing and evaluating field-based detection systems. Thus, the aims of this chapter are to: 1) summarize the different kinds of commercially available sampling kits and field-based biological detectors; 2) highlight some of the continued challenges of sample preparation to stimulate new research towards minimizing the impact of inhibitors on PCR-based detection systems; 3) describe our general rationale and statistically-based approach for instrument evaluation; 4) provide statistical and spatial guidelines for developing valid sampling plans; and 5) summarize some current needs and emerging technologies. This

  20. Holographic superconductors with Lifshitz scaling in external magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zixu; Jing, Jiliang

    2014-01-01

    We analytically study the holographic superconductors with Lifshitz scaling in presence of an external magnetic field. We observe that Lifshitz scaling can hinder the condensation to be formed, which can be used to back up the existing numerical results. Moreover, we find that the dynamical exponent $z$ does have effects on the upper critical magnetic field. However, we note that Lifshitz scaling does not modify the well-known relation obtained from the Ginzburg-Landau theory for the upper critical magnetic field.

  1. A field scale study of nZVI Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, D. M.; Kocur, C. M.; Chowdhury, A.; Weber, K.; Boparai, H. K.; Krol, M. M.; Sakulchaicharoen, N.; Sleep, B. E.; Austrins, L.; Peace, C.

    2011-12-01

    Nanometals have received significant attention in recent years due to their ability to rapidly destroy numerous priority source zone contaminants in controlled laboratory studies. This has led to great optimism about the potential of nanometal injection for insitu remediation. However, rapid nanometal settling, reportedly due to the ferromagnetic attractive forces between particles causing agglomeration, and poor mobility have limited widespread application of this technology. In literature studies different methods have been proposed to counteract attractive forces between nanometal particles (e.g., polymers providing steric and electrostatic repulsive forces), thus limiting agglomeration and preventing rapid settling. Although laboratory characterization of these particles confirm that these methods yield nanoscale particles that are stable and readily reactive for extended periods of time under laboratory conditions, several important uncertainties remain. The laboratory procedures for synthesizing stabilized nZVI are quite involved and labour intensive, with limited scale-up of the synthesis procedure to the field described in the literature. Furthermore, it is unclear if these nanometal particles would be of high quality and mobile in the field. In this study, these questions were addressed by scaling up laboratory synthesis techniques to produce 1000 litres of nanometal suspension at 1 g/L on site. The suspension was injected into a contaminated zone containing various chlorinated solvents. Detailed characterization of the field site before, during and after the field trial suggested that the injected nanoparticles travelled in excess of 1 m at normalized concentrations in excess of 50% and would therefore be available for contaminant destruction in the target source zone. This presentation will also discuss detailed characterization (e.g., TEM, zero valent iron content) of injected nanometals and those captured at the monitoring wells.

  2. Onsite Greywater Treatment using Pilot Scale Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzoor-ul-Haq Rajput

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The GROW Technology for greywater treatment was installed at the MUET (Mehran University of Engineering & Technology, hostel and run under continuous flow conditions with hydraulic loading rate of 0.15m.d-1. The monitoring and analysis of influent and effluent water were carried out during January-December, 2010. Local plants species such as water hyacinth, Pennywort (duck weed, Mint and Cattail were used in the GROW rig as a mixed mode. Coarse Gravels were filled in the troughs as a medium. The collected samples were analyzed for BOD5 (Biochemical Oxygen Demand, COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand, TSS (Total Suspended Solids, pH, and DO (Dissolved Oxygen. Removal efficiencies of BOD5, COD and TSS were calculated as 83.0,69.0 and 84.0% respectively. DO was found increased from 0.6-3.5 mg.dm-3 while pH was observed between 6.5-7.8

  3. Quantum Coherence and Random Fields at Mesoscopic Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbaum, Thomas F. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    We seek to explore and exploit model, disordered and geometrically frustrated magnets where coherent spin clusters stably detach themselves from their surroundings, leading to extreme sensitivity to finite frequency excitations and the ability to encode information. Global changes in either the spin concentration or the quantum tunneling probability via the application of an external magnetic field can tune the relative weights of quantum entanglement and random field effects on the mesoscopic scale. These same parameters can be harnessed to manipulate domain wall dynamics in the ferromagnetic state, with technological possibilities for magnetic information storage. Finally, extensions from quantum ferromagnets to antiferromagnets promise new insights into the physics of quantum fluctuations and effective dimensional reduction. A combination of ac susceptometry, dc magnetometry, noise measurements, hole burning, non-linear Fano experiments, and neutron diffraction as functions of temperature, magnetic field, frequency, excitation amplitude, dipole concentration, and disorder address issues of stability, overlap, coherence, and control. We have been especially interested in probing the evolution of the local order in the progression from spin liquid to spin glass to long-range-ordered magnet.

  4. The Research on Anti-scaling Based on Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjie Han

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic scaling is a kind of physics method of anti-scaling. An Anti-scaling instrument that generates electromagnetic fields to prevent scaling is designed in this study. The two important functions of the instrument are as follows: The output of a single frequency signal and its frequency and voltage can be changed manually; the output of a swept-frequency signal, from 0 to 21 kHz. The instrument is composed of a signal generator and coils in which electromagnetic fields are induced. The production of the signal mainly depends on the chip of CD4046B CMOS Micro power Phase-Locked Loop. According to the principle of electromagnetic induction, the signal from the signal generator flows though coils which induce changed magnetic fields, then the magnetic fields effect the microstructure of water, the aim of anti-scaling is achieved. The experiment shows that the equipment effectively reduces scaling.

  5. Electromagnetic anti-fouling technology for prevention of scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An electromagnetic anti-fouling technology(EAFT) was developed further. The operating principle of the EAFT was presented using fundamental physics laws. To validate the effect of EAFT and identify the mechanism, a circulating flow setup was built. A series of fouling tests were carried out with and without EAFT, measuring fouling thermal resistance as function of time, making scanning electron microscope images and analyzing the particles size distribution in solution by dynamics light scattering technology. The main results were as follows: 1)All the precipitated crystals in solution were calcite and there were little differences between with EAFT and without EAFT in the experimental range. 2) The number of precipitate nucleation in solution was small and the particle growth was slow without EAFT. In opposition to the case untreated, a rapid particle growth was observed and the number of nucleation was expected to be large, due to the fact that the EAFT effectively increases the ions and crystals collision frequency and effectiveness by utilizing the induced electric field. It is indicated that the particle growth is promoted mainly by coagulation process but not nucleation growth. 3) The EAFT could prolong the delay time of fouling greatly, and after the delay time, the thermal resistance quickly increased. Therefore, in order to mitigate scale significantly, the floccules in solution should be deposited beforehand in a low-lying area of the exchangers and let off in time.

  6. Generation of Large-Scale Magnetic Fields by Small-Scale Dynamo in Shear Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-10-23

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.

  7. Field-scale variation in colloid dispersibility and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Trine; Moldrup, P.; Ferre´, T. P A;

    2014-01-01

    risk of colloid-facilitated transport. Subsequently, using multiple linear regression (MLR) analyses, soil dispersibility was predicted at all three sample scales from the 24 measured, geo-referenced parameters to produce sets of only a few promising indicator parameters for evaluating soil stability...... and particle mobilization on field scale. The MLR analyses at each scale were separated in predictions using all, only north, and only south locations in the field. We found that different independent variables were included in the regression models when the sample scale increased from aggregate to column...... level. Generally, the predictive power of the regression models was better on the 1-2 mm aggregate scale than on the intact 100 cm3 and 20 cm × 20 cm scales. Overall, results suggested that different drivers controlled soil dispersibility 1 at the three scales and the two sub-areas of the field...

  8. Space Technology 5 Multi-Point Observations of Temporal Variability of Field-Aligned Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan; Wang, Yongli; Slavin, James A.; Strangeway, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using multi-point magnetic field measurements from ST5. The data demonstrate that meso-scale current structures are commonly embedded within large-scale field-aligned current sheets. The meso-scale current structures are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in time scales of approximately 10 min. They exhibit large temporal variations during both quiet and disturbed times in such time scales. On the other hand, the data also shown that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are approximately 1 min for meso-scale currents and approximately 10 min for large scale current sheets. These temporal features are obviously associated with dynamic variations of their particle carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of meso-scale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  9. Trends and challenges in VLSI technology scaling towards 100 nm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusu, S.; Sachdev, M.; Svensson, C.; Nauta, Bram

    Summary form only given. Moore's Law drives VLSI technology to continuous increases in transistor densities and higher clock frequencies. This tutorial will review the trends in VLSI technology scaling in the last few years and discuss the challenges facing process and circuit engineers in the 100nm

  10. Magnetic fields around AGNs at large and small scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyul'bashev, S. A.

    2002-06-01

    The dipole structure of the magnetic field on distances ge 1 kpc from an active galactic nucleus is discussed. Two different models of the magnetic field around a supermassive black hole on the scale of the accretion disk are tested. The first model suggests a superstrong field of the order of 1010 Gauss (Kardashev \\cite{Kardashev95}), the other one proposed by Field & Rodgers (\\cite{Field93}) predicts much lower values ( ~ 104 Gauss).

  11. IAEA programme in the field of radiation technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Haji-Saeid, Mohammad

    2005-07-01

    Radiation technologies applying gamma sources and electron accelerators for material modification are well-established processes. There are over 160 gamma industrial irradiators and 1300 electron industrial accelerators in operation worldwide. A new advancement in the field of radiation sources engineering is the development of high power direct e-/X conversion sources based on electron accelerators. Technologies to be developed beside environmental applications could be nanomaterials, structure engineered materials (sorbents, composites, ordered polymers, etc.) and natural polymers' processing. New products based on radiation-processed polysaccharides have already been commercialised in many countries of the East Asia and Pacific Region, especially in those being rich in natural polymers. Very important and promising applications concern environmental protection-radiation technology, being a clean and environment friendly process, helps to curb pollutants' emission as well. Industrial plants for flue gas treatment have been constructed in Poland and China. The pilot plant in Bulgaria using this technology has just started its operation. The Polish plant is equipped with accelerators of over 1 MW power, a breakthrough in radiation technology application. The industrial plant for wastewater treatment is under development in Korea and a pilot plant for sewage sludge irradiation has been in operation in India for many years. Due to recent developments, the Agency has restructured its programme and organized a Technical Meeting (TM) on "Emerging Applications of Radiation Technology for the 21st Century" at its Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, in April 2003, to review the present situation and possible developments of radiation technology to contribute to a sustainable development. This meeting provided the basic input to launch others in the most important fields of radiation technology applications: "Advances in Radiation Chemistry of Polymers" (Notre Dame, USA

  12. NON-SCALING FIXED FIELD GRADIENT OPTIMIZATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2004-10-13

    Optimization of the non-scaling FFAG lattice for the specific application of the muon acceleration with respect to the minimum orbit offsets, minimum path length and smallest circumference is described. The short muon lifetime requires fast acceleration. The acceleration is in this work assumed to be with super-conducting cavities. This sets up a condition of acceleration at the top of the sinusoidal RF wave.

  13. Field scale behaviour of cadmium in soil.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhold, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    Although total heavy metal contents of soil are often used to express the degree of contamination, they are of little value to judge environmental effects. The main objective of this thesis was to develop and test methodologies with which environmental risks of cadmium pollution of field soils can b

  14. Soil Water Balance Measurement in Field Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENZHI-XIONG

    1992-01-01

    A 5-year experiment on water balance has been conducted in a flat rainfed wheat field with an area of 66×100m2 in Fengqiu,Henan Province in China.Based on the analysis of semi-variance functions conducted with soil moisture samples taken from 77 nodes of a 10×10m2 grid,the soil moisture distribution in the field was structural with a temporal stability.According to the autocorrelation range of the semi-variance function,6 sites were selected for the determination of soil water conditions.The characteristic of probability density function of the differences of water storage in two sets of measurements showed that the distribution of these variables in the field was a normal one.The error in the estimation of the average of 5 random samples was 14% (α=0.10),and the errors of water consumption by wheat during the experiments were estimated to be 6-13%.Sime the experimental field was large enough to avoid any edge effect,the results obtained should tally with the actual situation.Yet the soil system was heterogeneous,so we must follow the principles of statistics and geostatistics when describing the system's status with the average of the samples.

  15. Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Observations of Field-Aligned Currents: Temporal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST-5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using multi-point magnetic field measurements from STS. The data demonstrate that masoscale current structures are commonly embedded within large-scale field-aligned current sheets. The meso-scale current structures are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in time scales of about 10 min. They exhibit large temporal variations during both quiet and disturbed times in such time scales. On the other hand, the data also shown that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are about I min for meso-scale currents and about 10 min for large scale current sheets. These temporal features are obviously associated with dynamic variations of their particle carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of meso-scale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  16. Magnetic Helicity and Large Scale Magnetic Fields: A Primer

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Eric G

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic fields of laboratory, planetary, stellar, and galactic plasmas commonly exhibit significant order on large temporal or spatial scales compared to the otherwise random motions within the hosting system. Such ordered fields can be measured in the case of planets, stars, and galaxies, or inferred indirectly by the action of their dynamical influence, such as jets. Whether large scale fields are amplified in situ or a remnant from previous stages of an object's history is often debated for objects without a definitive magnetic activity cycle. Magnetic helicity, a measure of twist and linkage of magnetic field lines, is a unifying tool for understanding large scale field evolution for both mechanisms of origin. Its importance stems from its two basic properties: (1) magnetic helicity is typically better conserved than magnetic energy; and (2) the magnetic energy associated with a fixed amount of magnetic helicity is minimized when the system relaxes this helical structure to the largest scale available. H...

  17. Magnetic fields of our Galaxy on large and small scales

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Jinlin

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic fields have been observed on all scales in our Galaxy, from AU to kpc. With pulsar dispersion measures and rotation measures, we can directly measure the magnetic fields in a very large region of the Galactic disk. The results show that the large-scale magnetic fields are aligned with the spiral arms but reverse their directions many times from the inner-most arm (Norma) to the outer arm (Perseus). The Zeeman splitting measurements of masers in HII regions or star-formation regions not only show the structured fields inside clouds, but also have a clear pattern in the global Galactic distribution of all measured clouds which indicates the possible connection of the large-scale and small-scale magnetic fields.

  18. BNL Citric Acid Technology: Pilot Scale Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCIS, A J; DODGE,; J, C; GILLOW, J B; FORRESTER, K E

    1999-09-24

    The objective of this project is to remove toxic metals such as lead and cadmium from incinerator ash using the Citric Acid Process developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this process toxic metals in bottom ash from the incineration of municipal solid waste were first extracted with citric acid followed by biodegradation of the citric acid-metal extract by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens for metals recovery. The ash contained the following metals: Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Ti, and Zn. Optimization of the Citric Acid Process parameters which included citric acid molarity, contact time, the impact of mixing aggressiveness during extraction and pretreatment showed lead and cadmium removal from incinerator ash of >90%. Seeding the treated ash with P. fluorescens resulted in the removal of residual citric acid and biostabilization of any leachable lead, thus allowing it to pass EPA?s Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Biodegradation of the citric acid extract removed >99% of the lead from the extract as well as other metals such as Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ti, and Zn. Speciation of the bioprecipitated lead by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure at the National Synchrotron Light Source showed that the lead is predominantly associated with the phosphate and carboxyl functional groups in a stable form. Citric acid was completely recovered (>99%) from the extract by sulfide precipitation technique and the extraction efficiency of recovered citric acid is similar to that of the fresh citric acid. Recycling of the citric acid should result in considerable savings in the overall treatment cost. We have shown the potential application of this technology to remove and recover the metal contaminants from incinerator ash as well as from other heavy metal bearing wastes (i.e., electric arc furnace dust from steel industry) or soils. Information developed from this project is being applied to demonstrate the remediation of

  19. CATALYST TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FROM MACRO-,MICRO- DOWN TO NANO-SCALE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Liu

    2005-01-01

    Catalyst and catalytic process technology has been an ever-growing field that involves chemical engineering, chemistry, and material science. A number of excellent review articles and books have been published on the subject. In this work, the author reviews the evolution and development of catalyst products with multi-scale methodology.The catalyst technologies are classified into three levels, macro-scale (reactor size), mini- and micro-scale (catalyst unit),and nano-scale (catalyst intrinsic structures). Innovation at different scales requires different sets of expertise, method,and knowledge. Specific examples of significant impact to practical application are used to illustrate technology development at each scale. The multi-scale analysis enables clear delineation of technology components and their relationship for a catalyst product and catalytic process. Manipulation of catalyst structures at nano-scale to increase intrinsic activity and/or selectivity is considered of large potential for future catalyst product development. Recent research results on Cu-CeO2 and Au-CeO2 composite catalysts for air pollution control and hydrogen production are used to show how novel catalytic properties can be discovered by unique combination of different but common materials at the nano-scale.

  20. Sensitivity technologies for large scale simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Smith, Thomas Michael; Heinkenschloss, Matthias (Rice University, Houston, TX); Wilcox, Lucas C. (Brown University, Providence, RI); Hill, Judith C. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Ghattas, Omar (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Berggren, Martin Olof (University of UppSala, Sweden); Akcelik, Volkan (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Ober, Curtis Curry; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Keiter, Eric Richard

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is critically important to numerous analysis algorithms, including large scale optimization, uncertainty quantification,reduced order modeling, and error estimation. Our research focused on developing tools, algorithms and standard interfaces to facilitate the implementation of sensitivity type analysis into existing code and equally important, the work was focused on ways to increase the visibility of sensitivity analysis. We attempt to accomplish the first objective through the development of hybrid automatic differentiation tools, standard linear algebra interfaces for numerical algorithms, time domain decomposition algorithms and two level Newton methods. We attempt to accomplish the second goal by presenting the results of several case studies in which direct sensitivities and adjoint methods have been effectively applied, in addition to an investigation of h-p adaptivity using adjoint based a posteriori error estimation. A mathematical overview is provided of direct sensitivities and adjoint methods for both steady state and transient simulations. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods. A direct sensitivity method is implemented to solve a source inversion problem for steady state internal flows subject to convection diffusion. Real time performance is achieved using novel decomposition into offline and online calculations. Adjoint methods are used to reconstruct initial conditions of a contamination event in an external flow. We demonstrate an adjoint based transient solution. In addition, we investigated time domain decomposition algorithms in an attempt to improve the efficiency of transient simulations. Because derivative calculations are at the root of sensitivity calculations, we have developed hybrid automatic differentiation methods and implemented this approach for shape optimization for gas dynamics using the Euler equations. The hybrid automatic differentiation method was applied to a first

  1. Sensitivity technologies for large scale simulation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Smith, Thomas Michael; Heinkenschloss, Matthias (Rice University, Houston, TX); Wilcox, Lucas C. (Brown University, Providence, RI); Hill, Judith C. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Ghattas, Omar (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Berggren, Martin Olof (University of UppSala, Sweden); Akcelik, Volkan (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Ober, Curtis Curry; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Keiter, Eric Richard

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is critically important to numerous analysis algorithms, including large scale optimization, uncertainty quantification,reduced order modeling, and error estimation. Our research focused on developing tools, algorithms and standard interfaces to facilitate the implementation of sensitivity type analysis into existing code and equally important, the work was focused on ways to increase the visibility of sensitivity analysis. We attempt to accomplish the first objective through the development of hybrid automatic differentiation tools, standard linear algebra interfaces for numerical algorithms, time domain decomposition algorithms and two level Newton methods. We attempt to accomplish the second goal by presenting the results of several case studies in which direct sensitivities and adjoint methods have been effectively applied, in addition to an investigation of h-p adaptivity using adjoint based a posteriori error estimation. A mathematical overview is provided of direct sensitivities and adjoint methods for both steady state and transient simulations. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods. A direct sensitivity method is implemented to solve a source inversion problem for steady state internal flows subject to convection diffusion. Real time performance is achieved using novel decomposition into offline and online calculations. Adjoint methods are used to reconstruct initial conditions of a contamination event in an external flow. We demonstrate an adjoint based transient solution. In addition, we investigated time domain decomposition algorithms in an attempt to improve the efficiency of transient simulations. Because derivative calculations are at the root of sensitivity calculations, we have developed hybrid automatic differentiation methods and implemented this approach for shape optimization for gas dynamics using the Euler equations. The hybrid automatic differentiation method was applied to a first

  2. Field scale measurements of NH3 emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neftel, Albrecht; Ammann, Christof; Kuhn, Uwe; Sintermann, Jörg; Lehuger, Simon; Gärtner, Andrea; Hirschberger, Rainer

    2010-05-01

    The uncertainty in the ammonia emissions after application of organic manure contributes to a large extent to the overall uncertainties of the nitrogen budget of managed grassland systems (Ammann et al., 2009). Due to the sticky nature of the ammonia molecule and the variability of the emission fluxes the experimental determination is still a major challenge and a wide spread range of emission factors can be found in the literature. We report on two field experiments performed in August 2009 at the NitroEurope site in Oensingen, Switzerland. The ammonia emission flux after liquid manure application was investigated simultaneously by various micrometeorological methods: (1) a mass balance approach measuring the horizontal advection flux with open-path FTIR sensors (Gärtner et al., 2008), (2) aerodynamic gradient methods, and (3) eddy covariance measurements based on a novel fast ammonia analyser. Due to the sequential application of the manure and the fast decrease of the ammonia volatilisation, detailed footprint calculations (Neftel et al., 2008) and corrections with a high temporal resolution were crucial for obtaining representative emission fluxes. The plausibility of flux measurements has been evaluated with back trajectories simulations (WindTrax, Flesch et al., 2009). The results of all applied flux measurement methods confirmed the low emission levels found earlier by Spirig et al. (2009). A comparison of the field observations with results of process oriented models showed considerable differences in the temporal course of the ammonia emission indicating the need for improvements of the models. References: Ammann, C., Spirig, C., Leifeld, J. and Neftel, A.: Assessment of the nitrogen and carbon budget of two managed temperate grassland fields, Agric. Ecosyst. Environ., 133, 150-162, 2009. Flesch, T.K., Harper, L.A., Desjardins, R.L., Gao, Z., and Crenna, B.: Multi-Source Emission Determination Using an Inverse-Dispersion Technique. Boundary-Layer Meteorol

  3. 苏里格大型致密砂岩气田开发井型井网技术%Well type and pattern optimization technology for large scale tight sand gas,Sulige gas field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何东博; 贾爱林; 冀光; 位云生; 唐海发

    2013-01-01

    Sulige gas field is a typical tight sand gas field in China. Well type and pattern optimization is the key technology to improve single well estimated reserves and recovery factor and to achieve effective field development. In view of the large area, low abundance and high heterogeneity of Sulige gas field, a series of techniques have been developed including hierarchical description for the reservoir architecture of large composite sand bodies and well spacing optimization, well pattern optimization, design and optimization for horizontal trajectory and deliverability evaluation for different types of gas wells. These technologies provide most important technical supports for the increases of class ⅠandⅡ wells proportion to 75%-80% with recovery factor enhanced by more than 35% and for the industrial application of horizontal drilling. To further improve individual well production and recovery factor, attempts and pilot tests in various well types including side tracking of deficient wells, multilateral horizontal wells, and directional wells, and horizontal well pattern and combined well pattern of various well types should be carried out throughout the development.%苏里格气田是中国致密砂岩气田的典型代表,井型井网技术是其提高单井控制储量和采收率、实现气田规模有效开发的关键技术.针对苏里格气田大面积、低丰度、强非均质性的特征,形成了大型复合砂体分级构型描述与优化布井技术、井型井网优化技术、水平井优化设计技术和不同类型井产能评价技术,为苏里格气田产能建设Ⅰ +Ⅱ类井比例达到75%~80%、预期采收率提高到35%以上以及水平井的规模化应用发挥了重要的技术支撑作用.为进一步提高苏里格气田单井产量和采收率,应继续开展低效井侧钻、多分支水平井、多井底定向井等不同井型,以及水平井井网、多井型组合井网的探索和开发试验.

  4. Water scaling in the North Sea oil and gas fields and scale prediction: An overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, M.

    1996-12-31

    Water-scaling is a common and major production chemistry problem in the North Sea oil and gas fields and scale prediction has been an important means to assess the potential and extent of scale deposition. This paper presents an overview of sulphate and carbonate scaling problems in the North Sea and a review of several widely used and commercially available scale prediction software. In the paper, the water chemistries and scale types and severities are discussed relative of the geographical distribution of the fields in the North Sea. The theories behind scale prediction are then briefly described. Five scale or geochemical models are presented and various definitions of saturation index are compared and correlated. Views are the expressed on how to predict scale precipitation under some extreme conditions such as that encountered in HPHT reservoirs. 15 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. Large-scale magnetic fields from inflation in teleparallel gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Luo, Ling-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Generation of large-scale magnetic fields in inflationary cosmology is studied in teleparallelism, where instead of the scalar curvature in general relativity, the torsion scalar describes the gravity theory. In particular, we investigate a coupling of the electromagnetic field to the torsion scalar during inflation, which leads to the breaking of conformal invariance of the electromagnetic field. We demonstrate that for a power-law type coupling, the current magnetic field strength of $\\sim 10^{-9}$ G on 1 Mpc scale can be generated, if the backreaction effects and strong coupling problem are not taken into consideration.

  6. Destruction of Be star disk by large scale magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ud-Doula, Asif; Owocki, Stanley P.; Kee, Nathaniel; Vanyo, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Classical Be stars are rapidly rotating stars with circumstellar disks that come and go on time scale of years. Recent observational data strongly suggests that these stars lack the ~10% incidence of global magnetic fields observed in other main-sequence B stars. Such an apparent lack of magnetic fields may indicate that Be disks are fundamentally incompatible with a significant large scale magnetic field. In this work, using numerical magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations, we show that a dipole field of only 100G can lead to the quick disruption of a Be disk. Such a limit is in line with the observational upper limits for these objects.

  7. Scaling and multifractal fields in the solid earth and topography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lovejoy

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Starting about thirty years ago, new ideas in nonlinear dynamics, particularly fractals and scaling, provoked an explosive growth of research both in modeling and in experimentally characterizing geosystems over wide ranges of scale. In this review we focus on scaling advances in solid earth geophysics including the topography. To reduce the review to manageable proportions, we restrict our attention to scaling fields, i.e. to the discussion of intensive quantities such as ore concentrations, rock densities, susceptibilities, and magnetic and gravitational fields.

    We discuss the growing body of evidence showing that geofields are scaling (have power law dependencies on spatial scale, resolution, over wide ranges of both horizontal and vertical scale. Focusing on the cases where both horizontal and vertical statistics have both been estimated from proximate data, we argue that the exponents are systematically different, reflecting lithospheric stratification which – while very strong at small scales – becomes less and less pronounced at larger and larger scales, but in a scaling manner. We then discuss the necessity for treating the fields as multifractals rather than monofractals, the latter being too restrictive a framework. We discuss the consequences of multifractality for geostatistics, we then discuss cascade processes in which the same dynamical mechanism repeats scale after scale over a range. Using the binomial model first proposed by de Wijs (1951 as an example, we discuss the issues of microcanonical versus canonical conservation, algebraic ("Pareto" versus long tailed (e.g. lognormal distributions, multifractal universality, conservative and nonconservative multifractal processes, codimension versus dimension formalisms. We compare and contrast different scaling models (fractional Brownian motion, fractional Levy motion, continuous (in scale cascades, showing that they are all based on fractional integrations of noises

  8. Electromagnetic fields on a quantum scale. I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Dale M; Grimes, Craig A

    2002-10-01

    This is the first in a series of two articles, the second of which provides an exact electro-magnetic field description of photon emission, absorption, and radiation pattern. Photon energy exchanges are analyzed and shown to be the triggered, regenerative response of a non-local eigenstate electron. This first article presents a model-based, hidden variable analysis of quantum theory that provides the statistical nature of wave functions. The analysis uses the equations of classical electro-magnetism and conservation of energy while modeling an eigenstate electron as a nonlocal entity. Essential to the analysis are physical properties that were discovered and analyzed only after the historical interpretation of quantum mechanics was established: electron non-locality and the standing electro-magnetic energy that accompanies and encompasses an active, electrically small volume. The standing energy produces a driving radiation reaction force that, under certain circumstances, is many orders of magnitude larger than currently accepted values. These properties provide a sufficient basis for the Schrödinger equation as a descriptor of non-relativistic eigenstate electrons in or near equilibrium. The uncertainty principle follows, as does the exclusion principle. The analysis leads to atomic stability and causality in the sense that the status of physical phenomena at any instant specifies the status an instant later.

  9. Cosmic Ray Small Scale Anisotropies and Local Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    López-Barquero, Vanessa; Xu, S; Desiati, P; Lazarian, A

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic ray anisotropy is observed in a wide energy range and at different angular scales by a variety of experiments. However, a comprehensive and satisfactory explanation has been elusive for over a decade now. The arrival distribution of cosmic rays on Earth is the convolution of the distribution of their sources and of the effects of geometry and properties of the magnetic field through which particles propagate. It is generally believed that the anisotropy topology at the largest angular scale is adiabatically shaped by diffusion in the structured interstellar magnetic field. On the contrary, the medium and small angular scale structure could be an effect of non diffusive propagation of cosmic rays in perturbed magnetic fields. In particular, a possible explanation of the observed small scale anisotropy observed at TeV energy scale, may come from the effect of particle scattering in turbulent magnetized plasmas. We perform numerical integration of test particle trajectories in low-$\\beta$ compressible mag...

  10. Anomalous scaling of a scalar field advected by turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraichnan, R.H. [Robert H. Kraichnan, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Recent work leading to deduction of anomalous scaling exponents for the inertial range of an advected passive field from the equations of motion is reviewed. Implications for other turbulence problems are discussed.

  11. Effective Work Function Engineering for Aggressively Scaled Planar and Multi-Gate Fin Field-Effect Transistor-Based Devices with High-k Last Replacement Metal Gate Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, Anabela; Aik Chew, Soon; Higuchi, Yuichi; Ragnarsson, Lars-Åke; Simoen, Eddy; Schram, Tom; Witters, Thomas; Van Ammel, Annemie; Dekkers, Harold; Tielens, Hilde; Devriendt, Katia; Heylen, Nancy; Sebaai, Farid; Brus, Stephan; Favia, Paola; Geypen, Jef; Bender, Hugo; Phatak, Anup; Chen, Michael S.; Lu, Xinliang; Ganguli, Seshadri; Lei, Yu; Tang, Wei; Fu, Xinyu; Gandikota, Srinivas; Noori, Atif; Brand, Adam; Yoshida, Naomi; Thean, Aaron; Horiguchi, Naoto

    2013-04-01

    This work reports on aggressively scaled replacement metal gate, high-k last devices (RMG-HKL), exploring several options for effective work function (EWF) engineering, and targeting logic high-performance and low-power applications. Tight low-threshold voltage (VT) distributions for scaled NMOS devices are obtained by controlled TiN/TiAl-alloying, either by using RF-physical vapor deposition (RF-PVD) or atomic layer deposition (ALD) for TiN growth. The first technique allows optimization of the TiAl/TiN thicknesses at the bottom of gate trenches while maximizing the space to be filled with a low-resistance metal; using ALD minimizes the occurrence of preferential paths, at gate sidewalls, for Al diffusion into the high-k dielectric, reducing gate leakage (JG). For multi-gate fin field-effect transistors (FinFETs) which require smaller EWF shifts from mid-gap for low-VT: 1) conformal, lower-JG ALD-TiN/TaSiAl; and 2) Al-rich ALD-TiN by controlled Al diffusion from the fill-metal are demonstrated to be promising candidates. Comparable bias temperature instability (BTI), improved noise behavior, and slightly reduced equivalent oxide thickness (EOT) are measured on Al-rich EWF-metal stacks.

  12. Ultra-Low Power Memory Design in Scaled Technology Nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeinali, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    technology nodes, this thesis also investigates emerging non-volatile spintronics memories. In this respect, STT-MRAMs and SOT-MRAMs are studied and their design challenges are explored. To improve the read performance of STT-MRAMs, a novel non-destructive self-reference sensing scheme is proposed enabling......In today’s chip design, robust memory design is one of the key challenges of process technology scaling. The steady pace of process technology scaling allows doubling memory array sizes approximately every 2 years. However, further scaling emerges undesirable effects which threaten the power......-efficiency, robust performance and high-density of memories. This thesis addresses these challenges and propose different solutions at the device, circuit and architecture levels in traditional SRAMs and emerging spintronics memories. Based on the fact that SRAMs are the dominant structure in cache memories, which...

  13. Polyethylene encapsulation full-scale technology demonstration. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalb, P.D.; Lageraaen, P.R.

    1994-10-01

    A full-scale integrated technology demonstration of a polyethylene encapsulation process, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD), was conducted at the Environmental & Waste Technology Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL.) in September 1994. As part of the Polymer Solidification National Effort, polyethylene encapsulation has been developed and tested at BNL as an alternative solidification technology for improved, cost-effective treatment of low-level radioactive (LLW), hazardous and mixed wastes. A fully equipped production-scale system, capable of processing 900 kg/hr (2000 lb/hr), has been installed at BNL. The demonstration covered all facets of the integrated processing system including pre-treatment of aqueous wastes, precise feed metering, extrusion processing, on-line quality control monitoring, and process control.

  14. Assistive Technology and Mathematics Education: Reports from the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, Emily C.

    2012-01-01

    Mathematics is a critical content area and assistive technology can benefit students with high incidence disabilities in accessing and achieving in this domain. Yet, the field lacks awareness of how often teachers use assistive technology in mathematics and what types of technology they are using. This study sought to understand teachers' self…

  15. Rcscarch on Small-Scale Solar Magnetic Fields and Activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun; YANG Shuhong

    2011-01-01

    It has been known that there are different kinds of small-scale active phenomena on the Sun. They are classified into spicules, macrospicules, and H-alpha jets, X-ray jets, etc., according to their sizes, velocities, lifetimes, and so on. All these phenomena are related to small-scale magnetic fields. The problems of solar upper atmospheric heating and solar wind acceleration have never been solved. Small-scale magnetic fields and activities are considered to play key roles in heating upper atmosphere and in accelerating solar wind.

  16. The large-scale properties of simulated cosmic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Marinacci, Federico; Mocz, Philip; Pakmor, Ruediger

    2015-01-01

    We perform uniformly sampled large-scale cosmological simulations including magnetic fields with the moving mesh code AREPO. We run two sets of MHD simulations: one including adiabatic gas physics only; the other featuring the fiducial feedback model of the Illustris simulation. In the adiabatic case, the magnetic field amplification follows the $B \\propto \\rho^{2/3}$ scaling derived from `flux-freezing' arguments, with the seed field strength providing an overall normalisation factor. At high baryon overdensities the amplification is enhanced by shear flows and turbulence. Feedback physics and the inclusion of radiative cooling change this picture dramatically. Gas collapses to much larger densities and the magnetic field is amplified strongly, reaching saturation and losing memory of the initial seed field. At lower densities a dependence on the seed field strength and orientation, which in principle can be used to constrain models of cosmological magnetogenesis, is still present. Inside the most massive ha...

  17. Key Technologies in Large-scale Rescue Robot Wrists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Zhidong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The full-Automatic Quick Hitch Coupling Device (full-AQHCD for short is used as the starting point, key technologies in a large-scale rescue robot wrist, which is constituted by integrating a quick hitch coupling device, a turning device, and a swaying device together, are reviewed respectively. Firstly, the semi-AQHCD made domestically for the main-Arm Claw Wrist (main-ACW for short is introduced, and the full-AQHCD imported from Oil Quick company in Sweden for the vice-Arm Cutter Wrist (vice-ACW for short is presented. Secondly, aiming at three key technologies in the full-AQHCD including rotary joint technology, automatic docking technology and precise docking technology for quick action coupling, are concisely expressed. Thirdly, the hydraulic motor driving gear type slewing bearing technology of the turning device made domestically for the main-ACW is introduced, and the hydraulic motor driving worm type slewing bearing technology of the turning device imported from HKS company in Germany for the vice-ACW is presented, especially, the existing gap in the similar domestic technology is discussed. Subsequently, the hydraulic cylinder driving 4-bar linkage technology of the swaying device made domestically for the main-ACW is introduced, and the hydraulic double spiral swing cylinder technology of the swaying device imported from HKS company in Germany for the vice-ACW is presented, especially, the existing gap in the similar domestic technology is discussed. Finally, it is emphasized that these technological gaps have seriously restricted the ability of the vice-ACW to successfully work in future actual rescue combats, therefore, it must be highly valued in the follow-up research and development (R&D through cooperating with professional manufacturers in China, thereby making technological advances.

  18. Interacting scale but non-conformal field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Nakayama, Yu

    2016-01-01

    There is a dilemma in constructing interacting scale invariant but not conformal invariant Euclidean field theories. On one hand, scale invariance without conformal invariance seems more generic by requiring only a smaller symmetry. On the other hand, the existence of a non-conserved current with exact scaling dimension $d-1$ in $d$ dimensions seems to require extra fine-tuning. To understand the competition better, we explore some examples without the reflection positivity. We show that a theory of elasticity (a.k.a Riva-Cardy theory) coupled with massless fermions in $d=4-\\epsilon$ dimensions never possess an interacting scale invariant fixed point. We do, however, find interacting scale invariant but non-conformal field theories in gauge fixed versions of the Banks-Zaks fixed points in $d=4$ dimensions.

  19. A characteristic scale in radiation fields of fractal clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiscombe, W.; Cahalan, R.; Davis, A.; Marshak, A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The wavenumber spectrum of Landsat imagery for marine stratocumulus cloud shows a scale break when plotted on a double log plot. We offer an explanation of this scale break in terms of smoothing by horizontal radiative fluxes, which is parameterized and incorporated into an improved pixel approximation. We compute the radiation fields emerging from cloud models with horizontally variable optical depth fractal models. We use comparative spectral and multifractal analysis to qualify the validity of the independent pixel approximation at the largest scales and demonstrate it`s shortcomings on the smallest scales.

  20. Large Scale Magnetic Fields: Density Power Spectrum in Redshift Space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajesh Gopal; Shiv K. Sethi

    2003-09-01

    We compute the density redshift-space power spectrum in the presence of tangled magnetic fields and compare it with existing observations. Our analysis shows that if these magnetic fields originated in the early universe then it is possible to construct models for which the shape of the power spectrum agrees with the large scale slope of the observed power spectrum. However requiring compatibility with observed CMBR anisotropies, the normalization of the power spectrum is too low for magnetic fields to have significant impact on the large scale structure at present. Magnetic fields of a more recent origin generically give density power spectrum ∝ 4 which doesn’t agree with the shape of the observed power spectrum at any scale. Magnetic fields generate curl modes of the velocity field which increase both the quadrupole and hexadecapole of the redshift space power spectrum. For curl modes, the hexadecapole dominates over quadrupole. So the presence of curl modes could be indicated by an anomalously large hexadecapole, which has not yet been computed from observation. It appears difficult to construct models in which tangled magnetic fields could have played a major role in shaping the large scale structure in the present epoch. However if they did, one of the best ways to infer their presence would be from the redshift space effects in the density power spectrum.

  1. Scientific and Technological Foundations for Scaling Production of Nanostructured Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Terry C.; Davis, Casey F.; Rovira, Peter M.; Hayne, Mathew L.; Campbell, Gordon S.; Grzenia, Joel E.; Stock, Paige J.; Meagher, Rilee C.; Rack, Henry J.

    2017-05-01

    Severe Plastic Deformation (SPD) has been explored in a wide range of metals and alloys. However, there are only a few industrial scale implementations of SPD for commercial alloys. To demonstrate and evolve technology for producing ultrafine grain metals by SPD, a Nanostructured Metals Manufacturing Testbed (NMMT) has been established in Golden, Colorado. Machines for research scale and pilot scale Equal Channel Angular Pressing-Conform (ECAP-C) technology have been configured in the NMMT to systematically evaluate and evolve SPD processing and advance the foundational science and technology for manufacturing. We highlight the scientific and technological areas that are critical for scale up of continuous SPD of aluminum, copper, magnesium, titanium, and iron-based alloys. Key areas that we will address in this presentation include the need for comprehensive analysis of starting microstructures, data on operating deformation mechanisms, high pressure thermodynamics and phase transformation kinetics, tribological behaviors, temperature dependence of lubricant properties, adaptation of tolerances and shear intensity to match viscoplastic behaviors, real-time process monitoring, and mechanics of billet/tooling interactions.

  2. Small Scale Beekeeping. Appropriate Technologies for Development. Manual M-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Curtis

    This manual is designed to assist Peace Corps volunteers in the development and implementation of small-scale beekeeping programs as a tool for development. Addressed in the individual chapters are bees and humans; project planning; the types and habits of bees; the essence of beekeeping; bee space and beehives; intermediate technology beekeeping;…

  3. Analytical estimation of the Earth's magnetic field scale

    CERN Document Server

    Bologna, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we analytically estimate the magnetic field scale of planets with physical core conditions similar to that of Earth from a statistical point of view. We evaluate the magnetic field on the basis of the physical parameters of the center of the planet, such as density, temperature, and core size. We look at the contribution of the Peltier-Seebeck effect on the magnetic field, showing that an electrical thermal current can exist in a rotating fluid sphere. Finally, we apply our calculations to Earth and Jupiter. In each case we show that the thermal generation of currents leads to a magnetic field scale comparable to the observed fields of the two planets.

  4. Generation of primordial magnetic fields on linear overdensity scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoz, Smadar; Narayan, Ramesh

    2013-08-02

    Magnetic fields appear to be present in all galaxies and galaxy clusters. Recent measurements indicate that a weak magnetic field may be present even in the smooth low density intergalactic medium. One explanation for these observations is that a seed magnetic field was generated by some unknown mechanism early in the life of the Universe, and was later amplified by various dynamos in nonlinear objects like galaxies and clusters. We show that a primordial magnetic field is expected to be generated in the early Universe on purely linear scales through vorticity induced by scale-dependent temperature fluctuations, or equivalently, a spatially varying speed of sound of the gas. Residual free electrons left over after recombination tap into this vorticity to generate magnetic field via the Biermann battery process. Although the battery operates even in the absence of any relative velocity between dark matter and gas at the time of recombination, the presence of such a relative velocity modifies the predicted spatial power spectrum of the magnetic field. At redshifts of order a few tens, we estimate a root mean square field strength of order 10(-25)-10(-24) G on comoving scales ~10 kpc. This field, which is generated purely from linear perturbations, is expected to be amplified significantly after reionization, and to be further boosted by dynamo processes during nonlinear structure formation.

  5. Health Technology Assessment: a field still maturing!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renaldo N. Battista

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available

    With this issue’s focus on Health Technology Assessment (HTA, the Italian Journal of Public Health has tackled an area of growing importance in today’s increasingly complex health care delivery systems.

    As the articles in this issue demonstrate, HTA has grown from a relatively narrow technical focus to a form of policy research underway in dozens of countries. Since its inception just over three decades ago,HTA has evolved through three distinct phases: the machine, the disease and the delivery mode, with the third of these still underway.

    As the focus has shifted from machines to disease conditions to service delivery approaches, HTA has drawn on research and modes of discourse from a growing variety of disciplines. Thus, despite the evolution that continues, HTA remains, at its core, both multidisciplinary and pragmatic, for the strengths of HTA arise from its integration of the efforts of actors in multiple, diverse disciplines with a view to producing knowledge that will assist decision-makers. The machine phase was marked by a focus on the technical performance of health technologies, often embodying innovative approaches to diagnosis or treatment of human illness.

    Given the newness and costliness of many technologies selected for assessment, a significant emphasis was placed on assessing the safety of these devices. Imaging technologies were the subject of assessment in many settings, perhaps in part because devices such as the CT scanner produced remarkable visual results that were heralded as affording breakthroughs in diagnosis and treatment. One need only look through the programs of early HTA conferences to see the emphasis on high cost, infrastructure-intensive health technologies that was the hallmark of the machine period.

  6. Large-scale building integrated photovoltaics field trial. First technical report - installation phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This report summarises the results of the first eighteen months of the Large-Scale Building Integrated Photovoltaic Field Trial focussing on technical aspects. The project aims included increasing awareness and application of the technology, raising the UK capabilities in application of the technology, and assessing the potential for building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV). Details are given of technology choices; project organisation, cost, and status; and the evaluation criteria. Installations of BIPV described include University buildings, commercial centres, and a sports stadium, wildlife park, church hall, and district council building. Lessons learnt are discussed, and a further report covering monitoring aspects is planned.

  7. New technological developments in integral field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vives, S.; Prieto, E.; Salaun, Y.; Godefroy, P.

    2008-07-01

    Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) provides a spectrum simultaneously for each spatial sample of an extended two-dimensional field. Basically, the IFS is located in a telescope focal plane and is composed by an Integral Field Unit (IFU or image slicer) and a spectrograph. The IFU acts as a coupler between the telescope and the spectrograph by reformatting optically a rectangular field into a quasi-continuous pseudo-slit located at the entrance focal plane of the spectrograph. The Integral Field Units (IFUs) are presently limited either by their cost/risk (when manufactured with classical glass polishing techniques) or by their performances (when constituted by metallic components). Recent innovative methods, developed conjointly by LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, France; WinLight Optics (Marseille, France), allow reaching high performances (accurate roughness, sharp edges, surface form, etc.) with standard glass manufactured components while saving costs and time by an order of magnitude compared with classical techniques. Last developments (in term of design and manufacturing) and applications are presented in details in this article.

  8. Biosensors in the small scale: methods and technology trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senveli, Sukru U; Tigli, Onur

    2013-03-01

    This study presents a review on biosensors with an emphasis on recent developments in the field. A brief history accompanied by a detailed description of the biosensor concepts is followed by rising trends observed in contemporary micro- and nanoscale biosensors. Performance metrics to quantify and compare different detection mechanisms are presented. A comprehensive analysis on various types and subtypes of biosensors are given. The fields of interest within the scope of this review are label-free electrical, mechanical and optical biosensors as well as other emerging and popular technologies. Especially, the latter half of the last decade is reviewed for the types, methods and results of the most prominently researched detection mechanisms. Tables are provided for comparison of various competing technologies in the literature. The conclusion part summarises the noteworthy advantages and disadvantages of all biosensors reviewed in this study. Furthermore, future directions that the micro- and nanoscale biosensing technologies are expected to take are provided along with the immediate outlook.

  9. Scalings of field correlations and heat transport in turbulent convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra K; Mishra, Pankaj K; Pandey, Ambrish; Paul, Supriyo

    2012-01-01

    Using direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection under free-slip boundary condition, we show that the normalized correlation function between the vertical velocity field and the temperature field, as well as the normalized viscous dissipation rate, scales as Ra-0.22 for moderately large Rayleigh number Ra. This scaling accounts for the Nusselt number Nu exponent of approximately 0.3, as observed in experiments. Numerical simulations also reveal that the aforementioned normalized correlation functions are constants for the convection simulation under periodic boundary conditions.

  10. Large-scale magnetic fields in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Alexandros

    2013-02-22

    High Reynolds number magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the presence of zero-flux large-scale magnetic fields is investigated as a function of the magnetic field strength. For a variety of flow configurations, the energy dissipation rate [symbol: see text] follows the scaling [Symbol: see text] proportional U(rms)(3)/ℓ even when the large-scale magnetic field energy is twenty times larger than the kinetic energy. A further increase of the magnetic energy showed a transition to the [Symbol: see text] proportional U(rms)(2) B(rms)/ℓ scaling implying that magnetic shear becomes more efficient at this point at cascading the energy than the velocity fluctuations. Strongly helical configurations form nonturbulent helicity condensates that deviate from these scalings. Weak turbulence scaling was absent from the investigation. Finally, the magnetic energy spectra support the Kolmogorov spectrum k(-5/3) while kinetic energy spectra are closer to the Iroshnikov-Kraichnan spectrum k(-3/2) as observed in the solar wind.

  11. Magnetic fields and the large-scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E

    1999-01-01

    The large-scale structure of the Universe has been observed to be characterized by long filaments, forming polyhedra, with a remarkable 100-200 Mpc periodicity, suggesting a regular network. The introduction of magnetic fields into the physics of the evolution of structure formation provides some clues to understanding this unexpected lattice structure. A relativistic treatment of the evolution of pre-recombination inhomogeneities, including magnetic fields, is presented to show that equivalent-to-present field strengths of the order of $10^{-8}$ G could have played an important role. Primordial magnetic tubes generated at inflation, at scales larger than the horizon before recombination, could have produced filamentary density structures, with comoving lengths larger than about 10 Mpc. Structures shorter than this would have been destroyed by diffusion due to the small pre-recombination conductivity. If filaments constitute a lattice, the primordial magnetic field structures that produced the post-recombinat...

  12. DOE/SNL-TTU scaled wind farm technology facility :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; White, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    The proposed DOE/Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility (SWiFT) hosted by Texas Tech University at Reese Technology Center in Lubbock, TX, will provide a facility for experimental study of turbine-turbine interaction and complex wind farm aerodynamics. This document surveys the current status of wind turbine wake and turbine-turbine interaction research, identifying knowledge and data gaps that the proposed test site can potentially fill. A number of turbine layouts is proposed, allowing for up to ten turbines at the site.

  13. Technology Scaling Impact on Embedded ADC Design for Telecom Receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Hammel; Andreani, Pietro; Malcovati, Piero

    2005-01-01

    -frequency, medium-resolution applications. The design of a 10 bit 20 MS/s ADC using the successive approximation algorithm is presented in order to validate the presented concepts. By using a deep-submicron technology, the speed of the chosen architecture is pushed to meet the desired output rate.......This paper is concerned with the impact of technology scaling on the choice of A/D converters in telecom receivers. It is shown that the trend of diminishing feature size, together with better matching of passive components, allows the use of A/D topologies traditionally confined to low...

  14. Field-programmable custom computing technology architectures, tools, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Luk, Wayne; Pocek, Ken

    2000-01-01

    Field-Programmable Custom Computing Technology: Architectures, Tools, and Applications brings together in one place important contributions and up-to-date research results in this fast-moving area. In seven selected chapters, the book describes the latest advances in architectures, design methods, and applications of field-programmable devices for high-performance reconfigurable systems. The contributors to this work were selected from the leading researchers and practitioners in the field. It will be valuable to anyone working or researching in the field of custom computing technology. It serves as an excellent reference, providing insight into some of the most challenging issues being examined today.

  15. Giga-Gauss scale quasistatic magnetic field generation with laser

    CERN Document Server

    Korneev, Philipp; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    A simple setup for the generation of ultra-intense quasistatic magnetic fields is proposed and analysed. Estimations and numerical Particle-In-Cell calculations show that magnetic fields of gigagauss scale may be generated with conventional powerful relativistic lasers interacting with the appropriate targets of a special geometry. The setup may be useful for a wide range of applications, from laboratory astrophysics to magnetized ICF schemes.

  16. Scaling critical behavior of superconductors at zero magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calan, C. de; Nogueira, F.S. [Ecole Polytechnique (France). Centre de Physique Theorique

    2000-07-01

    Full text follows: We consider the scaling behavior in the critical domain of superconductors at zero external magnetic field. The Josephson's relation for a charged superfluid is proved without assuming the hyperscaling relation. On the other hand we discuss the dual Ginzburg-Landau model. In this dual model, due to the presence of two mass scales, a continuous family of non equivalent scalings can be defined. The relevant critical regimes are identified, and the corresponding critical exponents are predicted. (author)

  17. Broadband Electric-Field Sensor Array Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-05

    the RF DUT. The RF receiver measures the power output from the photodiode, Prf. Fringing RF electric fields from a microstrip resonator circuit ...are measured by placing the ring resonators on top of the circuit . A photograph of the microstrip resonator circuit is shown in Fig. 6(b). The... circuit is a one port device and consists of a 50 Ω input line gap-coupled to a second 50 Ω microstrip line resonator. From vector network analyzer (VNA

  18. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EMERGING PIPE WALL INTEGRITY ASSESSMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR LARGE CAST IRON WATER MAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a large-scale field demonstration of innovative leak detection/location and condition assessment technologies on a 76-year old, 2,500-ft long, cement-lined, 24-in. cast iron water main in Louisville, KY from July through Septembe...

  19. Modelling of evapotranspiration at field and landscape scales. Abstract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Jesper; Butts, M.B.; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2002-01-01

    observations from a nearby weather station. Detailed land-use and soil maps were used to set up the model. Leaf area index was derived from NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) images. To validate the model at field scale the simulated evapotranspiration rates were compared to eddy...

  20. Planck intermediate results XLII. Large-scale Galactic magnetic fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Alves, M. I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent models for the large-scale Galactic magnetic fields in the literature have been largely constrained by synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation measures. We use three different but representative models to compare their predicted polarized synchrotron and dust emission with that measured...

  1. Lab-scale Technology for Biogas Production from Lignocellulose Wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Krátký

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently-operating biogas plants are based on the treatment of lignocellulose biomass, which is included in materials such as agriculture and forestry wastes, municipal solid wastes, waste paper, wood and herbaceous energy crops. Lab-scale biogas technology was specially developed for evaluating the anaerobic biodegrability and the specific methane yields of solid organic substrates. This technology falls into two main categories – pretreatment equipments, and fermentation equipments. Pretreatment units use physical principles based on mechanical comminution (ball mills, macerator orhydrothermal treatment (liquid hot water pretreatment technology. The biochemical methane potential test is used to evaluate the specific methane yields of treated or non-treated organic substrates. This test can be performed both by lab testing units and by lab fermenter.

  2. Scale-up on electrokinetic remediation: Engineering and technological parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vizcaíno, Rubén; Navarro, Vicente; León, María J; Risco, Carolina; Rodrigo, Manuel A; Sáez, Cristina; Cañizares, Pablo

    2016-09-05

    This study analyses the effect of the scale-up of electrokinetic remediation (EKR) processes in natural soils. A procedure is proposed to prepare soils based on a compacting process to obtaining soils with similar moisture content and density to those found in real soils in the field. The soil used here was from a region with a high agrarian activity (Mora, Spain). The scale-up study was performed in two installations at different scales: a mock-up pilot scale (0.175m(3)) and a prototype with a scale that was very similar to a real application (16m(3)). The electrode configuration selected consisted of rows of graphite electrodes facing each other located in electrolyte wells. The discharge of 20mg of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid [2,4-D] per kg of dry soil was treated by applying an electric potential gradient of 1Vcm(-1). An increase in scale was observed to directly influence the amount of energy supplied to the soil being treated. As a result, electroosmotic and electromigration flows and electric heating are more intense than in smaller-scale tests (24%, 1% and 25%, respectively respect to the values in prototype). In addition, possible leaks were evaluated by conducting a watertightness test and quantifying evaporation losses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. New tuberculosis technologies: challenges for retooling and scale-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, M; Palamountain, K M

    2012-10-01

    The availability of new tools does not mean that they will be adopted, used correctly, scaled up or have public health impact. Experience to date with new diagnostics suggests that many national tuberculosis programmes (NTPs) in high-burden countries are reluctant to adopt and scale up new tools, even when these are backed by evidence and global policy recommendations. We suggest that there are several common barriers to effective national adoption and scale-up of new technologies: global policy recommendations that do not provide sufficient information for scale-up, complex decision-making processes and weak political commitment at the country level, limited engagement of and support to NTP managers, high cost of tools and poor fit with user needs, unregulated markets and inadequate business models, limited capacity for laboratory strengthening and implementation research, and insufficient advocacy and donor support. Overcoming these barriers will require enhanced country-level advocacy, resources, technical assistance and political commitment. Some of the BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa) countries are emerging as early adopters of policies and technologies, and are increasing their investments in TB control. They may provide the first opportunities to fully assess the public health impact of new tools.

  4. Scaling behaviour of three-dimensional group field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Magnen, Jacques; Rivasseau, Vincent; Smerlak, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    Group field theory is a generalization of matrix models, with triangulated pseudomanifolds as Feynman diagrams and state sum invariants as Feynman amplitudes. In this paper, we consider Boulatov's three-dimensional model and its Freidel-Louapre positive regularization (hereafter the BFL model) with a `ultraviolet' cutoff, and study rigorously their scaling behavior in the large cutoff limit. We prove an optimal bound on large order Feynman amplitudes, which shows that the BFL model is perturbatively more divergent than the former. We then upgrade this result to the constructive level, using, in a self-contained way, the modern tools of constructive field theory: we construct the Borel sum of the BFL perturbative series via a convergent `cactus' expansion, and establish the `ultraviolet' scaling of its Borel radius. Our method shows how the `sum over triangulations' in quantum gravity can be tamed rigorously, and paves the way for the renormalization program in group field theory.

  5. Demonstration and Field Test of airjacket technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulkner, D.; Fisk, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.; Sullivan, D.P.

    1998-06-01

    There are approximately 600,000 paint spray workers in the United States applying paints and coatings with some type of sprayer. Approximately 5% of these spray workers are in the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD). These spray workers apply paints or other coatings to products such as bridges, houses, automobiles, wood and metal furniture, and other consumer and industrial products. The materials being sprayed include exterior and interior paints, lacquers, primers, shellacs, stains and varnishes. Our experimental findings indicate that the Airjacket does not significantly reduce the exposure of spray workers to paint fumes during HVLP spraying. The difference between ideal and actual spray paint procedures influence the mechanisms driving spray workers exposures to paint fumes and influence the viability of the Airjacket technology. In the ideal procedure, for which the Airjacket was conceived, the spray worker's exposure to paint fumes is due largely to the formation of a recirculating eddy between the spray worker and the object painted. The Airjacket ejects air to diminish and ventilate this eddy. In actual practice, exposures may result largely from directing paint upstream and from the bounce-back of the air/paint jet of the object being painted. The Airjacket, would not be expected to dramatically reduce exposures to paint fumes when the paint is not directed downstream or when the bounce-back of paint on the object creates a cloud of paint aerosols around the spray worker.

  6. The large scale magnetic fields of thin accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Xinwu

    2013-01-01

    Large scale magnetic field threading an accretion disk is a key ingredient in the jet formation model. The most attractive scenario for the origin of such a large scale field is the advection of the field by the gas in the accretion disk from the interstellar medium or a companion star. However, it is realized that outward diffusion of the accreted field is fast compared to the inward accretion velocity in a geometrically thin accretion disk if the value of the Prandtl number Pm is around unity. In this work, we revisit this problem considering the angular momentum of the disk is removed predominantly by the magnetically driven outflows. The radial velocity of the disk is significantly increased due to the presence of the outflows. Using a simplified model for the vertical disk structure, we find that even moderately weak fields can cause sufficient angular momentum loss via a magnetic wind to balance outward diffusion. There are two equilibrium points, one at low field strengths corresponding to a plasma-bet...

  7. Field analytical technology verification: The ETV Site Characterization Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einfeld, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jenkins, R.A.; Dindal, A.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Innovative field characterization and monitoring technologies are often slow to be adopted by the environmental engineering/consulting community because of concerns that their performance has not been proven by an independent testing body, and/or they have not received the EPA`s blessing on a regional or national level. The purpose of the EPA Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Site Characterization Pilot, a joint effort between EPA and DOE, is to accelerate the acceptance of technologies that reduce the cost and increase the speed of environmental clean-up and monitoring. Technology verifications that have been completed or are underway include: in situ technologies for the characterization of sub-surface hydrocarbon plumes, field-portable GC/MS systems, field-portable X-ray fluorescence analyzers, soil sampling technologies, field-portable PCB analyzers, analyzers for VOC analysis at the wellhead, and decision support software systems to aid site sample collection and contaminant plume definition. The verification process follows a somewhat generic pathway. A user-community need is identified, the vendor community is canvassed, and relevant, interested companies are selected. A demonstration plan is prepared by the verification organization and circulated to participants prior to the field activities. Field trials are normally held at two geologically or environmentally different sites and typically require one week at each site. Samples (soil, soil gas, water, surface wipe etc.) provided to the vendor at the demonstration include site-specific samples and standards or performance evaluation samples. Sample splits are sent to a pre-selected laboratory for analysis using a reference method. Laboratory data are used for comparison with field technology results during the data analysis phase of the demonstration.

  8. Large-scale solar magnetic field mapping: I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H

    2013-12-01

    This article focuses on mapping the Sun's large-scale magnetic fields. In particular, the model considers how photospheric fields evolve in time. Our solar field mapping method uses Netlogo's cellular automata software via algorithms to carry out the movement of magnetic field on the Sun via agents. This model's entities consist of two breeds: blue and red agents. The former carry a fixed amount of radially outward magnetic flux: 10(23) Mx, and the latter, the identical amount of inward directed flux. The individual agents are distinguished, for clarity, by various shades of blue and red arrows whose orientation indicates the direction the agents are moving, relative to the near-steady bulk fluid motions. The fluid motions generally advect the field with the well known meridional circulation and differential rotation. Our model predominantly focuses on spatial and temporal variations from the bulk fluid motions owing to magnetic interactions. There are but a few effects that agents have on each other: i) while at the poles, field agents are connected via the Babcock - Leighton (B - L) subsurface field to other latitudes. This allows them to undertake two duties there: A) the B - L subsurface field spawns the next generation of new magnetic field via new agents, and B) the B - L subsurface field attracts lower-latitude fields via the "long-range" magnetic stress tension; ii) nearby agents affect each other's motion by short-range interactions; and iii) through annihilation: when opposite field agents get too close to each other, they disappear in pairs. The behavior of the agents' long- and short-range magnetic forces is discussed within this paper as well as the model's use of internal boundary conditions. The workings of the model may be seen in the accompanying movies and/or by using the software available via SpringerPlus' website, or on the Netlogo (TM) community website, where help is readable available, and should all these fail, some help from the author.

  9. Volumetric Light-field Encryption at the Microscopic Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoyu; Guo, Changliang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Schroeder, Bryce C.; Sheridan, John T.; Jia, Shu

    2017-01-01

    We report a light-field based method that allows the optical encryption of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric information at the microscopic scale in a single 2D light-field image. The system consists of a microlens array and an array of random phase/amplitude masks. The method utilizes a wave optics model to account for the dominant diffraction effect at this new scale, and the system point-spread function (PSF) serves as the key for encryption and decryption. We successfully developed and demonstrated a deconvolution algorithm to retrieve both spatially multiplexed discrete data and continuous volumetric data from 2D light-field images. Showing that the method is practical for data transmission and storage, we obtained a faithful reconstruction of the 3D volumetric information from a digital copy of the encrypted light-field image. The method represents a new level of optical encryption, paving the way for broad industrial and biomedical applications in processing and securing 3D data at the microscopic scale.

  10. Volumetric Light-field Encryption at the Microscopic Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoyu; Guo, Changliang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Schroeder, Bryce C.; Sheridan, John T.; Jia, Shu

    2017-01-01

    We report a light-field based method that allows the optical encryption of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric information at the microscopic scale in a single 2D light-field image. The system consists of a microlens array and an array of random phase/amplitude masks. The method utilizes a wave optics model to account for the dominant diffraction effect at this new scale, and the system point-spread function (PSF) serves as the key for encryption and decryption. We successfully developed and demonstrated a deconvolution algorithm to retrieve both spatially multiplexed discrete data and continuous volumetric data from 2D light-field images. Showing that the method is practical for data transmission and storage, we obtained a faithful reconstruction of the 3D volumetric information from a digital copy of the encrypted light-field image. The method represents a new level of optical encryption, paving the way for broad industrial and biomedical applications in processing and securing 3D data at the microscopic scale. PMID:28059149

  11. Volumetric Light-field Encryption at the Microscopic Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Haoyu; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Schroeder, Bryce C; Sheridan, John T; Jia, Shu

    2016-01-01

    We report a light-field based method that allows the optical encryption of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric information at the microscopic scale in a single 2D light-field image. The system consists of a microlens array and an array of random phase/amplitude masks. The method utilizes a wave optics model to account for the dominant diffraction effect at this new scale, and the system point-spread function (PSF) serves as the key for encryption and decryption. We successfully developed and demonstrated a deconvolution algorithm to retrieve spatially multiplexed discrete and continuous volumetric data from 2D light-field images. Showing that the method is practical for data transmission and storage, we obtained a faithful reconstruction of the 3D volumetric information from a digital copy of the encrypted light-field image. The method represents a new level of optical encryption, paving the way for broad industrial and biomedical applications in processing and securing 3D data at the microscopic scale.

  12. Volumetric Light-field Encryption at the Microscopic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoyu; Guo, Changliang; Muniraj, Inbarasan; Schroeder, Bryce C; Sheridan, John T; Jia, Shu

    2017-01-06

    We report a light-field based method that allows the optical encryption of three-dimensional (3D) volumetric information at the microscopic scale in a single 2D light-field image. The system consists of a microlens array and an array of random phase/amplitude masks. The method utilizes a wave optics model to account for the dominant diffraction effect at this new scale, and the system point-spread function (PSF) serves as the key for encryption and decryption. We successfully developed and demonstrated a deconvolution algorithm to retrieve both spatially multiplexed discrete data and continuous volumetric data from 2D light-field images. Showing that the method is practical for data transmission and storage, we obtained a faithful reconstruction of the 3D volumetric information from a digital copy of the encrypted light-field image. The method represents a new level of optical encryption, paving the way for broad industrial and biomedical applications in processing and securing 3D data at the microscopic scale.

  13. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, John Joseph M. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Hertzberg, Mark P. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  14. Scaling laws for magnetic fields on the quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Stenflo, Jan O

    2012-01-01

    The Sun's magnetic field is structured over a range of scales that span approximately seven orders of magnitudes, four of which lie beyond the resolving power of current telescopes. Here we have used a Hinode SOT/SP deep mode data set for the quiet-sun disk center in combination with constraints from the Hanle effect to derive scaling laws that describe how the magnetic structuring varies from the resolved scales down to the magnetic diffusion limit, where the field ceases to be frozen-in. The focus of the analysis is a derivation of the magnetic energy spectrum, but we also discuss the scale dependence of the probability density function (PDF) for the flux densities and the role of the cancellation function for the average unsigned flux density. Analysis of the Hinode data set with the line-ratio method reveals a collapsed flux population in the form of flux tubes with a size distribution that is peaked in the 10-100 km range. Magnetic energy is injected into this scale range by the instability mechanism of ...

  15. Pulsed electric field technology: Modeling of electric field and temperature distributions within continuous flow PEF treatment chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Salengke, dkk

    2012-01-01

    Innovations and technology developments in the field of food pasteurization and sterilization are continuously evolving. These include innovations in thermal processing technologies such as aseptic processing, ohmic technology, and microwave technology, as well as non-thermal processing technologies which include pulsed electric field technology and high pressure processing technology. This paper discussed the results of a study on mathematical modeling of electric field and temperature distr...

  16. Turbulent compressible fluid: Renormalization group analysis, scaling regimes, and anomalous scaling of advected scalar fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N. V.; Gulitskiy, N. M.; Kostenko, M. M.; Lučivjanský, T.

    2017-03-01

    We study a model of fully developed turbulence of a compressible fluid, based on the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation, by means of the field-theoretic renormalization group. In this approach, scaling properties are related to the fixed points of the renormalization group equations. Previous analysis of this model near the real-world space dimension 3 identified a scaling regime [N. V. Antonov et al., Theor. Math. Phys. 110, 305 (1997), 10.1007/BF02630456]. The aim of the present paper is to explore the existence of additional regimes, which could not be found using the direct perturbative approach of the previous work, and to analyze the crossover between different regimes. It seems possible to determine them near the special value of space dimension 4 in the framework of double y and ɛ expansion, where y is the exponent associated with the random force and ɛ =4 -d is the deviation from the space dimension 4. Our calculations show that there exists an additional fixed point that governs scaling behavior. Turbulent advection of a passive scalar (density) field by this velocity ensemble is considered as well. We demonstrate that various correlation functions of the scalar field exhibit anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified as scaling dimensions of certain composite fields, can be systematically calculated as a series in y and ɛ . All calculations are performed in the leading one-loop approximation.

  17. Turbulent compressible fluid: Renormalization group analysis, scaling regimes, and anomalous scaling of advected scalar fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N V; Gulitskiy, N M; Kostenko, M M; Lučivjanský, T

    2017-03-01

    We study a model of fully developed turbulence of a compressible fluid, based on the stochastic Navier-Stokes equation, by means of the field-theoretic renormalization group. In this approach, scaling properties are related to the fixed points of the renormalization group equations. Previous analysis of this model near the real-world space dimension 3 identified a scaling regime [N. V. Antonov et al., Theor. Math. Phys. 110, 305 (1997)TMPHAH0040-577910.1007/BF02630456]. The aim of the present paper is to explore the existence of additional regimes, which could not be found using the direct perturbative approach of the previous work, and to analyze the crossover between different regimes. It seems possible to determine them near the special value of space dimension 4 in the framework of double y and ɛ expansion, where y is the exponent associated with the random force and ɛ=4-d is the deviation from the space dimension 4. Our calculations show that there exists an additional fixed point that governs scaling behavior. Turbulent advection of a passive scalar (density) field by this velocity ensemble is considered as well. We demonstrate that various correlation functions of the scalar field exhibit anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified as scaling dimensions of certain composite fields, can be systematically calculated as a series in y and ɛ. All calculations are performed in the leading one-loop approximation.

  18. Numerical analysis of field-scale transport of bromacil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, David; Tauber-Yasur, Inbar; Laufer, Asher; Yaron, Bruno

    Field-scale transport of bromacil (5-bromo-3- sec-butyl-6-methyluracil) was analyzed using two different model processes for local description of the transport. The first was the classical, one-region convection dispersion equation (CDE) model while the second was the two-region, mobile-immobile (MIM) model. The analyses were performed by means of detailed three-dimensional, numerical simulations of the flow and the transport [Russo, D., Zaidel, J. and Laufer, A., Numerical analysis of flow and transport in a three-dimensional partially saturated heterogeneous soil. Water Resour. Res., 1998, in press], employing local soil hydraulic properties parameters from field measurements and local adsorption/desorption coefficients and the first-order degradation rate coefficient from laboratory measurements. Results of the analyses suggest that for a given flow regime, mass exchange between the mobile and the immobile regions retards the bromacil degradation, considerably affects the distribution of the bromacil resident concentration, c, at relatively large travel times, slightly affects the spatial moments of the distribution of c, and increases the skewing of the bromacil breakthrough and the uncertainty in its prediction, compared with the case in which the soil contained only a single (mobile) region. Mean and standard deviation of the simulated concentration profiles at various elapsed times were compared with measurements from a field-scale transport experiment [Tauber-Yasur, I., Hadas, A., Russo, D. and Yaron, B., Leaching of terbuthylazine and bromacil through field soils. Water, Air Soil Poln., 1998, in press] conducted at the Bet Dagan site. Given the limitations of the present study (e.g. the lack of detailed field data on the spatial variability of the soil chemical properties) the main conclusion of the present study is that the field-scale transport of bromacil at the Bet Dagan site is better quantified with the MIM model than the CDE model.

  19. Space Technology 5 Multipoint Observations of Temporal and Spatial Variability of Field-Aligned Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Wang, Y.; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, R. L.

    2009-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST5) is a constellation mission consisting of three microsatellites. It provides the first multipoint magnetic field measurements in low Earth orbit, which enables us to separate spatial and temporal variations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using the ST5 data. We examine the field-aligned current observations during and after a geomagnetic storm and compare the magnetic field profiles at the three spacecraft. The multipoint data demonstrate that mesoscale current structures, commonly embedded within large-scale current sheets, are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in approx.10 min time scales. On the other hand, the data also show that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are approx.1 min for mesoscale currents and approx.10 min for large-scale currents. These temporal features are very likely associated with dynamic variations of their charge carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of mesoscale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  20. Two-field analysis of no-scale supergravity inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, King' s College London, WC2R 2LS London (United Kingdom); García, Marcos A.G.; Olive, Keith A. [William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Nanopoulos, Dimitri V., E-mail: john.ellis@cern.ch, E-mail: garciagarcia@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: dimitri@physics.tamu.edu, E-mail: olive@physics.umn.edu [George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, 77843 Texas (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Since the building-blocks of supersymmetric models include chiral superfields containing pairs of effective scalar fields, a two-field approach is particularly appropriate for models of inflation based on supergravity. In this paper, we generalize the two-field analysis of the inflationary power spectrum to supergravity models with arbitrary Kähler potential. We show how two-field effects in the context of no-scale supergravity can alter the model predictions for the scalar spectral index n{sub s} and the tensor-to-scalar ratio r, yielding results that interpolate between the Planck-friendly Starobinsky model and BICEP2-friendly predictions. In particular, we show that two-field effects in a chaotic no-scale inflation model with a quadratic potential are capable of reducing r to very small values || 0.1. We also calculate the non-Gaussianity measure f{sub NL}, finding that is well below the current experimental sensitivity.

  1. Wind turbine wake meandering at the laboratory and field scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisel, Michael; Musa, Mirko; Hong, Jiarong; Guala, Michele

    2016-11-01

    Flow measurements were collected in the wake of the utility-scale (2.5MW) Eolos wind turbine using a ground-based light detection and ranging (LiDAR) wind profiler to identify the characteristics of wake meandering at the field scale. The investigation seeks to establish the influence of scale and atmospheric turbulence on wake meandering, which has been observed to leave a strong spectral signature on laboratory measurements in wind tunnel and channel flows. The experimental data include multiple test periods at various downstream distances within the turbine wake. Inflow conditions were assessed using a meteorological tower equipped with sonic anemometers. Additionally, an experiment was conducted in the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory atmospheric boundary layer wind tunnel to provide a direct comparison for the utility-scale results and to reaffirm the findings of previous laboratory-scale investigations. Estimates of the wake and inflow one-dimensional velocity spectra were compared to determine whether wake meandering characteristics are present at both scales. An empirical correction to the velocity spectra of the LiDAR and a few options to extract a more local velocity signal are discussed to compensate for the inherent limitations of LiDAR in capturing turbulent fluctuations.

  2. Estimation of probability densities using scale-free field theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, Justin B

    2014-07-01

    The question of how best to estimate a continuous probability density from finite data is an intriguing open problem at the interface of statistics and physics. Previous work has argued that this problem can be addressed in a natural way using methods from statistical field theory. Here I describe results that allow this field-theoretic approach to be rapidly and deterministically computed in low dimensions, making it practical for use in day-to-day data analysis. Importantly, this approach does not impose a privileged length scale for smoothness of the inferred probability density, but rather learns a natural length scale from the data due to the tradeoff between goodness of fit and an Occam factor. Open source software implementing this method in one and two dimensions is provided.

  3. Micro powder injection molding——large scale production technology for micro-sized components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Micro powder injection molding (μPIM),a miniaturized variant of powder injection molding,has advantages of shape complexity,applicability to many materials and good mechanical properties. Co-injection molding has been realized between met-als and ceramics on micro components,which become the first breakthrough within the PIM field. Combined with the prominent characteristics of high features/cost ratio,micro powder injection molding becomes a potential technique for large scale production of intricate and three-dimensional micro components or micro-structured components in microsystems technology (MST) field.

  4. Micro powder injection molding-large scale production technology for micro-sized components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN HaiQing; JIA ChengChang; QU XuanHui

    2008-01-01

    Micro powder injection molding (μPIM), a miniaturized variant of powder injection molding, has advantages of shape complexity, applicability to many materials and good mechanical properties. Co-injection molding has been realized between metals and ceramics on micro components, which become the first breakthrough within the PIM field. Combined with the prominent characteristics of high features/cost ratio, micro powder injection molding becomes a potential technique for large scale production of intricate and three-dimensional micro components or microstructured components in microsystems technology (MST) field.

  5. Scale-Up and Demonstration of Fly Ash Ozonation Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Afonso; R. Hurt; I. Kulaots

    2006-03-01

    The disposal of fly ash from the combustion of coal has become increasingly important. When the fly ash does not meet the required specification for the product or market intended, it is necessary to beneficiate it to achieve the desired quality. This project, conducted at PPL's Montour SES, is the first near full-scale ({approx}10 ton/day), demonstration of ash ozonation technology. Bituminous and sub bituminous ashes, including two ash samples that contained activated carbon, were treated during the project. Results from the tests were very promising. The ashes were successfully treated with ozone, yielding concrete-suitable ash quality. Preliminary process cost estimates indicate that capital and operating costs to treat unburned carbon are competitive with other commercial ash beneficiation technologies at a fraction of the cost of lost sales and/or ash disposal costs. This is the final technical report under DOE Cooperative Agreement No.: DE-FC26-03NT41730.

  6. Battery technologies for large-scale stationary energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloveichik, Grigorii L

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, with the deployment of renewable energy sources, advances in electrified transportation, and development in smart grids, the markets for large-scale stationary energy storage have grown rapidly. Electrochemical energy storage methods are strong candidate solutions due to their high energy density, flexibility, and scalability. This review provides an overview of mature and emerging technologies for secondary and redox flow batteries. New developments in the chemistry of secondary and flow batteries as well as regenerative fuel cells are also considered. Advantages and disadvantages of current and prospective electrochemical energy storage options are discussed. The most promising technologies in the short term are high-temperature sodium batteries with β″-alumina electrolyte, lithium-ion batteries, and flow batteries. Regenerative fuel cells and lithium metal batteries with high energy density require further research to become practical.

  7. Designing defect spins for wafer-scale quantum technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehl, William F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Seo, Hosung [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Galli, Giulia [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Awschalom, David D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-11-27

    The past decade has seen remarkable progress in the development of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect center in diamond, which is one of the leading candidates for quantum information technologies. The success of the NV center as a solid-state qubit has stimulated an active search for similar defect spins in other technologically important and mature semiconductors, such as silicon carbide. If successfully combined with the advanced microfabrication techniques available to such materials, coherent quantum control of defect spins could potentially lead to semiconductor-based, wafer-scale quantum technologies that make use of exotic quantum mechanical phenomena like entanglement. In this article, we describe the robust spin property of the NV center and the current status of NV center research for quantum information technologies. We then outline first-principles computational modeling techniques based on density functional theory to efficiently search for potential spin defects in nondiamond hosts suitable for quantum information applications. The combination of computational modeling and experimentation has proven invaluable in this area, and we describe the successful interplay between theory and experiment achieved with the divacancy spin qubit in silicon carbide.

  8. Scaling Deviations for Neutrino Reactions in Aysmptotically Free Field Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilczek, F. A.; Zee, A.; Treiman, S. B.

    1974-11-01

    Several aspects of deep inelastic neutrino scattering are discussed in the framework of asymptotically free field theories. We first consider the growth behavior of the total cross sections at large energies. Because of the deviations from strict scaling which are characteristic of such theories the growth need not be linear. However, upper and lower bounds are established which rather closely bracket a linear growth. We next consider in more detail the expected pattern of scaling deviation for the structure functions and, correspondingly, for the differential cross sections. The analysis here is based on certain speculative assumptions. The focus is on qualitative effects of scaling breakdown as they may show up in the X and y distributions. The last section of the paper deals with deviations from the Callan-Gross relation.

  9. Impact of Scaled Technology on Radiation Testing and Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Cohn, Lewis M.

    2005-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief overview of some of the radiation challenges facing emerging scaled digital technologies with implications on using consumer grade electronics and next generation hardening schemes. Commercial semiconductor manufacturers are recognizing some of these issues as issues for terrestrial performance. Looking at means of dealing with soft errors. The thinned oxide has indicated improved TID tolerance of commercial products hardened by "serendipity" which does not guarantee hardness or say if the trend will continue. This presentation also focuses one reliability implications of thinned oxides.

  10. Generation of scale invariant magnetic fields in bouncing universes

    CERN Document Server

    Sriramkumar, L; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2015-01-01

    We consider the generation of primordial magnetic fields in a class of bouncing models when the electromagnetic action is coupled non-minimally to a scalar field that, say, drives the background evolution. For scale factors that have the power law form at very early times and non-minimal couplings which are simple powers of the scale factor, one can easily show that scale invariant spectra for the magnetic fields can arise {\\it before the bounce} for certain values of the indices involved. It will be interesting to examine if these power spectra retain their shape {\\it after the bounce}. However, analytical solutions for the Fourier modes of the electromagnetic vector potential across the bounce are difficult to obtain. In this work, with the help of a new time variable that we introduce, which we refer to as the ${\\rm e}$-${\\cal N}$-fold, we investigate these scenarios numerically. Imposing the initial conditions on the modes in the contracting phase, we numerically evolve the modes across the bounce and eva...

  11. Electric field scales at quasi-perpendicular shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Walker

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the short scale structures that are observed in the electric field during crossings of the quasi-perpendicular bow shock using data from the Cluster satellites. These structures exhibit large amplitudes, as high as 70 m Vm-1 and so make a significant contribution to the overall change in potential at the shock front. It is shown that the scale size of these short-lived electric field structures is of the order of a few cpe. The relationships between the scale size and the upstream Mach number and θBn are studied. It is found that the scale size of these structures decreases with increasing plasma β and as θBn→90°. The amplitude of the spikes remains fairly constant with increasing Ma and appears to increase as θBn→90°.

  12. Application of stereo-imaging technology to medical field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Kyoung Won; Park, Jeongyun; Kim, In Young; Kim, Kwang Gi

    2012-09-01

    There has been continuous development in the area of stereoscopic medical imaging devices, and many stereoscopic imaging devices have been realized and applied in the medical field. In this article, we review past and current trends pertaining to the application stereo-imaging technologies in the medical field. We describe the basic principles of stereo vision and visual issues related to it, including visual discomfort, binocular disparities, vergence-accommodation mismatch, and visual fatigue. We also present a brief history of medical applications of stereo-imaging techniques, examples of recently developed stereoscopic medical devices, and patent application trends as they pertain to stereo-imaging medical devices. Three-dimensional (3D) stereo-imaging technology can provide more realistic depth perception to the viewer than conventional two-dimensional imaging technology. Therefore, it allows for a more accurate understanding and analysis of the morphology of an object. Based on these advantages, the significance of stereoscopic imaging in the medical field increases in accordance with the increase in the number of laparoscopic surgeries, and stereo-imaging technology plays a key role in the diagnoses of the detailed morphologies of small biological specimens. The application of 3D stereo-imaging technology to the medical field will help improve surgical accuracy, reduce operation times, and enhance patient safety. Therefore, it is important to develop more enhanced stereoscopic medical devices.

  13. Planck intermediate results. XLII. Large-scale Galactic magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R; Alves, M I R; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dolag, K; Doré, O; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Gudmundsson, J E; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hobson, M; Hornstrup, A; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maggio, G; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Mangilli, A; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Masi, S; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Oppermann, N; Orlando, E; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perotto, L; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Scott, D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Strong, A W; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2016-01-01

    Recent models for the large-scale Galactic magnetic fields in the literature were largely constrained by synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation measures. We select three different but representative models and compare their predicted polarized synchrotron and dust emission with that measured by the Planck satellite. We first update these models to match the Planck synchrotron products using a common model for the cosmic-ray leptons. We discuss the impact on this analysis of the ongoing problems of component separation in the Planck microwave bands and of the uncertain cosmic-ray spectrum. In particular, the inferred degree of ordering in the magnetic fields is sensitive to these systematic uncertainties. We then compare the resulting simulated emission to the observed dust emission and find that the dust predictions do not match the morphology in the Planck data, particularly the vertical profile in latitude. We show how the dust data can then be used to further improve these magnetic field models, particu...

  14. Multiple-scale Proximal Sensor and Remote Imagery Technology for Sustaining Agricultural Productivity During Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, D. L.; Scudiero, E.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in climatic patterns have had dramatic influence on agricultural areas worldwide, particularly in irrigated arid-zone agricultural areas subjected to recurring drought, such as California's San Joaquin Valley. Climate change has impacted water availability, which subsequently has impacted soil salinity levels in the root zone, especially on the west side of the San Joaquin Valley (WSJV). Inventorying and monitoring the extent of climate change on soil salinity is crucial to evaluate the extent of the problem, to recognize trends, and to formulate state-wide and field-scale irrigation management strategies that will sustain the agricultural productivity of the WSJV. Over the past 3 decades, Corwin and colleagues at the U.S. Salinity Laboratory have developed proximal sensor (i.e., electrical resistivity and electromagnetic induction) and remote imagery (i.e., MODIS and Landsat 7) methodologies for assessing soil salinity at multiple scales: field (0.5 ha to 3 km2), landscape (3 to 10 km2), and regional (10 to 105 km2) scales. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of these scale-dependent salinity assessment technologies. Case studies for the WSJV are presented to demonstrate at multiple scales the utility of these approaches in assessing soil salinity changes due to management-induced changes and to changes in climate patterns, and in providing site-specific irrigation management information for salinity control. Land resource managers, producers, agriculture consultants, extension specialists, and Natural Resource Conservation Service field staff are the beneficiaries of this information.

  15. Scaling Impacts in Life Support Architecture and Technology Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    For long-duration space missions outside of Earth orbit, reliability considerations will drive higher levels of redundancy and/or on-board spares for life support equipment. Component scaling will be a critical element in minimizing overall launch mass while maintaining an acceptable level of system reliability. Building on an earlier reliability study (AIAA 2012-3491), this paper considers the impact of alternative scaling approaches, including the design of technology assemblies and their individual components to maximum, nominal, survival, or other fractional requirements. The optimal level of life support system closure is evaluated for deep-space missions of varying duration using equivalent system mass (ESM) as the comparative basis. Reliability impacts are included in ESM by estimating the number of component spares required to meet a target system reliability. Common cause failures are included in the analysis. ISS and ISS-derived life support technologies are considered along with selected alternatives. This study focusses on minimizing launch mass, which may be enabling for deep-space missions.

  16. Near-field focusing of dielectric microspheres: Super-resolution and field-invariant parameter scaling

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zengbo

    2013-01-01

    Optical near-fields of small dielectric particles are of particular importance and interests for nanoscale optical engineering such as field localization, fabrication, characterization, sensing and imaging. This paper represents a systematic investigation on the focusing characteristics (focal length, field enhancement, spot size) for a given refractive-index microsphere (n=1.6) with a varying size parameter piscaled to other refractive-index particles or background medium, principles of field-invariant parameters scaling (size, wavelength, and refractive index) were revealed and demonstrated with example cases. It offers the new freedom to choose particles and background medium to gai...

  17. Application and prospect of computer technology in welding materials field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the application status of computer technology in welding materials field from three aspects: the CAD of welding materials, the date base system for welding materials and the expert system for welding materials .Besides, this paper explores and discusses the existing problems and the developing trend in the future.

  18. SATELLITE GRAVITY SURVEYING TECHNOLOGY AND RESEARCH OF EARTH'S GRAVITY FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning Jinsheng

    2003-01-01

    This is a summarized paper. Two topics are discussed: Firstly, the concept, development and application of four kinds of satellite gravity surveying technology are introduced; Secondly, some problems of theory and method, which must be considered in the study of the Earth's gravity field based on satellite gravity data, are expounded.

  19. Mapping the (R-)Evolution of Technological Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurowetzki, Roman; Hain, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide a framework and novel methodology geared towards mapping technological change in complex interdependent systems by using large amounts of unstructured data from various recent on- and offline sources. Combining techniques from the fields of natural language pr...

  20. Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Multipoint Observations of Temporal and Spatial Variability of Field-Aligned Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST-5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this paper, we present a study of the temporal variability of field-aligned currents using multi-point magnetic field measurements from ST5. The data demonstrate that mesoscale current structures are commonly embedded within large-scale field-aligned current sheets. The meso-scale current structures are very dynamic with highly variable current density and/or polarity in time scales of about 10 min. They exhibit large temporal variations during both quiet and disturbed times in such time scales. On the other hand, the data also shown that the time scales for the currents to be relatively stable are about 1 min for meso-scale currents and about 10 min for large scale current sheets. These temporal features are obviously associated with dynamic variations of their particle carriers (mainly electrons) as they respond to the variations of the parallel electric field in auroral acceleration region. The characteristic time scales for the temporal variability of meso-scale field-aligned currents are found to be consistent with those of auroral parallel electric field.

  1. Image-based Exploration of Large-Scale Pathline Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Nagoor, Omniah H.

    2014-05-27

    While real-time applications are nowadays routinely used in visualizing large nu- merical simulations and volumes, handling these large-scale datasets requires high-end graphics clusters or supercomputers to process and visualize them. However, not all users have access to powerful clusters. Therefore, it is challenging to come up with a visualization approach that provides insight to large-scale datasets on a single com- puter. Explorable images (EI) is one of the methods that allows users to handle large data on a single workstation. Although it is a view-dependent method, it combines both exploration and modification of visual aspects without re-accessing the original huge data. In this thesis, we propose a novel image-based method that applies the concept of EI in visualizing large flow-field pathlines data. The goal of our work is to provide an optimized image-based method, which scales well with the dataset size. Our approach is based on constructing a per-pixel linked list data structure in which each pixel contains a list of pathlines segments. With this view-dependent method it is possible to filter, color-code and explore large-scale flow data in real-time. In addition, optimization techniques such as early-ray termination and deferred shading are applied, which further improves the performance and scalability of our approach.

  2. Atomic-Scale Confinement of Resonant Optical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Johannes; Großmann, Swen; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Häckel, Tim; Emmerling, Monika; Kamp, Martin; Huang, Jer-Shing; Biagioni, Paolo; Prangsma, Jord C.; Hecht, Bert

    2012-11-01

    In the presence of matter there is no fundamental limit preventing confinement of visible light even down to atomic scales. Achieving such confinement and the corresponding intensity enhancement inevitably requires simultaneous control over atomic-scale details of material structures and over the optical modes that such structures support. By means of self-assembly we have obtained side-by-side aligned gold nanorod dimers with robust atomically-defined gaps reaching below 0.5 nm. The existence of atomically-confined light fields in these gaps is demonstrated by observing extreme Coulomb splitting of corresponding symmetric and anti-symmetric dimer eigenmodes of more than 800 meV in white-light scattering experiments. Our results open new perspectives for atomically-resolved spectroscopic imaging, deeply nonlinear optics, ultra-sensing, cavity optomechanics as well as for the realization of novel quantum-optical devices.

  3. Field Testing of a 1/100th Scale Starshade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casement, L. S.; Glassman, T. M.; Lo, A.; Warwick, S.; Armagan, O.

    2013-01-01

    The external starshade is a prospective method for the direct detection and spectral characterization of terrestrial planets around other stars, a key goal identified in ASTRO2010. Validation of this approach has been challenging at ~1/1000th scale in the lab (Samuele et al., 2010). Recently we have successfully fabricated 60 cm 1/100th scale) starshades and have begun a series of ground test experiments with them. Our first experiment, limited by city lights and a short (300 m) baseline between the telescope and the starshade, showed excellent light suppression of >106. We enhanced our experimental setup to provide longer baselines and reduced aperture size to provide a closer match to the Fresnel number expected for the flight system. We took our test equipment into the field for a test in November 2012, the results of which are presented here.

  4. Longitudinal and transverse velocity fields in parsec-scale jets

    CERN Document Server

    Mertens, Florent

    2015-01-01

    Radio-loud AGN typically manifest powerful relativistic jets extending up to millions of light years and often showing superluminal motions organised in a complex kinematic pattern. A number of physical models are still competing to explain the jet structure and kinematics revealed by radio images using the VLBI technique. Robust measurements of longitudinal and transverse velocity field in the jets would provide crucial information for these models. This is a difficult task, particularly for transversely resolved jets in objects like 3C 273 and M87. To address this task, we have developed a new technique for identifying significant structural patterns (SSP) of smooth, transversely resolved flows and obtaining a velocity field from cross-correlation of these regions in multi-epoch observations. Detection of individual SSP is performed using the wavelet decomposition and multiscale segmentation of the observed structure. The cross-correlation algorithm combines structural information on different scales of the...

  5. Fitting magnetic field gradient with Heisenberg-scaling accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-Liang; Wang, Huan; Jing, Li; Mu, Liang-Zhu; Fan, Heng

    2014-12-09

    The linear function is possibly the simplest and the most used relation appearing in various areas of our world. A linear relation can be generally determined by the least square linear fitting (LSLF) method using several measured quantities depending on variables. This happens for such as detecting the gradient of a magnetic field. Here, we propose a quantum fitting scheme to estimate the magnetic field gradient with N-atom spins preparing in W state. Our scheme combines the quantum multi-parameter estimation and the least square linear fitting method to achieve the quantum Cramér-Rao bound (QCRB). We show that the estimated quantity achieves the Heisenberg-scaling accuracy. Our scheme of quantum metrology combined with data fitting provides a new method in fast high precision measurements.

  6. Parsec-scale Obscuring Accretion Disk with Large-scale Magnetic Field in AGNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorodnitsyn, A.; Kallman, T.

    2017-06-01

    A magnetic field dragged from the galactic disk, along with inflowing gas, can provide vertical support to the geometrically and optically thick pc-scale torus in AGNs. Using the Soloviev solution initially developed for Tokamaks, we derive an analytical model for a rotating torus that is supported and confined by a magnetic field. We further perform three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of X-ray irradiated, pc-scale, magnetized tori. We follow the time evolution and compare models that adopt initial conditions derived from our analytic model with simulations in which the initial magnetic flux is entirely contained within the gas torus. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the initial conditions based on the analytic solution produce a longer-lived torus that produces obscuration that is generally consistent with observed constraints.

  7. Integrated Technologies for Large-Scale Trapped-Ion Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorace-Agaskar, C.; Bramhavar, S.; Kharas, D.; Mehta, K. K.; Loh, W.; Panock, R.; Bruzewicz, C. D.; McConnell, R.; Ram, R. J.; Sage, J. M.; Chiaverini, J.

    2016-05-01

    Atomic ions trapped and controlled using electromagnetic fields hold great promise for practical quantum information processing due to their inherent coherence properties and controllability. However, to realize this promise, the ability to maintain and manipulate large-scale systems is required. We present progress toward the development of, and proof-of-principle demonstrations and characterization of, several technologies that can be integrated with ion-trap arrays on-chip to enable such scaling to practically useful sizes. Of particular use are integrated photonic elements for routing and focusing light throughout a chip without the need for free-space optics. The integration of CMOS electronics and photo-detectors for on-chip control and readout, and methods for monolithic fabrication and wafer-scale integration to incorporate these capabilities into tile-able 2D ion-trap array cells, are also explored.

  8. Multi-scale gravity field modeling in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Panet, Isabelle; Ramillien, Guillaume; Guilloux, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    The Earth constantly deforms as it undergoes dynamic phenomena, such as earthquakes, post-glacial rebound and water displacement in its fluid envelopes. These processes have different spatial and temporal scales and are accompanied by mass displacements, which create temporal variations of the gravity field. Since 2002, the GRACE satellite missions provide an unprecedented view of the gravity field spatial and temporal variations. Gravity models built from these satellite data are essential to study the Earth's dynamic processes (Tapley et al., 2004). Up to present, time variations of the gravity field are often modelled using spatial spherical harmonics functions averaged over a fixed period, as 10 days or 1 month. This approach is well suited for modeling global phenomena. To better estimate gravity related to local and/or transient processes, such as earthquakes or floods, and adapt the temporal resolution of the model to its spatial resolution, we propose to model the gravity field using localized functions in space and time. For that, we build a model of the gravity field in space and time with a four-dimensional wavelet basis, well localized in space and time. First we design the 4D basis, then, we study the inverse problem to model the gravity field from the potential differences between the twin GRACE satellites, and its regularization using prior knowledge on the water cycle. Our demonstration of surface water mass signals decomposition in time and space is based on the use of synthetic along-track gravitational potential data. We test the developed approach on one year of 4D gravity modeling and compare the reconstructed water heights to those of the input hydrological model. Perspectives of this work is to apply the approach on real GRACE data, addressing the challenge of a realistic noise, to better describe and understand physical processus with high temporal resolution/low spatial resolution or the contrary.

  9. Small Scale Turbopump Manufacturing Technology and Material Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Erika; Morgan, Kristin; Wells, Doug; Zimmerman, Frank

    2011-01-01

    As part of an internal research and development project, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been developing a high specific impulse 9,000-lbf LOX/LH2 pump-fed engine testbed with the capability to throttle 10:1. A Fuel Turbopump (FTP) with the ability to operate across a speed range of 30,000-rpm to 100,000-rpm was developed and analyzed. This small size and flight-like Fuel Turbopump has completed the design and analysis phase and is currently in the manufacturing phase. This paper highlights the manufacturing and processes efforts to fabricate an approximately 20-lb turbopump with small flow passages, intricately bladed components and approximately 3-in diameter impellers. As a result of the small scale and tight tolerances of the hardware on this turbopump, several unique manufacturing and material challenges were encountered. Some of the technologies highlighted in this paper include the use of powder metallurgy technology to manufacture small impellers, electron beam welding of a turbine blisk shroud, and casting challenges. The use of risk reduction efforts such as non-destructive testing (NDT) and evaluation (NDE), fractography, material testing, and component spin testing are also discussed in this paper.

  10. Correlators in integrable quantum field theory: the scaling RSOS models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delfino, G. E-mail: aldo@lpthe.jussieu.fr

    2000-09-11

    The study of the scaling limit of two-dimensional models of statistical mechanics within the framework of integrable field theory is illustrated through the example of the RSOS models. Starting from the exact description of regime III in terms of colliding particles, we compute the correlation functions of the thermal, phi (cursive,open) Greek{sub 1,2} and (for some cases) spin operators in the two-particle approximation. The accuracy obtained for the moments of these correlators is analysed by computing the central charge and the scaling dimensions and comparing with the exact results. We further consider the (generally non-integrable) perturbation of the critical points with both the operators phi (cursive,open) Greek{sub 1,3} and phi (cursive,open) Greek{sub 1,2} and locate the branches solved on the lattice within the associated two-dimensional phase diagram. Finally we discuss the fact that the RSOS models, the dilute q-state Potts model at and the O(n) vector model are all described by the same perturbed conformal field theory.

  11. Biome-Scale Forest Properties in Amazonia Based on Field and Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana O. Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Amazonian forests are extremely heterogeneous at different spatial scales. This review intends to present the large-scale patterns of the ecosystem properties of Amazonia, and focuses on two parts of the main components of the net primary production: the long-lived carbon pools (wood and short-lived pools (leaves. First, the focus is on forest biophysical properties, and secondly, on the macro-scale leaf phenological patterns of these forests, looking at field measurements and bringing into discussion the recent findings derived from remote sensing dataset. Finally, I discuss the results of the three major droughts that hit Amazonia in the last 15 years. The panorama that emerges from this review suggests that slow growing forests in central and eastern Amazonia, where soils are poorer, have significantly higher above ground biomass and higher wood density, trees are higher and present lower proportions of large-leaved species than stands in northwest and southwest Amazonia. However, the opposite pattern is observed in relation to forest productivity and dynamism, which is higher in western Amazonia than in central and eastern forests. The spatial patterns on leaf phenology across Amazonia are less marked. Field data from different forest formations showed that new leaf production can be unrelated to climate seasonality, timed with radiation, timed with rainfall and/or river levels. Oppositely, satellite images exhibited a large-scale synchronized peak in new leaf production during the dry season. Satellite data and field measurements bring contrasting results for the 2005 drought. Discussions on data processing and filtering, aerosols effects and a combined analysis with field and satellite images are presented. It is suggested that to improve the understanding of the large-scale patterns on Amazonian forests, integrative analyses that combine new technologies in remote sensing and long-term field ecological data are imperative.

  12. Scaling of sustained ZT-40 M reversed field pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, J. [ed.; Haberstich, A.; Baker, D.A.; Buchenauer, C.J.; Caramana, E.J.; DiMarco, J.N.; Erickson, R.M.; Ingraham, J.C.; Jacobson, A.R.; Little, E.M.; Massey, R.S.; Phillips, J.A.; Schoenberg, K.F.; Schofield, A.E.; Thomas, K.S.; Watt, R.G.; Weber, P.G.

    1993-12-01

    Experiments aimed at evaluating the scaling properties of the ZT-40M Reversed-Field Pinch (RFP) facility were conducted in 1983 at Los Alamos. Sustained discharges were produced at nominal toroidal currents ranging from 60 to 240 kA. The standard fill pressure was kept close to the lower limit of the usable pressure range, and the scaling data were acquired at a fixed time in the discharges while the plasma was in a quasi-steady state. Scalings of the diameter-averaged electron density, electron temperature on axis, product of these two parameters, and of various definitions of the electrical resistivity are presented. Trends of the toroidal voltage, energy containment time, and poloidal beta are shown. The impurity contents, particle containment time, and total radiation losses are described, and results obtained with and without poloidal limiters are compared. In addition, the performance of the facility at higher than standard density and at a constant ratio of the toroidal current over the electron line density is examined.

  13. Nonlinear density fluctuation field theory for large scale structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhang; Hai-Xing Miao

    2009-01-01

    We develop an effective field theory of density fluctuations for a Newtonian self-gravitating N-body system in quasi-equilibrium and apply it to a homogeneous uni-verse with small density fluctuations. Keeping the density fluctuations up to second or-der, we obtain the nonlinear field equation of 2-pt correlation ξ(r), which contains 3-pt correlation and formal ultra-violet divergences. By the Groth-Peebles hierarchical ansatz and mass renormalization, the equation becomes closed with two new terms beyond the Gaussian approximation, and their coefficients are taken as parameters. The analytic solu-tion is obtained in terms of the hypergeometric functions, which is checked numerically.With one single set of two fixed parameters, the correlation ξ(r) and the corresponding power spectrum P(k) simultaneously match the results from all the major surveys, such as APM, SDSS, 2dfGRS, and REFLEX. The model gives a unifying understanding of several seemingly unrelated features of large scale structure from a field-theoretical per-spective. The theory is worth extending to study the evolution effects in an expanding universe.

  14. Resonant Magnetic Field Sensors Based On MEMS Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-May, Agustín L.; Aguilera-Cortés, Luz A.; García-Ramírez, Pedro J.; Manjarrez, Elías

    2009-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology allows the integration of magnetic field sensors with electronic components, which presents important advantages such as small size, light weight, minimum power consumption, low cost, better sensitivity and high resolution. We present a discussion and review of resonant magnetic field sensors based on MEMS technology. In practice, these sensors exploit the Lorentz force in order to detect external magnetic fields through the displacement of resonant structures, which are measured with optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive sensing techniques. From these, the optical sensing presents immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and reduces the read-out electronic complexity. Moreover, piezoresistive sensing requires an easy fabrication process as well as a standard packaging. A description of the operation mechanisms, advantages and drawbacks of each sensor is considered. MEMS magnetic field sensors are a potential alternative for numerous applications, including the automotive industry, military, medical, telecommunications, oceanographic, spatial, and environment science. In addition, future markets will need the development of several sensors on a single chip for measuring different parameters such as the magnetic field, pressure, temperature and acceleration. PMID:22408480

  15. Evaluation of environmental control technologies for magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    The peripheral magnetic fields of several energy-related technologies are calculated, and shielding options are studied for three field intensities as possible exposure levels: 200 G, 10 G, and 0.3 G. Seven fusion reactor designs are studied. For a 200-G field level, shielding is not required. For the 10- and 0.3-G levels, land is the most economical shielding method, with shield coils an acceptable alternative at 0.3 G. Nonnuclear technologies studied are superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electric generators, magnetically levitated vehicles, superconducting ac generators, and underground transmission lines. Superconducting ac generators and underground transmission lines require no shielding. The superconducting magnetic energy storage coil requires no shielding for 200 G. Both a shield coil and land are needed to meet 10 G or 0.3 G. The MHD generator needs no shielding to 200 G and 10 G. Land is the most economical means of meeting the 0.3 G level. Most of the magnetically levitated vehicles require no shielding to 200 G. The field on-board can be reduced from 200 to 25 G, depending upon the vehicle design, with shield coils. The use of iron, or another permeable material, is necessary to reduce the field to 10 G or 0.3 G. However, iron introduces too much added weight to allow efficient operation.

  16. 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshley, Mark D.

    2008-12-31

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

  17. Relationships between Computer Self-Efficacy, Technology, Attitudes and Anxiety: Development of the Computer Technology Use Scale (CTUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Agatha M.; Munro, Don

    2008-01-01

    Two studies are reported which describe the development and evaluation of a new instrument, the Computer Technology Use Scale (CTUS), comprising three domains: computer self-efficacy, attitudes to technology, and technology related anxiety. Study 1 describes the development of the instrument and explores its factor structure. Study 2 used…

  18. Modelling Pesticide Leaching At Column, Field and Catchment Scales I. Analysis of Soil Variability At Field and Catchment Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärdenäs, A.; Jarvis, N.; Alavi, G.

    The spatial variability of soil characteristics was studied in a small agricultural catch- ment (Vemmenhög, 9 km2) at the field and catchment scales. This analysis serves as a basis for assumptions concerning upscaling approaches used to model pesticide leaching from the catchment with the MACRO model (Jarvis et al., this meeting). The work focused on the spatial variability of two key soil properties for pesticide fate in soil, organic carbon and clay content. The Vemmenhög catchment (9 km2) is formed in a glacial till deposit in southernmost Sweden. The landscape is undulating (30 - 65 m a.s.l.) and 95 % of the area is used for crop production (winter rape, winter wheat, sugar beet and spring barley). The climate is warm temperate. Soil samples for or- ganic C and texture were taken on a small regular grid at Näsby Farm, (144 m x 144 m, sampling distance: 6-24 m, 77 points) and on an irregular large grid covering the whole catchment (sampling distance: 333 m, 46 points). At the field scale, it could be shown that the organic C content was strongly related to landscape position and height (R2= 73 %, p organic C content of hollows in the landscape is so high that they contribute little to the total loss of pesticides (Jarvis et al., this meeting). Clay content is also related to landscape position, being larger at the hilltop locations resulting in lower near-saturated hydraulic conductivity. Hence, macropore flow can be expected to be more pronounced (see also Roulier & Jarvis, this meeting). The variability in organic C was similar for the field and catchment grids, which made it possible to krige the organic C content of the whole catchment using data from both grids and an uneven lag distance.

  19. BENCH-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a one- or two-stage catalytic reduction process for efficiently converting to elemental sulfur up to 98 percent or more of the sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) contained in the regeneration offgas streams produced in advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems. The DSRP reacts the regeneration offgas with a small slipstream of coal gas to effect the desired reduction. In this project the DSRP was demonstrated with actual coal gas (as opposed to the simulated laboratory mixtures used in previous studies) in a 75-mm, 1-L size fixed-bed reactor. Integrated with this testing, a US Department of Energy/Research Triangle Institute (DOE/RTI) patented zinc titanate-based fluidizable sorbent formulation was tested in a 75-mm (3-in.) diameter fluidized-bed reactor, and the regeneration offgas from that test was treated with the bench-unit DSRP. The testing was conducted at the DOE Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC)-Morgantown in conjunction with test campaigns of the pilot-scale gasifier there. The test apparatus was housed in a mobile laboratory built in a specially equipped office trailer that facilitated moving the equipment from RTI in North Carolina to the West Virginia test site. A long duration test of the DSRP using actual coal gas and simulated regeneration offgas showed no degradation in efficiency of conversion to elemental sulfur after 160 h of catalyst exposure. An additional exposure (200 h) of that same catalyst charge at the General Electric pilot gasifier showed only a small decline in performance. That problem is believed to have been caused by tar and soot deposits on the catalyst, which were caused by the high tar content of the atypical fixed-bed gasifier gas. A six-fold larger, single-stage skid-mounted DSRP apparatus was fabricated for additional, larger-scale slipstream testing.

  20. Comparison of different types of medium scale field rainfall simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostál, Tomáš; Strauss, Peter; Schindewolf, Marcus; Kavka, Petr; Schmidt, Jürgen; Bauer, Miroslav; Neumann, Martin; Kaiser, Andreas; Iserloh, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Rainfall simulators are used in numerous experiments to study runoff and soil erosion characteristics. However, they usually differ in their construction details, rainfall generation, plot size and other technical parameters. As field experiments using medium to large scale rainfall simulators (plot length 3 - 8 m) are very much time and labor consuming, close cooperation of individual teams and comparability of results is highly desirable to enlarge the database of results. Two experimental campaigns were organized to compare three field rainfall simulators of similar scale (plot size), but with different technical parameters. The results were then compared, to identify parameters that are crucial for soil loss and surface runoff formation and test if results from individual devices can be reliably compared. The rainfall simulators compared were: field rainfall simulator of CTU Prague (the Czech Republic) (Kavka et al., 2012; EGU2015-11025), field simulator of BAW (Austria) (Strauss et al., 2002) and field simulator of TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany) (Schindewolf & Schmidt 2012). The device of CTU Prague is usually applied to a plot size of 9,5 x 2 m employing 4 nozzles SS Full Jet 40WSQ mounted on folding arm, working pressure is 0.8 bar, height of nozzles is 2.65 m. The intensity of rainfall is regulated electronically, which leaves the nozzle opened only for certain time. The rainfall simulator of BAW is constructed as a modular system, which is usually applied for a length of 5 m (area 2 x 5 m), using 6 nozzles SS Full Jet 40WSQ. Usual working pressure is 0.25 bar. Elevation of nozzles is 2.6 m. The intensity of rainfall is regulated electronically, which leaves the nozzle opened only for certain time. The device of TU Bergakademie Freiberg is also standard modular system, working usually with a plot size of 3 x 1 m, using 3 oscillating VeeJet 80/100 nozzles with an usual operating pressure of 0.5 bar. Intensity is regulated by the frequency of sweeps above

  1. HI-SCALE Nanoparticle Composition and Precursors Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Stark, Harald [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Browne, Eleanor [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Hanson, David [Augsburg College, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-06-15

    From 21 August to 27 September, 2016, during the second Intensive Operational Period (IOP) of the Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecoystems (HI-SCALE) field campaign, a suite of instruments were placed in the Guest Instrument Facility (GIF) at the Central Facility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, Oklahoma. The goal of these measurements was to fully characterize the formation and evolution of atmospheric aerosol particles through measurements of gas-phase precursor and ambient nanoparticle composition. Specifically, we sought to: 1. investigate the role of acid-base chemistry in new-particle growth through measurements of ammonia and amines as well as organic and inorganic acids in both atmospheric nanoparticles and the gas phase; 2. investigate the contribution of other surface-area or volume-controlled processes to nanoparticle formation and growth, such as the uptake of extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOCs); 3. evaluate the performance of a new instrument being developed with funding from the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program for measuring gas-phase amines and related compounds; and 4. together with colleagues measuring on the ground and onboard the ARM Gulfstream-1 (G-1) aircraft during HI-SCALE, create a comprehensive data set related to new particle formation and growth that can be used in modeling efforts by the research team as well as DOE collaborators.

  2. IS THE SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD CORRELATED WITH THE DYNAMO CYCLE?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel, E-mail: bbkarak@nordita.org [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    The small-scale magnetic field is ubiquitous at the solar surface—even at high latitudes. From observations we know that this field is uncorrelated (or perhaps even weakly anticorrelated) with the global sunspot cycle. Our aim is to explore the origin, and particularly the cycle dependence, of such a phenomenon using three-dimensional dynamo simulations. We adopt a simple model of a turbulent dynamo in a shearing box driven by helically forced turbulence. Depending on the dynamo parameters, large-scale (global) and small-scale (local) dynamos can be excited independently in this model. Based on simulations in different parameter regimes, we find that, when only the large-scale dynamo is operating in the system, the small-scale magnetic field generated through shredding and tangling of the large-scale magnetic field is positively correlated with the global magnetic cycle. However, when both dynamos are operating, the small-scale field is produced from both the small-scale dynamo and the tangling of the large-scale field. In this situation, when the large-scale field is weaker than the equipartition value of the turbulence, the small-scale field is almost uncorrelated with the large-scale magnetic cycle. On the other hand, when the large-scale field is stronger than the equipartition value, we observe an anticorrelation between the small-scale field and the large-scale magnetic cycle. This anticorrelation can be interpreted as a suppression of the small-scale dynamo. Based on our studies we conclude that the observed small-scale magnetic field in the Sun is generated by the combined mechanisms of a small-scale dynamo and tangling of the large-scale field.

  3. Development and Validation of Information Technology Mentor Teacher Attitude Scale: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study development and validation of a teacher attitude scale toward Information Technology Mentor Teachers (ITMT). ITMTs give technological support to other teachers for integration of technology in their lessons. In the literature, many instruments have been developed to measure teachers' attitudes towards the technological tools…

  4. Technological learning through international collaboration: Lessons from the field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Danielle; Weigel, Annalisa

    2013-02-01

    Countries on every continent are making new or renewed commitments to domestic satellite programs. These programs have the potential to address national needs by enhancing access to information, improving infrastructure and providing inspiration to the public. How do countries without local expertise in space technology begin a new satellite program? What is the role of international collaboration in supporting the efforts of a new space fairing country? This paper explores such questions by highlighting outputs from intensive field work in Africa and Asia. Specifically, the study explores case studies of early space activity in these countries to search for lessons about the management of a young space program. The observations from field work are compared to ideas from scholarly literature on technological learning. The findings are organized using principles from systems architecture. The paper presents a model that captures many of the influences and strategic decision areas for a collaborative satellite development project. The paper also highlights the growth of capability among African countries in the area of satellite technology.

  5. Field emission driven direct current argon discharges and electrical breakdown mechanism across micron scale gaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejčik, Štefan; Radjenović, Branislav; Klas, Matej; Radmilović-Radjenović, Marija

    2015-11-01

    In this paper results of the experimental and theoretical studies of the field emission driven direct current argon microdischarges for the gaps between 1 μm and 100 μm are presented and discussed. The breakdown voltage curves and Volt-Ampere characteristics proved to be a fertile basis providing better understanding of the breakdown phenomena in microgaps. Based on the measured breakdown voltage curves, the effective yields have been estimated confirming that the secondary electron emission due to high electric field generated in microgaps depends primarily on the electric field leading directly to the violation of the Paschen's law. Experimental data are supported by the theoretical predictions that suggest departure from the scaling law and a flattening of the Paschen curves at higher pressures confirming that Townsend phenomenology breaks down when field emission becomes the key mechanism leading to the breakdown. Field emission of electrons from the cathode, the space charge effects in the breakdown and distinction between the Fowler-Nordheim field emission and the space charge limited current density are also analyzed. Images and Volt-Ampere characteristics recorded at the electrode gap size of 20 μm indicate the existence of a discharge region similar to arc at the pressure of around 200 Torr has been observed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Recent Breakthroughs in Microplasma Science and Technology", edited by Kurt Becker, Jose Lopez, David Staack, Klaus-Dieter Weltmann and Wei Dong Zhu.

  6. The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J.

    1993-03-05

    Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques.

  7. Study of Near Field Communication Technology in University Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Irene Luque; Miraz, Guillermo Matas; Gómez-Nieto, Miguel Ángel

    2009-08-01

    In this paper we present an introduction to the possibilities of NFC (Near Field Communication) technology in the University environment. NFC is the key for the development of interactive systems where "intelligent" objects interact with the user just only by touching the objects with a NFC device. We support that a University environment with active objects dispatching information and services to the users (students and teachers) can introduce an appropriate environment for the fulfillment of the new Educational European directives. Here, we briefly describe some of the possibilities of the NFC technology and we include an example of the use of NFC through a Smart Poster for a scenario where a Department directory is considered.

  8. Utilization of Near Field Communication Technology for Loyalty Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferina Ferdianti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Near Field Communication (NFC is one of wireless technology developed at this time. We can use a mobile phone to do many transactions with NFC. Mobile developments have created to provide convenience for users in all aspects. However, at this time the function of NFC just limited for payment and micropayment. Beside it, there are assets that support to increase sales with attention of loyality management system. In this system, discounts or prizes are given based on data mining for every transaction costumers. Loyalty management has three concept, those are Frequency, Recency and Quantity. The goals are minimizing the cost, making purchase process faster, and managing data obtained through the NFC technology more simple. The result of this paper is the procedure to use data mining of NFC for loyalty management and system design using Unified Modeling Language approach.

  9. Particle Number Concentrations for HI-SCALE Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hering, Susanne V [Aerosol Dynamics, Inc.

    2016-06-01

    In support of the Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) project to study new particle formation in the atmosphere, a pair of custom water condensation particle counters were provided to the second intensive field campaign, from mid-August through mid-September 2017, at the U.S. Department of Energy Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility observatory. These custom instruments were developed by Aerosol Dynamics, Inc. (Hering et al. 2017) to detect particles into the nanometer size range. Referred to as “versatile water condensation particle counter (vWCPC)”, they are water-based, laminar-flow condensational growth instruments whose lower particle size threshold can be set based on user-selected operating temperatures. For HI-SCALE, the vWCPCs were configured to measure airborne particle number concentrations in the size range from approximately 2nm to 2μm. Both were installed in the particle sizing system operated by Chongai Kuang of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). One of these was operated in parallel to a TSI Model 3776, upstream of the mobility particle sizing system, to measure total ambient particle concentrations. The airborne particle concentration data from this “total particle number vWCPC” (Ntot-vWCPC) system has been reported to the ARM database. The data are reported with one-second resolution. The second vWCPC was operated in parallel with the BNL diethylene glycol instrument to count particles downstream of a separate differential mobility size analyzer. Data from this “DMA-vWCPC” system was logged by BNL, and will eventually be provided by that laboratory.

  10. Energy storage technology - Environmental implications of large scale utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupka, M. C.; Moore, J. E.; Keller, W. E.; Baca, G. A.; Brasier, R. I.; Bennett, W. S.

    Environmental effects are identified for several energy storage technologies including advanced lead-acid battery, compressed air, underground pumped hydroelectric, flywheel, superconducting magnet, and various thermal systems. A preliminary study on fuel cell technology is also reported. New applications for energy storage technologies and the additional costs of controls to be used for mitigation of specific impacts are briefly discussed.

  11. DIGITAL ANALYSIS TECHNOLOGY FOR MORPHOLOGY OF POLYMER CHAIN COILS IN FLOW FIELDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chi-xing Zhou; Hong Zheng; Wei Yu; Ji-feng Yao; Yu-cheng Li

    2005-01-01

    Polymer chain coils with entanglement is a crucial scale of structures in polymer materials since their relaxation times are matching practical processing times. Based on the phenomenological model of polymer chain coils and a new finite element approach, we have designed a computer software including solver, pre- and post-processing modules, and developed a digital analysis technology for the morphology of polymer chain coils in flow fields (DAMPC). Using this technology we may simulate the morphology development of chain coils in various flow fields, such as simple shear flow, elongational flow,and any complex flow at transient or steady state. The applications made up to now show that the software predictions are comparable with experimental results.

  12. Magnetic field and temperature sensing with atomic-scale spin defects in silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, H; Soltamov, V A; Fuchs, F; Simin, D; Sperlich, A; Baranov, P G; Astakhov, G V; Dyakonov, V

    2014-07-04

    Quantum systems can provide outstanding performance in various sensing applications, ranging from bioscience to nanotechnology. Atomic-scale defects in silicon carbide are very attractive in this respect because of the technological advantages of this material and favorable optical and radio frequency spectral ranges to control these defects. We identified several, separately addressable spin-3/2 centers in the same silicon carbide crystal, which are immune to nonaxial strain fluctuations. Some of them are characterized by nearly temperature independent axial crystal fields, making these centers very attractive for vector magnetometry. Contrarily, the zero-field splitting of another center exhibits a giant thermal shift of -1.1 MHz/K at room temperature, which can be used for thermometry applications. We also discuss a synchronized composite clock exploiting spin centers with different thermal response.

  13. The laser measurement technology of combustion flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingdong; Wang, Guangyu; Qu, Dongsheng

    2014-07-01

    The parameters of combustion flow field such as temperature, velocity, pressure and mole-fraction are of significant value in engineering application. The laser spectroscopy technology which has the non-contact and non- interference properties has become the most important method and it has more advantages than conventionally contacting measurement. Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF/LIF) is provided with high sensibility and resolution. Filtered Rayleigh scattering (FRS) is a good measurement method for complex flow field .Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is prosperity on development and application. This article introduced the theoretical foundation, technical principle, system structure, merits and shortages. It is helpful for researchers to know about the latest development tendency and do the related research.

  14. Field Demonstraton of Existing Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent Perry; Samih Batarseh; Sheriff Gowelly; Thomas Hayes

    2006-05-09

    The performance of an advanced Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) has been measured in the field during the drilling of 25 test wells in the Niobrara formation of Western Kansas and Eastern Colorado. The coiled tubing (CT) rig designed, built and operated by Advanced Drilling Technologies (ADT), was documented in its performance by GTI staff in the course of drilling wells ranging in depth from 500 to nearly 3,000 feet. Access to well sites in the Niobrara for documenting CT rig performance was provided by Rosewood Resources of Arlington, VA. The ADT CT rig was selected for field performance evaluation because it is one of the most advanced commercial CT rig designs that demonstrate a high degree of process integration and ease of set-up and operation. Employing an information collection protocol, data was collected from the ADT CT rig during 25 drilling events that encompassed a wide range of depths and drilling conditions in the Niobrara. Information collected included time-function data, selected parametric information indicating CT rig operational conditions, staffing levels, and field observations of the CT rig in each phase of operation, from rig up to rig down. The data obtained in this field evaluation indicates that the ADT CT rig exhibited excellent performance in the drilling and completion of more than 25 wells in the Niobrara under varied drilling depths and formation conditions. In the majority of the 25 project well drilling events, ROP values ranged between 300 and 620 feet per hour. For all but the lowest 2 wells, ROP values averaged approximately 400 feet per hour, representing an excellent drilling capability. Most wells of depths between 500 and 2,000 feet were drilled at a total functional rig time of less than 16 hours; for wells as deep at 2,500 to 3,000 feet, the total rig time for the CT unit is usually well under one day. About 40-55 percent of the functional rig time is divided evenly between drilling and casing/cementing. The balance of

  15. Field Demonstraton of Existing Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent Perry; Samih Batarseh; Sheriff Gowelly; Thomas Hayes

    2006-05-09

    The performance of an advanced Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) has been measured in the field during the drilling of 25 test wells in the Niobrara formation of Western Kansas and Eastern Colorado. The coiled tubing (CT) rig designed, built and operated by Advanced Drilling Technologies (ADT), was documented in its performance by GTI staff in the course of drilling wells ranging in depth from 500 to nearly 3,000 feet. Access to well sites in the Niobrara for documenting CT rig performance was provided by Rosewood Resources of Arlington, VA. The ADT CT rig was selected for field performance evaluation because it is one of the most advanced commercial CT rig designs that demonstrate a high degree of process integration and ease of set-up and operation. Employing an information collection protocol, data was collected from the ADT CT rig during 25 drilling events that encompassed a wide range of depths and drilling conditions in the Niobrara. Information collected included time-function data, selected parametric information indicating CT rig operational conditions, staffing levels, and field observations of the CT rig in each phase of operation, from rig up to rig down. The data obtained in this field evaluation indicates that the ADT CT rig exhibited excellent performance in the drilling and completion of more than 25 wells in the Niobrara under varied drilling depths and formation conditions. In the majority of the 25 project well drilling events, ROP values ranged between 300 and 620 feet per hour. For all but the lowest 2 wells, ROP values averaged approximately 400 feet per hour, representing an excellent drilling capability. Most wells of depths between 500 and 2,000 feet were drilled at a total functional rig time of less than 16 hours; for wells as deep at 2,500 to 3,000 feet, the total rig time for the CT unit is usually well under one day. About 40-55 percent of the functional rig time is divided evenly between drilling and casing/cementing. The balance of

  16. Commercial scale pulsed electric field processing of tomato juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Seacheol; Jin, Z Tony; Zhang, Q Howard

    2003-05-21

    Effects of commercial scale pulsed electric field (PEF) processing on the quality of tomato juice were studied and compared with those of thermal processing. Tomato juice was prepared by hot break at 88 degrees C for 2 min or by cold break at 68 degrees C for 2 min and then thermally processed at 92 degrees C for 90 s or PEF processed at 40 kV/cm for 57 micros. Thermally processed, PEF processed, and unprocessed control juices were packed into 50 mL sterilized polypropylene tubes in a sanitary glovebox and stored at 4 degrees C for 112 days. Both thermally and PEF processed juices showed microbial shelf life at 4 degrees C for 112 days. The lipoxygenase activities of thermally and PEF processed juices were 0 and 47%, respectively. PEF processed juice retained more ascorbic acid than thermally processed juice at 4 degrees C for 42 days (p Brix, pH, or viscosity between thermally and PEF processed juices during the storage (p > 0.05). Sensory evaluations indicated that flavor and overall acceptability of PEF processed juice were preferred to those of thermally processed juice (p < 0.05).

  17. Field precision machining technology of target chamber in ICF lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanli; Wu, Wenkai; Shi, Sucun; Duan, Lin; Chen, Gang; Wang, Baoxu; Song, Yugang; Liu, Huilin; Zhu, Mingzhi

    2016-10-01

    In ICF lasers, many independent laser beams are required to be positioned on target with a very high degree of accuracy during a shot. The target chamber provides a precision platform and datum reference for final optics assembly and target collimation and location system. The target chamber consists of shell with welded flanges, reinforced concrete pedestal, and lateral support structure. The field precision machining technology of target chamber in ICF lasers have been developed based on ShenGuangIII (SGIII). The same center of the target chamber is adopted in the process of design, fabrication, and alignment. The technologies of beam collimation and datum reference transformation are developed for the fabrication, positioning and adjustment of target chamber. A supporting and rotating mechanism and a special drilling machine are developed to bore the holes of ports. An adjustment mechanism is designed to accurately position the target chamber. In order to ensure the collimation requirements of the beam leading and focusing and the target positioning, custom-machined spacers are used to accurately correct the alignment error of the ports. Finally, this paper describes the chamber center, orientation, and centering alignment error measurements of SGIII. The measurements show the field precision machining of SGIII target chamber meet its design requirement. These information can be used on similar systems.

  18. [Application of advanced engineering technologies to medical and rehabilitation fields].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujie, Masakatsu

    2012-07-01

    The words "Japan syndrome" can now be heard increasingly through the media. Facing the approach of an elderly-dominated society, Robot Technology(RT)is expected to play an important role in Japan's medical, rehabilitation, and daily support fields. The industrial robot, which has already spread through the world with a great success in certain isolated environments by doing the work which is specialized for the thing with the hard known characteristic. By comparison, in the medical and rehabilitation fields, environments always change intricately, and individual characteristics differ from person to person. Furthermore, there are many times when a robot will be asked to directly interact with people. Moreover, the relation between a robot and a person turns into a relation which should involve contact flexibly according to a situation, and also turns into a relation which should avoid contact. In our group, we have so far developed practical rehabilitation and medical robots which can respond to difficulties such as environmental change and individual specificity. In developing rehabilitation robots, it is especially important to consider intuitive operability and individual differences. In addition, in developing medical robots, it is important to replace the experimental knowledge of surgeons to the mechanical quantitative properties. In this article, we introduce some practical examples of rehabilitation and medical robots interweaving several detailed technologies we have so far developed.

  19. Aeration of the teuftal landfill: Field scale concept and lab scale simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritzkowski, Marco; Walker, Beat; Kuchta, Kerstin; Raga, Roberto; Stegmann, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Long lasting post-closure care (PCC) is often the major financial burden for operators of municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills. Beside costs for the installation and maintenance of technical equipment and barriers, in particular long term treatment of leachate and landfill gas has to be paid from capital surplus. Estimations based on laboratory experiments project time periods of many decades until leachate quality allows for direct discharge (i.e. no need for further purification). Projections based on leachate samples derived from the last 37years for 35 German landfills confirm these assumption. Moreover, the data illustrate that in particular ammonium nitrogen concentrations are likely to fall below limit values only after a period of 300years. In order to avoid long lasting PCC the operator of Teuftal landfill, located in the Swiss canton Bern, decided to biologically stabilize the landfill by means of a combined in situ aeration and moisturization approach. In December 2014 the aeration started at a landfill section containing approximately 30% of the total landfill volume. From summer 2016 onwards the remaining part of the landfill will be aerated. Landfill aeration through horizontal gas and leachate drains is carried out for the first time in field scale in Europe. The technical concept is described in the paper. Parallel to field scale aeration, investigations for the carbon and nitrogen turnover are carried out by means of both simulated aerated landfills and simulated anaerobic landfills. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that aeration is capable to enhance, both carbon mobilization and discharge via the gas phase. This effect comes along with a significant increase in bio-stabilization of the waste organic fraction, which positively affects the landfill emission behavior in the long run. In terms of leachate pollution reduction it could be demonstrated that the organic load decrease fast and widely independent of the adjusted aeration

  20. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF INNOVATIVE LEAK DETECTION/LOCATION TECHNOLOGIES COUPLED WITH WALL-THICKNESS SCREENING FOR WATER MAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a large-scale field demonstration of innovative leak detection/location and condition assessment technologies on a 76-year old, 2,500-ft long, cement-lined, 24-in. cast iron water main in Louisville, KY from July through Septembe...

  1. Application of Near Field Communication Technology for Mobile Airline Ticketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayan Suparta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Near Field Communication (NFC technology opens up exciting new usage scenarios for mobile devices based platform. Users of NFC-enabled devices can simply point or touch their devices to other NFC-enabled elements in the environment to communicate with them (‘contactless’, making application and data usage easy and convenient. Approach: The study describes the characteristics and advantages of NFC technology offers for the development of mobile airline ticketing. This scenario describes the potential to overcome the conventional systems that are not gated and use study tickets. In such a system, today a transport application can be loaded on a NFC-enabled phone. To study such a case, Yogyakarta International Airport was taken as an example for a discussion. Results: NFC technology which consisting of three modes of operation and with international standardization can be applied as contactless to simplicity transactions, content delivery and information sharing on a mobile based platform. Conclusion: The idea of NFC application for mobile airline ticketing has been discussed for Yogyakarta International Airport."

  2. Far field scattering pattern of differently structured butterfly scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giraldo, M. A.; Yoshioka, S.; Stavenga, D. G.

    2008-01-01

    The angular and spectral reflectance of single scales of five different butterfly species was measured and related to the scale anatomy. The scales of the pierids Pieris rapae and Delias nigrina scatter white light randomly, in close agreement with Lambert's cosine law, which can be well understood

  3. On the scaling features of magnetic field fluctuations at non-MHD scales in turbulent space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolini, G.; Giannattasio, F.; Yordanova, E.; Vörös, Z.; Marcucci, M. F.; Echim, M.; Chang, T.

    2016-11-01

    In several different contexts space plasmas display intermittent turbulence at magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) scales, which manifests in anomalous scaling features of the structure functions of the magnetic field increments. Moving to smaller scales, i.e. below the ion-cyclotron and/or ion inertial length, these scaling features are still observed, even though its is not clear if these scaling features are still anomalous or not. Here, we investigate the nature of scaling properties of magnetic field increments at non-MHD scales for a period of fast solar wind to investigate the occurrence or not of multifractal features and collapsing of probability distribution functions (PDFs) using the novel Rank-Ordered Multifractal Analysis (ROMA) method, which is more sensitive than the traditional structure function approach. We find a strong evidence for the occurrence of a near mono-scaling behavior, which suggests that the observed turbulent regime at non-MHD scales mainly displays a mono-fractal nature of magnetic field increments. The results are discussed in terms of a non-compact fractal structure of the dissipation field.

  4. Exploiting Challenges of Sub-20 nm CMOS for Affordable Technology Scaling

    OpenAIRE

    Vaidyanathan, Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    For the past four decades, cost and features have driven CMOS scaling. Severe lithography and material limitations seen below the 20 nm node, however, are challenging the fundamental premise of affordable CMOS scaling. Just continuing to co-optimize leaf cell circuit and layout designs with process technology does not enable us to exploit the challenges of a sub-20 nm CMOS. For affordable scaling it is imperative to work past sub-20 nm technology impediments while exploiting its features. To ...

  5. Large-scale dynamo growth rates from numerical simulations and implications for mean-field theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kiwan; Blackman, Eric G; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2013-05-01

    Understanding large-scale magnetic field growth in turbulent plasmas in the magnetohydrodynamic limit is a goal of magnetic dynamo theory. In particular, assessing how well large-scale helical field growth and saturation in simulations match those predicted by existing theories is important for progress. Using numerical simulations of isotropically forced turbulence without large-scale shear with its implications, we focus on several additional aspects of this comparison: (1) Leading mean-field dynamo theories which break the field into large and small scales predict that large-scale helical field growth rates are determined by the difference between kinetic helicity and current helicity with no dependence on the nonhelical energy in small-scale magnetic fields. Our simulations show that the growth rate of the large-scale field from fully helical forcing is indeed unaffected by the presence or absence of small-scale magnetic fields amplified in a precursor nonhelical dynamo. However, because the precursor nonhelical dynamo in our simulations produced fields that were strongly subequipartition with respect to the kinetic energy, we cannot yet rule out the potential influence of stronger nonhelical small-scale fields. (2) We have identified two features in our simulations which cannot be explained by the most minimalist versions of two-scale mean-field theory: (i) fully helical small-scale forcing produces significant nonhelical large-scale magnetic energy and (ii) the saturation of the large-scale field growth is time delayed with respect to what minimalist theory predicts. We comment on desirable generalizations to the theory in this context and future desired work.

  6. Clear well physical water treatment technology for the oil field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troncoso y Troncoso, Joao Ricardo [Weatherford Brazil, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rzeznik, Lawrence; Parker, Wiley L. [Weatherford International, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Deposits of various types are common problems associated with oil and gas production. Deposits of scale, paraffin can block tubing, cause pumps to stick and clog valves and chokes. The expense and widespread occurrence of deposition problems have resulted in the development of a variety of treatment options which have been marginally successful at best. This paper discusses a new and novel approach for controlling scale, paraffin using an electronic physical water treating device and results that have been achieved. This physical water treatment technology has been applied to oil and gas production wells which incorporate all forms of product lift. Units are now also being installed in several South American locations. This paper will discuss the results obtained from the use of these physical water treatment devices and discuss the criteria which are used to ascertain whether a particular well site's problems can be eased by use of these devices. These criteria will be discussed for both land based and offshore oil wells. (author)

  7. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Yan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  8. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feifei; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Haiping; Zhang, Fuhua; Zheng, Lulu; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-03-01

    The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES) process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  9. Field scale simulation of axial hydrokinetic turbines in a natural marine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawdhary, Saurabh; Angelidis, Dionysios; Shen, Lian; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-11-01

    Commercialization of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy technologies is still in the development stage. Existing technologies need fundamental research to enable efficient energy extraction from identified MHK sites. We propose a large eddy simulation (LES)-based framework to investigate the site-specific flow dynamics past MHK arrays in a real-life marine environment. To this end, we use advanced computational tools developed at the Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) to resolve the vast range of scales present in the flow. The new generation unstructured Cartesian flow solver, coupled with a sharp interface immersed boundary method for 3D incompressible flows, is used to numerically investigate New York City's East River, where an array of MHK turbines is to be deployed as part of the Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy (RITE) Project. Multi-resolution simulations on locally refined grids are used to simulate the flow in a section of the East River with detailed river bathymetry and inset turbines at field scale. The results are analyzed in terms of the wake recovery, overall wake dynamics, and the power produced by the turbines. These results will help develop design guidelines for the site-specific turbine array configuration. This work was supported by NSF Grant IIP-1318201.

  10. Advanced enzymatic elimination of phenolic contaminants in wastewater: a nano approach at field scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Christoph A; Yu, Liang; Svojitka, Jan; Wintgens, Thomas; Ammann, Erik M; Shahgaldian, Patrick; Corvini, Philippe F-X; Hommes, Gregor

    2014-04-01

    The removal of recalcitrant chemicals in wastewater treatment systems is an increasingly relevant issue in industrialized countries. The elimination of persistent xenobiotics such as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) emitted by municipal and industrial sewage treatment plants remains an unsolved challenge. The existing efficacious physico-chemical methods, such as advanced oxidation processes, are resource-intensive technologies. In this work, we investigated the possibility to remove phenolic EDCs [i.e., bisphenol A (BPA)] by means of a less energy and chemical consuming technology. To that end, cheap and resistant oxidative enzymes, i.e., laccases, were immobilized onto silica nanoparticles. The resulting nanobiocatalyst produced at kilogram scale was demonstrated to possess a broad substrate spectrum regarding the degradation of recalcitrant pollutants. This nanobiocatalyst was applied in a membrane reactor at technical scale for tertiary wastewater treatment. The system efficiently removed BPA and the results of long-term field tests illustrated the potential of fumed silica nanoparticles/laccase composites for advanced biological wastewater treatment.

  11. Pulsar rotation measures and the large-scale structure of Galactic magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J L; Manchester, R N; Qiao, G J; Van Straten, W

    2006-01-01

    The large-scale magnetic field of our Galaxy can be probed in three dimensions using Faraday rotation of pulsar signals. We report on the determination of 223 rotation measures from polarization observations of relatively distant southern pulsars made using the Parkes radio telescope. Combined with previously published observations these data give clear evidence for large-scale counterclockwise fields (viewed from the north Galactic pole) in the spiral arms interior to the Sun and weaker evidence for a counterclockwise field in the Perseus arm. However, in interarm regions, including the Solar neighbourhood, we present evidence that suggests that large-scale fields are clockwise. We propose that the large-scale Galactic magnetic field has a bisymmetric structure with reversals on the boundaries of the spiral arms. Streaming motions associated with spiral density waves can directly generate such a structure from an initial inwardly directed radial field. Large-scale fields increase toward the Galactic Center, ...

  12. RESEARCH ON THE KEY TECHNOLOGY OF LARGE SCALE MAPPING FROM LOW ALTITUDE PHOTOGRAMMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Bo-Yi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the theoretic analysis of the accuracy in large scale photogrammetric mapping, some defects in traditional procedure were discussed. A set of key technologies dedicate to accuracy improvement in low altitude photogrammetry were analyzed in detail, namely the utilization of wide angle camera and low altitude flight, enhancement in image matching, predesigned layout of Ground Control Points (GCPs in field survey, optimization of adjustment model and improvement in map processing. Besides, a low altitude aerial unmanned airship system was established. Finally, successful implementation in 1:500 topographic mapping project in built-up areas of 30 counties in Shanxi Province proves the practicability and effectiveness of the proposed approaches.

  13. Project Overview: Successful Field-Scale in SITU Thermal NAPL Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butherus, Michael [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Ingle, David S. [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Juhlin, Randall [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Daniel, Joseph [S.M. Stoller Corporation; none,

    2004-10-24

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) successfully completed a field-scale remediation to remove non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from the subsurface at the Northeast Site on the Young-Rainey Science, Technology, and Research (STAR) Center, Largo, Florida. The Young-Rainey STAR Center is a former DOE facility that was previously known as the Pinellas Plant and the Pinellas STAR Center. The remediation project encompassed an area of 10,000 ft2 and depths extending to 35 ft below ground surface. Prior to the remediation, DOE evaluated technologies that had the potential to remove NAPLs from the subsurface at the site. Because of site conditions (clay lenses and an underlying clay layer that were thought to be contaminated), steam injection and electrical heating were considered to be the only technologies that had the potential to remove these NAPLs. In July 2001, DOE’s contractor awarded a subcontract for removal of NAPLs from a portion of the Northeast Site. The technologies used for remediation were a combination of steam-enhanced extraction and Electro-Thermal Dynamic Stripping Process, an electrical resistive heating technology. Construction of the remediation system was completed in September 2002. Remedial operations began immediately after construction, and active heating ended in February 2003. After operations were completed, confirmatory sampling was conducted during a 6-month period to verify the level of cleanup achieved. Additional confirmatory sampling was conducted 18 months after operations ended. Analytical results of the confirmatory sampling showed that NAPL concentrations were reduced significantly below the required cleanup goals and, in most cases, below the regulatory maximum contaminant levels. Lessons learned relative to the design, construction, operation, confirmatory sampling approach, and subcontracting could benefit managers of similar remediation projects.

  14. Challenges and Emerging Technologies within the Field of Pediatric Actigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, Barbara; Meredith-Jones, Kim; Terrill, Philip; Taylor, Rachael

    2014-01-01

    Actigraphy as an objective measure of sleep and wakefulness in infants and children has gained popularity over the last 20 years. However, the field lacks published guidelines for sleep-wake identification within pediatric age groups. The scoring rules vary greatly and although sensitivity (sleep agreement with polysomnography) is usually high, a significant limitation remains in relation to specificity (wake agreement). Furthermore, accurate algorithm output and sleep-wake summaries usually require prior entry from daily logs of sleep-wake periods and artifact-related information (e.g., non-wear time), involving significant parent co-operation. Scoring criteria for daytime naps remains an unexplored area. Many of the problems facing accuracy of measurement are inherent within the field of actigraphy itself, particularly where sleep periods containing significant movements are erroneously classified as wake, and within quiet wakefulness when no movements are detected, erroneously classified as sleep. We discuss the challenges of actigraphy for pediatric sleep, briefly describe the technical basis and consider a number of technological approaches that may facilitate improved classification of errors in sleep-wake discrimination.

  15. Challenges and emerging technologies within the field of pediatric actigraphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eGalland

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Actigraphy as an objective measure of sleep and wakefulness in infants and children has gained popularity over the last 20 years. However, the field lacks published guidelines for sleep-wake identification within pediatric age groups. The scoring rules vary greatly and although sensitivity (sleep agreement with polysomnography is usually high, a significant limitation remains in relation to specificity (wake agreement. Furthermore, accurate algorithm output and sleep-wake summaries usually require prior entry from daily logs of sleep–wake periods and artefact-related information (e.g. non-wear time, involving significant parent co-operation. Scoring criteria for daytime naps remains an unexplored area. Many of the problems facing accuracy of measurement are inherent within the field of actigraphy itself, particularly where sleep periods containing significant movements are erroneously classified as wake, and within quiet wakefulness when no movements are detected, erroneously classified as sleep. We discuss the challenges of actigraphy for pediatric sleep, briefly describe the technical basis and consider a number of technological approaches that may facilitate improved classification of errors in sleep-wake discrimination.

  16. Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling in the Simulation of Field-Scale Uranium Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabusaki, S.; Wilkins, M.; Fang, Y.; Williams, K. H.; Waichler, S.; Long, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Coupled variably saturated flow and biogeochemical reactive transport modeling is used to improve understanding of the processes, properties, and conditions controlling uranium bio-immobilization in a field experiment where uranium-contaminated groundwater was amended with acetate and bicarbonate. The acetate stimulates indigenous microorganisms that catalyze metal reduction, including the conversion of aqueous U(VI) to solid-phase U(IV), which effectively removes uranium from solution. The initiation of the bicarbonate amendment prior to biostimulation was designed to promote U(VI) desorption that would increase the aqueous U(VI) available for bioreduction. The three-dimensional simulations were able to largely reproduce the timing and magnitude of the physical, chemical and biological responses to the acetate and bicarbonate amendment in the context of changing water table elevation and gradient. A time series of groundwater proteomic samples exhibited correlations between the most abundant Geobacter metallireducens proteins and the genome-scale metabolic model-predicted fluxes of intra-cellular reactions associated with each of those proteins. The desorption of U(VI) induced by the bicarbonate amendment led to initially higher rates of bioreduction compared to locations with minimal bicarbonate exposure. After bicarbonate amendment ceased, bioreduction continued at these locations whereas U(VI) sorption was the dominant removal mechanism at the bicarbonate-impacted sites.

  17. EXPLAINING THE COEXISTENCE OF LARGE-SCALE AND SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELDS IN FULLY CONVECTIVE STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Rakesh K.; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Wolk, Scott J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Christensen, Ulrich R.; Gastine, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Morin, Julien [LUPM, Université de Montpellier, CNRS, Place Eugène Bataillon, F-34095 (France); Reiners, Ansgar, E-mail: rakesh.yadav@cfa.harvard.edu [Institut für Astrophysik, Universität Göttingen, Friedrich Hund Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-11-10

    Despite the lack of a shear-rich tachocline region, low-mass fully convective (FC) stars are capable of generating strong magnetic fields, indicating that a dynamo mechanism fundamentally different from the solar dynamo is at work in these objects. We present a self-consistent three-dimensional model of magnetic field generation in low-mass FC stars. The model utilizes the anelastic magnetohydrodynamic equations to simulate compressible convection in a rotating sphere. A distributed dynamo working in the model spontaneously produces a dipole-dominated surface magnetic field of the observed strength. The interaction of this field with the turbulent convection in outer layers shreds it, producing small-scale fields that carry most of the magnetic flux. The Zeeman–Doppler-Imaging technique applied to synthetic spectropolarimetric data based on our model recovers most of the large-scale field. Our model simultaneously reproduces the morphology and magnitude of the large-scale field as well as the magnitude of the small-scale field observed on low-mass FC stars.

  18. Strong light fields coax intramolecular reactions on femtosecond time scales

    CERN Document Server

    Krishnamurthy, M; Mathur, D

    2004-01-01

    Energetic H$_2^+$ ions are formed as a result of intra-molecular rearrangement during fragmentation of linear alcohols (methanol, ethanol, propanol, hexanol, and dodecanol) induced by intense optical fields produced by 100 fs long, infrared, laser pulses of peak intensity 8$\\times10^{15}$ W cm$^{-2}$. Polarization dependent measurements show, counterintuitively, that rearrangement is induced by the strong optical field within a single laser pulse, and that it occurs before Coulomb explosion of the field-ionized multiply charged alcohols.

  19. Hydrologic and pollutant removal performance of stormwater biofiltration systems at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, Belinda E.; Fletcher, Tim D.; Deletic, Ana

    2009-02-01

    SummaryBiofiltration systems are a recommended and increasingly popular technology for stormwater management; however there is a general lack of performance data for these systems, particularly at the field scale. The objective of this study was to investigate the hydrologic and pollutant removal performance of three field-scale biofiltration systems in two different climates. Biofilters were shown to effectively attenuate peak runoff flow rates by at least 80%. Performance assessment of a lined biofilter demonstrated that retention of inflow volumes by the filter media, for subsequent loss via evapotranspiration, reduced runoff volumes by 33% on average. Retention of water was found to be most influenced by inflow volumes, although only small to medium storms could be assessed. Vegetation was shown to be important for maintaining hydraulic capacity, because root growth and senescence countered compaction and clogging. Suspended solids and heavy metals were effectively removed, irrespective of the design configuration, with load reductions generally in excess of 90%. In contrast, nutrient retention was variable, and ranged from consistent leaching to effective and reliable removal, depending on the design. To ensure effective removal of phosphorus, a filter medium with a low phosphorus content should be selected. Nitrogen is more difficult to remove because it is highly soluble and strongly influenced by the variable wetting and drying regime that is inherent in biofilter operation. The results of this research suggest that reconfiguration of biofilter design to manage the deleterious effects of drying on biological activity is necessary to ensure long term nitrogen removal.

  20. Production technology for actual fields in severe corrosive environments; Fushoku kankyo jitsu field jisshoka gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneda, H.; Ihara, K.; Wasada, N. [Tech. Research Center, Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-11-10

    Tests and studies were started for the verification of the coated tubing developed using the element technology introduced in the special study `Production Technology in High-Temperature Corrosive Environments`, for the development of oil exploring equipment serviceable in corrosive environments, and for the development of programs for selecting materials for use in corrosive environments. In connection with verification tests, investigations were conducted into the operating fields of domestic oil exploring corporations and into technical literature relating to the deterioration of basic materials in their resistance to SSC, and basic data were accumulated. In the efforts to develop equipment, it was decided that drilling stabilizer blades be developed by plasma sintering, that information be collected concerning technologies relating to functionally gradient materials, and that technologies be developed for YAG-laser cladding of flange seal surfaces and elbow inner surfaces. As for the development of material selecting programs, various tests were conducted into the 13Cr steel and super 13Cr steel for their SSC, total corrosion, and local corrosion, their performance was evaluated, and the limit of their serviceability was determined by mathematical treatment. 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Observation of a Turbulence-Generated Large Scale Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, E J; Kendrick, R D; Nornberg, M D

    2006-01-01

    A uniform magnetic field is applied to a spherical, turbulent flow of liquid sodium. An induced magnetic dipole moment is measured which cannot be generated by the interaction of the axisymmetric mean flow with the applied field, indicating the presence of a turbulent electromotive force. It is shown that the induced dipole moment should vanish for any axisymmetric laminar flow. Also observed is the production of toroidal magnetic field from applied poloidal magnetic field (the omega-effect). Its potential role in the production of the induced dipole is discussed.

  2. Fuel From Algae: Scaling and Commercialization of Algae Harvesting Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Led by CEO Ross Youngs, AVS has patented a cost-effective dewatering technology that separates micro-solids (algae) from water. Separating micro-solids from water traditionally requires a centrifuge, which uses significant energy to spin the water mass and force materials of different densities to separate from one another. In a comparative analysis, dewatering 1 ton of algae in a centrifuge costs around $3,400. AVS’s Solid-Liquid Separation (SLS) system is less energy-intensive and less expensive, costing $1.92 to process 1 ton of algae. The SLS technology uses capillary dewatering with filter media to gently facilitate water separation, leaving behind dewatered algae which can then be used as a source for biofuels and bio-products. The biomimicry of the SLS technology emulates the way plants absorb and spread water to their capillaries.

  3. Scaling preferential flow processes in agricultural soils affected by tillage and trafficking at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipović, Vilim; Coquet, Yves

    2016-04-01

    ., 2 cm height) taken from the face of a trench 12 h after the end of the tracer experiment. Successful modeling was performed using HYDRUS-2D after adjustments of soil hydraulic functions in which infiltration phase and final bromide map were reproduced. The 2D simulation was then extended to cover the water and bromide redistribution phase. Pressure heads, water content and bromide concentration data were averaged along the lateral dimension of the two-dimensional model domain and used as an input data to obtain hydraulic parameters for dual permeability model (1D) at various time stages. Manual fitting of the dual permeability soil properties was then performed using the HYDRUS-1D model and used to estimate a set of effective soil hydraulic parameters. First results indicate very good agreement with the two-dimensional data with high model efficiency values for water content (above 0.7) and bromide concentration (above 0.9) during the different time steps. By performing inverse manual modeling hydraulic properties of the fracture domain, which describes the preferential pathways, could be estimated. These results show that within-field soil heterogeneities could be accounted for in 1D models of water and solute transport used at the field scale using dual-permeability modelling. Keywords: Preferential flow; Soil heterogeneity; Conventional tillage; Water flow; Bromide concentration; Dual-permeability model; HYDRUS 1D/2D

  4. Space Technology 5 Multi-point Measurements of Near-Earth Magnetic Fields: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, James A.; Le, G.; Strangeway, R. L.; Wang, Y.; Boardsen, S.A.; Moldwin, M. B.; Spence, H. E.

    2007-01-01

    The Space Technology 5 (ST-5) mission successfully placed three micro-satellites in a 300 x 4500 km dawn-dusk orbit on 22 March 2006. Each spacecraft carried a boom-mounted vector fluxgate magnetometer that returned highly sensitive and accurate measurements of the geomagnetic field. These data allow, for the first time, the separation of temporal and spatial variations in field-aligned current (FAC) perturbations measured in low-Earth orbit on time scales of approximately 10 sec to 10 min. The constellation measurements are used to directly determine field-aligned current sheet motion, thickness and current density. In doing so, we demonstrate two multi-point methods for the inference of FAC current density that have not previously been possible in low-Earth orbit; 1) the "standard method," based upon s/c velocity, but corrected for FAC current sheet motion, and 2) the "gradiometer method" which uses simultaneous magnetic field measurements at two points with known separation. Future studies will apply these methods to the entire ST-5 data set and expand to include geomagnetic field gradient analyses as well as field-aligned and ionospheric currents.

  5. QCD Technology: Light-Cone Quantization and Commensurate Scale Relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    1999-09-03

    I discuss several theoretical tools which are useful for analyzing perturbative and non-perturbative problems in quantum chromodynamics, including (a) the light-cone Fock expansion, (b) the effective charge {alpha}{sub v}, (c) conformal symmetry, and (d) commensurate scale relations. Light-cone Fock-state wavefunctions encode the properties of a hadron in terms of its fundamental quark and gluon degrees of freedom. Given the proton's light-cone wavefunctions, one can compute not only the quark and gluon distributions measured in deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering, but also the multi-parton correlations which control the distribution of particles in the proton fragmentation region and dynamical higher twist effects. Light-cone wavefunctions also provide a systematic framework for evaluating exclusive hadronic matrix elements, including timelike heavy hadron decay amplitudes and form factors. The {alpha}{sub v} coupling, defined from the QCD heavy quark potential, provides a physical expansion parameter for perturbative QCD with an analytic dependence on the fermion masses which is now known to two-loop order. Conformal symmetry provides a template for QCD predictions, including relations between observables which are present even in a theory which is not scale invariant. Commensurate scale relations are perturbative QCD predictions based on conformal symmetry relating observable to observable at fixed relative scale. Such relations have no renormalization scale or scheme ambiguity.

  6. Prediction and optimisation of Pb/Zn/Fe sulphide scales in gas production fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, Sarah; Orski, Karine; Menezes, Carlos; Heath, Steve; MacPherson, Calum; Simpson, Caroline; Graham, Gordon

    2006-03-15

    Lead, zinc and iron sulphide scales are known to be a particular issue with gas production fields, particularly those producing from HP/HT reservoirs. However the prediction of sulphide scale and the methodologies available for their laboratory assessment are not as well developed as those for the more conventional sulphate and carbonate scales. This work examines a particular sulphide scaling regime from a North Sea high temperature gas condensate production field containing only 0.8ppm of sulphide ions. Sulphide scales were identified in the production system which was shown to be a mixture of lead and zinc sulphide, primarily lead sulphide. This formed as a result of cooling during production resulting in the over saturation of these minerals. This paper describes scale prediction and modified laboratory test protocols used to re-create the scales formed in the field prior to chemical performance testing. From the brine composition, scale prediction identified that the major scales that could be formed were calcium carbonate, iron carbonate, iron sulphide, lead sulphide and zinc sulphide. In addition, modification of the brine compositions led to prediction of primarily one scale or the other. Given the predicted over saturation of various minerals, preliminary laboratory tests were therefore conducted in order to ensure that the scale formed under laboratory conditions was representative of the field scale. Laboratory protocols were therefore developed to ensure that the scales formed in fully anaerobic dynamic performance tests and static performance tests were similar to those encountered in the field. The paper compares results from field analysis, scale predictions and laboratory scale formation tests using newly developed test protocols and shows differences between prediction and laboratory data. The paper therefore demonstrates the importance of ensuring that the correct scale is formed under laboratory test conditions and also indicates some potential

  7. Experience Scaling Up Manufacturing of Emerging Photovoltaic Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, G. W.; Skinner, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    This report examines two important generic photovoltaic technologies at particularly revealing stages of development, i.e., the stages between R&D and stable commercial production and profitable sales. Based on two historical cases, it attempts to shed light on the difference between: (1) costs and schedules validated by actual manufacturing and market experience, and (2) estimated costs and schedules that rely on technology forecasts and engineering estimates. The amorphous Silicon case also identifies some of the costs that are incurred in meeting specific market requirements, while the Cadmium Telluride case identifies many of the operational challenges involved in transferring R&D results to production. The transition between R&D and commercial success takes a great deal of time and money for emerging energy conversion technologies in general. The experience reported here can be instructive to those managing comparable efforts, and to their investors. It can also be instructive to R&D managers responsible for positioning such new technologies for commercial success.

  8. FINAL REPORT: Mechanistically-Base Field Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Brian D.

    2013-11-04

    Biogeochemical reactive transport processes in the subsurface environment are important to many contemporary environmental issues of significance to DOE. Quantification of risks and impacts associated with environmental management options, and design of remediation systems where needed, require that we have at our disposal reliable predictive tools (usually in the form of numerical simulation models). However, it is well known that even the most sophisticated reactive transport models available today have poor predictive power, particularly when applied at the field scale. Although the lack of predictive ability is associated in part with our inability to characterize the subsurface and limitations in computational power, significant advances have been made in both of these areas in recent decades and can be expected to continue. In this research, we examined the upscaling (pore to Darcy and Darcy to field) the problem of bioremediation via biofilms in porous media. The principle idea was to start with a conceptual description of the bioremediation process at the pore scale, and apply upscaling methods to formally develop the appropriate upscaled model at the so-called Darcy scale. The purpose was to determine (1) what forms the upscaled models would take, and (2) how one might parameterize such upscaled models for applications to bioremediation in the field. We were able to effectively upscale the bioremediation process to explain how the pore-scale phenomena were linked to the field scale. The end product of this research was to produce a set of upscaled models that could be used to help predict field-scale bioremediation. These models were mechanistic, in the sense that they directly incorporated pore-scale information, but upscaled so that only the essential features of the process were needed to predict the effective parameters that appear in the model. In this way, a direct link between the microscale and the field scale was made, but the upscaling process

  9. Further developments and field deployment of phosphorus functionalized polymeric scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd, Malcolm J.; Thornton, Alex R.; Wylde, Jonathan J.; Strachan, Catherine J.; Moir, Gordon [Clariant Oil Services, Muttenz (Switzerland); Goulding, John [John Goulding Consultancy, York (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01

    monomer distribution, it was important to gauge this effect in reservoir analogues. A reservoir rock will act as a large chromatography column, separating out the scale inhibitor according to molecular weight and phosphorus content. That is the larger molecular weights will adhere more strongly than lower molecular weight fractions, whereas polymer chains containing larger phosphorus functionality will adhere to the rock significantly stronger than those without. Thus it is important to understand if there were components containing phosphorus but did not contribute to the inhibition of scale. In order to study these effects the phosphorus functionalized polymers were tested on very clean sandstone core plugs in a core flood rig. Their adsorption/retention characteristics were studied. The scale inhibitor effluent was analyzed by numerous methods and confirmed by inhibition efficiency measurements. Following successful development, one of the phosphorus functionalized polymeric inhibitors was subject to sequential field-trial in a harsh BaSO{sub 4} scaling, highly naturally fractured North Sea carbonate reservoir. As this was the first deployment of this novel technology the scale inhibitor returns and water chemistry were monitored using a number of methods to assess the efficiency of the inhibitor at mitigating the BaSO{sub 4} risk. A number of previous technologies utilizing phosphorus tagging have resulted in false readings due to anomalous phosphorus signals. The results presented in this paper show a step change with the scale inhibitor analysis by both elemental phosphorus (ICP-OES) and polymer methods (cartridge/Hyamine) showing excellent correlation. Indirect analysis of the scale inhibitor performance by elemental Ba{sup 2+} measurement confirmed the results, as there was no drop in Ba{sup 2+} concentration indicating no significant scaling before the re-squeeze operation was conducted. The phosphorus functionalized inhibitor provided superior performance

  10. Galactic winds and the origin of large-scale magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Moss, David

    2016-01-01

    Observations of dwarf galaxies suggest the presence of large-scale magnetic fields. However the size and slow rotation of these galaxies appear insufficient to support a mean-field dynamo action to excite such fields. Here we suggest a new mechanism to explain large-scale magnetic fields in galaxies that are too small to support mean-field dynamo action. The key idea is that we do not identify large-scale and mean magnetic fields. In our scenario the the magnetic structures originate from a small-scale dynamo which produces small-scale magnetic field in the galactic disc and a galactic wind that transports this field into the galactic halo where the large turbulent diffusion increases the scale and order of the field. As a result, the magnetic field becomes large-scale; however its mean value remains vanishing in a strict sense. We verify the idea by numerical modelling of two distinct simplified configurations, a thin disc model using the no-$z$ approximation, and an axisymmetric model using cylindrical $r,z...

  11. Small scale structures in coupled scalar field dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, J., E-mail: j.beyer@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de; Wetterich, C.

    2014-11-10

    We investigate structure formation for ultra-light scalar field dark matter coupled to quintessence, in particular the cosmon–bolon system. The linear power spectrum is computed by a numerical solution of the coupled field equations. We infer the substructure abundance within a Milky Way-like halo. Estimates of dark halo abundances from recent galaxy surveys imply a lower bound on the bolon mass of about 9×10{sup −22} eV. This seems to exclude a possible detection of scalar field dark matter through time variation in pulsar timing signals in the near future.

  12. Small scale structures in coupled scalar field dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, Joschka

    2014-01-01

    We investigate structure formation for ultralight scalar field dark matter coupled to quintessence, in particular the cosmon-bolon system. The linear power spectrum is computed by a numerical solution of the coupled field equations. We infer the substructure abundance within a Milky Way-like halo. Estimates of dark halo abundances from recent galaxy surveys imply a lower bound on the bolon mass of about $9 \\times 10^{-22}$ eV. This seems to exclude a possible detection of scalar field dark matter through time variation in pulsar timing signals in the near future.

  13. Advanced modeling to accelerate the scale up of carbon capture technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C.; Sun, XIN; Storlie, Curtis B.; Bhattacharyya, Debangsu

    2015-06-01

    In order to help meet the goals of the DOE carbon capture program, the Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) was launched in early 2011 to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced computational tools and validated multi-scale models to reduce the time required to develop and scale-up new carbon capture technologies. This article focuses on essential elements related to the development and validation of multi-scale models in order to help minimize risk and maximize learning as new technologies progress from pilot to demonstration scale.

  14. Quantum fields from the Hubble to the Planck scale

    CERN Document Server

    Kachelriess, Michael

    2017-01-01

    This book introduces quantum field theory, together with its most important applications to cosmology and astroparticle physics, in a coherent framework. The path integral approach is employed right from the start, and the use of Green functions and generating functionals is illustrated first in quantum mechanics and then in scalar field theory. Massless spin one and two fields are discussed on an equal footing, and gravity is presented as a gauge theory in close analogy with the Yang-Mills case. Concepts relevant to modern research such as helicity methods, effective theories, decoupling, or the stability of the electroweak vacuum are introduced. Various applications such as topological defects, dark matter, baryogenesis, processes in external gravitational fields, inflation and black holes help students to bridge the gap between undergraduate courses and the research literature.

  15. Assessing and modelling ecohydrologic processes at the agricultural field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Bruno

    2015-04-01

    One of the primary goals of agricultural management is to increase the amount of crop produced per unit of fertilizer and water used. World record corn yields demonstrated that water use efficiency can increase fourfold with improved agronomic management and cultivars able to tolerate high densities. Planting crops with higher plant density can lead to significant yield increases, and increase plant transpiration vs. soil water evaporation. Precision agriculture technologies have been adopted for the last twenty years but seldom have the data collected been converted to information that led farmers to different agronomic management. These methods are intuitively appealing, but yield maps and other spatial layers of data need to be properly analyzed and interpreted to truly become valuable. Current agro-mechanic and geospatial technologies allow us to implement a spatially variable plan for agronomic inputs including seeding rate, cultivars, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, and water. Crop models are valuable tools to evaluate the impact of management strategies (e.g., cover crops, tile drains, and genetically-improved cultivars) on yield, soil carbon sequestration, leaching and greenhouse gas emissions. They can help farmers identify adaptation strategies to current and future climate conditions. In this paper I illustrate the key role that precision agriculture technologies (yield mapping technologies, within season soil and crop sensing), crop modeling and weather can play in dealing with the impact of climate variability on soil ecohydrologic processes. Case studies are presented to illustrate this concept.

  16. Technical Solutions to Mitigate Reliability Challenges due to Technology Scaling of Charge Storage NVM

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Meng Chuan; Wong, Hin Yong

    2013-01-01

    .... Technology scaling of charge storage NVM has always been the strategy to achieve higher density NVM with lower cost per bit in order to meet the persistent consumer demand for larger storage space...

  17. Approaches to calculating P balance at the field-scale in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tunney, H.; Csathó, P.; Ehlert, P.A.I.

    2003-01-01

    Policies for mitigating phosphorus (P) loss from agriculture are being developed in a number of European countries and calculation of P balance at farm-gate or field-scale is likely to be a part of such policies. The aim of the paper was to study P balance at the field-scale in 18 countries that par

  18. Technologies and challenges in large-scale phosphoproteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2013-01-01

    , and apoptosis, rely on phosphorylation. This PTM is thus involved in many diseases, rendering localization and assessment of extent of phosphorylation of major scientific interest. MS-based phosphoproteomics, which aims at describing all phosphorylation sites in a specific type of cell, tissue, or organism, has...... with focus on the various challenges and limitations this field currently faces....

  19. Duality and scale invariant magnetic fields from bouncing universes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chowdhury, Debika; Sriramkumar, L.; Jain, Rajeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    of such models. We illustrate that, for cosmological scales which have wave numbers much smaller than the wave number associated with the bounce, the shape of the spectrum is preserved across the bounce. Using the analytic solutions obtained, we also illustrate that the problem of backreaction is severe...

  20. Design and test challenges in Nano-scale analog and mixed CMOS technology

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The continuous increase of integration densities in Complementary Metal–Oxide–Semiconductor (CMOS)technology has driven the rapid growth of very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuit for today's high-tech electronics industries from consumer products to telecommunications and computers. As CMOS technologies are scaled down into the nano meter range, analog and mixed integrated circuit (IC) design and testing have become a real challenge to ensure the functionality and quality of the product. ...

  1. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, H; Rempel, M; Yokoyama, T

    2016-03-25

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲10 (12) square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities-that is, large Reynolds numbers.

  2. Technology evaluation center assessment synopsis: full-field digital mammography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Barbara M; Ziegler, Kathleen M; Aronson, Naomi

    2006-08-01

    Full-field digital mammography (FFDM) is proposed as an alternative to screen-film mammography (SFM). The ability to separate and optimize the acquisition, storage, and display of images may allow greater visualization of breast cancers at equal or lower radiation doses, especially in younger women and those with denser breasts. This is a synopsis of a systematic review by the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association Technology Evaluation Center. This updated systematic review primarily incorporated the results of the ACR Imaging Network(R) Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST), which provided results on 42,760 asymptomatic women who underwent both FFDM and SFM and showed with reasonable certainty that there was no difference in the accuracy of the 2 modalities for asymptomatic women in general, with some advantages of FFDM in certain subgroups. There were no strong, new studies on the use of digital mammography compared with film mammography in a diagnostic population. However, the DMIST results indicated that tumors detected by FFDM, but not by SFM, were likely to be invasive carcinomas or medium-grade to high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. On the basis of the suppositions that these are the cancers of greatest interest and the ones more likely to be found in a diagnostic population and that the diagnostic population may be younger on average than the screening population, it was concluded that there is sufficient evidence to support the use of FFDM for diagnostic purposes.

  3. Bench-scale demonstration of hot-gas desulfurization technology. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    At the start of the current project, the DSRP (Direct Sulfur Recovery Process) technology was at the bench-scale development stage with a skid-mounted system ready for field testing. The process had been extended to fluidized-bed operation in the Stage 1 reactor. A preliminary economic study for a 100 MW plant in which the two-stage DSRP was compared to conventional processes indicated the economic attractiveness of the DSRP. Through bench-scale development, both fluidized-bed zinc titanate and DSRP technologies have been shown to be technically and economically attractive. The demonstrations prior to the start of this project, however, had only been conducted using simulated (rather than real) coal gas and simulated regeneration off-gas. Thus, the effect of trace contaminants in real coal gases on the sorbent and DSRP catalyst was not known. Also, the zinc titanate desulfurization unit and DSRP had not been demonstrated in an integrated manner. The overall goal of this project is to continue further development of the zinc titanate desulfurization and DSRP technologies by scale-up and field testing (with actual coal gas) of the zinc titanate fluidized-bed reactor system, and the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process.

  4. Mechanistically-Based Field-Scale Models of Uranium Biogeochemistry from Upscaling Pore-Scale Experiments and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tim Scheibe; Alexandre Tartakovsky; Brian Wood; Joe Seymour

    2007-04-19

    Effective environmental management of DOE sites requires reliable prediction of reactive transport phenomena. A central issue in prediction of subsurface reactive transport is the impact of multiscale physical, chemical, and biological heterogeneity. Heterogeneity manifests itself through incomplete mixing of reactants at scales below those at which concentrations are explicitly defined (i.e., the numerical grid scale). This results in a mismatch between simulated reaction processes (formulated in terms of average concentrations) and actual processes (controlled by local concentrations). At the field scale, this results in apparent scale-dependence of model parameters and inability to utilize laboratory parameters in field models. Accordingly, most field modeling efforts are restricted to empirical estimation of model parameters by fitting to field observations, which renders extrapolation of model predictions beyond fitted conditions unreliable. The objective of this project is to develop a theoretical and computational framework for (1) connecting models of coupled reactive transport from pore-scale processes to field-scale bioremediation through a hierarchy of models that maintain crucial information from the smaller scales at the larger scales; and (2) quantifying the uncertainty that is introduced by both the upscaling process and uncertainty in physical parameters. One of the challenges of addressing scale-dependent effects of coupled processes in heterogeneous porous media is the problem-specificity of solutions. Much effort has been aimed at developing generalized scaling laws or theories, but these require restrictive assumptions that render them ineffective in many real problems. We propose instead an approach that applies physical and numerical experiments at small scales (specifically the pore scale) to a selected model system in order to identify the scaling approach appropriate to that type of problem. Although the results of such studies will

  5. Parsec-scale magnetic fields in Arp 220

    CERN Document Server

    McBride, James; Heiles, Carl; Bower, Geoffrey C; Sarma, Anuj P

    2014-01-01

    We present the first very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) detections of Zeeman splitting in another galaxy. We used Arecibo Observatory, the Green Bank Telescope, and the Very Long Baseline Array to perform dual-polarization observations of OH maser lines in the merging galaxy Arp 220. We measured magnetic fields of $\\sim$1-5 mG associated with three roughly parsec-sized clouds in the nuclear regions of Arp 220. Our measured magnetic fields have comparable strengths and the same direction as features at the same velocity identified in previous Zeeman observations with Arecibo alone. The agreement between single dish and VLBI results provides critical validation of previous Zeeman splitting observations of OH megamasers that used a single large dish. The measured magnetic field strengths indicate that magnetic energy densities are comparable to gravitational energy in OH maser clouds. We also compare our total intensity results to previously published VLBI observations of OH megamasers in Arp 220. We find ...

  6. Large Scale Structures at High Redshift in the GOODS Field

    CERN Document Server

    Castellano, M; Trevese, D; Pentericci, L; Grazian, A; Fontana, A; Giallongo, E; Santini, P; Cristiani, S; Nonino, M; Vanzella, E

    2008-01-01

    We present a catalogue of overdensities in the GOODS-South field. We find various high density peaks that are embedded in structures diffused on the entire field, up to z ~ 2.5. The slope of their colour-magnitude relation does not show significative evolution with z. We find evidence that galaxies forming these structures are more massive than galaxies located in low density regions. We also analyse the variation of galaxy properties with the associated environmental density and we find that the segregation of red galaxies with density is stronger at low redshift and at high luminosities while it gets much weaker for increasing z.

  7. Developing technology for large-scale production of forest chips. Wood Energy Technology Programme 1999-2003. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    that resulted in an unforeseen growth in the use of forest chips. The programme provided a frame and forum for joint research and development efforts. The key role was played by the participating enterprises in the fields of forest industries, production of fuels and energy, and machine manufacturing. The role of forest machine and timber truck entrepreneurs also was of utmost importance. Forest chip production technology matured during the programme period. Chips from logging residues from regeneration areas remained the cheapest and most abundant source. In 2002 they covered 63% of the total production of forest chips. As the demand for carbon-neutral wood fuels grew, industry sought for additional biomass sources and extended procurement operations to whole-tree material from early thinnings and even stump and root wood from regeneration areas. Special emphasis was placed on the development of system know-how. Baling technology revolutionized the transportation of uncomminuted biomass and opened the way to centralized comminution at the plant. Several large CHP plants installed a stationary crusher that, in turn, made it possible to process stump and root wood. By 2004, some 24 residue balers with a total annual capacity of 0.6 million m3 were in operation in Finland. The new technology was found especially attractive with respect to the flexible process control of large-scale procurement of forest chips. The traditional basic solution, comminution at landing, still held its leading position. The introduction of new chipper-trucks helped to cool the hot chain that is normally a weakness of the system. In addition to its application to logging residues, this system is suitable for whole-tree chip-ping as well. Regarding small-tree chips, the problem has been low productivity and the high cost of manual felling. After a long period of slow development, the use of accumulating felling heads is becoming common, and the production chain is becoming fully mechanized

  8. Novel forest fuel production technology for the large scale applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timperi, A. [Timberjack Energy Technology, Tampere (Finland)

    2003-07-01

    This PowerPoint presentation outlined the operations of Timberjack Energy Technology and provided illustrated examples of how the latest technologies in bioenergy have been applied to generate power in Finland. In particular, it referred to mobile chippers and loose residue bundlers used to provide feed for the CFB boiler at a kraft pulp and paper pilot project plant in Alholmens, Finland. The boiler generates 700 GWh of heat, and 1,300 GWh of electricity using 45 per cent peat, 45 per cent bark and wood waste, and 10 per cent heavy fuel oil and coal. Illustrations of the fuel handling system for the facility were presented. The Alholmens Kraft facility operates the world's first slash bundle train for bark and wood waste. It handles 4,000 bundles per day, equivalent to 65 full truck loads and 2,000 metric tons. The use of Timberjack's wood buncher and bundling machines have been tested in Austria, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland, Sweden and the United States. It is estimated that 720,000 bundles of loose residue were made in Finland in 2003, equivalent to 19 million US oil gallons of pure renewable energy. The target for 2004 is 1,250,000 bundles, equivalent to 1.3 TWh. Wood fuel accounts for 20 per cent of primary energy production in Finland. It was noted that an added benefit to bundling of forest residue is the potential to prevent forest fires. 1 tab., 53 figs.

  9. Adapting the Media and Technology Usage and Attitudes Scale to Turkish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özgür, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Due to the requirement of a current, valid, and reliable assessment instrument for determining usage frequencies of technology-based media and the attitudes towards these, this study intends to determine the validity and reliability of the Media and Technology Usage and Attitudes Scale, developed by researchers from California State University,…

  10. Framing Innovation: Do Professional Learning Communities Influence Acceptance of Large-Scale Technology Initiatives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolin, Anna P.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the role of professional learning communities for district leadership implementing large-scale technology initiatives such as 1:1 implementations (one computing device for every student). The existing literature regarding technology leadership is limited, as is literature on how districts use existing collaborative structures…

  11. Factors Affecting Teachers' Competence in the Field of Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Hamonangan

    2014-01-01

    The development of learning technology today, have a direct impact on improving teachers' information technology competence. This paper is presented the results of research related to teachers' information technology competence. The study was conducted with a survey of some 245 vocational high school teachers. There are two types of instrument…

  12. Introduction to the field of emerging technology management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, A. J.; Walsh, S. T.

    2013-01-01

    Many see emerging technologies as a solution vector for the global challenges of the twenty-first century. Today's emerging technologies include: computational sciences; nanotechnology; micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS); bio-fuels; mobile technologies and a host of others. Yet an adequate unde

  13. Introduction to the field of emerging technology management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, A. J.; Walsh, S. T.

    2013-01-01

    Many see emerging technologies as a solution vector for the global challenges of the twenty-first century. Today's emerging technologies include: computational sciences; nanotechnology; micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS); bio-fuels; mobile technologies and a host of others. Yet an adequate unde

  14. Introduction to the field of emerging technology management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Arend J.; Walsh, Steven Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Many see emerging technologies as a solution vector for the global challenges of the twenty-first century. Today's emerging technologies include: computational sciences; nanotechnology; micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS); bio-fuels; mobile technologies and a host of others. Yet an adequate

  15. Uncertainty analysis for a field-scale P loss model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Models are often used to predict phosphorus (P) loss from agricultural fields. While it is commonly recognized that model predictions are inherently uncertain, few studies have addressed prediction uncertainties using P loss models. In this study we assessed the effect of model input error on predic...

  16. Translating laboratory compaction test results to field scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roholl, J.A.; Thienen-Visser, K. van; Breunese, J.N.

    2016-01-01

    In recent studies on the surface subsidence caused by hydrocarbon recovery of the Groningen gas field, the predicted subsidence is overestimated if results of compaction experiments are not corrected by an empirical `upscaling factor'. In order to find an explanation for this `upscaling factor', an

  17. Universal scaling behaviour of directed percolation and the pair contact process in an external field

    CERN Document Server

    Lübeck, S

    2002-01-01

    We consider the scaling behaviour of directed percolation and of the pair contact process with a conjugated field. In particular we determine numerically the equation of state and show that both models are characterized by the same universal scaling function. Furthermore we derive the equation of state for the pair contact process within a mean-field approach which again agrees with the mean-field equation of state of the directed percolation universality class.

  18. Gravitational waves from the first order phase transition of the Higgs field at high energy scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Nakayama, Kazunori; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2016-02-01

    In a wide class of new physics models, there exist scalar fields that obtain vacuum expectation values of high energy scales. We study the possibility that the standard model Higgs field has experienced first order phase transition at the high energy scale due to the couplings with these scalar fields. We estimate the amount of gravitational waves produced by the phase transition, and discuss observational consequences.

  19. Gravitational Waves from the First Order Phase Transition of the Higgs Field at High Energy Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    In a wide class of new physics models, there exist scalar fields which obtain vacuum expectation values of high energy scales. We study the possibility that the standard model Higgs field has experienced first-order phase transition at the high energy scale due to the couplings with these scalar fields.We estimate the amount of gravitational waves produced by the phase transition, and discuss observational consequences.

  20. New business opportunity: Green field project with new technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Seung Jae

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009 of global financial crisis, shipbuilding industry has undergone hard times seriously. After such a long depression, the latest global shipping market index shows that the economic recovery of global shipbuilding market is underway. Especially, nations with enormous resources are going to increase their productivity or expanding their shipyards to accommodate a large amount of orders expected in the near future. However, few commercial projects have been carried out for the practical shipyard layout designs even though those can be good commercial opportunities for shipbuilding engineers. Shipbuilding starts with a shipyard construction with a large scale investment initially. Shipyard design and the equipment layout problem, which is directly linked to the productivity of ship production, is an important issue in the production planning of mass production of ships. In many cases, shipbuilding yard design has relied on the experience of the internal engineer, resulting in sporadic and poorly organized processes. Consequently, economic losses and the trial and error involved in such a design process are inevitable problems. The starting point of shipyard construction is to design a shipyard layout. Four kinds of engineering parts required for the shipyard layout design and construction. Those are civil engineering, building engineering, utility engineering and production layout engineering. Among these parts, production layout engineering is most important because its result is used as a foundation of the other engineering parts, and also, determines the shipyard capacity in the shipyard lifecycle. In this paper, the background of shipbuilding industry is explained in terms of engineering works for the recognition of the macro trend. Nextly, preliminary design methods and related case study is introduced briefly by referencing the previous research. Lastly, the designed work of layout design is validated using the computer simulation

  1. New business opportunity: Green field project with new technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jae; Woo, Jong Hun; Shin, Jong Gye

    2014-06-01

    Since 2009 of global financial crisis, shipbuilding industry has undergone hard times seriously. After such a long depression, the latest global shipping market index shows that the economic recovery of global shipbuilding market is underway. Especially, nations with enormous resources are going to increase their productivity or expanding their shipyards to accommodate a large amount of orders expected in the near future. However, few commercial projects have been carried out for the practical shipyard layout designs even though those can be good commercial opportunities for shipbuilding engineers. Shipbuilding starts with a shipyard construction with a large scale investment initially. Shipyard design and the equipment layout problem, which is directly linked to the productivity of ship production, is an important issue in the production planning of mass production of ships. In many cases, shipbuilding yard design has relied on the experience of the internal engineer, resulting in sporadic and poorly organized processes. Consequently, economic losses and the trial and error involved in such a design process are inevitable problems. The starting point of shipyard construction is to design a shipyard layout. Four kinds of engineering parts required for the shipyard layout design and construction. Those are civil engineering, building engineering, utility engineering and production layout engineering. Among these parts, production layout engineering is most important because its result is used as a foundation of the other engineering parts, and also, determines the shipyard capacity in the shipyard lifecycle. In this paper, the background of shipbuilding industry is explained in terms of engineering works for the recognition of the macro trend. Nextly, preliminary design methods and related case study is introduced briefly by referencing the previous research. Lastly, the designed work of layout design is validated using the computer simulation technology.

  2. On the scales of structures of the large-scale background magnetic field in the 20th solar cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, V. I.; Tavastsherna, K. S.

    On the basis of Hα maps two scale distributions of longitudinal structures of the large-scale magnetic field are found at 10 - 40° in both solar hemispheres. One of them is a gaussian distribution for the dimensions from 3 to 15°. These are "islands" of the predominant polarity of the magnetic field. They are outlined by filaments and filament channels and are connected with the appearance of a new magnetic flux. The other is a Pearson curve of type I for 15° to 60° with maximum at 25°. At the equator and latitudes φ > 40° there are no predominant dimensions.

  3. Validation of the Domains of Creativity Scale for Nigerian Preservice Science, Technology, and Mathematics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awofala, Adeneye O. A.; Fatade, Alfred O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Investigation into the factor structure of Domains of Creativity Scale has been on for sometimes now. The purpose of this study was to test the validity of the Kaufman Domains of Creativity Scale on Nigerian preservice science, technology, and mathematics teachers. Method: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed…

  4. Psychometric Summary of the Technology-Delivered Tension Scales for Weight Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer-Jackman, Kelli L; Popkess-Vawter, Sue

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the psychometric results from studies of the last 25 years of the Overeating Tension Scale, Exercise Tension Scale, Feelings Tension Scale, and Feelings About Weight Tension Scale. These reliable and valid technology-delivered weight management scales can be used by clinicians independently or in combination to longitudinally identify specific triggers of overeating, skipping exercise, feeling low or down, and strong feelings about one's body weight; motivational states, and related tension levels. Through cognitive behavior therapy, individuals can learn to shift to another motivational state and employ healthy coping mechanisms to avoid related negative behaviors. Psychometric results from seven developmental studies are described, including technology-delivery adaptation results from the original paper and pencil versions. Future tension scale development priorities also are discussed.

  5. Full scale phosphoric acid fuel cell stack technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christner, L.; Faroque, M.

    1984-01-01

    The technology development for phosphoric acid fuel cells is summarized. The preparation, heat treatment, and characterization of carbon composites used as bipolar separator plates are described. Characterization included resistivity, porosity, and electrochemical corrosion. High density glassy carbon/graphite composites performed well in long-term fuel cell endurance tests. Platinum alloy cathode catalysts and low-loaded platinum electrodes were evaluated in 25 sq cm cells. Although the alloys displayed an initial improvement, some of this improvement diminished after a few thousand hours of testing. Low platinum loading (0.12 mg/sq cm anodes and 0.3 mg/sq cm cathodes) performed nearly as well as twice this loading. A selectively wetproofed anode backing paper was tested in a 5 by 15 inch three-cell stack. This material may provide for acid volume expansion, acid storage, and acid lateral distribution.

  6. Stochastic analysis of field-scale heat advection in heterogeneous aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-M. Chang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the analogy between the solute and heat transport processes, it can be expected that the rate of growth of the spatial second moments of the heat flux in a heterogeneous aquifer over relatively large space scales is greater than that predicted by applying the classical heat transport model. The motivation of stochastic analysis of heat transport at the field scale is therefore to quantify the enhanced growth of the field-scale second moments caused by the spatially varying specific discharge field. Within the framework of stochastic theory, an effective advection-dispersion equation containing effective parameters (namely, the macrodispersion coefficients is developed to model the mean temperature field. The rate of growth of the field-scale spatial second moments of the mean temperature field in the principal coordinate directions is described by the macrodispersion coefficient. The variance of the temperature field is also developed to characterize the reliability to be anticipated in applying the mean heat transport model. It is found that the heterogeneity of the medium and the correlation length of the log hydraulic conductivity are important in enhancing the field-scale heat advection, while the effective thermal conductivity plays the role in reducing the field-scale heat advection.

  7. High magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgen, John [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard [Oak Ridge, TN; Ludtka, Gail [Oak Ridge, TN; Jaramillo, Roger [Knoxville, TN

    2009-05-19

    Methods and apparatus are described for high magnetic field ohmically decoupled non-contact treatment of conductive materials in a high magnetic field. A method includes applying a high magnetic field to at least a portion of a conductive material; and applying an inductive magnetic field to at least a fraction of the conductive material to induce a surface current within the fraction of the conductive material, the surface current generating a substantially bi-directional force that defines a vibration. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, the fraction of the conductive material is located within the portion of the conductive material and ohmic heating from the surface current is ohmically decoupled from the vibration. An apparatus includes a high magnetic field coil defining an applied high magnetic field; an inductive magnetic field coil coupled to the high magnetic field coil, the inductive magnetic field coil defining an applied inductive magnetic field; and a processing zone located within both the applied high magnetic field and the applied inductive magnetic field. The high magnetic field and the inductive magnetic field are substantially confocal, and ohmic heating of a conductive material located in the processing zone is ohmically decoupled from a vibration of the conductive material.

  8. Rotor blade full-scale fatigue testing technology and research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Hørlyk; Berring, Peter; Pavese, Christian

    Full scale fatigue test is an important part of the development and design of wind turbine blades. Testing is also needed for the approval of the blades in order for them to be used on large wind turbines. However, usually only one prototype blade is tested. Fatigue test of wind turbine blades...... was started in the beginning of the 1980´s and has been further developed since then. Structures in composite materials are generally difficult and time consuming to test for fatigue resistance. Therefore, several methods for testing of blades have been developed and exist today. These methods...... will be presented in this report giving the blade test facility operator a guide to choose the method that best fit the needs and economic constraints. The state of the art method is currently dual axis mass resonance, where the purpose of the test is to emulate the loads the blades encounter in operation....

  9. Scale-invariant helical magnetic fields and the duration of inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Kahniashvili, Tina; Durrer, Ruth; Tevzadze, Alexander G; Yin, Winston

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study a (nearly) scale-invariant helical magnetic field generated during inflation. We show that, if the helicity of such fields is measured, it can be used to determine the beginning of inflation. Upper bounds can be used to derive constraints on the minimal duration of inflation if one assumes that the magnetic fields generated during inflation are helical.

  10. Crystallization of Calcium Carbonate in a Large Scale Field Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueckert, Martina; Wismeth, Carina; Baumann, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    The long term efficiency of geothermal facilities and aquifer thermal energy storage in the carbonaceous Malm aquifer in the Bavarian Molasse Basin is seriously affected by precipitations of carbonates. This is mainly caused by pressure and temperature changes leading to oversaturation during production. Crystallization starts with polymorphic nuclei of calcium carbonate and is often described as diffusion-reaction controlled. Here, calcite crystallization is favoured by high concentration gradients while aragonite crystallization is occurring at high reaction rates. The factors affecting the crystallization processes have been described for simplified, well controlled laboratory experiments, the knowledge about the behaviour in more complex natural systems is still limited. The crystallization process of the polymorphic forms of calcium carbonate were investigated during a heat storage test at our test site in the eastern part of the Bavarian Molasse Basin. Complementary laboratory experiments in an autoclave were run. Both, field and laboratory experiments were conducted with carbonaceous tap water. Within the laboratory experiments additionally ultra pure water was used. To avoid precipitations of the tap water, a calculated amount of {CO_2} was added prior to heating the water from 45 - 110°C (laboratory) resp. 65 - 110°C (field). A total water volume of 0.5 L (laboratory) resp. 1 L (field) was immediately sampled and filtrated through 10 - 0.1

  11. Fractality Field in the Theory of Scale Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nottale L.

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In the theory of scale relativity, space-time is considered to be a continuum that is not only curved, but also non-differentiable, and, as a consequence, fractal. The equation of geodesics in such a space-time can be integrated in terms of quantum mechanical equations. We show in this paper that the quantum potential is a manifestation of such a fractality of space-time (in analogy with Newton’s potential being a manifestation of curvature in the framework of general relativity.

  12. Pion production via proton synchrotron radiation in strong magnetic fields in relativistic field theory: Scaling relations and angular distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2016-06-01

    We study pion production by proton synchrotron radiation in the presence of a strong magnetic field when the Landau numbers of the initial and final protons are ni,f ∼104-105. We find in our relativistic field theory calculations that the pion decay width depends only on the field strength parameter which previously was only conjectured based upon semi-classical arguments. Moreover, we also find new results that the decay width satisfies a robust scaling relation, and that the polar angular distribution of emitted pion momenta is very narrow and can be easily obtained. This scaling implies that one can infer the decay width in more realistic magnetic fields of 1015 G, where ni,f ∼1012-1013, from the results for ni,f ∼104-105. The resultant pion intensity and angular distributions for realistic magnetic field strengths are presented and their physical implications discussed.

  13. Technology, managerial, and policy initiatives for improving environmental performance in small-scale gold mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilson, Gavin; Van der Vorst, Rita

    2002-12-01

    This paper reviews a series of strategies for improving environmental performance in the small-scale gold mining industry. Although conditions vary regionally, few regulations and policies exist specifically for small-scale gold mining activity. Furthermore, because environmental awareness is low in most developing countries, sites typically feature rudimentary technologies and poor management practices. A combination of policy-, managerial- and technology-related initiatives is needed to facilitate environmental improvement in the industry. Following a broad overview of these initiatives, a recommended strategy is put forth for governments keen on improving the environmental conditions of resident small-scale gold mines.

  14. Comparison of field-scale herbicide runoff and volatilization losses: an eight-year field investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gish, Timothy J; Prueger, John H; Daughtry, Craig S T; Kustas, William P; McKee, Lynn G; Russ, Andrew L; Hatfield, Jerry L

    2011-01-01

    An 8-yr study was conducted to better understand factors influencing year-to-year variability in field-scale herbicide volatilization and surface runoff losses. The 21-ha research site is located at the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center in Beltsville, MD. Site location, herbicide formulations, and agricultural management practices remained unchanged throughout the duration of the study. Metolachlor [2-chloro--(2-ethyl-6-methylphenyl)--(2-methoxy-1-methylethyl) acetamide] and atrazine [6-chloro--ethyl--(1-methylethyl)-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine] were coapplied as a surface broadcast spray. Herbicide runoff was monitored from a month before application through harvest. A flux gradient technique was used to compute volatilization fluxes for the first 5 d after application using herbicide concentration profiles and turbulent fluxes of heat and water vapor as determined from eddy covariance measurements. Results demonstrated that volatilization losses for these two herbicides were significantly greater than runoff losses ( < 0.007), even though both have relatively low vapor pressures. The largest annual runoff loss for metolachlor never exceeded 2.5%, whereas atrazine runoff never exceeded 3% of that applied. On the other hand, herbicide cumulative volatilization losses after 5 d ranged from about 5 to 63% of that applied for metolachlor and about 2 to 12% of that applied for atrazine. Additionally, daytime herbicide volatilization losses were significantly greater than nighttime vapor losses ( < 0.05). This research confirmed that vapor losses for some commonly used herbicides frequently exceeds runoff losses and herbicide vapor losses on the same site and with the same management practices can vary significantly year to year depending on local environmental conditions.

  15. Field-Scale Effective Matrix Diffusion Coefficient for FracturedRock: Results From Literature Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui Hai; Molz, Fred J.; Zhang, Yingqi; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-03-28

    Matrix diffusion is an important mechanism for solutetransport in fractured rock. We recently conducted a literature survey onthe effective matrix diffusion coefficient, Dem, a key parameter fordescribing matrix diffusion processes at the field scale. Forty fieldtracer tests at 15 fractured geologic sites were surveyed and selectedfor study, based on data availability and quality. Field-scale Dem valueswere calculated, either directly using data reported in the literature orby reanalyzing the corresponding field tracer tests. Surveyed dataindicate that the effective-matrix-diffusion-coefficient factor FD(defined as the ratio of Dem to the lab-scale matrix diffusioncoefficient [Dem]of the same tracer) is generally larger than one,indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient in the fieldis comparatively larger than the matrix diffusion coefficient at therock-core scale. This larger value could be attributed to the manymass-transfer processes at different scales in naturally heterogeneous,fractured rock systems. Furthermore, we observed a moderate trend towardsystematic increase in the emDFmDDF value with observation scale,indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is likely tobe statistically scale dependent. The FD value ranges from 1 to 10,000for observation scales from 5 to 2,000 m. At a given scale, the FD valuevaries by two orders of magnitude, reflecting the influence of differingdegrees of fractured rock heterogeneity at different sites. In addition,the surveyed data indicate that field-scale longitudinal dispersivitygenerally increases with observation scale, which is consistent withprevious studies. The scale-dependent field-scale matrix diffusioncoefficient (and dispersivity) may have significant implications forassessing long-term, large-scale radionuclide and contaminant transportevents in fractured rock, both for nuclear waste disposal and contaminantremediation.

  16. Field Experience with and Potential for Multi-time Scale Grid Transactions from Responsive Commercial Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Ghatikar, Girish

    2014-08-01

    The need for and concepts behind demand response are evolving. As the electric system changes with more intermittent renewable electric supply systems, there is a need to allow buildings to provide more flexible demand. This paper presents results from field studies and pilots, as well as engineering estimates of the potential capabilities of fast load responsiveness in commercial buildings. We present a sector wide analysis of flexible loads in commercial buildings, which was conducted to improve resource planning and determine which loads to evaluate in future demonstrations. These systems provide important capabilities for future transactional systems. The field analysis is based on results from California, plus projects in the northwest and east coast. End-uses considered include heating, ventilation, air conditioning and lighting. The timescales of control include day-ahead, as well as day-of, 10-minute ahead and even faster response. This technology can provide DR signals on different times scales to interact with responsive building loads. We describe the latency of the control systems in the building and the round trip communications with the wholesale grid operators.

  17. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  18. Electron scale nested quadrupole Hall field in Cluster observations of magnetic reconnection

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    This Letter presents the first evidence of a new and unique feature of spontaneous reconnection at multiple sites in electron current sheet, viz. nested quadrupole structure of Hall field at electron scales, in Cluster observations. The new nested quadrupole is a consequence of electron scale processes in reconnection. Whistler response of the upstream plasma to the interaction of electron flows from neighboring reconnection sites produces a large scale quadrupole Hall field enclosing the quadrupole fields of the multiple sites, thus forming a nested structure. Electron-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of an electron current sheet yields mechanism of the formation of nested quadrupole.

  19. NOx control in large-scale power plant boilers through superfine pulverized coal technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie YIN; Jianxing REN; Dunsong WEI

    2008-01-01

    Superfine pulverized coal technology can effectively reduce NOx emission in coal-fired power plant boilers. It can also economize the cost of the power plant and improve the use of the ash in the flue gas. Superfine pulverized coal technology, which will be widely used in China, includes common superfine pulverized coal technology and superfine pulverized coal reburning technology. The use of superfine pulver-ized coal instead of common coal in large-scale power plants will not only reduce more than 30% of NOx emission but also improve the thermal efficiency of the boiler.

  20. Final Technical Report Laramie County Community College: Utility-Scale Wind Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas P. Cook

    2012-05-22

    The Utility-Scale Wind Energy Technology U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant EE0000538, provided a way ahead for Laramie County Community College (LCCC) to increase educational and training opportunities for students seeking an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) or Associate of Science (AS) degree in Wind Energy Technology. The DOE grant enabled LCCC to program, schedule, and successfully operate multiple wind energy technology cohorts of up to 20-14 students per cohort simultaneously. As of this report, LCCC currently runs four cohorts. In addition, the DOE grant allowed LCCC to procure specialized LABVOLT electronic equipment that directly supports is wind energy technology curriculum.

  1. How large-scale energy-environment models represent technology and technological change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-01-01

    In the process of selecting measures against global warming, it is important to consider the introduction of technological innovations into the models, and studies were made in this connection. An induced technical change model has to be an economically total model that represents various incentives involving the form of profits from innovations; profits from cost functions, research-and-development production functions, and abstract profits from empirical estimates; and the dimensions in which technological change is assumed to progress. Under study at the Stanford Energy Modeling Forum is how to represent various technological assumptions and development, which is necessary to predict the cost for dealing with global warming. At the conference of February 2001, 10 cases of preliminary model scenarios were discussed. In one case, for instance, a carbon tax of $25/ton in 2010 is raised $25 every decade to be $100/ton in 2040. Three working groups are engaged in the study of long-run economy/technology baseline scenarios, characterization of current and potential future technologies, and ways of modeling technological change. (NEDO)

  2. Experimental evidence for seismoelectric observations at field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzhauer, Julia; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2010-05-01

    In the past decades, seismoelectric has concentrated a growing interest as a promising tool for hydrogeophysical studies. Resulting from an electrokinetic coupling in porous saturated media traversed by an acoustic wave, this method could ultimately offer a direct access to various hydraulic parameters ranging from porosity to permeability or fluids conductivity. In some other aspects it also occasionally showed some ability to thin-layer resolution. Within the development of the new test-site Schillerslage with typical north-German geology, consisting of two shallow quaternary aquifers separated by a till layer over cretaceous marl, we tested the observability of the seismoelectric signal along with various conventional (seismic, georadar, geoelectric) and unconventional (magnetic resonance sounding -MRS, spectral induced polarisation -SIP) geophysical methods as well as boreholes analysis. The special focus was on the converted seismoelectric signal, an electromagnetic wave acting as a vertical dipole which should theoretically display on the seismoelectrogram as a horizontal arrival. This converted wave appears when the incident acoustic wave meets a hydraulic discontinuity affecting the pore space in any geometrical or chemical manner. This electromagnetic signal fades out rapidly, due to its dipole nature and its weakness, so that its relevance is restricted to the near surface characterisation. In the given setting, such a wave could either initiate at the water table or originate from an abrupt transition from sand to till. Decision was made to record both seismic and seismoelectric signal concomitantly. To allow the detection of the later signal, the field layout was gradually adjusted. Considering the source, hammer-seismic was chosen for its precision in near surface application and automatic trigger-techniques producing major disturbances in the first 10 ms of the seismoelectrogram were abandoned in favour of manual triggering. To avoid any further noise

  3. The magnetic shear-current effect: generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2016-04-01

    > A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. The effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo - in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is non-helical, with the mean field coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack of turbulent resistivity quenching by magnetic fluctuations. As well as being interesting for its applications to general high Reynolds number astrophysical turbulence, where strong small-scale magnetic fluctuations are expected to be prevalent, the magnetic shear-current effect is a likely candidate for large-scale dynamo in the unstratified regions of ionized accretion disks. Evidence for this is discussed, as well as future research directions and the challenges involved with understanding details of the effect in astrophysically relevant regimes.

  4. Low Field Scaling of the Flux-Flow Resistivity in the Unconventional Superconductor UPt3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambe, S.; Huxley, A. D.; Rodière, P.; Flouquet, J.

    1999-08-01

    Measurements of the flux-flow resistivity in the unconventional superconductor UPt3 are reported for a large range of magnetic field. In agreement with a recent theory, ρf at low field is far larger than that found in conventional superconductors. Its field dependence at different temperatures shows a predicted scaling relation for clean superconductors. The crossover from localized to delocalized quasiparticle excitations around the vortex is also observed as the magnetic field increases.

  5. Stream conversion technology and gas condensate field development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuntadi, Arif

    2012-07-01

    In the last few years, integrated modeling has become a preferred tool in the petroleum industry to manage the value chain of different assets. It is slowly replacing the traditional modeling approach that treats each petroleum asset model separately. Having different discipline models and applications in a single platform will ensure more consistency of the value chain from one asset to another. Integrated modeling also enables engineers to optimize assets, both locally and globally, using an automatic approach. Coupling of different petroleum assets entails transferring and combining petroleum streams from one asset to the others. Stream conversion is a key requirement in integrated modeling because petroleum assets usually have their own fluid model, and it is rare to have a single common fluid model in both the subsurface and surface simulation models. This thesis investigates different stream conversion methods and provides important technologies for integrating different petroleum assets into an integrated asset model. These stream conversions are expected to have highly accurate results and reduce the computational time. Reservoir engineers have utilized both compositional and black-oil reservoir simulations for many years. Due to the CPU-time consideration, the EOS model used in a compositional simulation is normally limited to 6-10 components, a so-called lumped EOS model. We propose a delumping method to generate detailed compositional streams from either black-oil or compositional (lumped-EOS) reservoir simulations, performed as a simple post-processing step. These methods are based on a set of phase-specific and pressure-dependent split factors. The reservoir simulation phase behavior can be approximated by a PVT depletion experiment, such as the CCE depletion experiment. We have used this approach to develop the blackoil and compositional delumping method applied to the reservoir simulation output. The split factors are generated from simulated

  6. Technology and Economic Assessment of Innovative Field Drainage Technologies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gachango, Florence Gathoni

    technologies, and their willingness and extent of trading-off the existing farm management nutrient reduction measures with constructed wetland technology, iii) the cost-effectiveness of surface flow constructed wetlands, and iv) the strategies of incorporating the filter technologies into policy measures....... Overall, the findings in this thesis indicate a potential for integration of the filter technologies into nutrient reduction measures....

  7. Developing technology for large-scale production of forest chips. Wood Energy Technology Programme 1999-2003. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakkila, P. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland)

    2003-07-01

    Finland is enhancing its use of renewable sources in energy production. From the 1995 level, the use of renewable energy is to be increased by 50 % by 2010, and 100 % by 2025. Wood-based fuels will play a leading role in this development. The main source of wood-based fuels is processing residues from the forest industries. However, as all processing residues are already in use, an increase is possible only as far as the capacity and wood consumption of the forest industries grow. Energy policy affects the production and availability of processing residues only indirectly. Another large source of wood-based energy is forest fuels, consisting of traditional firewood and chips comminuted from low-quality biomass. It is estimated that the reserve of technically harvest-able forest biomass is 10-16 Mm' annually, when no specific cost limit is applied. This corresponds to 2-3 Mtoe or 6-9 % of the present consumption of primary energy in Finland. How much of this re-serve it will actually be possible to harvest and utilize depends on the cost competitiveness of forest chips against alternative sources of energy. A goal of Finnish energy and climate strategies is to use 5 Mm' forest chips annually by 2010. The use of wood fuels is being promoted by means of taxation, investment aid and support for chip production from young forests. Furthermore, research and development is being supported in order to create techno-economic conditions for the competitive production of forest chips. In 1999, the National Technology Agency Tekes established the five-year Wood Energy Technology Programme to stimulate the development of efficient systems for the large-scale production of forest chips. Key tar-gets are competitive costs, reliable supply and good quality chips. The two guiding principles of the programme are: (1) close cooperation between researchers and practitioners and (2) to apply research and development to the practical applications and commercialization. As of

  8. Technical Solutions to Mitigate Reliability Challenges due to Technology Scaling of Charge Storage NVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Chuan Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Charge storage nonvolatile memory (NVM is one of the main driving forces in the evolution of IT handheld devices. Technology scaling of charge storage NVM has always been the strategy to achieve higher density NVM with lower cost per bit in order to meet the persistent consumer demand for larger storage space. However, conventional technology scaling of charge storage NVM has run into many critical reliability challenges related to fundamental device characteristics. Therefore, further technology scaling has to be supplemented with novel approaches in order to surmount these reliability issues to achieve desired reliability performance. This paper is focused on reviewing critical research findings on major reliability challenges and technical solutions to mitigate technology scaling challenges of charge storage NVM. Most of these technical solutions are still in research phase while a few of them are more mature and ready for production phase. Three of the mature technical solutions will be reviewed in detail, that is, tunnel oxide top/bottom nitridation, nanocrystal, and phase change memory (PCM. Key advantages and reported reliability challenges of these approaches are thoroughly reviewed in this paper. This paper will serve as a good reference to understand the future trend of innovative technical solutions to overcome the reliability challenges of charge storage NVM due to technology scaling.

  9. The Media and Technology Usage and Attitudes Scale: An empirical investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, L D; Whaling, K; Carrier, L M; Cheever, N A; Rokkum, J

    2013-11-01

    Current approaches to measuring people's everyday usage of technology-based media and other computer-related activities have proved to be problematic as they use varied outcome measures, fail to measure behavior in a broad range of technology-related domains and do not take into account recently developed types of technology including smartphones. In the present study, a wide variety of items, covering a range of up-to-date technology and media usage behaviors. Sixty-six items concerning technology and media usage, along with 18 additional items assessing attitudes toward technology, were administered to two independent samples of individuals, comprising 942 participants. Factor analyses were used to create 11 usage subscales representing smartphone usage, general social media usage, Internet searching, e-mailing, media sharing, text messaging, video gaming, online friendships, Facebook friendships, phone calling, and watching television in addition to four attitude-based subscales: positive attitudes, negative attitudes, technological anxiety/dependence, and attitudes toward task-switching. All subscales showed strong reliabilities and relationships between the subscales and pre-existing measures of daily media usage and Internet addiction were as predicted. Given the reliability and validity results, the new Media and Technology Usage and Attitudes Scale was suggested as a method of measuring media and technology involvement across a variety of types of research studies either as a single 60-item scale or any subset of the 15 subscales.

  10. TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT TO ELABORATE COMMON WHITE WINE IN MISIONES, WITH ECONOMIC EVALUATION AT INDUSTRIAL SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miño Valdés, Juan Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper was to develop a sustainable technology on an industrial scale to produce common white wine with non viniferous grapes cultivated in Misiones. This technological project was initiated at a laboratory scale, continued in the pilot plant and industrial-scale project. It was considered as a productive unit to 12 rural families with 27 hectares of vines each. The 8 stages followed with inductive and deductive methodology were: The development of dry white wine at laboratory scale. The evaluation of process variables in the vivification. The mathematical modeling of the alcoholic fermentation in oenological conditions. The valuation of the aptitude of wines for human consumption. The establishment of a technological procedure for wine in the pilot plant. The evaluation of the pilot plant in technological procedure established. The calculation and selection of industrial equipment. The estimate of the costs and profitability of industrial technological process. It reached a technology for a production capacity of 5,834 L day-1, with dynamic economic indicators whose values were: net present value of 6,602,666 U$D, an internal rate of return of 60 % for a period of recovery of investment to net present value of 3 years.

  11. STAGE TECHNOLOGY FOR OBTAINIGN AN ECONOMIC WHITE WINE TO AN INDUSTRIAL SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Esteban Miño Valdés

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to develop a sustainable technology to produce economical white wine, industrial scale, not viniferous grapes grown in Misiones. This technological project started at laboratory scale, it continued in a pilot plant and planned to an industrial scale. It was considered as productive unit 12 rural families with 27 hectares of vines each. The 8 stages followed with inductive and deductive methodology were: the development of dry white wine at laboratory scale, the evaluation of the variables of the process in the vilification, the Mathematical modeling of alcoholic fermentation in winemaking conditions, the assessment of the fitness of wines for human consumption, the establishment of a technological process for winemaking in a pilot plant, the evaluation in pilot plant of the technological process established, the calculation and selection of industrial equipment and finally, the costs estimation and profitability of the industrial technological process. A technology for a production capacity of 5,834 L day-1, with dynamic economic indicators was reached whose values were 6,602,666 net present value of U$D, an internal rate of return of 60 % for a period of payback a value net of three years to date.

  12. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields from inflation in teleparallelism

    CERN Document Server

    Bamba, Kazuharu; Luo, Ling-Wei

    2012-01-01

    We explore the generation of large-scale magnetic fields from inflation in teleparallelism, in which the gravitational theory is described by the torsion scalar instead of the scalar curvature in general relativity. In particular, we examine the case that the conformal invariance of the electromagnetic field during inflation is broken by a non-minimal gravitational coupling between the torsion scalar and the electromagnetic field. It is shown that for a power-law type coupling, the magnetic field on 1Mpc scale with its strength of $\\sim 10^{-9}$G at the present time can be generated.

  13. Generation of large-scale magnetic fields from inflation in teleparallelism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamba, Kazuharu [Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Geng, Chao-Qiang; Luo, Ling-Wei, E-mail: bamba@kmi.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: geng@phys.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: d9622508@oz.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, 300, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-01

    We explore the generation of large-scale magnetic fields from inflation in teleparallelism, in which the gravitational theory is described by the torsion scalar instead of the scalar curvature in general relativity. In particular, we examine the case that the conformal invariance of the electromagnetic field during inflation is broken by a non-minimal gravitational coupling between the torsion scalar and the electromagnetic field. It is shown that for a power-law type coupling, the magnetic field on 1 Mpc scale with its strength of ∼ 10{sup −9} G at the present time can be generated.

  14. A review on technology maturity of small scale energy storage technologies★

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Thu-Trang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current status of energy storage technologies which have the higher potential to be applied in small scale energy systems. Small scale energy systems can be categorized as ones that are able to supply energy in various forms for a building, or a small area, or a limited community, or an enterprise; typically, they are end-user systems. Energy storage technologies are classified based on their form of energy stored. A two-step evaluation is proposed for selecting suitable storage technologies for small scale energy systems, including identifying possible technical options, and addressing techno-economic aspects. Firstly, a review on energy storage technologies at small scale level is carried out. Secondly, an assessment of technology readiness level (TRL is conducted. The TRLs are ranked according to information gathered from literature review. Levels of market maturity of the technologies are addressed by taking into account their market development stages through reviewing published materials. The TRLs and the levels of market maturity are then combined into a technology maturity curve. Additionally, market driving factors are identified by using different stages in product life cycle. The results indicate that lead-acid, micro pumped hydro storage, NaS battery, NiCd battery, flywheel, NaNiCl battery, Li-ion battery, and sensible thermal storage are the most mature technologies for small scale energy systems. In the near future, hydrogen fuel cells, thermal storages using phase change materials and thermochemical materials are expected to become more popular in the energy storage market.

  15. Bench-scale experiment design for developing co-pyrolysis and co-gasification technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandiyoti, R. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2004-07-01

    Important technical issues must be resolved before co-pyrolysis and co-gasification technologies can be offered as commercially viable processes. Clearly, issues such as solids handling and solids injection require solutions developed at actual plant or pilot scale. However, research on numerous other residual problems can be carried out effectively, rapidly, and inexpensively at bench-scale level. This article describes several cases where problems encountered during pilot or plant scale operation can be studied by experiments at bench-top levels; the designs of the bench-scale reactors used in these studies are presented and discussed. 34 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Toward a model for field-testing patient decision-support technologies : a qualitative field-testing study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, R.; Elwyn, G.; Edwards, A.; Watson, E.; Austoker, J.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Field-testing is a quality assurance criterion in the development of patient decision-support technologies (PDSTs), as identified in the consensus statement of the International Patient Decision Aids Standards Collaboration. We incorporated field-testing into the development of a Web-bas

  17. Field Demonstration of Electro-Scan Defect Location Technology for Condition Assessment of Wastewater Collection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of the field demonstration program is to gather technically reliable cost and performance information on selected condition assessment technologies under defined field conditions. The selected technologies include zoom camera, electro-scan (FELL-41), and a multi-sens...

  18. From Field- to Landscape-Scale Vadose Zone Processes: Scale Issues, Modeling, and Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corwin, D.L.; Hopmans, J.; Rooij, de G.H.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling and monitoring vadose zone processes across multiple scales is a fundamental component of many environmental and natural resource issues including nonpoint source (NPS) pollution, watershed management, and nutrient management, to mention just a few. In this special section in Vadose Zone Jo

  19. A relativistic signature in large-scale structure: Scale-dependent bias from single-field inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Nicola; Bruni, Marco; Koyama, Kazuya; Maartens, Roy; Matarrese, Sabino; Sasaki, Misao; Verde, Licia; Wands, David

    2015-01-01

    In General Relativity, the constraint equation relating metric and density perturbations is inherently nonlinear, leading to an effective non-Gaussianity in the density field on large scales -- even if the primordial metric perturbation is Gaussian. This imprints a relativistic signature in large-scale structure which is potentially observable, for example via a scale-dependent galaxy bias. The effect has been derived and then confirmed by independent calculations, using second-order perturbation theory. Recently, the physical reality of this relativistic effect has been disputed. The counter-argument is based on the claim that a very long wavelength curvature perturbation can be removed by a coordinate transformation. We argue that while this is true locally, the large-scale curvature cannot be removed by local coordinate transformations. The transformation itself contains the long-wavelength modes and thus includes the correlation. We show how the separate universe approach can be used to understand this co...

  20. Development of a Service Quality Scale for Multiple Technology Interfaces in Commercial Banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAYA SANGEETHA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to develop a service quality scale by identifying the dimensions affecting the service quality across various technology interfaces in retail banking. The paper examines the literature involving the various technology interfaces and aims to propose a conceptual model involving dimensions that affect the perceptions of service quality of the technology interfaces used in banks. The paper also seeks to establish the psychometric properties of the scale thus arrived. The literature review reveals that the models currently available to measure the service quality of the technology interfaces are limited in their focus, encompassing mostly one electronic channel – the internet – and few others studying the ATM and telephone banking cha nnels. However, there is a gap with regard to the study of other technology interfaces like call centers and queue systems used in the branches. In this study, an attempt is being made to explore the influence of the various technology interfaces on banks’ service quality like the ATM, telephone banking, call center services, queue systems in the branches etc. which the customers use in combination and thereby to develop a scale to measure technology interface service quality (TISQ.

  1. Length Scales and Turbulent Properties of Magnetic Fields in Simulated Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Egan, Hilary; Hallman, Eric; Burns, Jack; Xu, Hao; Collins, David; Li, Hui; Norman, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Additional physics beyond standard hydrodynamics is needed to fully model the intracluster medium (ICM); however, as we move to more sophisticated models, it is important to consider the role of magnetic fields and the way the fluid approximation breaks down. This paper represents a first step towards developing a self-consistent model of the ICM by characterizing the statistical properties of magnetic fields in cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters. We find that plasma conditions are largely homogeneous across a range of cluster masses and relaxation states. We also find that the magnetic field length scales are resolution dependent and not based on any particular physical process. Energy transfer mechanisms and scales are also identified, and imply the existence of small scale dynamo action. The scales of the small scale dynamo are resolution limited and driven by numerical resistivity and viscosity.

  2. Slow decay of cosmic magnetic fields superadiabatically in curvature-torsion scales

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L C Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Recently Barrow, and Tsagas [Phys Rev D 77: 107302, (2008)] have shown that slow decay of cosmological magnetic slowly decay in FRW universes on curvature scales as $B\\sim{a^{-1}}$ in the context of general relativity (GR). This helps possible amplification of cosmic magnetic fields. In this paper starting from dynamo equations in spacetimes with torsion we obtain also slow decay of magnetic fields naturally on curvature-torsion scales of Riemann-Cartan spacetime on a de Sitter universe. In this case the constant of proportionality between the magnetic field and the curvature scale is the torsion in the present universe. Thus the B-field becomes $B\\sim{\\frac{{\\eta}}{H_{0}}Ta^{-1}}$ where T is torsion vector modulus, $H_{0}$ is the Hubble constant and $\\eta$ is the diffusive scale.

  3. Do the effects of crops on skylark (Alauda arvensis differ between the field and landscape scales?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Sausse

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The promotion of biodiversity in agricultural areas involves actions at the landscape scale, and the management of cropping patterns is considered an important means of achieving this goal. However, most of the available knowledge about the impact of crops on biodiversity has been obtained at the field scale, and is generally grouped together under the umbrella term “crop suitability.” Can field-scale knowledge be used to predict the impact on populations across landscapes? We studied the impact of maize and rapeseed on the abundance of skylark (Alauda arvensis. Field-scale studies in Western Europe have reported diverse impacts on habitat selection and demography. We assessed the consistency between field-scale knowledge and landscape-scale observations, using high-resolution databases describing crops and other habitats for the 4 km2 grid scales analyzed in the French Breeding Bird Survey. We used generalized linear models to estimate the impact of each studied crop at the landscape scale. We stratified the squares according to the local and geographical contexts, to ensure that the conclusions drawn were valid in a wide range of contexts. Our results were not consistent with field knowledge for rapeseed, and were consistent for maize only in grassland contexts. However, the effect sizes were much smaller than those of structural landscape features. These results suggest that upscaling from the field scale to the landscape scale leads to an integration of new agronomic and ecological processes, making the objects studied more complex than simple “crop ∗ species” pairs. We conclude that the carrying capacity of agricultural landscapes cannot be deduced from the suitability of their components.

  4. Small-scale primordial magnetic fields and anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedamzik, Karsten [Laboratoire de Univers et Particules, UMR5299-CNRS, Université de Montpellier II, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Abel, Tom, E-mail: karsten.jedamzik@um2.fr, E-mail: tabel@slac.stanford.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC/Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    It is shown that small-scale magnetic fields present before recombination induce baryonic density inhomogeneities of appreciable magnitude. The presence of such inhomogeneities changes the ionization history of the Universe, which in turn decreases the angular scale of the Doppler peaks and increases Silk damping by photon diffusion. This unique signature could be used to (dis)prove the existence of primordial magnetic fields of strength as small as B ≅ 10{sup −11} Gauss by cosmic microwave background observations.

  5. Field Validation of Visual Cleaning Performance Indicator (VCPI) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-31

    test panels. Panels sets included 2024-T3 aluminum alloy sheet (Air Force platform), and primer coated HY80 steel alloy (Navy platform). 1. Weight...Cleaning Petfmmance Indicator (VCPI) tedmology as a means to verify surface cleanliness on aluminum and painted steel alloys. The VCPI technology...the surface cleanliness of unpainted structures fabricated from aluminum and steel alloys. In concept, the VCPI technology represents an innovative

  6. Quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model on scale-free networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hangmo

    2015-01-01

    I investigate the quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model in which nearest neighbors are defined according to the connectivity of scale-free networks. Using a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo simulation method and the finite-size scaling analysis, I identify the quantum critical point and study its scaling characteristics. For the degree exponent λ=6, I obtain results that are consistent with the mean-field theory. For λ=4.5 and 4, however, the results suggest that the quantum critical point belongs to a non-mean-field universality class. Further simulations indicate that the quantum critical point remains mean-field-like if λ>5, but it continuously deviates from the mean-field theory as λ becomes smaller.

  7. Quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model on scale-free networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hangmo

    2015-01-01

    I investigate the quantum phase transition of the transverse-field quantum Ising model in which nearest neighbors are defined according to the connectivity of scale-free networks. Using a continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo simulation method and the finite-size scaling analysis, I identify the quantum critical point and study its scaling characteristics. For the degree exponent λ =6 , I obtain results that are consistent with the mean-field theory. For λ =4.5 and 4, however, the results suggest that the quantum critical point belongs to a non-mean-field universality class. Further simulations indicate that the quantum critical point remains mean-field-like if λ >5 , but it continuously deviates from the mean-field theory as λ becomes smaller.

  8. Spectator Higgs, large-scale gauge fields and the non-minimal coupling to gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Even if the Higgs field does not affect the evolution of the background geometry, its massive inhomogeneities induce large-scale gauge fields whose energy density depends on the slow-roll parameters, on the effective scalar mass and, last but not least, on the dimensionless coupling to the space-time curvature. Since the non-Abelian gauge modes are screened, the non-minimal coupling to gravity predominantly affects the evolution of the hypercharge and electromagnetic fields. While in the case of minimal coupling the obtained constraints are immaterial, as soon as the coupling increases beyond one fourth the produced fields become overcritical. We chart the whole parameter space of this qualitatively new set of bounds. Whenever the limits on the curvature coupling are enforced, the magnetic field may still be partially relevant for large-scale magnetogenesis and exceed $10^{-20}$ G for the benchmark scale of the protogalactic collapse.

  9. Effective field theory of large scale structure at two loops: The apparent scale dependence of the speed of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldauf, Tobias; Mercolli, Lorenzo; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-12-01

    We study the effective field theory (EFT) of large-scale structure for cosmic density and momentum fields. We show that the finite part of the two-loop calculation and its counterterms introduces an apparent scale dependence for the leading-order parameter cs2 of the EFT starting at k =0.1 h Mpc-1 . These terms limit the range over which one can trust the one-loop EFT calculation at the 1% level to k z =0 . We construct a well-motivated one-parameter ansatz to fix the relative size of the one- and two-loop counterterms using their high-k sensitivity. Although this one-parameter model is a very restrictive choice for the counterterms, it explains the apparent scale dependence of cs2 seen in simulations. It is also able to capture the scale dependence of the density power spectrum up to k ≈0.3 h Mpc-1 at the 1% level at redshift z =0 . Considering a simple scheme for the resummation of large-scale motions, we find that the two-loop calculation reduces the need for this IR resummation at k <0.2 h Mpc-1 . Finally, we extend our calculation to momentum statistics and show that the same one-parameter model can also describe density-momentum and momentum-momentum statistics.

  10. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure at Two Loops: the apparent scale dependence of the speed of sound

    CERN Document Server

    Baldauf, Tobias; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-01-01

    We study the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure for cosmic density and momentum fields. We show that the finite part of the two-loop calculation and its counterterms introduce an apparent scale dependence for the leading order parameter $c_\\text{s}^2$ of the EFT starting at k=0.1 h/Mpc. These terms limit the range over which one can trust the one-loop EFT calculation at the 1 % level to k<0.1 h/Mpc at redshift z=0. We construct a well motivated one parameter ansatz to fix the relative size of the one- and two-loop counterterms using their high-k sensitivity. Although this one parameter model is a very restrictive choice for the counterterms, it explains the apparent scale dependence of $c_\\text{s}^2$ seen in simulations. It is also able to capture the scale dependence of the density power spectrum up to k$\\approx$ 0.3 h/Mpc at the 1 % level at redshift $z=0$. Considering a simple scheme for the resummation of large scale motions, we find that the two loop calculation reduces the need for this ...

  11. Simulating space-time uncertainty in continental-scale gridded precipitation fields for agrometeorological modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, de A.J.W.; Bruin, de S.

    2006-01-01

    Previous analyses of the effects of uncertainty in precipitation fields on the output of EU Crop Growth Monitoring System (CGMS) demonstrated that the influence on simulated crop yield was limited at national scale, but considerable at local and regional scales. We aim to propagate uncertainty due t

  12. Is There Scale-Dependent Bias in Single-Field Inflation?

    CERN Document Server

    de Putter, Roland; Green, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Scale-dependent halo bias due to local primordial non-Gaussianity provides a strong test of single-field inflation. While it is universally understood that single-field inflation predicts negligible scale-dependent bias compared to current observational uncertainties, there is still disagreement on the exact level of scale-dependent bias at a level that could strongly impact inferences made from future surveys. In this paper, we clarify this confusion and derive in various ways that there is exactly zero scale-dependent bias in single-field inflation. Much of the current confusion follows from the fact that single-field inflation does predict a mode coupling of matter perturbations at the level of $f_{NL}^{loc} \\approx -5/3$, which naively would lead to scale-dependent bias. However, we show explicitly that this mode coupling cancels out when perturbations are evaluated at a fixed physical scale rather than fixed coordinate scale. Furthermore, we show how the absence of scale-dependent bias can be derived eas...

  13. Buoyancy Effects on the Scaling Characteristics of Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Fields in the Mesoscale Range

    CERN Document Server

    Kiliyanpilakkil, V P; Ruiz-Columbié, A; Araya, G; Castillo, L; Hirth, B; Burgett, W

    2015-01-01

    We have analyzed long-term wind speed time-series from five field sites up to a height of 300 m from the ground. Structure function-based scaling analysis has revealed that the scaling exponents in the mesoscale regime systematically depend on height. This anomalous behavior is shown to be caused by the buoyancy effects. In the framework of the extended self-similarity, the relative scaling exponents portray quasi-universal behavior.

  14. Automated tracing of open-field coronal structures for an optimized large-scale magnetic field reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uritsky, V. M.; Davila, J. M.; Jones, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    Solar Probe Plus and Solar Orbiter will provide detailed measurements in the inner heliosphere magnetically connected with the topologically complex and eruptive solar corona. Interpretation of these measurements will require accurate reconstruction of the large-scale coronal magnetic field. In a related presentation by S. Jones et al., we argue that such reconstruction can be performed using photospheric extrapolation methods constrained by white-light coronagraph images. Here, we present the image-processing component of this project dealing with an automated segmentation of fan-like coronal loop structures. In contrast to the existing segmentation codes designed for detecting small-scale closed loops in the vicinity of active regions, we focus on the large-scale geometry of the open-field coronal features observed at significant radial distances from the solar surface. The coronagraph images used for the loop segmentation are transformed into a polar coordinate system and undergo radial detrending and initial noise reduction. The preprocessed images are subject to an adaptive second order differentiation combining radial and azimuthal directions. An adjustable thresholding technique is applied to identify candidate coronagraph features associated with the large-scale coronal field. A blob detection algorithm is used to extract valid features and discard noisy data pixels. The obtained features are interpolated using higher-order polynomials which are used to derive empirical directional constraints for magnetic field extrapolation procedures based on photospheric magnetograms.

  15. FIELD-SCALE EFFECTIVE MATRIX DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT FOR FRACTURED ROCK:RESULTS FROM LITERATURE SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Q. Zhou; Hui-Hai Liu; F.J. Molz; Y. Zhang; G.S. Bodvarsson

    2005-04-08

    Matrix diffusion is an important mechanism for solute transport in fractured rock. We recently conducted a literature survey on the effective matrix diffusion coefficient, D{sub m}{sup e}, a key parameter for describing matrix diffusion processes at the field scale. Forty field tracer tests at 15 fractured geologic sites were surveyed and selected for the study, based on data availability and quality. Field-scale D{sub m}{sup e} values were calculated, either directly using data reported in the literature or by reanalyzing the corresponding field tracer tests. Surveyed data indicate that the effective-matrix-diffusion-coefficient factor F{sub D} (defined as the ratio of D{sub m}{sup e} to the lab-scale matrix diffusion coefficient [D{sub m}] of the same tracer) is generally larger than one, indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient in the field is comparatively larger than the matrix diffusion coefficient at the rock-core scale. This larger value can be attributed to the many mass-transfer processes at different scales in naturally heterogeneous, fractured rock systems. Furthermore, we observed a moderate trend toward systematic increase in the F{sub D} value with observation scale, indicating that the effective matrix diffusion coefficient is likely to be statistically scale dependent. The F{sub D} value ranges from 1 to 10,000 for observation scales from 5 to 2,000 m. At a given scale, the F{sub D} value varies by two orders of magnitude, reflecting the influence of differing degrees of fractured rock heterogeneity at different sites. In addition, the surveyed data indicate that field-scale longitudinal dispersivity generally increases with observation scale, which is consistent with previous studies. The scale-dependent field-scale matrix diffusion coefficient (and dispersivity) may have significant implications for assessing long-term, large-scale radionuclide and contaminant transport events in fractured rock, both for nuclear waste disposal

  16. Magnetic fields in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ryu, Dongsu; Treumann, Rudolf A; Tsagas, Christos G; Widrow, Lawrence M

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic fields appear to be ubiquitous in astrophysical environments. Their existence in the intracluster medium is established through observations of synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation. On the other hand, the nature of magnetic fields outside of clusters, where observations are scarce and controversial, remains largely unknown. In this chapter, we review recent developments in our understanding of the nature and origin of intergalactic magnetic fields, and in particular, intercluster fields. A plausible scenario for the origin of galactic and intergalactic magnetic fields is for seed fields, created in the early universe, to be amplified by turbulent flows induced during the formation of the large scale structure. We present several mechanisms for the generation of seed fields both before and after recombination. We then discuss the evolution and role of magnetic fields during the formation of the first starts. We describe the turbulent amplification of seed fields during the formation of large scal...

  17. A glance of technology efforts for design-for-manufacturing in nano-scale CMOS processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG YuHua

    2008-01-01

    This paper overviews design for manufacturing (DFM) for IC design in nano-CMOS technologies. Process/device issues relevant to the manufacturability of ICs in advanced CMOS technologies will be presented first before an exploration on process/device modeling for DFM is done. The discussion also covers a brief in-troduction of DFM-aware of design flow and EDA efforts to better handle the design-manufacturing interface in very large scale IC design environment.

  18. Ever-present threats from information technology: the Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver John Mason

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Delusions involving technology, and specifically the internet, are increasingly common, and fear-reality statistics suggest computer-related fears are very widespread. These fears form a continuum from the widely understandable and realistic to the unrealistic, and frankly paranoid. The present study investigated the validity of this construct in a non-clinical population by constructing a novel self-report measure. The new Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale aims to measure the perception of information technology-related threats originating from or enabled by computers, smartphones, social networks and digital surveillance. Psychometric properties of the new Cyber-Paranoia and Fear Scale are reported alongside an established measure of suspiciousness and paranoia in 181 participants including a sub-group of fifty information technology professionals. Exploratory factor analysis suggested the presence of two, related, dimensions that we term Cyber-Fear and Cyber-Paranoia. Both sub-scales were internally consistent and produced a normal distribution of scores. The relationships of the sub-scales with age, gender, trait paranoia, digital literacy and digital inclusion are supportive of construct validity. The distinctiveness of ‘cyber-paranoia’ from general trait paranoia appears to mirror the clinical distinctiveness of ‘internet’ and other technology fuelled delusions. Knowledge provision to increase technological proficiency and awareness may bring about a reduction in cyber-paranoia.

  19. Pilot-scale tests of an innovative 'serial self-turning reactor' composting technology in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungsomboon, Praj-ya; Chaisomphob, Taweep; Bongochgetsakul, Nattakorn; Ishida, Tetsuya

    2013-02-01

    Composting facilities in Thailand have faced various operational problems, resulting in the emission of odours, incomplete digestion of waste organics, and higher than desired costs. Composting technologies imported from developed countries tend to be sized for larger communities and are otherwise not suited for the rural communities that comprise more than 80% of all communities in Thailand. This article addresses the research and development of a novel composting technology aimed at filling this observed need. The study was divided into two parts: (1) the development of a new composting technology and fabrication of a prototype configuration of equipment; and (2) scale-up and study on a pilot-scale using real rubbish. The proposed technology, called 'serial self-turning reactor (STR)', entailed a vertical flow composting system that consisted of a set of aerobic reactors stacked on a set of gravity fed turning units. In-vessel bioreactor technology enables the operator to control composting conditions. The researchers found that a tower-like STR results in flexibility in size scale and waste processing residence time. The pilot-scale experiments showed that the proposed system can produce good quality compost while consuming comparatively little energy and occupying a compact space, compared to traditional land-intensive windrow composting facilities.

  20. NASA(Field Center Based) Technology Commercialization Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Under the direction of the IC(sup 2) Institute, the Johnson Technology Commercialization Center has met or exceeded all planned milestones and metrics during the first two and a half years of the NTCC program. The Center has established itself as an agent for technology transfer and economic development in- the Clear Lake community, and is positioned to continue as a stand-alone operation. This report presents data on the experimental JTCC program, including all objective measures tracked over its duration. While the metrics are all positive, the data indicates a shortage of NASA technologies with strong commercial potential, barriers to the identification and transfer of technologies which may have potential, and small financial return to NASA via royalty-bearing licenses. The Center has not yet reached the goal of self-sufficiency based on rental income, and remains dependent on NASA funding. The most important issues raised by the report are the need for broader and deeper community participation in the Center, technology sourcing beyond JSC, and the form of future funding which will be appropriate.

  1. Measuring water-vapour and carbon-dioxide fluxes at field scales with scintillometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesteren, van A.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    Scintillometry is a measurement technique that has proven itself to be of great value for measuring spatial-averaged fluxes of sensible heat, momentum, and evapotranspiration. Furthermore, for crop fields (field scales), scintillometry has been shown to accurately determine the sensible-heat and mom

  2. Adapting crop management practices to climate change: Modeling optimal solutions at the field scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehmann, N.; Finger, R.; Klein, T.; Calanca, P.; Walter, A.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change will alter the environmental conditions for crop growth and require adjustments in management practices at the field scale. In this paper, we analyzed the impacts of two different climate change scenarios on optimal field management practices in winterwheat and grain maize production

  3. Atomistic near-field nanoplasmonics: reaching atomic-scale resolution in nanooptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbry, M; Koval, P; Marchesin, F; Esteban, R; Borisov, A G; Aizpurua, J; Sánchez-Portal, D

    2015-05-13

    Electromagnetic field localization in nanoantennas is one of the leitmotivs that drives the development of plasmonics. The near-fields in these plasmonic nanoantennas are commonly addressed theoretically within classical frameworks that neglect atomic-scale features. This approach is often appropriate since the irregularities produced at the atomic scale are typically hidden in far-field optical spectroscopies. However, a variety of physical and chemical processes rely on the fine distribution of the local fields at this ultraconfined scale. We use time-dependent density functional theory and perform atomistic quantum mechanical calculations of the optical response of plasmonic nanoparticles, and their dimers, characterized by the presence of crystallographic planes, facets, vertices, and steps. Using sodium clusters as an example, we show that the atomistic details of the nanoparticles morphologies determine the presence of subnanometric near-field hot spots that are further enhanced by the action of the underlying nanometric plasmonic fields. This situation is analogue to a self-similar nanoantenna cascade effect, scaled down to atomic dimensions, and it provides new insights into the limits of field enhancement and confinement, with important implications in the optical resolution of field-enhanced spectroscopies and microscopies.

  4. Field-scale sensitivity of vegetation discrimination to hyperspectral reflectance and coupled statistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manevski, Kiril; Jabloun, Mohamed; Gupta, Manika

    2016-01-01

    of the field campaigns and the utilization of the spectral libraries for discrimination and classification purpose. All in all, this work contributes to better understand the uncertainty of the field-scale discrimination results due to the type of reflectance, the nature of the statistical test, and the number...

  5. Full Scale Field Trial of the Low Temperature Mercury Capture Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Locke, James [CONSOL Energy Inc., South Park, PA (United States); Winschel, Richard [CONSOL Energy Inc., South Park, PA (United States)

    2012-05-21

    CONSOL Energy Inc., with partial funding from the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory, designed a full-scale installation for a field trial of the Low-Temperature Mercury Control (LTMC) process, which has the ability to reduce mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants by over 90 percent, by cooling flue gas temperatures to approximately 230°F and absorbing the mercury on the native carbon in the fly ash, as was recently demonstrated by CONSOL R&D on a slip-stream pilot plant at the Allegheny Energy Mitchell Station with partial support by DOE. LTMC has the potential to remove over 90 percent of the flue gas mercury at a cost at least an order of magnitude lower (on a $/lb mercury removed basis) than activated carbon injection. The technology is suitable for retrofitting to existing and new plants, and, although it is best suited to bituminous coal-fired plants, it may have some applicability to the full range of coal types. Installation plans were altered and moved from the original project host site, PPL Martins Creek plant, to a second host site at Allegheny Energy's R. Paul Smith plant, before installation actually occurred at the Jamestown (New York) Board of Public Utilities (BPU) Samuel A. Carlson (Carlson) Municipal Generating Station Unit 12, where the LTMC system was operated on a limited basis. At Carlson, over 60% mercury removal was demonstrated by cooling the flue gas to 220-230°F at the ESP inlet via humidification. The host unit ESP operation was unaffected by the humidification and performed satisfactorily at low temperature conditions.

  6. On the magnetic field evolution time-scale in superconducting neutron star cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passamonti, Andrea; Akgün, Taner; Pons, José A.; Miralles, Juan A.

    2017-08-01

    We revisit the various approximations employed to study the long-term evolution of the magnetic field in neutron star cores and discuss their limitations and possible improvements. A recent controversy on the correct form of the induction equation and the relevant evolution time-scale in superconducting neutron star cores is addressed and clarified. We show that this ambiguity in the estimation of time-scales arises as a consequence of nominally large terms that appear in the induction equation, but which are, in fact, mostly irrotational. This subtlety leads to a discrepancy by many orders of magnitude when velocity fields are absent or ignored. Even when internal velocity fields are accounted for, only the solenoidal part of the electric field contributes to the induction equation, which can be substantially smaller than the irrotational part. We also argue that stationary velocity fields must be incorporated in the slow evolution of the magnetic field as the next level of approximation.

  7. In Situ Origin of Large Scale Galactic Magnetic Fields Without Kinetic Helicity?

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, E G

    1998-01-01

    The origin and sustenance of large scale galactic magnetic fields has been a long standing and controversial astrophysical problem. Here an alternative to the ``standard'' $\\a-\\Omega$ mean field dynamo and primordial theories is pursued. The steady supply of supernovae induced turbulence exponentiates the total field energy, providing a significant seed mean field that can be linearly stretched by shear. The observed micro-Gauss fields would be produced primarily within one vertical diffusion time since it is only during this time that linear stretching can compete with diffusion. This approach does not invoke exponential mean field dynamo growth from the helicity $\\a$-effect but does employ turbulent diffusion, which limits the number of large scale reversals. The approach could be of interest if the helicity effect is suppressed independently of the turbulent diffusion. This is an important but presently unresolved issue.

  8. Field application of freezing technology for social infrastructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EunChul Shin; YuRa Gong; CheolGyu Jeong

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous methods to prevent seepage flow and ground improvement methodologies such as cement grouting, sheet piling, and the membrane method. In this paper, we present case histories of freezing technology applications in the construction of a deep tunnel sewerage system, undersea highway tunnel, and liquefied natural gas tank. Heaving pressure measurements for various soil types around a liquefied natural tank are compared with existing data. In this paper, we present temperature variations at the bottom and side of a liquefied natural gas tank. Our findings show that ground-freezing technology is very effective in controlling ground water infiltration into underground structures as well providing soil reinforcement in the soft ground.

  9. ERL with non-scaling fixed field alternating gradient lattice for eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brooks, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Hao, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Litvinenko, V. N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Meot, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Roser, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Thieberger, P. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tsoupas, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The proposed eRHIC electron-hadron collider uses a "non-scaling FFAG" (NS-FFAG) lattice to recirculate 16 turns of different energy through just two beam lines located in the RHIC tunnel. This paper presents lattices for these two FFAGs that are optimized for low magnet field and to minimize total synchrotron radiation across the energy range. The higher number of recirculations in the FFAG allows a shorter linac (1.322GeV) to be used, drastically reducing cost, while still achieving a 21.2 GeV maximum energy to collide with one of the existing RHIC hadron rings at up to 250GeV. eRHIC uses many cost-saving measures in addition to the FFAG: the linac operates in energy recovery mode, so the beams also decelerate via the same FFAG loops and energy is recovered from the interacted beam. All magnets will be constructed from NdFeB permanent magnet material, meaning chillers and large magnet power supplies are not needed. This paper also describes a small prototype ERL-FFAG accelerator that will test all of these technologies in combination to reduce technical risk for eRHIC.

  10. Field-aligned currents' scale analysis performed with the Swarm constellation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Hermann; Park, Jaeheung; Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff

    2015-01-01

    We present a statistical study of the temporal- and spatial-scale characteristics of different field-aligned current (FAC) types derived with the Swarm satellite formation. We divide FACs into two classes: small-scale, up to some 10 km, which are carried predominantly by kinetic Alfve´n waves......, and large-scale FACs with sizes of more than 150 km. For determining temporal variability we consider measurements at the same point, the orbital crossovers near the poles, but at different times. From correlation analysis we obtain a persistent period of small-scale FACs of order 10 s, while large-scale...... FACs can be regarded stationary for more than 60 s. For the first time we investigate the longitudinal scales. Large-scale FACs are different on dayside and nightside. On the nightside the longitudinal extension is on average 4 times the latitudinal width, while on the dayside, particularly in the cusp...

  11. Giga-Gauss scale quasistatic magnetic field generation in an 'escargot' target

    CERN Document Server

    Korneev, Ph; Tikhonchuk, V

    2014-01-01

    A simple setup for the generation of ultra-intense quasistatic magnetic fields, based on the generation of electron currents with a predefined geometry in a curved 'escargot' target, is proposed and analysed. Particle-In-Cell simulations and qualitative estimates show that giga-Gauss scale magnetic fields may be achieved with existent laser facilities. The described mechanism of the strong magnetic field generation may be useful in a wide range of applications, from laboratory astrophysics to magnetized ICF schemes.

  12. [Constant scaled-energy spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms in a static electric field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jun-wen; Liu, Xiao-jun; Zhao, Zhi; Zhan, Ming-sheng

    2002-02-01

    In the past years, scaled energy spectroscopy is under active investigation because this method can simplify the analysis of atomic spectra in the external field based on classic mechanics. A fully computer-controlled experimental system to study the constant scaled-energy spectroscopy was established and described in this paper. The excitation energy E and the strength of the external electric field F were controlled synchronously to keep the scaled-energy epsilon = E/square root of F constant. With this system, constant scaled-energy spectra of Strontium Rydberg atoms at epsilon = -3.0 in a static electric field were successfully recorded for the first time, and the recurrence spectra were obtained by a Fourier transform.

  13. EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN PRACTICE Research and Practical Case Studies from the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Ozden SAHIN-IZMIRLI

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The book starts with an explanation of the reason why the terms found in the book are sometimes used in place of each other. The editors stated that when technological tools are used to establish an effective and productive study process in education, the concept of learning technology is used instead of educational technology. The editors of the book considers the field as complex and vague in terms of the fact that the meanings of the concepts are close to each other in the field of educational technology and that the field provides an opportunity for inter-disciplinary studies. However, according to the editors, this vagueness and complexity shows the superiority of the field. This superiority is explained with the fact that the field of educational technology requires upper-level skills of problem solving and critical thinking and that it presents a multi-dimensional and inter-disciplinary study field. The book was edited by Wanjira Kinuthia and Steward Marshall. Wanjira Kinuthia, an assistant professor at Georgia State University, works in the Department of Middle-Secondary Education and Instructional Technology. Steward Marshall, a professor at the University of the West Indies, is the director of the Distance Education Centre. The book includes five sections and 21 chapters. These sections are “Materials, Methods, and Modalities”, “Technology Implementation and Integration Issues”, “Student Engagement and Learning”, “Building Capacity”, “Using Technology for Performance Improvement and Productivity Enhancement”.

  14. Plot-scale field experiment of surface hydrologic processes with EOS implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laymon, Charles A.; Macari, Emir J.; Costes, Nicholas C.

    1992-01-01

    Plot-scale hydrologic field studies were initiated at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to a) investigate the spatial and temporal variability of surface and subsurface hydrologic processes, particularly as affected by vegetation, and b) develop experimental techniques and associated instrumentation methodology to study hydrologic processes at increasingly large spatial scales. About 150 instruments, most of which are remotely operated, have been installed at the field site to monitor ground atmospheric conditions, precipitation, interception, soil-water status, and energy flux. This paper describes the nature of the field experiment, instrumentation and sampling rationale, and presents preliminary findings.

  15. Comparison of Temperature Field Distribution between Cement Preclinkering Technology and Cement Precalcining Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xun; WANG Lan

    2016-01-01

    Through the comparison of calcination conditions between cement preclinkering technology and cement precalcining technology, we studied the characteristics of temperature ifeld distribution of cement preclinkering technology systems including cyclone preheater, preclinkering furnace, and rotary kiln. We used numerical simulation method to obtain data of temperature ifeld distribution.Some results are found by system study. The ratio of tail coal of cement preclinkering technology is about 70%, and raw meal temperature can reach 1070℃. ShorterL/D kiln type of preclinkering technology can obtain more stable calcining zone temperature. The highest solid temperature of cement preclinkering technology is higher than 80℃, and high temperature region (>1450℃) length is 2 times, which is beneifcial for calcining clinker and higher clinker quality. So cement preclinkering technology can obtain more performance temperature ifled, which improves both the solid-phase reaction and liquid-phase reaction.

  16. Gender Differences in the Field of Information Security Technology Management: A Qualitative, Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marcia L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored why there are so few senior women in the information security technology management field and whether gender played a part in the achievement of women in the field. Extensive interviews were performed to capture the lived experiences of successful women in the field regarding the obstacles and common denominators of…

  17. Gender Differences in the Field of Information Security Technology Management: A Qualitative, Phenomenological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Marcia L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored why there are so few senior women in the information security technology management field and whether gender played a part in the achievement of women in the field. Extensive interviews were performed to capture the lived experiences of successful women in the field regarding the obstacles and common denominators of…

  18. Effect of Field Trip on Students' Academic Performance in Basic Technology in Ilorin Metropolis, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amosa, Abdul Ganiyu Alasela; Ogunlade, Oyeronke Olufunmilola; Atobatele, Adunni Suliat

    2015-01-01

    The use of field trip in teaching and learning helps to bring about effective and efficient learning in Basic Technology. Field trip is a group excursion away from the normal education environment for firsthand experience of an historic site or place of special interest. This study therefore was geared towards finding out the effect of field trip…

  19. The Physics and Technology of Strong Magnetic Fields (Chapter 10),

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    capacitor bank was discharged. The solenoid was placed into a metal tube, which was equipped with a radial slot and an explosive surrounded by a ring...1) "Trap" of magnetic field; 2) Ring of explosive; 3) De- L_ l tonator; 4) Trigger; 5) Capacitor Iw bank . 3 ,. .,.’ . - *-’-- The strength of the...and the other, outside it. The initial magnetic field was monitored according to the magnitude of the discharge current of the capacitor bank ; a test

  20. A Field Guide to Heidegger: Understanding "The Question Concerning Technology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddington, David I.

    2005-01-01

    This essay serves as a guide for scholars, especially those in education, who want to gain a better understanding of Heidegger's essay, "The Question Concerning Technology". The paper has three sections: an interpretive summary, a critical commentary, and some remarks on Heidegger scholarship in education. Since Heidegger's writing style is rather…

  1. Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Curtis [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Springer, David [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak. Standard blower door technology is used to facilitate the building pressurization, which allows the installer to track the sealing progress during the installation and automatically verify the final building tightness. Each aerosol envelope sealing installation was performed after drywall was installed and taped, and the process did not appear to interrupt the construction schedule or interfere with other trades working in the homes. The labor needed to physically seal bulk air leaks in typical construction will not be replaced by this technology. However, this technology is capable of bringing the air leakage of a building that was built with standard construction techniques and HERS-verified sealing down to levels that would meet DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes program requirements. When a developer is striving to meet a tighter envelope leakage specification, this technology could greatly reduce the cost to achieve that goal by providing a simple and relatively low cost method for reducing the air leakage of a building envelope with little to no change in their common building practices.

  2. The Outlook in Engineering-Related Technology Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Peggie

    2009-01-01

    Community colleges have a long and impressive history of preparing a well-qualified technical workforce to meet the immediate and short-term needs of local and regional industries. Programs range from certificates in areas such as drafting, computer-aided design, and automotive technology to associate degrees in electrical and mechanical…

  3. The magnetic shear-current effect: generation of large-scale magnetic fields by the small-scale dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Squire, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    A novel large-scale dynamo mechanism, the magnetic shear-current effect, is discussed and explored. The effect relies on the interaction of magnetic fluctuations with a mean shear flow, meaning the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo can drive a large-scale dynamo -- in some sense the inverse of dynamo quenching. The dynamo is nonhelical, with the mean-field $\\alpha$ coefficient zero, and is caused by the interaction between an off-diagonal component of the turbulent resistivity and the stretching of the large-scale field by shear flow. Following up on previous numerical and analytic work, this paper presents further details of the numerical evidence for the effect, as well as an heuristic description of how magnetic fluctuations can interact with shear flow to produce the required electromotive force. The pressure response of the fluid is fundamental to this mechanism, which helps explain why the magnetic effect is stronger than its kinematic cousin, and the basic idea is related to the well-known lack...

  4. Electron-scale shear instabilities: magnetic field generation and particle acceleration in astrophysical jets

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, E P; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2014-01-01

    Strong shear flow regions found in astrophysical jets are shown to be important dissipation regions, where the shear flow kinetic energy is converted into electric and magnetic field energy via shear instabilities. The emergence of these self-consistent fields make shear flows significant sites for radiation emission and particle acceleration. We focus on electron-scale instabilities, namely the collisionless, unmagnetized Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) and a large-scale dc magnetic field generation mechanism on the electron scales. We show that these processes are important candidates to generate magnetic fields in the presence of strong velocity shears, which may naturally originate in energetic matter outburst of active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursters. We show that the KHI is robust to density jumps between shearing flows, thus operating in various scenarios with different density contrasts. Multidimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of the KHI, performed with OSIRIS, reveal the emergen...

  5. Plasma Boundaries and Kinetic-Scale Electric Field Structures in the Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David; Larsen, Brian; Ergun, R. E.; Skoug, Ruth; Wygant, John; Reeves, Geoffrey; Jaynes, Allison

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in spacecraft instrumentation have enabled fresh examination of coupling between macro-scale and micro-scale physics in the terrestrial magnetosphere, demonstrating not only that cross-scale interactions are a key component of magnetospheric dynamics, but also that plasma boundaries play a crucial role in mediating cross-scale coupling. We use Van Allen Probe observations to study the cross-scale interaction between inner magnetospheric plasma boundaries (including the plasmapause and injection fronts) and kinetic-scale electric field structures including kinetic Alfven waves, double layers, phase space holes, and nonlinear whistler mode waves. We focus on the spatial distribution of these kinetic structures in the inner magnetosphere and their interaction with plasma boundaries. We demonstrate that both the occurrence probability and amplitude of these structures peak at plasma boundaries. Further, it is found that regions of kinetic-scale electric field structure activity travel with plasma boundaries. These observations imply that kinetic-scale electric field structures are continually generated by instabilities localized to these boundaries, constraining their ability to energize radiation belt particles over large spatial regions.

  6. Small-scale Magnetic Field Diagnostics outside Sunspots: Comparison of Different Methods

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. N. Rachkovsky; T. T. Tsap; V. G. Lozitsky

    2005-12-01

    We analyse different observational data related to the problem of intrinsic magnetic field strength in small-scale fluxtubes outside sunspots. We conclude that the kG range of fluxtube fields follows from not only classical line ratio method, but also from other old and new techniques. For the quiet regions on the Sun, the most probable mode of such fields has a magnetic field strength of 1.2–1.5 kG assuming the rectangular field profile. To best interpret the observations, a weak background field between fluxtubes should be assumed, and its magnetic field strength is expected to increase with the filling factor of fluxtubes. The alternative point of view about subkilogauss fluxtube fields is critically examined, and possible sources of different conclusions are presented.

  7. Quantum Quenches in Free Field Theory: Universal Scaling at Any Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Sumit R; Myers, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    Quantum quenches display universal scaling in several regimes. For quenches which start from a gapped phase and cross a critical point, with a rate slow compared to the initial gap, many systems obey Kibble-Zurek scaling. More recently, a different scaling behaviour has been shown to occur when the quench rate is fast compared to all other physical scales, but still slow compared to the UV cutoff. We investigate the passage from fast to slow quenches in scalar and fermionic free field theories with time dependent masses for which the dynamics can be solved exactly for all quench rates. We find that renormalized one point functions smoothly cross over between the regimes.

  8. Technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) influenza vaccine manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Barry; Boulanger, Robert; Fino, Mireli; Srivastava, Indresh; Holtz, Kathy; Khramtsov, Nikolai; McPherson, Clifton; Meghrous, Jamal; Kubera, Paul; Cox, Manon M J

    2014-09-22

    Multiple different hemagglutinin (HA) protein antigens have been reproducibly manufactured at the 650L scale by Protein Sciences Corporation (PSC) based on an insect cell culture with baculovirus infection. Significantly, these HA protein antigens were produced by the same Universal Manufacturing process as described in the biological license application (BLA) for the first recombinant influenza vaccine approved by the FDA (Flublok). The technology is uniquely designed so that a change in vaccine composition can be readily accommodated from one HA protein antigen to another one. Here we present a vaccine candidate to combat the recently emerged H7N9 virus as an example starting with the genetic sequence for the required HA, creation of the baculovirus and ending with purified protein antigen (or vaccine component) at the 10L scale accomplished within 38 days under GMP conditions. The same process performance is being achieved at the 2L, 10L, 100L, 650L and 2500L scale. An illustration is given of how the technology was transferred from the benchmark 650L scale facility to a retrofitted microbial facility at the 2500L scale within 100 days which includes the time for facility engineering changes. The successful development, technology transfer and scale-up of the Flublok process has major implications for being ready to make vaccine rapidly on a worldwide scale as a defense against pandemic influenza. The technology described does not have the same vulnerability to mutations in the egg adapted strain, and resulting loss in vaccine efficacy, faced by egg based manufacture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Measuring Artistically Gifted Students' Attitudes toward Technology Using Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantzler, John A.; Bensoy, Kevin D.; Siders, James. A.

    2014-01-01

    This study measured artistically gifted students' attitudes toward technology and compared them to their math/science peers. Researchers administered the English version of the Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales (M-FSAS) to 149 students enrolled at a residential school (grades 7-12) for the artistically and math/science gifted (108 female,…

  10. Unraveling the photovoltaic technology learning curve by incorporation of input price changes and scale effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C.F.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Alsema, E.A. [Department of Science, Technology and Society, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    In a large number of energy models, the use of learning curves for estimating technological improvements has become popular. This is based on the assumption that technological development can be monitored by following cost development as a function of market size. However, recent data show that in some stages of photovoltaic technology (PV) production, the market price of PV modules stabilizes even though the cumulative capacity increases. This implies that no technological improvement takes place in these periods: the cost predicted by the learning curve in the PV study is lower than the market one. We propose that this bias results from ignoring the effects of input prices and scale effects, and that incorporating the input prices and scale effects into the learning curve theory is an important issue in making cost predictions more reliable. In this paper, a methodology is described to incorporate the scale and input-prices effect as the additional variables into the one factor learning curve, which leads to the definition of the multi-factor learning curve. This multi-factor learning curve is not only derived from economic theories, but also supported by an empirical study. The results clearly show that input prices and scale effects are to be included, and that, although market prices are stabilizing, learning is still taking place. (author)

  11. Large-scale decontamination and decommissioning technology demonstration project at a former uranium metal production facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martineit, R.A.; Borgman, T.D.; Peters, M.S.; Stebbins, L.L. [and others

    1997-03-05

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Science and Technology Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Focus Area, led by the Federal Energy Technology Center, has been charged with improving upon baseline D&D technologies with the goal of demonstrating and validating more cost-effective and safer technologies to characterize, deactivate, survey, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of surplus structures, buildings, and their contents at DOE sites. The D&D Focus Area`s approach to verifying the benefits of the improved D&D technologies is to use them in large-scale technology demonstration (LSTD) projects at several DOE sites. The Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) was selected to host one of the first three LSTD`s awarded by the D&D Focus Area. The FEMP is a DOE facility near Cincinnati, Ohio, that was formerly engaged in the production of high quality uranium metal. The FEMP is a Superfund site which has completed its RUFS process and is currently undergoing environmental restoration. With the FEMP`s selection to host an LSTD, the FEMP was immediately faced with some challenges. The primary challenge was that this LSTD was to be integrated into the FEMP`s Plant 1 D&D Project which was an ongoing D&D Project for which a firm fixed price contract had been issued to the D&D Contractor. Thus, interferences with the baseline D&D project could have significant financial implications. Other challenges include defining and selecting meaningful technology demonstrations, finding/selecting technology providers, and integrating the technology into the baseline D&D project. To date, twelve technologies have been selected, and six have been demonstrated. The technology demonstrations have yielded a high proportion of {open_quotes}winners.{close_quotes} All demonstrated, technologies will be evaluated for incorporation into the FEMP`s baseline D&D strategy.

  12. Field Trial of an Aerosol-Based Enclosure Sealing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, Curtis [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Springer, David [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report presents the results from several demonstrations of a new method for sealing building envelope air leaks using an aerosol sealing process developed by the Western Cooling Efficiency Center at UC Davis. The process involves pressurizing a building while applying an aerosol sealant to the interior. As air escapes through leaks in the building envelope, the aerosol particles are transported to the leaks where they collect and form a seal that blocks the leak. Standard blower door technology is used to facilitate the building pressurization, which allows the installer to track the sealing progress during the installation and automatically verify the final building tightness. Each aerosol envelope sealing installation was performed after drywall was installed and taped, and the process did not appear to interrupt the construction schedule or interfere with other trades working in the homes. The labor needed to physically seal bulk air leaks in typical construction will not be replaced by this technology.

  13. Narrow Scale Flow and a Weak Field by the Top of Earth's Core: Evidence from Orsted, Magsat and Secular Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhies, Coerte V.

    2004-01-01

    As Earth's main magnetic field weakens, our magnetic shield against the onslaught of the solar wind thins. And the field strength needed to fend off battering by solar coronal mass ejections is decreasing, just when the delicate complexity of modem, vulnerable, electro-technological systems is increasing at an unprecedented rate. Recently, a working group of distinguished scientist from across the nation has asked NASA's Solid Earth and Natural Hazards program a key question: What are the dynamics of Earth s magnetic field and its interactions with the Earth system? Paleomagnetic studies of crustal rocks magnetized in the geologic past reveal that polarity reversals have occurred many times during Earth s history. Networked super-computer simulations of core field and flow, including effects of gravitational, pressure, rotational Coriolis, magnetic and viscous forces, suggest how this might happen in detail. And space-based measurements of the real, time-varying magnetic field help constrain estimates of the speed and direction of fluid iron flowing near the top of the core and enable tests of some hypotheses about such flow. Now scientists at NASA s Goddard Space Flight Center have developed and applied methods to test the hypotheses of narrow scale flow and of a dynamically weak magnetic field near the top of Earth s core. Using two completely different methods, C. V. Voorhies has shown these hypotheses lead to specific theoretical forms for the "spectrum" of Earth s main magnetic field and the spectrum of its rate of change. Much as solar physicists use a prism to separate sunlight into its spectrum, from long wavelength red to short wavelength blue light, geophysicists use a digital prism, spherical harmonic analysis, to separate the measured geomagnetic field into its spectrum, from long to short wavelength fields. They do this for the rate of change of the field as well.

  14. Utility-Scale Concentrating Solar Power and Photovoltaic Projects: A Technology and Market Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Lowder, T.; Canavan, B.

    2012-04-01

    Over the last several years, solar energy technologies have been, or are in the process of being, deployed at unprecedented levels. A critical recent development, resulting from the massive scale of projects in progress or recently completed, is having the power sold directly to electric utilities. Such 'utility-scale' systems offer the opportunity to deploy solar technologies far faster than the traditional 'behind-the-meter' projects designed to offset retail load. Moreover, these systems have employed significant economies of scale during construction and operation, attracting financial capital, which in turn can reduce the delivered cost of power. This report is a summary of the current U.S. utility-scale solar state-of-the-market and development pipeline. Utility-scale solar energy systems are generally categorized as one of two basic designs: concentrating solar power (CSP) and photovoltaic (PV). CSP systems can be further delineated into four commercially available technologies: parabolic trough, central receiver (CR), parabolic dish, and linear Fresnel reflector. CSP systems can also be categorized as hybrid, which combine a solar-based system (generally parabolic trough, CR, or linear Fresnel) and a fossil fuel energy system to produce electric power or steam.

  15. Phase field modelling of stressed grain growth: Analytical study and the effect of microstructural length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamshidian, M., E-mail: mostafa.jamshidian@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, Marienstrasse 15, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Rabczuk, T., E-mail: timon.rabczuk@uni-weimar.de [Institute of Structural Mechanics, Bauhaus-University Weimar, Marienstrasse 15, 99423 Weimar (Germany); School of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We establish the correlation between the diffuse interface and sharp interface descriptions for stressed grain boundary migration by presenting analytical solutions for stressed migration of a circular grain boundary in a bicrystalline phase field domain. The validity and accuracy of the phase field model is investigated by comparing the phase field simulation results against analytical solutions. The phase field model can reproduce precise boundary kinetics and stress evolution provided that a thermodynamically consistent theory and proper expressions for model parameters in terms of physical material properties are employed. Quantitative phase field simulations are then employed to investigate the effect of microstructural length scale on microstructure and texture evolution by stressed grain growth in an elastically deformed polycrystalline aggregate. The simulation results reveal a transitional behaviour from normal to abnormal grain growth by increasing the microstructural length scale.

  16. Scaling of semivariograms and the kriging estimation of field-measured properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Vieira

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Two methods were evaluated for scaling a set of semivariograms into a unified function for kriging estimation of field-measured properties. Scaling is performed using sample variances and sills of individual semivariograms as scale factors. Theoretical developments show that kriging weights are independent of the scaling factor which appears simply as a constant multiplying both sides of the kriging equations. The scaling techniques were applied to four sets of semivariograms representing spatial scales of 30 x 30 m to 600 x 900 km. Experimental semivariograms in each set successfully coalesced into a single curve by variances and sills of individual semivariograms. To evaluate the scaling techniques, kriged estimates derived from scaled semivariogram models were compared with those derived from unscaled models. Differences in kriged estimates of the order of 5% were found for the cases in which the scaling technique was not successful in coalescing the individual semivariograms, which also means that the spatial variability of these properties is different. The proposed scaling techniques enhance interpretation of semivariograms when a variety of measurements are made at the same location. They also reduce computational times for kriging estimations because kriging weights only need to be calculated for one variable. Weights remain unchanged for all other variables in the data set whose semivariograms are scaled.

  17. Development of Lab-to-Fab Production Equipment Across Several Length Scales for Printed Energy Technologies, Including Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hösel, Markus; Dam, Henrik Friis; Krebs, Frederik C

    2015-01-01

    We describe and review how the scaling of printed energy technologies not only requires scaling of the input materials but also the machinery used in the processes. The general consensus that ultrafast processing of technologies with large energy capacity can only be realized using roll-to-roll m......We describe and review how the scaling of printed energy technologies not only requires scaling of the input materials but also the machinery used in the processes. The general consensus that ultrafast processing of technologies with large energy capacity can only be realized using roll...

  18. Cosmic-Ray Small-scale Anisotropies and Local Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barquero, V.; Farber, R.; Xu, S.; Desiati, P.; Lazarian, A.

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic-ray anisotropy has been observed in a wide energy range and at different angular scales by a variety of experiments over the past decade. However, no comprehensive or satisfactory explanation has been put forth to date. The arrival distribution of cosmic rays at Earth is the convolution of the distribution of their sources and of the effects of geometry and properties of the magnetic field through which particles propagate. It is generally believed that the anisotropy topology at the largest angular scale is adiabatically shaped by diffusion in the structured interstellar magnetic field. On the contrary, the medium- and small-scale angular structure could be an effect of nondiffusive propagation of cosmic rays in perturbed magnetic fields. In particular, a possible explanation for the observed small-scale anisotropy observed at the TeV energy scale may be the effect of particle propagation in turbulent magnetized plasmas. We perform numerical integration of test particle trajectories in low-β compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence to study how the cosmic rays’ arrival direction distribution is perturbed when they stream along the local turbulent magnetic field. We utilize Liouville’s theorem for obtaining the anisotropy at Earth and provide the theoretical framework for the application of the theorem in the specific case of cosmic-ray arrival distribution. In this work, we discuss the effects on the anisotropy arising from propagation in this inhomogeneous and turbulent interstellar magnetic field.

  19. Patterning technology for solution-processed organic crystal field-effect transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Sun, Huabin; Shi, Yi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2014-04-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are fundamental building blocks for various state-of-the-art electronic devices. Solution-processed organic crystals are appreciable materials for these applications because they facilitate large-scale, low-cost fabrication of devices with high performance. Patterning organic crystal transistors into well-defined geometric features is necessary to develop these crystals into practical semiconductors. This review provides an update on recent development in patterning technology for solution-processed organic crystals and their applications in field-effect transistors. Typical demonstrations are discussed and examined. In particular, our latest research progress on the spin-coating technique from mixture solutions is presented as a promising method to efficiently produce large organic semiconducting crystals on various substrates for high-performance OFETs. This solution-based process also has other excellent advantages, such as phase separation for self-assembled interfaces via one-step spin-coating, self-flattening of rough interfaces, and in situ purification that eliminates the impurity influences. Furthermore, recommendations for future perspectives are presented, and key issues for further development are discussed.

  20. Patterning technology for solution-processed organic crystal field-effect transistors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs are fundamental building blocks for various state-of-the-art electronic devices. Solution-processed organic crystals are appreciable materials for these applications because they facilitate large-scale, low-cost fabrication of devices with high performance. Patterning organic crystal transistors into well-defined geometric features is necessary to develop these crystals into practical semiconductors. This review provides an update on recent development in patterning technology for solution-processed organic crystals and their applications in field-effect transistors. Typical demonstrations are discussed and examined. In particular, our latest research progress on the spin-coating technique from mixture solutions is presented as a promising method to efficiently produce large organic semiconducting crystals on various substrates for high-performance OFETs. This solution-based process also has other excellent advantages, such as phase separation for self-assembled interfaces via one-step spin-coating, self-flattening of rough interfaces, and in situ purification that eliminates the impurity influences. Furthermore, recommendations for future perspectives are presented, and key issues for further development are discussed.

  1. Rapid, high-temperature, field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcium carbonate scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1986-09-01

    A new test method is described that allows the rapid field testing of calcium carbonate scale inhibitors at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). The method evolved from use of a full-flow test loop on a well with a mass flow rate of about 1 x 10/sup 6/ lbm/hr (126 kg/s). It is a simple, effective way to evaluate the effectiveness of inhibitors under field conditions. Five commercial formulations were chosen for field evaluation on the basis of nonflowing, laboratory screening tests at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). Four of these formulations from different suppliers controlled calcium carbonate scale deposition as measured by the test method. Two of these could dislodge recently deposited scale that had not age-hardened. Performance-profile diagrams, which were measured for these four effective inhibitors, show the concentration interrelationship between brine calcium and inhibitor concentrations at which the formulations will and will not stop scale formation in the test apparatus. With these diagrams, one formulation was chosen for testing on the full-flow brine line. The composition was tested for 6 weeks and showed a dramatic decrease in the scaling occurring at the flow-control valve. This scaling was about to force a shutdown of a major, long-term flow test being done for reservoir economic evaluations. The inhibitor stopped the scaling, and the test was performed without interruption.

  2. Evaluation in Component Technology Small Scale Food Industry Cluster in West Sumatera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunarif Taib

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of small-scale food industry cluster is influenced by the technology component. Because it required accurate information about the importance of existing technology components. This study aims to evaluate the technology components that are known several important factors that need to be improved so that clusters of small-scale food industries can thrive. This research using the program Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP to determine the level of importance of each variable based on its value. The survey results revealed that each technology component has a value as follows: technoware component of the operation of the order is a factor (0.2889, quality of raw materials (0.2770, improvement of production efficiency (0.1894, the fulfillment of production capacity (0.1717, technology adoption (0.0489 and resource technologies (0.0242. Components of the order value is organoware environmental management factor (0.6267, marketing management (0.2797 and production management (0.0936. Components infoware order value is a factor of production records (0.6267, the promotion of products (0.2797 and documentation effort (0.0936. Humanware component order is the motivation factor (0.5022, the trust fellow members (0.1883, knowledge manager (0.1854, the management skills (0.0817 and innovation (0, 0425.

  3. Hybrid spherical particle field measurement based on interference technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinlu; Zhang, Hongxia; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Ye; Jia, Dagong; Liu, Tiegen

    2017-03-01

    Interferometric particle imaging is widely used in particle size measurement. Conventional algorithms, which focus on single size particle fields, have difficulties in extracting each interference fringe in a hybrid spherical particle field due to the noise. To solve this problem, an iterative mean filter (IMF) algorithm is proposed. Instead of the specific mean filter template coefficient, the noise is reduced by iterating the calculation results under different template coefficients. The average value of the calculation results excluding the gross error is output as the final result. The effect of different template coefficients are simulated, furthermore, the value range of template coefficients has been analyzed. The interferogram of the hybrid spherical particle field from 21.3 µm to 57.9 µm is processed by the conventional algorithms with specific template coefficients of 2, 8, 12 and the IMF algorithm. The corresponding measurement errors are 17.22%, 10.69%, 9.04% and 5.11%. The experimental results show that the IMF algorithm would reduce measurement error, and could be potentially applied in particle field measurement.

  4. Enhancing Field Research Methods with Mobile Survey Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the experience of undergraduate students using mobile devices and a commercial application, iSurvey, to conduct a neighborhood survey. Mobile devices offer benefits for enhancing student learning and engagement. This field exercise created the opportunity for classroom discussions on the practicalities of urban research, the…

  5. Enhancing Field Research Methods with Mobile Survey Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper assesses the experience of undergraduate students using mobile devices and a commercial application, iSurvey, to conduct a neighborhood survey. Mobile devices offer benefits for enhancing student learning and engagement. This field exercise created the opportunity for classroom discussions on the practicalities of urban research, the…

  6. FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM: PCP METHOD - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Field Analytical Screening Program (FASP) pentachlorophenol (PCP) method uses a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a megabore capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) and electron capture detector (ECD) to identify and quantify PCP. The FASP PCP method is design...

  7. Los Alamos National Laboratory Tritium Technology Deployments Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFee, J.; Blauvelt, D.; Stallings, E.; Willms, S.

    2002-02-26

    This paper describes the organization, planning and initial implementation of a DOE OST program to deploy proven, cost effective technologies into D&D programs throughout the complex. The primary intent is to accelerate closure of the projects thereby saving considerable funds and at the same time being protective of worker health and the environment. Most of the technologies in the ''toolkit'' for this program have been demonstrated at a DOE site as part of a Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP). The Mound Tritium D&D LSDDP served as the base program for the technologies being deployed in this project but other LSDDP demonstrated technologies or ready-for-use commercial technologies will also be considered. The project team will evaluate needs provided by site D&D project managers, match technologies against those needs and rank deployments using a criteria listing. After selecting deployments the project will purchase the equipment and provide a deployment engineer to facilitate the technology implementation. Other cost associated with the use of the technology will be borne by the site including operating staff, safety and health reviews etc. A cost and performance report will be prepared following the deployment to document the results.

  8. Development and Prospects for Energy Saving Technology in Oil & Gas Fields, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Youwang; Yu Jiqing; Lin Ran; Zhu Yingru; Liu Feijun

    2010-01-01

    @@ Current state of energy saving technology in China's oil and gas fields System optimization To optimize the oil-gas field surface engineering system is critical to improve the efficiency of oil and gas field system.To adapt to the changes in development of old oil and gas fields, all oilfields are adjusted and reconstructed;a set of optimized and simplified modes and technical measures are developed.

  9. An Empirical Relation Between The Large-Scale Magnetic Field And The Dynamical Mass In Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Tabatabaei, F S; Knapen, J H; Beckman, J E; Koribalski, B; Elmegreen, B G

    2015-01-01

    The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetic fields as well as the influence of the magnetic fields on the evolution of galaxies are unknown. Though not without challenges, the dynamo theory can explain the large-scale coherent magnetic fields which govern galaxies, but observational evidence for the theory is so far very scarce. Putting together the available data of non-interacting, non-cluster galaxies with known large-scale magnetic fields, we find a tight correlation between the integrated polarized flux density and the rotation speed, v(rot), of galaxies. This leads to an almost linear correlation between the large-scale magnetic field B and v(rot), assuming that the number of cosmic ray electrons is proportional to the star formation rate. This correlation cannot be attributed to an active linear dynamo processes, as no correlation holds with shear or angular speed. It indicates instead a coupling between the large-scale magnetic field and the dynamical mass of the galaxies, B~M(dyn)^{0.2-0.3}. Hence, f...

  10. Large parallel and perpendicular electric fields on electron spatial scales in the terrestrial bow shock

    CERN Document Server

    Bale, S D

    2007-01-01

    Large parallel ($\\leq$ 100 mV/m) and perpendicular ($\\leq$ 600 mV/m) electric fields were measured in the Earth's bow shock by the vector electric field experiment on the Polar satellite. These are the first reported direct measurements of parallel electric fields in a collisionless shock. These fields exist on spatial scales comparable to or less than the electron skin depth (a few kilometers) and correspond to magnetic field-aligned potentials of tens of volts and perpendicular potentials up to a kilovolt. The perpendicular fields are amongst the largest ever measured in space, with energy densities of $\\epsilon_0 E^2/ n k_b T_e$ of order 10%. The measured parallel electric field implies that the electrons can be demagnetized, which may result in stochastic (rather than coherent) electron heating.

  11. The socio-materiality of learning practices and implications for the field of learning technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aditya Johri

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the use of digital information technologies in education has becomecommonplace, there are few, if any, central guiding frameworks or theories thatexplicate the relationship between technology and learning practices. In thispaper, I argue that such a theoretical framework can assist scholars and practitionersalike by working as a conduit to study and design learning technologies.Towards this goal, I propose socio-materiality as a key theoretical construct withvaluable insights and implications for the field of learning technology. Sociomaterialityhelps balance the disproportionate attention given to either the socialimplications of technology use or the material aspects of technology design.Furthermore, I forward ‘socio-material bricolage' as a useful analytical frameworkto examine and design technology-infused learning environments. I illustratethe value of the framework by applying it to three case studies of formaland informal technology-based learning.

  12. FIELD TESTING & OPTIMIZATION OF CO2/SAND FRACTURING TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond L. Mazza

    2004-11-30

    These contract efforts involved the demonstration of a unique liquid free stimulation technology which was, at the beginning of these efforts, in 1993 unavailable in the US. The process had been developed, and patented in Canada in 1981, and held promise for stimulating liquid sensitive reservoirs in the US. The technology differs from that conventionally used in that liquid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), instead of water is the base fluid. The CO{sub 2} is pumped as a liquid and then vaporizes at reservoir conditions, and because no other liquids or chemicals are used, a liquid free fracture is created. The process requires a specialized closed system blender to mix the liquid CO{sub 2} with proppant under pressure. These efforts were funded to consist of up to 21 cost-shared stimulation events. Because of the vagaries of CO{sub 2} supplies, service company support and operator interest only 19 stimulation events were performed in Montana, New Mexico, and Texas. Final reports have been prepared for each of the four demonstration groups, and the specifics of those demonstrations are summarized. A summary of the demonstrations of a novel liquid-free stimulation process which was performed in four groups of ''Candidate Wells'' situated in Crockett Co., TX; San Juan Co., NM; Phillips Co., MT; and Blaine Co., MT. The stimulation process which employs CO{sub 2} as the working fluid and the production responses were compared with those from wells treated with conventional stimulation technologies, primarily N{sub 2} foam, excepting those in Blaine Co., MT where the reservoir pressure is too low to clean up spent stimulation liquids. A total of 19 liquid-free CO{sub 2}/sand stimulations were performed in 16 wells and the production improvements were generally uneconomic.

  13. Near field communications technology and the potential to reduce medication errors through multidisciplinary application

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Connell, Emer

    2016-07-01

    Patient safety requires optimal management of medications. Electronic systems are encouraged to reduce medication errors. Near field communications (NFC) is an emerging technology that may be used to develop novel medication management systems.

  14. Innovative technology in teaching foreign language of future specialists in the field of tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Мира Алексеевна Вчерашняя

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the major trends in tourism development in Kaliningrad, caused the actualization of the application of information and innovative technologies of foreign language teaching in vocational training in the field of tourism.

  15. Computational thermodynamics and informational technologies in the field of computer design of materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udovsky A.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational thermodynamics and informational technologies in the field of computer desing of materials as well as appliance of CALPHAD method on resolution of thermodynamic problems are presented in this paper.

  16. Magnetic fields on a wide range of scales in star-forming galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Heald, George; Sridhar, Sarrvesh S

    2016-01-01

    A key ingredient in the evolution of galaxies is the star formation cycle. Recent progress in the study of magnetic fields is revealing the close connection between star formation and its effect on the small-scale structure in the magnetized interstellar medium (ISM). In this contribution we describe how the modern generation of radio telescopes is being used to probe the physics of the ISM through sensitive multiwavelength surveys of gas and magnetic fields, from the inner star forming disk and outward into the galaxy outskirts where large-scale magnetic fields may also play a key role. We highlight unique pioneering efforts towards performing and scientifically exploiting large-scale surveys of the type that the SKA will undertake routinely. Looking to the future, we describe plans for using the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its pathfinders to gain important new insights into the cosmic history of galaxy evolution.

  17. Heterogeneous grain-scale response in ferroic polycrystals under electric field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniels, John E.; Majkut, Marta; Cao, Qingua

    2016-01-01

    -ray diffraction (3D-XRD) is used to resolve the non-180° ferroelectric domain switching strain components of 191 grains from the bulk of a polycrystalline electro-ceramic that has undergone an electric-field-induced phase transformation. It is found that while the orientation of a given grain relative...... to the field direction has a significant influence on the phase and resultant domain texture, there are large deviations from the average behaviour at the grain scale. It is suggested that these deviations arise from local strain and electric field neighbourhoods being highly heterogeneous within the bulk...... polycrystal. Additionally, the minimisation of electrostatic potentials at the grain boundaries due to interacting ferroelectric domains must also be considered. It is found that the local grain-scale deviations average out over approximately 10–20 grains. These results provide unique insight into the grain-scale...

  18. The Need for an Effective Collaboration across Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) Fields for a Meaningful Technological Development in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruna, Umar Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Collaboration plays a major role in interdisciplinary activities among Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) disciplines or fields. It also affects the relationships among cluster members on the management team. Although effective collaboration does not guarantee success among STEM disciplines, its absence usually assures…

  19. Using virtual reality technology to include field operators in simulation and training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nystad, E.; Strand, S. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)]. E-mail: espen.nystad@hrp.no

    2006-07-01

    By using virtual reality technology, field operators can be included in simulator training. A study has been performed where field operators could perform their activities in a virtual plant and communicate with a control room operator who was placed in a physical control room simulator. This paper describes the use of VR technology in the study and how the operators experienced interacting with the virtual plant. (author)

  20. Technology Acceptance in Social Work Education: Implications for the Field Practicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Alex Don; Bullock, Angela N.

    2014-01-01

    The exponential growth and sophistication of new information and computer technology (ICT) have greatly influenced human interactions and provided new metaphors for understanding the world. The acceptance and integration of ICT into social work field education are examined here using the technological acceptance model. This article also explores…

  1. The Need for Increased Integration of Technology and Digital Skills in the Literacy Field in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2011-01-01

    This report examines the increasing need for literacy professionals and practitioners in Canada to integrate technology into literacy instruction. An overview of the current state of technology in education and workforce training is presented. This is contrasted with the literacy field, which remains heavily reliant on paper-based resources. The…

  2. Efficiency scale and technological change in credit unions and multiple banks using the COSIF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanderson Rocha Bittencourt

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The modernization of the financial intermediation process and adapting to new technologies, brought adjustments to operational processes, providing the reduction of information borrowing costs, allowing generate greater customer satisfaction, due to increased competitiveness in addition to making gains with long efficiency period. In this context, this research aims to analyze the evolution in scale and technological efficiency of credit and multiple cooperative banks from 2009 to 2013. We used the method of Data Envelopment Analysis - DEA, which allows to calculate the change in efficiency of institutions through the Malmquist Index. The results indicated that institutions that employ larger volumes of assets in the composition of its resources presented evolution in scale and technological efficiency, influencing the change in total factor productivity. It should be noticed that cooperatives had, in some years, advances in technology and scale efficiency higher than banks. However, this result can be explained by the fact that the average efficiency of credit unions have been lower than that of banks in the analyzed sample, indicating that there is greater need to improve internal processes by cooperatives, compared to multiple banks surveyed.

  3. FULL-SCALE TESTING OF ENHANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR WET FGD SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.K. McDonald; G.T. Amrhein; G.A. Kudlac; D. Madden Yurchison

    2003-05-07

    Wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD) systems are currently installed on about 25% of the coal-fired utility generating capacity in the U.S., representing about 15% of the number of coal-fired units. Depending on the effect of operating parameters such as mercury content of the coal, form of mercury (elemental or oxidized) in the flue gas, scrubber spray tower configuration, liquid-to-gas ratio, and slurry chemistry, FGD systems can provide cost-effective, near-term mercury emissions control options with a proven history of commercial operation. For boilers already equipped with FGD systems, the incremental cost of any vapor phase mercury removal achieved is minimal. To be widely accepted and implemented, technical approaches that improve mercury removal performance for wet FGD systems should also have low incremental costs and have little or no impact on operation and SO{sub 2} removal performance. The ultimate goal of the Full-scale Testing of Enhanced Mercury Control for Wet FGD Systems Program was to commercialize methods for the control of mercury in coal-fired electric utility systems equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (wet FGD). The program was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development, and Babcock & Wilcox. Host sites and associated support were provided by Michigan South Central Power Agency (MSCPA) and Cinergy. Field-testing was completed at two commercial coal-fired utilities with wet FGD systems: (1) MSCPA's 55 MW{sub e} Endicott Station and (2) Cinergy's 1300 MW{sub e} Zimmer Station. Testing was conducted at these two locations because of the large differences in size and wet scrubber chemistry. Endicott employs a limestone, forced oxidation (LSFO) wet FGD system, whereas Zimmer uses Thiosorbic{reg_sign} Lime (magnesium enhanced lime) and ex situ oxidation. Both locations burn Ohio bituminous coal.

  4. NON-SCALING FIXED FIELD GRADIENT ACCELERATOR (FFAG) DESIGN FOR THE PROTON AND CARBON THERAPY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TRBOJEVIC, D.; KEIL, E.; SESSLER, A.

    2005-06-05

    The non-scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG-from now on) accelerator provides few advantages with respect to the other fixed field accelerators like CYCLOTRONS or scaling-FFAG's. One of the advantages is smaller required aperture due to small orbit offsets during acceleration. The large and heavy magnets are avoided. The beam is very well controlled in a strong focusing regime. This concept has been extensively investigated during the last eight FFAG workshops in Japan, USA, Canada, and CERN in Europe.

  5. Use of computer technology in design of mining field parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magda, R.; Franik, T. (Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland). Instytut Projektowania i Budowy Kopaln)

    1989-01-01

    Discusses use of computerized simulation for optimization of longwall mining under conditions of the Lublin coal basin. A model of a coal block mined by a system of 1, 2 or 3 longwall faces is analyzed. Seven different mining schemes (with retreating or advancing working faces, gate roads driven simultaneously with working face advance or with advanced drivage, gate roads used by one or two working faces) are comparatively evaluated. Four groups of input data are used: natural conditions (coal seam thickness, dip angles, coal properties), equipment (drive power, productivity, cutting depth, conveyor length etc.), organizational factors and economic factors. Using the simulation procedure optimum (in regard to economic and technological aspects) mining schemes are selected. 3 refs.

  6. The concentration of the large-scale solar magnetic field by a meridional surface flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devore, C. R.; Boris, J. P.; Sheeley, N. R., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions to the magnetic flux transport equation in the absence of new bipolar sources of flux are calculated for several meridional flow profiles and a range of peak flow speeds. It is found that a poleward flow with a broad profile and a nominal 10 m/s maximum speed concentrates the large-scale field into very small caps of less than 15 deg half-angle, with average field strengths of several tens of gauss, contrary to observations. A flow which reaches its peak speed at a relatively low latitude and then decreases rapidly to zero at higher latitudes leads to a large-scale field pattern which is consistent with observations. For such a flow, only lower latitude sunspot groups can contribute to interhemispheric flux annihilation and the resulting decay and reversal of the polar magnetic fields.

  7. Market Assessment of Biomass Gasification and Combustion Technology for Small- and Medium-Scale Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, D.; Haase, S.

    2009-07-01

    This report provides a market assessment of gasification and direct combustion technologies that use wood and agricultural resources to generate heat, power, or combined heat and power (CHP) for small- to medium-scale applications. It contains a brief overview of wood and agricultural resources in the U.S.; a description and discussion of gasification and combustion conversion technologies that utilize solid biomass to generate heat, power, and CHP; an assessment of the commercial status of gasification and combustion technologies; a summary of gasification and combustion system economics; a discussion of the market potential for small- to medium-scale gasification and combustion systems; and an inventory of direct combustion system suppliers and gasification technology companies. The report indicates that while direct combustion and close-coupled gasification boiler systems used to generate heat, power, or CHP are commercially available from a number of manufacturers, two-stage gasification systems are largely in development, with a number of technologies currently in demonstration. The report also cites the need for a searchable, comprehensive database of operating combustion and gasification systems that generate heat, power, or CHP built in the U.S., as well as a national assessment of the market potential for the systems.

  8. The Scaling of Electron Acceleration in Magnetic Reconnection with a Guide Field

    CERN Document Server

    Dahlin, J T; Swisdak, M

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic simulations of two-dimensional collisionless magnetic reconnection with a guide field reveal disparate behavior in the weak and strong guide field regimes. In systems where the guide field is smaller than the reconnecting component, the dominant electron accelerator is a Fermi-type mechanism that preferentially energizes the most energetic particles. In the strong guide field regime, however, the field-line contraction that drives Fermi reflection becomes weak. Instead, parallel electric fields ($E_\\parallel$) are primarily responsible for driving electron heating but are ineffective in driving the energetic component of the spectrum. This is due to the the weaker energy scaling of acceleration by $E_\\parallel$ compared with Fermi reflection. These results have important implications for understanding electron acceleration in solar flares and reconnection-driven dissipation in astrophysical turbulence.

  9. Gauge-invariant perturbations at second order: multiple scalar fields on large scales

    CERN Document Server

    Malik, K A

    2005-01-01

    We derive the governing equations for multiple scalar fields minimally coupled to gravity in a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) background spacetime on large scales. We include scalar perturbations up to second order and write the equations in terms of physically transparent gauge-invariant variables at first and second order. This allows us to write the perturbed Klein-Gordon equation at second order solely in terms of the field fluctuations on flat slices at first and second order.

  10. Ultra-fine-scale filamentary structures in the Outer Corona and the Solar Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Filamentary structures following magnetic field lines pervade the Sun's atmosphere and offer us insight into the solar magnetic field. Radio propagation measurements have shown that the smallest filamentary structures in the solar corona are more than 2 orders of magnitude finer than those seen in solar imaging. Here we use radio Doppler measurements to characterize their transverse density gradient and determine their finest scale in the outer corona at 20-30 R(circled dot operator), where open magnetic fields prevail. Filamentary structures overly active regions have the steepest gradient and finest scale, while those overlying coronal holes have the shallowest gradient and least finest scale. Their organization by the underlying corona implies that these subresolution structures extend radially from the entire Sun, confirming that they trace the coronal magnetic field responsible for the radial expansion of the solar wind. That they are rooted all over the Sun elucidates the association between the magnetic field of the photosphere and that of the corona, as revealed by the similarity between the power spectra of the photospheric field and the coronal density fluctuations. This association along with the persistence of filamentary structures far from the Sun demonstrate that subresolution magnetic fields must play an important role not only in magnetic coupling of the photosphere and corona, but also in coronal heating and solar wind acceleration through the process of small-scale magnetic reconnection. They also explain why current widely used theoretical models that extrapolate photospheric magnetic fields into the corona do not predict the correct source of the solar wind.

  11. Rapid high temperature field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcite scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1982-08-01

    A test method is described which allows the rapid field testing of calcite scale inhibitors in high- temperature geothermal brines. Five commercial formulations, chosen on the basis of laboratory screening tests, were tested in brines with low total dissolved solids at ca 500 F. Four were found to be effective; of these, 2 were found to be capable of removing recently deposited scale. One chemical was tested in the full-flow brine line for 6 wks. It was shown to stop a severe surface scaling problem at the well's control valve, thus proving the viability of the rapid test method. (12 refs.)

  12. Field scale heterogeneity of redox conditions in till-upscaling to a catchment nitrate model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.R.; Erntsen, V.; Refsgaard, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Point scale studies in different settings of glacial geology show a large local variation of redox conditions. There is a need to develop an upscaling methodology for catchment scale models. This paper describes a study of field-scale heterogeneity of redox-interfaces in a till aquitard within...... that the depth of the redox-interface is randomly distributed according to a log-normal probability distribution function. The upscaling approach using the random redox model estimated recharge concentrations comparable to the observed concentration in the underlying aquifer. The presented upscaling approach...

  13. Chiral scale and conformal invariance in 2D quantum field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Diego M; Strominger, Andrew

    2011-10-14

    It is well known that a local, unitary Poincaré-invariant 2D quantum field theory with a global scaling symmetry and a discrete non-negative spectrum of scaling dimensions necessarily has both a left and a right local conformal symmetry. In this Letter, we consider a chiral situation beginning with only a left global scaling symmetry and do not assume Lorentz invariance. We find that a left conformal symmetry is still implied, while right translations are enhanced either to a right conformal symmetry or a left U(1) Kac-Moody symmetry.

  14. Scaling and universality in the two-dimensional Ising model with a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangazeev, Vladimir V; Dudalev, Michael Yu; Bazhanov, Vladimir V; Batchelor, Murray T

    2010-06-01

    The scaling function of the two-dimensional Ising model on the square and triangular lattices is obtained numerically via Baxter's variational corner transfer-matrix approach. The use of Aharony-Fisher nonlinear scaling variables allowed us to perform calculations sufficiently away from the critical point and to confirm all predictions of the scaling and universality hypotheses. Our results are in excellent agreement with quantum field theory calculations of Fonseca and Zamolodchikov as well as with many previously known exact and numerical calculations, including susceptibility results by Barouch, McCoy, Tracy, and Wu.

  15. Full Scale Experiences with Didactic Changes in Distance Education in Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten Haack; Borch, Ole M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper report the main results of didactic changes in the first year of an experiment in ICT-based distance learning. The results are based on a full scale experiment in the education, Master of Industrial Information Technology (MII). The experiment transforming the well functioning on......-campus engineering program based on project organized collaborative learning to the technology supported distance education program failed. Despite of many miner didactic changes we did not obtain the same self regulating learning effect in the group work among the off-campus students as is the case for oncampus....... Questionnaires, discussions and measurements of the internet activities show results which are contradictory compared to expectations....

  16. Ten key considerations for the successful implementation and adoption of large-scale health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Bates, David W; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-06-01

    The implementation of health information technology interventions is at the forefront of most policy agendas internationally. However, such undertakings are often far from straightforward as they require complex strategic planning accompanying the systemic organizational changes associated with such programs. Building on our experiences of designing and evaluating the implementation of large-scale health information technology interventions in the USA and the UK, we highlight key lessons learned in the hope of informing the on-going international efforts of policymakers, health directorates, healthcare management, and senior clinicians.

  17. Modeling the Sun’s Small-scale Global Photospheric Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, K. A.; Mackay, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    We present a new model for the Sun’s global photospheric magnetic field during a deep minimum of activity, in which no active regions emerge. The emergence and subsequent evolution of small-scale magnetic features across the full solar surface is simulated, subject to the influence of a global supergranular flow pattern. Visually, the resulting simulated magnetograms reproduce the typical structure and scale observed in quiet Sun magnetograms. Quantitatively, the simulation quickly reaches a steady state, resulting in a mean field and flux distribution that are in good agreement with those determined from observations. A potential coronal magnetic field is extrapolated from the simulated full Sun magnetograms to consider the implications of such a quiet photospheric magnetic field on the corona and inner heliosphere. The bulk of the coronal magnetic field closes very low down, in short connections between small-scale features in the simulated magnetic network. Just 0.1% of the photospheric magnetic flux is found to be open at 2.5 R ⊙, around 10-100 times less than that determined for typical Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager synoptic map observations. If such conditions were to exist on the Sun, this would lead to a significantly weaker interplanetary magnetic field than is currently observed, and hence a much higher cosmic ray flux at Earth.

  18. Indirect measurements of field-scale hydraulic conductivity of waste from two landfill sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, I R

    2011-12-01

    Management and prediction of the movement and distribution of fluids in large landfills is important for various reasons. Bioreactor landfill technology shows promise, but in arid or semi-arid regions, the natural content of landfilled waste may be low, thus requiring addition of significant volumes of water. In more humid locations, landfills can become saturated, flooding gas collection systems and causing sideslope leachate seeps or other undesirable occurrences. This paper compares results from two different approaches to monitoring water in waste. At the Brock West Landfill in eastern Canada, positive pore pressures were measured at various depths in saturated waste. The downward seepage flux through the waste is known, thus the vertical saturated hydraulic conductivity of the waste at this landfill was determined to be 3 × 10(-7)cm/s. By comparison, the Spadina Landfill in western Canada is predominantly unsaturated. The infiltration of moisture into the waste was measured using moisture sensors installed in boreholes which determined arrival time for moisture fronts resulting from major precipitation events as well as longer-term change in moisture content resulting from unsaturated drainage during winter when frozen ground prevented infiltration. The unsaturated hydraulic conductivity calculated from these data ranged from approximately 10(-6)cm/s for the slow winter drainage in the absence of significant recharge to 10(-2)cm/s or higher for shallow waste subject to high infiltration through apparent preferential pathways. These two very different approaches to field-scale measurements of vertical hydraulic conductivity provide insight into the nature of fluid movement in saturated and unsaturated waste masses. It is suggested that the principles of unsaturated seepage apply reasonably well for landfilled waste and that the hydraulic behavior of waste is profoundly influenced by the nature and size of voids and by the degree of saturation prevailing in the

  19. Research Progress on the Large-scale Culture Technology of Mammalian Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunyan; XIAO Jing; JIANG Yonghou

    2009-01-01

    The culture of mammalian cells is closely related to the development of biotechnology, which has been used extensively in the research and application fields of biology and medical science. In this article, various factors affecting cell cultivation and the application of microcarrier and bioreactor on large-scale culture of mammalian cells were reviewed.

  20. Engaging in large-scale digital health technologies and services. What factors hinder recruitment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Siobhan; Mair, Frances S; McGee-Lennon, Marilyn; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; O'Donnell, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Implementing consumer oriented digital health products and services at scale is challenging and a range of barriers to reaching and recruiting users to these types of solutions can be encountered. This paper describes the experience of implementers with the rollout of the Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale (dallas) programme. The findings are based on qualitative analysis of baseline and midpoint interviews and project documentation. Eight main themes emerged as key factors which hindered participation. These include how the dallas programme was designed and operationalised, constraints imposed by partnerships, technology, branding, and recruitment strategies, as well as challenges with the development cycle and organisational culture.

  1. Large scale renewable power generation advances in technologies for generation, transmission and storage

    CERN Document Server

    Hossain, Jahangir

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the issues of integrating large-scale renewable power generation into existing grids. The issues covered in this book include different types of renewable power generation along with their transmission and distribution, storage and protection. It also contains the development of medium voltage converters for step-up-transformer-less direct grid integration of renewable generation units, grid codes and resiliency analysis for large-scale renewable power generation, active power and frequency control and HVDC transmission. The emerging SMES technology for controlling and int

  2. Field Test of Advanced Duct-Sealing Technologies Within the Weatherization Assistance Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ternes, MP

    2001-12-05

    A field test of an aerosol-spray duct-sealing technology and a conventional, best-practice approach was performed in 80 homes to determine the efficacy and programmatic needs of the duct-sealing technologies as applied in the U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program. The field test was performed in five states: Iowa, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, and Wyoming. The study found that, compared with the best-practice approach, the aerosol-spray technology is 50% more effective at sealing duct leaks and can potentially reduce labor time and costs for duct sealing by 70%, or almost 4 crew-hours. Further study to encourage and promote use of the aerosol-spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program is recommended. A pilot test of full production weatherization programs using the aerosol-spray technology is recommended to develop approaches for integrating this technology with other energy conservation measures and minimizing impacts on weatherization agency logistics. In order to allow or improve adoption of the aerosol spray technology within the Weatherization Assistance Program, issues must be addressed concerning equipment costs, use of the technology under franchise arrangements with Aeroseal, Inc. (the holders of an exclusive license to use this technology), software used to control the equipment, safety, and training. Application testing of the aerosol-spray technology in mobile homes is also recommended.

  3. Collective action and technology development: up-scaling of innovation in rice farming communities in Northern Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limnirankul, B.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords:small-scale rice farmers, collective action, community rice seed, local innovations, green manure crop, contract farming, participatory technology development, up-scaling, technological configuration, grid-group theory,

  4. 3D Printing of Biocompatible Acellular Auricular Implant Using Dual Scaled Hydrid Technology Combining Fused Deposition Modeling with Electrospinning

    OpenAIRE

    Rezenda, R; Sabado, M; Kasjanovs, V; Baptista, L.; da Silva, K; Noritomi, P; Sena, F.; Wen, X.; Da Silva, J; Mironov, V.

    2013-01-01

    The dual-scaled hydrid scaffold fabrication technology based on combination of 3D printing (fused deposition modeling) and electrospining have been recently introduced. We report here the design, fabrication, mechanical testing, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility testing of novel auricular implants for treatment microtia fabricated by dual scaled hydbrid scaffold fabrication technology.

  5. Collective action and technology development: up-scaling of innovation in rice farming communities in Northern Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limnirankul, B.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords:small-scale rice farmers, collective action, community rice seed, local innovations, green manure crop, contract farming, participatory technology development, up-scaling, technological configuration, grid-group theory,

  6. The Influence of Technology-Rich Early Childhood Field Experiences on Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Nicholas; Lux, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Despite a comprehensive body of research on field experiences in teacher education, technology-rich early field experiences in early childhood environments is one particular area of inquiry lacking substantive current research. Therefore, this study was conducted to better understand how preservice teachers' perceptions of global concepts related…

  7. Theory Development and Convergence of Human Resource Fields: Implications for Human Performance Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo; Yoon, Seung Won

    2010-01-01

    This study examines major theory developments in human resource (HR) fields and discusses implications for human performance technology (HPT). Differentiated HR fields are converging to improve organizational performance through knowledge-based innovations. Ruona and Gibson (2004) made a similar observation and analyzed the historical evolution…

  8. Theory Development and Convergence of Human Resource Fields: Implications for Human Performance Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yonjoo; Yoon, Seung Won

    2010-01-01

    This study examines major theory developments in human resource (HR) fields and discusses implications for human performance technology (HPT). Differentiated HR fields are converging to improve organizational performance through knowledge-based innovations. Ruona and Gibson (2004) made a similar observation and analyzed the historical evolution…

  9. Family impact of assistive technology scale: development of a measurement scale for parents of children with complex communication needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarosa, Elizabeth; Horner, Stephanie; Eisenberg, Casey; Ball, Laura; Renzoni, Anne Marie; Ryan, Stephen E

    2012-09-01

    Young people use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems to meet their everyday communication needs. However, the successful integration of an AAC system into a child's life requires strong commitment and continuous support from parents and other family members. This article describes the development and evaluation of the Family Impact of Assistive Technology Scale for AAC Systems - a parent-report questionnaire intended to detect the impact of AAC systems on the lives of children with complex communication needs and their families. The study involved 179 parents and clinical experts to test the content and face validities of the questionnaire, demonstrate its internal reliability and stability over time, and estimate its convergent construct validity when compared to a standardized measure of family impact.

  10. Galactic magnetic fields and the large-scale anisotropy at MILAGRO

    CERN Document Server

    Battaner, E; Masip, M

    2009-01-01

    The air-shower observatory Milagro has detected a large-scale anisotropy of unknown origin in the flux of TeV cosmic rays. We propose that this anisotropy is caused by galactic magnetic fields, in particular, that it results from the combined effects of the regular and the turbulent (fluctuating) magnetic fields in our vicinity. Instead of a diffusion equation, we integrate Boltzmann's equation to show that the turbulence may define a preferred direction in the cosmic-ray propagation that is orthogonal to the local regular magnetic field. The approximate dipole anisotropy that we obtain explains well Milagro's data.

  11. A Limit on Primordial Small-Scale Magnetic Fields from CMB Distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Jedamzik, K; Olinto, A V

    2000-01-01

    Spatially varying primordial magnetic fields may be efficiently dissipated prior to the epoch of recombination due to the large viscosity of the baryon-photon fluid. We show that this dissipation may result in observable chemical potential mu and Compton y distortions in the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) spectrum. Current upper limits on mu and y from FIRAS constrain magnetic fields to have strength B_0 < 3\\times 10^{-8}Gauss (scaled to the present) between comoving coherence length \\approx 400 pc and primordial magnetic fields to date.

  12. Recognition and development of "educational technology" as a scientific field and school subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilović Mirčeta S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the process of development, establishment and recognition of "educational technology" as an independent scientific field and a separate teaching subject at universities. The paper points to: (a the problems that this field deals with or should deal with, (b knowledge needed for the profession of "educational technologist", (c various scientific institutions across the world involved in educational technology, (d scientific journals treating issues of modern educational technology, (e the authors i.e. psychologists and educators who developed and formulated the basic principles of this scientific field, (f educational features and potentials of educational technologies. Emphasis is placed on the role and importance of AV technology in developing, establishing and recognition of educational technology, and it is also pointed out that AV technology i.e. AV teaching aids and a movement for visualization of teaching were its forerunners and crucial factors for its establishing and developing into an independent area of teaching i.e. school subject. In summary it is stressed that educational technology provides for the execution of instruction through emission transmission, selection, coding, decoding, reception, memorization transformation of all types of pieces of information in teaching.

  13. Microbial Indicators, Pathogens, and Antibiotic Resistance in Groundwater Impacted by Animal Farming: Field Scale to Basin Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, T.; Li, X.; Atwill, E. R.; Packman, A. I.

    2015-12-01

    three site scales on CAFOs and in ¼ of production aquifer samples near and away from CAFOs. Two thirds of E. coli and five in six Enterococcus exhibited resistance to multiple (> 2) antibiotics. Field monitoring results are consistent with fate and transport modeling that accounts for heterogeneity in aquifer systems.

  14. Magnet Science and Technology for Basic Research at the High Field Laboratory for Superconducting Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    渡辺和雄

    2007-01-01

    Since the first practical cryocooled superconducting magnet using a GM-cryocooler and high temperature superconducting current leads has been demonstrated successfully at the High Field Laboratory for Superconducting Materials (HFLSM), various kinds of cryocooled superconducting magnets in fields up to 15 T have been used to provide access for new research areas in fields of magneto-science. Recently, the HFLSM has succeeded in demonstrating a cryocooed 18 T high temperature superconducting magnet and a high field cryocooled 27.5 T hybrid magnet. Cryocooled magnet technology and basic research using high field magnets at the HFLSM are introduced.

  15. Robotics and tele-operation technology for applications in nuclear fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosuge, Kazuhiro; Hirata, Yasuhisa; Takeo, Koji [Tohoku Univ., Department of Machine Intelligence and Systems Engineering, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we introduce available robotics and tele-operation technology for applications in Nuclear Fields. First, robotics technology for manipulation of a large object is introduced which has been experimentally applied to ITER Maintenance Robot. Then, transportation technology of a large object by multiple mobile robots is reviewed. At last, recent tele-operation technologies and a prototype tele-operation system, referred to as VISIT (Visual Interface System for Interactive Task-execution), is introduced. Several experimental results are also introduced. (author)

  16. Field-scale fluorescence fingerprinting of biochar-borne dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar continues to receive worldwide enthusiasm as means of augmenting recalcitrant organic carbon in agricultural soils. Realistic biochar amendment rate (typically less than 1 wt%) in the field scale, and loss by sizing, rain, and other transport events demand reliable methods to quantify the r...

  17. DIRECTIONAL DERIVATIVE OF VECTOR FIELD AND REGULAR CURVES ON TIME SCALES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Emin (O)zyilmaz

    2006-01-01

    The general idea in this paper is to study curves of the parametric equations where the parameter varies in a so-called time scale, which may be an arbitrary closed subset of the set of all real numbers. We introduce the directional derivative according to the vector fields.

  18. Magnetorotational Instability Can Sustain Turbulence From Tangled Small-Scale Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi; Blackman, Eric G; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2016-01-01

    The initial conditions used in previous magnetorotational instability (MRI) simulations always consisted of a significant large or system-scale component, even if random. However it is of both conceptual and practical interest to assess whether the MRI can sustain when the initial field is turbulent, correlated on scales much smaller than the given system. More generally, we also study what minimum conditions the initial random small-scale field must have for the MRI to sustain the turbulence. The ubiquitous presence of turbulent or random flows in the high magnetic Reynolds number astrophysical plasmas in galaxies or stars for example, leads to a small-scale dynamo (SSD). This can generate random magnetic fields in the plasma that eventually enters an accretion disk. To simulate this scenario, we take the random field generated by the SSD as the input initial condition to a shearing box simulation that has uniform shear and rotation but with the forcing turned off. We find that the system becomes unstable to...

  19. Scaling of crystal field parameters between Pd 2REIn and Pd 2RESn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babateen, M.; Neumann, K.-U.; Ziebeck, K. R. A.

    1995-02-01

    Experimentally it is found that crystal field (CF) parameters between the same rare earth compounds in the alloy series Pd 2REIn and Pd 2RESn (RE = rare earth element) exhibit scaling properties. A phenomenological model is put forward to explain this observation.

  20. Mapping daily evapotranspiration at Landsat spatial scales during the BEAREX'08 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robust spatial information about environmental water use at field scales and daily to seasonal timesteps will benefit many applications in agriculture and water resource management. This information is particularly critical in arid climates where freshwater resources are limited or expensive, and g...

  1. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : Swap model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale level. The ma

  2. Supporting Students with Disabilities Entering the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Field Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishauzi, Karen M.

    Extensive research exists on female, African American, and Hispanic students pursuing Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) field disciplines. However, little research evaluates students with disabilities and career decision-making relating to STEM field disciplines. This study explored the career decision-making experiences and self-efficacy for students with disabilities. The purpose of this research study was to document experiences and perceptions of students with disabilities who pursue, and may consider pursuing, careers in the STEM field disciplines by exploring the career decision-making self-efficacy of students with disabilities. This study documented the level of influence that the students with disabilities had or may not have had encountered from parents, friends, advisors, counselors, and instructors as they managed their decision-making choice relating to their academic major/career in the STEM or non-STEM field disciplines. A total of 85 respondents of approximately 340 students with disabilities at one Midwestern public university completed a quantitatively designed survey instrument. The Career Decision-Making Self-Efficacy Scale-Short Form by Betz and Hackett was the instrument used, and additional questions were included in the survey. Data analysis included descriptive statistics and analysis of variance. Based upon the results, college students with disabilities are not currently being influenced by individuals and groups of individuals to pursue the STEM field disciplines. This is a cohort of individuals who can be marketed to increase enrollment in STEM programs at academic institutions. This research further found that gender differences at the institution under study did not affect the career decision-making self-efficacy scores. The men did not score any higher in confidence in career decision-making than the women. Disability type did not significantly affect the relationship between the Career Decision-Making Self

  3. Current helicity pattern of large-scale magnetic field on the photosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Following Pevtsov and Latushko, we study the current helicity pattern of the large-scale magnetic field on the photosphere. We use the same technique as theirs to derive the vector magnetic field (Br,Bθ,Bφ) from full-disk longitudinal magnetograms based on the assumption that large-scale magnetic fields evolve rather slowly and the variations of the longitudinal magnetic fields within certain time duration are caused by the changing position angles only. Different from their study, we have calculated the current helicity maps directly from the derived vector magnetograms, rather than from obtaining the latitudinal variation of hc by ignoring the role of Bθ component and averaging Br and Bφ over all solar longitudes. This approach significantly strengthens the evidence of the hemispheric rule presented in the reconstructed vector magnetic field. Our study shows that the established hemispheric sign rule, that is, positive helicity sign in the southern hemisphere and negative helicity sign in the northern hemisphere, is applicable everywhere in the global magnetic field, namely, also evident in weak fields outside active regions, and that the obtained sign pattern is independent of the longitudinal magnetograms and the parameters that we have used.

  4. Gauge Field Generation on Large-Scale GPU-Enabled Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Over the past years GPUs have been successfully applied to the task of inverting the fermion matrix in lattice QCD calculations. Even strong scaling to capability-level supercomputers, corresponding to O(100) GPUs or more has been achieved. However strong scaling a whole gauge field generation algorithm to this regim requires significantly more functionality than just having the matrix inverter utilizing the GPUs and has not yet been accomplished. This contribution extends QDP-JIT, the migration of SciDAC QDP++ to GPU-enabled parallel systems, to help to strong scale the whole Hybrid Monte-Carlo to this regime. Initial results are shown for gauge field generation with Chroma simulating pure Wilson fermions on OLCF TitanDev.

  5. Extended power-law scaling of heavy-tailed random fields or processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guadagnini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the scaling behaviors of two log permeability data sets showing heavy-tailed frequency distributions in three and two spatial dimensions, respectively. One set consists of 1-m scale pneumatic packer test data from six vertical and inclined boreholes spanning a decameters scale block of unsaturated fractured tuffs near Superior, Arizona, the other of pneumatic minipermeameter data measured at a spacing of 15 cm along two horizontal transects on a 21 m long outcrop of lower-shoreface bioturbated sandstone near Escalante, Utah. Order q sample structure functions of each data set scale as a power ξ (q of separation scale or lag, s, over limited ranges of s. A procedure known as Extended Self-Similarity (ESS extends this range to all lags and yields a nonlinear (concave functional relationship between ξ (q and q. Whereas the literature tends to associate extended and nonlinear power-law scaling with multifractals or fractional Laplace motions, we have shown elsewhere that (a ESS of data having a normal frequency distribution is theoretically consistent with (Gaussian truncated (additive, self-affine, monofractal fractional Brownian motion (tfBm, the latter being unique in predicting a breakdown in power-law scaling at small and large lags, and (b nonlinear power-law scaling of data having either normal or heavy-tailed frequency distributions is consistent with samples from sub-Gaussian random fields or processes subordinated to tfBm, stemming from lack of ergodicity which causes sample moments to scale differently than do their ensemble counterparts. Here we (i demonstrate that the above two data sets are consistent with sub-Gaussian random fields subordinated to tfBm and (ii provide maximum likelihood estimates of parameters characterizing the corresponding Lévy stable subordinators and tfBm functions.

  6. Ricci curvature non-minimal derivative coupling cosmology with field re-scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumjudpai, Burin; Jawralee, Yuttana; Kaewkhao, Narakorn

    2017-09-01

    In this letter, cosmology of a simple NMDC gravity with ξ R φ _{,μ }φ ^{,μ } term and a free kinetic term is considered in flat geometry and in presence of dust matter. A logarithm field transformation φ ' = μ ln φ is proposed phenomenologically. Assuming slow-roll approximation, equation of motion, scalar field solution and potential are derived as function of kinematic variables. The field solution and potential are found straightforwardly for power-law, de-Sitter and super-acceleration expansions. Slow-roll parameters and slow-roll condition are found to depend on more than one variable. At large field the re-scaling effect can enhance the acceleration. For slow-rolling field, the negative coupling ξ could enhance the effect of acceleration.

  7. Comparing the Large-Scale Magnetic Field During the Last Three Solar Cycles (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeksema, J. T.

    2009-12-01

    Large-scale magnetic field observations show that the current extended solar cycle minimum differs from the two previous well-observed minima in several respects. The weaker polar fields increase the relative influence of middle and low-latitude flux patterns on the configuration of the corona and heliosphere. A much larger fraction of the open flux originates in equatorial coronal holes. Even though the heliospheric field magnitude and the mean solar magnetic field are the weakest since direct measurements began, the sector structure of the interplanetary field that reflects the shape of the heliospheric current sheet continues to extend to fairly high latitude. The pattern of emergence of active regions through the cycle and the transport of flux from low to high latitudes also show quite different patterns, providing insight into the meridional flow that influences the dynamo that drives the cycle. The long records of synoptic observations that provide a rich source of information about solar activity must be maintained.

  8. Equipartition magnetic fields and star formation rates in normal galaxies at sub-kpc scales

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Aritra

    2014-01-01

    We studied the total magnetic field strength in normal star-forming galaxies estimated using energy equipartition assumption. Using the well known radio--far infrared correlation we demonstrate that the equipartition assumption is valid in galaxies at sub-kpc scales. We find that the magnetic field strength is strongly correlated with the surface star formation rate in the galaxies NGC 6946 and NGC 5236. Further, we compare the magnetic field energy density to the total (thermal + turbulent) energy densities of gas (neutral + ionized) to identify regions of efficient field amplification in the galaxy NGC 6946. We find that in regions of efficient star formation, the magnetic field energy density is comparable to that of the total energy density of various interstellar medium components and systematically dominates in regions of low star formation efficiency.

  9. Self-adaptive phosphor coating technology for wafer-level scale chip packaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Linsong; Rao Haibo; Wang Wei; Wan Xianlong; Liao Junyuan; Wang Xuemei; Zhou Da

    2013-01-01

    A new self-adaptive phosphor coating technology has been successfully developed,which adopted a slurry method combined with a self-exposure process.A phosphor suspension in the water-soluble photoresist was applied and exposed to LED blue light itself and developed to form a conformal phosphor coating with selfadaptability to the angular distribution of intensity of blue light and better-performing spatial color uniformity.The self-adaptive phosphor coating technology had been successfully adopted in the wafer surface to realize a waferlevel scale phosphor conformal coating.The first-stage experiments show satisfying results and give an adequate demonstration of the flexibility of self-adaptive coating technology on application of WLSCP.

  10. Review of DC System Technologies for Large Scale Integration of Wind Energy Systems with Electricity Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Jie Shao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The ever increasing development and availability of power electronic systems is the underpinning technology that enables large scale integration of wind generation plants with the electricity grid. As the size and power capacity of the wind turbine continues to increase, so is the need to place these significantly large structures at off-shore locations. DC grids and associated power transmission technologies provide opportunities for cost reduction and electricity grid impact minimization as the bulk power is concentrated at single point of entry. As a result, planning, optimization and impact can be studied and carefully controlled minimizing the risk of the investment as well as power system stability issues. This paper discusses the key technologies associated with DC grids for offshore wind farm applications.

  11. Multi-scale Hydrologic Modeling of the White Sands Dune Field, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret, S. M.; Newton, B. T.

    2014-12-01

    The shallow groundwater flow system of White Sands dune field, located within the arid to semi-arid Tularosa Basin of Southern New Mexico, likely stabilizes the base of the largest gypsum dune field in the world. The dune is saturated throughout nearly its entire accumulation thickness, resulting in a shallow water table (adapted to survive there. In response to projected increases in groundwater pumping in the regional Tularosa Basin groundwater system, changes in surface water use, and the threat of climate change, the WHSA is interested in understanding how these changes on a regional scale may impact the shallow dune field aquifer. Mathematical modeling techniques on varying spatial and temporal scales are used to characterize the relative importance of the sources of water (local vs. regional) to the dune aquifer, and to quantify the timescales on which changes may affect the water table in the dune field. A 2-dimensional, dune-scale heat and fluid flow model uses the seasonal temperature fluctuations to estimate the vertical and horizontal flow of water from the regional system to the dune field aquifer. We have also constructed a 2-dimensional, hydrologic model to characterize the regional groundwater flow regime near to the dune aquifer system, as well as across the Tularosa Basin to a depth of 6 km. Additionally, a 3-dimensional, hydrologic model of the Tularosa Basin and the White Sands dune field quantifies hydrologic characteristics, sources and sinks of groundwater in the basin and at the dune field. Computed and observed salinity, groundwater residence times, and water level data are the primary means of model calibration. Preliminary results from the three models indicate the regional groundwater system does contribute flow to the dune aquifer, and that increased pumping may increase drawdown of the regional groundwater system near the dune field. These results indicate the dune is sensitive to regional hydrologic changes.

  12. Impact of small scale fermentation technology on food safety in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motarjemi, Yasmine

    2002-05-25

    Fermentation is one of the oldest technologies used for food preservation. Over the centuries, it has evolved and been refined and diversified. Today, a variety of food products is derived from this technology in households, small-scale food industries as well as in large enterprises. Furthermore, fermentation is an affordable food preservation technology and of economic importance to developing countries. In the report of an FAO/WHO Workshop (FAO/WHO, 1996), fermentation was reviewed and the nutritional and safety aspects of fermentation technologies and their products were assessed. Fermentation enhances the nutritional quality of foods and contributes to food safety particularly under conditions where refrigeration or other foods processing facilities are not available. Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HACCP) studies of some fermented products have demonstrated that depending on the process and the hygienic conditions observed during preparation, some fermented foods, e.g. togwa prepared in Tanzania, may pose a safety risk. Fermented foods must therefore be studied following HACCP principles and small-scale food industries and households must be advised on the critical control points of fermentation processes and the control measures to be applied at these points. This paper reviews the risks and benefits of fermentation and demonstrates the application of the HACCP system to some fermented foods in developing countries.

  13. Spatiotemporal signature of methane venting from lake sediments: from lab to field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandella, B.; Pillsbury, L.; Weber, T.; Ruppel, C. D.; Hemond, H.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, and the production and emission of methane from sediments in inland waters and shallow oceans both contributes to and may be exacerbated by climate change. In some of these shallow-water settings, methane fluxes are often controlled by episodic free-gas venting. The fraction of the methane released from the sediments that bypasses dissolution in the water column and reaches the atmosphere impacts the magnitude of the climate forcing, and this fraction depends critically on the mode and spatiotemporal characteristics of the bubble releases. Here, we present measurements of the episodicity, spacing and persistence of ebullition from the laboratory scale (1-50 cm) to the field scale (0.5-20 m). Field observations were made using a fixed-location Imagenex DeltaT 837B multibeam sonar, which was calibrated to quantify gas fluxes with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution (~0.5 m, 1 Hz). The field scale results show a pattern of short range spatiotemporal clustering (radiustriggering nearby aftershock ebullition episodes. The fine-scale (1-50 cm) experiment recorded ebullition from sediments that were dredged from the field site, reconstituted and incubated in the laboratory to generate methane. This experiment shows the degree of re-use of specific outlets, with implications for the scale of lateral methane transport and the role of hysteresis on sediment cohesion (healing of closed conduits). The details of the short range clustering process helps to identify the mechanism by which gas venting triggers nearby "aftershock" episodes of gas release. Taken together, these results point towards a better understanding of the microscale processes controlling methane venting from deformable sediments, as well as their impact on large-scale methane fluxes from shallow-water bodies.Figure: Short-range spatial clustering, quantified with the Radial Distribution Function (RDF>1, r<2), dissipates to a homogeneous signature (RDF = 1) over

  14. Advection/diffusion of large scale magnetic field in accretion disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. E. Lovelace

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Activity of the nuclei of galaxies and stellar mass systems involving disk accretion to black holes is thought to be due to (1 a small-scale turbulent magnetic field in the disk (due to the magneto-rotational instability or MRI which gives a large viscosity enhancing accretion, and (2 a large-scale magnetic field which gives rise to matter outflows and/or electromagnetic jets from the disk which also enhances accretion. An important problem with this picture is that the enhanced viscosity is accompanied by an enhanced magnetic diffusivity which acts to prevent the build up of a significant large-scale field. Recent work has pointed out that the disk's surface layers are non-turbulent and thus highly conducting (or non-diffusive because the MRI is suppressed high in the disk where the magnetic and radiation pressures are larger than the thermal pressure. Here, we calculate the vertical (z profiles of the stationary accretion flows (with radial and azimuthal components, and the profiles of the large-scale, magnetic field taking into account the turbulent viscosity and diffusivity due to the MRI and the fact that the turbulence vanishes at the surface of the disk. We derive a sixth-order differential equation for the radial flow velocity vr(z which depends mainly on the midplane thermal to magnetic pressure ratio β>1 and the Prandtl number of the turbulence P=viscosity/diffusivity. Boundary conditions at the disk surface take into account a possible magnetic wind or jet and allow for a surface current in the highly conducting surface layer. The stationary solutions we find indicate that a weak (β>1 large-scale field does not diffuse away as suggested by earlier work.

  15. Adiabatic Ekpyrosis: Scale-Invariant Curvature Perturbations from a Single Scalar Field in a Contracting Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Khoury, Justin

    2009-01-01

    The universe can be made flat and smooth by undergoing a phase of ultra-slow (ekpyrotic) contraction with equation of state w >> 1, a condition that is achievable with a single, canonical scalar field and conventional general relativity. It has been argued, though, that another goal, generating scale-invariant density perturbations, requires at least two scalar fields and a two-step process that first produces entropy fluctuations and then converts them to curvature perturbations. In this paper, we exploit a loophole in the argument and introduce an ekpyrotic model based on a single, canonical scalar field that utilizes a purely "adiabatic mechanism" to generate nearly scale-invariant curvature fluctuations. The curvature perturbation tends to a constant at long wavelengths, indicating that the background evolution is a dynamical attractor. The resulting spectrum is slightly red with distinctive non-gaussian fluctuations.

  16. Memory Effects in Turbulent Dynamo Generation and Propagation of Large Scale Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Fedotov, S; Zubarev, A; Fedotov, Sergei; Ivanov, Alexey; Zubarev, Andrey

    2001-01-01

    We are concerned with large scale magnetic field dynamo generation and propagation of magnetic fronts in turbulent electrically conducting fluids. An effective equation for the large scale magnetic field is developed here that takes into account the finite correlation times of the turbulent flow. This equation involves the memory integrals corresponding to the dynamo source term describing the alpha-effect and turbulent transport of magnetic field. We find that the memory effects can drastically change the dynamo growth rate, in particular, non-local turbulent transport might increase the growth rate several times compared to the conventional gradient transport expression. Moreover, the integral turbulent transport term leads to a large decrease of the speed of magnetic front propagation.

  17. Recent progresses in the simulation of small-scale magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Steiner, Oskar

    2007-01-01

    New high-resolution observations reveal that small-scale magnetic flux concentrations have a delicate substructure on a spatial scale of 0.1''. Its basic structure can be interpreted in terms of a magnetic flux sheet or tube that vertically extends through the ambient weak-field or field-free atmosphere with which it is in mechanical equilibrium. A more refined interpretation comes from new three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations that are capable of reproducing the corrugated shape of magnetic flux concentrations and their signature in the visible continuum. Furthermore it is shown that the characteristic asymmetric shape of the contrast profile of facular granules is an effect of radiative transfer across the rarefied atmosphere of the magnetic flux concentration. I also discuss three-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the integral layers from the top of the convection zone to the mid-chromosphere. They show a highly dynamic chromospheric magnetic field, marked by rapidly movi...

  18. Scaling laws for Bénard-Marangoni convection using automatic background field generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Andrew; Pershin, Anton; Fantuzzi, Giovanni

    2016-11-01

    We consider scaling laws for Bénard-Marangoni convection and, in particular, study the question of obtaining an upper bound on the Nusselt number Nu in terms of the flow's forcing parameter, the Marangoni number Ma . It has recently been proven using the background field method that in the case of infinite Prandtl number, these fundamental quantities are related by the scaling law Nu optimal background field which numerically improves this bound. The constructed background profiles have boundary layers at both the upper and lower domain boundaries, which is in contrast to those used in previous work. Analysis will be presented explaining how both boundary layers interact (in the context of the optimization problem associated with the background field method) to improve the Nusselt number bound within the background profile method.

  19. Field demonstration and commercialization of silent discharge plasma hazardous air pollutant control technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosocha, L.A.; Coogan, J.J.; Korzekwa, R.A.; Secker, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Reimers, R.F.; Herrmann, P.G.; Chase, P.J.; Gross, M.P. [High Mesa Technologies LLC, Santa Fe, NM (United States)]|[High Mesa Technologies LLC, Irvine, CA (United States); Jones, M.R. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Silent electrical discharge plasma (dielectric barrier) reactors can decompose gas-phase pollutants by free-radical attack or electron-induced fragmentation. The radicals or electrons are produced by the large average volume nonthermal plasmas generated in the reactor. In the past decade, the barrier configuration has attracted attention for destroying toxic chemical agents for the military, removing harmful greenhouse gases, and treating other environmentally- hazardous chemical compounds. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have been studying the silent discharge plasma (SDP) for processing gaseous-based hazardous chemicals for approximately five years. The key objective is to convert hazardous or toxic chemicals into non-hazardous compounds or into materials which are more easily managed. The main applications have been for treating off-gases from thermal treatment units, and for abating hazardous air-pollutant emissions (e.g., industrial air emissions, vapors extracted from contaminated soil or groundwater). In this paper, we will summarize the basic principles of SDP processing, discuss illustrative applications of the technology, and present results from small-scale field tests that are relevant to our commercialization effort.

  20. Design and test challenges in Nano-scale analog and mixed CMOS technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna Karmani

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The continuous increase of integration densities in Complementary Metal–Oxide–Semiconductor (CMOStechnology has driven the rapid growth of very large scale integrated (VLSI circuit for today's high-tech electronics industries from consumer products to telecommunications and computers. As CMOS technologies are scaled down into the nano meter range, analog and mixed integrated circuit (IC design and testing have become a real challenge to ensure the functionality and quality of the product. The first part of the paper presents the CMOS technology scaling impact on design and reliability for consumer and critical applications. We then propose a discussion on the role and challenges of testing analog and mixed devices in the nano-scale era. Finally we present the IDDQ testing technique used to detect the most likely defects of bridging type occurring in analog CMOS circuits during the manufacturing process and creating a resistive path between VDD supply and the ground.To prove the efficiency of the proposed technique we design a CMOS 90nm operational amplifier (Opamp and a Built in Current Sensor (BICS to validate the technique and correlate it with post layout simulation results.

  1. Good learning practices in the field of science and technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Amante García

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The European Higher Education Area (EHEA scenario offers a new framework in which the role of universities can be rethought, regardless of the field of new degrees and postgraduate Studies involved. Therefore, the roles of teachers and students might differ significantly as the student would be obliged to request teacher’s guidance in order to acquire not only knowledge, which could be easily obtained elsewhere (books, internet etc. , but also personal skills and, especially, those related to their future professional career.By the term “Good learning practices” we refer to those activities asociated with professorship itself  ,such as those of facilitating and guiding the student learning process, or rather, those activities which are aimed at the student´s thorough learning of specific  (related to the field of study and generic skills.It is now a common occurrence to describe the students of a given classroom as being little motivated and as having great interest in passing but not in actually learning. This fact is quite concerning, as it suggests that the student sees the university as a mere transaction by which they can obtain a degree, certifying that they are apt for the professional world,  where they consider the “real” learning will take place.A good classroom environment is essential for the generation of teaching-learning processes.  It is precisely because of this that we are able to raise the issue of effective practices among teachers who foster a suitable classroom dynamics facilitating, then, the targeted learning experience.  Within this context, there are some authors who discuss good practices by professors especially concerned on how to perform assessment and feedback to enhance student’s learning activity. Thus,  providing them with a deep and lasting impact. Generally speaking, the activities in question are those which enable the student to execute a learning process that will continue throughout

  2. A field evaluation of small-scale forest resource aerial photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Meyer, M.

    1977-01-01

    An earlier study under somewhat clinical laboratory conditions has suggested the possibility of using smaller scales of forest photography without serious information loss. The present paper subjects this idea to a rigorous field test by a number of experienced user-cooperators. Various combinations of summer black-and-white infrared and color infrared aerial photography at scales of 1:15,840, 1:24,000, 1:31,680, and 1:80,000 were taken over forested portions of Minnesota. Major conclusions are that 1:15,840 is the preferred working photo scale, and that instead of 1:15,840 a scale of 1:20,000 is considered an acceptable substitute.

  3. Direct multi-scale reconstruction of velocity fields from measurements of particle tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Douglas H

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for reconstructing two-dimensional velocity fields at specified length scales using observational data from tracer particles in a flow, without the need for interpolation or smoothing. The algorithm, adapted from techniques proposed for oceanography, involves a least-squares projection of the measurements onto a set of two-dimensional, incompressible basis modes with known length scales. Those modes are constructed from components of the velocity potential function, which accounts for inflow and outflow at the open boundaries of the measurement region; and components of the streamfunction, which accounts for the remainder of the flow. All calculations are evaluated at particle locations, without interpolation onto an arbitrary grid. Since the modes have a well-defined length scales, scale-local flow properties are available directly. The technique eliminates outlier particles automatically and reduces the apparent compressibility of the data. Moreover the technique can be used to produce s...

  4. Mean-field and non-mean-field behaviors in scale-free networks with random Boolean dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro e Silva, A [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Campus Universitario, 35.400-000 Ouro Preto, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Kamphorst Leal da Silva, J, E-mail: alcidescs@gmail.co, E-mail: jaff@fisica.ufmg.b [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa Postal 702, 30.161-970, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2010-06-04

    We study two types of simplified Boolean dynamics in scale-free networks, both with a synchronous update. Assigning only the Boolean functions AND and XOR to the nodes with probabilities 1 - p and p, respectively, we are able to analyze the density of 1's and the Hamming distance on the network by numerical simulations and by a mean-field approximation (annealed approximation). We show that the behavior is quite different if the node always enters in the dynamics as its own input (self-regulation) or not. The same conclusion holds for the Kauffman NK model. Moreover, the simulation results and the mean-field ones (i) agree well when there is no self-regulation and (ii) disagree for small p when self-regulation is present in the model.

  5. Mean-Field and Non-Mean-Field Behaviors in Scale-free Networks with Random Boolean Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, A Castro e

    2009-01-01

    We study two types of simplified Boolean dynamics over scale-free networks, both with synchronous update. Assigning only Boolean functions AND and XOR to the nodes with probability $1-p$ and $p$, respectively, we are able to analyze the density of 1's and the Hamming distance on the network by numerical simulations and by a mean-field approximation (annealed approximation). We show that the behavior is quite different if the node always enters in the dynamic as its own input (self-regulation) or not. The same conclusion holds for the Kauffman KN model. Moreover, the simulation results and the mean-field ones (i) agree well when there is no self-regulation, and (ii) disagree for small $p$ when self-regulation is present in the model.

  6. Uranium Bioreduction Rates Across Scales During a Biostimulation Field Experiments at Rifle, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehikhoo, F.; Bao, C.; Li, L.; Wu, H.; Williams, K. H.; Newcomer, D.; Long, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding temporal and spatial evolution of biogeochemical processes at different spatial scales is important (and challenging) for complex, heterogeneous subsurface systems. In this work, we aim to understand the dynamic propagation of uranium bioreduction rates across scales during a field biostimulation experiment at Rifle, Colorado. Acetate was injected as an electron donor to stimulate Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and reduce mobile U(VI) to immobile U(IV). Bicarbonate was co-injected in half of the domain to mobilize sorbed U(VI) to investigate the impact of bicarbonate on the bioreduction of mobile U(VI). We use reactive transport modeling to integrate hydraulic conductivity and aqueous geochemistry data and to quantify bioreduction rates from the local grid block scale (approximately 0.25 meters) to the field scale (10s of meters). The modeling results showed good agreement with the geochemical measurements in the 17 monitoring wells. The good match indicates that the model has captured the dynamics of the system given our conceptual model of an inverse relationship between bioavailable oxidized Fe and permeability, providing constraints for the estimation of aqueous species, mineral precipitates, and biomass. Our results shows that although the local rates varied by more than two orders of magnitude with the biostimulation fronts propagating downstream, the maximum rates remained at the a few 'hot spots' right at the down gradient of the injection wells where Fe(III), U(VI), and FeRB were at their maximum. These local rates dominated the ';field-scale' rates (10's of m2). At particular locations, the 'hot moments' with maximum bioreduction rates positively corresponded to their distance from the wells. Although bicarbonate injection enhanced the local bioreduction rates near the injection wells by a maximum of 41.9%, its effect at the field-scale was limited to a maximum of 15.7%, with majority of the domain unaffected. The field-scale rates calculated

  7. Technology and Economic Assessment of Innovative Field Drainage Technologies in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gachango, Florence Gathoni

    Intensive agricultural production in most parts of the world especially in the more developed countries continues to mount pressure on water resources thereby threatening the quality of life in the aquatic ecosystems. With stringent standards such as those stipulated in the European Union Water...... proposed as appropriate solutions to this problem in the Danish context. The feasibility of these technologies with regards to their cost-effectiveness in nutrient mitigation, farmers’ adoption behavior, and environmental policy implementation is assessed in this thesis. The thesis comprises of four papers...... based on survey and case-farms data and utilizes a mix of quantitative and qualitative methods to investigate: i) the farmers’ perception of water quality and their adoption behavior with respect to voluntary nutrient reduction technologies, ii) the farmers willingness to adopt constructed wetland...

  8. Generation of scaled protogalactic seed magnetic fields in laser-produced shock waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregori, G.; Ravasio, A.; Murphy, C. D.; Schaar, K.; Baird, A.; Bell, A. R.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Bingham, R.; Constantin, C.; Drake, R. P.; Edwards, M.; Everson, E. T.; Gregory, C. D.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Lau, W.; Mithen, J.; Niemann, C.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Reville, B.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sakawa, Y.; Yang, S.; Woolsey, N. C.; Koenig, M.; Miniati, F.

    2012-01-01

    The standard model for the origin of galactic magnetic fields is through the amplification of seed fields via dynamo or turbulent processes to the level consistent with present observations. Although other mechanisms may also operate, currents from misaligned pressure and temperature gradients (the Biermann battery process) inevitably accompany the formation of galaxies in the absence of a primordial field. Driven by geometrical asymmetries in shocks associated with the collapse of protogalactic structures, the Biermann battery is believed to generate tiny seed fields to a level of about 10-21 gauss (refs 7, 8). With the advent of high-power laser systems in the past two decades, a new area of research has opened in which, using simple scaling relations, astrophysical environments can effectively be reproduced in the laboratory. Here we report the results of an experiment that produced seed magnetic fields by the Biermann battery effect. We show that these results can be scaled to the intergalactic medium, where turbulence, acting on timescales of around 700 million years, can amplify the seed fields sufficiently to affect galaxy evolution.

  9. Local diversity and fine-scale organization of receptive fields in mouse visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Vincent; Histed, Mark H; Yurgenson, Sergey; Reid, R Clay

    2011-12-14

    Many thousands of cortical neurons are activated by any single sensory stimulus, but the organization of these populations is poorly understood. For example, are neurons in mouse visual cortex--whose preferred orientations are arranged randomly--organized with respect to other response properties? Using high-speed in vivo two-photon calcium imaging, we characterized the receptive fields of up to 100 excitatory and inhibitory neurons in a 200 μm imaged plane. Inhibitory neurons had nonlinearly summating, complex-like receptive fields and were weakly tuned for orientation. Excitatory neurons had linear, simple receptive fields that can be studied with noise stimuli and system identification methods. We developed a wavelet stimulus that evoked rich population responses and yielded the detailed spatial receptive fields of most excitatory neurons in a plane. Receptive fields and visual responses were locally highly diverse, with nearby neurons having largely dissimilar receptive fields and response time courses. Receptive-field diversity was consistent with a nearly random sampling of orientation, spatial phase, and retinotopic position. Retinotopic positions varied locally on average by approximately half the receptive-field size. Nonetheless, the retinotopic progression across the cortex could be demonstrated at the scale of 100 μm, with a magnification of ≈ 10 μm/°. Receptive-field and response similarity were in register, decreasing by 50% over a distance of 200 μm. Together, the results indicate considerable randomness in local populations of mouse visual cortical neurons, with retinotopy as the principal source of organization at the scale of hundreds of micrometers.

  10. Wintertime connections between extreme wind patterns in Spain and large-scale geopotential height field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, A.; Martín, M. L.; Valero, F.; Luna, M. Y.; Morata, A.

    2013-03-01

    The present study is focused on the study of the variability and the most significant wind speed patterns in Spain during the winter season analyzing as well connections between the wind speed field and the geopotential height at 1000 hPa over an Atlantic area. The daily wind speed variability is investigated by means of principal components using wind speed observations. Five main modes of variation, accounting 66% of the variance of the original data, have been identified, highlighting their differences in the Spanish wind speed behavior. Connections between the wind speeds and the large-scale atmospheric field were underlined by means of composite maps. Composite maps were built up to give an averaged atmospheric circulation associated with extreme wind speed variability in Spain. Moreover, the principal component analysis was also applied to the geopotential heights, providing relationships between the large-scale atmospheric modes and the observational local wind speeds. Such relationships are shown in terms of the cumulated frequency values of wind speed associated with the extreme scores of the obtained large-scale atmospheric modes, showing those large-scale atmospheric patterns more dominant in the wind field in Spain.

  11. On the distribution of scaling hydraulic parameters in a spatially anisotropic banana field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalado, Carlos M.

    2005-06-01

    When modeling soil hydraulic properties at field scale it is desirable to approximate the variability in a given area by means of some scaling transformations which relate spatially variable local hydraulic properties to global reference characteristics. Seventy soil cores were sampled within a drip irrigated banana plantation greenhouse on a 14×5 array of 2.5 m×5 m rectangles at 15 cm depth, to represent the field scale variability of flow related properties. Saturated hydraulic conductivity and water retention characteristics were measured in these 70 soil cores. van Genuchten water retention curves (WRC) with optimized m ( m≠1-1/ n) were fitted to the WR data and a general Mualem-van Genuchten model was used to predict hydraulic conductivity functions for each soil core. A scaling law, of the form ν=ανi*, was fitted to soil hydraulic data, such that the original hydraulic parameters νi were scaled down to a reference curve with parameters νi*. An analytical expression, in terms of Beta functions, for the average suction value, hc, necessary to apply the above scaling method, was obtained. A robust optimization procedure with fast convergence to the global minimum is used to find the optimum hc, such that dispersion is minimized in the scaled data set. Via the Box-Cox transformation P(τ)=(αiτ-1)/τ, Box-Cox normality plots showed that scaling factors for the suction ( αh) and hydraulic conductivity ( αk) were approximately log-normally distributed (i.e. τ=0), as it would be expected for such dynamic properties involving flow. By contrast static soil related properties as αθ were found closely Gaussian, although a power τ=3/4 was best for approaching normality. Application of four different normality tests (Anderson-Darling, Shapiro-Wilk, Kolmogorov-Smirnov and χ2 goodness-of-fit tests) rendered some contradictory results among them, thus suggesting that this widely extended practice is not recommended for providing a suitable probability

  12. Characteristic Time Scales of Transport Processes for Chemotactic Bacteria in Groundwater: Analysis of Pore-scale to Field-scale Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Many processes contribute to the transport of microorganisms in groundwater environments. One process of interest is chemotaxis, whereby motile bacteria are able to detect and swim toward increasing concentrations of industrial hydrocarbons that they perceive as food sources. By enabling bacteria to migrate to the sources of pollutants that they degrade, chemotaxis has the potential to enhance bioremediation efforts, especially in less permeable zones where contamination may persist. To determine the field conditions under which chemotaxis might be exploited in a bioremediation scheme requires an understanding of the characteristic time scales in the system. We defined a dimensionless chemotaxis number that compares the time over which a bacterial population is exposed to a chemical gradient to the time required for a bacterial population to migrate a significant distance in response to a chemical gradient. The exposure time and the response time are dependent upon the experimental conditions and properties of the bacteria and chemical attractant. Experimental data was analyzed for a range of groundwater flow rates over a wide scope of experimental systems including a single-pore with NAPL source, a microfluidic channel with and without a porous matrix, a laboratory column, a bench-scale microcosm and a field-scale study. Chemical gradients were created transverse to the flow direction. Distributions of chemotactic and nonchemotactic bacteria were compared to determine the extent of migration due to chemotaxis. Under some conditions at higher flow rates, the effect of chemotaxis was diminished to the point of not being detected. The goal of the study was to determine a critical value for the dimensionless chemotaxis number (which is independent of scale) that can be used as a design criterion to ascertain a priori the conditions under which a chemotactic response will impact bacterial transport relative to other processes such as advection and dispersion.

  13. Estimating field scale root zone soil moisture using the cosmic-ray neutron probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, A. M.; Helgason, W. D.; Ireson, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Many practical hydrological, meteorological and agricultural management problems require estimates of soil moisture with an areal footprint equivalent to "field scale", integrated over the entire root zone. The cosmic-ray neutron probe is a promising instrument to provide field scale areal coverage, but these observations are shallow and require depth scaling in order to be considered representative of the entire root zone. A study to identify appropriate depth-scaling techniques was conducted at a grazing pasture site in central Saskatchewan, Canada over a two year period. Area-averaged soil moisture was assessed using a cosmic-ray neutron probe. Root zone soil moisture was measured at 21 locations within the 5002 m2 area, using a down-hole neutron probe. The cosmic-ray neutron probe was found to provide accurate estimates of field scale surface soil moisture, but accounted for less than 40 % of the seasonal change in root zone storage due to its shallow measurement depth. The root zone estimation methods evaluated were: (1) the coupling of the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a time stable neutron probe monitoring location, (2) coupling the cosmic-ray neutron probe with a representative landscape unit monitoring approach, and (3) convolution of the cosmic-ray neutron probe measurements with the exponential filter. The time stability method provided the best estimate of root zone soil moisture (RMSE = 0.004 cm3 cm-3), followed by the exponential filter (RMSE = 0.012 cm3 cm-3). The landscape unit approach, which required no calibration, had a negative bias but estimated the cumulative change in storage reasonably. The feasibility of applying these methods to field sites without existing instrumentation is discussed. It is concluded that the exponential filter method has the most potential for estimating root zone soil moisture from cosmic-ray neutron probe data.

  14. A density spike on astrophysical scales from an N-field waterfall transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Illan F. Halpern

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid inflation models are especially interesting as they lead to a spike in the density power spectrum on small scales, compared to the CMB, while also satisfying current bounds on tensor modes. Here we study hybrid inflation with N waterfall fields sharing a global SO(N symmetry. The inclusion of many waterfall fields has the obvious advantage of avoiding topologically stable defects for N>3. We find that it also has another advantage: it is easier to engineer models that can simultaneously (i be compatible with constraints on the primordial spectral index, which tends to otherwise disfavor hybrid models, and (ii produce a spike on astrophysically large length scales. The latter may have significant consequences, possibly seeding the formation of astrophysically large black holes. We calculate correlation functions of the time-delay, a measure of density perturbations, produced by the waterfall fields, as a convergent power series in both 1/N and the field's correlation function Δ(x. We show that for large N, the two-point function is 〈δt(xδt(0〉∝Δ2(|x|/N and the three-point function is 〈δt(xδt(yδt(0〉∝Δ(|x−y|Δ(|x|Δ(|y|/N2. In accordance with the central limit theorem, the density perturbations on the scale of the spike are Gaussian for large N and non-Gaussian for small N.

  15. Scaling and anisotropy in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grappin, Roland; Müller, Wolf-Christian

    2010-08-01

    We present an analysis of the anisotropic spectral energy distribution in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence permeated by a strong mean magnetic field. The turbulent flow is generated by high-resolution pseudospectral direct numerical simulations with large-scale isotropic forcing. Examining the radial energy distribution for various angles θ with respect to B0 reveals a specific structure which remains hidden when not taking axial symmetry with respect to B0 into account. For each direction, starting at the forced large scales, the spectrum first exhibits an amplitude drop around a wave number k0 which marks the start of a scaling range and goes on up to a dissipative wave number k(d)(θ). The three-dimensional spectrum for k≥k0 is described by a single θ-independent functional form F(k/k(d)), with the scaling law being the same in every direction. The previous properties still hold when increasing the mean field from B0=5 up to B0=10b(rms), as well as when passing from resistive to ideal flows. We conjecture that at fixed B0 the direction-independent scaling regime is reached when increasing the Reynolds number above a threshold which raises with increasing B0. Below that threshold critically balanced turbulence is expected.

  16. Turbulent Combustion in Aluminum-air Clouds for Different Scale Explosion Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Allen; Balakrishnan, Kaushik; Bell, John; Beckner, Vincent

    2015-06-01

    We have studied turbulent combustion effects in explosions, and proposed heterogeneous continuum models for the turbulent combustion fields. Also we have proposed an induction-time model for the ignition of Al particle clouds, based on Arrhenius fits to the shock tube data of Boiko. Here we explore scaling issues associated with Al particle combustion in such explosions. This is a non-premixed combustion system; the global burning rate is controlled by rate of turbulent mixing of fuel (Al particles) with air. For similitude reasons, the turbulent mixing rates should scale with the explosion length and time scales. However, the induction time for ignition of Al particles depends on an Arrhenius function, which is independent of such scales. To study this, we have performed numerical simulations of turbulent combustion in unconfined Al-SDF (shock-dispersed-fuel) explosion fields at different scales. Three different charge masses were assumed: 1-g, 1-kg and 1-T Al-powder charges. We found that there are two combustion regimes: an ignition regime--where the burning rate decays a power law function of time, and a turbulent combustion regime--where the burning rate decays exponentially with time.

  17. PIXELS: Using field-based learning to investigate students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, A.; Tinigin, L.; Petcovic, H. L.; Ormand, C. J.; LaDue, N.

    2015-12-01

    Empirical work over the past decade supports the notion that a high level of spatial thinking skill is critical to success in the geosciences. Spatial thinking incorporates a host of sub-skills such as mentally rotating an object, imagining the inside of a 3D object based on outside patterns, unfolding a landscape, and disembedding critical patterns from background noise. In this study, we focus on sense of scale, which refers to how an individual quantified space, and is thought to develop through kinesthetic experiences. Remote sensing data are increasingly being used for wide-reaching and high impact research. A sense of scale is critical to many areas of the geosciences, including understanding and interpreting remotely sensed imagery. In this exploratory study, students (N=17) attending the Juneau Icefield Research Program participated in a 3-hour exercise designed to study how a field-based activity might impact their sense of scale and their conceptions of pixels in remotely sensed imagery. Prior to the activity, students had an introductory remote sensing lecture and completed the Sense of Scale inventory. Students walked and/or skied the perimeter of several pixel types, including a 1 m square (representing a WorldView sensor's pixel), a 30 m square (a Landsat pixel) and a 500 m square (a MODIS pixel). The group took reflectance measurements using a field radiometer as they physically traced out the pixel. The exercise was repeated in two different areas, one with homogenous reflectance, and another with heterogeneous reflectance. After the exercise, students again completed the Sense of Scale instrument and a demographic survey. This presentation will share the effects and efficacy of the field-based intervention to teach remote sensing concepts and to investigate potential relationships between students' concepts of pixels and sense of scale.

  18. Biomat flow: fluorescent dye field experiments, pore-scale modeling of flow and transport properties, and field-scale flow models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, K.; Sidle, R. C.; Mallants, D.; Vasilyev, R.; Karsanina, M.; Skvortsova, E. B.; Korost, D. V.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies highlight the important role that the upper litter layer in forest soils (biomat) plays in hillslope and catchment runoff generation. This biomat layer is a very loose material with high porosity and organic content. Direct sampling is usually problematic due to limited layer thickness. Conventional laboratory measurements can mobilize solids or even cause structure failure of the sample thus making measurements unreliable. It is also difficult to assess local variation in soil properties and transition zones using these methods; thus, they may not be applicable to biomat studies. However, if the physics of flow through this layer needs to be quantified and incorporated into a model, a detailed study of hydraulic properties is necessary. Herein we show the significance of biomat flow by staining experiments in the field, study its structure and transition to mineral soil layer using X-ray micro-tomography, assess hydraulic properties and structure differences using a pore-scale modeling approach, and, finally, use conventional variably-saturated flow modeling based on Richards equation to simulate flow in the hillslope. Using staining tracers we show that biomat flow in forested hillslopes can extend long distances (lateral displacement was about 1.2 times larger than for subsurface lateral flow) before infiltration occurs into deeper layers. The three-dimensional structure of an undisturbed sample (4 x 3 x 2.5 cm) of both biomat and deeper consolidated soil was obtained using an X-ray micro-tomography device with a resolution of 15 um. Local hydraulic properties (e.g., permeability and water retention curve) for numerous layers (e.g., transition zones, biomat, mineral soil) were calculated using Stokes flow FDM solution and pore-network modeling. Anisotropy, structure differences, and property fluctuations of different layers were quantified using local porosity analysis and correlation functions. Current results support the hypothesis that small-scale

  19. Upscaling of Long-Term U9VI) Desorption from Pore Scale Kinetics to Field-Scale Reactive Transport Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andy Miller

    2009-01-25

    Environmental systems exhibit a range of complexities which exist at a range of length and mass scales. Within the realm of radionuclide fate and transport, much work has been focused on understanding pore scale processes where complexity can be reduced to a simplified system. In describing larger scale behavior, the results from these simplified systems must be combined to create a theory of the whole. This process can be quite complex, and lead to models which lack transparency. The underlying assumption of this approach is that complex systems will exhibit complex behavior, requiring a complex system of equations to describe behavior. This assumption has never been tested. The goal of the experiments presented is to ask the question: Do increasingly complex systems show increasingly complex behavior? Three experimental tanks at the intermediate scale (Tank 1: 2.4m x 1.2m x 7.6cm, Tank 2: 2.4m x 0.61m x 7.6cm, Tank 3: 2.4m x 0.61m x 0.61m (LxHxW)) have been completed. These tanks were packed with various physical orientations of different particle sizes of a uranium contaminated sediment from a former uranium mill near Naturita, Colorado. Steady state water flow was induced across the tanks using constant head boundaries. Pore water was removed from within the flow domain through sampling ports/wells; effluent samples were also taken. Each sample was analyzed for a variety of analytes relating to the solubility and transport of uranium. Flow fields were characterized using inert tracers and direct measurements of pressure head. The results show that although there is a wide range of chemical variability within the flow domain of the tank, the effluent uranium behavior is simple enough to be described using a variety of conceptual models. Thus, although there is a wide range in variability caused by pore scale behaviors, these behaviors appear to be smoothed out as uranium is transported through the tank. This smoothing of uranium transport behavior transcends

  20. A Slight Excess of Large Scale Power from Moments of the Peculiar Velocity Field

    CERN Document Server

    Macaulay, Edward; Ferreira, Pedro G; Hudson, Michael J; Watkins, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The peculiar motions of galaxies can be used to infer the distribution of matter in the Universe. It has recently been shown that measurements of the peculiar velocity field indicates an anomalously high bulk flow of galaxies in our local volume. In this paper we find the implications of the high bulk flow for the power spectrum of density fluctuations. We find that analyzing only the dipole moment of the velocity field yields an average power spectrum amplitude which is indeed higher than the LCDM value at over 2 sigma confidence. However, by also including shear and octupole moments of the velocity field, and marginalizing over possible values for the growth rate, an average power spectrum amplitude which is consistent with LCDM is recovered. We attempt to infer the shape of the matter power spectrum from moments of the velocity field, and find a slight excess of power on scales ~ h-1 Gpc.

  1. Criteria for the determination of time dependent scalings in the Fock quantization of scalar fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cortez, Jerónimo; Olmedo, Javier; Velhinho, José M

    2012-01-01

    The quantization of scalar fields in nonstationary spacetimes is plagued with ambiguities that undermine the significance of physical predictions. A context in which this kind of ambiguities arises and prevents the derivation of robust results is, e.g., in the quantum analysis of cosmological perturbations. In these situations, typically, a suitable scaling of the field by a time dependent function leads to a description in an auxiliary static background, though the nonstationarity still shows up in a time dependent mass. For such a field description, and assuming the compactness of the spatial sections, we recently proved in three or less spatial dimensions that the criteria of a natural implementation of the spatial isometries and of a unitary time evolution are able to select a unique class of unitarily equivalent vacua, and hence of Fock representations. In this work, we extend our uniqueness result to the consideration of all possible field descriptions that can be reached by a time dependent canonical t...

  2. Determining student teachers' perceptions on using technology via Likert scale, visual association test and metaphors: A mixed study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mevhibe Kobak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine senior student teachers’ perceptions on using technology by approaching various points of view. In this study, researchers collected data through Technology Perceptions Scale, Visual Association Activity and Technology Metaphors. The participants of the study were 104 senior student teachers who were enrolled in Balıkesir University Necatibey Faculty of Education. In this descriptive study, researchers interpreted qualitative data in conjunction with quantitative data. Based on the data obtained, even though student teachers’ perceptions on using technology were found positive in the light of Likert scale, there was no significant relation in terms of gender and enrolled undergraduate program. According to the results of visual association test, student teachers ranked smartboard, Internet and computer in the first three, and portable media player, mobile phone and video/camera in the last three. Besides, researchers analyzed and classified student teachers’ metaphors about technology under 9 categories: 1developing-changing technology, 2rapidly progressing technology, 3 limitless-endless technology, 4beneficial technology, 5harmful technology, 6both beneficial and harmful technology, 7indispensible technology, 8technology as a necessity, 9 all-inclusive technology. At the end of the study, those nine categories which were acquired using the content analysis technique are presented in a table which shows the interaction between categories in a holistic view.

  3. EFFECTS OF LARGE-SCALE NON-AXISYMMETRIC PERTURBATIONS IN THE MEAN-FIELD SOLAR DYNAMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pipin, V. V. [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation); Kosovichev, A. G. [W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    We explore the response of a nonlinear non-axisymmetric mean-field solar dynamo model to shallow non-axisymmetric perturbations. After a relaxation period, the amplitude of the non-axisymmetric field depends on the initial condition, helicity conservation, and the depth of perturbation. It is found that a perturbation that is anchored at 0.9 R{sub ⊙} has a profound effect on the dynamo process, producing a transient magnetic cycle of the axisymmetric magnetic field, if it is initiated at the growing phase of the cycle. The non-symmetric, with respect to the equator, perturbation results in a hemispheric asymmetry of the magnetic activity. The evolution of the axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric fields depends on the turbulent magnetic Reynolds number R{sub m}. In the range of R{sub m} = 10{sup 4}–10{sup 6} the evolution returns to the normal course in the next cycle, in which the non-axisymmetric field is generated due to a nonlinear α-effect and magnetic buoyancy. In the stationary state, the large-scale magnetic field demonstrates a phenomenon of “active longitudes” with cyclic 180° “flip-flop” changes of the large-scale magnetic field orientation. The flip-flop effect is known from observations of solar and stellar magnetic cycles. However, this effect disappears in the model, which includes the meridional circulation pattern determined by helioseismology. The rotation rate of the non-axisymmetric field components varies during the relaxation period and carries important information about the dynamo process.

  4. Fully Scaled 0.5 Micron CMOS Technology Using Variable Shaped Electron Beam Lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coane, Philip; Rudeck, Paul; Wang, Li-Kong; Wilson, Alan; Hohn, Fritz

    1988-06-01

    Over the past several years, CMOS technology has been continuously driven to achieve enhanced performance and higher density. The resulting reduction in semiconductor dimensions has surpasssed the limits attainable by the most advanced optical lithography tools. As a result, the utilization of electron beam lithography direct writing techniques to satisfy VLSI patterning requirements has increased significantly. In principle, variable shaped electron beam systems are capable of writing linewidths down to at least 0.1 micron. However, the successful application of sub-micron scaling principles to device fabrication involves an integration of tool capability and resist process control. In order to achieve the realization of improved CMOS device performance and circuit density, sub-micron ground rules (line width control and overlay) must be satisfied over the full chip. This paper reports on a high performance, fully scaled 0.5 micron CMOS technology developed for VLSI appli-cations. Significant gains in both density and performance at reduced power supply levels are realized over previously reported 1.0 micron technology. The details of the integrated lithography strategy used to achieve these results are presented.

  5. Optical coordinate scanners applied for the inspection of large scale housings produced in foundry technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grzelka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents possibilities of the dimensional and geometry measurement of the large scale casting details with a coordinate measuring technique. In particular, the analysis has been devoted to the measurement strategy in case of the measurement of large scale detail (larger than 1000 mm made in foundry technology, with the 3D optical scanner. The attention was paid on the possibility created by the advanced software attached to the scanner for measurement data processing. Preparation to the geometrical accuracy analysis of the measured objects consisted of the identification of particular geometrical features based on the large number of probing points, as well as the creation of the coordinate systems derived from the best-fitting algorithms which calculate the inscribed or circumscribed geometrical elements. Analysis of accuracy in every probing point has been performed through the comparison of their coordinates with nominal values set by 3D model. Application of the 3D optical coordinate scanner with advanced measurement software for the manufacturing accuracy inspection is very useful in case of large scale details produced with foundry technologies and allows to carry out full accuracy analysis of the examined detail.

  6. Automatic Measurement in Large-Scale Space with the Laser Theodolite and Vision Guiding Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The multitheodolite intersection measurement is a traditional approach to the coordinate measurement in large-scale space. However, the procedure of manual labeling and aiming results in the low automation level and the low measuring efficiency, and the measurement accuracy is affected easily by the manual aiming error. Based on the traditional theodolite measuring methods, this paper introduces the mechanism of vision measurement principle and presents a novel automatic measurement method for large-scale space and large workpieces (equipment combined with the laser theodolite measuring and vision guiding technologies. The measuring mark is established on the surface of the measured workpiece by the collimating laser which is coaxial with the sight-axis of theodolite, so the cooperation targets or manual marks are no longer needed. With the theoretical model data and the multiresolution visual imaging and tracking technology, it can realize the automatic, quick, and accurate measurement of large workpieces in large-scale space. Meanwhile, the impact of artificial error is reduced and the measuring efficiency is improved. Therefore, this method has significant ramification for the measurement of large workpieces, such as the geometry appearance characteristics measuring of ships, large aircraft, and spacecraft, and deformation monitoring for large building, dams.

  7. DEMONSTRATION OF A FULL-SCALE RETROFIT OF THE ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tom Hrdlicka; William Swanson

    2005-12-01

    The Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector (AHPC), developed in cooperation between W.L. Gore & Associates and the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), is an innovative approach to removing particulates from power plant flue gas. The AHPC combines the elements of a traditional baghouse and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) into one device to achieve increased particulate collection efficiency. As part of the Power Plant Improvement Initiative (PPII), this project was demonstrated under joint sponsorship from the U.S. Department of Energy and Otter Tail Power Company. The EERC is the patent holder for the technology, and W.L. Gore & Associates was the exclusive licensee for this project. The project objective was to demonstrate the improved particulate collection efficiency obtained by a full-scale retrofit of the AHPC to an existing electrostatic precipitator. The full-scale retrofit was installed on an electric power plant burning Powder River Basin (PRB) coal, Otter Tail Power Company's Big Stone Plant, in Big Stone City, South Dakota. The $13.4 million project was installed in October 2002. Project related testing concluded in December 2005. The following Final Technical Report has been prepared for the project entitled ''Demonstration of a Full-Scale Retrofit of the Advanced Hybrid Particulate Collector Technology'' as described in DOE Award No. DE-FC26-02NT41420. The report presents the operation and performance results of the system.

  8. Energy of coronal mass ejections and large-scale structure of solar magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, E. V.

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between variations of the energy and linear velocity of coronal mass ejections (CME) and the typical dimensions of structural elements of the large-scale solar magnetic field structure (LSMFS) is investigated for the period of 1996-2014. It is shown that the maximum linear velocity and maximum energy of CME correspond to the values of the effective solar multipole index n 4.0-4.4. These values determine the maximum size of the complexes of active regions, which, together with the observed maximum values of magnetic field intensity in the complexes, limit the possible maximum CME energy.

  9. Deviation of Large Scale Gravitoelectromagnetic Field in Post-Newtonian Aproximation

    CERN Document Server

    Jardim, I C

    2013-01-01

    In this work a study of the gravity is made using Einstein equation in the post- Newtonian approach. This method makes the equation linear and is used to treat non-relativistic objects. It enables us to construct, from metric-independent elements, fields that are governed by equations similar to the Maxwell ones in Lorentz gauge. We promediate these equations for matter distribuited in local sistens, like solar sistems or galaxies. Finally we define the large scale fields for this distribution, which includes terms analogous to electromagnetic case, like polarization, magnetization and superiors terms.

  10. Multifractal structure of the large-scale heliospheric magnetic field strength fluctuations near 85AU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Burlaga

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available During 2002, the Voyager 1 spacecraft was in the heliosphere between 83.4 and 85.9AU (1AU is the mean distance from the Sun to Earth at 34° N heliographic latitude. The magnetic field strength profile observed in this region had a multifractal structure in the range of scales from 2 to 16 days. The multifractal spectrum observed near 85AU is similar to that observed near 40AU, indicating relatively little evolution of the multifractal structure of the magnetic field with increasing distance in the distant heliosphere in the epoch near solar maximum.

  11. Alignments of dark matter halos with large-scale tidal fields: mass and redshift dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Sijie; Mo, H J; Shi, Jingjing

    2016-01-01

    Large scale tidal field estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos is used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependencies are only through the peak height, {\

  12. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richters, Dorothee; Kühne, Thomas D

    2014-04-01

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  13. Self-consistent field theory based molecular dynamics with linear system-size scaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richters, Dorothee [Institute of Mathematics and Center for Computational Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 9, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Kühne, Thomas D., E-mail: kuehne@uni-mainz.de [Institute of Physical Chemistry and Center for Computational Sciences, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Technical and Macromolecular Chemistry, University of Paderborn, Warburger Str. 100, D-33098 Paderborn (Germany)

    2014-04-07

    We present an improved field-theoretic approach to the grand-canonical potential suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is circumvented by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of the present approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  14. Engineering the magnetic anisotropy of atomic-scale nanostructure under electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wanjiao; Ding, Hang-Chen; Tong, Wen-Yi; Gong, Shi-Jing; Wan, Xiangang; Duan, Chun-Gang

    2015-02-01

    Atomic-scale magnetic nanostructures are promising candidates for future information processing devices. Utilizing external electric field to manipulate their magnetic properties is an especially thrilling project. Here, by carefully identifying the different contributions of each atomic orbital to the magnetic anisotropy energy (MAE) of the ferromagnetic metal films, we argue that it is possible to engineer both the MAE and the magnetic response to the electric field of atomic-scale magnetic nanostructures. Taking the iron monolayer as a matrix, we propose several interesting iron nanostructures with dramatically different magnetic properties. Such nanostructures could exhibit a strong magnetoelectric effect. Our work may open new avenues to the artificial design of electrically controlled magnetic devices.

  15. Relationship between Fujikawa's Method and the Background Field Method for the Scale Anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Chris L

    2015-01-01

    We show the equivalence between Fujikawa's method for calculating the scale anomaly and the diagrammatic approach to calculating the effective potential via the background field method, for an $O(N)$ symmetric scalar field theory. Fujikawa's method leads to a sum of terms, each one superficially in one-to-one correspondence with a vacuum diagram of the 1-loop expansion. From the viewpoint of the classical action, the anomaly results in a breakdown of the Ward identities due to a scale-dependence of the couplings, whereas in terms of the effective action, the anomaly is the result of the breakdown of Noether's theorem due to explicit symmetry breaking terms of the effective potential.

  16. Relationship between Fujikawa’s Method and the Background Field Method for the Scale Anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We show the equivalence between Fujikawa’s method for calculating the scale anomaly and the diagrammatic approach to calculating the effective potential via the background field method, for an O(N symmetric scalar field theory. Fujikawa’s method leads to a sum of terms, each one superficially in one-to-one correspondence with a vacuum diagram of the 1-loop expansion. From the viewpoint of the classical action, the anomaly results in a breakdown of the Ward identities due to scale-dependence of the couplings, whereas, in terms of the effective action, the anomaly is the result of the breakdown of Noether’s theorem due to explicit symmetry breaking terms of the effective potential.

  17. A field-theoretic approach to linear scaling \\textit{ab-initio} molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Richters, Dorothee; Kühne, Thomas D

    2012-01-01

    We present a field-theoretic method suitable for linear scaling molecular dynamics simulations using forces from self-consistent electronic structure calculations. It is based on an exact decomposition of the grand canonical potential for independent fermions and does neither rely on the ability to localize the orbitals nor that the Hamilton operator is well-conditioned. Hence, this scheme enables highly accurate all-electron linear scaling calculations even for metallic systems. The inherent energy drift of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations, arising from an incomplete convergence of the self-consistent field cycle, is solved by means of a properly modified Langevin equation. The predictive power of this approach is illustrated using the example of liquid methane under extreme conditions.

  18. Crack formation under an electric field in droplets of laponite gel: memory effect and scaling relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Tajkera; Dutta, Tapati; Tarafdar, Sujata

    2013-12-17

    When a colloidal gel dries through evaporation, cracks are usually formed, which often reveal underlying processes at work during desiccation. Desiccating colloid droplets of a few hundred microliters size show interesting effects of pattern formation and cracking which makes this an active subject of current research. Because aqueous gels of clay are known to be strongly affected by an electric field, one may expect crack patterns to exhibit a field effect. In the present study we allow droplets of laponite gel to dry under a radial electric field. This gives rise to highly reproducible patterns of cracks, which depend on the strength, direction, and time of exposure to the electric field. For a continuously applied DC voltage, cracks always appear on dissipation of a certain constant amount of energy. If the field is switched off before cracks appear, the observed results are shown to obey a number of empirical scaling relations, which enable us to predict the time of appearance and the number of cracks under specified conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the surface between the macroscopic cracks show the presence of microcracks, which are wider and more numerous when no electric field is applied. The microcracks are reduced in the presence of stronger fields.

  19. Dual mean field search for large scale linear and quadratic knapsack problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Juan; Velasco, Jonás; Berrones, Arturo

    2017-07-01

    An implementation of mean field annealing to deal with large scale linear and non linear binary optimization problems is given. Mean field annealing is based on the analogy between combinatorial optimization and interacting physical systems at thermal equilibrium. Specifically, a mean field approximation of the Boltzmann distribution given by a Lagrangian that encompass the objective function and the constraints is calculated. The original discrete task is in this way transformed into a continuous variational problem. In our version of mean field annealing, no temperature parameter is used, but a good starting point in the dual space is given by a ;thermodynamic limit; argument. The method is tested in linear and quadratic knapsack problems with sizes that are considerably larger than those used in previous studies of mean field annealing. Dual mean field annealing is capable to find high quality solutions in running times that are orders of magnitude shorter than state of the art algorithms. Moreover, as may be expected for a mean field theory, the solutions tend to be more accurate as the number of variables grow.

  20. Models of optimal technology for removing oil by secondary methods of developing highly viscous oil fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewulski, J.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents research on developing several methods of optimal technology for removing oil in highly viscous oil fields from the following wells: Lubno-3, Kharklova-Gvaretstvo 154 and Vetzhno (heavy oil). The problem connected with preparing the displacement fluids, with special emphasis on the authors patented technology for producing micellar solutions are discussed. The studies of dislocation fluids (including modified ones) were conducted at 3 temperatures: 293, 308, and 323/sup 0/K and with and without micellar solutions. The tests were used to idetify static regressive models of oil removal from oil fields. The model is satisfactorily accurate in predicting the amount of oil yield by using various secondary methods. Practical conclusions are reached based on an analysis of the studies. These conclusions provide the basis for industrial tests to increase the effectiveness of waterflooding highly viscous oil fields. They can also be used to develop old (gased) oil fields, an advantage considering the current fuel-energy situation.

  1. Technologies for small scale wood-fueled combined heat and power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houmann Jakobsen, H.; Houmoeller, S.; Thaaning Pedersen, L.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe and compare different technologies for small cogeneration systems (up to 2-3 MW{sub e}), based on wood as fuel. For decentralized cogeneration, i.e. for recovering energy from saw mill wood wastes or heat supply for small villages, it is vital to know the advantages and disadvantages of the different technologies. Also, for the decision-makers it is of importance to know the price levels of the different technologies. A typical obstacle for small wood cogeneration systems is the installation costs. The specific price (per kW) is usually higher than for larger plants or plants using fossil fuels. For a saw mill choosing between cogeneration and simple heat production, however, the larger installation costs are counter weighed by the sale of electricity, while the fuel consumption is the same. Whether it is profitable or not to invest in cogeneration is often hard to decide. For many years small wood cogeneration systems have been too expensive, leading to the construction of only heat producing systems due to too high price levels of small steam turbines. In recent years a great deal of effort has been put into research and developing of new technologies to replace this traditional steam turbine. Among these are: Steam engines; Stirling engines; Indirectly fired gas turbines; Pressurized down draft combustion. Along with the small scale traditional steam turbines, these technologies will be evaluated in this study. When some or all these technologies are fully developed and commercial, a strong means of reducing the strain on the environment and the greenhouse effect will be available, as the total efficiency is high (up to 90%) and wood is an energy source in balance with nature. (au) EFP-95. 19 refs.

  2. Mapping daily evapotranspiration at Landsat spatial scales during the BEAREX'08 field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Martha C.; Kustas, William P.; Alfieri, Joseph G.; Gao, Feng; Hain, Christopher; Prueger, John H.; Evett, Steven; Colaizzi, Paul; Howell, Terry; Chávez, José L.

    2012-12-01

    Robust spatial information about environmental water use at field scales and daily to seasonal timesteps will benefit many applications in agriculture and water resource management. This information is particularly critical in arid climates where freshwater resources are limited or expensive, and groundwater supplies are being depleted at unsustainable rates to support irrigated agriculture as well as municipal and industrial uses. Gridded evapotranspiration (ET) information at field scales can be obtained periodically using land-surface temperature-based surface energy balance algorithms applied to moderate resolution satellite data from systems like Landsat, which collects thermal-band imagery every 16 days at a resolution of approximately 100 m. The challenge is in finding methods for interpolating between ET snapshots developed at the time of a clear-sky Landsat overpass to provide complete daily time-series over a growing season. This study examines the efficacy of a simple gap-filling algorithm designed for applications in data-sparse regions, which does not require local ground measurements of weather or rainfall, or estimates of soil texture. The algorithm relies on general conservation of the ratio between actual ET and a reference ET, generated from satellite insolation data and standard meteorological fields from a mesoscale model. The algorithm was tested with ET retrievals from the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) surface energy balance model and associated DisALEXI flux disaggregation technique, which uses Landsat-scale thermal imagery to reduce regional ALEXI maps to a finer spatial resolution. Daily ET at the Landsat scale was compared with lysimeter and eddy covariance flux measurements collected during the Bushland Evapotranspiration and Agricultural Remote sensing EXperiment of 2008 (BEAREX08), conducted in an irrigated agricultural area in the Texas Panhandle under highly advective conditions. The simple gap-filling algorithm performed

  3. Wafer-Scale Gigahertz Graphene Field Effect Transistors on SiC Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘洪亮; 金智; 麻芃; 郭建楠; 刘新宇; 叶甜春; 李佳; 敦少博; 冯志红

    2011-01-01

    Wafer-scale graphene field-effect transistors are fabricated using benzocyclobutene and atomic layer deposition Al2O3 as the top-gate dielectric.The epitaxial-graphene layer is formed by graphitization of a 2-inch-diameter Si-face semi-insulating 6H-SiC substrate.The graphene on the silicon carbide substrate is heavily n-doped and current saturation is not found.For the intrinsic characteristic of this particular channel material,the devices cannot be switched off.The cut-off frequencies of these graphene field-effect transistors,which have a gate length of l μm,are larger than 800 MHz.The largest one can reach 1.24 GHz.There are greater than 95% active devices that can be successfully applied.We thus succeed in fabricating wafer-scale gigahertz graphene field-effect transistors,which paves the way for high-performance graphene devices and circuits.%Wafer-scale graphene Beld-effect transistors are fabricated using benzocyclobutene and atomic layer deposition AI2O3 as the top-gate dielectric. The epitaxial-graphene layer is formed by graphitization of a 2-inch-diameter Si-face semi-insulating 6H-SiC substrate. The graphene on the silicon carbide substrate is heavily n-doped and current saturation is not found. For the intrinsic characteristic of this particular channel material, the devices cannot be switched off. The cut-off frequencies of these graphene field-effect transistors, which have a gate length of l μm, are larger than 800MHz. The largest one can reach 1.24 GHz. There are greater than 95% active devices that can be successfully applied. We thus succeed in fabricating wafer-scale gigahertz graphene Geld-effect transistors, which paves the way for high-performance graphene devices and circuits.

  4. Modeling of the subgrid-scale term of the filtered magnetic field transport equation

    OpenAIRE

    Balarac, Guillaume; Kosovichev, Alexander; Brugière, Olivier; Wray, Alan; Mansour, Nagi

    2010-01-01

    Accurate subgrid-scale turbulence models are needed to perform realistic numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the subsurface flows of the Sun. To perform large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent MHD flows, three unknown terms have to be modeled. As a first step, this work proposes to use a priori tests to measure the accuracy of various models proposed to predict the SGS term appearing in the transport equation of the filtered magnetic field. It is proposed to evaluate the SGS ...

  5. REDUCING FIBER LOSS IN LABORATORY-AND MILL-SCALE FLOTATION DEINKING USING SURFACTANT SPRAY TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Greg.DeLozier; YulinZhao; YulinDeng; DavidWhite; JunyongZhu; MarkPrein

    2004-01-01

    As the cost of quality waste paper continues to escalate in response tofor the finite resource,an increased global demand loss of saleable fiber within flotation rejects becomes both environmentally and economically unacceptable. The ability of surfactant spray technology to reduce yield loss without detriment to pulp brightness gains has been demonstrated during both laboratory-and pilot-scale flotation deinking investigations. This paper documents the successful transfer of this technology to a single flotation unit within the deinking line of a mill producing newsprint from 100% secondary fiber. Initial results suggest that the loss of fiber across the unit may be reduced by more than 50% without obvious detriment to final pulp quality.

  6. REDUCING FIBER LOSS IN LABORATORY- AND MILL-SCALE FLOTATION DEINKING USING SURFACTANT SPRAY TECHNOLOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Greg. DeLozier; Yulin Zhao; Yulin Deng; David White; Junyong Zhu; Mark Prein

    2004-01-01

    As the cost of quality waste paper continues to escalate in response to an increased global demand for the finite resource, loss of saleable fiber within flotation rejects becomes both environmentally and economically unacceptable. The ability of surfactant spray technology to reduce yield loss without detriment to pulp brightness gains has been demonstrated during both laboratory- and pilot-scale flotation deinking investigations. This paper documents the successful transfer of this technology to a single flotation unit within the deinking line of a mill producing newsprint from 100% secondary fiber. Initial results suggest that the loss of fiber across the unit may be reduced by more than 50%without obvious detriment to final pulp quality.

  7. Department of Energy Small-Scale Hydropower Program: Feasibility assessment and technology development summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinehart, B.N.

    1991-06-01

    This report summarizes two subprograms under the US Department of Energy's Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Program. These subprograms were part of the financial assistance activities and included the Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) feasibility assessments and the technology development projects. The other major subprograms included engineering research and development, legal and institutional aspects, and technology transfer. These other subprograms are covered in their respective summary reports. The problems of energy availability and increasing costs of energy led to a national effort to develop economical and environmental attractive alternative energy resources. One such alternative involved the utilization of existing dams with hydraulic heads of <65 ft and the capacity to generate hydroelectric power of 15 MW or less. Thus, the PRDA program was initiated along with the Technology Development program. The purpose of the PRDA feasibility studies was to encourage development of renewable hydroelectric resources by providing engineering, economic, environmental, safety, and institutional information. Fifty-five feasibility studies were completed under the PRDA. This report briefly summarizes each of those projects. Many of the PRDA projects went on to become technology development projects. 56 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. Measuring Artistically Gifted Students' Attitudes toward Technology Using Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Dantzler

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study measured artistically gifted students’ attitudes toward technology and compared them to their math/science peers. Researchers administered the English version of the Modified Fennema Sherman Attitudes Scales (M-FSAS to 149 students enrolled at a residential school (grades 7 – 12 for the artistically and math/science gifted (108 female, 41 male. Analyses revealed no multivariate difference between arts concentrations; however, there was a statistically significant multivariate difference between math/science students and arts students. Further univariate analyses indicated statistically significant differences in all areas except in the gender differences subscale. Math/science students had lower M-FSAS scores, which equate to stronger attitudes surrounding technology. Results suggest that artistically gifted students do not perceive technology as being as relevant to their lives as their math/science gifted peers. For this artistically gifted sample, these results potentially represent fewer career opportunities and creative outlets. Based on these results, educators should imbed into the curriculum opportunities for artistically gifted students to utilize technology for career-oriented purposes. Key Words:

  9. Ecologies of Scale: Multifunctionality Connects Conservation and Agriculture across Fields, Farms, and Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devan Allen McGranahan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Agroecology and landscape ecology are two land-use sciences based on ecological principles, but have historically focused on fine and broad spatial scales, respectively. As global demand for food strains current resources and threatens biodiversity conservation, concepts such as multifunctional landscapes and ecologically-analogous agroecosystems integrate ecological concepts across multiple spatial scales. This paper reviews ecological principles behind several concepts crucial to the reconciliation of food production and biodiversity conservation, including relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functions such as productivity and stability; insect pest and pollinator management; integrated crop and livestock systems; countryside biogeography and heterogeneity-based rangeland management. Ecological principles are integrated across three spatial scales: fields, farms, and landscapes.

  10. Helical magnetic fields in the M87 jet at arc-second scales

    CERN Document Server

    Algaba, J C; Nakamura, M

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the magnetic field configuration of the M87 jet at arc-second scales by using archival polarimetric VLA data at 8, 15, 22 and 43 GHz. By stacking images over three years in order to enhance the sensitivity, we reveal, for the first time, systematic transverse gradients of the Faraday rotation measure in several knots along the jet. Combining this result with polarization properties and the dynamics of the jet, we suggest the magnetic structure in several knots at kiloparsec scales consists of a systematically wrapped, tightly wound helical configuration. Our analysis brings us a new paradigm where the M87 jet is a fundamentally current carrying system produced in the vicinity of the supermassive black hole, transferring a huge amount of the electromagnetic energy over the host galaxy scale.

  11. Field-based observations confirm linear scaling of sand flux with wind stress

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Raleigh L

    2016-01-01

    Wind-driven sand transport generates atmospheric dust, forms dunes, and sculpts landscapes. However, it remains unclear how the sand flux scales with wind speed, largely because models do not agree on how particle speed changes with wind shear velocity. Here, we present comprehensive measurements from three new field sites and three published studies, showing that characteristic saltation layer heights, and thus particle speeds, remain approximately constant with shear velocity. This result implies a linear dependence of saltation flux on wind shear stress, which contrasts with the nonlinear 3/2 scaling used in most aeolian process predictions. We confirm the linear flux law with direct measurements of the stress-flux relationship occurring at each site. Models for dust generation, dune migration, and other processes driven by wind-blown sand on Earth, Mars, and several other planetary surfaces should be modified to account for linear stress-flux scaling.

  12. A phase-field study of the scaling law in free-standing ferroelectric thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Binglun; Mao, Huina; Qu, Shaoxing

    2015-12-18

    The scaling law for ferroelectric stripe domains is investigated in free-standing BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin films via phase-field simulations. The results agree with the Kittel law, where the square of the domain width is found to be proportional to the thin film thickness. After being rescaled by the corresponding domain wall thickness, the generalized scaling law is also demonstrated, with the dimensionless scaling constant M estimated to be ∼3.3 in two ferroelectric materials. Moreover, we predict the effect of the exchange constant which is incorporated in Ginzburg-Landau theory on the equilibrium domain width and the critical thickness of the ferroelectric thin films.

  13. A phase-field study of the scaling law in free-standing ferroelectric thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Binglun; Mao, Huina; Qu, Shaoxing

    2015-12-01

    The scaling law for ferroelectric stripe domains is investigated in free-standing BaTiO3 and PbTiO3 thin films via phase-field simulations. The results agree with the Kittel law, where the square of the domain width is found to be proportional to the thin film thickness. After being rescaled by the corresponding domain wall thickness, the generalized scaling law is also demonstrated, with the dimensionless scaling constant M estimated to be ˜3.3 in two ferroelectric materials. Moreover, we predict the effect of the exchange constant which is incorporated in Ginzburg-Landau theory on the equilibrium domain width and the critical thickness of the ferroelectric thin films.

  14. Primordial Magnetic Field Effects on the CMB and Large-Scale Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai G. Yamazaki

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic fields are everywhere in nature, and they play an important role in every astronomical environment which involves the formation of plasma and currents. It is natural therefore to suppose that magnetic fields could be present in the turbulent high-temperature environment of the big bang. Such a primordial magnetic field (PMF would be expected to manifest itself in the cosmic microwave background (CMB temperature and polarization anisotropies, and also in the formation of large-scale structure. In this paper, we summarize the theoretical framework which we have developed to calculate the PMF power spectrum to high precision. Using this formulation, we summarize calculations of the effects of a PMF which take accurate quantitative account of the time evolution of the cutoff scale. We review the constructed numerical program, which is without approximation, and an improvement over the approach used in a number of previous works for studying the effect of the PMF on the cosmological perturbations. We demonstrate how the PMF is an important cosmological physical process on small scales. We also summarize the current constraints on the PMF amplitude Bλ and the power spectral index nB which have been deduced from the available CMB observational data by using our computational framework.

  15. Critical point scaling of Ising spin glasses in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Joonhyun; Moore, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Critical point scaling in a field H applies for the limits t →0 (where t =T /Tc-1 ) and H →0 but with the ratio R =t /H2 /Δ finite. Δ is a critical exponent of the zero-field transition. We study the replicon correlation length ξ and from it the crossover scaling function f (R ) defined via 1 /(ξ H4 /(d +2 -η )) ˜f (R ) . We have calculated analytically f (R ) for the mean-field limit of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model. In dimension d =3 , we have determined the exponents and the critical scaling function f (R ) within two versions of the Migdal-Kadanoff (MK) renormalization group procedure. One of the MK versions gives results for f (R ) in d =3 in reasonable agreement with those of the Monte Carlo simulations at the values of R for which they can be compared. If there were a de Almeida-Thouless (AT) line for d ≤6 , it would appear as a zero of the function f (R ) at some negative value of R , but there is no evidence for such behavior. This is consistent with the arguments that there should be no AT line for d ≤6 , which we review.

  16. Alignments of Dark Matter Halos with Large-scale Tidal Fields: Mass and Redshift Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sijie; Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Shi, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale tidal fields estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos are used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate, and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of the tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependence is only on the peak height, ν \\equiv {δ }{{c}}/σ ({M}{{h}},z). The scaling relations of the alignment strengths with the value of ν indicate that the alignment strengths remain roughly constant when the structures within which the halos reside are still in a quasi-linear regime, but decreases as nonlinear evolution becomes more important. We also calculate the alignments in projection so that our results can be compared directly with observations. Finally, we investigate the alignments of tidal tensors on large scales, and use the results to understand alignments of halo pairs separated at various distances. Our results suggest that the coherent structure of the tidal field is the underlying reason for the alignments of halos and galaxies seen in numerical simulations and in observations.

  17. On the universality of MOG weak field approximation at galaxy cluster scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Ivan; De Laurentis, Mariafelicia

    2017-07-01

    In its weak field limit, Scalar-tensor-vector gravity theory introduces a Yukawa-correction to the gravitational potential. Such a correction depends on the two parameters, α which accounts for the modification of the gravitational constant, and μ * - 1 which represents the scale length on which the scalar field propagates. These parameters were found to be universal when the modified gravitational potential was used to fit the galaxy rotation curves and the mass profiles of galaxy clusters, both without Dark Matter. We test the universality of these parameters using the temperature anisotropies due to the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. In our model the intra-cluster gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium within the modified gravitational potential well and it is described by a polytropic equation of state. We predict the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich temperature anisotropies produced by Coma cluster, and we compare them with those obtained using the Planck 2013 Nominal maps. In our analysis, we find α and the scale length, respectively, to be consistent and to depart from their universal values. Our analysis points out that the assumption of the universality of the Yukawa-correction to the gravitational potential is ruled out at more than 3.5σ at galaxy clusters scale, while demonstrating that such a theory of gravity is capable to fit the cluster profile if the scale dependence of the gravitational potential is restored.

  18. On the universality of MOG weak field approximation at galaxy cluster scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan De Martino

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In its weak field limit, Scalar-tensor-vector gravity theory introduces a Yukawa-correction to the gravitational potential. Such a correction depends on the two parameters, α which accounts for the modification of the gravitational constant, and μ⁎−1 which represents the scale length on which the scalar field propagates. These parameters were found to be universal when the modified gravitational potential was used to fit the galaxy rotation curves and the mass profiles of galaxy clusters, both without Dark Matter. We test the universality of these parameters using the temperature anisotropies due to the thermal Sunyaev–Zeldovich effect. In our model the intra-cluster gas is in hydrostatic equilibrium within the modified gravitational potential well and it is described by a polytropic equation of state. We predict the thermal Sunyaev–Zeldovich temperature anisotropies produced by Coma cluster, and we compare them with those obtained using the Planck 2013 Nominal maps. In our analysis, we find α and the scale length, respectively, to be consistent and to depart from their universal values. Our analysis points out that the assumption of the universality of the Yukawa-correction to the gravitational potential is ruled out at more than 3.5σ at galaxy clusters scale, while demonstrating that such a theory of gravity is capable to fit the cluster profile if the scale dependence of the gravitational potential is restored.

  19. A Parallel Multigrid Solver for High Frequency Electromagnetic Field Analyses with Small-scale PC Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yosui, Kuniaki; Iwashita, Takeshi; Mori, Michiya; Kobayashi, Eiichi

    Finite element analyses of electromagnetic field are commonly used for designing of various electronic devices. The scale of the analyses becomes larger and larger, therefore, a fast linear solver is needed to solve linear equations arising from the finite element method. Since a multigrid solver is the fastest linear solver for these problems, parallelization of a multigrid solver is a quite useful approach. From the viewpoint of industrial applications, an effective usage of a small-scale PC cluster is important due to initial cost for introducing parallel computers. In this paper, a distributed parallel multigrid solver for a small-scale PC cluster is developed. In high frequency electromagnetic field analyses, a special block Gauss-Seidel smoother is used for the multigrid solver instead of general smoothers such as Gauss-Seidel smoother or Jacobi smoother in order to improve a convergence rate. The block multicolor ordering technique is applied to parallelize the smoother. A numerical exsample shows that a 3.7-fold speed-up in computational time and a 3.0-fold increase in the scale of the analysis were attained when the number of CPU was increased from one to five.

  20. Spatial Scaling of the Profile of Selective Attention in the Visual Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Matthew A; Knapp, Ashley A; Adams, Thomas G; Long, Stephanie M; Parks, Nathan A

    2016-01-01

    Neural mechanisms of selective attention must be capable of adapting to variation in the absolute size of an attended stimulus in the ever-changing visual environment. To date, little is known regarding how attentional selection interacts with fluctuations in the spatial expanse of an attended object. Here, we use event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the scaling of attentional enhancement and suppression across the visual field. We measured ERPs while participants performed a task at fixation that varied in its attentional demands (attentional load) and visual angle (1.0° or 2.5°). Observers were presented with a stream of task-relevant stimuli while foveal, parafoveal, and peripheral visual locations were probed by irrelevant distractor stimuli. We found two important effects in the N1 component of visual ERPs. First, N1 modulations to task-relevant stimuli indexed attentional selection of stimuli during the load task and further correlated with task performance. Second, with increased task size, attentional modulation of the N1 to distractor stimuli showed a differential pattern that was consistent with a scaling of attentional selection. Together, these results demonstrate that the size of an attended stimulus scales the profile of attentional selection across the visual field and provides insights into the attentional mechanisms associated with such spatial scaling.

  1. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual field tours in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, D. G.; Eastwood, W. J.; Jones, P. I.; Johnson, R.; Marshall, S.; Hannah, D. M.

    2012-05-01

    Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field tour for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD), and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS) and geographical information systems (GIS). The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students). A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field tour over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field tour in particular). Our experiences are highly relevant to the implementation of novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  2. Experiences of using mobile technologies and virtual field tours in Physical Geography: implications for hydrology education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Kingston

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Education in hydrology is changing rapidly due to diversification of students, emergent major scientific and practical challenges that our discipline must engage with, shifting pedagogic ideas and higher education environments, the need for students to develop new discipline specific and transferrable skills, and the advent of innovative technologies for learning and teaching. This paper focuses on new technologies in the context of learning and teaching in Physical Geography and reflects on the implications of our experiences for education in hydrology. We evaluate the experience of designing and trialling novel mobile technology-based field exercises and a virtual field tour for a Year 1 undergraduate Physical Geography module at a UK university. The new exercises are based on using and obtaining spatial data, operation of meteorological equipment (explained using an interactive DVD, and include introductions to global positioning systems (GPS and geographical information systems (GIS. The technology and exercises were well received in a pilot study and subsequent rolling-out to the full student cohort (∼150 students. A statistically significant improvement in marks was observed following the redesign. Although the students enjoyed using mobile technology, the increased interactivity and opportunity for peer learning were considered to be the primary benefits by students. This is reinforced further by student preference for the new interactive virtual field tour over the previous "show-and-tell" field exercise. Despite the new exercises having many advantages, exercise development was not trivial due to the high start-up costs, the need for provision of sufficient technical support and the relative difficulty of making year-to-year changes (to the virtual field tour in particular. Our experiences are highly relevant to the implementation of novel learning and teaching technologies in hydrology education.

  3. Light sources for high-volume manufacturing EUV lithography: technology, performance, and power scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkov, Igor; Brandt, David; Ershov, Alex; Schafgans, Alexander; Tao, Yezheng; Vaschenko, Georgiy; Rokitski, Slava; Kats, Michael; Vargas, Michael; Purvis, Michael; Rafac, Rob; La Fontaine, Bruno; De Dea, Silvia; LaForge, Andrew; Stewart, Jayson; Chang, Steven; Graham, Matthew; Riggs, Daniel; Taylor, Ted; Abraham, Mathew; Brown, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is expected to succeed in 193-nm immersion multi-patterning technology for sub-10-nm critical layer patterning. In order to be successful, EUV lithography has to demonstrate that it can satisfy the industry requirements in the following critical areas: power, dose stability, etendue, spectral content, and lifetime. Currently, development of second-generation laser-produced plasma (LPP) light sources for the ASML's NXE:3300B EUV scanner is complete, and first units are installed and operational at chipmaker customers. We describe different aspects and performance characteristics of the sources, dose stability results, power scaling, and availability data for EUV sources and also report new development results.

  4. Inventory of future power and heat production technologies. Partial report Small-scale technology; Inventering av framtidens el- och vaermeproduktionstekniker. Delrapport Smaaskalig teknik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridell, Bengt (Grontmij AB (Sweden))

    2008-12-15

    The following techniques for small-scale production have been selected to be studied more carefully, Fuel cells, Photovoltaics, Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), and Wave power. Of the four selected technologies, fuel cells, solar cells, ORC are appropriate for use in so-called distributed generation, to be used close to a consumer, and possibly also for the production of electricity. Wave power is more like the wind in nature and is probably better suited to be used by power companies for direct input to the transmission grid. None of these technologies are now competitive against buying electricity from the Swedish grid. However, there are opportunities for all to reduce production costs so that they can become competitive alternatives in the future, depending largely on the general development of electricity prices, taxes, delivery reliability, etc. The four different technologies have different development stages and requirements that affect their possibility for a commercial breakthrough. These technologies will probably not all get a breakthrough in Sweden. Small-scale technologies will in the time period up to 2030 not be able to compete with the large-scale technologies that exist in today's power grid. In the longer term the situation may be different. The power system might be reduced in importance if the small scale technologies become cheap, reliable and easy to use. Electricity can then be produced locally, directly related to user needs

  5. Design and test challenges in Nano-scale analog and mixed CMOS technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouna Karmani

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The continuous increase of integration densities in Complementary Metal–Oxide–Semiconductor (CMOStechnology has driven the rapid growth of very large scale integrated (VLSI circuit for today's high-techelectronics industries from consumer products to telecommunications and computers. As CMOStechnologies are scaled down into the nanometer range, analog and mixed integrated circuit (IC design andtesting have become a real challenge to ensure the functionality and quality of the product. The first part ofthe paper presents the CMOS technology scaling impact on design and reliability for consumer and criticalapplications. We then propose a discussion on the role and challenges of testing analog and mixed devicesin the nano-scale era. Finally we present the IDDQ testing technique used to detect the most likely defects ofbridging type occurring in analog CMOS circuits during the manufacturing process and creating a resistivepath between VDD supply and the ground.To prove the efficiency of the proposed technique we design a CMOS 90nm operational amplifier (Opamp and a Built in Current Sensor (BICS to validate the technique and correlate it with post layoutsimulation results.

  6. Contribution of the infrasound technology to characterize large scale atmospheric disturbances and impact on infrasound monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Elisabeth; Le Pichon, Alexis; Ceranna, Lars; Pilger, Christoph; Charlton Perez, Andrew; Smets, Pieter

    2016-04-01

    The International Monitoring System (IMS) developed for the verification of the Comprehensive nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) provides a unique global description of atmospheric disturbances generating infrasound such as extreme events (e.g. meteors, volcanoes, earthquakes, and severe weather) or human activity (e.g. explosions and supersonic airplanes). The analysis of the detected signals, recorded at global scales and over near 15 years at some stations, demonstrates that large-scale atmospheric disturbances strongly affect infrasound propagation. Their time scales vary from several tens of minutes to hours and days. Their effects are in average well resolved by the current model predictions; however, accurate spatial and temporal description is lacking in both weather and climate models. This study reviews recent results using the infrasound technology to characterize these large scale disturbances, including (i) wind fluctuations induced by gravity waves generating infrasound partial reflections and modifications of the infrasound waveguide, (ii) convection from thunderstorms and mountain waves generating gravity waves, (iii) stratospheric warming events which yield wind inversions in the stratosphere, (iv)planetary waves which control the global atmospheric circulation. Improved knowledge of these disturbances and assimilation in future models is an important objective of the ARISE (Atmospheric dynamics Research InfraStructure in Europe) project. This is essential in the context of the future verification of the CTBT as enhanced atmospheric models are necessary to assess the IMS network performance in higher resolution, reduce source location errors, and improve characterization methods.

  7. Developments in MEMS scale printable alkaline and Li-ion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littau, K. A.; Cobb, C. L.; Spengler, N.; Solberg, S.; Weisberg, M.; Chang, N.; Rodkin, A.

    2011-06-01

    Two technologies for MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) scale cell formation are discussed. First, the fabrication of planar alkaline cell batteries compatible with MEMS scale power storage applications is shown. Both mm scale and sub-mm scale individual cells and batteries have been constructed. The chosen coplanar electrode geometry allows for easy fabrication of series connected cells enabling higher voltage while simplifying the cell sealing and electrode formation. The Zn/Ag alkaline system is used due to the large operating voltage, inherent charge capacity, long shelf life, and ease of fabrication. Several cells have been constructed using both plated and spun-on silver. The plated cells are shown to be limited in performance due to inadequate surface area and porosity; however, the cells made from spun-on colloidal silver show reasonable charge capacity and power performance with current densities of up to 200 uA/mm2 and charge capacities of up to 18 mA-s/mm2. Second, a new printing method for interdigitated 3-D cells is introduced. A microfluidic printhead capable of dispensing multiple materials at high resolution and aspect ratio is described and used to form fine interdigitated cell features which show >10 times improvement in energy density. Representative structures enabled by this method are modeled, and the energy and power density improvements are reported.

  8. In-situ determination of field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients: Performance, simulation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobile, Michael; Widdowson, Mark; Stewart, Lloyd; Nyman, Jennifer; Deeb, Rula; Kavanaugh, Michael; Mercer, James; Gallagher, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Better estimates of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mass, its persistence into the future, and the potential impact of source reduction are critical needs for determining the optimal path to clean up sites impacted by NAPLs. One impediment to constraining time estimates of source depletion is the uncertainty in the rate of mass transfer between NAPLs and groundwater. In this study, an innovative field test is demonstrated for the purpose of quantifying field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients (klN) within a source zone of a fuel-contaminated site. Initial evaluation of the test concept using a numerical model revealed that the aqueous phase concentration response to the injection of clean groundwater within a source zone was a function of NAPL mass transfer. Under rate limited conditions, NAPL dissolution together with the injection flow rate and the radial distance to monitoring points directly controlled time of travel. Concentration responses observed in the field test were consistent with the hypothetical model results allowing field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients to be quantified. Site models for groundwater flow and solute transport were systematically calibrated and utilized for data analysis. Results show klN for benzene varied from 0.022 to 0.60 d- 1. Variability in results was attributed to a highly heterogeneous horizon consisting of layered media of varying physical properties.

  9. In-situ determination of field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients: Performance, simulation and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobile, Michael; Widdowson, Mark; Stewart, Lloyd; Nyman, Jennifer; Deeb, Rula; Kavanaugh, Michael; Mercer, James; Gallagher, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Better estimates of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) mass, its persistence into the future, and the potential impact of source reduction are critical needs for determining the optimal path to clean up sites impacted by NAPLs. One impediment to constraining time estimates of source depletion is the uncertainty in the rate of mass transfer between NAPLs and groundwater. In this study, an innovative field test is demonstrated for the purpose of quantifying field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients (kl(N)) within a source zone of a fuel-contaminated site. Initial evaluation of the test concept using a numerical model revealed that the aqueous phase concentration response to the injection of clean groundwater within a source zone was a function of NAPL mass transfer. Under rate limited conditions, NAPL dissolution together with the injection flow rate and the radial distance to monitoring points directly controlled time of travel. Concentration responses observed in the field test were consistent with the hypothetical model results allowing field-scale NAPL mass transfer coefficients to be quantified. Site models for groundwater flow and solute transport were systematically calibrated and utilized for data analysis. Results show kl(N) for benzene varied from 0.022 to 0.60d(-1). Variability in results was attributed to a highly heterogeneous horizon consisting of layered media of varying physical properties.

  10. Parsec-scale Magnetic-Field Structures in HEAO-1 BL Lacs

    CERN Document Server

    Kharb, P; Shastri, P

    2007-01-01

    We present very long baseline interferometry polarization images of an X-ray selected sample of BL Lacertae objects belonging to the first High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO-1) and the ROSAT-Green Bank (RGB) surveys. These are primarily high-energy-peaked BL Lacs (HBLs) and exhibit core-jet radio morphologies on pc-scales. They show moderately polarized jet components, similar to those of low-energy-peaked BL Lacs (LBLs). The fractional polarization in the unresolved cores of the HBLs is, on average, lower than in the LBLs, while the fractional polarizations in the pc-scale jets of HBLs and LBLs are comparable. However a difference is observed in the orientation of the inferred jet magnetic fields -- while LBL jets are well-known to preferentially exhibit transverse magnetic fields, the HBL jets tend to display longitudinal magnetic fields. Although a `spine-sheath' jet velocity structure, along with larger viewing angles for HBLs could produce the observed magnetic field configuration, differences in ot...

  11. Sediment and phosphorus fluxes - monitoring and modelling from field to regional scale - connectivity implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Miroslav; Zumr, David; Krása, Josef; Dostál, Tomáš; Jáchymová, Barbora; Rosendorf, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    Sediment and phosphorus fluxes - monitoring and modelling from field to regional scale - connectivity implications Miroslav Bauer1), David Zumr1), Josef Krása1), Tomáš Dostal1), Barbora Jáchymová1), Pavel Rosendorf2) Czech Technical University in Prague1, Water Research Institute of T.G.M. 2, Agricultural landscape management has a strong influences on sediment and nutrients flow paths from field to streams and reservoirs. According to many studies water erosion driven phosphorus can play important role in total phosphorous budgets in catchments and accelerate eutrophication process in vulnerable reservoirs. Research team of CTU Prague focuses on research of sediment transport processes from a small plot scale to regional scale. Using field rainfall simulator the data are collected to assess the fluxes in the scale from one to several square meters and to analyze the plot size effect on the runoff, solid particles and phosphorous transport processes (see corresponding posters of Jachymova et al., Kavka et al., Laburda et al., Zumr et al.). Running fully agricultural experimental catchment of 49 ha (Nucice, Czech Republic) and experimental soil erosion plots (Bykovice, Czech Republic) we analyze runoff and soil erosion with the aim to upscale the results from single plot studies to the catchment scale. Soil erosion is also monitored by means of spatially distributed soil sampling and photogrammetry analyses. The water flow pathways via subsurface and surface runoff and the temporary variable catchment connectivity are studied here. Finally the research team produced unique large extent study, performed by WATEM/SEDEM model adopted for erosion driven phosphorus fluxes modelling, for the area of 1/3 of the Czech Republic (ca 31500 km2) in the resolution (pixel size) of 10 by 10 meters, with estimated connectivity from single field to outlet reservoirs of large catchments, including stream topology, sediment trapping efficiencies of all ponds and reservoirs within

  12. Field Scale Variation in Water Dispersible Colloids from Aggregates and Intact Soil Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Ferré, Ty P A

    Colloid-facilitated transport can play an important role in the transport of chemicals through the soil profile. The negative surface charge and large surface area makes colloids perfect carriers for strongly sorbing chemicals, like phosphorus and certain pesticides, in highly structured soils....... It is, however, difficult to quantify the amount of colloids ready available to participate in colloid-facilitated transport. In literature, the part of the colloidal fraction that readily disperses into suspension is referred to as water-dispersible clay (WDC). In this study we used two methods...... cm intact soil columns sampled from the same field grid also showed that the largest mass of particles and phosphorus leached from this part of the field. Thus, the presented WDC method comparison and results seem highly relevant in regard to field-scale mapping of leaching risk in regard to colloid...

  13. The small scale dynamo and the amplification of magnetic fields in massive primordial haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Latif, M A; Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J

    2012-01-01

    While our present standard model of cosmology yields no clear prediction for the initial magnetic field strength, efficient dynamo action may compensate for initially weak seed fields via rapid amplification. In particular, the small-scale dynamo is expected to exponentially amplify any weak magnetic field in the presence of turbulence. We explore whether this scenario is viable using cosmological magneto-hydrodynamics simulations modeling the formation of the first galaxies, which are expected to form in so-called atomic cooling halos with virial temperatures $\\rm T_{vir} \\geq 10^{4}$ K. As previous calculations have shown that a high Jeans resolution is needed to resolve turbulent structures and dynamo effects, our calculations employ resolutions of up to 128 cells per Jeans length. The presence of the dynamo can be clearly confirmed for resolutions of at least 64 cells per Jeans length, while saturation occurs at approximate equipartition with turbulent energy. As a result of the large Reynolds numbers in ...

  14. Overview of the Full-scale Radiological Dispersal Device Field Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Anna Rae; Erhardt, Lorne; Lebel, Luke; Duke, M John M; Jones, Trevor; White, Dan; Quayle, Debora

    2016-05-01

    In 2012, Defence Research and Development Canada, in partnership with a number of other Canadian and International organizations, led a series of three field trials designed to simulate a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD). These trials, known as the Full-Scale RDD (FSRDD) Field Trials, involved the explosive dispersal of a short-lived radioactive tracer ((140)La, t1/2 = 40.293 h). The FSRDD Field Trials required a significant effort in their planning, preparation, and execution to ensure that they were carried out in a safe, efficient manner and that the scientific goals of the trials were met. The discussion presented here details the planning and execution of the trials, outlines the relevant radiation safety aspects, provides a summary of the source term and atmospheric conditions for the three dispersal events, and provides an overview of the measurements that were made to track the plumes and deposition patterns.

  15. Field Scale Variation in Water Dispersible Colloids from Aggregates and Intact Soil Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Trine; Møldrup, Per; Ferré, Ty P A;

    Colloid-facilitated transport can play an important role in the transport of chemicals through the soil profile. The negative surface charge and large surface area makes colloids perfect carriers for strongly sorbing chemicals, like phosphorus and certain pesticides, in highly structured soils....... It is, however, difficult to quantify the amount of colloids ready available to participate in colloid-facilitated transport. In literature, the part of the colloidal fraction that readily disperses into suspension is referred to as water-dispersible clay (WDC). In this study we used two methods...... cm intact soil columns sampled from the same field grid also showed that the largest mass of particles and phosphorus leached from this part of the field. Thus, the presented WDC method comparison and results seem highly relevant in regard to field-scale mapping of leaching risk in regard to colloid...

  16. Survival and leaching of Tetracycline resistant bacteria and fecal indicators from manure in field scale experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Tina; Amin, Mostofa; Lægdsmand, Mette

    The spreading of manure on agricultural land is an economic and practical solution for improving soil quality; however, animal manure frequently contains zoonotic pathogenic bacteria, such as certain Eschericia coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. The present experiment was conducted...... as a large multidisciplinary project. Pig manure with a natural content of Tetracycline resistant bacteria and fecal indicator organisms was followed in soil columns and a field scale experiment. In the field experiment pig manure was injected into agricultural soil. The distribution and survival of natural...... resistant bacterial species is E. coli. Drainage water from the field sites were collected weekly from one year prior to manure application, where no Tetracycline resistant bacteria were detected. For a period of 11 months following the first manure application, drainage water was sampled proportional...

  17. Large-scale magnetic fields can explain the baryon asymmetry of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fujita, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Helical hypermagnetic fields in the primordial Universe can produce the observed amount of baryon asymmetry through the chiral anomaly without any ingredients beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. While they generate no $B-L$ asymmetry, the generated baryon asymmetry survives the spharelon washout effect, because the generating process remains active until the electroweak phase transition. Solving the Boltzmann equation numerically and finding an attractor solution, we show that the baryon asymmetry of our Universe can be explained, if the present large-scale magnetic fields indicated by the blazar observations have a negative helicity and existed in the early Universe before the electroweak phase transition. We also derive the upper bound on the strength of the helical magnetic field, which is tighter than the CMB constraint, to avoid the overproduction of baryon asymmetry.

  18. ACCRETION DISKS WITH A LARGE SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD AROUND BLACK HOLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennady Bisnovatyi-Kogan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We consider accretion disks around black holes at high luminosity, and the problem of the formation of a large-scale magnetic field in such disks, taking into account the non-uniform vertical structure of the disk. The structure of advective accretion disks is investigated, and conditions for the formation of optically thin regions in central parts of the accretion disk are found. The high electrical conductivity of the outer layers of the disk prevents outward diffusion of the magnetic field. This implies a stationary state with a strong magnetic field in the inner parts of the accretion disk close to the black hole, and zero radial velocity at the surface of the disk. The problem of jet collimation by magneto-torsion oscillations is investigated.

  19. Potts q-color field theory and scaling random cluster model

    CERN Document Server

    Delfino, Gesualdo

    2011-01-01

    We study structural properties of the q-color Potts field theory which, for real values of q, describes the scaling limit of the random cluster model. We show that the number of independent n-point Potts spin correlators coincides with that of independent n-point cluster connectivities and is given by generalized Bell numbers. Only a subset of these spin correlators enters the determination of the Potts magnetic properties for q integer. The structure of the operator product expansion of the spin fields for generic q is also identified. For the two-dimensional case, we analyze the duality relation between spin and kink field correlators, both for the bulk and boundary cases, obtaining in particular a sum rule for the kink-kink elastic scattering amplitudes.

  20. Dynamics of Particles in Non Scaling Fixed Field Alternating Gradient Accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones J. K.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Non scaling Fixed-Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG accelerators have an unprece- dented potential for muon acceleration, as well as for medical purposes based on car- bon and proton hadron therapy. They also represent a possible active element for an Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactor (ADSR. Starting from first principle the Hamil- tonian formalism for the description of the dynamics of particles in non-scaling FFAG machines has been developed. The stationary reference (closed orbit has been found within the Hamiltonian framework. The dependence of the path length on the energy deviation has been described in terms of higher order dispersion functions. The latter have been used subsequently to specify the longitudinal part of the Hamiltonian. It has been shown that higher order phase slip coefficients should be taken into account to adequately describe the acceleration in non-scaling FFAG accelerators. A complete theory of the fast (serpentine acceleration in non-scaling FFAGs has been developed. An example of the theory is presented for the parameters of the Electron Machine with Many Applications (EMMA, a prototype electron non-scaling FFAG to be hosted at Daresbury Laboratory.