WorldWideScience

Sample records for technologically savvy faculty

  1. Technology Leadership Is Just Good Leadership: Dispositions of Tech Savvy Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Jayson W.; McLeod, Scott; Sauers, Nick

    2015-01-01

    This study describes core dispositions of school district superintendents who have been identified as technology savvy leaders by a prominent educational technology newspaper. The superintendents in this study described how they accomplished their technology initiatives and offered suggestions for other superintendents who aspire to be more…

  2. Adapting qualitative research strategies to technology savvy adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Deanna Marie; Ide, Bette

    2014-05-01

    To adapt research strategies involving adolescents in a grounded theory qualitative research study by conducting email rather than face-to-face interviews. Adolescent culture relies heavily on text-based communication and teens prefer interactions mediated through technology. Traditional qualitative research strategies need to be rethought when working with adolescents. Adapting interviewing strategies to electronic environments is timely and relevant for researching adolescents. Twenty three adolescents (aged 16-21) were interviewed by email. A letter of invitation was distributed. Potential participants emailed the researcher to convey interest in participating. If the inclusion criteria were met, email interviews were initiated. Participants controlled the interviews through their rate of response to interview questions. A grounded theory methodology was employed. Initial contact with participants reiterated confidentiality and the ability to withdraw from the study at any time. Interviews began with the collection of demographic information and a broad opening based on a semi-structured interview guide. All data were permissible, including text, photos, music, videos or outside media, for example YouTube. The participant was allowed to give direction to the interview after initial questions were posed. Email interviews continued until saturation was reached in the data. Participants were enthusiastic about email interviewing. Attrition did not occur. Email interviewing gave participants more control over the research, decreased power differentials between the adolescent and researcher, allowed the study to be adapted to cultural, linguistic and developmental needs, and maintained confidentiality. As participants said that email communication was slow and they preferred instant messaging, replication in faster-paced media is recommended. Repetition in face-to-face settings is warranted to evaluate how technology may have influenced the findings. Implications for

  3. Student Characteristics and E-Textbook Experiences: The Direct and Moderating Effects of Technology Savvy and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jun; Flores, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The adoption of e-textbooks in universities by the majority of students has yet to materialize, requiring a better understanding of the differences among users to cater for their different needs. The main focus of this study is to examine the role of technology savvy in terms of the experiences, skills and self-efficacy of students in using…

  4. Future Savvy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, Adam

    -tank forecasts, consultant reports, and stock-market guides. These resources are crucial, but they are also of very mixed quality. How can decision-makers know which predictions to take seriously, which to be wary of, and which to throw out entirely? Future Savvy provides analytical filters to judging predictive......There's no shortage of predictions available to organizations looking to anticipate and profit from future events or trends. Apparently helpful forecasts are ubiquitous in everyday communications such as newspapers and business magazines, and in specialized sources such as government and think...... material of all types, including providing a battery of critical tests to apply to any forecast to assess its validity, and judge how to fit it into everyday management thinking. The book synthesizes information assessment skills and future studies tools into a single template that allows managers to apply...

  5. Consumer Savvy: Conceptualisation and Measurement.

    OpenAIRE

    Macdonald, Emma K.; Uncles, Mark D.

    2007-01-01

    The notion of savvy consumers increasingly appears in the e-marketing and e-management literatures, usually in discussions about the importance of consumer-centricity. A synthesis of the literature identifies six broad characteristics of these savvy consumers: they are enabled by competencies in relation to technological sophistication, interpersonal networking, online networking and marketing/advertising literacy, and they are empowered by consumer self-efficacy and by their expectations of ...

  6. Faculty and Technology: Implications for Faculty Training and Technology Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Kidd, Terry; Kyei-Blankson, Lydia

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors affecting ICT adoption process and the implications for faculty training and technology leadership. Respondents represented a wide range of academic and professional positions. They identified themselves as Assistant, Associate, and Professor as well as Instructional Designer, Director of Technology, Information Manager, eLearning Manager, Assistant Department Chair, Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs and Consultant. The respondents identified Organizational Support, Leadership, Training and Development, and Resources as the predominate themes affecting Information and Communication Technology (ICT) adoption process in higher education. Evidence from this study offers insights on how higher education administrators and technology leaders could help their faculty and staff to implement appropriate ICT tools and practices to improve student learning.

  7. Searching for Educational Technology Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Lloyd H.

    2003-01-01

    Identifies the types of positions available at domestic four-year institutions of higher education for faculty whose specialty is educational technology. Analyzes educational job postings listed in the "Chronicle of Higher Education" from August, 2000, through July, 2001. (Author/SOE)

  8. Tech-Savvy Science Education? Understanding Teacher Pedagogical Practices for Integrating Technology in K-12 Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechter, Richard; Vermette, Laurie Anne

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the technology integration practices of Manitoban K-12 inservice science educators based on the Technological, Pedagogical, and Content knowledge (TPACK) framework. Science teachers (n = 433) completed a 10-item online survey regarding pedagogical beliefs about technology integration, types of technology used, and how often…

  9. Perceptions of pharmacy students, faculty members, and administrators on the use of technology in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVall, Margarita V; Hayney, Mary S; Marsh, Wallace; Neville, Michael W; O'Barr, Stephen; Sheets, Erin D; Calhoun, Larry D

    2013-05-13

    To gather and evaluate the perceptions of students, faculty members, and administrators regarding the frequency and appropriateness of classroom technology use. Third-year pharmacy students and faculty members at 6 colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed to assess their perceptions about the type, frequency, and appropriateness of using technology in the classroom. Upper-level administrators and information technology professionals were also interviewed to ascertain overall technology goals and identify criteria used to adopt new classroom technologies. Four hundred sixty-six students, 124 faculty members, and 12 administrators participated in the survey. The most frequently used and valued types of classroom technology were course management systems, audience response systems, and lecture capture. Faculty members and students agreed that faculty members appropriately used course management systems and audience response systems. Compared with their counterparts, tech-savvy, and male students reported significantly greater preference for increased use of classroom technology. Eighty-six percent of faculty members reported having changed their teaching methodologies to meet student needs, and 91% of the students agreed that the use of technology met their needs. Pharmacy colleges and schools use a variety of technologies in their teaching methods, which have evolved to meet the needs of the current generation of students. Students are satisfied with the appropriateness of technology, but many exhibit preferences for even greater use of technology in the classroom.

  10. Technology in Today's Classroom: Are You a Tech-Savvy Teacher?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Stephanie Diamond

    2011-01-01

    Technology has changed the way the world functions on a day-to-day basis, but what about education? Education has been directly affected by the increase of technology in the United States. This change has not been well accepted by some members of the educational community, thus leaving the realm of education behind in the technology era. This…

  11. Study of Faculty and Information Technology, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Eden; Brooks, D. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    In this inaugural year of the faculty technology study, EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR) partnered with 151 college/university sites yielding responses from 17,451 faculty respondents across 13 countries. The findings are exploratory in nature, as they cover new ground to help us tell a more comprehensive story about technology…

  12. Technology Adoption in Higher Education: Overcoming Anxiety through Faculty Bootcamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Terri; Wisniewski, Mary Ann; Kuhlemeyer, Greg; Isaacs, Gerald; Krzykowski, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The reluctance to design and teach online courses in higher education is often attributed to technology anxiety in faculty. This article documents a faculty development model that has successfully helped faculty overcome this obstacle. "Bootcamps," faculty development programs held at Carroll University in Waukesha, WI, were specifically and…

  13. An Investigation of Faculty Abstention or Adoption of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gersch, Carolyn

    2017-01-01

    Although faculty members are the front line adopters of technology in education, some appear to be unhurried to accept and use technology as part of their curriculum to meet institutional and student demands. The problem was that there was not a complete understanding of how faculty members made decisions on whether or not to implement new…

  14. Technology Professional Development and Instructional Technology Integration among Part-Time Faculty at Illinois Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohani, Behnam

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on exploring Illinois community college faculty development coordinators' perceptions about how they are implementing faculty technology professional development programs and providing technical support for part-time faculty in the Illinois community college systems. Also examined were part-time faculty perceptions of the degree…

  15. The Relationship Between Student and Faculty Attitudes Toward Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine student and faculty attitudes toward computer technology in advanced arts classes at a southeastern university in the United States. This one semester study was focused on the traditional arts disciplines of art, dance, music, and theatre. This correlational analysis limited to faculty members and students…

  16. Connection, Technology, Positionality: An Inside Look at Women Faculty's Positionality toward "Connection" and "Technology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Women faculty members have been reported rating their level of knowledge and experience in using technologies lower than male faculty members. A closer examination revealed that women faculty members were likely to use technologies that fit into their pedagogy, met students. learning styles and needs, and facilitated their interactions with…

  17. Higher Education Beyond Faculties: Interdisciplinary Education in Care and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sponselee, Anne-Mie A G; Van Hoof, Joost

    2017-01-01

    A Centre of Healthcare and Technology of a Dutch University of Applied Sciences, is presented - and illustrated by project examples - to show how the transitions in the sectors of health care and technology can result in interdisciplinary education in care and technology by means of higher education beyond faculties.

  18. M-Learning Systems Design--Technology and Pedagogy Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourova, Elissaveta; Asenova, Asya; Dulev, Pavlin

    2013-01-01

    Technology developments face universities with many challenges--to integrate technologies in educational processes, design new electronic materials, change teaching styles, and better meet the demands of the technology-savvy generation. The paper considers problems of m-learning adoption in Bulgaria at one Faculty of the Technical…

  19. Factors Affecting Faculty Use of Learning Technologies: Implications for Models of Technology Adoption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Tom; Sainter, Phillip; Saunders, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    This study examines factors associated with the use of learning technologies by higher education faculty. In an online survey in a UK university, 114 faculty respondents completed a measure of Internet self-efficacy, and reported on their use of learning technologies along with barriers to their adoption. Principal components analysis suggested…

  20. Understanding University Faculty Perceptions about Innovation in Teaching and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopcha, Theodore J.; Rieber, Lloyd P.; Walker, Brandy B.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to understand faculty perceptions about innovation in teaching and technology in a college of education in a research-intensive university. This study was motivated by the creation of a new initiative begun in a large college of education at a Carnegie Research-Intensive university to promote innovation in teaching…

  1. Technology and Teaching: A Conversation among Faculty Regarding the Pros and Cons of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Andrew T.; Preston, John; Page, C. Steven; Harper, Rebecca; Dillard, Benita; Flynn, Joseph; Yamaguchi, Misato

    2014-01-01

    Technology is often touted as the savior of education (Collins & Haverson, 2009). However, is technology the panacea that it is made out to be? This paper is an extended conversation among a group of faculty members at three different universities and their attitudes and beliefs about technology and education. Three professors shared their…

  2. Disrupting Faculty Service: Using Technology to Increase Academic Service Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Perry; Shemroske, Kenneth; Khayum, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly attention regarding faculty involvement has primarily focused on faculty opinions of shared governance and faculty influence on institutional decision-making. There has been limited attention given to academic service productivity and the effectiveness of traditional approaches toward the accomplishment of faculty service requirements.…

  3. Technology and College Students: What Faculty Members Think About the Use of Technology in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Faruk ISLIM

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tablet PCs especially iPads are one of the most commonly used devices that most educational institutions from elementary school to colleges have been using as a main or supplementary part of their educational system. This article aims at investigating faculty members’ personal and educational use of technology especially iPads, their opinions on educational use of technology, and their students’ technology competency. This study was conducted at a college of education in the Southwestern United States where a technology initiative was carried out and iPads were distributed. In this qualitative research, case study research was utilized as a research method and a purposeful sampling method was employed. The data were obtained from eight faculty members via semi structured interviews. Results of the study show that faculty members own a variety of devices in addition to iPad, and they are using many apps based on the class needs. Almost all faculty members define themselves and their current students as technology competent, and they stated that experience, socioeconomic status and willingness to use the technology are the main factors affecting technology competence.

  4. Do gender and personality traits (BFI-10) influence self-perceived tech savviness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudzina, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, it is necessary to use technology in various everyday activities. A certain level of what used to be called high-tech savviness is needed to access certain services. The aim of this paper is to analyze if gender and personality traits (Big Five Inventory-10) influence self-perceived tech...

  5. Impact of gender and personality traits (BFI-10) on tech savviness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlicek, Antonin; Sudzina, Frantisek; Malinova, Ludmila

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, it is necessary to use technology in various everyday activities. A certain level of what used to be called high-tech savviness is needed to access almost all modern services. The aim of this paper is to analyze if gender and personality traits (Big Five Inventory-10) influence self...

  6. Impact of gender and personality traits (BFI-10) on tech savviness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlicek, Antonin; Sudzina, Frantisek; Malinova, Ludmila

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, it is necessary to use technology in various everyday activities. A certain level of what used to be called high-tech savviness is needed to access almost all modern services. The aim of this paper is to analyze if gender and personality traits (Big Five Inventory-10) influence self-per...

  7. It savvy what top executives must know to go from pain to gain

    CERN Document Server

    Weill, Peter; Ross, Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Digitization of business interactions and processes is advancing full bore. But in many organizations, returns from IT investments are flatlining, even as technology spending has skyrocketed. These challenges call for new levels of IT savvy: the ability of all managers-IT or non-IT-to transform their company's technology assets into operational efficiencies that boost margins. Companies with IT-savvy managers are 20 percent more profitable than their competitors. In IT Savvy, Peter Weill and Jeanne Ross-two of the world's foremost authorities on using IT in business-explain how non-IT executives can acquire this savvy. Concise and practical, the book describes the practices, competencies, and leadership skills non-IT managers need to succeed in the digital economy. You'll discover how to: -Define your firm's operating model-how IT can help you do business -Revamp your IT funding model to support your operating model -Build a digitized platform of business processes, IT systems, and data to execute on the mode...

  8. IT savvy what top executives must know to go from pain to gain

    CERN Document Server

    Weill, Peter; Ross, Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Digitization of business interactions and processes is advancing full bore. But in many organizations, returns from IT investments are flatlining, even as technology spending has skyrocketed. These challenges call for new levels of IT savvy: the ability of all managers-IT or non-IT-to transform their company's technology assets into operational efficiencies that boost margins. Companies with IT-savvy managers are 20 percent more profitable than their competitors. In IT Savvy, Peter Weill and Jeanne Ross-two of the world's foremost authorities on using IT in business-explain how non-IT executives can acquire this savvy. Concise and practical, the book describes the practices, competencies, and leadership skills non-IT managers need to succeed in the digital economy. You'll discover how to: -Define your firm's operating model-how IT can help you do business -Revamp your IT funding model to support your operating model -Build a digitized platform of business processes, IT systems, and data to execute on the mode...

  9. Technology and College Students: What Faculty Members Think about the Use of Technology in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islim, Omer Faruk; Sevim Cirak, Nese

    2017-01-01

    Tablet PCs especially iPads are one of the most commonly used devices that most educational institutions from elementary school to colleges have been using as a main or supplementary part of their educational system. This article aims at investigating faculty members' personal and educational use of technology especially iPads, their opinions on…

  10. Radiography Faculty Engaged in Online Education: Perceptions of Effectiveness, Satisfaction, and Technological Self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Shirley J; Flora, Bethany H

    2017-01-01

    To assess radiography faculty perceptions of the effectiveness of online courses. An original survey instrument was created by selecting items from 3 instruments used in prior research and adding unique questions designed to elicit demographic data from faculty. The sample included a national dataset of radiography faculty members employed in Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology-accredited programs in the United States. Findings showed that faculty perceptions of online course effectiveness are not affected significantly by faculty position, type of institution, faculty age, or years of teaching experience. Positive perceptions of the effectiveness of online courses moderately increased with years of teaching online courses, number of online courses taught in the past 5 years, and perceived competence with the use of technology. Faculty satisfaction with interaction in online courses moderately increased as the years of teaching online courses increased. However, the number of years of teaching online courses was not related to faculty satisfaction with teaching online courses or faculty satisfaction with institutional support. Online technology acceptance had a moderately positive relationship with perceived ease of use and a strong positive relationship with perceived usefulness of online technology. In addition, the use of technology-enhanced learning methods had a strong positive relationship with technological self-efficacy. Radiography faculty perceptions of the effectiveness of online courses improved with experience in teaching online courses and competence with use of technology. Perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of online technology were related directly to online technology acceptance. Furthermore, faculty members with technological self-efficacy were more likely to use technology-enhanced learning methods in the online environment.

  11. Teaching In Online Courses:
Experiences Of Instructional Technology Faculty Members

    OpenAIRE

    AKDEMIR, Omur

    2015-01-01

    The Internet and computer technology have altered the education landscape. Online courses are offered throughout the world. Learning about the experiences of faculty members is important to guide practitioners and administrators. Using qualitative research methodology, this study investigated the experiences of faculty members teaching online courses. A convenience sampling was used to select the instructional technology faculty members to investigate their experiences in online courses. Semi...

  12. Analysis of Predictive Factors that Influence Faculty Members Technology Adoption Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ismail; Thompson, Ann

    2007-01-01

    This quantitative study used the Learning/Adoption Trajectory model of technology adoption as a scaffold to investigate whether a faculty adoption level of instructional technology in the College of Education (COE) at a large midwestern university in the US can be predicted by the faculty members' responses to questionnaire items in four areas:…

  13. Motivating Factors of Florida Community and State College Information Technology Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Wendy Louise

    2013-01-01

    In this study the core job characteristics that contribute to the internal motivational factors and job satisfaction of information technology faculty members working at a community or state college in Florida were investigated. Fifty-four information technology faculty members working at a community or state college in Florida completed the Job…

  14. Love and Hate in University Technology Transfer: Examining Faculty and Staff Conflicts and Ethical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Clovia; Schumann, David

    2016-01-01

    With respect to university technology transfer, the purpose of this paper is to examine the literature focused on the relationship between university research faculty and technology transfer office staff. We attempt to provide greater understanding of how research faculty's personal values and research universities' organization values may differ…

  15. Stages of Faculty Concern about Teaching Online: Relationships between Faculty Teaching Methods and Technology Use in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, John H.

    2016-01-01

    As more online courses and programs are created, it is imperative institutions understand the concern of their faculty toward teaching online, the types of technology they use, and the methods they use to instruct students in order to provide appropriate resources to support them. This quantitative study measures these concerns, using the Stages…

  16. Questioning Faculty Use of Information Technology by Context of NETS-T Standards in Bologna Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmas, Muzaffer

    2013-01-01

    Using technology in and out of class has been becoming more and more important recently. University settings also become more dependent to technology. Bologna process requires university and faculty diffuse and

  17. Perceptions and Use of iPad Technology by Pharmacy Practice Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgarrick, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To explore the potential of tablet technology to address the specific workload challenges of pharmacy practice faculty members and to evaluate tablet usage after a department-wide iPad initiative. Methods. After conducting a needs assessment to determine pharmacy faculty attitudes towards tablet technology and to identify potential usage scenarios, all faculty members in a department of pharmacy practice received an iPad. After iPad distribution, training sessions and virtual tutorials were provided. An anonymous survey was administered to evaluate the pilot. Results. The needs assessment survey revealed positive attitudes towards iPad technology, identified use scenarios, and led to a department-wide iPad pilot program. Most faculty members used iPads for connectivity with students (86%), paper/project annotation (68%), assessment (57%), and demonstration of tools used in practice (36%). For teaching, 61% of faculty members used iPads in seminars/laboratories, 57% used iPads in the experiential setting, and 43% used iPads in the classroom. Use of iPads for patient-care activities varied and depended on site support for mobile technology. The 23 faculty members with external practice sites used iPads to a greater extent and had more positive attitudes towards this technology compared with campus-based faculty members. Conclusion. Integration of tablet technology into the pharmacy education setting resulted in faculty-reported increased productivity and decreased paper waste. It also allowed faculty members to experiment with new teaching strategies in the classroom and experiential setting. Administrators at institutions exploring the use of tablet technology should allocate resources based on faculty needs and usage patterns. PMID:24761013

  18. Perceptions and use of iPad technology by pharmacy practice faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVall, Margarita V; Zgarrick, David P

    2014-04-17

    To explore the potential of tablet technology to address the specific workload challenges of pharmacy practice faculty members and to evaluate tablet usage after a department-wide iPad initiative. After conducting a needs assessment to determine pharmacy faculty attitudes towards tablet technology and to identify potential usage scenarios, all faculty members in a department of pharmacy practice received an iPad. After iPad distribution, training sessions and virtual tutorials were provided. An anonymous survey was administered to evaluate the pilot. The needs assessment survey revealed positive attitudes towards iPad technology, identified use scenarios, and led to a department-wide iPad pilot program. Most faculty members used iPads for connectivity with students (86%), paper/project annotation (68%), assessment (57%), and demonstration of tools used in practice (36%). For teaching, 61% of faculty members used iPads in seminars/laboratories, 57% used iPads in the experiential setting, and 43% used iPads in the classroom. Use of iPads for patient-care activities varied and depended on site support for mobile technology. The 23 faculty members with external practice sites used iPads to a greater extent and had more positive attitudes towards this technology compared with campus-based faculty members. Integration of tablet technology into the pharmacy education setting resulted in faculty-reported increased productivity and decreased paper waste. It also allowed faculty members to experiment with new teaching strategies in the classroom and experiential setting. Administrators at institutions exploring the use of tablet technology should allocate resources based on faculty needs and usage patterns.

  19. Competence and Usage of Web 2.0 Technologies by Higher Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Kamal Ahmed; Zai, Sajid Yousuf; Jafri, Iftikhar Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Literature on Web 2.0 experiences of higher education faculty in developing countries such as Pakistan is very limited. An insight on awareness and practices of higher education faculty with these tools can be helpful to map strategies and plan of action for adopting latest technologies to support teaching-learning processes in higher education of…

  20. An Analysis of Technological Issues Emanating from Faculty Transition to a New Learning Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanga, Mapopa William

    2016-01-01

    This case study investigated the process 119 faculty members underwent as they transitioned from using Desire to Learn (D2L) learning management system (LMS), to using Canvas LMS. Other than analyzing technological issues faculty members encountered while navigating various aspects of the Canvas interface, the study also analyzed technological…

  1. Faculty Use and Perception of Mobile Information and Communication Technology (m-ICT) for Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddix, J. Patrick; Chung, Chung Joo; Park, Han Woo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to consider faculty use and perception of mobile information and communication technology (m-ICT) for teaching practices. The researchers examined qualitative responses about specific m-ICT use and efficiency amongst Korean and US faculty (n = 59) at three different institutions. Findings from multi-level textual…

  2. Issues and strategies for faculty development in technology and biomedical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M A

    2003-12-01

    Biomedical informatics and technology are becoming important components of dental education. The tools and techniques now available have the potential for significant impact on teaching and research by improving the way information is acquired, stored, retrieved, and managed. However, a gap exists between those who create, introduce, or implement the technology applications and the faculty in dental schools faced with the challenge of using it. For technology and informatics to thrive in the areas of didactic teaching, clinical teaching, and clinical practice, more than a select few must understand the potential applications. This paper provides an overview of the issues and strategies involved with faculty development for the use of technology in the educational setting. The discussion covers important reasons for developing faculty competence in technology applications, significant barriers to faculty development in this area, and several strategies designed to overcome these barriers.

  3. Do College Faculty Embrace Web 2.0 Technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siha, Samia M.; Bell, Reginald Lamar; Roebuck, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    The authors sought to determine if Rogers's Innovation Decision Process model could analyze Web 2.0 usage within the collegiate environment. The key independent variables studied in relationship to this model were gender, faculty rank, course content delivery method, and age. Chi-square nonparametric tests on the independent variables across…

  4. Faculty Online Technology Adoption: The Role of Management Support and Organizational Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui-Ting; Deggs, David M.; Jabor, M. Khata; Machtmes, Krisanna

    2011-01-01

    Although there is a plethora of online learning studies, relatively few studies have probed into teachers' online technology adoption. It is suggested that faculty resistance to technology be one of the key hindrances to the future development of distance learning. Several studies have argued that teachers' resistance to technology, one of the key…

  5. Factors Influencing the Integration of Technology by Community College Adjunct Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paver, Jonathan David

    2012-01-01

    This research examined the factors that predict intention to integrate technology into instruction by community college adjunct faculty. For this study the integration of technology was defined as beyond simple occasional use, within the next academic year. The decomposed theory of planned behavior was tested for its predictive ability with this…

  6. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  7. Impact of Information Technologies on Faculty and Students in Distance Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jensen J.; Alexander, Melody W.; Perreault, Heidi; Waldman, Lila

    2003-01-01

    A survey of distance education technologies received responses from 81 business faculty and 153 students, who indicated that e-mail, Internet lectures/assignments, and discussion groups were most frequently used. There were few differences between teachers and students. A technology's frequent usage and positive impact on productivity did not…

  8. Multimedia Bootcamp: a health sciences library provides basic training to promote faculty technology integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Ellen C

    2006-04-25

    Recent research has shown a backlash against the enthusiastic promotion of technological solutions as replacements for traditional educational content delivery. Many institutions, including the University of Virginia, have committed staff and resources to supporting state-of-the-art, showpiece educational technology projects. However, the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library has taken the approach of helping Health Sciences faculty be more comfortable using technology in incremental ways for instruction and research presentations. In July 2004, to raise awareness of self-service multimedia resources for instructional and professional development needs, the Library conducted a "Multimedia Bootcamp" for nine Health Sciences faculty and fellows. Case study. Program stewardship by a single Library faculty member contributed to the delivery of an integrated learning experience. The amount of time required to attend the sessions and complete homework was the maximum fellows had to devote to such pursuits. The benefit of introducing technology unfamiliar to most fellows allowed program instructors to start everyone at the same baseline while not appearing to pass judgment on the technology literacy skills of faculty. The combination of wrapping the program in the trappings of a fellowship and selecting fellows who could commit to a majority of scheduled sessions yielded strong commitment from participants as evidenced by high attendance and a 100% rate of assignment completion. Response rates to follow-up evaluation requests, as well as continued use of Media Studio resources and Library expertise for projects begun or conceived during Bootcamp, bode well for the long-term success of this program. An incremental approach to integrating technology with current practices in instruction and presentation provided a supportive yet energizing environment for Health Sciences faculty. Keys to this program were its faculty focus, traditional hands-on instruction, unrestricted

  9. Development of an instrument to measure Faculty's information and communication technology access (FICTA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Kamal Ahmed; Kale, Ugur; Curtis, Reagan; Akcaoglu, Mete; Bernstein, Malayna

    2018-01-01

    The phenomenon of "digital divide" is complex and multidimensional, extending beyond issues of physical access. The purpose of this study was to develop a scale to measure a range of factors related to digital divide among higher education faculty and to evaluate its reliability and validity. Faculty's Information and Communication Technology Access (FICTA) scale was tested and validated with 322 faculty teaching in public and private sector universities. Principal components analysis with varimax rotation confirmed an 8-factor solution corresponding to various dimensions of ICT access. The 57-item FICTA scale demonstrated good psychometric properties and offers researchers a tool to examine faculty's access to ICT at four levels - motivational, physical, skills, and usage access.

  10. Media work as public affairs: moving beyond media savvy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Leila; Laursen, Bo

    . The interviews reveal that media work is considered an effective, though potentially risky, form of public affairs. Indeed, media work is said to damage, or even ruin, an organization’s lobbying efforts or relationships with political actors. The study’s key finding is that in order to deal with these risks......, professional press contact staff acquire a great deal of political savvy in addition to the well-known forms of media savvy. The interviewees describe intricate media tactics used to minimize the risks, and even strengthen relationships to political actors. These include flattery, praise, self...

  11. The BERG faculty students readiness for information technologies study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horovèák Pavel

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution deals with the reconnaissance of our students’ readiness to study information technologies, its interpretation, comparison with some published data as well as with a completion and evaluation of the reconnaissance. It specifies methods and processes of evaluation, structure, sections and questions of the reconnaissance. The reconnaissance was oriented particularly to the evaluation of knowledge in the information technologies area acquired at secondary schools. It was completed in a classical paper form as a preparation for the realization and utilization of questionnaire in the electronic form. The following is constructed using modern internet and database technologies and presents extensive possibilities of evaluation answers respondents. The results of the reconnaissance are presented in the form distribution (sex, domicile, secondary school, secondary school influence, work with a computer, operating and exploitation of internet technologies, familiarity with operating systems and typical applications software and programming languages as well as the interest in information technologies of respondents. The results are compared with some other published data and future perspectives of completion and its evaluation of completion are outlined.

  12. Literature Review of Faculty-Perceived Usefulness of Instructional Technology in Classroom Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a literature review of the research concerning the role of faculty perspectives about instructional technology. Learning management systems, massive open online courses (MOOCs), cloud-based multimedia applications, and mobile apps represent the tools and the language of academia in the 21st century. Research examined…

  13. An Examination of Faculty Innovativeness in Relation to Inductive Teaching and the Use of Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrer, Donald A.; Wyant, Nancey A.; Gordin, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    The conceptual framework for this research describes the processes faculty use to create an online course that meets learning outcomes while creating a positive learning experience for the online student. This involves acceptance of technology to create a course structured for inductive learning in addition to traditional deductive learning. The…

  14. Fire and collapse, Faculty of Architecture building, Delft University of Technology: Data collection and preliminary analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, B.; Park, H.; Engelhardt, M.; Kirk, A.; Kodur, V.; Straalen, IJ.J.; Maljaars, J.; Weeren, K. van; Feijter, R. de; Both, K.

    2010-01-01

    On the morning of May 13, 2008, a fire that started in a coffee vending machine on the 6th floor of the 13-story Faculty of Architecture Building at the Delft University of Technology (TUD), Delft, the Netherlands, quickly developed into an extreme loading event. Although all building occupants

  15. Automotive Technology Student Learning Styles and Their Implications for Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threeton, Mark D.; Walter, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to provide Career and Technical Education (CTE) professionals with additional insight on how to better meet the educational needs of the learner, this study sought to identify the preference for learning of postsecondary automotive technology students. While it might appear logical to naturally classify auto-tech students as primarily…

  16. Engaging TBR Faculty in Online Research Communities and Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Jasmine

    2017-01-01

    The growing impact of online research communities and emerging technologies is creating a significant paradigm shift and consequently changing the current research landscape of higher education. The rise of online research communities exemplifies a shift from traditional research engagements, to online research communities using "Web…

  17. Custom Formula-Based Visualizations for Savvy Designers"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhail, Mohammad Amin

    Despite their usefulness in many domains (e.g. healthcare, finance, etc.), custom visualizations remain tedious and hard to implement. It would be advantageous if savvy designers (designers with end-user development skills and much domain knowledge) could refine visualizations to their needs...

  18. Scaling up a learning technology strategy: supporting student/faculty teams in learner-centred design

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Tom; Harrigan, Kevin; Palmer, Antonia; Swallow, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The need for post-secondary institutions to think strategically about the application of learning technologies has been well documented. The strategy must plan to effect change in faculty approaches to teaching and learning, not just to 'add technology and stir'. An effective strategy will also address both content - the particular applications with the most leverage for institutional goals - and the process of obtaining commitment and moving forward (Daniel, 1996).DOI: 10.1080/0968776990070203

  19. Scaling up a learning technology strategy: supporting student/faculty teams in learner-centred design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Carey

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The need for post-secondary institutions to think strategically about the application of learning technologies has been well documented. The strategy must plan to effect change in faculty approaches to teaching and learning, not just to 'add technology and stir'. An effective strategy will also address both content - the particular applications with the most leverage for institutional goals - and the process of obtaining commitment and moving forward (Daniel, 1996.

  20. Faculty and organizational characteristics associated with informatics/health information technology adoption in DNP programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Cathy R; Meek, Julie A; Walker, Patricia Hinton

    2014-01-01

    Nursing informatics/health information technology are key components of graduate nursing education and an accreditation requirement, yet little is known about the extent to which doctor of nursing practice (DNP) curricula include these content domains. The purpose of this descriptive study was to elicit perceptions of DNP program directors relative to (a) whether and how the American Association of Colleges of Nursing's (AACN's) Essential IV standard has been met in their DNP programs; (b) whether the Technology Informatics Guiding Educational Reform Initiative Foundation's Phase II competencies have been integrated in their programs; and (c) the faculty and organizational characteristics associated with the adoption of the AACN's Essential IV. In 2011, an electronic survey was sent to all 138 DNP program directors identified on the AACN Web site with an 81.2% response rate. Findings include variation in whether and how programs have integrated informatics/health information technology content, a lack of informatics-certified and/or master's-prepared faculty, and a perceived lack of faculty awareness of informatics curricular guidelines. DNP program director and dean awareness and support of faculty informatics education, use of informatics competency guidelines, and national policy and stimulus funding support are recommended to promote curricular inclusion and the engagement of nurses in strong informatics practices. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A survey of nursing faculty needs for training in use of new technologies for education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Diane N; Zierler, Brenda; Nguyen, Huong Q

    2011-04-01

    This study describes nursing faculty's use, knowledge of, and training needs associated with distance learning, simulation, telehealth, and informatics tools in nursing education and practice. Web-based surveys were completed by 193 faculty members from nursing schools in the western United States. More than half of the respondents were frequent users of distance learning and informatics tools. Approximately 66% of faculty reported they were competent with distance learning and informatics tools. Training and technical support for the use of distance learning was highest, yet 69% of faculty still reported a need for additional training. The availability of training and financial and technical support was associated with greater use of distance learning technologies (p technologies, the findings suggest nursing faculty perceive a need for training and support to effectively use educational technologies in nursing education. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. Senior Faculty Members' Attitudes in Jordanian Universities towards Using Information and Communication Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Abu Qudais; Mosleh Al-Adhaileh; Aieman Al-Omari

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the main factors affecting the attitude of the seniors of faculty memberstowards using technology especially in their teaching activities. The study addresses the following questions: (1) Do seniorinstructors at Jordan universities have enough knowledge and skill to practice using ICTs in their teaching activities? (2)What is the degree of senior instructors' attitudes towards ICTs? And (3) Is there a significant difference in attitudes towardsICTs wit...

  3. The Agony and the Ecstasy of Adult Learning: Faculty Learning Computer Technology. What Lessons Can We Learn from These Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasworm, Carol E.

    Three years of helping faculty members at a state university learn computing technology yielded the following lessons: (1) for faculty members, the ownership of a computer is an emotional event during which computers are viewed successively as glorified typewriters, status symbols, and tools; (2) even to highly knowledgeable individuals, learning…

  4. Experience, Adoption, and Technology: Exploring the Phenomenological Experiences of Faculty Involved in Online Teaching at One School of Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Terry; Davis, Trina; Larke, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Using the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) and Dewey's Theory of Experience, this phenomenological study explored the experiences of faculty who engaged in online teaching at one school of public health. Findings revealed that the experiences of public health faculty, who engaged in online teaching, are similar and…

  5. Is eLearning only for the tech savvy and the lazy? : A survey study to determine what characterizes students who enroll in internet based classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rhee, van der B.; Verma, R.; Plaschka, G.

    2005-01-01

    More and more Business Schools are offering classes using a mix of face-to-face and online elements. We conducted a large scale survey to determine whether only students who are technology savvy would enroll in these mixed classes and whether there exists a participation bias such that students with

  6. How To: Be VoIP-Savvy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Cablevision, Comcast, Verizon, and many other high-speed broadband Internet providers are now also offering telephone services through "Voice over Internet Protocol" (VoIP). This technology sends ordinary telephone calls over the Internet rather than over telephone lines. While impractical without the use of a broadband Internet connection, with…

  7. Formative method of the competence for educational orientation on Technology Faculty teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamilet Ávila-Seco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article started from considering insufficiency on teachers’ professional work at Health Technology Faculty in Santiago de Cuba, which is a limitation for their formative action towards their own students. It aimed to give a methodology with a system of reflexive procedures to the competence formation for educational orientation in the Faculty, and it consequently may contribute to a right teachers’ professional work as a way to improve the students’ formative process. Taking into consideration the social role corresponding to those teachers on integrated formation of their students; it is assumed that method in forming the competence. This method is useful for teachers reflecting and being aware of their own insufficiency, and it is driven dynamically through reflexive procedures, so that they allow getting structured all valuable criteria to test that competence formation. 

  8. AN ACTIVITY THEORY APPROACH TO STUDY BARRIERS OF FACULTY REGARDING TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro Guzman, Willy

    2016-01-01

    technology. Ertmer’s approach establishes first-order and second-orders barriers as hinderers for teacher’s adoption of technology. The study intends to answer what are the barriers existing in the socalled enthusiastic faculty teachers regarding technology integration in Education? Findings call......Information and communication technologies are instruments for supporting new ways of teaching and learning. Nevertheless, its impact concerning scope has not reached the expected level. This strain between benefits and impact has been inquired from the perspective of barriers of teachers to use...... dichotomies between enthusiastic-resistant teachers, the intrinsic-extrinsic barriers, and claims for passing from an individual to a collective approach to ICT integration in education...

  9. Gender and personality traits' (BFI-10) effect on self-perceived tech savviness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olexova, Cecilia; Kirchner, Kathrin; Sudzina, Frantisek

    2017-01-01

    Today's students are considered as digital natives that grew up digitally. They use smartphones and services like social media on a regular basis. The aim of this paper is to analyze if gender and personality traits (Big Five Inventory-10) influence self-perceived tech savviness of Slovak business...... features of tech devices. Moreover, self-perceived tech savviness in eyes of others is significantly influenced also by gender, i.e. men consider themselves more tech savvy....

  10. The Predictive Value of Selected Extrinsic and Intrinsic Indicators of Overall Job Satisfaction in Diagnostic Radiological Technology, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine Technology Allied Health Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Healthcare is the largest industry in the United States and 60 percent of its 14 million workers are in allied health jobs. The need to attract and retain allied health faculty is critical to preparing a competent workforce in healthcare. This study reports the results of a survey of 259 faculty members working in diagnostic radiologic technology,…

  11. The Circumstances of Using Technological Applications Inside and Outside of the Faculty by Physicianand Nurse Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Sezer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study the aim is to determine which technological applications are used by physician and nurse candidates; where, why and how they are used, based upon the technologic and educational context. Material and Method: The study was carried out pursuant to the design of case study method that is one of the qualitative research methods. The study group was determined by %u201Ceasily accessible case sampling%u201D and consisted of 78 freshman, sophomore and junior physician candidates from the Faculty of Medicine of Hacettepe University; 50 freshman, sophomore, junior and senior nurse candidates from the Nursing Program of the Faculty of Medical Sciences in Baskent University. A questionnaire and a semi-structured interview form created by the researchers were used in this study. The content analysis method was used in the data solution. Results and Discussion: Research participants stated that technological applications they used in daily life and for classes were different. This situation can be considered as an indication that we could not yet integrate technology into education. It was determined in the research that students used search engines and office programs the most. And they are willingness to take distance learning courses and use of social networks in their academic life.

  12. Investigating IT Faculty Resistance to Learning Management System Adoption Using Latent Variables in an Acceptance Technology Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousbahi, Fatiha; Alrazgan, Muna Saleh

    2015-01-01

    To enhance instruction in higher education, many universities in the Middle East have chosen to introduce learning management systems (LMS) to their institutions. However, this new educational technology is not being used at its full potential and faces resistance from faculty members. To investigate this phenomenon, we conducted an empirical research study to uncover factors influencing faculty members' acceptance of LMS. Thus, in the Fall semester of 2014, Information Technology faculty members were surveyed to better understand their perceptions of the incorporation of LMS into their courses. The results showed that personal factors such as motivation, load anxiety, and organizational support play important roles in the perception of the usefulness of LMS among IT faculty members. These findings suggest adding these constructs in order to extend the Technology acceptance model (TAM) for LMS acceptance, which can help stakeholders of the university to implement the use of this system. This may assist in planning and evaluating the use of e-learning.

  13. Nursing Faculty Members' Use of Web 2.0 Technology and Perceptions of Importance of Online Faculty Presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Kelly A. Kratzer

    2012-01-01

    Since the creation of the Internet in 1991 (Casey, 2008), the use of online tools to deliver academic higher education has continued to grow exponentially (Allen & Seaman, 2010b). The existing base of literature is replete with studies of online education modalities, outcomes and faculty concerns. However, little of this research has focused…

  14. Students′ Perception of Organization Culture at a Faculty of Science and Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ujhelyi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The current study uses an adapted version of Cameron and Quinn’s OCAI questionnaire to test the organisational culture of the Faculty of Science and Technology at the University of Debrecen, Hungary, as it is perceived by its students, and also to discover what type of organisational culture the same students think would be ideal for them. An additional objective of this paper is to identify possible gaps between the perceived and the ideal cultures expressed by the students. Our sample includes 128 questionnaires completed by bachelor students from 6 different majors at the faculty. According to our results, the respondents perceive to a significant degree that the faculty’s organisational culture is at an average level of clan, market and hierarchy cultures, while it also exhibits a relatively low level of the adhocracy culture. Their ideal faculty culture would be one with average adhocracy, average hierarchy, high clan and low market features. Significant gaps are identified between the perceived and ideal cultures in all the four types: students would prefer an increase in clan and adhocracy cultures, and a decrease in the other two cultures.

  15. AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Annual Report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The most important research activities of the Faculty are condensed matter physics and physics of elementary particles. Advanced fundamental as well as applied studies are also carried out in the fields of nuclear physics and technology, electronics, environmental physics and medicinal physics. Report presents short descriptions of the results obtained in 2009. It contains also list of 198 papers published in the national and international scientific journals and of 6 book chapters published in 2009. Report contains full list of grants (national and international) realized in 2009 [pl

  16. Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK): An Educational Landscape for Tertiary Science Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavadia, Linda

    Earlier studies concluded that technology's strength is in supporting student learning rather than as an instrument for content delivery (Angeli & Valanides, 2014). Current research espouses the merits of the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework as a guide for educators' reflections about technology integration within the context of content and instructional practice. Grounded by two theoretical frameworks, TPACK (Mishra & Koehler, 2006; 2008) and Rogers' (1983, 1995) theory of diffusion of innovation, the purpose of this mixed-methods research was two-fold: to explore the perceived competencies of tertiary science faculty at higher education institutions with respect to their integration of technology within the constructs of pedagogical practice and content learning and to analyze whether these perceived competencies may serve as predictive factors for technology adoption level. The literature review included past research that served as models for the Sci-TPACK instrument. Twenty-nine professors of tertiary science courses participated in an online Likert survey, and four professors provided in-depth interviews on their TPACK practices. Quantitative analysis of data consisted of descriptive and reliability statistics, calculations of means for each of the seven scales or domains of TPACK, and regression analysis. Open-ended questions on the Likert survey and individual interviews provided recurrent themes of the qualitative data. Final results revealed that the participants integrate technology into pedagogy and content through a myriad of TPACK practices. Regression analysis supported perceived TPACK competencies as predictive factors for technology adoption level.

  17. Investigation of attitudes regarding technology in teaching staff members of Medical Faculty by CHAID analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Satıcı

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, the attitudes of teaching staff of Fac-ulty of Medicine, Dicle University, in the 2005-2006 aca-demic year about technology was intended to be exam-ined. This research is a study on how teaching staff are affected with their different characteristics.Materials and Methods: Our study 224 persons were taken. Of the persons, 68 were professor, 40 were As-soc Professor, 44 were Assistant Professors, 58 were research assistants and 14 were expert. In our study, how the attitude variables were connected to the de-pendent (target variables was determined. The emer-gence of attitudes of different items has been intended to be studied on. Likert type form was applied for attitude items.Results: The attitudes on the wish of the teaching staff to join technology fairs were found to be different. Re-search assistants were found to have positive attitudes compared to the higher rank teaching staff. It was seen that the teaching staff who were indecisive to join the technological fairs wanted new instructive technologies to be used in their areas. Their departments determined their attitudes. It can be said that the teaching staff are indecisive about the opinion that ‘technology will take place of human beings’. It was found that the ones who did not agree with this item were mostly from Surgery Department. Conclusion: In general, the academic staff have posi-tive attitudes towards technology.

  18. Examining Transformative Faculty Development Factors to Advance Technology Adoption and Diffusion at a Campus-Based Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKissic, Stephanie Camille

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed-method research, in the context of a case study was to examine faculty concerns with integrating technologies and the influences and motivations that lead to technology adoption and diffusion in the classroom. Specifically, the study examined the conceptual frameworks of Rogers' Innovation Diffusion Theory (IDT) and…

  19. Attitudes of Female Faculty toward the Use of Computer Technologies and the Barriers that Limit Their Use of Technologies in Girls' Colleges in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuqayteeb, Taghreed Abdulaziz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine female faculty members' use of computer technologies, their attitudes toward computers, the factors that best predict their attitudes toward computers, and the barriers that limit their use of computer technologies in girls' colleges in Dammam and Jubail, Saudi Arabia. Also, this study examined how female…

  20. Gender and personality traits' (BFI-10) effect on self-perceived tech savviness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olexova, Cecilia; Kirchner, Kathrin; Sudzina, Frantisek

    2017-01-01

    Today's students are considered as digital natives that grew up digitally. They use smartphones and services like social media on a regular basis. The aim of this paper is to analyze if gender and personality traits (Big Five Inventory-10) influence self-perceived tech savviness of Slovak business...... students. The tech savviness is investigated in two dimensions - in one's own opinion and in the eyes of others. In both cases, neuroticism significantly influences self-perceived tech savviness, and the relationship is negative. It may be because more neurotic people are more afraid of using various new...

  1. Educational Technology-Related Performance of Teaching Faculty in Higher Education: Implications for eLearning Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi-Apau, Josephine A.; Guerra-Lopez, Ingrid; Moseley, James L.; Spannaus, Timothy; Yaprak, Attila

    2017-01-01

    The study examined teaching faculty's educational technology-related performances (ETRP) as a measure for predicting eLearning management in Ghana. A total of valid data (n = 164) were collected and analyzed on applied ISTE-NETS-T Performance Standards using descriptive and ANOVA statistics. Results showed an overall moderate performance with the…

  2. A Quantitative Study of Faculty Perceptions and Attitudes on Asynchronous Virtual Teamwork Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolusky, G. Anthony

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study used a web-based questionnaire to assess the attitudes and perceptions of online and hybrid faculty towards student-centered asynchronous virtual teamwork (AVT) using the technology acceptance model (TAM) of Davis (1989). AVT is online student participation in a team approach to problem-solving culminating in a written…

  3. Digital immigrants teaching digital natives: A phenomenological study of higher education faculty perspectives on technology integration with English core content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Robert C.

    In the last two decades, technology use has escalated and educators grapple with its advances and integration into the classroom. Issues surrounding what constitutes a literate society, the clarion calls for educational reform emanating from US presidents to parent teacher organizations, and educators' ability to cope with advances in technology in the classroom demand attention. Therefore, the purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and understand the professional and educational experiences of six English faculty members teaching undergraduate courses at Midwest universities. Using the framework of Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge -- TPACK (Koehler and Mishra 2008), the major focus of the study was to determine how faculty members understood what characterized the nature of teaching with technology in undergraduate classrooms. Results of this study revealed five themes showing how the participants were introduced to technology, how they assimilated it into their pedagogy, and how they integrated it into teaching practice. This study has the potential to impact the nature of illustrating the methods and techniques used by the six participants as they merge technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge and set in motion classroom practices that assist faculty at all levels to develop and teach technology skills necessary for the 21st century and to better prepare students for thinking critically about how to use digital advances.

  4. Five Years of Research Into Technology-Enhanced Learning at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svetský, Štefan; Moravčík, Oliver; Rusková, Dagmar; Balog, Karol; Sakál, Peter; Tanuška, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    The article describes a five-year period of Technology Enhanced Learning (TEL) implementation at the Faculty of Materials Science and Technology (MTF) in Trnava. It is a part of the challenges put forward by the 7th Framework Programme (ICT research in FP7) focused on "how information and communication technologies can be used to support learning and teaching". The empirical research during the years 2006-2008 was focused on technology-driven support of teaching, i. e. the development of VLE (Virtual Learning Environment) and the development of database applications such as instruments developed simultaneously with the information support of the project, and tested and applied directly in the teaching of bachelor students. During this period, the MTF also participated in the administration of the FP7 KEPLER project proposal in the international consortium of 20 participants. In the following period of 2009-2010, the concept of educational activities automation systematically began to develop. Within this concept, the idea originated to develop a universal multi-purpose system BIKE based on the batch processing knowledge paradigm. This allowed to focus more on educational approach, i.e. TEL educational-driven and to finish the programming of the Internet application - network for feedback (communication between teachers and students). Thanks to this specialization, the results of applications in the teaching at MTF could gradually be presented at the international conferences focused on computer-enhanced engineering education. TEL was implemented at a detached workplace and four institutes involving more than 600 students-bachelors and teachers of technical subjects. Four study programmes were supported, including technical English language. Altogether, the results have been presented via 16 articles in five countries, including the EU level (IGIP-SEFI).

  5. Investigating IT Faculty Resistance to Learning Management System Adoption Using Latent Variables in an Acceptance Technology Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatiha Bousbahi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance instruction in higher education, many universities in the Middle East have chosen to introduce learning management systems (LMS to their institutions. However, this new educational technology is not being used at its full potential and faces resistance from faculty members. To investigate this phenomenon, we conducted an empirical research study to uncover factors influencing faculty members’ acceptance of LMS. Thus, in the Fall semester of 2014, Information Technology faculty members were surveyed to better understand their perceptions of the incorporation of LMS into their courses. The results showed that personal factors such as motivation, load anxiety, and organizational support play important roles in the perception of the usefulness of LMS among IT faculty members. These findings suggest adding these constructs in order to extend the Technology acceptance model (TAM for LMS acceptance, which can help stakeholders of the university to implement the use of this system. This may assist in planning and evaluating the use of e-learning.

  6. Development of an Instrument to Measure Faculty's Information and Communication Technology Access (FICTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Kamal Ahmed; Kale, Ugur; Curtis, Reagan; Akcaoglu, Mete; Bernstein, Malayna

    2018-01-01

    The phenomenon of "digital divide" is complex and multidimensional, extending beyond issues of physical access. The purpose of this study was to develop a scale to measure a range of factors related to digital divide among higher education faculty and to evaluate its reliability and validity. Faculty's Information and Communication…

  7. The technological convergence in the virtual classrooms at the faculty of distance education at Universidad Nueva Granada university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guillermo Cogollo Rincón

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This work is part of the research project entitled "Analysis, design and development of Social Network prototype as an observatory in the New Granada Military University " in which analyzes whether the academic community of the online education faculty if is ready to do technological convergence on the virtual course content.The purpose of the article is to study the feasibility of offering all virtual contents through mobile devices, and this way to have more coverage for formation processes.This study was based in teachers and students surveyed through the virtual platform  of Online Education Faculty; a qualitative analysis of the information collected through the use of technological tools and the object of study items were taken to the respective analysis was made.Teachers and Students showed skills in the use of electronic items, as mobile devices and virtual environments that can be reflected in the academic environment to achieve a higher qualityeducation.

  8. Perceptions of Faculty toward Integrating Technology in Undergraduate Higher Education Traditional Classrooms at Research-Focused Regional Universities in South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Cheri Deann

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the perceptions of faculty members who use technology in undergraduate higher education traditional classrooms in research-focused regional universities in South Texas. Faculty members at research-focused regional universities are expected to divide time judiciously into three major areas: research, service, and…

  9. The Use of Collaboration, Authentic Learning, Linking Material to Personal Knowledge, and Technology in the Constructivist Classroom: Interviews with Community College Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinski, Dianne E.

    2017-01-01

    This study explored how faculty members implemented constructivist teaching methods after training. The student-centered teaching methods were interactions and collaborations, authentic learning and real-world experiences, linking material to previously learned information, and using technology in the classroom. Seven faculty members trained in…

  10. Influential Factors and Faculty Members' Practices in Technology Integration Using ISTE Standards for Teacher Preparation at Taibah University--Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajabaa, Aysha Sulaiman

    2017-01-01

    Using technology effectively has been proven to enhance education. The status quo in Saudi Arabia reflects low-level usage of technology in K-12 classrooms. Preparing 21st Century teachers to integrate technology in their future classrooms for meaningful learning requires College of Education faculty to model using technology effectively. This…

  11. A study on Factors Affecting Application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT by Faculty Members of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Biglari

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to investigate the factors affecting on ICT application by faculty members of University of Razi. A descriptive-correlative research survey method was used. The statistical population of this research consist of faculty members of University of Kermanshah (N=271. Sampling method was stratified randomization (n=116. Questionnaire was used for data collection, the validity of which was confirmed by the opinions of some of professionals and faculty members of Agriculture Education and Extension and for determining reliability Cronbach's Alpha (0.83 was used. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS software. The findings reveal that there’s a significant positive relationship between the number of published papers in internal and external journals and conferences, familiarity with internet services, skill in driving computer, skill in using internet services, using internet for meeting educational and research needs, skill in English language, attitude towards using ICT in education and research, scientific rank and use of internet for supervising over  thesis and dissertation, on the one hand, and the variable of application of ICT by faculty members of University of Kermanshah. In regression analysis, the predicting variables of factors affecting on application of ICT by faculty members, including skill in using internet services, attitude towards using ICT in research and education and the number of published papers in foreign journals and conferences were entered in 3 stages, which in total explain 25.1 percent variance of dependent variable. 

  12. Information technology - a tool for development of the teaching process at the faculty of medicine, university of sarajevo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2015-04-01

    Information Technologies, taking slow steps, have found its application in the teaching process of Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Online availability of the teaching content is mainly intended for users of the Bologna process. The aim was to present the level of use of information technologies at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo, comparing two systems, old system and the Bologna process, and to present new ways of improving the teaching process, using information technology. The study included the period from 2012 to 2014, and included 365 students from the old system and the Bologna Process. Study had prospective character. Students of the old system are older than students of the Bologna process. In both systems higher number of female students is significantly present. All students have their own computers, usually using the Office software package and web browsers. Visits of social networks were the most common reason for which they used computers. On question if they know to work with databases, 14.6% of students of the old system responded positively and 26.2% of students of the Bologna process answered the same. Students feel that working with databases is necessary to work in primary health care. On the question of the degree of computerization at the university, there were significant differences between the two systems (p information technology, than students of old system. 68.7% of students of the Bologna process of generation 2013-2014, and 71.3% of generation 2014-2015, believed that the subject of Medical Informatics, the same or similar name, should be included in the new reform teaching process of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Sarajevo. Information technologies can help the development of the teaching process, and represent attractive and accessible tool in the process of modernization and progress.

  13. Identification of Preferred Sources of Information for Undertaking Studies in the Faculty of Engineering Management at Poznan University of Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Wyrwicka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010 a survey has been conducted among first-year students about sources of information which influence the decision of undertaking field studies in Safety Engineering, Management Engineering and Logistics in the Faculty of Engineering Management at Poznan University of Technology. The goal of these analyses is both to assess the effectiveness of promotion and also show trends in the use of diverse channels of information transfer of studies. The results of the investigation show that internet promotion via university and faculty website plays the dominant role but also direct promotion, such as opinion of older friends, is crucial. Furthermore, from year to year the analyses indicate the significant increase of official media and reveal that the prospective students rely on a few sources of information simultaneously.

  14. Adding faculty in transportation areas : research progress on geomaterials and non-destructive sensor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    This funding was provided to help departments build up their faculty in the transportation field over the next years. Broad areas will : be considered as listed in the UTC mission or other areas that relate to State Departments of Transportation and ...

  15. App Savvy Turning Ideas into iPad and iPhone Apps Customers Really Want

    CERN Document Server

    Yarmosh, Ken

    2010-01-01

    How can you make your iPad or iPhone app stand out in the highly competitive App Store? While many books simply explore the technical aspects of iPad and iPhone app design and development, App Savvy also focuses on the business, product, and marketing elements critical to pursuing, completing, and selling your app -- the ingredients for turning a great idea into a genuinely successful product. Whether you're a designer, developer, entrepreneur, or just someone with a unique idea, App Savvy explains every step in the process, with guidelines for planning a solid concept, engaging customers ea

  16. The Development and Validation of an Instrument for Assessing College Students' Perceptions of Faculty Knowledge in Technology-Supported Class Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Ching-Lin; Chuang, Hsueh-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Research in the area of educational technology has argued that the technological pedagogical content knowledge of faculty is crucial to addressing the challenge of teaching in higher education in the digital age, which is characterized by the common use of instructional technology in college classrooms and the ubiquitous presence of computing on…

  17. The Logo Analysis from Faculty of Information Technology and Communication of Universitas Semarang in order to Redesign the Logo and the Corporate Identity Design using Logotype Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdaus Azwar Ersyad

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The logo analysis from Faculty of Information Technology and Communication (FTIK of Universitas Semarang in order to redesign logo and corporate identity design using logotype method is an effort to stimulate the faculty potentiality, by strengthening the brand image so that faculty is well-known in the future and would convince the society as social partner in organizing education quality. Redesign logo and corporate design is a research and development method which purpose at developing FTIK logo. The research uses Research and Development method. From the entire process of R&D development, eight steps are taken as follow: Potential and Problems of Data Collection, Product Design, Design Validation, Design Revision, Product Trial, Product Revision, Usage Trial, Mass Production. The process of redesigning the logo and faculty identity design refers to the vision and mission of the faculty so it can be implemented in creative concepts, communication strategies and application media.

  18. SAVVY vaginal gel (C31G for prevention of HIV infection: a randomized controlled trial in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Feldblum

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this trial was to determine the effectiveness of 1.0% C31G (SAVVY in preventing male-to-female vaginal transmission of HIV infection among women at high risk.This was a Phase 3, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Participants made up to 12 monthly follow-up visits for HIV testing, adverse event reporting, and study product supply. The study was conducted between September 2004 and December 2006 in Lagos and Ibadan, Nigeria, where we enrolled 2153 HIV-negative women at high risk of HIV infection. Participants were randomized 1 ratio 1 to SAVVY or placebo. The effectiveness endpoint was incidence of HIV infection as indicated by detection of HIV antibodies in oral mucosal transudate (rapid test or blood (ELISA, and confirmed by Western blot or PCR testing. We observed 33 seroconversions (21 in the SAVVY group, 12 in the placebo group. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of the cumulative probability of HIV infection at 12 months were 0.028 in the SAVVY group and 0.015 in the placebo group (2-sided p-value for the log-rank test of treatment effect 0.121. The point estimate of the hazard ratio was 1.7 for SAVVY versus placebo (95% confidence interval 0.9, 3.5. Because of lower-than-expected HIV incidence, we did not observe the required number of HIV infections (66 for adequate power to detect an effect of SAVVY. Follow-up frequencies of adverse events, reproductive tract adverse events, abnormal pelvic examination findings, chlamydial infections and vaginal infections were similar in the study arms. No serious adverse event was attributable to SAVVY use.SAVVY did not reduce the incidence of HIV infection. Although the hazard ratio was higher in the SAVVY than the placebo group, we cannot conclude that there was a harmful treatment effect of SAVVY.

  19. Learning from Cyber-Savvy Students: How Internet-Age Kids Impact Classroom Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hird, Anne

    This book describes what happens when cyber-savvy students enter classrooms wired to the Internet. It offers a preview of challenges teachers will face as they become connected to the Internet. Information comes from 6 months spent observing an 8th- grade class at Cityview School, a 4-8 school that was wired to the Internet. Participants were 34…

  20. THE USE OF EDUCATIONAL INFORMATION DESIGN TECHNOLOGY IN THE COURSE OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE DISTANCE LEARNING AT NON-PHILOLOGICAL FACULTIES

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    Olena Ye. Kravets

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article substantiates the view that the intensification of information flows as one of the main factors entering the world in the era of the global information society actualizes the problem of the organization of educational information space in the classroom for foreign language in higher educational institutions. The authors have proposed the educational information design technology in foreign languages distance learning at non-philological faculties. The article analyzes the experimental results verification of the technological effectiveness used in the learning content design in a foreign language for professional purposes; it has been proved the basic criterion of effective informational product – information-oriented competence of professional foreign language knowledge.

  1. A Comparison of Undergraduate Faculty and Millennial Students regarding the Utilization of Weblog and Podcast Technology in a Teacher Education Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, Leslie Sturdivant; Gambrell, Elizabeth Anne

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to compare the utilization of weblog and podcast technology by undergraduate university faculty and Millennial college students. The study was conducted to test the hypothesis, formed from existing literature, that there might be a difference in the utilization of weblog and podcast technology between faculty…

  2. How Students Use Technology to Cheat and What Faculty Can Do about It

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Lisa Z.

    2015-01-01

    Technology, like most things in life, can provide many benefits to society and improve both the business and academic environments. Technology can also be used in ways that circumvent the educational process and create situations where it is not being used in the appropriate way. College students that use technology to gain access to unauthorized…

  3. Faculty Use of Tablet Computers at the University of Ontario Institute of Technology

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    Roland van Oostveen

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This article describes instructor use of tablet computers for personal use, research activities and teaching practices within the Faculties of Science and Engineering at UOIT. The benefits of tablet use were evaluated on the basis of types of usage, personal and professional productivity and the “richness” of the overall computing experience. Major findings include the enhanced ubiquity of computer use by faculty as a result of increased mobility, and the modification of pedagogical practices before, during and after lectures. The article also reports on faculty speculation regarding the effects of tablet use by students as well as suggestions for improving tablet computer design. The article concludes with a number of recommendations for the expanded use of tablet computers within higher education settings. Résumé : Le présent article décrit l’utilisation par l’instructeur d’ordinateurs tablettes à des fins personnelles, pour des activités de recherche et la pratique de l’enseignement au sein des facultés de sciences et génie de l’UOIT. On a évalué les avantages de l’utilisation de la tablette en fonction des types d’utilisation, de la productivité personnelle et professionnelle et de la « richesse » de l’ensemble de l’expérience de traitement. Parmi les conclusions importantes, on trouve l’ubiquité améliorée de l’utilisation de l’ordinateur par la faculté en raison de la mobilité accrue et de la modification des pratiques pédagogiques avant, pendant et après les cours. Le présent article traite aussi des suppositions du corps professoral quant aux effets de l’utilisation des ordinateurs tablettes par les étudiants et de suggestions visant l’amélioration de la conception de ces ordinateurs. L’article termine sur des recommandations pour une utilisation accrue des ordinateurs tablettes en enseignement supérieur.

  4. Exploring the Use of information and communication technologies and social networks among university nursing faculty staff. An opinion survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Fernández-Alemán

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This work sought to analyze the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs and social networks among the university nursing faculty staff in Spain. Methodology. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study using a questionnaire on ICT skills designed to comply with the research objective, which was evaluated by experts and which was subjected to exploratory analysis of principal components; the reliability of this instrument measured with Cronbach's alpha was 0.85. The information technology tool used to publish the questionnaire on line was Limesurvey. The sample comprised 165 professors from 25 Nursing Faculties and Schools from universities in Spain. Results. Seventy one percent of the total surveyed used internet services to look for information, 63% used the internet as a means for formation and learning, and 72% used it as a communication platform (e-mail and virtual platforms like Sakai and Moodle. Although 51% of the teaching staff surveyed had more than 120 students registered in their courses, hypothesis testing revealed that the number of students in class is not a determining factor for the teaching staff to have greater interest to update its knowledge in ICTs. Younger professors use new technologies more profusely and the most-valued advantage of using ICTs was quick access to information. Professors perceive that after the Bologna Declaration, which requires modifying their teaching-learning processes through the new teaching methodologies, a drop has been produced in their performance and that of their peers in their area of knowledge. Conclusion. The nursing teaching staff is making strong efforts to confront the new challenges posed by ICTs to train the professionals of the 21st century. It is fundamental to pay special attention to improving the university teaching staff's skills in managing ICTs, promoting the implementation of the knowledge acquired.

  5. Exploring the Use of information and communication technologies and social networks among university nursing faculty staff. An opinion survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alemán, José Luis; Sánchez García, Ana Belén; López Montesinos, María José; Marqués-Sánchez, Pilar; Bayón Darkistade, Enrique; Pérez Rivera, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    This work sought to analyze the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) and social networks among the university nursing faculty staff in Spain. This was a descriptive, cross-sectional study using a questionnaire on ICT skills designed to comply with the research objective, which was evaluated by experts and which was subjected to exploratory analysis of principal components; the reliability of this instrument measured with Cronbach's alpha was 0.85. The information technology tool used to publish the questionnaire on line was Limesurvey. The sample comprised 165 professors from 25 Nursing Faculties and Schools from universities in Spain. Seventy one percent of the total surveyed used internet services to look for information, 63% used the internet as a means for formation and learning, and 72% used it as a communication platform (e-mail and virtual platforms like Sakai and Moodle). Although 51% of the teaching staff surveyed had more than 120 students registered in their courses, hypothesis testing revealed that the number of students in class is not a determining factor for the teaching staff to have greater interest to update its knowledge in ICTs. Younger professors use new technologies more profusely and the most-valued advantage of using ICTs was quick access to information. Professors perceive that after the Bologna Declaration, which requires modifying their teaching-learning processes through the new teaching methodologies, a drop has been produced in their performance and that of their peers in their area of knowledge. The nursing teaching staff is making strong efforts to confront the new challenges posed by ICTs to train the professionals of the 21st century. It is fundamental to pay special attention to improving the university teaching staff's skills in managing ICTs, promoting the implementation of the knowledge acquired.

  6. Development and Implementation of Tele-Savvy for Dementia Caregivers: A Department of Veterans Affairs Clinical Demonstration Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Patricia C; Whitney, M Kate; Kovaleva, Mariya; Hepburn, Kenneth

    2016-02-01

    To test fidelity and preliminary efficacy of Tele-Savvy, an internet-based version of the in-person, evidence-based psychoeducation Savvy Caregiver Program (SCP) for dementia caregivers. Tele-Savvy used synchronous (tele-conferences) and asynchronous components (video modules) to provide program access to caregivers in their homes. SCP experts were surveyed to evaluate Tele-Savvy's fidelity to SCP. A convenience sample of 30 dementia caregivers from the Atlanta VA Medical Center enrolled in the Tele-Savvy clinical demonstration program. Twenty-two caregivers completed both pre- and postprogram evaluations, which included measures of caregiver stress and competence and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Expert review confirmed Tele-Savvy's fidelity with and, in certain domains, improvement on the original. Participants demonstrated moderately high initial levels of burden, anxiety, and depressive symptoms all of which decreased significantly postprogram in an intention to treat analysis. Similar reductions were seen in care recipients' BPSD and caregivers' reactions to them. Marginally significant increases in caregiver competence were observed. Caregiver and expert panel evaluations of program quality were enthusiastic. An effective online caregiver psychoeducation program could provide greatly expanded access for caregivers who cannot attend in person for reasons of distance, transportation limitations, and caregiving responsibilities. Further testing in a controlled trial is needed to establish program efficacy. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Gerontological Society of America 2015.

  7. Global and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Changes in Library and Information Studies (LIS): Information Seeking Behaviors of LIS Faculty Members in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polparsi, Jomkwan

    2012-01-01

    This study provides an overview of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Library and Information Studies (LIS) education in Thailand, focusing on challenges and pressures in the information environment of Thai LIS faculty members. This study employed a qualitative research approach, naturalistic inquiry, and inductive data analysis.…

  8. An Evaluation of the National Information Communication and Technology (ICT) Policy at the University of Namibia in the Faculty of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Albert; Kazembe, Lawrence; Kazondovi, Collins

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this evaluation study was to determine the extent to which the teacher educators in the Faculty of Education at the University of Namibia implemented the national Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Policy for Education. This study employed both the quantitative method in the form of questionnaires and the qualitative…

  9. Factors That Female Higher Education Faculty in Select Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Fields Perceive as Being Influential to Their Success and Persistence in Their Chosen Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opare, Phyllis Bernice

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine factors female higher education faculty in select science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields perceived as influential to their success and persistence in their chosen professions. Females are underrepresented in STEM professions including academia, despite the fact that female…

  10. African American Faculty Women Experiences of Underrepresentation in Computer Technology Positions in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Dolores

    2013-01-01

    African American women are underrepresented in computer technology disciplines in institutions of higher education throughout the United States. Although equitable gender representation is progressing in most fields, much less information is available on why institutions are still lagging in workforce diversity, a problem which can be lessened by…

  11. Information and Communication Technology in the International Business Classroom: Comparing Faculty and Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Deusen, Cheryl A.; Jones, Gordon; Mueller, Carolyn B.; Ricks, David A.; Schlegelmilch, Bodo B.

    2004-01-01

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) is revolutionizing traditional educational methods in university contexts and changing the process of how educators do their jobs. However, research offers conflicting views regarding the benefits of ICT in the classroom. To better understand the various advantages and disadvantages of…

  12. ROLE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN TEACHING LEARNING PROCESS: Perception of the Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irshad HUSSAIN

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Information technologies have affected every aspect of human activity and have a potential role to play in the field of education and training, specially, in distance education to transform it into an innovative form of experience. The need of new technologies in teaching learning process grows stronger and faster. The information age becomes an era of knowledge providing sound and unmatched feasibility for discovery, exchange of information, communication and exploration to strengthen the teaching learning process.Information technologies help in promoting opportunities of knowledge sharing throughout the world. These can help the teachers and students having up-to-date information and knowledge. Accurate and right information is necessary for effective teaching and learning; and information technologies (Haag, 1998; p.10 are “set of tools that can help provide the right people with the right information at the right time.” Students are independent and they can make best decisions possible about their studies, learning time, place and resources.Students are able to work in collaborative and interactive learning environments effectively communicating, sharing information and exchanging ideas and learning experiences with all in the environment.

  13. Perceptions on Information and Communication Technology among the Faculty of a Mexican University: the South University Center of the University of Guadalajara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina López De la Madrid

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It is the faculty members who can generate the greatest changes in universities around the world, based on the establishment of defined policies. On the teachers falls the responsibility of training and orienting students—the primary users of these institutions. The objective of the present study is to define what have been the perceptions and the changes among teaching faculty in the process of implementing information technologies in the South University Center, University of Guadalajara (Mexico. Questionnaires were distributed to 42 of the institution’s 320 teachers. Four areas were addressed: technological infrastructure; teacher training and support; reasons for implementing information and communication technologies; and modification of the teaching/learning process. Based on the surveyees’ answers, categories of analysis were developed; these were used to define the needs of the group. Next a process of research-action was carried out with a group of faculty interested in changing their educational practices; the group members received several different training courses. Most of the professors accepted the implementation of the technologies in their academic programs, although many of them had not put them into practice. On the other hand, they pointed out the importance of having the necessary infrastructure and training support, as well as constant technical, methodological and didactic assistance.

  14. Enrichment of the educational environment with information and communication technologies: state of art at the Faculty of Pharmacy of Kaunas University of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butrimiene, Edita; Stankeviciene, Nida

    2008-01-01

    Both traditional and new educational environments, the latter enriched with information and communication technologies, coexist in today's university. The goal of this article is to present the concept of educational environment enriched with information and communication technologies, to reveal the main features of such environment, and to present the results of certain investigation on the application of information technologies in teaching/learning processes at the Faculty of Pharmacy of Kaunas University of Medicine. The discussion object of this paper is the educational environment enriched with information and communication technologies. In designing the environments of this type, positive aspects of traditional teaching models are being developed by integrating them into the new educational environment. The concept of educational environment enriched with information and communication technologies is reviewed in the first part of this paper. The structure and main features of educational environments enriched with information and communication technologies are highlighted in the second part. The results of the study on the application of information technologies in teaching/learning processes at the Faculty of Pharmacy of Kaunas University of Medicine are presented in the third part.

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF MATHEMATICAL THINKING ON CAREER PATH CHOICE FOR GRADUATES OF MANAGEMENT FACULTY AT UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY IN CZÊSTOCHOWA

    OpenAIRE

    Ewa £adyga; Marek£adyga

    2014-01-01

    Difficult subjects in the course of study may have beneficial influence on future life of graduates. Authors of the article are pointing out attention on connections that exist between teaching mathematics and choice of career path for graduates of Management Faculty AT University of Technology in Czêstochowa. In first part of the article is briefly presenting an influence of mathematical thinking on growth of various civilizations. Than focus in turned on benefits of mathematical thinking, p...

  16. Effects of Information Technology Use on The Education of Studens And Information Technology Expenditure Elasticity: The Case of Biga Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences of Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University

    OpenAIRE

    Aktas, Erkan; Alioğlu, Osman; Vardar, Engin

    2007-01-01

    In this study, data obtained from a survey that was conducted on students of Biga Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences of Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University have been used in order to put forward effects of information Technologies on the education of students and factors that affect information technology expenditures have been estimated. LOGIT and Linear Expenditure System have been used in demonstrating the relationship. Results of the study estimate that there is a negative rel...

  17. Building capacity for information and communication technology use in global health research and training in China: a qualitative study among Chinese health sciences faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Abdullah, Abu S; Ma, Zhenyu; Fu, Hua; Huang, Kaiyong; Yu, Hongping; Wang, Jiaji; Cai, Le; He, Huimin; Xiao, Jian; Quintiliani, Lisa; Friedman, Robert H; Yang, Li

    2017-06-28

    The demand to use information and communications technology (ICT) in education and research has grown fast among researchers and educators working in global health. However, access to ICT resources and the capacity to use them in global health research remains limited among developing country faculty members. In order to address the global health needs and to design an ICT-related training course, we herein explored the Chinese health science faculty members' perceptions and learning needs for ICT use. Nine focus groups discussions (FGDs) were conducted during December 2015 to March 2016, involving 63 faculty members working in areas of health sciences from six universities in China. All FGDs were audio recorded and analysed thematically. The findings suggest that the understandings of ICT were not clear among many researchers; some thought that the concept of ICT was too wide and ambiguous. Most participants were able to cite examples of ICT application in their research and teaching activities. Positive attitudes and high needs of ICT use and training were common among most participants. Recommendations for ICT training included customised training programmes focusing on a specific specialty, maintaining a balance between theories and practical applications, more emphasis on the application of ICT, and skills in finding the required information from the bulk information available in the internet. Suggestions regarding the format and offering of training included short training programmes, flexible timing, lectures with practicum opportunities, and free of charge or with very minimal cost to the participants. Two participants suggested the linking of ICT-related training courses with faculty members' year-end assessment and promotion. This study among health sciences faculty members in China demonstrated a high level of need and interest in learning about ICT use in research and training. The results have important implications for the design and implementation of

  18. Does Not Compute: The High Cost of Low Technology Skills in the U.S.--and What We Can Do about It. Vital Signs: Reports on the Condition of STEM Learning in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Change the Equation, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Although American millennials are the first generation of "digital natives"--that is, people who grew up with computers and the internet--they are not very tech savvy. Using technology for social networking, surfing the web, or taking selfies is a far cry from using it to solve complex problems at work or at home. Truly tech savvy people…

  19. Challenges and issues facing the future of nursing education: implications for ethnic minority faculty and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sheila P; Davis, Danyetta D

    2010-01-01

    Current trends in higher education in the United States demand that nursing take stock of how it is prepared or being prepared to face challenges and issues impacting on its future. The intense effort made to attract students to pursue advanced training in science and engineering in the United States pales in comparison to the numbers of science and engineering majors produced yearly in international schools. As a result, more and more jobs are being outsourced to international markets. Could international outsourcing become a method of nursing education? Authors submit that to remain competitive, the nursing profession must attract a younger cohort of technologically savvy students and faculty reflective of the growing diverse population in the United States. Additionally, nursing programs in research universities face even more daunting challenges as it relates to mandates for funded research programs of educational units. This article offers suggestions and recommendations for nursing programs in higher education institutions on ways to attract and retain ethnic minorities and of how to harness the power of research to address burgeoning societal health challenges.

  20. Overcoming Barriers to Classroom Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Technology-savvy teachers are often the "go to" staff members in schools for their colleagues' technology issues. These teachers are seen as leaders within their schools with respect to technology and often do not understand their peers' difficulties when bringing technology into the classroom. Understanding both the reasons teachers may…

  1. Electricity - Energy - Information. The history of the Faculty for Electrical Engineering and Information Technology at the RWTH Aachen; Elektrizitaet - Energie - Information. Die Geschichte der Fakultaet fuer Elektrotechnik und Informationstechnik an der RWTH Aachen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilson, Norbert; Kaiser, Walter

    2010-07-01

    The authors of the book under consideration report on the history of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology at the RWTH Aachen University (Aachen, Federal Republic of Germany). For the first time, electrical engineering was taught in 1883 was first taught as a subject of its own. The first three chapters of this book sum up the time until the Second World War. The focus of this book is on the description of the development of this faculty in the time period after the Second World War. The development of the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology is described among the most important institutional, personal, contextual and social aspects. Due to the profound analysis of the reasons for the leading role of this faculty in a wide range of areas in the national and international scope, this book also is of great benefit for electrical engineers.

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Preferred Learning and Teaching Styles for Engineering, Industrial, and Technology Education Students and Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Fantz, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    In the spring semester of 2010, a materials process course was selected as a means to perform a preferred learning style research study. This course was selected because it contained three groups of students: technology education, engineering technology, and industrial technology. The researchers believed that the differences in the students'…

  3. The Relationship Between Usage Rate of Information and Communication Technology by Faculty Members of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, and Motivation Rate, Updating of Lesson Content and Attractiveness of Classroom in Academic Year of 2008-2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shila Soleymani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aimed to study the relationship between usage rate of information and communication technology by faculty members of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad and motivation rate, updating of lesson content and attractiveness of classroom in academic year of 2008-2009 and to study the ability to use information and communication technology in the classroom effectively , its effects on motivation of teachers and learners and updating of lesson content and to investigate possible difficulties and challenges in its usage and to suggest a course of action. Statistical universe studied was selected 274 members of faculty of Ferdowsi University using random-stratified sampling with proper assignment. Considering purpose of the paper, it was applied research and descriptive survey and concerning methodology it was correlation research. A researcher-built questionnaire was filled as face to face and precisely an interview in which professors expressed their problems in usage of information and communication technologies were used as a data collection tool. The results showed that the relationship between usage rate of information and communication technology by faculty members of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad and updating lesson content, attractiveness of class and their motivation level (low, medium, high according to one-sided variance analysis, the assumption of average equality of usage rate of information and communication technology by faculty members was rejected in all three cases. In other words, there was a significant difference (positive between them, in ascending order were as low, medium and high.

  4. Emerging Instructional Technologies: Exploring the Extent of Faculty Use of Web 2.0 Tools at a Midwestern Community College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Tareq; Lazarevic, Bojan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to provide insight into the several aspects of instructional use of emerging web-based technologies. The study first explores the extent of Web 2.0 technology integration into face-to-face classroom activities. In this phase, the main focus of research interests was on the types and dynamics of Web 2.0 tools used by…

  5. SAVVY (C31G gel for prevention of HIV infection in women: a Phase 3, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Peterson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this trial was to determine the effectiveness of 1.0% C31G (SAVVY in preventing male-to-female vaginal transmission of HIV infection among women at high risk.This was a Phase 3, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Participants made up to 12 monthly visits for HIV testing, adverse event reporting, and study product supply. The study was conducted between March 2004 and February 2006 in Accra and Kumasi, Ghana. We enrolled 2142 HIV-negative women at high risk of HIV infection, and randomized them to SAVVY or placebo gel. Main outcome measures were the incidence of HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection as determined by detection of HIV antibodies from oral mucosal transudate specimens and adverse events. We accrued 790 person-years of follow-up in the SAVVY group and 772 person-years in the placebo group. No clinically significant differences in the overall frequency of adverse events, abnormal pelvic examination findings, or abnormal laboratory results were seen between treatment groups. However, more participants in the SAVVY group reported reproductive tract adverse events than in the placebo group (13.0% versus 9.4%. Seventeen HIV seroconversions occurred; eight in participants randomized to SAVVY and nine in participants receiving placebo. The Kaplan-Meier estimates of the cumulative probability of HIV infection through 12 months were 0.010 in the SAVVY group and 0.011 in the placebo group (p = 0.731, with a hazard ratio (SAVVY versus placebo of 0.88 (95% confidence interval 0.33, 2.27. Because of a lower-than-expected HIV incidence, we were unable to achieve the required number of HIV infections (66 to obtain the desired study power.SAVVY was not associated with increased adverse events overall, but was associated with higher reporting of reproductive adverse events. Our data are insufficient to conclude whether SAVVY is effective at preventing HIV infection relative to placebo.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00129532.

  6. An evaluation on the analysis of communication faculties and education system compliance with new communication technologies in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulunmaz Barış

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the disciplines covered in the social sciences is communication sciences. Communication; when considered from an overall and simple perspective, is defined as the transfer of messages between sender and receiver. As every kind of innovation is integrated into social life over time, increasing human-based practices and significant importance of communication emerge both scientifically and socially; communication has been more institutionalized and gained its current structure. Communication, studied on undergraduate and postgraduate level at many colleges and institutes, has gained even more importance parallel to important changes created by new media and communication technologies especially depending on the spread of Internet and technological infrastructure to a wider area. In this study, a research will be performed with a small group of -in quantitative sense- students, and results will be evaluated about the adaptation of new communication technologies integrated into study of communication and to what extent they are used.

  7. Propagations of the AAPT New Faculty Workshop: A case study of the infusion of student-centered technological and pedagogical innovations in the introductory physics program at West Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sones, Bryndol

    2009-03-01

    Since 2002, the Department of Physics at West Point has been the fortunate recipient of yearly attendance at the AAPT New Faculty Workshop. This sustained involvement has contributed directly to enhancements in our two-semester introductory physics program. Two aspects of West Point's environment make our involvement with the workshop especially fruitful: our diverse students and our frequent faculty turn-over. We teach to over 1100 students with majors across the entire spectrum. The majority of our faculty is an active duty Army officer here for just three years. At West Point, we rely on the workshop as a wellspring for faculty development, technological innovation, and pedagogical refinement. In the past few years, we have incorporated aspects of peer instruction, activity-based learning, and tutorials for student discovery. On the technological side, we now have TabletPCs for faculty, rf response cards (TurningPoint), high speed video analysis (LoggerPro) projects, and video tutoring capabilities (Camtashia). Student achievement is measured through our traditional course evaluation tools as well as nationally recognized standardize tests. Results will are discussed in the presentation.

  8. Helping faculty enhance scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawranik, Pamela; Thorpe, Karran M

    2008-04-01

    Nurse educators face a myriad of challenges (e.g., changing student populations, increased demand for the use of technology, faculty shortages, and facilitating the development of self-confidence and competence in students) as they endeavor to enhance scholarship and quality in nursing education. Scholarship encompasses four separate but integrated elements (i.e., discovery, integration, application, and teaching) that need to be instilled in nursing students to prepare them for diverse roles in the profession of nursing. Implications for nurse educators relate to creating curricula that support scholarship, technological and interprofessional opportunities, and strategies for socializing students into scholarship.

  9. The Role of Aerospace Technology in Agriculture. The 1977 Summer Faculty Fellowship Program in Engineering Systems Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Possibilities were examined for improving agricultural productivity through the application of aerospace technology. An overview of agriculture and of the problems of feeding a growing world population are presented. The present state of agriculture, of plant and animal culture, and agri-business are reviewed. Also analyzed are the various systems for remote sensing, particularly applications to agriculture. The report recommends additional research and technology in the areas of aerial application of chemicals, of remote sensing systems, of weather and climate investigations, and of air vehicle design. Also considered in detail are the social, legal, economic, and political results of intensification of technical applications to agriculture.

  10. Stirring the Pot: Supporting and Challenging General Education Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Faculty to Change Teaching and Assessment Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieha, Vicki; Shadle, Susan E.; Paterson, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based instructional practices (ebips) have been associated with positive student outcomes; however, institutions struggle to catalyze widespread adoption of these practices in general education science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (stem) courses. Further, linking ebips with integrated learning assessment is rarely discussed…

  11. Job Satisfaction of Information Technology Faculty in Educational Institutions: A Regression Analysis Based on the Job Satisfaction Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazil, Sharon Nesbitt

    2017-01-01

    In the 21st century, business settings are more dynamic and more thought provoking than in previous years because lately information technology (IT) has dominated all aspects of the business field. For this reason, this study involved examining job satisfaction of IT professionals paying particular attention to the opportunity for advancement and…

  12. Through the Looking Glass: Examining Technology Integration in School Librarianship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lucy Santos

    2014-01-01

    The school library profession has begun to develop a reputation for tech-savviness. Several school librarians are nationally recognized technology leaders and present at conferences where instructional technology is at the forefront. Unfortunately, while school librarians have done a wonderful job of marketing their technological expertise in the…

  13. Applying ethical and legal principles to new technology: the University of Auckland Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences' policy 'Taking and Sharing Images of Patients.'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Monique; Malpas, Phillipa; Kersey, Kate; Merry, Alan; Bagg, Warwick

    2017-01-27

    To develop a policy governing the taking and sharing of photographic and radiological images by medical students. The Rules of the Health Information Privacy Code 1994 and the Code of Health and Disability Services Consumers' Rights were applied to the taking, storing and sharing of photographic and radiological images by medical students. Stakeholders, including clinicians, medical students, lawyers at district health boards in the Auckland region, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner and the Health and Disability Commissioner were consulted and their recommendations incorporated. The policy 'Taking and Sharing Images of Patients' sets expectations of students in relation to: photographs taken for the purpose of providing care; photographs taken for educational or professional practice purposes and photographic or radiological images used for educational or professional practice purposes. In addition, it prohibits students from uploading images of patients onto image-sharing apps such as Figure 1. The policy has since been extended to apply to all students at the Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences at the University of Auckland. Technology-driven evolutions in practice necessitate regular review to ensure compliance with existing legal regulations and ethical frameworks. This policy offers a starting point for healthcare providers to review their own policies and practice, with a view to ensuring that patients' trust in the treatment that their health information receives is upheld.

  14. Integrating Technology into the Classroom: How Does It Impact Student Achievement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Woodall, Antionette

    2009-01-01

    As an educator during the 21st century, it is important to note that technology is becoming more and more dominant in society. Many teachers have become very knowledgeable of how technologically-savvy students have become. In the field of technology, everyday upgrades are being made and new innovations are being discovered. As a result, the…

  15. An Inch Deep and a Mile Wide: Electronic Tools for Savvy Administrators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Jolly

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Texas school administrators often lack vital knowledge of technology trends, issues and skills; therefore, they are not as effective leaders of technology introduction, integration, and management as are needed. This lack comes from three sources: 1 school administrator preparatory programs have not and do not provide technology-related courses; 2 there are few technology-related in-service training course available to administrators; and 3 many Texas administrators are geographically isolated and thus have less opportunity to interact with colleagues and less opportunity to receive training. This article presents and explains web-based resources for: 1 standards development for administrator, teacher and student technology skills and knowledge; 2 standards development for accessibility, connectivity, and software; and 3 national and state resources such as diagnostic tools, school data/statistics, and other technology-related information.

  16. Faculty Activity Assignment Versus Faculty Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, D. R.; Peeples, T. O.

    The use of faculty activity data in higher education is discussed and the issue of whether the chairperson or the faculty member's estimates of how time was spent should determine resource expenditures is addressed. A historical review indicates that this type of data has been a concern of higher education for the past three decades. This…

  17. The Faculty Self-Reported Assessment Survey (FRAS): Differentiating Faculty Knowledge and Experience in Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David I.; Bauerle, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education reform efforts have called for widespread adoption of evidence-based teaching in which faculty members attend to student outcomes through assessment practice. Awareness about the importance of assessment has illuminated the need to understand what faculty members know and how they engage…

  18. Faculty Motivation Toward Professional Improvement: A Study of Two-Year College Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwin, Luene Holmes

    Faculty from 16 food service and hotel technology programs in New York two-year colleges were surveyed to determine the components of faculty decisions concerning participation in professional improvement activities aimed at updating knowledge, to explore the function and relationship of the components of a composite expectancy model which…

  19. Nursing Faculty Members' Perspectives of Faculty-to-Faculty Workplace Incivility among Nursing Faculty Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Kimberly S.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, nursing faculty incivility has been a searing topic of research. Nursing research included studies on incivility among nursing students, incivility between nursing students and nursing faculty, and incivility in the clinical setting. However, literature specifically on nursing faculty incivility was limited. This descriptive,…

  20. The Analysis of the Relationship between Organizational Structure and Information Technology (IT): And the Barriers to Its Establishment at the University of Isfahan from the Faculty Member's Viewpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, Yarmohammadzadeh; Mohsen, Allammeh Sayyed; Hassan, Ghalavandi; Aboulghassim, Farhang; Zaman, Ajdari

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to investigate the relationship between organizational structure between IT and the barriers to its establishment in University of Isfahan from faculty member's viewpoints in 2007-2008. The questionnaires were prepared and examined based on the organization dimensions of organizational structures (formality,…

  1. Social Responsibility of a Profession: An Analysis of Faculty Perception of Social Responsibility Factors and Integration into Graduate Programs of Educational Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Stephanie L.

    2009-01-01

    Although ethics are commonly regarded as an important characteristic and performance attribute, they are also regarded as a slippery or ill-defined topic leaving practitioners and faculty flat-footed in how to teach and assess ethics. This article reports part of the findings from an investigation on deriving an empirical definition of ethics,…

  2. Millennial Learners and Net-Savvy Teens? Examining Internet Use among Low-Income Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhow, Christine; Walker, J. D.; Kim, Seongdok

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses access and use of information and communication technologies among urban high school students from low-income families, a topic of great interest to teacher educators, educational policymakers, and others concerned with digital literacy instruction. Recent reports from national digital learning initiatives have portrayed…

  3. Development needs of faculty in foodservice management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, E S; Benes, B A

    1997-03-01

    To determine the development needs of foodservice management (FSM) faculty originally prepared in other fields. Application of qualitative research methodologies to description and comparison of the perspective of three groups: faculty themselves, leaders in foodservice industry, and educators in advanced-degree programs. Purposive sampling of organization directories was used to recruit faculty members for two surveys (142 and 62 respondents) and four focus groups; 15 representatives from industry, professional organizations, and education (through an advisory committee); and 11 foodservice administration advanced-degree programs (through survey and study of program catalogs). Faculty competencies needed were compared from the three perspectives. Descriptive statistics plus chi 2 determinations were used to make comparisons. All three sources identified needs that could be classified into one of three groups: acquisition of theory, mastery of applications, and personal qualities. Theoretical groundwork needed included food science/quantity food production, financial and personnel management, marketing, customer satisfaction, and use of computer and other technologies. Although only 44% of faculty respondents had advanced degrees in FSM, their graduate study in other areas was applicable in meeting many of the competencies. Almost all faculty had some FSM industry experience-a high priority from all perspectives. Most faculty were involved in development activities and reported success in acquiring knowledge and application competence. The faculty members' lack of identification with FSM and their feelings of isolation were more problematic.

  4. Science, Technology and University in the XIXth Century. The Free-Faculty of Sciences of the University of Salamanca (1875-1902

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín PÉREZ MELERO

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Free-Faculty of Sciences of the University of Salamanca was established in 1875 as the only way to continue Science studies in the University. Poorly financed, with little resources and academic acceptance, it survives helped by financial support from the City Hall and the Provincial Deputation, and to the Rector Esperabé5 s will, against the High Education centralization trend which concentres the studies at the Central University of Madrid. That economic and technical poverty provides just only an approach to the physico-chemical sciences in the framework of a provincial University, but helps it to stay alive until its recongnition as «official» faculty in 1902.

  5. Accounting Faculty Internships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Christopher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accounting professionals, business college accrediting bodies, and even accounting academics themselves acknowledge that there is a disconnect between academe and the rigors and requirements of the accounting profession. Among the suggestions proposed in the literature to reduce this gap is the faculty internship, where accounting faculty members work within the field as accountants. Heretofore, individual case studies report benefits of such internships that accrue to a variety of stakeholder groups beyond just the faculty intern and include the academic institution, students, and accounting profession through faculty internships. This research seeks wider support for these benefits. This descriptive study involved surveying a sample of accounting faculty members to get their opinions about the benefits and drawbacks of faculty internships, and to determine the level of use of faculty internships in accounting. In all, 128 usable responses were obtained, representing a 14.6% response rate. The results of this study reveal that although most faculty members acknowledge the benefits cited in the literature, too few take advantage of faculty internships.

  6. Faculty Assignment Classification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatcom Community Coll., Ferndale, WA.

    This document outlines the point-based faculty assignment classification system in effect at Whatcom Community College (Washington). The purpose of the point system is to provide an equitable and flexible means of compensating faculty members based on a system of assigning quantitative values to tasks. Teaching, which includes classroom…

  7. Faculty Internationalization Priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criswell, John R., II; Zhu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    The internationalization of higher education has been the subject of a substantial body of research. However, few studies have examined how faculty members, significant implementers of internationalization, think about internationalization priorities. This article presents the results of a questionnaire which was sent to faculty members at three…

  8. Faculty Retirement Transitions Revitalized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ummersen, Claire; Duranleau, Lauren; McLaughlin, Jean

    2013-01-01

    It has been almost ten years since the American Council on Education (ACE) began to raise awareness of the importance of workplace flexibility in faculty careers and to encourage colleges and universities to support faculty in better integrating their professional and personal lives. With the generous support of the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, ACE…

  9. Empowering the Faculty through Faculty Mentoring Needs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the mentoring assessment needs of faculties of the University of Education, Winneba, UEW; a public university in Ghana. The study was exploratory, and used survey, focus groups and semi-structured interviews in collecting data from 102 participants. The survey consisted of a 13-item 5-point ...

  10. Students Computer Skills in Faculty of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Caglar; Mukaddes Sakalli Demirok

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays; the usage of technology is not a privilege but an obligation. Technological developments influence structures andfunctions of educational institutions. It is also expected from the teachers that they integrate technology in their lessons inorder to educate the individuals of information society. This research has covered 145(68 female, 78 male) students, studying inNear East University Faculty of Education. The Computer Skills Scale developed by Güçlü (2010) was used as a data colle...

  11. The Effects of Technology Instruction on the Academic Achievement of Fifth Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Karen Cortina

    2012-01-01

    A digital native is an individual born between 1981 and 2001, and children born after 2001 are called millennials. Educators are expected to meet the needs of today's technologically savvy students. Some researchers assert that an academic "moral panic" is taking place that lacks the empirical and theoretical knowledge to support…

  12. Stock Market Savvy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okula, Susan

    2003-01-01

    This issue of Keying In, the newsletter of the National Business Education Association, focuses upon teaching young adults how to develop both investment strategies and an understanding of the stock market. The first article, "Sound Investing Know-How: A Must for Today's Young Adults," describes how young adults can plan for their own…

  13. An Analysis of Academic Library Web Pages for Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Susan J.; Juricek, John Eric; Xu, F. Grace

    2008-01-01

    Web sites are increasingly used by academic libraries to promote key services and collections to teaching faculty. This study analyzes the content, location, language, and technological features of fifty-four academic library Web pages designed especially for faculty to expose patterns in the development of these pages.

  14. CSU Digital Ambassadors: An Empowering and Impactful Faculty Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soodjinda, Daniel; Parker, Jessica K.; Ross, Donna L.; Meyer, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    This article chronicles the work of the California State University Digital Ambassador Program (DA), a Faculty Learning Community (FLC), which brought together 13 faculty members across the state to create ongoing, targeted spaces of support for colleagues and educational partners to learn about innovative technological and pedagogical practices…

  15. ESMD Space Grant Faculty Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiang; Whitmore, Stephen; Radcliff, Roger; Misra, Prabhakar; Prasad, Nadipuram; Conrad, James; Lackey, Ellen; Selby, Gregory; Wersinger, Jean-Marie; Lambright, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    The strength of the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate ESMD Faculty Project lies in its ability to meet National Aeronautics Space Administration NASA's Strategic Educational Outcome 1 by developing a sustainable and long-term integration of student involvement at academic institutions with all NASA Centers. This outcome is achieved by a three-fold approach: 1) by collecting Senior Design projects pertaining to Constellation work performed at each of the ten NASA Centers, 2) by engaging students at Minority Serving Institutions in the art of systems engineering and systems design of technologies required for space exploration, and 3) by identifying potential internships at each Center relative to exploration that provide students who are supported by their institutional Space Grant to engage in on-going mission-level and explorative systems designs. The objectives of the ESMD Faculty Project are to: 1. Aid the Centers (both Education Offices and associated technical organizations) in providing relevant opportunities for the ESMD Space Grant Program to support student and faculty in Senior Design projects 2. Enable better matches between the ESMD work required and what the Space Grant Consortia can do to effectively contribute to NASA programs 3. Provide the Space Grant Consortia an opportunity to strengthen relations with the NASA Centers 4. Develop better collective understanding of the U.S. Space Exploration Policy by the Center, Space Grant, faculty, Education Office, and students 5. Enable Space Grant institution faculty to better prepare their students to meet current and future NASA needs 6. Enable the Center Education Offices to strengthen their ties to their technical organizations and Space Grant Consortia 7. Aid KSC in gaining a greater and more detailed understanding of each of the Center activities Senior Design projects are intended to stimulate undergraduate students on current NASA activities related to lunar, Mars, and other planetary missions

  16. Developing clinically savvy nursing students: an evaluation of problem-based learning in an associate degree program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Marcia

    2008-01-01

    Faculty in an associate degree nursing program at a community college in NewYork City noted that nursing students lacked critical analysis, problem-solving, and decision-making skills and the reflective ability essential to applying nursing knowledge in clinical situations. This study reports on the use of problem-based learning as a teaching strategy and its impact on the development of critical thinking and communication skills in nursing students.

  17. Stressed Out! A National Study of Women and Men Journalism and Mass Communication Faculty, Their Uses of Technology, and Levels of Professional and Personal Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogan, Christine; Chung, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    Examines gender differences as they manifest themselves when journalism educators use computers and computer-based technologies in their teaching and research. Notes that gender differences have been found in overall stress levels and for a variety of types of stress. Concludes that the strongest relationship in the study was not between…

  18. Mobile Computing in Higher Education: Faculty Perceptions of Benefits and Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Minsuk K.; Shim, Sung J.

    2001-01-01

    Examined faculty's perceptions toward the potential benefits of and barriers to mobile computing in higher education based on a survey of faculty at a university that is planning to adopt campus-wide mobile computing. Also examined the role of three moderating variables associated with faculty's current use of technology. (Author/LRW)

  19. 5 February 2010: Romanian Former Minister of Justice V. Stoica (4th from left) visiting SM18 with, from left to right, University of Bucharest Faculty of Physics A. Costescu, DESY Hamburg C. Diaconu; Mrs Valeriu Stoica; Université de Montpellier II S. Ciulli; Technology Department Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group S. Ilie; Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Adviser for Russian Federation, Central and Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    5 February 2010: Romanian Former Minister of Justice V. Stoica (4th from left) visiting SM18 with, from left to right, University of Bucharest Faculty of Physics A. Costescu, DESY Hamburg C. Diaconu; Mrs Valeriu Stoica; Université de Montpellier II S. Ciulli; Technology Department Vacuum, Surfaces and Coatings group S. Ilie; Technology Department Head F. Bordry and Adviser for Russian Federation, Central and Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka.

  20. Faculty Development Proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kelsey A.

    An integrative approach to departmental design proposed for the Department of Criminal Justice at the University of the District of Columbia is described. The proposed curriculum classification framework for faculty assignment consists of three matrices: social behavior and humanities courses, technical courses, and philosophical courses. For the…

  1. Overcoming Faculty Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaff, Jerry G.

    1978-01-01

    Teaching improvement and institutional renewal efforts often face pessimism about change, if not suspicion and resistance, but faculty teams can overcome these problems through an action-oriented but low-profile "organic" approach. The need for personal invitations by colleagues is shown. (Author/LBH)

  2. Architecture faculty, Prague

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnídková, Vendula

    -, č. 40 (2011), s. 30-31 ISSN 1573-3815 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z80330511 Keywords : Czech contemporary architecture * Alena Šrámková * Architecture faculty, Prague Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture , Cultural Heritage

  3. The Development and Infrastructure Needs Required for Success--One College's Model: Online Nursing Education at Drexel University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Fran; Glasgow, Mary Ellen Smith

    2007-01-01

    Technology's impact on the delivery of health care mandates that nursing faculty use all technologies at their disposal to better prepare students to work in technology-infused health care environments. Essential components of an infrastructure to grow technology-infused nursing education include a skilled team comprised of tech-savvy faculty and…

  4. Mentoring and Pretenure Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Alan A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The University of British Columbia (Canada) Dental School uses teaching and research mentors for new faculty, together with a structured semiannual review process, to clearly identify faculty expectations for tenure. Pretenure faculty have appreciated the clear and regular input concerning their progress, and mentors enjoy the interaction with…

  5. Faculty Internships for Hospitality Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Christine; Hales, Jonathan A; Wiener, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Internships can help hospitality faculty build industry relationships while also ensuring the best and most current training for their students. Many hospitality organizations have structured faculty internships available or are willing to work with faculty to provide individualized internship opportunities. Career and technical educators in…

  6. Faculty Awareness of Textbook Prices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Robert; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Reports that variation in textbook prices is not correlated with textbook quality as judged by instructors and that university faculty are less price conscious when selecting textbooks than are community college faculty. States that, if faculty had greater access to price information, textbook prices would decrease. Makes recommendations for…

  7. Mentoring Faculty: Results from National Science Foundation's ADVANCE Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Faculty mentoring programs are common components of National Science Foundation ADVANCE awards. The ADVANCE program aims to increase the number of women on the faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) departments through grants to individuals and to entire institutions. These grants target a change in institutional culture so that faculty from non-majority groups will succeed and thrive. Mentoring programs are generally designed to fit the particular institution(s) or target population (e.g., meteorologists at the beginning of their careers). A successful mentoring program makes the implicit knowledge necessary for faculty success explicit: policies and practices are made transparent; routes for finding answers are clarified or generated with faculty input; faculty overcome a sense of isolation and develop a community. Mentoring programs may be formal, with assigned mentors and mentees, or informal, with opportunities for beginning, middle and advanced career STEM faculty to mingle, generally over food and sometimes with a formal speaker. The programs are formally evaluated; in general, attention to mentoring generates better outcomes for all faculty. Research indicates that most successful scientists have a network of mentors rather than relying on one person to help navigate department, institution, and profession. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln's (UNL) award, ADVANCE-Nebraska, offered opportunities for faculty to informally network over luncheons with women speakers, advanced in their careers. We also offered after-hours networking receptions. In response to faculty feedback, we shifted to a series of panel discussions entitled "Conversations". Most panels were conducted by successful UNL faculty; about one-third had an outside expert on a given topic. Topics were chosen based on faculty feedback and targeted specifically to beginning faculty (How to Start Up a Lab; How to Balance Teaching and Writing), mid-career faculty (Putting

  8. How Faculty can Affect Student Texting, Distraction, Grades, and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Hoekstra, A.; Wilcox, B.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable pressure on faculty members to use technology in teaching. Students also bring technology into class in the form of laptop computers, smart phones, and iPads. Does this technology increase or decrease learning? We report two years of data studying 14 different classes with a total of approximately 1200 students. We find that, on the average, approximately 70% of students use their own digital devices during class and 30% do not. The grades earned by the former group average nearly half a grade point average lower than the non-use group. Faculty policies are found to dramatically influence student behavior. Extensive student interview data will be reported that shows that students expect faculty members to set technology policies and summarizes their attitudes about technology use.

  9. Radiologic sciences. Faculty needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Kevin J

    2005-01-01

    A total of 326 programs are represented in the data collected. Based on the average number of full- and part-time faculty members reported per program, this survey represents more than 1500 faculty positions. Based on the forecast of retirement and career change for all faculty members, there will be a turnover of 700 to 800 positions over the next 5 to 10 years. Part-time/adjunct faculty vacancies are expected to create the greatest number of opportunities for technologists to make the transition to education, with approximately one third of current part-time/adjunct educators planning on leaving radiologic sciences education within 5 years. To encourage retention of part-time/adjunct educators, annual evaluations should be modified to recognize the important educational role these instructors play. There is a need to create enthusiasm and interest in education as a career pathway for radiologic technologists. Resources are needed that help radiologic technologists make the transition to teaching. Finally, the retention of educators must be emphasized. Program applicant trends indicate radiologic technology students are older, have prior postsecondary education experience or are making a career change. This data emphasizes the need for educators, both full time and part time, to understand the characteristics and needs of the adult learner. Adult learners bring a wealth of education, experience and life skills that create both opportunities and challenges in the classroom and clinical setting. All categories of respondents indicated that their current salaries were greater than those of program graduates in their firstjob. Of interest is that 1 in 5 (20%) of part-time/adjunct educators indicated the opposite--that program graduates earn more in their firstjob than educators earn. When asked about salaries if working full time in clinical practice, the majority of all groups indicated their salary would be about the same or would decrease. Only 20% of program

  10. Implementation of Android application for faculty employees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. B. Purić

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the functionality and implementation of applications for mobile phones used in the School of Electrical Engineering at the University of Belgrade in the daily work of faculty employees. The application uses a system’s shared data for financial and material accounting, human resources and teaching process. The system was implemented using a REST Web service, Google's model for Android REST client applications and Robospice technologies.

  11. Online learning for faculty development: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A; Steinert, Yvonne

    2013-11-01

    With the growing presence of computers and Internet technologies in personal and professional lives, it seems prudent to consider how online learning has been and could be harnessed to promote faculty development. Discuss advantages and disadvantages of online faculty development, synthesize what is known from studies involving health professions faculty members, and identify next steps for practice and future research. We searched MEDLINE for studies describing online instruction for developing teaching, leadership, and research skills among health professions faculty, and synthesized these in a narrative review. We found 20 articles describing online faculty development initiatives for health professionals, including seven quantitative comparative studies, four studies utilizing defined qualitative methods, and nine descriptive studies reporting anecdotal lessons learned. These programs addressed diverse topics including clinical teaching, educational assessment, business administration, financial planning, and research skills. Most studies enrolled geographically-distant learners located in different cities, provinces, or countries. Evidence suggests that online faculty development is at least comparable to traditional training, but learner engagement and participation is highly variable. It appears that success is more likely when the course addresses a relevant need, facilitates communication and social interaction, and provides time to complete course activities. Although we identified several practical recommendations for success, the evidence base for online faculty development is sparse and insubstantial. Future research should include rigorous, programmatic, qualitative and quantitative investigations to understand the principles that govern faculty member engagement and success.

  12. Nursing faculty shortage in 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Jennifer M

    2009-01-01

    As everyone is well aware, we are in the midst of a nursing shortage-one with no end in sight at the present time. But are you aware that we also have a shortage of nursing faculty? This article will briefly describe the current and predicted shortage of faculty, potential reasons for the shortage, current ways of coping, and the future for nursing faculty.

  13. Facilitating scholarship among clinical faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E G; Van Ort, S

    2001-01-01

    This article describes an evolving model of clinical scholarship for clinical-track faculty. Contemporary literature regarding scholarship emphasizes broader definitions of scholarship among university faculty, usually with an implicit focus on university faculty with doctoral degrees. Discussions of clinical scholarship focus on scholarship projects with clear application to improved patient care. Clinical-track faculty in university settings serve as exemplars of professional nurse clinicians for their students and for community-based colleagues, and also participate in university life as full faculty. Furthermore, scholarship for clinical faculty is consistent with their participation as academic scholars and as clinical scholars. An important strategy for fostering scholarship among clinical faculty in one school was the creation of a position, Director of Clinical Scholarship, with responsibilities for strengthening organizational support for scholarship activities among clinical-track faculty. Examples of activities and resources designed to foster scholarship are presented, along with preliminary evaluation of scholarship activities of clinical-track faculty. J Prof Nurs 17:141-146, 2001. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company

  14. Emerging Online Learning Environments and Student Learning: An Analysis of Faculty Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Brown

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available New educational technologies and online learning environments (OLEs are infiltrating today’s college classes and campuses. While research has examined many aspects of this permeation, one research gap exists. How do faculty perceive the learning experience in courses that use OLEs compared to courses that do not? One important factor that may influence faculty perceptions are their reasons for teaching with OLEs. This paper seeks to understand how faculty perceive OLEs as a function of their reasons for teaching with this educational technology. This paper also investigates whether faculty evaluations of OLEs differ based on gender and by years teaching. The results of the analysis reveal several noteworthy patterns. First, it appears that favorable opinions about the learning experiences in online learning environments are not because faculty are motivated to learn about new technologies per se, but because they want to update their vitas and teaching skills. Second, the results suggest that it may be harder to convince older and more experienced faculty to use new technologies compared to younger and less experienced faculty. These results apply to both male and female faculty and provide practical implications for universities and support services on how to recruit and then support faculty who implement educational technologies.

  15. The Savvy Caregiver Program: A Probe Multicenter Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial in Caregivers of Patients Affected by Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepe-Monti, Micaela; Vanacore, Nicola; Bartorelli, Luisa; Tognetti, Alessandra; Giubilei, Franco

    2016-10-04

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a major cause of disability in the elderly, leading to a considerable burden on caregivers and high costs to society. Psycho-education programs such as the Savvy Caregiver Program (SCP) are reported to be a successful means of reducing caregivers' distress through various intervention strategies. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of the SCP in reducing the burden and psychological symptoms in caregivers of AD patients and to analyze the coping strategies adopted by the caregivers. The study was designed as a multicenter, randomized, controlled, pilot clinical trial. One hundred and sixty-four caregivers of patients with probable AD were randomized. The SCP was structured in six, weekly, two-hour sessions. All the clinical scales were administered before treatment, two weeks and six months after treatment. Caregivers in the SCP group displayed better coping strategies adopted to positive attitudes, and they tended to be less anxious and less depressed than those in the control group. However, caregiver burden levels were not reduced in SCP caregivers. The patients of SCP caregivers received a lower number of new prescriptions of neuroleptics during the 6 months of follow-up than the patients of control caregivers and apathy was the neuropsychiatric symptom that improved most as a result of the SCP. The results of this study suggest that the SCP may improve coping strategies of caregivers of people affected by AD, influencing their psychological symptoms and those of their patients.

  16. Use of iPads to Decrease Faculty Workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, Sarah; Hess, Kari; Peek, Gina

    2016-10-01

    Multiple faculty were present during a simulation for competency assessments of students, thus creating an increased workload and fatigue. Faculty used technology to reduce the workload and maintain interrater reliability, at little to no cost. The use of high-fidelity simulators, tablet computers, and a university video platform were used to record student competency assessments. One faculty member could perform the assessment, but other course faculty could review the results. Seventy-four competency assessments were recorded, and faculty determined that the tablet provided a viable and inexpensive method to record the competency assessments. The ability for faculty to review the recordings helped in maintaining rater and interrater reliability and a method for student remediation. Time spent in the competency assessment, especially during evening hours, was decreased. A tablet computer and video platform provided an inexpensive method to reduce faculty contact hours and maintain interrater reliability. It also provided a valuable method to allow students to review their own performance for remediation. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(10):590-591.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Promoting Interdisciplinary Research among Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Elena; Zhao, Weinan; Reiser, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    With the growing recognition of the importance of interdisciplinary research, many faculty have increased their efforts to form interdisciplinary research teams. Oftentimes, attempts to put together such teams are hampered because faculty have a limited picture of the research interests and expertise of their colleagues. This paper reports on…

  18. Issues and Opportunities on Implementing an Online Faculty Review System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erstad, Brian L; Oxnam, Maliaca G; Miller, Tom P; Draugalis, JoLaine R

    2018-04-01

    Intensifying accountability pressures have led to an increased attention to assessments of teaching, but teaching generally represents only a portion of faculty duties. Less attention has been paid to how evaluations of faculty members can be used to gather data on teaching, research, clinical work, and outreach to integrate clinical and academic contributions and fill in information gaps in strategic areas such as technology transfer and commercialization where universities are being pressed to do more. Online reporting systems can enable departments to gather comprehensive data on faculty activities that can be aggregated for accreditation assessments, program reviews, and strategic planning. As detailed in our case study of implementing such a system at a research university, online annual reviews can also be used to publicize faculty achievements, to document departmental achievements, foster interdisciplinary and community collaborations, recognize service contributions (and disparities), and provide a comprehensive baseline for salary and budgetary investments.

  19. Charting the Course and Tapping the Community: The EDUCAUSE Top Teaching and Learning Challenges 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Julie K.; Page, Carie

    2009-01-01

    Keeping faculty one step ahead of emerging technologies--and providing them with the support to manage what often feels like a rising tide of new tools and learning research--can indeed be difficult. Managing the widening gulf between early adopters and less technologically savvy faculty can be downright frustrating. And then there's the delicate…

  20. Nursing faculty academic incivility: perceptions of nursing students and faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muliira, Joshua K; Natarajan, Jansi; van der Colff, Jacoba

    2017-12-13

    Incivility in nursing education can adversely affect the academic environment, the learning outcomes, and safety. Nursing faculty (NF) and nursing students (NS) contribute to the academic incivility. Little is known about the extent of NF academic incivility in the Middle East region. This study aimed at exploring the perceptions and extent of NF academic incivility in an undergraduate nursing program of a public university in Oman. A cross sectional survey was used to collect data from 155 undergraduate NS and 40 NF about faculty academic incivility. Data was collected using the Incivility in Nursing Education Survey. The majority of NS and NF had similar perceptions about disruptive faculty behaviors. The incidence of faculty incivility was low (Mean = 1.5). The disruptive behaviors with the highest incidence were arriving late for scheduled activities, leaving schedule activities early, cancelling scheduled activities without warning, ineffective teaching styles and methods, and subjective grading. The most common uncivil faculty behaviors reported by participants were general taunts or disrespect to other NF, challenges to other faculty knowledge or credibility, and general taunts or disrespect to NS. The relatively low level of NF academic incivility could still affect the performance of some students, faculty, and program outcomes. Academic institutions need to ensure a policy of zero tolerance to all academic incivility, and regular monitoring and evaluation as part of the prevention strategies.

  1. Faculty and medical student attitudes about preclinical classroom attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazulia, Allyson R; Goldhoff, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have diminished reliance on classroom attendance for mastering preclinical medical school course content, but nonattendance may have unintended consequence on the learning environment. Perceptions among educators and students regarding the value of attendance and implications of nonattendance have not been systematically studied. The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in medical student and faculty attitudes regarding preclinical classroom attendance and the impact of nonattendance on educators and the learning environment. Using Internet-based surveys, we assessed attitudes about preclinical classroom attendance among medical students and teaching faculty at Washington University School of Medicine. Our primary hypothesis was that students would be less likely than faculty to place societal value on attendance and relate it to professionalism. A total of 382 (79%) of 484 eligible students and 248 (64%) of 387 eligible faculty completed the survey. Both groups recognized a negative impact of poor attendance on faculty enthusiasm for teaching (students 83%, faculty 75%), but faculty were significantly more likely to endorse a negative impact on effectiveness of lectures (75% vs. 42%, pattendance and professionalism (88% vs. 68%, pStudents were significantly more likely to support free choice among learning opportunities (90% vs. 41%, pattendance (70% vs. 15%, pstudents tended to view class-going primarily as a tool for learning factual material, whereas many faculty viewed it as serving important functions in the professional socialization process. In this single-center cohort, medical student and teaching faculty attitudes differed regarding the importance of classroom attendance and its relationship to professionalism, findings that were at least partially explained by differing expectations of the purpose of the preclinical classroom experience.

  2. CSIR ScienceScope: Science and technology in support of small, medium and micro enterprises

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available generation of small-scale farmers with business savvy 34 Diversifying the product range of the Tshivhase Tea Estate 36 Supporting the creation of substantive township economic activity 38 CSIR technology stimulating the media and broadcast... and natural remedies. The cooperative is supported by the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform, which contracted the CSIR as an implementation agent for the production facility. See articles on page 28-31 44 54 ENTERPRISE AND SUPPLIER...

  3. Development of future faculty teaching skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penson, J B

    2010-01-01

    Doctoral and postdoctoral students considering a career as an educator would be well served by: (1) training in effective classroom communication skills, (2) the use of existing technology in teaching, (3) developing a new course or updating an existing course, and (4) availing themselves of campus teaching resources designed enhance their teaching portfolio. Universities need to place more attention on developing the teaching skills of their doctoral and postdoctoral students. This should include teaching methods and aids, communication skills, motivation, learning theory, testing, counselling and guidance, and course design. An important dimension from a guidance stand point is the conduct of a formal peer review process for beginning faculty.

  4. 'Uncrunching' time: medical schools' use of social media for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, Peter S; Benjamin, Emelia J; Shanahan, Christopher W

    2013-06-27

    The difficulty of attracting attendance for in-person events is a problem common to all faculty development efforts. Social media holds the potential to disseminate information asynchronously while building a community through quick, easy-to-use formats. The authors sought to document creative uses of social media for faculty development in academic medical centers. In December 2011, the first author (P.S.C.) examined the websites of all 154 accredited medical schools in the United States and Canada for pages relevant to faculty development. The most popular social media sites and searched for accounts maintained by faculty developers in academic medicine were also visited. Several months later, in February 2012, a second investigator (C.W.S.) validated these data via an independent review. Twenty-two (22) medical schools (14.3%) employed at least one social media technology in support of faculty development. In total, 40 instances of social media tools were identified--the most popular platforms being Facebook (nine institutions), Twitter (eight institutions), and blogs (eight institutions). Four medical schools, in particular, have developed integrated strategies to engage faculty in online communities. Although relatively few medical schools have embraced social media to promote faculty development, the present range of such uses demonstrates the flexibility and affordability of the tools. The most popular tools incorporate well into faculty members' existing use of technology and require minimal additional effort. Additional research into the benefits of engaging faculty through social media may help overcome hesitation to invest in new technologies.

  5. Neonatology faculty development using simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Heather M; Hales, Roberta L

    2016-11-01

    The goal of faculty development activities is to supply the public with knowledgeable, skilled, and competent physicians who are prepared for high performance in the dynamic and complex healthcare environment. Current faculty development programs lack evidence-based support and are not sufficient to meet the professional needs of practicing physicians. Simulation activities for faculty development offer an alternative to traditional, teacher-centric educational offerings. Grounded in adult learning theory, simulation is a learner-centric, interactive, efficient, and effective method to train busy professionals. Many of the faculty development needs of clinical neonatologists can be met by participating in simulation-based activities that focus on technical skills, teamwork, leadership, communication, and patient safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Burnout in Female Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy-Vu, Lisa; Beck, Keli; Moore, Justin B

    2017-04-01

    Despite approximately equal numbers of male and female medical school graduates, women are entering academic medicine at a lower rate than their male colleagues. Of those who do assume a faculty position, female faculty members report higher levels of burnout, often attributable to gender-specific difficulties in clinical expectations and maintenance of work-life balance. Many of these struggles are attributable to issues that are amenable to supportive policies, but these policies are inconsistent in their availability and practice. This commentary presents evidence for inconsistencies in the day-to-day experience of female faculty members, and proposes solutions for the mitigation of the challenges experienced more often by female faculty members with the goal of diversifying and strengthening academic medicine.

  7. Faculty Collaboration: How a Wiki Enhanced Communication, Organization, Accessibility, and Management of Writing a Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Vivian H.; Burnham, Joy J.; Hooper, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Faculty members have collaborated on research studies, manuscripts, books, teaching pedagogies, and ideas for years. From exchanging marked-up paper copies to exchanging email attachments, as technology has progressed so have the techniques and methods of collaborating. However, often, faculty adhere to traditional methods of sharing work and thus…

  8. Academic Leadership Forum on Faculty Workload, Engagement, and Development. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    WCET, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A select group of academic officers and deans from institutions (all sectors) whose programs are primarily online and whose teaching faculty differ considerably from traditional faculty participated in the Academic Leadership Forum, October 26, 2011, held in conjunction with WCET's (WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies') Annual Meeting.…

  9. Online Adjunct Faculty: A Quantitative Examination of the Predictive Relationship between Leadership and Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Donald E.

    2018-01-01

    Advances in technology and the rapid expansion and affordability of the internet have helped facilitate the use of online education, or e-learning. To accommodate increased online enrollments, universities are hiring adjunct faculty to teach online courses. Despite the importance of adjunct faculty, there is a lack of research on the experiences…

  10. Gender Differences in Business Faculty's Research Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yining; Zhao, Qin

    2013-01-01

    The authors use expectancy theory to evaluate gender differences in key factors that motivate faculty to conduct research. Using faculty survey data collected from 320 faculty members at 10 business schools, they found that faculty members, both men and women, who displayed higher motivation were more productive in research. Among them, pretenured…

  11. The Vernier System at the Faculty of Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budajová, Kristína; Komová, Eva; Berežný, Štefan; Glaser-Opitz, Henrich

    2017-01-01

    This article describes an educational challenge which was prepared for students at the faculty of Aeronautics, Technical University of Košice. Our goal is to improve the methods of the practical training by introducing modern automation and information technologies to the experiments and to the processing of acquired data. We have updated our…

  12. STEM Faculty and Indirect Costs: What Administrators Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossman, Susan

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this single site, qualitative case study was on public research university STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) faculty and their perspectives on, and behavior towards, indirect cost recovery. The explanatory scheme was derived from anthropological theory and incorporated organizational culture, resource dependency…

  13. Intending the Faculty and its Relation with the City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vande Putte, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the preparation of the idea competition 'Building for Bouwkunde' that was held in 2008. The competition intended entrants to design a replacement building for the lost building of the Faculty of Architecture of the Delft University of Technology, based on the

  14. Faculties brain above altered by the use inappropriate of internet

    OpenAIRE

    Ramirez Restrepo, Luis Miguel; Universidad de manizales

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of the information technologies and communication in general, and Internet in particular, has been multifaceted. This network of computer networks thatshare information, entertainment and marketing has become indispensable for the modern man’s life. Internet, mobile phones, consoles and network occupy a fundamentalspace in the process of socialization, industrialization, globalization and information, influencing the superior brain faculty: attention, memory, learning, behavi...

  15. Extension faculty through use of forage analyses and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For example, during 1986 the National Research Council will release their revised Nutritional Requirements for Dairy Cattle. We will be able to incorporate most of their changes into our. CDA's within a few days; thereby keeping the county faculty as close as possible to the cutting edge of current technology. Extension must ...

  16. The Effect of Multitasking to Faculty Members' Academic Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Bahar

    2013-01-01

    Faculty members in higher education institutions which technology produced in and used actively try to overcome simultaneous one more works because of their intensive works and responsibilities. This study associated simultaneously doing one more academic works to multitasking. Multitasking may have a detrimental effect on academic works since it…

  17. Technology for long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Sunghee H; Benefield, Lazelle E; Mahoney, Diane Feeney

    2010-01-01

    Severe staff shortages in long-term care (LTC) make it difficult to meet the demands of the growing aging population. Further, technology-savvy Baby Boomers are expected to reshape the current institutional environments toward gaining more freedom and control in their care and lives. Voices from business, academia, research, advocacy organizations, and government bodies suggest that innovative technological approaches are the linchpin that may prepare society to cope with these projected demands. In this article, we review the current state of aging-related technology, identify potential areas for efficacy testing on improving the quality of life of LTC residents in future research, and discuss barriers to implementation of LTC technology. Finally, we present a vision of future technology use that could transform current care practices. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Criteria for the selection of a technical platform for WWW-based course support within a faculty.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collis, Betty

    1999-01-01

    Based on experience with the use of telematics applications for course support in a faculty of educational technology, a team responsible for the implementation of more-flexible education within the Faculty of Educational Science and Technology at the University of Twente derived a set of

  19. A national study on the attitudes of Irish dental faculty members to faculty development.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Sullivan, E M

    2010-02-01

    International studies suggest that dental faculty are resistant to the concept and practice of faculty development. This paper analyses the demographic and educational profile of Irish Dental Faculty, exploring their attitudes to educational initiatives.

  20. Data-Savvy School Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavadsky, Heather

    2013-01-01

    A team of 4th-grade teachers in California's Sacramento City Unified School District collaboratively examines student writing products using a rubric that outlines elements in high-quality persuasive writing. The teachers analyze how they taught and assigned the written work in relationship to what the students produced. They focus on what a few…

  1. Technology acceptance perception for promotion of sustainable consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Aindrila; Roy, Mousumi

    2018-03-01

    Economic growth in the past decades has resulted in change in consumption pattern and emergence of tech-savvy generation with unprecedented increase in the usage of social network technology. In this paper, the technology acceptance value gap adapted from the technology acceptance model has been applied as a tool supporting social network technology usage and subsequent promotion of sustainable consumption. The data generated through the use of structured questionnaires have been analyzed using structural equation modeling. The validity of the model and path estimates signifies the robustness of Technology Acceptance value gap in adjudicating the efficiency of social network technology usage in augmentation of sustainable consumption and awareness. The results indicate that subjective norm gap, ease-of-operation gap, and quality of green information gap have the most adversarial impact on social network technology usage. Eventually social networking technology usage has been identified as a significant antecedent of sustainable consumption.

  2. Student narratives of faculty incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasiter, Sue; Marchiondo, Lisa; Marchiondo, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Academic incivility remains a problem on college campuses. Nursing research has refocused from student impropriety to aberrant faculty behaviors. Our original study using the Nursing Education Environment Survey showed that 133 of 152 student participants experienced uncivil treatment. Latent, inductive content analysis was undertaken to analyze narratives about their "worst experience" of negative faculty behavior. Four categories were identified: "In front of someone," "Talked to others about me," "Made me feel stupid," and "I felt belittled." Incivility had a profound effect on students and is problematic because it increases already significant academic pressure; it interferes with learning and safe clinical performance; it is contrary to caring, a central nursing concept; and it decreases program satisfaction and retention. Few nursing schools have civility policies for faculty behavior. Formal procedures that promote professional interaction should be crafted and implemented. Equally important is creating ways for nursing students to document incivility without fear of retaliation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Faculty Toolkit for Formative Assessment in Pharmacy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiVall, Margarita V; Alston, Greg L; Bird, Eleanora; Buring, Shauna M; Kelley, Katherine A; Murphy, Nanci L; Schlesselman, Lauren S; Stowe, Cindy D; Szilagyi, Julianna E

    2014-11-15

    This paper aims to increase understanding and appreciation of formative assessment and its role in improving student outcomes and the instructional process, while educating faculty on formative techniques readily adaptable to various educational settings. Included are a definition of formative assessment and the distinction between formative and summative assessment. Various formative assessment strategies to evaluate student learning in classroom, laboratory, experiential, and interprofessional education settings are discussed. The role of reflective writing and portfolios, as well as the role of technology in formative assessment, are described. The paper also offers advice for formative assessment of faculty teaching. In conclusion, the authors emphasize the importance of creating a culture of assessment that embraces the concept of 360-degree assessment in both the development of a student's ability to demonstrate achievement of educational outcomes and a faculty member's ability to become an effective educator.

  4. Student evaluation of teaching enhances faculty professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betty McDonald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper highlights the role of Web 2.0 technologies in sourcing ongoing information from university students in an effort to assist faculty in their continuous professional development (PD, with the ultimate goal of incrementally improving teaching and learning. On a semester basis, students use an online program called CoursEvals to provide their opinions about the course and its instructor. The collected data are used to inform the content and delivery of faculty PD workshops. The interactive nature of CoursEvals, with Web features that facilitate information sharing and interoperatibility with Blackboard, a learning/course management system, make it ideal for impacting higher education. Students can complete student evaluation of teaching (SEOT online from any location (university, home, mobile, or overseas. This paper underscores the interactive nature of the feedback process that allows faculty, administration, policy makers, and other stakeholders to participate in the ongoing improvement of teaching and learning. We see how Web 2.0 technologies can impact the teaching/learning nexus in higher education, how online forums and Blackboard bulletin boards have helped popularize Web 2.0 technologies, how online social interactions have escalated through wikis, blogs, emails, instant messaging, and audio and video clips, and how faculty can retrieve their personal SEOT at any time and use the information to self- or peer-evaluate at their convenience. Faculty can compare their SEOT over time to determine stability and monitor their classroom effectiveness. They can also address reliability and validity issues and use the information judiciously without making unnecessary generalizations. Researchers will find useful information supporting the impact of Web 2.0 technologies in higher education.

  5. Faculty and student perceptions of effective study strategies and materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Katie J; Bell, Gillian C; Franks, Andrea S

    2011-12-15

    To evaluate faculty members' and students' perceptions of study strategies and materials. Focus groups were conducted with course directors and first- and second-year students to generate ideas relating to use of course materials, technology, class attendance, and study strategies for mastering class concepts. Students and faculty members differed in their opinions about the utility of textbooks and supplemental resources. The main learning method recommended by students and faculty members was repeated review of course material. Students recommended viewing classroom lectures again online, if possible. Course directors reported believing that class attendance is important, but students based their opinions regarding the importance of attendance on their perceptions of lecture and handout quality. Results did not differ by campus or by student group (first-year vs. second-year students). Students and faculty members have differing opinions on the process that could influence learning and course design. Faculty members should understand the strategies students are using to learn course material and consider additional or alternative course design and delivery techniques based on student feedback.

  6. Yüksek Öğrenimde Öğretim Elemanlarının Teknoloji Kabulü ve Kullanımı: Adnan Menderes Üniversitesinde Ampirik Bir Değerlendirme = Faculty's Acceptance and Use of Technology in Higher Education: An Empirical Assessment at Adnan Menderes University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Hamit TURAN, Bengü Emine ÇOLAKOĞLU

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available For more than 20 years, Information Technologies, especially personal computer and Internet have been employed in all phases of our lives, especially in education. In today's globalizing world, borders among countries have been dissolved as qualified workforce would easily travel from one country to another. These developments required higher education institutions to provide education by using the latest techniques and technologies and educate highly qualified individuals with worldwide accredited diplomas and certificates at an increasing pace. In order to have such graduates, first instructors and academicians at higher institutions should use new Information and Communication Technologies effectively and efficiently and to do that, we need to know why these faculty members would use or prefer not to use such technologies as a personal choice. In this study, Davis' (1989 Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, which has strong socio-psychological theoretical foundations, has been empirically tested with the help of data collected at one of the newly established universities in Turkey. The study is among the first that tests the TAM, and the results generally support the theory empirically.

  7. Faculty Desegregation and Student Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jimy M.

    1984-01-01

    In the largest district initially placed under court-ordered faculty desegregation. The influences of teacher turnover, experience, and racial isolation on elementary school student achievement in predominantly minority schools were examined. Findings suggest that poorly planned desegregation policies can have undesirable consequences, especially…

  8. Faculty Rights to Scholarly Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Molly

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides a history of the scholarly publishing system, and explains how it has evolved to benefit corporate publishers to the detriment of faculty, universities, and the public. It offers the open access movement as a potential remedy for the publishing crisis, and the policy environment surrounding these new forms of communication.

  9. Faculty Consulting: Responsibility or Promiscuity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Carol M; Lewis, Darrell R.

    1984-01-01

    The potential benefits--to the individual, the institution, and society--and the potential costs of faculty consulting are examined. A review of the relevant literature and data precedes a presentation of new findings and a taxonomy for developing institutional guidelines. (Author/MLW)

  10. Faculty Development through Cognitive Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Mary Antony

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes a faculty development project in which 12 teacher educators used the Cognitive Coaching model to engage in critical reflections about their teaching. Each identified an aspect of their teaching they wanted to improve and a colleague to serve as coach. Participants engaged in Cognitive Coaching cycles, consisting of planning…

  11. Embedded Neoliberalism within Faculty Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, John S.; Aliyeva, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Although there are claims that neoliberalism has not only commandeered the agenda and actions of universities and colleges but also become identified with the work of academic professionals, there is little empirical evidence to show that neoliberalism has infiltrated the work of faculty. This qualitative field work investigation of three…

  12. Cross-Race Faculty Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Christine A.; Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    2005-01-01

    There are many synonyms for the word "mentor": coach, guide, role model, peer advisor, and sponsor, among others. The plethora of terms would suggest that we know something about this role, but most of the research on mentoring has been conducted in business and industry rather than in education. In fact, junior and senior faculty and…

  13. Blend or not to blend: a study investigating faculty members perceptions of blended teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet A Ocak

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined faculty members’ perceptions of blended teaching from several perspectives. A total of 73 faculty members in Turkish Higher Education context participated in the study by completing an online survey that combined quantitative and qualitative approaches. Based on a data analysis, the faculty members’ perceptions were sorted into six categories: (a satisfaction with blended teaching, (b perceived impact on the role of the faculty, (c perceived impact on student learning, (d perceived impact on student motivation, (e advantages of blended teaching, and (f disadvantages of blended teaching. Findings indicated that faculty members were likely to agree that blended teaching provides a high degree of satisfaction and that it requires more time and commitment from the faculty. The faculty members perceived that blended teaching improves student learning and, to some extent, improves motivation. The faculty members also emphasized the importance of institutional support and the use of technology to mitigate student problems. This study presents these faculty members’ perceptions, which are helpful for those planning to implement a blended teaching approach, and makes suggestions for trouble-shooting and taking advantage of the opportunities in a blended environment successfully.

  14. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  15. Faculty attitudes about interprofessional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Beck Dallaghan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Interprofessional education (IPE is an important component to training health care professionals. Research is limited in exploring the attitudes that faculty hold regarding IPE and what barriers they perceive to participating in IPE. The purpose of this study was to identify faculty attitudes about IPE and to identify barriers to participating in campus-wide IPE activities. Methods: A locally used questionnaire called the Nebraska Interprofessional Education Attitudes Scale (NIPEAS was used to assess attitudes related to interprofessional collaboration. Questions regarding perceived barriers were included at the end of the questionnaire. Descriptive and non-parametric statistics were used to analyze the results in aggregate as well as by college. In addition, open-ended questions were analyzed using an immersion/crystallization framework to identify themes. Results: The results showed that faculty had positive attitudes of IPE, indicating that is not a barrier to participating in IPE activities. Most common barriers to participation were scheduling conflicts (x24,285=19.17, p=0.001, lack of department support (4,285=10.09, p=0.039, and lack of awareness of events (x24,285=26.38, p=0.000. Narrative comments corroborated that scheduling conflicts are an issue because of other priorities. Those who commented also added to the list of barriers, including relevance of the activities, location, and prior negative experiences. Discussion: With faculty attitudes being positive, the exploration of faculty's perceived barriers to IPE was considered even more important. Identifying these barriers will allow us to modify our IPE activities from large, campus-wide events to smaller activities that are longitudinal in nature, embedded within current curriculum and involving more authentic experiences.

  16. Extrinsic versus Intrinsic Motivation in Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, E. Dendy

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the motivation of faculty for effective teaching. Describes five stages in faculty growth and development. Suggests some implications of career phases and motivational studies. Lists 22 references. (YP)

  17. A Corporate Approach to Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Diana

    1988-01-01

    Presents a corporate model for faculty development programs. Reviews corporate training programs, including planning, implementation, and motivations. Discusses the application of these corporate concepts to professional development, instructional development, personal development, and new staff orientation for faculty. (CH)

  18. Teaching of nuclear medicine at medical faculties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dienstbier, Z.

    1987-01-01

    The teaching of nuclear medicine at medical faculties in the CSSR is analyzed. It is shown that the teaching conditions are different at the individual faculties of medicine and the respective conditions are exemplified. (author). 4 tabs

  19. A successful faculty development program for implementing a sociocultural ePortfolio assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Rachel L; Christner, Jennifer; Ross, Paula T; Lypson, Monica L

    2014-02-01

    Portfolios are emerging as a tool for documenting learning progression and assessing competency. ePortfolios are appealing as a portable and fluid means of documenting both learning and relevant experiences in a large number of students. Competence and learning can be especially difficult to document in important aspects of education and training, such as patient-centeredness, the cultural context of disease, and social determinants of health that do not lend themselves to fact-based assessment methods. Successful implementation of a method such as an ePortfolio requires explicit faculty development, as many faculty members have limited expertise with modern educational assessment technology. As part of the authors' introduction of a Sociocultural ePortfolio Assessment Tool in the undergraduate medical curriculum, three faculty development workshops were held to expand faculty skills in using this technology. In addition to gaining comfort using a new Web-based technology, faculty members also needed to develop skills with providing mentored feedback and stimulating student reflection. Workshops were modeled after other successful programs reported in the literature and allowed faculty to develop a structured format for evaluating student content. Faculty members were given multiple opportunities to practice their newly developed skills providing mentored reflections using an ePortfolio. The workshop evaluations were positive, suggesting that faculty participation in the workshops were a necessary component for them to develop sufficient assessment skills for providing mentored reflection. Faculty members who participated in this program-whether or not they had content expertise in sociocultural medicine-valued the hands-on faculty development program.

  20. The 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, J. R.; Karr, G.; Freeman, L. M.; Hassan, R.; Day, J. B. (Compiler)

    2005-01-01

    This is the administrative report for the 2004 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the 40th consecutive year. The NFFP offers science and engineering faculty at U.S. colleges and universities hands-on exposure to NASA s research challenges through summer research residencies and extended research opportunities at participating NASA research Centers. During this program, fellows work closely with NASA colleagues on research challenges important to NASA's strategic enterprises that are of mutual interest to the fellow and the Center. The nominal starting and .nishing dates for the 10-week program were June 1 through August 6, 2004. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and operated under contract by The University of Alabama, The University of Alabama in Huntsville, and Alabama A&M University. In addition, promotion and applications are managed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and assessment is completed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The primary objectives of the NFFP are to: Increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to the Agency s space aeronautics and space science mission. Engage faculty from colleges, universities, and community colleges in current NASA research and development. Foster a greater public awareness of NASA science and technology, and therefore facilitate academic and workforce literacy in these areas. Strengthen faculty capabilities to enhance the STEM workforce, advance competition, and infuse mission-related research and technology content into classroom teaching. Increase participation of underrepresented and underserved faculty and institutions in NASA science and technology.

  1. Relationships between teaching faculty and teaching librarians

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, Linda S

    2014-01-01

    Every librarian who teaches in an academic library setting understands the complexities involved in partnering with teaching faculty. Relationships Between Teaching Faculty and Teaching Librarians recounts the efforts of librarians and faculty working together in disciplines across the board to create and sustain connections crucial to the success of library instruction. This unique collection of essays examines various types of partnerships between librarians and faculty (networking, coordination, and collaboration) and addresses the big issues involved, including teaching within an academic

  2. Drake University Faculty Manual. Revised, Fall 1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake Univ., Des Moines, IA.

    The current Drake University faculty handbook contains information on the organization and administration of the institution including the faculty, the institutional government, the academic staff, academic rank, and academic freedom. Faculty responsibilities and relationships listed include the academic responsibilities and student-teacher…

  3. Perceptions of Faculty Status among Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Quinn; Garrison, Melissa; Hales, Whitney

    2016-01-01

    This study measures the opinions of ARL librarians concerning the benefits and disadvantages of faculty status in academic librarianship. Average responses from faculty and nonfaculty librarians, as well as from tenured and tenure-track librarians, are analyzed to determine the general perceptions of each group. Overall, faculty librarians…

  4. Faculty Desegregation and Student Achievement. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jimy M.

    The priority attached to inner-city student desegregation has often become diminished with the onset of mandatory faculty desegregation. Consequently, students tend to be substantially more segregated than teachers in urban schools. Faculties in predominantly minority schools typically have higher turnover and less experience than faculties in…

  5. Faculty Recruitment in an Era of Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Marilyn; Schimpf, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Faculty recruitment is a challenge for administration and departments, especially in an era of change in the academy. This article builds on information from an interactive conference panel session that focused on faculty recruitment best practices. The article addresses faculty recruitment strategies that focus on the optimization of search…

  6. Faculty Experiences in a Research Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Courtney M.; Kozlowski, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines the experiences of faculty in a research learning community developed to support new faculty in increasing scholarly productivity. A phenomenological, qualitative inquiry was used to portray the lived experiences of faculty within a learning community. Several themes were found including: accountability, belonging,…

  7. Interculturalising the Curriculum: Faculty Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garson, Kyra; Bourassa, Emma; Odgers, Todd

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes faculty perceptions of the impacts of a professional development (PD) programme for faculty called Interculturalising the curriculum. Over 70 faculty members have participated since 2008. Participants in the study represented four cohorts from 2008, 2011, 2012, 2013, from a broad range of academic disciplines. We begin with a…

  8. Faculty Development--An Ounce of Prevention...?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Robert F.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses areas of concern for faculty development in the sciences, including: (1) knowledge of computers, (2) subject matter knowledge; (3) correlation of the delivery of faculty development programs with individual needs, (4) responsibility for science faculty development in terms of available supports. (CS)

  9. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  10. Students Computer Skills in Faculty of Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Caglar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays; the usage of technology is not a privilege but an obligation. Technological developments influence structures andfunctions of educational institutions. It is also expected from the teachers that they integrate technology in their lessons inorder to educate the individuals of information society. This research has covered 145(68 female, 78 male students, studying inNear East University Faculty of Education. The Computer Skills Scale developed by Güçlü (2010 was used as a data collectingtool. Data were analysed using SPSS software program. In this study, students’ computer skills were investigated; the variationsin the relationships between computer skills and (a gender, (b family’s net monthly income, (c presence of computers athome, (d presence of a computer laboratory at school and (e parents’ computer skills were examined. Frequency analysis,percentage and mean calculations were used. In addition, t-test and multi-variate analysis were used to look at the relationshipbetween different variables. As a result of this study, a statistically significant relationship between computer skills of studentswho had a computer at home and computer skills of those who didn’t have a computer at home were found.

  11. Faculty development: a 'field of dreams'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinert, Yvonne; McLeod, Peter J; Boillat, Miriam; Meterissian, Sarkis; Elizov, Michelle; Macdonald, Mary Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Participants in faculty development workshops often comment that 'those who need faculty development the most attend the least'. The goals of this study were to explore the reasons why some clinical teachers do not participate in centralised faculty development activities and to learn how we can make faculty development programmes more relevant to teachers' needs. In 2006, we conducted focus groups with 16 clinical teachers, who had not participated in faculty development activities, to ascertain their perceptions of faculty development, reasons for non-participation and perceived barriers to involvement. Content analysis and team consensus guided the data interpretation. Focus group participants were aware of faculty development offerings and valued the goals of these activities. Important reasons for non-participation emerged: clinical reality, which included volume of work and lack of (protected) time; logistical issues, such as timing and the central location of organised activities; a perceived lack of financial reward and recognition for teaching, and a perceived lack of direction from, and connection to, the university. Clinical reality and logistical issues appeared to be greater deterrents to participation than faculty development goals, content or strategies. Moreover, when asked to discuss faculty development, teachers referred to their development as faculty members in the broadest sense, which included personal and career development. They also expressed the desire for clear guidance from the university, financial rewards and recognition for teaching, and a sense of 'belonging'. Faculty development programmes should try to address these organisational issues as well as teachers' personal and professional needs.

  12. Exploring Nurse Faculty Incivility and Resonant Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Katherine R

    The purpose of this quantitative correlational study was to explore the relationship between the frequency of interfaculty incivility among nurses in academia and observed levels of resonant leadership of immediate supervisors. Despite mandates to address incivility in health care, nurse faculty report high levels of horizontal incivility among their peers. No known quantitative research has measured the relationship between nurse faculty-to-faculty incivility and resonant leadership traits of leaders. Nursing faculty from 17 universities (n = 260) were emailed an anonymous link to answer survey questions about horizontal peer incivility and leaders' management styles. There was a significant inverse relationship (Pearson's r, -.560) between the frequency of experienced faculty-to-faculty incivility and the level of observed resonant leadership behaviors of participants' immediate supervisors. Resonant supervisory behaviors inversely correlated with nurse faculty peer incivility, with potential to impact satisfaction, recruitment, and retention.

  13. A Survey of Family Medicine Department Chairs About Faculty With Disabilities: A CERA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churgay, Catherine A; Smith, Mindy A; Woodard, Laurie; Wallace, Lorraine S

    2015-01-01

    Despite 21 million US adults having a disability, little is known about the types of disabilities among faculty in family medicine departments, accommodations used, or work limitations. We surveyed family medicine department chairs electronically about the number, types of disabilities encountered, accommodations and associated costs, and attitudes toward family medicine faculty with disabilities. This 10-item survey was part of the Council of Academic Family Medicine Educational Research Alliance omnibus survey. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. The survey response rate was 59% (88/148). Types of disabilities were reported for approximately 50 faculty members by 31 department chairs; only seven knew about the disability at hiring. The most common impairments were mobility, hearing, and mental health problems. Accommodations included adjusting schedules, additional time to meet tasks, and assistive technology. No additional costs were reported for accommodations by about one-third of respondents while costs were over $5,000 for approximately one-quarter. Most chairs reported that faculty performance was similar to peers without disabilities (42.2%) or adequate but not at the level of peers (40%); only one reported inadequate job performance. Faculty members with disabilities appeared to be accepted by peers, patients, learners, and staff, and only two faculty left their program because of the disability. Most chairs did not report experience with faculty members with disabilities. The disabilities encountered and accommodations were not unusual, but costs were sometimes high. While about half of chairs reported adequate or superior job performance for their faculty with disabilities, a sizeable minority judged such faculty to have poorer performance than peers despite reporting wide acceptance of faculty with disabilities by patients and colleagues. This study raises concerns about potential underreporting by faculty with disabilities and poorer

  14. Iowa community college Science, Engineering and Mathematics (SEM) faculty: Demographics and job satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogotzke, Kathy

    Community college faculty members play an increasingly important role in the educational system in the United States. However, over the past decade, concerns have arisen, especially in several high demand fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), that a shortage of qualified faculty in these fields exists. Furthermore, the average age of community college faculty is increasing, which creates added concern of an increased shortage of qualified faculty due to a potentially large number of faculty retiring. To help further understand the current population of community college faculty, as well as their training needs and their satisfaction with their jobs, data needs to be collected from them and examined. Currently, several national surveys are given to faculty at institutions of higher education, most notably the Higher Education Research Institute Faculty Survey, the National Study of Postsecondary Faculty, and the Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement. Of these surveys the Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement is the only survey focused solely on community college faculty. This creates a problem because community college faculty members differ from faculty at 4-year institutions in several significant ways. First, qualifications for hiring community college faculty are different at 4-year colleges or universities. Whereas universities and colleges typically require their faculty to have a Ph.D., community colleges require their arts and science faculty to have a only master's degree and their career faculty to have experience and the appropriate training and certification in their field with only a bachelor's degree. The work duties and expectations for community college faculty are also different at 4-year colleges or universities. Community college faculty typically teach 14 to 19 credit hours a semester and do little, if any research, whereas faculty at 4-year colleges typically teach 9 to 12 credit

  15. Spaced education faculty development may not improve faculty teaching performance ratings in a surgery department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernar, Luise I M; Beleniski, Florencia; Rosen, Heather; Lipsitz, Stuart; Hafler, Janet; Breen, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of spaced education as a faculty development tool designed to improve teaching skills in a surgery department. Faculty members were randomized to receive either weekly spaced education e-mails with content designed to improve teaching skills (group A) or no e-mails (group B). Using qualitative and quantitative surveys, we assessed both medical students' perception of faculty members' teaching effectiveness and faculty members' perception of the usefulness of the spaced education e-mails. Academic medical center. Twenty-nine surgery faculty members with teaching responsibility for medical students in their Core Surgery Clerkship. All 41 medical students who rotated through the Core Surgery Clerkship rated the quality of teaching for each faculty members; 172 online rating surveys were completed. Overall, faculty members received high ratings on the teaching skills included on the surveys. Additionally, no significant differences were found between the perceived skill level of the faculty members who received the weekly e-mails and those who did not. Specifically, 53.8% and 54% (p = 0.47) of the faculty were felt to deliver feedback more than three times per week; 87.1% and 89.9% (p = 0.15) of faculty were felt to deliver useful feedback; 89.2% and 90.8% (p = 0.71) of faculty were perceived to encourage student autonomy; and 78.1% and 81.9% (p = 0.89) of faculty were felt to set clear learning expectations for students. Postprogram comments from faculty revealed they did not find the e-mails useful as a faculty development tool. Students perceived high levels of teaching skills among the clinical faculty. Faculty members who received e-mail-based spaced education-based faculty development were not rated to be more effective teachers on the student surveys. Electronically based faculty development does not satisfy faculty expectations. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  16. ‘Uncrunching’ time: medical schools’ use of social media for faculty development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter S. Cahn

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The difficulty of attracting attendance for in-person events is a problem common to all faculty development efforts. Social media holds the potential to disseminate information asynchronously while building a community through quick, easy-to-use formats. The authors sought to document creative uses of social media for faculty development in academic medical centers. Method: In December 2011, the first author (P.S.C. examined the websites of all 154 accredited medical schools in the United States and Canada for pages relevant to faculty development. The most popular social media sites and searched for accounts maintained by faculty developers in academic medicine were also visited. Several months later, in February 2012, a second investigator (C.W.S. validated these data via an independent review. Results: Twenty-two (22 medical schools (14.3% employed at least one social media technology in support of faculty development. In total, 40 instances of social media tools were identified – the most popular platforms being Facebook (nine institutions, Twitter (eight institutions, and blogs (eight institutions. Four medical schools, in particular, have developed integrated strategies to engage faculty in online communities. Conclusions: Although relatively few medical schools have embraced social media to promote faculty development, the present range of such uses demonstrates the flexibility and affordability of the tools. The most popular tools incorporate well into faculty members’ existing use of technology and require minimal additional effort. Additional research into the benefits of engaging faculty through social media may help overcome hesitation to invest in new technologies.

  17. Experiences of faculty and students using an audience response system in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christine M; Monturo, Cheryl; Conroy, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The advent of innovative technologies, such as the audience response system, provides an opportunity to engage students and enhance learning. Based on their experiences, three nursing faculty evaluated the use of an audience response system in four distinct nursing courses through the use of informal survey results. When using the audience response system, the faculty experienced an increased perception of student attentiveness and engagement, high level of class attendance, and enhanced learning. Faculty feelings were mixed concerning the burden in adapting to increased classroom time and increased preparation time. Students' perception of the value of audience response system use was mostly positive, except when responses were included as part of the grade. The majority of the students indicated that use of the audience response system enhanced learning and was a helpful learning method when used with NCLEX-style questions. Overall, faculty believed that the benefits of student engagement and enhanced learning outweighed the burdens of incorporating this new technology in the classroom.

  18. Motivational Factors Affecting the Integration of a Learning Management System by Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia Gautreau

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Online courses taught using a learning management system are common in higher education. Teaching online requires a new set of skills, knowledge, and professional growth. Faculty development programs often overlook factors that promote or inhibit the use of technologies among professors. This study identified the motivation factors that faculty consider relevant to their personal decision to adopt a learning management system. A needs assessment evaluation methodology was applied to investigate two research questions. The first question analyzed the demographics of the participants in this study including gender, age, tenure status, department, and years of experience using a technology and using an LMS. The second research question investigated the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that motivate faculty to adopt a learning management system in their instruction. Participants (N = 42 were tenured and tenure track faculty instructing at a four-year public university in California.

  19. Faculty development programs for medical teachers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANJAY ZODPEY

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: India has the highest number of medical colleges in the world and subsequently the higher number of medical teachers. There is a dire need of adopting a systematic approach to faculty development to enhance quality education to meet health challenges for 21st Century. This manuscript provides a landscape of faculty development programs in India, identifying gaps and opportunities for reforms in faculty development. Methods: Conventionally, FDPs are organized by medical colleges and universities through Basic Courses and Advanced Courses focusing on pedagogy. Medical Council of India is facilitating FDPs through 18 selected regional centers to enable medical teachers to avail modern education technology for teaching from July 2009. Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research has three Regional Institutes in India. Results: Recommendations include the need for formulating a national strategy for faculty development to not only enhance the quantity of medical teachers but also the quality of medical education; providing support for Departments of Medical Education/Regional Centers in terms of finance and staffing and incorporation of teaching skills in postgraduate training. Conclusion: Distance learning courses focusing on educational leadership and pedagogy for medical teachers can be an option to reach a wider audience. FDPs can be an asset in recruiting and retaining teachers as they offer valued professional development opportunities.

  20. The 2003 NASA Faculty Fellowship Program Research Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash-Stevenson, S. K.; Karr, G.; Freeman, L. M.; Bland, J. (Editor)

    2004-01-01

    For the 39th consecutive year, the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program (NFFP) was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center. The program was sponsored by NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC, and operated under contract by The University of Alabama in Huntsville. In addition, promotion and applications are managed by the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) and assessment is completed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA). The nominal starting and finishing dates for the 10-week program were May 27 through August 1, 2003. The primary objectives of the NASA Faculty Fellowship Program are to: (1) Increase the quality and quantity of research collaborations between NASA and the academic community that contribute to NASA s research objectives; (2) provide research opportunities for college and university faculty that serve to enrich their knowledge base; (3) involve students in cutting-edge science and engineering challenges related to NASA s strategic enterprises, while providing exposure to the methods and practices of real-world research; (4) enhance faculty pedagogy and facilitate interdisciplinary networking; (5) encourage collaborative research and technology transfer with other Government agencies and the private sector; and (6) establish an effective education and outreach activity to foster greater awareness of this program.

  1. Doing it my way: old women, technology and wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loe, Meika

    2010-02-01

    This article focuses on women in their nineties (nonagenarians) who are ageing in place - or ageing at home - in upstate New York. I analyse these old women's use of everyday technological tools to care for themselves and construct meaning. I argue that despite what we may expect, nonagenarian women can be and are technogenarians in their active and creative uses of everyday technologies. Old women utilise lifelong care work repertoires to identify, adjust, use and reject old and new technologies for their own everyday mobility, communication, nourishment, and physiological health. Perhaps most importantly techno-savvy elders can maintain and achieve health and wellbeing, associated here with bodily comfort, social networks, self-efficacy and intellectual life, in and beyond their homes. In these ways, nonagenarians can teach us how household technologies can be health and ageing technologies; instruments of continuity and control; or just the opposite.

  2. Keeping learning central: a model for implementing emerging technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irmgard U. Willcockson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Felt problem: Technology integration continues to be a challenge for health science faculty. While students expect emerging technologies to be used in the classroom, faculty members desire a strategic process to incorporate technology for the students’ benefit. Our solution: We have developed a model that provides faculty a strategy for integrating emerging technologies into the classroom. The model is grounded in student learning and may be applied to any technology. We present the model alongside examples from faculty who have used it to incorporate technology into their health sciences classrooms.

  3. Keeping learning central: a model for implementing emerging technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcockson, Irmgard U; Phelps, Cynthia L

    2010-01-15

    FELT PROBLEM: Technology integration continues to be a challenge for health science faculty. While students expect emerging technologies to be used in the classroom, faculty members desire a strategic process to incorporate technology for the students' benefit. OUR SOLUTION: We have developed a model that provides faculty a strategy for integrating emerging technologies into the classroom. The model is grounded in student learning and may be applied to any technology. We present the model alongside examples from faculty who have used it to incorporate technology into their health sciences classrooms.

  4. The research impact of school psychology faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Marley W; Chan-Park, Christina Y

    2015-06-01

    Hirsch's (2005) h index has become one of the most popular indicators of research productivity for higher education faculty. However, the h index varies across academic disciplines so empirically established norms for each discipline are necessary. To that end, the current study collected h index values from Scopus and Google Scholar databases for 401 tenure-track faculty members from 109 school psychology training programs. Male faculty tended to be more senior than female faculty and a greater proportion of the male faculty held professorial rank. However, female faculty members outnumbered males at the assistant and associate professor ranks. Although strongly correlated (rho=.84), h index values from Google Scholar were higher than those from Scopus. h index distributions were positively skewed with many faculty having low values and a few faculty having high values. Faculty in doctoral training programs exhibited significantly larger h index values than faculty in specialist training programs and there were univariate differences in h index values across academic rank and sex, but sex differences were not significant after taking seniority into account. It was recommended that the h index be integrated with peer review and diverse other indicators when considering individual merit. Copyright © 2015 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cultivating adjunct faculty: strategies beyond orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santisteban, Lisette; Egues, Aida L

    2014-01-01

    Schools of nursing across the country are using adjunct faculty to meet clinical, didactic, and online instructional needs of their nursing programs. While adjunct faculty are vital to the alleviation of the nursing shortage and the shortage of nursing faculty, and to the preparation of the current and future nursing workforce, little is known about cultivating adjunct faculty as nurse educators. To investigate the cultivation of adjunct nursing faculty, the authors engaged in a comprehensive review of the extant literature of primary databases and reports from accredited nursing programs and professional nursing organizations. Scant literature exists that seeks to identify issues associated with developing adjunct nursing faculty as educators, including role transition needs, and useful approaches to orientation, mentorship, or retention. Working toward cultivation of adjunct faculty includes innovative support measures beyond simple orientation. Orientation should be comprehensive, and move to mentorship as a key component that helps establish a sustainable nurse educator career for adjunct nursing faculty. It is incumbent upon schools of nursing to cultivate their adjunct faculty, and this article includes creative approaches to doing so, with recommendations for nursing education, nursing practice, and nursing research settings. While adjunct faculty may successfully meet some of the challenges faced by nursing programs, they themselves face many challenges that may hinder their success as nurse educators. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Preparing Mathematics Teachers for Technology-Rich Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdivant, Rodney X.; Dunham, Penelope; Jardine, Richard

    2009-01-01

    This article describes key elements for faculty development programs to prepare mathematics teachers for technology-rich environments. We offer practical examples from our experiences in teaching mathematics with technology and in teaching others to incorporate technology-based pedagogies. We address challenges faced by faculty using technology,…

  7. Communication and Cultural Change in University Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David

    2013-01-01

    Faculty culture and communication networks are pivotal components of technology transfer on university campuses. Universities are focused upon diffusing technology to external clients and upon building structure and support systems to enhance technology transfer. However, engaging faculty members in technology transfer requires an internal…

  8. Predicting the Probability for Faculty Adopting an Audience Response System in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Fung Ivan Chan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Instructional technologies can be effective tools to foster student engagement, but university faculty may be reluctant to integrate innovative and evidence-based modern learning technologies into instruction. Based on Rogers’ diffusion of innovation theory, this quantitative, nonexperimental, one-shot cross-sectional survey determined what attributes of innovation (relative advantage, compatibility, complexity, trialability, and observability predict the probability of faculty adopting the audience response system (ARS into instruction. The sample of the study consisted of 201 faculty at a university in the southeastern United States. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to determine the attributes of innovation that predict the probability of faculty adopting the ARS into instruction. Out of the five attributes, compatibility and trialability made significant contributions to the model. The implication of the findings is that, in order to maximize adoption, the faculty needs to be given the opportunity to pre-test the ARS prior to implementation, and they need to know how the technology will assist them in achieving their pedagogical goals. Recommendations were made to leverage these attributes to foster faculty adoption of the ARS into instruction.

  9. What Are the Best Approaches for Encouraging the Diffusion of a New Instructional Technology among Faculty Members in Higher Education? a Look at Eportfolio Use at Stony Brook University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardasz, Sara M.

    2013-01-01

    This article will summarize and explain the Diffusion of Innovations Theory put forth by Everett M. Rogers (2003). It will then share some of the other research that has been conducted relevant to diffusion, especially those researchers who have looked at the diffusion of instructional technology in higher education. It will consider criticisms of…

  10. Assessing faculty professional development in STEM higher education: Sustainability of outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derting, Terry L; Ebert-May, Diane; Henkel, Timothy P; Maher, Jessica Middlemis; Arnold, Bryan; Passmore, Heather A

    2016-03-01

    We tested the effectiveness of Faculty Institutes for Reforming Science Teaching IV (FIRST), a professional development program for postdoctoral scholars, by conducting a study of program alumni. Faculty professional development programs are critical components of efforts to improve teaching and learning in the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) disciplines, but reliable evidence of the sustained impacts of these programs is lacking. We used a paired design in which we matched a FIRST alumnus employed in a tenure-track position with a non-FIRST faculty member at the same institution. The members of a pair taught courses that were of similar size and level. To determine whether teaching practices of FIRST participants were more learner-centered than those of non-FIRST faculty, we compared faculty perceptions of their teaching strategies, perceptions of environmental factors that influence teaching, and actual teaching practice. Non-FIRST and FIRST faculty reported similar perceptions of their teaching strategies and teaching environment. FIRST faculty reported using active learning and interactive engagement in lecture sessions more frequently compared with non-FIRST faculty. Ratings from external reviewers also documented that FIRST faculty taught class sessions that were learner-centered, contrasting with the teacher-centered class sessions of most non-FIRST faculty. Despite marked differences in teaching practice, FIRST and non-FIRST participants used assessments that targeted lower-level cognitive skills. Our study demonstrated the effectiveness of the FIRST program and the empirical utility of comparison groups, where groups are well matched and controlled for contextual variables (for example, departments), for evaluating the effectiveness of professional development for subsequent teaching practices.

  11. Predicting the Probability for Faculty Adopting an Audience Response System in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tan Fung Ivan; Borja, Marianne; Welch, Brett; Batiuk, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Instructional technologies can be effective tools to foster student engagement, but university faculty may be reluctant to integrate innovative and evidence-based modern learning technologies into instruction. Based on Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory, this quantitative, nonexperimental, one-shot cross-sectional survey determined what…

  12. Attitudes towards students who plagiarize: a dental hygiene faculty perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-Bhakta, Hemali G; Muzzin, Kathleen B; Dewald, Janice P; Campbell, Patricia R; Buschang, Peter H

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine baccalaureate dental hygiene faculty members' attitudes and practices regarding student plagiarism. An email containing a link to a thirty-two-item survey was sent to fifty-two baccalaureate dental hygiene program directors in the United States; thirty of those agreed for their faculty members to participate. Of the 257 faculty members who received the survey link, 106 completed the survey, for a response rate of 41.2 percent. The responding faculty members reported thinking plagiarism is a rising concern in their dental hygiene programs (54.5 percent, 54/99). The majority said they check for plagiarism on student class assignment/projects (67.1 percent, 53/79). For those who did not check for plagiarism, 45.8 percent (11/24) stated it took "too much time to check" or it was "too hard to prove" (16.6 percent, 4/24). The most frequent form of student plagiarism observed by the respondents was "copying directly from a source electronically" (78.0 percent, 39/50). Most respondents reported checking for plagiarism through visual inspection (without technological assistance) (73.0 percent, 38/52). Of those who said they use plagiarism detection software/services, 44.4 percent (16/36) always recommended their students use plagiarism detection software/services to detect unintentional plagiarism. For those faculty members who caught students plagiarizing, 52.9 percent (27/51) reported they "always or often" handled the incident within their dental hygiene department, and 76.5 percent (39/51) said they had never reported the student's violation to an academic review board.

  13. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L; Saltzman, Bryan M; Chalmers, Peter N; Frank, Rachel M; Cole, Brian J; Bach, Bernard R

    2016-12-01

    Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Descriptive epidemiology study. Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [ h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine-fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers ( P Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy per faculty member ( P sports medicine fellowship faculty. Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest regions and at programs with a larger number of fellows.

  14. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. Purpose: To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Characteristics of orthopaedic sports medicine fellowship programs were obtained from the AOSSM and program websites. Metrics of academic productivity (Hirsch index [h index], I-10 index, publications, citations, and number of publications in several journals) were obtained from Scopus. Statistical analyses were conducted to determine whether academic productivity differs with fellowship attributes and academic rank. Results: A total of 90 AOSSM sports medicine fellowship programs with 610 associated faculty members were identified. Faculty were predominantly male (94%), at academic medical centers (74%), members of AOSSM (71%), and sports medicine–fellowship trained (84%). Faculty had a median of 18 (range, 0-684) publications overall, including a median of 3 (range, 0-161) publications since 2012. All measures of academic productivity were significantly higher among faculty employed at academic medical centers compared with those not employed at academic centers (P Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy per faculty member (P sports medicine fellowship faculty. Research productivity was higher among faculty employed at academic centers in the Northeast and Midwest regions and at programs with a larger number of fellows. PMID:28210650

  15. Faculty-Student Collaboration: Issues and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeline L. Barretta-Herman

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This exploratory qualitative study of 11 social work faculty identified the benefits and risks of faculty-student collaboration. Benefits articulated include helping students learn to write for publication, learning the publication process, getting innovative student material published, and enriching the project through shared problem-solving. The benefits, however, must be weighed against the risks of exploitation of the student collaborator. Successful faculty-student collaboration in this dual relationship demands that faculty take responsibility for safeguarding boundaries, following the NASW Code of Ethics, and openly negotiating roles, tasks, workload, and order of authorship with the student.

  16. Education Faculty Students' Views About Use of E-Books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat YALMAN

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parallel to technological developments, numerous new tools are now available for people’s use. Societies adapt these tools to their professional lives by learning how to use them. In this way, they try to establish more comfortable working environments. Universities giving vocational education are supposed to teach these new technologies to their students to help them become successful in their future profession. Books that serve as the basic sources of information for education faculty students are increasingly being transformed into e-books parallel to these new technologies. In line with these developments, identifying students’ approaches and preferences regarding e-book could help determine the needs regarding this type of new technologies. In line with this purpose, the present study aimed at determining the views and preferences of preservice teachers regarding e-book as well as their levels of general knowledge about this technology. The participants of the study were 1179 students attending an education faculty (660 female, 519 male. In the study, qualitative and quantitative methods were used together. The results revealed that the students did not have sufficient knowledge about e-book and that they regarded any digital source on the Internet as e-book. Of all the participating preservice teachers, only 6% of them had sufficient knowledge about e-book.

  17. Does formal mentoring for faculty members matter? A survey of clinical faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylona, Elza; Brubaker, Linda; Williams, Valerie N; Novielli, Karen D; Lyness, Jeffrey M; Pollart, Susan M; Dandar, Valerie; Bunton, Sarah A

    2016-06-01

    Mentoring relationships, for all medical school faculty members, are an important component of lifelong development and education, yet an understanding of mentoring among medical school clinical faculty members is incomplete. This study examined associations between formal mentoring relationships and aspects of faculty members' engagement and satisfaction. It then explored the variability of these associations across subgroups of clinical faculty members to understand the status of mentoring and outcomes of mentoring relationships. The authors hypothesised that academic clinical faculty members currently in formal mentoring relationships experience enhanced employee engagement and satisfaction with their department and institution. Medical school faculty members at 26 self-selected USA institutions participated in the 2011-2014 Faculty Forward Engagement Survey. Responses from clinical faculty members were analysed for relationships between mentoring status and perceptions of engagement by faculty members. Of the 11 953 clinical faculty respondents, almost one-third reported having a formal mentoring relationship (30%; 3529). Most mentored faculty indicated the relationship was important (86%; n = 3027), and over three-fourths were satisfied with their mentoring experience (77%; n = 2722). Mentored faculty members across ranks reported significantly higher levels of satisfaction and more positive perceptions of their roles in the organisation. Faculty members who were not receiving mentoring reported significantly less satisfaction with their workplace environment and lower overall satisfaction. Mentored clinical faculty members have significantly greater satisfaction with their department and institution. This multi-institutional study provides evidence that fostering mentoring opportunities may facilitate faculty members' satisfaction and engagement, which, in turn, may help medical schools retain high-quality faculty staff committed to the multidimensional

  18. Concerns and professional development needs of science faculty at Taibah University in adopting blended learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sarrani, Nauaf

    two revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between science faculty's use of technology in teaching by department and their attitudes towards technology integration in the Science curriculum. Lambda MANOVA test result was sig =.019 at the alpha = .05 level. Follow up ANOVA result indicated that Chemistry department was significant in the use of computer-based technology (sig =.049) and instructional technology use (sig =.041). Therefore, null hypothesis 2.1 was rejected (There are no statistically significant differences between science faculty's attitudes towards technology integration in the Science curriculum and faculty's use of technology in teaching by department). The data also revealed that there was no statistically significant difference (pblended learning concerns comments (question 36, which had 10 units), professional development activities, support, or incentive requested (question 74, which had 28 units), and the most important professional development activities, support, or incentive (question 75, which had 37 units). These questions yielded 75 units, 23 categories and 8 themes that triangulated with the quantitative data. These 8 themes were then combined to obtain overall themes for all qualitative questions in the study. The two most important themes were "Professional development" with three categories; Professional development through workshops (10 units), Workshops (10 units), Professional development (5 units) and the second overall theme was "Technical support" with two categories: Internet connectivity (4 units), and Technical support (4 units). Finally, based on quantitative and qualitative data, the summary, conclusions, and recommendations for Taibah University regarding faculty adoption of BL in teaching were presented. The recommendations for future studies focused on Science faculty Level of Use and technology use in Saudi universities.

  19. Transferring learning from faculty development to the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Kim Z

    2014-12-01

    This study’s purpose was to better understand the transfer of learning by uncovering how various factors supported the integration of health information technology knowledge and skills gleaned from the Health Resources and Services Administration–funded faculty development programs into nursing education curricula. Through interviews with 20 participants from four programs, this study confirmed the importance of findings related to faculty, program, and work environment characteristics for supporting successful transfer of learning and substantiates a variety of other transfer-of-learning research. New or seldom discussed supportive individual characteristics were found, including leadership abilities, lifelong learning, ability to recognize limitations, persistence, creativity, and risk taking. The importance of networking, diversity of perspectives, postconference support, and teams in program designs were found to positively influence transfer. The variety of supportive factors and barriers in the participants’ work environments strengthens the assertions that transfer may be context dependent. Findings provided insight for recommendations to improve learning transfer. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. E-books: nurse faculty use and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Cathy H; Garrett-Wright, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify nurse educators' stage of concern regarding e-books and examine relationships between stage of concern and demographic variables. The use of e-books is growing, and nursing faculty must be prepared to use this evolving technology. A descriptive design was used with a convenience sample of 50 nurse educators attending a professional conference. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and the Stages of Concern (SoC) questionnaire. Sixty-four percent of participants' first high stage was Stage 0 (awareness); 22 percent had a first high stage of Stage 1 (informational). Using ordinal regression, no statistical significance was noted with the highest Stage of Concern and age (p = .431) or experience as a nurse educator (p = .893). Findings indicate low usage, faculty concerns, and the need for ongoing education regarding e-books.

  1. The Experiences of Vietnamese University Faculty in Relation to Their Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong, Tam T.; McLean, Gary N.

    2016-01-01

    As Vietnam higher education has explored ways to integrate into the international community, professional development of faculty is becoming a key element. However, there is a significant shortage of faculty development (FD) in Vietnam, resulting in a large gap in quality, quantity, and qualifications between Vietnamese faculty and their…

  2. Lodestar of the Faculty: The Increasingly Important Role of Dean of Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilian, Fred

    2012-01-01

    In the tight budget atmosphere of recent years, schools may have chosen to do without a dean of faculty or, at best, to double- hat another middle manager with this responsibility. This is a mistake. That all private schools do not have a dedicated dean of faculty suggests a lack of emphasis on the very component of the school--the faculty--that…

  3. Administrative Hierarchy and Faculty Work: Examining Faculty Satisfaction with Academic Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Michael T.; Mamiseishvili, Ketevan; Lee, Donghun

    2016-01-01

    Academic administrators at all levels have some impact on the performance of faculty members, yet each level of administration may interact differently with faculty. Literature has strongly supported the notion that department chairs, deans, and provosts can positively influence the performance and livelihood of faculty members. This study was…

  4. Mid-Career Faculty Development in Academic Medicine: How Does It Impact Faculty and Institutional Vitality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, MaryAnn W.; Bhasin, Robina M.; Beaudette, Donald J.; Shann, Mary H.; Benjamin, Emelia J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Faculty vitality is integral to the advancement of higher education. Strengthening vitality is particularly important for midcareer faculty, who represent the largest and most dissatisfied segment. The demands of academic medicine appear to be another factor that may put faculty at risk of attrition. To address these issues, we initiated…

  5. Faculty Perspectives on International Education: The Nested Realities of Faculty Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Joanne; Mitsunaga, Rikki

    2010-01-01

    Even though faculty are obviously vital to the work of internationalizing academia, "surprisingly little work has been published that addresses the roles, responsibilities, and problems faced by faculty on an operational level" (Dewey and Duff 2009, p. 491). This chapter examines the motivations, supports, and barriers faculty are facing…

  6. Research Resources Survey: Radiology Junior Faculty Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupinski, Elizabeth A; Votaw, John R

    2015-07-01

    To assess resources available to junior faculty in US academic radiology departments for research mentorship and funding opportunities and to determine if certain resources are more common in successful programs. An anonymous survey covering scientific environment and research mentorship and was sent to vice-chairs of research of radiology departments. Results were evaluated to identify practices of research programs with respect to mentorship, resources, and opportunities. Academy of Radiology Research's 2012 National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants and awards list was used to determine if environment and practices correlate with funding. There was a 51% response rate. A greater fraction of clinical faculty gets promoted from assistant to associate professor than research faculty. Research faculty overall submits more funding applications. Most programs support start-up costs and K-awards. Over half of the departments have a vice-chair for faculty development, and most have formal mentorship programs. Faculty members are expected to teach, engage in service, publish, and apply for and get research funding within 3 years of hire. Top-tier programs as judged by NIH awards have a combination of MDs who devote >50% effort to research and PhD faculty. Key factors holding back both clinical and research junior faculty development were motivation, resources, and time, although programs reported high availability of resources and support at the department level. Better marketing of resources for junior faculty, effort devoted to mentoring clinical faculty in research, and explicit milestones/expectations for achievement could enhance junior faculty success, promote interest in the clinician–scientist career path for radiologists, and lead to greater research success.

  7. The Readiness of Sorsogon State College Faculty for Teaching with ICT: Basis for a Faculty Training Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine A. De Castro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Information and communication technologies (ICT such as computers, multimedia systems, productivity software, and the Internet have greatly improved the performance of different organizations and influenced higher learning institutions like Sorsogon State College (SSC to develop and implement innovative teaching and learning methods. However, despite the many benefits of ICT when used in education, there are still faculty members who do not use these technologies for teaching. Hence, this research was conducted to assess their readiness for teaching with ICT. Findings revealed that most of the surveyed respondents were above forty-five years old, have 1-10 years of government service, and have specialization in the field of education. In terms of readiness to teach with ICT, the results disclosed that they were fairly ready along human-resource readiness, ready along technological skill readiness, and much ready along equipment readiness. Their age was not significantly related to their human resource readiness but significantly related to their technological skill and equipment readiness. The respondents’ number of years in the government was significantly related to their readiness to teach with ICT in terms of human resource, technological skill, and equipment readiness. Their field of specialization was not significantly related to their readiness to teach with ICT. Among the most identified factors why some of them do not use ICT resources were unavailability of ICT resources, lack of knowledge and lack of familiarity to ICT. The output of this research is a faculty training program to enhance their know

  8. Influencing Academic Motivation: The Effects of Student-Faculty Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolian, Teniell L.; Jach, Elizabeth A.; Hanson, Jana M.; Pascarella, Ernest T.

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education, we examined the influence of student-faculty interactions on student academic motivation over 4 years of college. Results suggest that several forms of student-faculty interaction, such as quality of faculty contact, frequency of faculty contact, research with faculty, personal…

  9. Successful enculturation: strategies for retaining newly hired nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazza, Elizabeth A; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Although the nursing faculty shortage negatively impacts student enrollment figures, it also facilitates career mobility of nursing faculty. To retain qualified faculty, nursing programs need to implement supportive programs that facilitate successful enculturation of the newly hired faculty member. The authors propose a series of supportive activities aimed at enculturation and subsequent retention of newly hired nursing faculty.

  10. How to Evaluate a Faculty Governance Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, John W.; Dunbar, David; Gingerich, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    During the 2010-11 academic year, Cabrini College began an evaluation of a faculty governance structure that had been implemented in fall 2007. The processes involved might serve as a roadmap for faculty members and administrators at other institutions who seek to understand the strengths and weaknesses of their governance model and improve shared…

  11. The Integration of Women into Law Faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashburn, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Elena N.

    The integration of women into law school faculties was studied to determine the interrelationships among cultural, institutional, and individual influences. Currently available data on women's representation in law schools were analyzed, and data were collected from a national law faculty recruitment conference and through on-site visits to 10 law…

  12. Faculty ethics: ideal principles with practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reybold, L Earle

    2009-01-01

    Ethics in higher education is the subject of intense public attention, with considerable focus on faculty roles and responsibilities. Media reports and scholarly research have documented egregious misconduct that includes plagiarism, falsification of data, illicit teacher-student relationships, and grading bias. These accounts of wrongdoing often portray faculty ethicality as only a legal issue of obeying rules and regulations, especially in the teaching and research roles. My discussion challenges this narrow perspective and argues that characterizations of faculty ethicality should take into account broader expectations for professionalism such as collegiality, respect, and freedom of inquiry. First, I review the general principles of faculty ethics developed by the American Association of University Professors, as well as professional codes of ethics in specific professional fields. Second, I juxtapose the experiences of women and minority faculty members in relation to these general codes of ethics. This section examines three issues that particularly affect women and minority faculty experiences of ethicality: "chilly and alienating" academic climates, "cultural taxation" of minority identity, and the snare of conventional reward systems. Third, I suggest practical strategies to reconcile faculty practice with codes of ethics. My challenge is to the faculty as a community of practice to engage professional ethics as social and political events, not just legal and moral failures.

  13. Racial and Gender Differences in Faculty Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Robert; And Others

    The overall study examined job satisfaction among tenured college faculty. This paper compares responses from minority (about 6%) and female (about 18%) faculty with the overall responses (N=1135). Overall, 91% reported being satisfied with their careers with 82% saying they would choose the career again. Race and gender were not related…

  14. Information-Seeking Habits of Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp-Serrano, Karen; Robbins, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the information-seeking behavior of academic education faculty from twenty large public research universities. The investigation includes an examination of how frequently education faculty seek or access information, how they stay up-to-date on current developments in the field and identify less recent journal literature, how…

  15. Paying Faculty Members What They Are Worth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Richard D.; Klagholz, Leo F.

    1980-01-01

    Faculty members at New Jersey's state colleges have begun working under a plan that provides salary increases for meritorious performance. Such merit compensation does not conflict with faculty promotion, nor is it intended to replace cost-of-living increases. However, it does replace government-style guaranteed automatic raises that encourage…

  16. Japan: Faculty and Curriculum Development Seminar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Joseph, Jr.; Hurst, G. Cameron, III; Coble, Parks; Ruder, Philip J.; Knippling, Alpana Sharma

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Association of American Colleges and Universities' Faculty and Curriculum Development Seminar, held in Japan and designed to open faculty minds to global issues. The year-long seminar involves three-person teams from eight institutions, competitively selected through proposals. Its three phases include preparatory reading and…

  17. Faculty Personality: A Factor of Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Cassandra S.; Wu, Xiaodong; Irwin, Kathleen C.; Patrizi, L. A. Chad

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between student retention and faculty personality as it was hypothesized that faculty personality has an effect on student retention. The methodology adopted for this study was quantitative and in two parts 1) using linear regression models to examine the impact or causality of faculty…

  18. Motivational Issues of Faculty in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Cader, Akram

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have suggested that faculty motivation influences profitability of academic programs. The problem researched in this mixed method study was the motivational factors that reduce faculty member effectiveness in improving the profitability of their universities' academic programs. Based on Maslow's theory of needs, the purpose of the…

  19. Innovation of University Teaching Faculty Management Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuzheng; Wang, Boyu

    2015-01-01

    With the deepening of university reform in China, the traditional teaching faculty management mode has been exposed more and more defects. To make innovation of the university teaching faculty management mode becomes the voice of the times. Universities should conduct careful research on this issue in the development. Starting from the…

  20. Regional Accreditation and the Evaluation of Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elman, Sandra E.

    1994-01-01

    Universities can effectively employ regional accreditation processes in striving to find legitimate means and credible mechanisms for more equitably evaluating faculty teaching and professional work. Examples from accreditation show how institutions can ensure compliance while establishing strong evaluation procedures for faculty service and…

  1. Faculty Development: An Imperative for the Nineties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, Joyce I.

    1990-01-01

    Budget constraints and changing enrollment patterns have expanded the concept of faculty development to include retraining. In home economics, retraining faculty for high demand areas such as hotel/restaurant management and fashion merchandising can be an efficient use of resources and an effective way to meet demand. (SK)

  2. Social Work Faculty and Undergraduate Research Mentorships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Pilar S.; Hughes, Anne K.; Vélez Ortiz, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Social work faculty scholars lead the field as generators of knowledge that integrates investigative studies with practical social welfare outcomes. As such, the faculty potentially offers undergraduate researchers a different way of envisioning research that extends beyond traditional undergraduate research models. To date, however, no research…

  3. The Nursing Faculty Shortage: Is There Hope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeYoung, Sandra; Bliss, Julie; Tracy, Janet P.

    2002-01-01

    Recent solutions to the nursing faculty shortage (expanded certification programs, aggressive recruitment, delayed retirement) have had some success. New solutions might include fast-track bachelor-to-doctorate curricula, recruitment of advanced practice nurses, image enhancement, national certification, and linking of the faculty and nurse…

  4. AACSB Standards and Accounting Faculty's Intellectual Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. Brian; Quddus, Munir

    2008-01-01

    The authors performed a content analysis of intellectual contribution portfolios of accounting faculty at various business schools that Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International recently accredited. The results showed a significant divergence in faculty research (e.g., areas, topics) and their teaching assignments. This…

  5. Faculty Satisfaction Questionnaire: Development, Validity, and Reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafin, Ana Gil

    This study sought to design and test a survey instrument which examined college faculty satisfaction with their roles of teaching, research, and service. A panel of experts reviewed the Spanish and English versions of the 39 item survey for quality of items and grammatical accuracy. Thirty randomly selected faculty members from a population of 234…

  6. The organisational aspect of faculty development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Gynnild, Vidar; Roxå, Torgny

    2004-01-01

    The article points out the faculty centres ought to be more conscious in their organisational strategies and get to managements support when working on pedagogical changes.......The article points out the faculty centres ought to be more conscious in their organisational strategies and get to managements support when working on pedagogical changes....

  7. Enhancing Sustainability Curricula through Faculty Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natkin, L. W.; Kolbe, Tammy

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although the number of higher education institutions adopting sustainability-focused faculty learning communities (FLCs) has grown, very few of these programs have published evaluation research. This paper aims to report findings from an evaluation of the University of Vermont's (UVM's) sustainability faculty fellows (SFF) program. It…

  8. Bullying and Inappropriate Behaviour among Faculty Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriläinen, Matti; Sinkkonen, Hanna-Maija; Puhakka, Helena; Käyhkö, Katinka

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the degree, nature and consequences of bullying or inappropriate behaviour among faculty personnel (n = 303) in a Finnish university. A total of 114 (38%) faculty members answered the email questionnaire. According to the results, 15% of the respondents had experienced bullying; in addition, 45% had experienced inappropriate…

  9. The Faculty Learning Outcome Assessment Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurney, Carol A.; Brantmeier, Edward J.; Good, Megan R.; Harrison, Douglas; Meixner, Cara

    2016-01-01

    Assessment is a cyclical process within which educators construct outcomes, implement programs, assess constructs such as learning, evaluate results, and utilize results to craft stronger programs and services. Within educational and faculty development, assessment measures program impact on faculty, students, and/or institutional culture.…

  10. Why Does the Faculty Resist Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagg, John

    2012-01-01

    Faculty members who led change initiatives often express frustration at the roadblocks created by other faculty members or groups. In 2009 George Kuh and Stanley Ikenberry undertook a survey of provosts for the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment to explore the state of student learning assessment. They found that "Gaining faculty…

  11. Nurse Faculty Practice: From Theory to Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Nancy Burk; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Because nursing is a practice profession and an applied science, it is a challenge for faculty members to maintain their clinical expertise and pursue scholarly activities. The Medical College of Georgia's School of Nursing's development of a faculty practice plan is reviewed. The political constraints are identified. (MLW)

  12. Nursing Faculty Perceptions on Teaching Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Doris A.

    2010-01-01

    The perceptions of nursing faculty teaching critical thinking (CT) affective attributes and cognitive skills are described in this quantitative, descriptive study. The study sample consisted of nurse educators from the National League of Nursing database. The purpose of the study was to gain nursing faculty perception of which teaching strategies…

  13. Are All Part-Time Faculty Underemployed? The Influence of Faculty Status Preference on Satisfaction and Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Douglas C.; Joseph, Todd Allen

    2008-01-01

    Utilizing a person-job fit perspective, we examined the job satisfaction and affective commitment of three groups of college faculty (N = 167): full-time faculty, part-time faculty preferring a part-time position (voluntary part-time), and part-time faculty preferring a full-time position (involuntary part-time). Involuntary part-time faculty were…

  14. Planning for Internationalization By Investing in Faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa K. Childress

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last half century, major world events have prompted higher education institutions to develop internationalization plans. In order engage faculty in internationalization, higher education scholars and practitioners have recommended that internationalization plans include allocated resources, such as budgets for academic exchanges, faculty development workshops, and international curricular development and research grants (Olson, Green, & Hill, 2006; Paige, 2005; Siaya & Hayward, 2003. Yet, a frequently cited obstacle to faculty engagement in internationalization plans is lack of funding (Backman, 1984; Bond, 2003; Ellingboe, 1998; Green & Olson, 2003; Steers & Ungsen, 1992; Woolston, 1983. A cross-case analysis reveals that differential investment leads to faculty engagement in internationalization plans. This article discusses how two institutions developed funds from a variety of sources and institutional levels to engage faculty in an institutional planning process. This study offers implications for institutional planning, resource dependency theory, and internationalization.

  15. Predictors of turnover intention in nurse faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Denise K; Kennerly, Susan

    2011-04-01

    Turnover of nurse faculty is an increasingly important issue in nursing as the available number of qualified faculty continues to decrease. Understanding the factors that contribute to turnover is important to academic administrators to retain and recruit qualified nursing faculty. The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of turnover intention in nurse faculty working in departments and schools of nursing in Carnegie Doctoral/Research Universities-Extensive, public and private, not-for-profit institutions. The multidimensional model of organizational commitment was used to frame this study. The predictor variables explored were organizational climate, organizational commitment, work role balance, role ambiguity, and role conflict. The work roles examined were research, teaching, and service. Logistical regression was performed to examine the predictors of turnover intention. Organizational climate intimacy and disengagement, affective and continuance organizational commitment, and role ambiguity were shown to predict turnover intention in nurse faculty. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Cognitive dissonance experienced by nurse practitioner faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B; Hawkins, Joellen W; Weiss, Josie A

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explicate the concept of cognitive dissonance as experienced and reported by nurse practitioner (NP) faculty members. Responses from NP faculty members to an online survey about their experiences with cognitive dissonance. The respondents detailed their experiences with cognitive dissonance, citing differences between expectations for which they are rewarded and those for which they are paid. Expecting all faculty members to excel in practice, research, teaching, and service may create unrealistic workloads for NP faculty members. Examining expectations and considering creation of a clinical track for faculty who practice may be options administrators of NP programs might explore. ©2012 The Author(s) Journal compilation ©2012 American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

  17. Faculty Viewpoints on Teaching Quantway®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Howington

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantway is a quantitative reasoning-based pathway for developmental math that has been developed as an alternative to the traditional remedial algebra sequence. To explore the experiences of faculty involved with Quantway, we interviewed eight individuals who have taught the course in the past year to survey their attitudes and opinions about students in their classes, the materials and pedagogies in use, and the collegial interaction of networked faculty. Faculty were selected with the intention of gathering a broad set of opinions resulting from differences of location, experience, and other factors. In this paper, we summarize those interviews by identifying common themes reported by the faculty that highlight strengths and challenges of teaching Quantway. Themes include perceptions about changes in student engagement and attitudes as well as changes in their own mindset; the evolution of teaching strategies and materials used inside and outside the classroom; and the relevance of connections between faculty at different institutions involved in the project.

  18. Faculty Experiences of Merger and Organizational Change in a Social Work Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedoyin, A Christson; Miller, Monte; Jackson, Mary S; Dodor, Bernice; Hall, Kristen

    2016-01-01

    Social work programs are experiencing unprecedented organizational changes due to budget cuts, dwindling resources, global, and technological challenges. However, there is limited information in the literature about the merger experiences of faculty in social work programs. On one hand undergoing merger and reorganization provides the opportunity to reorganize, reprioritize, re-assess, develop strategies, and explore previously untapped opportunities for social work programs. Conversely, merger experiences have caused frustration, intention to quit, confusion, and loss of professional identity for social work faculty. In this article the authors utilize a journaling method and sense-making approach of the merger experiences of some of the faculty members of a social work program in the United States. The authors suggest a framework to understand how the faculty confronted the challenges, overcame the pitfalls, and maximized the opportunities offered during the merger and organizational change process.

  19. Now hiring! Empirically testing a three-step intervention to increase faculty gender diversity in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessi L.; Handley, Ian M.; Zale, Alexander V.; Rushing, Sara; Potvin, Martha A.

    2015-01-01

    Workforce homogeneity limits creativity, discovery, and job satisfaction; nonetheless, the vast majority of university faculty in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields are men. We conducted a randomized and controlled three-step faculty search intervention based in self-determination theory aimed at increasing the number of women faculty in STEM at one US university where increasing diversity had historically proved elusive. Results show that the numbers of women candidates considered for and offered tenure-track positions were significantly higher in the intervention groups compared with those in controls. Searches in the intervention were 6.3 times more likely to make an offer to a woman candidate, and women who were made an offer were 5.8 times more likely to accept the offer from an intervention search. Although the focus was on increasing women faculty within STEM, the intervention can be adapted to other scientific and academic communities to advance diversity along any dimension.

  20. Dental Student and Faculty Perceptions of Uncivil Behavior by Faculty Members in Classroom and Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Fournier, Suzanne E; Townsend, Janice A; Ballard, Mary B; Armbruster, Paul C

    2018-02-01

    Uncivil behavior by a faculty member or student can threaten a classroom environment and make it less conducive to learning. The aim of this study was to explore faculty behaviors that dental faculty and students perceive to be uncivil when exhibited in the classroom and clinic. In 2015, all faculty, administrators, and students at a single academic dental institution were invited to participate in an electronic survey that used a five-point Likert scale for respondents to indicate their agreement that 33 faculty behaviors were uncivil. Response rates were 49% for faculty and 59% for students. Significant differences were found between student and faculty responses on 22 of the 33 behavioral items. None of the three category composite scores differed significantly for students compared to faculty respondents. The category composite scores were not significantly associated with gender, ethnicity, or age for faculty or students. Overall, this study found significant differences between students and faculty about perceived uncivil faculty behaviors, though not for categories of behaviors.

  1. What motivates occasional faculty developers to lead faculty development workshops? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Irby, David M

    2015-11-01

    The demand for faculty development is ongoing, and many medical schools will need to expand their pool of faculty developers to include physicians and scientists whose primary expertise is not education. Insight into what motivates occasional faculty developers can guide recruitment and retention strategies. This study was designed to understand the motivations of faculty developers who occasionally (one to three times each year) lead faculty development workshops. Qualitative data were collected in March and April 2012 from interviews with faculty developers who occasionally taught workshops from 2007 to 2012 in the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine's faculty development program. The interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. The authors thematically analyzed the transcripts using a general inductive approach and developed codes sensitized by motivation theories. The authors interviewed 29/30 (97%) occasional faculty developers and identified five themes: mastery (desire to learn and develop professionally), relatedness (enjoyment of working with and learning from others), duty (sense of obligation to give back and be a good academic citizen), purpose (commitment to improving local teaching and ultimately patient care), and satisfaction (fun and enjoyment). Four of the themes the authors found are well addressed in motivation theory literature: mastery, relatedness, duty, and purpose. Whereas these four are motivators for occasional faculty developers, it is the fifth theme-satisfaction-that the authors feel is foundational and links the others together. Armed with this understanding, individuals leading faculty development programs can develop strategies to recruit and retain occasional faculty developers.

  2. Mid-career faculty development in academic medicine: How does it impact faculty and institutional vitality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, MaryAnn W; Bhasin, Robina M; Beaudette, Donald J; Shann, Mary H; Benjamin, Emelia J

    2016-09-01

    Faculty vitality is integral to the advancement of higher education. Strengthening vitality is particularly important for mid-career faculty, who represent the largest and most dissatisfied segment. The demands of academic medicine appear to be another factor that may put faculty at risk of attrition. To address these issues, we initiated a ten-month mid-career faculty development program. A mixed-methods quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate the program's impact on faculty and institutional vitality. Pre/post surveys compared participants with a matched reference group. Quantitative data were augmented by interviews and focus groups with multiple stakeholders. At the program's conclusion, participants showed statistically significant gains in knowledge, skills, attitudes, and connectivity when compared to the referents. Given that mid-career faculty development in academic medicine has not been extensively studied, our evaluation provides a useful perspective to guide future initiatives aimed at enhancing the vitality and leadership capacity of mid-career faculty.

  3. A comparison of millennial dental hygiene student and faculty classroom expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rachel K; Gibson-Howell, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Research has shown that Millennial students are different than students in previous generations. This study compares the expectations of the didactic environment of faculty and students in a baccalaureate dental hygiene program. Expectations of faculty and students were examined, and comparisons between Millennial and non-Millennial students and faculty were made in order to improve the educational experience of dental hygiene students. Students and faculty completed a survey adapted from McCargar's role expectations survey. Items were chosen from the survey to cover such areas as technology, group work and authority. The survey consisted of a Likert-type scale including strongly agree, agree, neutral, disagree and strongly disagree. Data was entered into SPSS 15.0 database. Scoring on negative questions was reversed so that the score would be positive. Individual answers are given the following scoring assignments: Strongly Agree (+2), Agree (+1), Neutral (0), Disagree (-1) and Strongly Disagree (-2). Scores were added together to create a summative score for each item. Descriptive statistics and an unpaired t-test comparing responses were used to analyze data. Cronbach's alpha was run to measure the internal consistency of the instrument. Twelve faculty and 94 students returned surveys. Students felt strongly that copies of course notes should be available online and faculty should return emails within 24 hours. Statistically significant differences in the expectations of Millennial and non-Millennial students were found in regards to issues of authority, community service, attendance and evaluation. The majority of significant differences were found between Millennial students and faculty. Significant differences were found in interaction, community service, technology and homework. Faculty should examine the expectations of their students and should use the findings to create learning experiences that are more effective for students. Expectations change with

  4. Better Learning Through Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, R. D.; National InstituteScience Education, College Level-One Team

    2000-12-01

    The Learning Through Technology (LT2) resource is designed to help college Science, Mathematics, Engineering and Technology (SMET) instructors: - understand why and how they should use technology-enhanced learning strategies; - shape the powerful emerging technologies into learning tools that better prepare college students for the 21st century; and - provide all their students more experience with, and a better appreciation for, SMET as a living enterprise. The LT2 website includes case studies of learning technology innovations at a variety of post-secondary institutions. Personal narratives of faculty and students cover virtually every logistical, technological, inter-personal, and political issue involved in adapting learning technologies into courses or curricula. The site also includes a wide array of lively first-person vignettes about learning technology experiences from around the country. Frequently Asked Questions is a quick stop for opinions, advice, and bits of wisdom from experienced learning technology users. Finally, the Team is developing user-friendly evaluation resources to help faculty assess the success of learning technologies in improving student learning. The LT2 site is an element of the NISE website "Innovations in SMET Education". This site is intended to help college faculty meet multiple challenging goals including: educating all students to be scientifically literate in a technological society, developing the ranks of future scientists and skilled technicians, and preparing K-12 science and math teachers. The "Innovations in SMET Education" website can be found at www.wcer.wisc.edu/nise/cl1 .

  5. Salisbury State College Faculty Handbook. 1974-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury State Coll., MD.

    The Salisbury State College's faculty handbook details the college's history and organization; personnel, academic and administrative policies and procedures; and the college services available to the faculty. (JMF)

  6. You Can Lead Students to the Classroom, and You Can Make Them Think: Ten Brain-Based Strategies for College Teaching and Learning Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Greta G.; Wash, Pamela D.

    2013-01-01

    Teaching in the digital age has become increasingly challenging for college and university faculty. Application, relevance, and active engagement rather than traditional PowerPoint slide show lectures are what our technology-savvy, socially networked students crave and need to keep their attention and interest levels high. Using a combination of…

  7. Can Tablet Computers Enhance Faculty Teaching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Aditee P; Whicker, Shari A; Benjamin, Robert W; Hawley, Jeffrey; McGann, Kathleen A

    2015-06-01

    Learner benefits of tablet computer use have been demonstrated, yet there is little evidence regarding faculty tablet use for teaching. Our study sought to determine if supplying faculty with tablet computers and peer mentoring provided benefits to learners and faculty beyond that of non-tablet-based teaching modalities. We provided faculty with tablet computers and three 2-hour peer-mentoring workshops on tablet-based teaching. Faculty used tablets to teach, in addition to their current, non-tablet-based methods. Presurveys, postsurveys, and monthly faculty surveys assessed feasibility, utilization, and comparisons to current modalities. Learner surveys assessed perceived effectiveness and comparisons to current modalities. All feedback received from open-ended questions was reviewed by the authors and organized into categories. Of 15 eligible faculty, 14 participated. Each participant attended at least 2 of the 3 workshops, with 10 to 12 participants at each workshop. All participants found the workshops useful, and reported that the new tablet-based teaching modality added value beyond that of current teaching methods. Respondents developed the following tablet-based outputs: presentations, photo galleries, evaluation tools, and online modules. Of the outputs, 60% were used in the ambulatory clinics, 33% in intensive care unit bedside teaching rounds, and 7% in inpatient medical unit bedside teaching rounds. Learners reported that common benefits of tablet computers were: improved access/convenience (41%), improved interactive learning (38%), and improved bedside teaching and patient care (13%). A common barrier faculty identified was inconsistent wireless access (14%), while no barriers were identified by the majority of learners. Providing faculty with tablet computers and having peer-mentoring workshops to discuss their use was feasible and added value.

  8. Smartphone Use and the Perception of Professionalism Among Medical Students and Surgical Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Silka; Lidor, Anne; Sanyal, Abanti; Goepfert, Alice R; Hueppchen, Nancy

    2017-08-03

    To understand the perception of professionalism surrounding smartphone use (wards/educational activities) among medical students and surgical faculty. A prospective cohort study was conducted using an electronic survey and distributed to third- and fourth-year medical students, obstetrics/gynecology, and surgery faculty members. Five cases were randomly presented; participants were asked to review and rate the clinician's behavior on a 5-point Likert scale. The study was completed at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, a tertiary care institution, in the departments of gyn/ob and surgery. A total of 123 medical students (51% response rate) from the class of 2015/2016 along with 73 surgical faculty in the departments of gyn/ob and surgery completed the study. Of the surgical faculty, 48% were ob/gyn (54% response rate) and 52% were surgery (21% response rate). Of note, when quarrying the department of surgery all surgical faculty were included, however, only those with direct student interaction were asked to complete the survey leading to the lower response rate. In 3 of 5 scenarios, students and faculty had significant differences in perception of professionalism (pstudents. The acceptability of certain behaviors was significantly correlated in some case scenarios with how participants reported using their smartphones. Personal use of technology appears to influence the perception of acceptable behavior in certain scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pharmacy faculty members' perspectives on the student/faculty relationship in online social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Anne H; Finley, Kristen N; Ulbrich, Timothy R; McAuley, James W

    2010-12-15

    To describe pharmacy faculty members' use of the online social network Facebook and compare the perspectives of faculty members with and without Facebook profiles regarding student/faculty relationships. An electronic survey instrument was sent to full-time faculty members (n = 183) at 4 colleges of pharmacy in Ohio seeking their opinions on student/faculty relationships on Facebook. If respondents answered "yes" to having a Facebook profile, they were asked 14 questions on aspects of being "friends" with students. If respondents answered "no," they were asked 4 questions. Of the 95 respondents (52%) to the survey instrument, 44 faculty members (46%) had a Facebook profile, while 51 faculty members (54%) did not. Those who had a profile had been faculty members for an average of 8.6 years, versus 11.4 years for those who did not have a Facebook profile. Seventy-nine percent of faculty members who used Facebook were not "friends" with their students. The majority of respondents reported that they would decline/ignore a "friend" request from a student, or decline until after the student graduated. Although a limited number of faculty members had used Facebook for online discussions, teaching purposes, or student organizations, the majority of universities did not have policies on the use of social networking sites. Online social network sites are used widely by students and faculty members, which may raise questions regarding professionalism and appropriate faculty/student relationships. Further research should address the student/preceptor relationship, other online social networking sites, and whether students are interested in using these sites within the classroom and/or professional organizations.

  10. Hitting the nursing faculty shortage head on: strategies to recruit, retain, and develop nursing faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Harriet R; Greenberg, Martha J; Jaffe-Ruiz, Marilyn; Kaufman, Sophie Revillard; Cignarale, Stacie

    2015-01-01

    More than ever before, schools of nursing are challenged with finding qualified faculty to teach growing numbers of undergraduate and graduate students. Qualified applicants by the thousands are being turned away, in large part because of an insufficient pipeline of faculty. This article describes how one school hit the shortage head on by creating alternate models for employing and growing new faculty, and then instituting a variety of strategies to develop and keep them. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Mathematics Turned Inside Out: The Intensive Faculty Versus the Extensive Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2011-01-01

    Research universities in the United States have larger mathematics faculties outside their mathematics departments than inside. Members of this "extensive" faculty conduct most mathematics research, their interests are the most heavily published areas of mathematics, and they teach this mathematics in upper division courses independent of mathematics departments. The existence of this de facto faculty challenges the pertinence of institutional and national policies for higher education in mat...

  12. The Faculty Web Page: Contrivance or Continuation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennex, Lesia

    2007-01-01

    In an age of Internet education, what does it mean for a tenure/tenure-track faculty to have a web page? How many professors have web pages? If they have a page, what does it look like? Do they really need a web page at all? Many universities have faculty web pages. What do those collective pages look like? In what way do they represent the…

  13. Research Productivity of Sports Medicine Fellowship Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Cvetanovich, Gregory L.; Saltzman, Bryan M.; Chalmers, Peter N.; Frank, Rachel M.; Cole, Brian J.; Bach, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Research productivity is considered an important factor in academic advancement in sports medicine. No study to date has evaluated academic productivity and correlates of academic rank for sports medicine fellowship faculty. Purpose: To describe the academic productivity of American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) fellowship program faculty and to determine the association between academic productivity, fellowship characteristics, and academic rank. Study Design: D...

  14. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, N. F. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The Faculty Fellowship program was revived in the summer of 2015 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, following a period of diminished faculty research activity here since 2006 when budget cuts in the Headquarters' Education Office required realignment. Several senior Marshall managers recognized the need to involve the Nation's academic research talent in NASA's missions and projects to the benefit of both entities. These managers invested their funds required to establish the renewed Faculty Fellowship program in 2015, a 10-week residential research involvement of 16 faculty in the laboratories and offices at Marshall. These faculty engineers and scientists worked with NASA collaborators on NASA projects, bringing new perspectives and solutions to bear. This Technical Memorandum is a compilation of the research reports of the 2015 Marshall Faculty Fellowship program, along with the Program Announcement (appendix A) and the Program Description (appendix B). The research touched on seven areas-propulsion, materials, instrumentation, fluid dynamics, human factors, control systems, and astrophysics. The propulsion studies included green propellants, gas bubble dynamics, and simulations of fluid and thermal transients. The materials investigations involved sandwich structures in composites, plug and friction stir welding, and additive manufacturing, including both strength characterization and thermosets curing in space. The instrumentation projects involved spectral interfero- metry, emissivity, and strain sensing in structures. The fluid dynamics project studied the water hammer effect. The human factors project investigated the requirements for close proximity operations in confined spaces. Another team proposed a controls system for small launch vehicles, while in astrophysics, one faculty researcher estimated the practicality of weather modification by blocking the Sun's insolation, and another found evidence in satellite data of the detection of a warm

  15. Doctoral Advisor-Advisee Pairing in STEM Fields: Selection Criteria and Impact of Faculty, Student and Departmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simy Joy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Unlike the doctoral programs in places where students are paired with advisors at the time of admission itself, most US programs require the students to choose their advisors, and the advisors to formally accept the students as advisees. Little research has been done to understand how students and faculty approach this mutual selection and pairing process. This paper examines this process in STEM departments (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, with specific focus on factors influencing the decisions. Based on focus groups and interviews of doctoral students and faculty from STEM departments in an American university, we identify criteria applied by students and faculty in making their choices. Students were found to assess faculty on available funding, area of research, personality, ability to graduate students fast, and career prospects for students, and faculty to assess students on their qualifications/credentials and perceived ability to contribute to research. We also found that this mutual assessment was not objective, but influenced by perceptions associated with faculty gender and career stage, and student nationality. In the end, whether students and faculty were actually paired with persons of their choice depended on departmental factors including prevalent pairing practices, restrictions on student numbers per faculty, and reward structure. We discuss implications of the findings for research and practice.

  16. Factors Affecting Job Satisfaction among the Faculty Members at Guilan University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fardin Mehrabian

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job satisfaction plays a pivotal role in the performance of university faculty members. Identification of the factors influencing job satisfaction can be useful in advancing the educational and research objectives of the university. The aim of the present study was to analyze the factors influencing job satisfaction among the faculty members of Guilan University of medical sciences. Methods: This study was a descriptive cross-sectional research that was conducted in 2012. The statistical population of the research included 139 faculty members at faculties of Guilan University of Medical Sciences selected using stratified random sampling. The instrument of data collection was a questionnaire consisting of two sections; the first section contained 10 questions about demographic information and the second section comprised of 19 questions which was designed based on Herzberg's two-factor theory. The questionnaire was scored according to 5-point Likert scale. Data were analyzed by SPSS 18 software and descriptive statistics indices of frequency, mean, standard deviation and Pearson correlation coefficient reported.Results: 66.2% of the faculty members were male, 62.6% were clinical faculty members and 37.4% basic sciences faculty members. The most important factors affecting the faculty members’ job satisfaction were job security (4.14±0.96, friendly relationship with colleagues (4.01±0.81, and technology and technical knowledge (3.99±0.87. The most important motivational factors influencing job satisfaction were interest in job (4.24+0.71, achievement (3.99±0.87 and equal opportunities for career promotion (3.95±0.99.Conclusion: stability and job satisfaction, creating friendly working environment, proper environmental conditions, professor’s welfare and providing spiritual and material incentives are factors that influence the professor’s job satisfaction.

  17. The adaptation and use of a WWW-based course-management system within two different types of faculties at the University of Twente

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Willem; Collis, Betty; Bourdeau, Jacqueline; Heller, Rachelle

    2000-01-01

    At the Faculty of Educational Science and Technology, University of Twente, in The Netherlands, the entire faculty is involved not only in the use of a new WWW-based coursemanagement system (called TeleTOP) but more fundamentally in a new educational approach. In addition we are working with other

  18. On the Use of Cell Phones and Other Electronic Devices in the Classroom: Evidence from a Survey of Faculty and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William M.; Lusk, Edward J.; Neuhauser, Karyn L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated faculty and student perceptions regarding the use of cell phones and other electronic devices in the classroom. Students differed markedly from faculty, with students exhibiting much greater acceptance of in-class use of technology. Among students, the authors found that gender affected perceptions. Specifically, male…

  19. Writing for publication: faculty development initiative using social learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Bonnie K; Carter, Matt; Schuessler, Jenny B

    2012-01-01

    Demonstrating scholarly competency is an expectation for nurse faculty. However, there is hesitancy among some faculty to fully engage in scholarly activities. To strengthen a school of nursing's culture of scholarship, a faculty development writing initiative based on Social Learning Theory was implemented. The authors discuss this initiative to facilitate writing for publication productivity among faculty and the successful outcomes.

  20. Part-Time Faculty in 2-Year Colleges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education Newsletter, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Recognition clauses of negotiated faculty contracts from 139 two-year colleges were analyzed to determine the extent to which part-time faculty are included in the bargaining unit, and to examine contract references to part-time faculty. Approximately one-half (71) of the contracts did not include part-time faculty as members. Exclusion was either…

  1. Comparison of Sports Sciences and Education Faculty Students' Aggression Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atan, Tülin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the aggression scores of Sports Sciences Faculty and Education Faculty students and also to examine the effects of some demographic variables on aggression. Two hundred Sports Sciences Faculty students (who engage in sporting activities four days a week for two hours) and 200 Education Faculty students (who do…

  2. A DYNAMIC MODEL FOR EVALUATION OF USEFULNESS OF FACULTY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES IN THE AREA OF BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuj Nandan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Faculty Development Progammes are a means to expose the faculty in higher education to new theories and technology in their field. However, evaluation component of such programmes is usually not well-planned. An attempt has been made to identify the determinants of usefulness of FDPs in the area of Business Management as perceived by faculty and the extent of impact of these factors on usefulness. The study identifies four determinants. A dynamic model of sefulness of FDPs is presented as an outcome of the study.

  3. Encouraged or Weeded Out: Perspectives of Students of Color in the STEM Disciplines on Faculty Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Dorian L.; Luedke, Courtney L.; Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle

    2017-01-01

    For this multisite qualitative case study, framed in Bourdieu's social reproduction theory, we examined mentoring experiences among Students of Color majoring in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines at both a predominantly White institution and a historically Black institution. Findings revealed that faculty served…

  4. Examining the Influence of Personality Traits on Intranet Portal Adoption by Faculty in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambare, Narcissus

    2013-01-01

    The problem examined in the proposed study was the underutilization of the intranet portals (IP) by faculty in institutions of higher education (IHE). Despite the time and investment allocated to the IP, the technology remains underutilized to improve productivity, efficiency, and justify its investment yet there is lack of understanding of why…

  5. Academic Identities and University Faculty Responses to New Managerialist Reforms: Experiences from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yating; Pang, Sun-Keung; Yu, Shulin

    2018-01-01

    Chinese universities are being continually subjected to new managerial practices and technologies that have fundamental consequences on the university faculty's academic life. Within a predominantly communitarian theoretical framework of academic identity, this qualitative case study draws upon interviews with 25 academics in Mainland China to…

  6. Perceptions of Active Learning between Faculty and Undergraduates: Differing Views among Departments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Lorelei E.; Howell, Leigh Anne; Wischusen, William

    2016-01-01

    There have been numerous calls recently to increase the use of active learning in university science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) classrooms to more actively engage students and enhance student learning. However, few studies have investigated faculty and student perceptions regarding the effectiveness of active learning or the…

  7. Relations with Faculty as Social Capital for College Students: Evidence from Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dika, Sandra L.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a social capital framework was adopted to investigate the extent to which academically focused interactions with faculty and other institutional agents serve as social capital for college students, using National Survey of Student Engagement data from a large, science, technology, engineering and math-focused institution in Puerto…

  8. uCollaborator: Framework for STEM Project Collaboration among Geographically-Dispersed Student/Faculty Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Stephen M.; Rodriguez, Walter E.; Carstens, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for facilitating communication among STEM project teams that are geographically dispersed in synchronous or asynchronous online courses. The framework has been developed to: (a) improve how engineering and technology students and faculty work with collocated and geographically-dispersed teams; and (b) to connect the…

  9. "You Need to Have a Street Beat": A Qualitative Study of Faculty Research Needs and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe-Gulick, Amalia; Valentine, Greta; Brooks-Kieffer, Jamene

    2017-01-01

    In the spring of 2015, 14 faculty members in social science or in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) spoke with a working group from the University of Kansas (KU) Libraries regarding their research needs and challenges. Their responses highlighted a dynamic research environment in which individual researchers desire to…

  10. Information seeking behaviour of faculty: The case of the College of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article sought to find the information seeking behaviour of faculty members of the College of Science, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana. The survey method was employed. Questionnaire instrument was used to collect data on method of selecting information, type of information ...

  11. 2009 ESMD Space Grant Faculty Project Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gloria; Ghanashyam, Joshi; Guo, Jiang; Conrad, James; Bandyopadhyay, Alak; Cross, William

    2009-01-01

    The Constellation Program is the medium by which we will maintain a presence in low Earth orbit, return to the moon for further exploration and develop procedures for Mars exploration. The foundation for its presence and success is built by the many individuals that have given of their time, talent and even lives to help propel the mission and objectives of NASA. The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Faculty Fellows Program is a direct contributor to the success of directorate and Constellation Program objectives. It is through programs such as the ESMD Space Grant program that students are inspired and challenged to achieve the technological heights that will propel us to meet the goals and objectives of ESMD and the Constellation Program. It is through ESMD Space Grant programs that future NASA scientists, engineers, and mathematicians begin to dream of taking America to newer heights of space exploration. The ESMD Space Grant program is to be commended for taking the initiative to develop and implement programs that help solidify the mission of NASA. With the concerted efforts of the Kennedy Space Center educational staff, the 2009 ESMD Space Grant Summer Faculty Fellows Program allowed faculty to become more involved with NASA personnel relating to exploration topics for the senior design projects. The 2009 Project was specifically directed towards NASA's Strategic Educational Outcome 1. In-situ placement of Faculty Fellows at the NASA field Centers was essential; this allowed personal interactions with NASA scientists and engineers. In particular, this was critical to better understanding the NASA problems and begin developing a senior design effort to solve the problems. The Faculty Fellows are pleased that the ESMD Space Grant program is taking interest in developing the Senior Design courses at the university level. These courses are needed to help develop the NASA engineers and scientists of the very near future. It has been a pleasure to be

  12. The Relationship between Faculty Involvement in Governance and Faculty Vitality: The Case of North Carolina Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madray, Van

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the effects of governance involvement on the vitality of community college faculty members. This study explores the degree to which involvement in the governance of a college through a faculty senate fosters the vitality of elected faculty members. While faculty vitality is a difficult concept to measure directly, faculty…

  13. Strategies for Faculty-Student Engagement: How Community College Faculty Engage Latino Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cejda, Brent D.; Hoover, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Student-faculty engagement has been identified as the best predictor of Latino student persistence (Hurtado & Carter, 1997). This study explores the strategies that community college faculty employ to engage Latino students. Findings indicate that knowledge, appreciation, and sensitivity to Hispanic cultures and an understanding of the preferred…

  14. The Influence of Nursing Faculty Workloads on Faculty Retention: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jennifer J.

    2013-01-01

    Nursing faculty workloads have come to the forefront of discussion in nursing education. The National League of Nursing (NLN) has made nursing faculty workloads a high priority in nursing education. Included in the priorities are areas of creating reform through innovations in nursing education, evaluating reform through evaluation research, and…

  15. Faculty and student perceptions of the feasibility of individual student-faculty meetings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, B.F.; Erich, M.H.; Borleffs, J.C.; Elgersma, A.F.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.

    2012-01-01

    The extent to which students feel involved in their education positively influences academic achievement. Individual student-faculty meetings can foster student involvement. To be effective, faculty acknowledgement of the benefit of these meetings is a prerequisite. The aim of this study was to

  16. Why Learner-Centered New Faculty Orientations Matter: Organizational Culture and Faculty Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Whitney; Lemus, Daisy; Knotts, Greg; Oh, Janet

    2016-01-01

    A learner-centered New Faculty Orientation (NFO) can be a powerful way to immediately engage new faculty and develop their organizational identification to the institution and its values. Unfortunately, some NFOs do not model a learner-centered philosophy and miss opportunities to establish a collaborative and celebratory tone. In this paper, we…

  17. A Faculty-Based Mentorship Circle: Positioning New Faculty for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Janice; Martin, Jennifer; Schwind, Jasna K.; Lapum, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple and competing priorities within a dynamic and changing academic environment can pose significant challenges for new faculty. Mentorship has been identified as an important strategy to help socialize new faculty to their roles and the expectations of the academic environment. It also helps them learn new skills that will position them to…

  18. Developing an Instrument to Examine Student-Faculty Interaction in Faculty-in-Residence Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Rishi; McLevain, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Faculty-in-residence programs are a distinct feature of residential colleges (Ryan, 2001), but more recently, institutions of higher education have created more opportunities for faculty to reside in various types of living-learning programs, including theme housing and first-year experience communities. Within the context of this study,…

  19. Finding an Analytic Frame for Faculty-Student Interaction within Faculty-in-Residence Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mara, Miriam; Mara, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe a case study analyzing how a Faculty-in-Residence program fosters student engagement. Using Cox & Orehovec's typology to add granularity to the National Study on Student Engagement's criteria for student engagement, we suggest best practices for the implementation of these in-situ faculty engagement programs.

  20. Mentorship Matters: Does Early Faculty Contact Lead to Quality Faculty Interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Marcia V.; Ruiz Alvarado, Adriana; Berdan, Jennifer; DeAngelo, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to understand the factors that contribute to a type of student-faculty interaction known to have particular benefits for students, faculty mentorship. Using three-time-point data from the Cooperative Institutional Research Program at the University of California, Los Angeles, this study employed structural equation modeling to…

  1. Physics and Astronomy New Faculty Workshops: 20 Years of Workshops and 2000 Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilborn, Robert

    Most college and university new faculty members start their teaching careers with almost no formal training in pedagogy. To address this issue, the American Association of Physics Teachers, the American Astronomical Society, and the American Physical Society have been offering since 1996 workshops for physics and astronomy new faculty members (and in recent years for experienced faculty members as well). The workshops introduce faculty members to a variety of interactive engagement teaching (IET) methods and the evidence for their effectiveness, embedded in a framework of general professional development. Currently the workshops engage about 50% of the new tenure-track hires in physics and astronomy. The workshops are quite successful in making the participants aware of IET methods and motivating them to implement them in their classes. However, about 1/3 of the participants stop using IET methods within a year or two. The faculty members cite (a) lack of time and energy to change, (b) content coverage concerns, and (c) difficulty getting students engaged as reasons for their discontinuance. To help overcome these barriers, we have introduced faculty online learning communities (FOLCs). The FOLCs provide peer support and advice through webinars and coaching from more experienced faculty members. Recommendations based on the workshops and the experiences of the participants can enhance the teaching effectiveness of future physics and astronomy faculty members. This work was supported in part by NSF Grant 1431638.

  2. Defining a mismatch: differences in usage of social networking sites between medical students and the faculty who teach them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisson, Gregory E; Fisher, Matthew J; LaBelle, Mark W; Kozmic, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    Use of social networking sites (SNS) by medical students is increasing, and some students lack awareness of pitfalls arising from the intersection of social networking and medicine. Many institutions have developed guidelines on using SNS, but they are insufficient for students. Educators need new methods to train students on the appropriate use of this technology, but more information is needed before implementing change. Differences in SNS usage between students and faculty were examined. The goal was to evaluate four content areas: SNS usage patterns, attitudes regarding activity on SNS, experience with patient interactions online, and awareness of institutional guidelines on use of SNS. A cross-sectional survey took place at Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, in 2012. Participants included all students and a cohort of faculty who teach them in a class on professionalism. The response rate was 42% by students (300/711) and 78% by faculty (31/40). Of the students, 94% use SNS, compared to 48% of faculty. Students were more likely than faculty to display content they would not want patients to see (57% vs. 27%), report seeing inappropriate content on colleagues' SNS profiles (64% vs. 42%), and ignore harmful postings by colleagues (25% vs. 7%). Faculty were more likely than students to have been approached by patients on SNS (53% vs. 3%). Most participants were unlikely to conduct Internet searches on patients. Students are more likely than faculty to use SNS and use it very differently than faculty. Students would benefit from training on appropriate use of SNS. Topics that should be addressed include editing one's online presence, managing friend requests from patients, dealing with colleagues who post harmful content, conducting Internet searches on patients, and discussion of boundaries to identify potential harms associated with SNS usage. Differences in usage between students and faculty raise questions if faculty are well suited to

  3. Gamification of Nursing Education With Digital Badges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Meagan; Shellenbarger, Teresa

    Digital badges (DBs) serve as an innovative approach to gamifying nursing education by engaging socially connected, technologically savvy nursing students in learning. Because assessment and credentialing mechanisms are housed and managed online, DBs are designed as visible indicators of accomplishment and skill. This article describes important considerations for faculty when incorporating game-based pedagogies such as DB into nursing education and identifies potential pitfalls with DB use that faculty should consider.

  4. Technology in the Classroom versus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Cynthia L.; Steube, G.; Yang, Hongqiang

    2013-01-01

    The use of technology in universities and colleges is an issue of interest and speculation. One issue related to technology use in the classroom is sustainability of resources that support the technology. This paper explores faculty perceptions about technology use and sustainability in an east coast university. This university has initiated a new…

  5. Nigerian Journal of Technology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Technology is based at the Faculty of Engineering, University of Nigeria, Nsukka and has been in existence for over 30 years. Any paper submitted to the journal should be an original thought-provoking review or appraisal of existing ... Table of Contents. Preliminary Pages & General Engineering ...

  6. Nigerian Journal of Technology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Technology is based at the Faculty of Engineering, University of Nigeria, Nsukka and has been in existence for over 30 years. Any paper submitted to the journal should be an original thought-provoking review or appraisal of existing knowledge, collation of relevant data of interest or investigation ...

  7. New Rules, New Roles: Technology Standards and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, Becky; Adcock, Phyllis G.

    2007-01-01

    The digital age is infiltrating colleges of education around the country, but while some faculty are jumping on the bandwagon and working hard to improve their own technological literacy and that of their students, other faculty are resistant, afraid that technology may "dehumanize" education. School districts around the country are investing…

  8. Restoring Faculty Vitality in Academic Medicine When Burnout Threatens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Darshana T; Williams, Valerie N; Thorndyke, Luanne E; Marsh, E Eugene; Sonnino, Roberta E; Block, Steven M; Viggiano, Thomas R

    2017-11-21

    Increasing rates of burnout-with accompanying stress and lack of engagement-among faculty, residents, students, and practicing physicians have caused alarm in academic medicine. Central to the debate among academic medicine's stakeholders are oft-competing issues of social accountability; cost containment; effectiveness of academic medicine's institutions; faculty recruitment, retention, and satisfaction; increasing expectations for faculty; and mission-based productivity.The authors propose that understanding and fostering what contributes to faculty and institutional vitality is central to preventing burnout during times of change. They first look at faculty vitality and how it is threatened by burnout, to provide a framework for a greater understanding of faculty well-being. Then they draw on higher education literature to determine how vitality is defined in academic settings and what factors affect faculty vitality within the context of academic medicine. Next, they propose a model to explain and examine faculty vitality in academic medicine, followed by a discussion of the need for a greater understanding of faculty vitality. Finally, the authors offer conclusions and propose future directions to promote faculty vitality.The authors encourage institutional decision makers and other stakeholders to focus particular attention on the evolving expectations for faculty, the risk of extensive faculty burnout, and the opportunity to reduce burnout by improving the vitality and resilience of these talented and crucial contributors. Faculty vitality, as defined by the institution, has a critical role in ensuring future institutional successes and the capacity for faculty to thrive in a complex health care economy.

  9. Humor in the classroom using faculty skits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cheryl Mixon; Noviello, Sheri Reynolds

    2012-01-01

    The infusion of humor in the classroom through faculty-developed skits is a teaching-learning strategy that engages nursing students in the learning process. Gardner's Multiple Intelligence Theory for Adult Learners provides the framework for the use of humor as a strategy in higher education. Three exemplars are presented with a description of the specific strategy, an objective for each strategy, and the effect of the strategy on student engagement in nursing education. In the exemplars, the authors provide "ready to use" ideas with some "pearls of wisdom" for other faculty interested in developing similar learning activities.

  10. Welcoming speech from Dean Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, UMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Zahari

    2012-09-01

    In the Name of Allah, the Most Beneficent, the Most Merciful. It is with great pleasure that I welcome the participants of the International Conference of Mechanical Engineering Research 2011. The Prophet Muhammad (peace be upon him) said 'Acquire knowledge and impart it to the people.' (Al Tirmidhi). The quest for knowledge has been from the beginning of time but knowledge only becomes valuable when it is disseminated and applied to benefit humankind. It is hoped that ICMER 2011 will be a platform to gather and disseminate the latest knowledge in mechanical engineering. Academicians, Scientist, Researchers and practitioners of mechanical engineering will be able to share and discuss new findings and applications of mechanical engineering. It is envisaged that the intellectual discourse will result in future collaborations between universities, research institutions and industry both locally and internationally. In particular it is expected that focus will be given to issues on environmental and energy sustainability. Researchers in the mechanical engineering faculty at UMP have a keen interest in technology to harness energy from the ocean. Lowering vehicle emissions has been a primary goal of researchers in the mechanical engineering faculty and the automotive engineering centre as well including developing vehicles using alternative fuels such as biodiesel and renewable sources such as solar driven electric vehicles. Finally I would like to congratulate the organizing committee for their tremendous efforts in organizing the conference. As I wrote this in the Holy Land of Makkah, I pray to Allah swt that the conference will be a success. Prof. Dr. Zahari Taha CEng, MIED, FASc Dean, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering Universiti Malaysia Pahang

  11. Outline of scientific and research activities of the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loncar, G.

    1982-01-01

    A survey is presented of scientific and research activities carried out in the departments of the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering of the Czech Technical University in Prague. The first section lists the principal results achieved in the course of the 6th Five-Year Plan in Physical Electronics, Solid State Engineering, Materials Structure and Properties, Nuclear Physics, Theory and Technology of Nuclear Reactors, Dosimetry and Application of Ionizing Radiation and Nuclear Chemistry. The second part gives a summary of scientific and research work carried out in the Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering in the 7th Five-Year Plan in all branches of science represented. The Faculty's achievements in international scientific cooperation are assessed. (author)

  12. Faculty-led faculty development: evaluation and reflections on a distributed educational leadership model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzubeir, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This report describes and explores the impact of a series of faculty-led faculty development programs underpinned by principles of distributed educational leadership. We aimed to prepare faculty for their roles as facilitators and assessors in a newly implemented problem-based (PBL) graduate entry medical program. We asked participants attending a series of faculty development programs to evaluate workshops attended using an in-house designed survey. Overall descriptive statistics for all workshops and qualitative feedback for PBL workshops alone were examined. It was concluded that clinical faculty who are not specialized in medical education can offer high-quality, well-accepted training for their peers. Faculty development, underpinned by a distributed leadership approach which supports learning organization tenets, imaginative, flexible and democratic approaches to developing and nurturing expertise at all levels of the organization, is likely to lead to improvements in medical education. Despite the limitations of the survey approach to evaluation of faculty development programs, the information provided is useful both as a basis for decision making and program improvement.

  13. Barriers and strategies toward the implementation of a full-time faculty-at-a-distance nurse educator role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearsall, Catherine; Hodson-Carlton, Kay; Flowers, James C

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this two-phase exploratory, descriptive study was to uncover and describe barriers and potential strategies toward implementation of a full-time faculty-at-a-distance nurse educator (FDNE) role, with all responsibilities of instruction, governance, research, and student service, as perceived by hirers and potential hires. The faculty deficit has reached critical proportions that directly affect the nation's nursing workforce. There is a growing need to use nontraditional methods to reinforce, energize, and expand faculty capacity. The two-phase study was conducted using online questionnaires with two samples: decision makers with regard to faculty hiring and current, experienced nurse faculty. Respondents were asked to rate how National League for Nursing Nurse Educator Core Competencies could be achieved by a FDNE. The ability to facilitate student learning development and socialization was ranked most difficult, while engagement in scholarship and use of assessment and evaluation strategies were ranked least difficult. Both groups of respondents identified "tradition" and "perceived faculty role change" as the highest ranked barriers. Technological and administrative support and support of colleagues were seen as strategies for the implementation of the role. Perceived barriers to the FDNE were attitudinal and infrastructural. The findings of this study may pave the way toward development of a prefatory faculty-at-a-distance model.

  14. Faculty Diversity Programs in U.S. Medical Schools and Characteristics Associated with Higher Faculty Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Kathleen Raquel; Castillo-Page, Laura; Wright, Scott M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To describe diversity programs for racial and ethnic minority faculty in U.S. medical schools and identify characteristics associated with higher faculty diversity. Method The authors conducted a cross-sectional survey study of leaders of diversity programs at 106 U.S. MD-granting medical schools in 2010. Main outcome measures included African American and Latino faculty representation, with correlations to diversity program characteristics, minority medical student representation, and state demographics. Results Responses were obtained from 82 of the 106 institutions (77.4%). The majority of the respondents were deans, associate and assistant deans (68.3%), members of minority ethnic/racial background (65.9% African American, 14.7% Latino), and women (63.4%). The average time in the current position was 6.7 years, with approximately 50% effort devoted to the diversity program. Most programs targeted medical trainees and faculty (63.4%). A majority of programs received monetary support from their institutions (82.9%). In bivariate analysis, none of the program characteristics measured were associated with higher than the mean minority faculty representation in 2008 (3% African American and 4.2% Latino faculty). However, minority state demographics in 2008, and proportion of minority medical students a decade earlier, were significantly associated with minority faculty representation. Conclusions Medical student diversity ten years earlier was the strongest modifiable factor associated with faculty diversity. Our results support intervening early to strengthen the minority medical student pipeline to improve faculty diversity. Schools located in states with low minority representation may need to commit additional effort to realize institutional diversity. PMID:21869663

  15. Job Satisfaction Analysis of Faculty Members in Public Sector Engineering Universities: An Empirical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMEER ALI SHAHANI

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of the researchers have conducted study on the job satisfaction of the faculty members in Non? Engineering Universities only few have paid their attention in the Public Sector Engineering Universities. This study is the first attempt towards the research on faculty members? job satisfaction in public sector engineering universities of Sindh, Pakistan. The focus of this research is to assess the faculty members?job satisfaction on the perspectives of different factors i.e. compensation, research and technology, management style, recognition, working environment, in-service teaching training. The data was collected and analyzed using SPSS version 17.0 on five point likert scale. Regression, Correlation and ANOVAs (Analysis of Variance tests were conducted. Results showed that faculty members of the public sector engineering universities have lower job satisfaction. The finding suggested that, the study is useful for the management of universities in order to rectify the areas of dissatisfaction and to tackle the issues related to the faculty members regarding their job satisfaction.

  16. Faculty and Student Teams and National Laboratories: Expanding the Reach of Research Opportunities and Workforce Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn,N.; White, K.; Stegman, M.

    2009-08-05

    The Faculty and Student Teams (FaST) Program, a cooperative effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and the National Science Foundation (NSF), brings together collaborative research teams composed of a researcher at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and a faculty member with two or three undergraduate students from a college or university. Begun by the Department of Energy in 2000 with the primary goal of building research capacity at a faculty member's home institution, the FaST Program focuses its recruiting efforts on faculty from colleges and universities with limited research facilities and those institutions that serve populations under-represented in the fields of science, engineering and technology, particularly women and minorities. Once assembled, a FaST team spends a summer engaged in hands-on research working alongside a laboratory scientist. This intensely collaborative environment fosters sustainable relationships between the faulty members and BNL that allow faculty members and their BNL colleagues to submit joint proposals to federal agencies, publish papers in peer-reviewed journals, reform local curriculum, and develop new or expand existing research labs at their home institutions.

  17. Finding a mentor: the complete examination of an online academic matchmaking tool for physician-faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez GF

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: To have a successful career in academic medicine, finding a mentor is critical for physician-faculty. However, finding the most appropriate mentor can be challenging for junior faculty. As identifying a mentor pool and improving the search process are paramount to both a mentoring program’s success, and the academic medical community, innovative methods that optimize mentees’ searches are needed. This cross-sectional study examines the search and match process for just over 60 junior physician-faculty mentees participating in a department-based junior faculty mentoring program. To extend beyond traditional approaches to connect new faculty with mentors, we implement and examine an online matchmaking technology that aids their search and match process. Methods: We describe the software used and events leading to implementation. A concurrent mixed method design was applied wherein quantitative and qualitative data, collected via e-surveys, provide a comprehensive analysis of primary usage patterns, decision making, and participants’ satisfaction with the approach. Results: Mentees reported using the software to primarily search for potential mentors in and out of their department, followed by negotiating their primary mentor selection with their division chief’s recommendations with those of the software, and finally, using online recommendations for self-matching as appropriate. Mentees found the online service to be user-friendly while allowing for a non-threatening introduction to busy senior mentors. Conclusions: Our approach is a step toward examining the use of technology in the search and match process for junior physician-faculty. Findings underscore the complexity of the search and match process.

  18. Nigerian Journal of Technological Development

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nigerian Journal of Technological Development is now a quarterly publication of the Faculty of Engineering & Technology, University of Ilorin, Ilorin, Nigeria. It publishes original high-quality articles focusing on all aspects of Engineering and Applied Sciences in March, June, September and December. Manuscripts are ...

  19. Faculty Development for Educators: A Realist Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorinola, Olanrewaju O.; Thistlethwaite, Jill; Davies, David; Peile, Ed

    2015-01-01

    The effectiveness of faculty development (FD) activities for educators in UK medical schools remains underexplored. This study used a realist approach to evaluate FD and to test the hypothesis that motivation, engagement and perception are key mechanisms of effective FD activities. The authors observed and interviewed 33 course participants at one…

  20. Effective Collection Developers: Librarians or Faculty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidor, David L.; Futas, Elizabeth

    1988-01-01

    A study at the Emory University School of Business Administration library compared the effectiveness of faculty members and librarians as book selectors. Effectiveness was measured by comparing selected titles with the Baker list published by the Harvard Business School and with business periodical reviews, and by examining circulation records.…

  1. Faculty Development in Russian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Donald K.; Kondrashova, Maria V.; Efendiev, Azer Gamidovich; Tukhfatullin, Marat

    2005-01-01

    This work summarizes results from three studies of the current state of higher education faculty development in Russia. Positive aspects include its support for societal change, content focus, regularity, systematic nature, governmental support, established tradition, encouragement of graduate work, career-long continuity, institutional control,…

  2. Market Meltdown: Recruiting Qualified Business Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, James E.; Swartz, Teresa A.; Liang, Priscilla

    2007-01-01

    University business programs have been facing a growing dilemma concerning how to address increasing shortages of doctoral-level faculty. In this study, the authors examine the challenges facing business schools because of the identified shortage, especially in light of pending baby boomer retirements. With the California State University system…

  3. Evidences of Faculty Centered Management Style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, William F.

    At Wytheville Community College (WCC) in Virginia, the seminal management style is collegial, while the seminal management structure is bureaucratic. Formal bureaucratic structures exist for normal and routine communication and for policy decisions. However, faculty are encouraged to share their concerns with the president and other administrators…

  4. A Causal Model of Faculty Turnover Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, John C.

    1990-01-01

    A causal model assesses the relative influence of individual attributes, institutional characteristics, contextual-work environment variables, and multiple measures of job satisfaction on faculty intentions to leave their current institutions. Factors considered include tenure status, age, institutional status, governance style, organizational…

  5. Faculty Work Load Models: Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, William F., Jr.; And Others

    Descriptions are presented of the responsibilities and general workload of the physical education faculty at four institutions of higher education; (1) University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (a major research institution); (2) West Virginia University (a regional university); (3) Wittenburg University (a liberal arts institution); and (4)…

  6. Faculty Salaries and the Maximization of Prestige

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melguizo, Tatiana; Strober, Myra H.

    2007-01-01

    Through the lens of the emerging economic theory of higher education, we look at the relationship between salary and prestige. Starting from the premise that academic institutions seek to maximize prestige, we hypothesize that monetary rewards are higher for faculty activities that confer prestige. We use data from the 1999 National Study of…

  7. Women Faculty, Professional Identity, and Generational Disposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine, Susan B.; Martínez Alemán, Ana M.

    2018-01-01

    In an exploratory qualitative study, the generational dispositions of tenured women faculty from the Boomer Generation were examined. As pioneers and now senior members in the academic profession in the Golden Era of American higher education, they exist in a common historical location characterized by cultural forces and events that helped to…

  8. Women Engineering Faculty: Expanding the Pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greni, Nadene Deiterman

    2006-01-01

    The purpose for this case study was to explore the features of undergraduate engineering departmental and college support that influenced the persistence of women students. Women engineering faculty members were among the participants at three Land Grant universities in the Midwest. The data revealed the theme, Expanding the Pipeline, and…

  9. Public Colleges Fight Raids on Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    June, Audrey Williams

    2008-01-01

    Public colleges and universities are girding themselves to win the war for tenured talent. Some are succeeding. State budget woes and a rocky economy have shaken public colleges and universities. One of the most noticeable shudders has been a pervasive "brain drain," as many state institutions face competition for their best faculty members from…

  10. Perceptions of Novice Clinical Adjunct Nursing Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmelberg, Layna

    2011-01-01

    The anticipated nursing shortage in the United States is well documented and continues to be a topic of discussion. A nationwide solution has been for nursing programs to increase their enrollment of nursing students. This could be difficult for many nursing schools; as many have a shortage of qualified nursing faculty with which to instruct…

  11. Empowering Untenured Faculty through Mosaic Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanuka, Heather; Marini, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Mentoring programs have consistently demonstrated their value in assisting new and early faculty members to make successful adjustments and productive contributions to the academy. Yet, mentoring programs have failed to be consistently implemented despite their efficacy and increasing levels of job dissatisfaction reported by new and early faculty…

  12. Human Sexuality: Faculty Knowledge and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Karen Lee

    1976-01-01

    A knowledge of human sexuality is necessary in order to answer inquiries from patients regarding their sexual problems. A survey of faculty knowledge levels in the area of human sexuality reveals that more attention should be given to teaching human sexuality as part of the nursing curriculum. (EC)

  13. Faculty Marginality and Radical Academic Ideology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Harold C.; Vaughan, Suzanne

    One of the outgrowths of the student counterculture of the late 1960's and 1970's was the emergence of a specifically educational counterculture that found a following among members of college and university faculties. As war and militarism declined as dominant issues provoking campus unrest, assaults on the structure of higher education…

  14. Psychology Faculty Perceptions of Abnormal Psychology Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Zachary

    2011-01-01

    The problem. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the perceptions and opinions of psychology professors regarding the accuracy and inclusiveness of abnormal psychology textbooks. It sought answers from psychology professors to the following questions: (1) What are the expectations of the psychology faculty at a private university of…

  15. Motivational Implications of Faculty Performance Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Kollmann, Sherry L.

    2012-01-01

    Expectations and how they are communicated influence employees' motivation, effort, goals, efficacy and performance. This study examined faculty performance evaluation standards and processes of 60 academic departments in research universities for motivationally relevant elements. Characteristics were systematically analysed to understand their…

  16. Faculty: Thy Administrator's Keeper? Some Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Brendan M.

    2009-01-01

    Colleges and universities face a principal-agent problem. There are information asymmetries over the actions chosen by administrators. Because non-profit constraints limit the financial stake of trustees there may be insufficient monitoring of administrators and, consequentially, shirking. It is conceivable that faculty will serve as "delegated…

  17. A Model for Mentoring University Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Operational characteristics for successful mentoring programs of new university faculty include clarity of purpose of the program, methods for matching mentors and proteges, mentor training, mentor-protege relationship building, and program effectiveness assessment. Strengths of formal, informal, peer, group or consortia, intra-departmental,…

  18. Accounting Students' Perceptions of Effective Faculty Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfraih, Mishari M.; Alanezi, Faisal S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to explore the attributes of an effective accounting faculty from the student perspective. It also examines similarities and differences in the perceived importance of these attributes between bachelor's and associate's accounting degree students in two public higher education institutions in Kuwait, namely, Kuwait…

  19. The Language Faculty - mind or brain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Torben

    2009-01-01

    The paper subjects Chomsky's compound creation - the 'mind/brain' - to scrutiny. It argues that it creates a slipway for talk about the human language faculty,  such that what should properly be discussed in functional terms - what the brain does when processing language - is instead talked about...

  20. Finding Time for Faculties to Study Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Carlene

    1997-01-01

    Describes how various schools nationwide have carved study time out of their schedules in order to make professional development a seamless part of their work day, noting how many schools find it difficult to create this study time. These whole-faculty study groups work seriously and purposefully to increase teachers' knowledge and skills. (SM)

  1. Faculty intent to engage in interprofessional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olenick M

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Maria Olenick,1 Lois Ryan Allen2 1College of Nursing and Health Science, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA; 2School of Nursing, Widener University, Chester, PA, USA Background: This descriptive correlational and comparative study explored health-care faculty (HCF attitudes toward interprofessional education (IPE and interprofessional health-care teams, HCF perceptions of subjective norms, the influence of subjective norms on HCF intent to engage in IPE, and HCF intent to engage in IPE. In addition, differences among seven disciplines of HCF were explored. Methods: Nursing, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistants, and social work faculty were identified. Stratified random sampling was used to ensure that the population surveyed was representative of the target population. The total sample for this study included 439 HCF from the seven identified health-care professions in the US. Data collection included measures of attitudes toward IPE and attitudes toward interprofessional health-care teams. Subjective norms were measured using two 7-point rating scales. Intent to engage in IPE was measured using a 10-point rating scale. Results: There were no significant differences among HCF groups regarding attitudes toward IPE or interprofessional health-care teams. Administrative faculty reported greater intent to engage in IPE than teaching faculty. HCF who were currently in or had previously engaged in IPE reported greater intent to engage in or continue to engage, and had higher attitude and subjective norm scores than faculty without IPE experience. The combination of perceived pressure from school administrators and attitudes toward IPE was the best predictor of intent to engage in IPE. Conclusion: IPE has the potential to influence patient quality of care and lead to better working relationships between health-care providers. HCF are more likely to engage in IPE when they believe their school

  2. Faculty intent to engage in interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenick, Maria; Allen, Lois Ryan

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive correlational and comparative study explored health-care faculty (HCF) attitudes toward interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional health-care teams, HCF perceptions of subjective norms, the influence of subjective norms on HCF intent to engage in IPE, and HCF intent to engage in IPE. In addition, differences among seven disciplines of HCF were explored. Nursing, medicine, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistants, and social work faculty were identified. Stratified random sampling was used to ensure that the population surveyed was representative of the target population. The total sample for this study included 439 HCF from the seven identified health-care professions in the US. Data collection included measures of attitudes toward IPE and attitudes toward interprofessional health-care teams. Subjective norms were measured using two 7-point rating scales. Intent to engage in IPE was measured using a 10-point rating scale. There were no significant differences among HCF groups regarding attitudes toward IPE or interprofessional health-care teams. Administrative faculty reported greater intent to engage in IPE than teaching faculty. HCF who were currently in or had previously engaged in IPE reported greater intent to engage in or continue to engage, and had higher attitude and subjective norm scores than faculty without IPE experience. The combination of perceived pressure from school administrators and attitudes toward IPE was the best predictor of intent to engage in IPE. IPE has the potential to influence patient quality of care and lead to better working relationships between health-care providers. HCF are more likely to engage in IPE when they believe their school's administrators think they should engage in IPE and when they have positive attitudes toward IPE.

  3. The Opinion of Students and Faculty Members about the Effect of the Faculty Performance Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahrani, Nassim; Siamian, Hasan; Balaghafari, Azita; Aligolbandi, Kobra; Vahedi, Mohammad

    2015-08-01

    One of the most common ways that in most countries and Iran in determining the status of teacher training is the evaluation by students. The most common method of evaluation is the survey questionnaire provided to the study subjects, comprised of questions about educational activities. The researchers plan to evaluate the opinion of students and faculty members about the effect of the faculty performance evaluation at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in 2014-15. In this descriptive cross-sectional survey of attitudes of students and professors base their evaluation on the impact on their academic performance, have been studied. The populations were 3904 students and 149 faculty members of basic sciences Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Sample of 350 students and 107 students using Cochran formula faculty members through proportional stratified random sampling was performed. The data of the questionnaire with 28 questions on a Likert Spectrum, respectively. Statistical Analysis Data are descriptive and inferential statistics using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test is done. Based on the results obtained from total of 350 students, 309 students and from total of 107 faculty members, 76 faculty of basic sciences, participated in this study. The most of the students, 80 (25.9%) of the Faculty of Allied Medical Sciences and most of the faculty of basic sciences, 33 (4.43) of the medicine science faculty. Comments Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences in comparison to the scope of the evaluation should test using Binominal test; we can conclude that in the field of regulatory, scientific, educational, and communications arena, there were no significant differences between the views of students. The greatest supporter of the education of 193 (62%) and most challengers of exam 147 (48%), respectively. Regarding the viewpoints of the faculty members at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences towards the evaluation domains, using binomial test

  4. Will BSN Students Consider a Future Nursing Faculty Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Diana K

    The aim of the study was to determine the intent of baccalaureate nursing students to pursue a future nursing faculty role. An impending nursing faculty shortage negatively affects the capacity to meet the need for nurses. Using the constructs of social cognitive career theory, a prospective correlational research design was used to survey prelicensure BSN nursing students regarding their intent for a future nursing faculty role. Twenty-five percent of the students intend to pursue a future faculty role. The six statistically significant predictors for a future faculty role were type of nursing program (OR = 2.0), interest in the activities of a faculty role (OR = 2.3), outcome expectations-advantages (OR = 1.9), previous teaching experiences (OR = 1.7), encouragement (OR = 1.5), and outcome expectations-disadvantages (OR = 0.8). Providing students with knowledge of the faculty role, teaching experiences, and encouragement may inspire them to pursue a future faculty role.

  5. Gender, Pay and Job Satisfaction of Faculty in Journalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, James D.

    1989-01-01

    Examines gender-based differences in job satisfaction among faculty in journalism and mass communication. Finds that women faculty members receive less pay but have the same degree of job satisfaction as men. (RS)

  6. Measurement and comparison of nursing faculty members' critical thinking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondy, Laurie C

    2011-03-01

    Nursing faculty members strive to teach students to think critically. It has long been assumed that nursing faculty members are good at critical thinking because they are expected to teach these skills to students, but this assumption has not been well supported empirically. Faculty members question their ability to think critically and are unsure of their skills. The purpose of this study was to address this assumption by measuring nursing faculty members' critical thinking skills and compare the faculty mean score to that of a student norming group, and to the mean scores of other nursing faculty studies. Findings can be used to increase nursing faculty members' understanding of their critical thinking skills, prompt discussion about critical thinking skills, and to help faculty members address concerns and uncertainty about the concept of critical thinking. This study also helps establish an empirical basis for future research.

  7. The preceptor--preceptee model for faculty "cross-training".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, M C

    1993-01-01

    In the review of the literature, the author notes several discussions concerning collaboration between nursing education and service agencies for updating faculty clinical practice. This article addresses the Preceptor-Preceptee model for Faculty "Cross-training," including the permission process, method, needs analysis, and evaluation. A concluding statement by the author strongly recommends the utilization of the faculty practice model to enhance the faculty's competence in clinical nursing areas.

  8. Timing of revenue streams from newly recruited faculty: implications for faculty retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Keith A; Hiteman, Sarah; Wormsley, Steven; St Germain, Patricia

    2007-12-01

    To determine the timing and magnitude of revenues generated by newly recruited faculty, to facilitate configuration of recruitment packages appropriately matched to expected financial returns. The aggregate of all positive cash flows to central college of medicine administration -- from research, clinical care, tuition, philanthropy, and royalties and patents, from all faculty newly recruited to the University of Arizona College of Medicine between 1998 and 2004 -- was quantified using the net present value (npv) methodology, which incorporates the time value of money. Tenure-track faculty and, in particular, those with laboratory research programs, generated the highest positive central cash flows. The npv for positive cash flows (npv[+]) during 6 and 10 years for newly recruited assistant professors with laboratory research programs were $118,600 and $255,400, respectively, and, for professors with laboratory research programs, $172,600 and $298,000, respectively (associate professors were not analyzed because of limited numbers). Faculty whose appointments at the University of Arizona College of Medicine exceeded 15 years in duration were the most productive in central revenue generation, far in excess of their numbers proportionate to the total. The results emphasize the critical importance of faculty retention, because even those newly recruited faculty who are most successful in central revenue generation (tenure track with laboratory research programs) must be retained for periods well in excess of 10 years to recoup the initial central investment required for their recruitment.

  9. Cyber Savvy: Embracing Digital Safety and Civility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Concerns about children's online safety have evolved from protecting them to focusing on encouraging positive social norms, transmitting effective skills, and encouraging students to be helpful allies. In fact, federal law now requires schools that receive funding to educate students about cyber safety. Nancy Willard integrates her expertise in…

  10. Help Your Kids Be Savvy about Sunglasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PTA Today, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Children need to protect their eyes from the sun's harmful rays. Sunglasses with ultraviolet (UV) protection can help enhance the eye's ability to filter out damaging rays, but sunglasses without such protection may allow in more harmful rays. The article presents guidelines to help parents select safe, appropriate sunglasses for their children.…

  11. 10 Budget-Savvy Content Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillis, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Facing an overall budget reduction of 10 percent, most colleges or universities would postpone investing in a Web content management system. However, for California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB), a large budget cut made Web content management even more important. CSUMB found an innovative way to purchase and implement a new Content…

  12. Just Ask: Using Faculty Input to Inform Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann-Longtin, Krista; Palmer, Megan M.; Welch, Julie L.; Walvoord, Emily C.; Dankoski, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Faculty members today are bombarded with information, yet limited in time and attention. Managing communication with faculty is an increasingly important function of faculty development offices. This study explored how communication frameworks can be paired with web design principles and attention economics to increase the effectiveness of…

  13. The Characteristics and Utility of National Faculty Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    It is proposed that numerous national surveys of faculty since the late 1960s provide institutional researchers and others with rich sources of descriptive data to help address the shifting national issues and institutional concerns related to faculty resources. An annotated list of 12 major faculty surveys is appended. (MSE)

  14. Content Analysis of a Computer-Based Faculty Activity Repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Eveleth, Lori; Stone, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    The research presents an analysis of faculty opinions regarding the introduction of a new computer-based faculty activity repository (FAR) in a university setting. The qualitative study employs content analysis to better understand the phenomenon underlying these faculty opinions and to augment the findings from a quantitative study. A web-based…

  15. A critical review of current nursing faculty practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, M J; Alexander, I M; Gordon, L; Juszczak, L J; Gilliss, C

    2000-12-01

    To critically examine the current literature on nursing faculty practice, using the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) Guidelines for Evaluation of Faculty Practice, and to examine faculty practice models' strengths, weaknesses, and barriers. Thirty-five articles describing models of faculty practice were identified through an exhaustive search on CINAHL and Medline. Two NONPF monographs on nursing faculty practice were used as guidelines for the critical review. Faculty practice has become an integral component of faculty-role expectations at many schools of nursing. Workload, especially without adequate compensation, remains a hindrance to practice. The value of faculty practice time and expertise has not been sufficiently demonstrated. Integration of practitioner, educator and researcher roles remains extremely difficult and sometimes elusive. Faculty practice offers many advantages to schools of nursing, including educational and research opportunities for faculty and students, as well as practice sites and affordable community healthcare. Providing health care in the community presents an opportunity for independent and collaborative practice. To fully utilize the great research opportunities provided by faculty practice, more emphasis must be placed on gathering and analyzing descriptive data.

  16. Connecting Student-Faculty Interaction to Academic Dishonesty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluestein, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper highlights the results of a study on the effects of student-faculty interaction on academic dishonesty; the results were used to develop an explanatory model showing how faculty's classroom demeanor and attitude can impact the likelihood of cheating. Individual, confidential interviews pertaining to student-faculty interaction and…

  17. Responsive and Responsible: Faculty Encouragement of Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Eddie R.; Howe, Elijah C.; Laird, Thomas F. Nelson

    2016-01-01

    This study explores how often faculty members encourage students to engage with campus, local, state, national, and global issues. Using data from the 2013 administration of the Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (FSSE), the results show that faculty members are more likely to encourage students to engage in state, national, or global issues…

  18. Extensive UOP Program Brings (and) Keeps Faculty UP to Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippe, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Describes programs at the University of Phoenix to develop and enhance faculty effectiveness. Discusses training for first-time online courses; continuous online training (including: the Faculty Writing Workshop; Critical Thinking Across the Curriculum; Grading, Evaluation, and Feedback; Learning Teams; and other courses); faculty peer reviews;…

  19. Senior Faculty Careers and Personal Development: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Robert; And Others

    A total of 1,135 senior faculty from 6 institutions of higher education responded to a questionnaire designed to determine the relationships between personal and career development for senior college faculty and the similarities and differences in satisfaction among faculty from various disciplines. Responses from the questionnaire showed that…

  20. Not Dean School: Leadership Development for Faculty Where They Are

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Karrin E.; Shults, Christopher; Berg, James J.

    2018-01-01

    Leadership development for faculty often is designed as training for administration, but faculty demonstrate leadership in the classroom, in their departments, college-wide, and beyond. To fully realize and leverage this leadership potential, colleges must design opportunities for faculty to hone their knowledge and skills as active participants…

  1. Role Perception among Faculty Members at Teacher Education Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grobgeld, Esther; Teichman-Weinberg, Ariela; Wasserman, Egoza; Barchilon Ben-Av, Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine how faculty members at academic colleges of education perceive their role and to consider elements of their work that need to be included in a professional profile definition. All faculty of one college of education were asked: "What are the tasks/obligations of a faculty member at a college of education?…

  2. Changing Institutional Culture through Peer Mentoring of Women STEM Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicole; Bystydzienski, Jill; Desai, Anand

    2015-01-01

    Higher education institutions often use mentoring to socialize faculty members into their academic disciplines and to retain them. Mentoring can also be used to change organizational culture to meet the needs of historically marginalized faculty members. In this article we focus on peer mentoring circles for women STEM faculty at a large,…

  3. Increasing Leadership Capacity for Senior Women Faculty through Mutual Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Karen; Sorcinelli, Mary Deane

    2018-01-01

    Mentoring has long been viewed as a powerful means of enhancing the professional success and personal wellbeing of early-career faculty; however, little is known about its benefits for senior faculty. Using data from a peer mentoring community of six senior faculty women in leadership roles at a research university, this study explores the impact…

  4. Faculty in the U.S. Community College: Corporate Labour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, John S.

    2005-01-01

    Community college faculty are a major labour force in the U.S. and constitute one-third of all postsecondary education faculty. As a labour force, community college faculty epitomize professional work in the new economy and the post-bureaucratic organization: they are predominantly temporary or part-time; the majority bargain collectively for a…

  5. Objective, Way and Method of Faculty Management Based on Ergonomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, Hong-bin; Liu, Yu-hua

    2008-01-01

    The core problem that influences educational quality of talents in colleges and universities is the faculty management. Without advanced faculty, it is difficult to cultivate excellent talents. With regard to some problems in present faculty construction of colleges and universities, this paper puts forward the new objectives, ways and methods of…

  6. Adult Education Faculty and Programs in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Wright, Robin Redmon; Taylor, Edward W.

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of a quantitative survey of North American adult education faculty and a textual analysis of websites of adult education graduate programs in North America conducted in the fall of 2013. This study examined background information about adult education faculty and programs; the nature of faculty work interests,…

  7. Faculty Perspectives on Culturally Responsive Teaching Practices in Developmental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined the perspectives of developmental math faculty at a two-year technical college regarding culturally responsive beliefs and instructional practices. Thirteen faculty who taught the developmental class Elementary Algebra with Applications were surveyed. Nine of the 13 faculty responded. One section of Wisconsin's…

  8. Comparing Community College Student and Faculty Perceptions of Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn-Carter, Darian

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to compare faculty and student perceptions of "student engagement" at a mid-Atlantic community college to determine the level of correlation between student experiences and faculty practices in five benchmark areas of student engagement: "academic challenge, student-faculty interaction,…

  9. Systems Alignment for Comprehensive Faculty Development in Liberal Arts Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Vicki L.; Lunsford, Laura G.; Pifer, Meghan J.

    2015-01-01

    Using an alignment framework, the authors explore faculty development initiatives in liberal arts colleges in order to understand the connection between organizational priorities and processes as connected to faculty members' stated needs. The study draws on mixed-methods data from The Initiative for Faculty Development in Liberal Arts Colleges…

  10. Using a writing group to promote faculty scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houfek, Julia Fisco; Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Visovsky, Constance; Barry, Teresa L; Nelson, Audrey E; Kaiser, Margaret M; Miller, Connie L

    2010-01-01

    Writing productivity is an essential component of scholarship. Barriers to writing include intrapersonal characteristics, faculty role complexity, and time constraints. Writing groups can increase faculty members' writing, contributing to dissemination of nursing knowledge and advancement of professional nursing. The authors discuss the structure and processes of a writing group that can be adapted by faculty interested in using comentoring to increase their scholarship.

  11. Minority Recruitment and Retention for Universities: Bilingual Special Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Alejandro E.

    2012-01-01

    Recruitment and retention of minority faculty in bilingual special education is a perilous task. Research has shown that minority faculty/teachers are able to provide emotional support, mentor students, serve as role models, create a positive climate, provide diverse views, increase collaboration among faculty and teachers, and work with…

  12. Motivations of Faculty Engagement in Internationalization: A Survey in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bihong; Tu, Yangjun

    2016-01-01

    Faculty plays a critical role in the growing trend of internationalization in higher education. Thus, it is important to understand the factors that drive faculty members to get involved in internationalization. Employing structural equation model with data gathered from questionnaire, this study attempts to explore how faculty engagement in…

  13. Blended Learning for Faculty Professional Development Incorporating Knowledge Management Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Adjunct faculty comprise a large percentage of part-time faculty for many colleges and universities today. Adjunct faculty are hired because they are experts in their content areas; however, this does not guarantee that they are skilled in effective classroom management. These instructors can become bewildered and frustrated because they lack the…

  14. Greener Pastures: Faculty Turnover Intent in Urban Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Cheryl J.; Dee, Jay R.

    2006-01-01

    The unique challenges of balancing teaching, research, and service in urban public universities are likely to affect faculty intentions to remain in or depart from these institutions. Findings from this national study of urban public university faculty suggest that institutional efforts to retain faculty should attend to the structural…

  15. Faculty Member Perceptions of Academic Leadership Styles at Private Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidman, Lori Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    The leadership style of academic leaders was studied through the eyes of faculty members. This empirical study looked at faculty perceptions of academic leadership with the use of a numerical survey as the basis for observation. Faculty members at six private liberal arts institutions completed the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ) in…

  16. Barriers in adopting blended learning in a private university of Pakistan and East Africa: faculty members' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Nusrat Fatima; Gulzar, Saleema; Nicholas, Wachira; Nkoroi, Beatrice

    2017-01-01

    Education methods have undergone transformation over the centuries. Use of technology is the cornerstone for innovation in teaching methods. Hence, blended learning which includes face to face and online modalities is being increasingly explored as effective method for learning. This pilot study determines the perceptions of faculty members in a private international university on barriers influencing adoption of technology for teaching and learning. A cross-sectional survey was conducted through a self-reported questionnaire using 'survey monkey'. The data was entered and analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS version 20). Frequencies and proportions are reported. Findings indicated that 51.6% faculty members perceived the importance of integration of technology in their teaching. Around 54% of the participants recognized that they do possess the ability and accessibility to integrate information communication technology (ICT) in teaching and learning, but there is a need to hone the basic information technology (IT) skills to initiate technology driven teaching. Findings revealed that 55% faculty members acknowledged the constraint of not getting protective time to develop and deliver technology driven courses. Further, results showed that 45% faculty members perceived that their innovation efforts in terms of teaching as blended learning do not count towards their professional promotion or recognition, as usually priority is given to research over teaching innovation. The findings also indicated that 54.5% participants asserted that university lack mentorship in the field of blended learning. Therefore, study suggests that universities should provide adequate mentorship programmes for the faculty members in enhancing their skills of integrating technology in their teaching.

  17. The transformation of science and mathematics content knowledge into teaching content by university faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Natalie P.

    This study developed a survey from the existing literature in an attempt to illuminate the processes, tools, insights, and events that allow university science and mathematics content experts (Ph.D.'s) unpack their expertise in order to teach develop and teach undergraduate students. A pilot study was conducted at an urban university in order to refine the survey. The study consisted of 72 science or mathematics Ph.D. faculty members that teach at a research-based urban university. Follow-up interviews were conducted with 21 volunteer faculty to further explore their methods and tools for developing and implementing teaching within their discipline. Statistical analysis of the data revealed: faculty that taught while obtaining their Ph.D. were less confident in their ability to teach successful and faculty that received training in teaching believed that students have difficult to change misconceptions and do not commit enough time to their course. Student centered textbooks ranked the highest among tools used to gain teaching strategies followed by grading of exams and assignments for gaining insights into student knowledge and difficulties. Science and mathematics education literature and university provided education session ranked the lowest in rating scale for providing strategies for teaching. The open-ended survey questions were sub-divided and analyzed by the number of years of experience to identify the development of teaching knowledge over time and revealed that teaching became more interactive, less lecture based, and more engaging. As faculty matured and gained experience they became more aware of student misconceptions and difficulties often changing their teaching to eliminate such issues. As confidence levels increase their teaching included more technology-based tools, became more interactive, incorporated problem based activities, and became more flexible. This change occurred when and if faculty members altered their thinking about their

  18. Creating a Pipeline for African American Computing Science Faculty: An Innovative Faculty/Research Mentoring Program Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleston, LaVar J.; Gilbert, Juan E.; Escobar, Barbara; Jackson, Jerlando F. L.

    2014-01-01

    African Americans represent 1.3% of all computing sciences faculty in PhD-granting departments, underscoring the severe underrepresentation of Black/African American tenure-track faculty in computing (CRA, 2012). The Future Faculty/Research Scientist Mentoring (FFRM) program, funded by the National Science Foundation, was found to be an effective…

  19. Motivation and Faculty Development: A Three-State Study of Presidential Perceptions of Faculty Professional Development Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, Desna C.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the appropriate roles of community college faculty and administration in assuring access to meaningful faculty development opportunities. Describes this three-state study as using the motivational theories of Maslow and Porter to determine faculty qualities as perceived by college presidents. Contains seven references. Survey instrument…

  20. Growing a Faculty Writing Group on a Traditionally Teaching-Focused Campus: A Model for Faculty Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton-Farmer, Cheri; Laverick, Erin; Denecker, Christine; Tulley, Christine E.; Diederich, Nicole; Wilgus, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    When expectations for scholarly productivity increase at comprehensive universities, faculty writing groups can provide the tools, motivation, and support necessary to achieve both administrative and faculty goals. Narratives from members of a faculty writing group experiencing a shift in institutional expectations for scholarship reveal tangible…

  1. Nursing faculty practice: a valid sabbatical request?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassan, R

    1994-01-01

    It is well-recognized and supported in the literature that nursing faculty members often rely on "moonlighting" to keep up their practice skills. The focus of this article is the respectability of sabbatical requests for the purpose of enhancing clinical skills. The author describes personal and professional benefits that can emerge from such an experience, and presents guidelines to develop a proposal for this purpose.

  2. Nursing faculty experiences of students' academic dishonesty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Joyce S

    2009-04-01

    Student academic dishonesty was examined using a qualitative critical method to determine the effects of this experience on nurse educators. Twelve faculty members were interviewed about confronting and reporting academic misconduct. Results indicated that educators perceived significant personal and professional risks associated with addressing academic dishonesty, including damage to their relationships with students and colleagues. Participants identified their primary responsibility as gatekeepers of the profession and therefore noted their willingness to bear the burden of being the accuser.

  3. Professionalism of Lecturers at Faculty of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangkere, T. F. S.; Langitan, F. W.; Maukar, S. M. D.; Roring, R. F.

    2018-02-01

    The main objective of this research was to get the picture pertaining to the professionalization of Lecturers at Faculty of Education in Manado State University, Indonesia. The research method was naturalistic inquiry with qualitative approach. The research techniques were: deep interview, participative observation and document study. The data were analyzed by: data reduction, data display and conclusions, while the validation of data was done by four criteria, namely: credibility, transferability, dependability and conformability. The collecting procedure and data recording were done through observation and interviews. From the findings and conclusions, it can be identified that professionalization of Lecturers at Faculty of Education in Manado State University has been well processed. This can be proved by fulfillment of the minimum academic standard Ninety-one out of the total l12 lecturers has been certified. Based on conclusions, the researcher recommends that the teacher always develop their capability through increasing their academic qualification, self-development through attending educational trainings, conducting more research and publishing those researches through accredited journals. Dean of every Faculty and also execute supporting activities which will support self-development of the lectures and increase the budget for research of the lecturers.

  4. Investigating Mobile Devices Integration in Higher Education in Cyprus: Faculty Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikleia Eteokleous

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices are everywhere and mobile learning has emerged as a potential educational environment; however it is relatively new to Cyprus educational system. The purpose of this research work is to assess and determine the readiness; and evaluate the viability of integrating mobile technology in Cyprus higher education level. To address the above, a mixed method approach is employed making use of quantitative and qualitative data from faculty members working in three private universities in Cyprus. Faculty reactions were mixed with some of them seeing the benefits for mobile learning while others have doubts. The results summarize the technological and pedagogical aspects to be considered prior integrating mobile devices. Additionally, the study supports that one of the major barriers to educators is the lack of understanding regarding mobile devices integration in the teaching and learning process. Finally, there is a need to develop well-defined and well-structured requirements for mobile integration in the classroom.

  5. The global nursing faculty shortage: status and solutions for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Deena A; Gyurko, Charlene C

    2013-09-01

    In addition to a global shortage of nurses, there is also a shortage of academically qualified faculty available to teach in schools of nursing. A systematic review examined proposed solutions to the global shortage of nursing faculty. Metasynthesis was used to compare and critically appraise strategies offered for solving or ameliorating the global nursing faculty shortage by premier nursing organizations. 181 recommendations in 62 publications were categorized into eight major themed solutions, including centralizing data management, international collaboration in nursing research, and increased funding for full-time faculty positions in nursing programs. The nursing faculty shortage is due to a confluence of factors, including the global migration of nurses, a seeming persistent devaluation of faculty by academic programs, disincentives, and an overall reduction in full-time equivalent faculty positions. Results point to a needed change in direction and approach to solving the nursing faculty shortage. By designing new education models that fit global healthcare needs and pooling teaching resources, designing and using the same databases across organizations to track and project faculty needs, and collaborating between schools and businesses to create mutually beneficial agreements for services, nursing faculty capacity can be enhanced, and nursing's capacity to meet global healthcare needs can be expanded. The results of this systematic review can be used as a rubric for the design and development of strategies to end the nursing faculty shortage and expand global nursing capacity. © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  6. Workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Providing resources and support for new faculty to succeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. M.; Beane, R. J.; Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Allen-King, R. M.; Yuretich, R.; Richardson, R. M.; Ormand, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    A vital strategy to educate future geoscientists is to support faculty at the beginning of their careers, thus catalyzing a career-long impact on the early-career faculty and on their future students. New faculty members are at a pivotal stage in their careers as they step from being research-focused graduate students and post-doctoral scholars, under the guidance of advisors, towards launching independent careers as professors. New faculty commonly, and not unexpectedly, feel overwhelmed as they face challenges to establish themselves in a new environment, prepare new courses, begin new research, and develop a network of support. The workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty: Teaching, Research, and Managing Your Career has been offered annually in the U.S. since 1999. The workshop is currently offered through the National Association of Geoscience Teachers On the Cutting Edge professional development program with support from the NSF, AGU and GSA. This five-day workshop, with associated web resources, offers guidance for incorporating evidence-based teaching practices, developing a research program, and managing professional responsibilities in balance with personal lives. The workshop design includes plenary and concurrent sessions, individual consultations, and personalized feedback from workshop participants and leaders. Since 1999, more than 850 U.S. faculty have attended the Early Career Geoscience Faculty workshop. Participants span a wide range of geoscience disciplines, and are in faculty positions at two-year colleges, four-year colleges, comprehensive universities and research universities. The percentages of women (~50%) and underrepresented participants (~8%) are higher than in the general geoscience faculty population. Multiple participants each year are starting positions after receiving all or part of their education outside the U.S. Collectively, participants report that they are better prepared to move forward with their careers as a result of

  7. Millennial Dental Hygiene Students' Learning Preferences Compared to Non-Millennial Faculty Members' Teaching Methods: A National Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, April M; Prihoda, Thomas J; English, Dana K; Chismark, Aubreé; Jacks, Mary E

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the learning preferences of millennial dental hygiene students (born between 1982 and 2002) in the U.S. with the teaching methods used by their non-millennial instructors. Cross-sectional surveys were developed with 21-item, five-point Likert scales to examine students' preferences for and faculty use of lecture, collaborative activities, technology, independent work, and group discussion. Surveys were emailed to U.S. dental hygiene program directors in September 2015. The respondents totaled 800 students and 343 faculty members-approximately 5% of all dental hygiene students and 6.8% of all dental hygiene faculty members in the U.S. The results showed that the responding faculty members (88.7%) used case studies more than the students (61.2%) preferred and that the students (71.4%) preferred games when learning more than the faculty members (57.2%) used them (pmillennial dental hygiene students in this study were consistent with previous research on millennial traits. This study found areas of disagreement between students and faculty members on the use of case studies, study guides, and group work. Although these students stated they preferred lecture over group work, trends in education stress using active learning over lecture.

  8. Journal Rankings by Health Management Faculty Members: Are There Differences by Rank, Leadership Status, or Area of Expertise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menachemi, Nir; Hogan, Tory H; DelliFraine, Jami L

    2015-01-01

    Health administration (HA) faculty members publish in a variety of journals, including journals focused on management, economics, policy, and information technology. HA faculty members are evaluated on the basis of the quality and quantity of their journal publications. However, it is unclear how perceptions of these journals vary by subdiscipline, department leadership role, or faculty rank. It is also not clear how perceptions of journals may have changed over the past decade since the last evaluation of journal rankings in the field was published. The purpose of the current study is to examine how respondents rank journals in the field of HA, as well as the variation in perception by academic rank, department leadership status, and area of expertise. Data were drawn from a survey of HA faculty members at U.S. universities, which was completed in 2012. Different journal ranking patterns were noted for faculty members of different subdisciplines. The health management-oriented journals (Health Care Management Review and Journal of Healthcare Management) were ranked higher than in previous research, suggesting that journal ranking perceptions may have changed over the intervening decade. Few differences in perceptions were noted by academic rank, but we found that department chairs were more likely than others to select Health Affairs in their top three most prestigious journals (β = 0.768; p journal prestige varied between a department chair and untenured faculty in different disciplines, and this perceived difference could have implications for promotion and tenure decisions.

  9. Benchmarking and gap analysis of faculty mentorship priorities and how well they are met.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Deborah Watkins; Dunbar, Sandra; Higgins, Melinda; Martyn, Kristy

    2016-01-01

    package (61.5%), guidance on test writing (60%), and utilizing technology in the classroom (60%). Priorities varied by faculty track. In terms of the gap between mentorship priorities and how well they were being met, the highest gaps overall were for test writing, using technology in the classroom, curriculum development, lecturing, and developing and managing a research team. As with priorities, the gaps between priorities and how well they were being met varied by track. The priorities and gap analysis were used to guide career development program activities and to develop a plan for future mentor-mentee training and activities. The survey tool demonstrated face validity, variability, and preliminary utility as one method for assessing and guiding improvements in faculty mentorship. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Dental school faculty and the academic environment from 1936 to 2011: familiar features in a new context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drisko, Connie L; Whittaker, Lynn Page

    2012-01-01

    From its first issue in 1936 until today, no subject has been more central to the work published in the Journal of Dental Education (JDE) and to dental education itself than the dental school faculty. William Gies's vision in 1926 of the professionalization of dental educators was key to the professionalization of dental education. His focus on the need to develop these teachers as both instructors and researchers established the model by which a "dental educator" became a distinct professional, different from a dentist who happens to teach. This article for the seventy-fifth anniversary issue of the JDE thus starts from the obvious but not always acknowledged point that faculty members are central to the entire enterprise of dental education and relate to change over time as both cause and effect. Whether the profession today is evolving to incorporate new science and curricular models or becoming more interprofessional or meeting the needs of diverse patient populations or adopting new educational methodologies and technologies, developments in these areas will have a direct impact on the way individual faculty members do their jobs. To give a taste of the rich variety published over the past seventy-five years, the first section touches briefly on three significant types of research regarding faculty as exemplified by articles published in the JDE. These three are faculty development, educational methodologies, and faculty recruitment and retention. The second section addresses an increasingly important area of research: faculty members' perceptions of the academic work environment. After considering some trends that will affect this environment over the next decade, the article concludes with additional reasons the JDE is a valuable resource for faculty members in dental schools and allied and advanced dental education programs.

  11. Influences of faculty evaluating system on educational performance of medical school faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Bin; Myung, Sun Jung; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Chang, Ji Young; Shin, Chan Soo

    2016-09-01

    The promotion of educators is challenged by the lack of accepted standards to evaluate the quality and impact of educational activities. Traditionally, promotion is related to research productivity. This study developed an evaluation tool for educational performance of medical school faculty using educator portfolios (EPs). Design principles and quantitative items for EPs were developed in a consensus workshop. These principles were tested in a simulation and revised based on feedback. The changes of total educational activities following introduction of the system were analyzed. A total of 71% faculty members answered the simulation of the system and the score distributed widely (mean±standard deviation, 65.43±68.64). The introduction of new system significantly increased the total educational activities, especially in assistant professors. The authors offer comprehensive and practical tool for enhancing educational participation of faculty members. Further research for development of qualitative evaluation systems is needed.

  12. Influences of faculty evaluating system on educational performance of medical school faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Bin Kim

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The promotion of educators is challenged by the lack of accepted standards to evaluate the quality and impact of educational activities. Traditionally, promotion is related to research productivity. This study developed an evaluation tool for educational performance of medical school faculty using educator portfolios (EPs. Methods: Design principles and quantitative items for EPs were developed in a consensus workshop. These principles were tested in a simulation and revised based on feedback. The changes of total educational activities following introduction of the system were analyzed. Results: A total of 71% faculty members answered the simulation of the system and the score distributed widely (mean±standard deviation, 65.43±68.64. The introduction of new system significantly increased the total educational activities, especially in assistant professors. Conclusion: The authors offer comprehensive and practical tool for enhancing educational participation of faculty members. Further research for development of qualitative evaluation systems is needed.

  13. New Clinical Faculty Training Program: Transforming Practicing Dentists into Part-Time Dental Faculty Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Brooke N; Kirkup, Michele L; Willis, Lisa H; Reifeis, Paul E

    2017-06-01

    At Indiana University School of Dentistry, a New Clinical Faculty Training (NCFT) program was created with the primary goals of informing new part-time faculty members of clinical policies and assessment guidelines and thus developing qualified and satisfied faculty members. The aim of this study was to determine if participation in the training program improved the participants' satisfaction and competence in comparison to their colleagues who did not participate in the program. Two cohorts were compared: a control group of part-time faculty members who did not receive formal training when they were hired (n=21; response rate 58.3%); and the intervention group, who had participated in the NCFT program (n=12; response rate 80%). A survey of faculty members in the control group gathered information on their experiences when initially hired, and a pretest was administered to measure their knowledge of clinical policies. After the control group was given an overview of the program, their feedback was collected through post surveys, and a posttest identical to the pretest was given that found statistically significant increases on questions one (p=0.003) and four (p=0.025). In February 2014, 15 new faculty members participated in the pilot implementation of the NCFT program. Of those 15, 12 (the intervention group) completed follow-up surveys identical to the pre survey used with the control group. Statistically significant differences were found for the factors clinical teaching (p=0.005) and assessment training (p=0.008) with better responses for the NCFT group. These results suggest that participation in the program was associated with improved clinical teaching knowledge and job satisfaction.

  14. Examining E-Learning Barriers as Perceived by Faculty Members of Engineering Colleges in the Jordanian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawneh, Muhammad K.

    2014-01-01

    Employing computer's technology that includes e-learning system in the field of Engineering is a vital issue which needs to be discussed. Therefore, this study purposed to examine e-learning barriers as perceived by faculty members of engineering in three major universities in Jordan (Yarmouk University, Jordan University of Science and…

  15. Faculty Transitions in Online Delivery: Make or Buy? Tips for Developing a "New to You" Online Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney-Klinger, Kelly; Vanevenhoven, Jeff; Wagner, Richard; Chenoweth, John

    2014-01-01

    In the last few decades, teaching courses online has become a standard practice at many colleges and universities. Although technologies and pedagogies have changed rapidly during this time, developing an online course is still a labor and time-intensive undertaking. With changes in staffing and course offerings, faculty are often faced with…

  16. The Role of Peer Influence and Perceived Quality of Teaching in Faculty Acceptance of Web-Based Learning Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salajan, Florin D.; Welch, Anita G.; Ray, Chris M.; Peterson, Claudette

    2015-01-01

    This study's primary investigation is the impact of "peer influence" and "perceived quality of teaching" on faculty members' usage of web-based learning management systems within the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) framework. These factors are entered into an extended TAM as external variables impacting on the core constructs…

  17. Computing and STEM in Greek Tertiary Education: Gender Representation of Faculty Members during the Decade 2003-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdousis, Ioannis; Kordaki, Maria

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on the investigation of gender representation of faculty members of all ranks (professors, associate professors, assistant professors and lecturers) of Computing and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) in Greek tertiary education during the decade 2003-2013. To this end, a quantitative study was conducted,…

  18. A Comparative Study of Refereed Journal Articles Published by Native and Foreign Born Faculty in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zeng, Gao, Yan-he

    2010-01-01

    One of the key features of American hegemonic power is the ability to attract talents from all over the world, especially in those shortage areas of science and technology. To explore what is behind the advanced American higher education system, this research compares native and foreign born faculty using four dimensions: demographics, field of…

  19. International Education in the 21st Century: The Importance of Faculty in Developing Study Abroad Research Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giedt, Todd; Gokcek, Gigi; Ghosh, Jayati

    2015-01-01

    This paper argues for a reimagining of education abroad that fuses short-term programming with some kind of experiential research component led by home campus disciplinary faculty, especially those in the sciences, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, in order to better integrate the study abroad program into the core undergraduate…

  20. Virtual Community and Invisible Colleges: Alterations in Faculty Scholarly Networks and Professional Self-Image. ASHE Annual Meeting Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Yvonna S.

    This descriptive study examines how the proliferation of electronic hook-ups to remote locations, to databases, and particularly to electronic mail (e-mail), is changing the work, communication patterns and self-image of higher education faculty. In particular the study examined whether technological acquisition had an impact on professors'…

  1. Faculty Development at One Midwestern Dental School: A Program Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Smith, Deborah B; Overman, Pamela R; Bunce, Larry

    2015-10-01

    Most dental school faculty members arrive on campus with a wealth of clinical experience but little to no teacher training. For the past two decades, there has been a call for schools to educate their faculty on a wide variety of topics including educational methodology and cutting-edge educational techniques through faculty development programs. Drawing on theories of general program evaluation as well as evaluation specific to educational programming, the aim of this study was to investigate outcomes of the Faculty Development Program at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Dentistry between 2007 and 2014. A mixed-methods research design gathered quantitative data via email survey sent to all eligible teaching faculty members; it received an overall response rate of 54% (N=51). Qualitative data came from open-ended survey questions and a focus group with seven volunteer faculty participants. The survey data suggested that the stated outcomes of faculty development were being met for all stakeholder groups with varying degrees of success. Focus group results indicated a need for a more formal new faculty orientation and better communication with all about the specific charge of faculty development within the school. Evaluation of faculty development activities in academic dental institutions is a necessary component of the ongoing improvement of dental education. Suggestions for future evaluations include the idea of collaborating with other dental schools to increase sample sizes, which would increase participants' perception of the level of confidentiality and make statistical analyses more robust.

  2. Diagnosing Management of Agricultural Research and Technology Development under the Agricultural Innovation Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamhossein Abdollahzadeh

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying and analyzing issues and challenges on the agricultural research and technology development under the national innovation framework. The survey consisted of two groups: agricultural researchers of Agriculture-Research and Education Organization and all faculty members of public agricultural faculties of Ministry of Scientific, Research and Technology. Using Cochran sampling formula and multi-stage sampling method, 188 researchers and 205 faculty members were s...

  3. A MODEL FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF THE PROCESS OF SCIENTIFIC INVESTIGATION IN THE FACULTIES OF PHYSICAL CULTURE / MODELO PARA LA GESTIÓN DEL PROCESO DE INVESTIGACIÓN CIENTÍFICA EN FACULTADES DE CULTURA FÍSICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Gilda Prado Alfaro

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This investigation takes as point of departures the insufficiencies of the process of scientific investigation that limit the obtaining of impacts of science and technology in the Faculty of Physical Culture in “Las Tunas”. It was planned as objective: the elaboration of a model for the management of scientific investigation process for this faculty supported by the adaptation pattern for the negotiation of relevant processes and impacts in University Faculties. The fundamental contribution is the application of Model for the management of Relevant and Impact Processes in University Faculties to a Faculty of Physical Culture, a new regularity for the process of scientific investigation and its administration and on the base of it, to sustain a strategy for the management in faculties of Physical Culture.

  4. Observing bedside rounds for faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookherjee, Somnath; Cabrera, Daniel; McKinney, Christy M; Kaplan, Elizabeth; Robins, Lynne

    2017-12-01

    Bedside rounds are an ideal opportunity for clinical teaching. We previously offered faculty development on balancing learner autonomy, patient care and teaching. We noticed that participants often asked whether attending physicians and learners shared the same perceptions of the key elements (patient-centredness, efficiency and educational value) of bedside rounds. Understanding these perceptions and identifying areas of discordance would inform faculty development for optimal bedside rounds. At a university hospital we observed 16 attending physicians and 47 learners over 112 patient encounters. We noted the length of rounds and the number of interruptions. Participants were surveyed on their perception of the attending physicians' efficacy in preparing the team for rounds, and the efficiency and educational value of the rounds. Bedside rounds are an ideal opportunity for clinical teaching FINDINGS: After the same rounds, compared with the attending physicians, learners perceived the patient-centredness, efficiency and educational value of the rounds to be significantly higher. Learners rated attending physicians higher than attending physicians did themselves on learner autonomy, appropriate supervision, conferring responsibility for the care plan to learners and not interrupting. There was no correlation between interruptions and length of the rounds, or learner or attending physician perception of key elements of the rounds. Learners tended to attribute greater efficacy to attending physicians for team preparation than attending physicians did themselves. We identified salient beliefs and practices on bedside teaching. Our findings suggest that identifying shared goals and expectations, and creating metrics to define successful rounds, may help attending physicians to better synergize with learners. Interruptions need not be eschewed completely for the purpose of achieving efficient rounds. Integrating these measures into faculty development may bolster the

  5. Broca and the General Language Faculty

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    Grazia Basile

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I examine the important impact of Paul Broca on our understanding of language. Broca not only discovered the brain area responsible for language production, but he also highlighted the importance of a general language faculty – as Ferdinand de Saussure would later do in his Course in General Linguistics – considered as a kind of semiotic faculty that enables us to establish a constant relationship between an idea and a sign, between an entity that is situated on the level of content and an entity that is situated on the level of expression. Saussure later emphasized that this faculty of associating something on the level of content with something on the level of expression is a natural tendency in every human being. In this paper we will argue – with reference to the socio-constructivist theory of meaning – that the “generality” to which Broca refers should be understood to be closely correlated with the “naturalness” intended by Saussure. In particular, general and natural should be considered together, taking into account the ways in which human beings who live within a linguistic community put into practice, from childhood, their ability to build a language and, conversely, what happens when, in cases of aphasia, patients - so to speak - “lose the words”. Both children who are acquiring their mother tongue and aphasic patients who fail to “find the words” behave in a holistic way, within forms of life, that is, shared situations in which their own life experiences, habits, knowledge, words and so on come to life.

  6. A Little TLC (Technology Learning Cycle) as a Means to Technology Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Rose M.; Howland, Jane; Wedman, Judy; Diggs, Laura

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the need for elementary and secondary school teachers to integrate technology into the classroom and explains the University of Missouri's (Columbia, MO) technology-focused development program, the Technology Learning Cycle (TLC), for faculty who teach undergraduate teacher methods courses. Examines the application of the TLC to two…

  7. Academic Primer Series: Key Papers About Teaching with Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen-Osborn, Megan; Cooney, Robert; Gottlieb, Michael; Chan, Teresa M; Brown, Aaron; King, Andrew; Tobias, Adam; Thoma, Brent

    2017-06-01

    Modern learners have immediate, unlimited access to a wide variety of online resources . To appeal to this current generation of learners, educators must embrace the use of technology. However, educators must balance newer, novel technologies with traditional methods to achieve the best learning outcomes. Therefore, we aimed to review several papers useful for faculty members wishing to incorporate technology into instructional design. We identified a broad list of papers relevant to teaching and learning with technology within the online discussions of the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM) Faculty Incubator. This list was augmented with suggestions by a guest expert (BT) and an open call on Twitter (tagged with the #meded and #FOAMed hashtags) yielding 24 papers. We then conducted a modified three-round Delphi process within the authorship group, including junior and senior faculty members, to identify the most impactful papers. We pared the list of 24 papers to five that were most highly rated. Two were research papers and three were commentaries or editorials. The authorship group reviewed and summarized these papers with specific consideration to their value to junior educators and faculty developers. This is a key reading list for junior faculty members and faculty developers interested in teaching with technology. The commentary contextualizes the importance of these papers for medical educators, to optimize use of technology in their teaching or incorporate into faculty development.

  8. Academic Primer Series: Key Papers About Teaching with Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen-Osborn

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Modern learners have immediate, unlimited access to a wide variety of online resources . To appeal to this current generation of learners, educators must embrace the use of technology. However, educators must balance newer, novel technologies with traditional methods to achieve the best learning outcomes. Therefore, we aimed to review several papers useful for faculty members wishing to incorporate technology into instructional design. Methods: We identified a broad list of papers relevant to teaching and learning with technology within the online discussions of the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM Faculty Incubator. This list was augmented with suggestions by a guest expert (BT and an open call on Twitter (tagged with the #meded and #FOAMed hashtags yielding 24 papers. We then conducted a modified three-round Delphi process within the authorship group, including junior and senior faculty members, to identify the most impactful papers. Results: We pared the list of 24 papers to five that were most highly rated. Two were research papers and three were commentaries or editorials. The authorship group reviewed and summarized these papers with specific consideration to their value to junior educators and faculty developers. Conclusion: This is a key reading list for junior faculty members and faculty developers interested in teaching with technology. The commentary contextualizes the importance of these papers for medical educators, to optimize use of technology in their teaching or incorporate into faculty development.

  9. Faculty receives Excellence in Geophysical Education Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Sarah; Baldridge, W. Scott; Biehler, Shawn; Braile, Lawrence W.; Ferguson, John F.; Gilpin, Bernard E.; Jiracek, George R.

    “The second AGU Excellence in Geophysical Education Award was presented to the faculty of the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE): Scott Baldridge, Shawn Biehler, Larry Braile, John Ferguson, Bernard Gilpin, and George Jiracek. The persistence and commitment of this group has provided the geophysical community with a superb educational program for over 16 years, reaching nearly 400 students, including undergraduates, graduates, and professionals. The award was presented at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on December 8, 1998, in San Francisco, California.

  10. The university faculty's selection in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángel Luis Sánchez Marín

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the systems of the faculty selection discussed in this paper, the conclusion that there are two types of systems in Europe can be reached: centralized systems depending on the central government, where the government regulates and dictates the rules for the selection process, including France, Italy and Spain, with their own features. Then, non-centralized systems not depending on the country central government, where each university dictates and manages its own system, such is the case of Germany, the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland, and the Netherlands.

  11. Looking Out and Looking In: Exploring a Case of Faculty Perceptions during E-Learning Staff Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hendrik Daniël Esterhuizen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This explorative study captured the perceptions of faculty members new to technology enhanced learning and the longitudinal observations of the e-learning manager during dedicated professional development in order to compile a socially transformative emergent learning technology integration framework for open and distance learning at the School of Continuing Teacher Education at North-West University, South Africa. A pragmatic approach guided the bounded case study. The study followed a fully mixed sequential equal status design of mixing sequential qualitative and quantitative findings. Data collection strategies concern a custom-made questionnaire, interviews with faculty members, and longitudinal observations by the e-learning manager. The first phase uncovered 34 qualitative codes. After quantitating of the data, a t-test indicated significant differences for 17 variables between faculty perceptions and observations of the e-learning manager. Ward’s method of Euclidean distances grouped the variables into five clusters according to the researchers’ paradigm of looking in and looking out from the development context. The clusters formed the basis of a model for faculty development towards socially transformative learning technology integration for open distance learning. The five aspects of the model comprise (i the environment in which faculty members should gain support from the institution; (ii the environment in which faculty have to address the realities of adopting TEL; (iii human factors relating to the adoption of TEL; (iv concerns and reservations about the use of TEL; and (v continuing professional development needs, expectations, and motivators. The sustainable integration of ICT into higher education institutions remains a major challenge for the adoption of TEL.

  12. Communication technology update and fundamentals

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, August E

    2014-01-01

    A classic now in its 14th edition, Communication Technology Update and Fundamentals is the single best resource for students and professionals looking to brush up on how these technologies have developed, grown, and converged, as well as what's in store for the future. It begins by developing the communication technology framework-the history, ecosystem, and structure-then delves into each type of technology, including everything from mass media, to computers and consumer electronics, to networking technologies. Each chapter is written by faculty and industry experts who p

  13. Advancing a Program of Research within a Nursing Faculty Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Marie T.; Wenzel, Jennifer; Han, Hae-Ra.; Allen, Jerilyn K.; Paez, Kathryn A.; Mock, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Doctoral students and new faculty members often seek advice from more senior faculty on how to advance their program of research. Students may ask whether they should choose the manuscript option for their dissertation or whether they should seek a postdoctoral fellowship. New faculty members wonder whether they should pursue a career development (K) award and whether they need a mentor as they strive to advance their research while carrying out teaching, service, and practice responsibilities. In this paper, we describe literature on the impact of selected aspects of pre and postdoctoral training and faculty strategies on scholarly productivity in the faculty role. We also combine our experiences at a school of nursing within a research-intensive university to suggest strategies for success. Noting the scarcity of research that evaluates the effect of these strategies we are actively engaged in collecting data on their relationship to the scholarly productivity of students and faculty members within our own institution. PMID:19022210

  14. Comparison of learning styles of pharmacy students and faculty members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Stephanie Y; Alhreish, Suhail K; Popovich, Nicholas G

    2012-12-12

    To compare dominant learning styles of pharmacy students and faculty members and between faculty members in different tracks. Gregorc Style Delineator (GSD) and Zubin's Pharmacists' Inventory of Learning Styles (PILS) were administered to students and faculty members at an urban, Midwestern college of pharmacy. Based on responses from 299 students (classes of 2008, 2009, and 2010) and 59 faculty members, GSD styles were concrete sequential (48%), abstract sequential (18%), abstract random (13%), concrete random (13%), and multimodal (8%). With PILS, dominant styles were assimilator (47%) and converger (30%). There were no significant differences between faculty members and student learning styles nor across pharmacy student class years (p>0.05). Learning styles differed between men and women across both instruments (pstyles (p=0.01). Learning styles differed among respondents based on gender and faculty track.

  15. Who Assists the Faculty? The Need for Mentorship Programs for Faculty Undertaking Global Education Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Yasmin; London, Chad; Carston, Cathy; Salyers, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the expectations, motivations, and experiences of Canadian faculty members undertaking development and implementation of global education initiatives (GEI) for students in the form of exchange and study abroad programs, supervised practical coursework, and experiential learning in international settings. Findings revealed that…

  16. Faculty Retention factors at European Business Schools. How Deans and Faculty Perceptions Differ.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Moratis; P.J. van Baalen (Peter); L.H. Teunter (Linda); P.H.A.M. Verhaegen

    2005-01-01

    textabstractDevelopments in the management education environment present business schools with several challenges. Among these, perhaps the most important to address relates to a mission-critical resource for business schools: faculty retention. In this paper, we position and examine this problem

  17. Library School Faculty Member Perceptions Regarding Faculty Status for Academic Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Paul Alan

    2010-01-01

    The faculties of the library schools listed as ALA-accredited are directly involved in setting the direction of the education provided to academic librarians through curriculum development and teaching. The curricula and teaching at ALA-accredited library schools revolve around aspects of librarianship such as providing research assistance at a…

  18. Nurse practitioner faculty research: Results from the 2012 National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, Susan Weber; Bloch, Joan Rosen; Westrin, David; Fogg, Louis

    2015-12-01

    To better understand the research capacity and productivity of nurse practitioner (NP) faculty, a study was conducted to describe the types of research that have been and are being completed by National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) members. A web-based survey was developed with input from members of the NONPF Research Special Interest Group and the NONPF Board. This 23-question survey included demographic, academic degree, NP population focus, and research-related questions. Three e-mails were sent to NONPF members over a 10-week period of time (late December 2012 to early February 2013). Respondents (N = 344) in the sample were Advanced Practice Registered Nurses with either a Masters, Doctor of Nursing Practice, DNS or PhD as their highest academic degree. Study results demonstrated that current NP faculty research includes a wide breadth of clinical areas studied, types of methodologies used, variety of funding mechanisms, and successful publication records. Because NP faculty conduct a wide array of research on clinically relevant topics, and demonstrate successful funding and publication track records, they are poised to continue to be leaders in healthcare research. ©2015 American Association of Nurse Practitioners.

  19. Faculty Perceptions Related to Teaching Online: A Starting Point for Designing Faculty Development Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Shelly; Grover, Kenda S.; Turner, Ronna C.; Alexander, Jackson C.

    2017-01-01

    To design and deliver meaningful professional development programs for faculty who teach online, the unit responsible for these activities should have a clear idea of what content participants might find most beneficial to their practice, as well as what can improve instructor and student satisfaction. Using an online survey, this study explored…

  20. Evaluating Faculty Work: Expectations and Standards of Faculty Performance in Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardre, Patricia; Cox, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Expectations and the way they are communicated can influence employees' motivation and performance. Previous research has demonstrated individual effects of workplace climate and individual differences on faculty productivity. The present study focused on the characteristics of institutional performance standards, evaluation processes and…

  1. Faculty Transformation in Curriculum Transformation: The Role of Faculty Development in Campus Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Elizabeth; Williams, Letitia

    2016-01-01

    Curriculum transformation is often cited as one of the key strategies for internationalizing higher education in the United States, and faculty members play a central role in this process. The purpose of the study we report here was to explore the potential for professional development initiatives to foster the transformation in perspectives…

  2. Elements of distance learning in the course of chemistry for engineering faculty students of People's Friendship University of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О А Егорова

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At the Department of General Chemistry RUDN a program control and consulting activities is developed.. This program is conducted with the use of Internet technology and is used for training students of evening and correspondence departments of the Faculty of Engineering of PFUR in the study course "Chemistry". Application of this technology can improve the quality of student learning. In article the received results are stated.

  3. Faculty Engagement in Higher Educational Institution – A proposed model

    OpenAIRE

    Arup BARMAN; Roy SAIKAT

    2011-01-01

    An engaged faculty will show a high degree of commitment and involvement in the profession. For him/her teaching is more of commitment than compliance. Important thing to be noticed here is where this commitment and involvement of a faculty reflect upon? This paper tries to go deeper into the analysis of justifying what engages the faculties of management colleges and institutions in such a way that it enhances the students’ performance.

  4. The evolution of educational information systems and nurse faculty roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ramona; Meyers, Linda; Rizzolo, Mary Anne; Rutar, Pamela; Proto, Marcia B; Newbold, Susan

    2006-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are purchasing and/or designing sophisticated administrative information systems to manage such functions as the application, admissions, and registration process, grants management, student records, and classroom scheduling. Although faculty also manage large amounts of data, few automated systems have been created to help faculty improve teaching and learning through the management of information related to individual students, the curriculum, educational programs, and program evaluation. This article highlights the potential benefits that comprehensive educational information systems offer nurse faculty.

  5. Mentoring Nontenured Track Nursing Faculty: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Deborah; Shieh, Carol; McLennon, Susan M; Pike, Caitlin; Hartman, Taylor; Shah, Hena

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of mentoring strategies for nursing faculty progression and productivity in the nontenure track at institutions of higher education. Sixty articles were included in the review. Findings revealed that nontenure track nursing faculty require planned programs and mentoring strategies unique to their role and abilities. Schools of nursing can improve on faculty progression, scholarship, and career growth by providing structured mentoring activity.

  6. Advancing a Program of Research within a Nursing Faculty Role

    OpenAIRE

    Nolan, Marie T.; Wenzel, Jennifer; Han, Hae-Ra.; Allen, Jerilyn K.; Paez, Kathryn A.; Mock, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Doctoral students and new faculty members often seek advice from more senior faculty on how to advance their program of research. Students may ask whether they should choose the manuscript option for their dissertation or whether they should seek a postdoctoral fellowship. New faculty members wonder whether they should pursue a career development (K) award and whether they need a mentor as they strive to advance their research while carrying out teaching, service, and practice responsibilitie...

  7. Engineering Faculty Indicate High Levels of Awareness and Use of the Library but Tend to Consult Google and Google Scholar First for Research Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Sullo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Zhang, L. (2015. Use of library services by engineering faculty at Mississippi State University, a large land grant institution. Science & Technology Libraries, 34(3, 272-286. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0194262X.2015.1090941 Objective – To investigate the engineering faculty’s information-seeking behaviour, experiences, awareness, and use of the university library. Design – Web-based survey questionnaire. Setting – The main campus of a state university in the United States of America. Subjects – 119 faculty members within 8 engineering departments. Methods – An email invitation to participate in a 16-item electronic survey questionnaire, with questions related to library use, was sent in the spring of 2015 to 119 engineering faculty members. Faculty were given 24 days to complete the survey, and a reminder email was sent 10 days after the original survey invitation. Main Results – Thirty-eight faculty members responded to the survey, representing a response rate of 32%. Overall, faculty had a high level of use and awareness of both online and physical library resources and services, although their awareness of certain scholarly communication services, such as data archiving and copyright advisory, was significantly lower. Faculty tend to turn to Google and Google Scholar when searching for information rather than turning to library databases. Faculty do not use social media to keep up with library news and updates. The library website, as well as liaison librarians, were cited as the primary sources for this type of information. Conclusions – The researcher concludes that librarians need to do a better job of marketing library resources, such as discipline-specific databases, as well as other library search tools. Because faculty use web search engines as a significant source of information, the author proposes further research on this behaviour, and suggests more action to educate faculty on different search tools

  8. Climate Change Education for General Education Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbay, G.; Fox-Lykens, R.; Fuoco, M. J.; Phalen, L.; Harcourt, P.; Veron, D. E.; Rogers, M.; Merrill, J.

    2016-12-01

    As MADE-CLEAR scientists, our ultimate goal is to inform the public about climate change through education. Education will provide citizens with important tools for adapting and coping against climate change through the understanding of the cause and effects of climate change, and the role they play in counteracting these effects. MADE-CLEAR is connecting educators with resources such as lesson plans and hands-on activities so they can easily incorporate climate change into their curriculum. This past year Delaware State University held workshops for Chemistry and Math faculty to provide information and resources to help integrate climate change education into their classes. We presented them with information on climate change and demonstrated several laboratory activities that would be applicable to their classes. Such activities included a sea level rise graphing exercise, ocean acidification pH demonstration, ocean acidification's effect on organism's demonstration, carbon dioxide variability and heat trapping gas simulation. The goals of the workshops are to implement a multidisciplinary approach in climate change education. Workshops are prepared hands-on heavy followed by the lectures and video resources. Pre- and post-workshop assessment questions on the workshop contents are provided to monitor faculty understanding of the climate change content. In doing so, we aim to improve climate literacy in our higher education students.

  9. Minority dental faculty development: responsibility and challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkford, Jeanne C; Valachovic, Richard W; Weaver, Richard G; West, Joseph F

    2010-12-01

    Over at least the last twenty years, the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) has given attention and priority to increasing the number of underrepresented minority (URM) dental school applicants, enrollees, and faculty members and to meeting the challenges of achieving diversity in the oral health workforce of the future as racial and ethnic minorities continue to grow and are expected to comprise more than 50 percent of the U.S. population by the middle of the twenty-first century. Dental schools have the responsibility of preparing dentists to provide oral health care for the nation's population. This includes creating a workforce of adequate size and racial/ethnic composition. As part of ADEA's priorities to improve the recruitment, retention, and development of URMs in the dental profession, with funding from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, ADEA launched the Minority Dental Faculty Development Program in 2004. The intent of the program is to foster academic partnerships, mentoring, and institutional commitment and leadership designed to increase the number of URM individuals interested in and prepared for careers in academic dentistry.

  10. Mobile Technology and Liberal Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossing, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author offers reflections on the impact of mobile technology for liberal education. These reflections are based on his own experience of incorporating iPads in his communication courses during the 2010-2011 academic year. As a member of an interdisciplinary faculty learning community on the use of mobile tablets, he explored…

  11. Art Education Technology: Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2007-01-01

    The application of digital storytelling to art education is an interdisciplinary, inquiry-based, hands-on project that integrates the arts, education, local communities, technology, and storytelling. Through digital storytelling, students develop and apply multiliteracy skills, aesthetic sensitivities, and critical faculties to address greater…

  12. Structured Annual Faculty Review Program Accelerates Professional Development and Promotion

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    Stanley J. Robboy MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective observational study on faculty development analyzes the Duke University Pathology Department’s 18-year experience with a structured mentoring program involving 51 junior faculty members. The majority had MD degrees only (55%. The percentage of young women faculty hires before 1998 was 25%, increasing to 72% after 2005. Diversity also broadened from 9% with varied heritages before 1998 to 37% since then. The mentoring process pivoted on an annual review process. The reviews generally helped candidates focus much earlier, identified impediments they individually felt, and provided new avenues to gain a national reputation for academic excellence. National committee membership effectively helped gain national exposure. Thirty-eight percent of the mentees served on College of American Pathologists (CAP committees, exponential multiples of any other national society. Some used CAP resources to develop major programs, some becoming nationally and internationally recognized for their academic activities. Several faculty gained national recognition as thought leaders for publishing about work initiated to serve administrative needs in the Department. The review process identified the need for more protected time for research, issues with time constraints, and avoiding exploitation when collaborating with other departments. This review identified a rigorous faculty mentoring and review process that included annual career counseling, goal-oriented academic careers, monitored advancement to promotion, higher salaries, and national recognition. All contributed to high faculty satisfaction and low faculty turnover. We conclude that a rigorous annual faculty review program and its natural sequence, promotion, can greatly foster faculty satisfaction.

  13. The essential value of projects in faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusic, Maryellen E; Milner, Robert J; Tisdell, Elizabeth J; Taylor, Edward W; Quillen, David A; Thorndyke, Luanne E

    2010-09-01

    Projects--planned activities with specific goals and outcomes--have been used in faculty development programs to enhance participant learning and development. Projects have been employed most extensively in programs designed to develop faculty as educators. The authors review the literature and report the results of their 2008 study of the impact of projects within the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine Junior Faculty Development Program, a comprehensive faculty development program. Using a mixed-methods approach, the products of project work, the academic productivity of program graduates, and the impact of projects on career development were analyzed. Faculty who achieved the most progress on their projects reported the highest number of academic products related to their project and the highest number of overall academic achievements. Faculty perceived that their project had three major effects on their professional development: production of a tangible outcome, development of a career focus, and development of relationships with mentors and peers. On the basis of these findings and a review of the literature, the authors conclude that projects are an essential element of a faculty development program. Projects provide a foundation for future academic success by enabling junior faculty to develop and hone knowledge and skills, identify a career focus and gain recognition within their community, generate scholarship, allocate time to academic work, and establish supportive relationships and collaborative networks. A list of best practices to successfully incorporate projects within faculty development programs is provided.

  14. Curriculum revision: reaching faculty consensus through the Nominal Group Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D C; Rhodes, R; Baker, A S

    1998-10-01

    A fundamental concept to initiate change in the curriculum revision process is to overcome resistance to change and the boundaries of self-interest. Curriculum change cannot occur without an "unfreezing" of faculty values and interests. The Nominal Group Technique (NGT) was used to facilitate faculty identification of areas needing change in the undergraduate nursing curriculum. The process led to the generation of numerous independent ideas in which all faculty participated. The revised curriculum which resulted from the NGT process has had full and enthusiastic support of the faculty.

  15. Exploring the Potential of Mobile Learning Use Among Faculty Members

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    Mansour A Alwraikat

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate faculty members' attitudes toward mobile learning in King Saud University. The sample of the study consisted of 362 faculty members from King Saud University in Saudi Arabia during the academic year 2012-2013. A questionnaire consisted of 37 items was developed to measure the attitudes. The results showed that the attitudes of faculty members towards mobile learning are positive and there are statistically significant differences attributed to gender in favor of (female faculty members, academic rank in favor of (instructor, and academic experience in favor of (21 years of experience and more.

  16. Creating a Curriculum for Training Health Profession Faculty Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Pamela H; Robins, Lynne S; Schaad, Dotiglas

    2005-01-01

    ... of physicians, nurses, and other health professional faculty leaders. Methods: Executive and advisory committees became a collaborative team, surveying and cataloguing existing educational tools and materials...

  17. A Production Lab the Faculty Can Call Their Own.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, Donald J.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a case study of the development of a faculty media production laboratory by Michigan State University's media center, describing funding, facilities, promotion, utilization, and future plans. (CMV)

  18. Survey of generational aspects of nurse faculty organizational commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, Lara; Candela, Lori; Gutierrez, Antonio P

    2011-01-01

    To describe organizational commitment and generational differences in nursing faculty. The study provides new knowledge on generational differences in organizational commitment among nursing faculty with regard to work values, perceived organizational support, perceived person-organization fit, developmental experiences, and global job satisfaction. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used with random stratified sampling procedures. Surveys measuring organizational commitment and related constructs were sent electronically to 4886 faculty, yielding a 30% response rate. Significant differences were noted between generations of faculty regarding organizational commitment and related measures. Include specific strategies for fostering commitment from each generation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Knowledge processing and faculty engagement in multicultural university settings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmer, Jan; Jonasson, Charlotte; Lauring, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    productive and healthier faculty members. In this study, based on a sample consisting of 489 members of multicultural university departments, we set out to investigate the relationship between internal knowledge processing – conceptualised as the ability to locate and share knowledge in the faculty group...... – and faculty engagement. Our hypotheses are based on social learning theory and social exchange theory predicting that increased knowledge sharing activities could facilitate an environment in which faculty engagement thrives. In order to test our hypotheses we use multiple regression analysis. We assessed...

  20. Factors affecting allied health faculty job satisfaction: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romig, Barbara; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie; Denmark, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Evidence in the literature suggests job satisfaction can make a difference in keeping qualified workers on the job, but little research has been conducted focusing specifically on allied health faculty. In order to attract and retain top quality faculty, colleges and universities should understand the variables impacting faculty satisfaction and develop a plan to enhance satisfaction. An integrative literature review (CINHAL, ERIC, Journal of Allied Health, Chronicle of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and current books on job satisfaction) of faculty job satisfaction and dissatisfaction produced a variety of publications presenting the key determinants of job satisfaction by allied health faculty in the United States. The purpose of the analysis was to examine the various factors that influence job satisfaction, especially by allied health faculty, in institutions of higher education in the U.S. The procedure used for this analysis consisted of reviewing allied health and higher education faculty studies to identify factors influencing job satisfaction, research questions, sample size reported, instruments used for measurement of job satisfaction, and job satisfaction results. While the theoretical models of allied health and higher education faculty job satisfaction exist separately in the literature, their remarkable similarities permit the prospect of a contemporary framework of the essential components of job satisfaction. Potential opportunities for continuing research on the personal and professional variables impacting job satisfaction of allied health faculty and similar disciplines are presented.

  1. Students' Involvement in Faculty Research: Ethical and Methodological Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda M. Ferguson

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Faculty who engage students as participants in their qualitative research often encounter methodological and ethical problems. Ethical issues arise from the fiduciary relationship between faculty and their students, and violations of that relationship occur when the educator has a dual role as researcher with those students. Methodological issues arise from research designs to address these ethical issues. This conflict is particularly evident in faculty research on pedagogy in their own disciplines, for which students are necessary as participants but are captive in the relationship. In this article, the authors explore the issues of double agency when faculty involve students as participants in their research.

  2. Creating a Curriculum for Training Health Profession Faculty Leaders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mitchell, Pamela H; Robins, Lynne S; Schaad, Dotiglas

    2005-01-01

    .... They synthesized materials about patient safety and interprofessional collaboration to provide faculty with tools for assessing and improving their current teaching practices that influence patient safety. Results...

  3. Analysis of the extent and efficiency of the partnership and collaboration between the dental faculties and National Dental Associations within the FDI-ERO zone: a dental faculties' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamalik, Nermin; Mersel, Alex; Margvelashvili, Vladimer; Melo, Paulo; Jerolimov, Vjekoslav

    2013-10-01

    As National Dental Associations and dental faculties can be considered as the two major institutions representing national organised dentistry, their further extended collaboration is crucial in responding to the many global oral health matters and issues. The main aim of the present study is to analyse the nature and extent of the partnership between the dental faculties and NDAs. A questionnaire was developed focusing on the relationship between National Dental Associations and the dental faculties within the World Dental Federation-European Regional Organisation zone regarding their major professional activities such as dental education, workforce issues, improvement of national oral health, science and knowledge transfer. The questionnaire was sent to 173 dental faculties within the countries in the European Regional Organisation zone. Response rate was 62/173 (35.8%). Major activities of dental faculties were listed as implementation of new technologies into practice (72%), followed by improvement of national oral health (65%), while the least involved activity was dental workforce issues (42%). The dental faculties perceived their relationship with the National Dental Associations as quite satisfactory in the field of continuing education and science and knowledge transfer. However, their relationship was suggested to need significant improvement when dealing with undergraduate dental education curriculum, dental workforce issues and negotiations with the authorities regarding professional matters/issues. Despite the fact that there are differences between the perceived competences and responsibilities of the two bodies, the presence of so many potential areas of collaboration, the increasing expectations from the individual dentists/dental profession and the new challenges of the dental profession give this relationship significant importance. Communication, regular contacts, more joint activities and improved collaboration is needed between dental faculties

  4. Integration of a NASA faculty fellowship project within an undergraduate engineering capstone design class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmen, C.

    2012-11-01

    The United States (US) National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) provides university faculty fellowships that prepare the faculty to implement engineering design class projects that possess the potential to contribute to NASA ESMD objectives. The goal of the ESMD is to develop new capabilities, support technologies and research that will enable sustained and affordable human and robotic space exploration. In order to create a workforce that will have the desire and skills necessary to achieve these goals, the NASA ESMD faculty fellowship program enables university faculty to work on specific projects at a NASA field center and then implement the project within their capstone engineering design class. This allows the senior - or final year - undergraduate engineering design students, the opportunity to develop critical design experience using methods and design tools specified within NASA's Systems Engineering (SE) Handbook. The faculty fellowship projects focus upon four specific areas critical to the future of space exploration: spacecraft, propulsion, lunar and planetary surface systems and ground operations. As the result of a 2010 fellowship, whereby faculty research was conducted at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama (AL), senior design students in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) department at the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) had the opportunity to complete senior design projects that pertained to current work conducted to support ESMD objectives. Specifically, the UAH MAE students utilized X-TOOLSS (eXploration Toolset for the Optimization Of Launch and Space Systems), an Evolutionary Computing (EC) design optimization software, as well as design, analyze, fabricate and test a lunar regolith burrowing device - referred to as the Lunar Wormbot (LW) - that is aimed at exploring and retrieving samples of lunar regolith. These two projects were

  5. WHAT ARE THE USAGE CONDITIONS OF WEB 2.0 TOOLS FACULTY OF EDUCATION STUDENTS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet AGIR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available As a result of advances in technology and then the emergence of using Internet in every step of life, web that provides access to the documents such as picture, audio, animation and text in Internet started to be used. At first, web consists of only visual and text pages that couldn’t enable to make user’s interaction. However, it is seen that not only access to information but also analyzing, configuring, sharing information and creating new information came into the prominence in 21st century. Changing needs and conditions has led to the changing web and the emergence of Web 2.0. The purpose of the study is to be examined faculty of education students' the usage condition of Web 2.0 tools in terms of various variables. This is a descriptive style study with a survey model that aims to present faculty of education students' the usage condition of Web 2.0 tools. The population of research composed of 359 students who study at first grade of Faculty of Education in Istanbul University in 2008-2009 academic year. These students were taken from eight different departments through random sampling for this research. The data collection used in this research was a questionnaire that is developed by researcher with 18 items. One-way ANOVA, t-test, was made to determine whether there was a significant different between averages according to the varieties about individual properties. It is seen in analyses which were practiced in line with this aim that faculty of education students' the usage condition of Web 2.0 tools differentiates in terms of departments, gender, high school which they graduate, the year of Internet and computer usage, weekly average duration of Internet and computer usage. It can be generally said that faculty of education students don't use Web 2.0 applications in the expected level. It is very important that pre-service teachers should learn how to use these tools as well as they should receive education of computer literacy

  6. Four Cornerstones to Mentoring Adjunct Faculty Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Carolyn; McIntyre, Melissa; Jazzar, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Online teaching and learning in higher education is growing at an exponential rate! This growth will continue to escalate during the 21st century! The powerful tools of technology will deliver instruction in unprecedented ways. Yet, the tools of technology are only as effective as the masters of this craft. Those using technology to teach online…

  7. Faculty Professional Development for Quality Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou-Ray, Jennifer; Bentley, Courtney C.

    2015-01-01

    Meaningful technology use in education continues to improve given an increase in access to available technologies and professional development. For educators, professional development has focused on approaches for technology use that foster content-specific best practices and improve student learning in traditional classroom formats. Meaningful…

  8. Race, disadvantage and faculty experiences in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda; Cooper, Lisa A; Carr, Phyllis

    2010-12-01

    Despite compelling reasons to draw on the contributions of under-represented minority (URM) faculty members, US medical schools lack these faculty, particularly in leadership and senior roles. The study's purpose was to document URM faculty perceptions and experience of the culture of academic medicine in the US and to raise awareness of obstacles to achieving the goal of having people of color in positions of leadership in academic medicine. The authors conducted a qualitative interview study in 2006-2007 of faculty in five US medical schools chosen for their diverse regional and organizational attributes. Using purposeful sampling of medical faculty, 96 faculty were interviewed from four different career stages (early, plateaued, leaders and left academic medicine) and diverse specialties with an oversampling of URM faculty. We identified patterns and themes emergent in the coded data. Analysis was inductive and data driven. Predominant themes underscored during analyses regarding the experience of URM faculty were: difficulty of cross-cultural relationships; isolation and feeling invisible; lack of mentoring, role models and social capital; disrespect, overt and covert bias/discrimination; different performance expectations related to race/ethnicity; devaluing of research on community health care and health disparities; the unfair burden of being identified with affirmative action and responsibility for diversity efforts; leadership's role in diversity goals; and financial hardship. Achieving an inclusive culture for diverse medical school faculty would help meet the mission of academic medicine to train a physician and research workforce that meets the disparate needs of our multicultural society. Medical school leaders need to value the inclusion of URM faculty. Failure to fully engage the skills and insights of URM faculty impairs our ability to provide the best science, education or medical care.

  9. Race, Disadvantage and Faculty Experiences in Academic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lisa A.; Carr, Phyllis

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Despite compelling reasons to draw on the contributions of under-represented minority (URM) faculty members, US medical schools lack these faculty, particularly in leadership and senior roles. Objective The study’s purpose was to document URM faculty perceptions and experience of the culture of academic medicine in the US and to raise awareness of obstacles to achieving the goal of having people of color in positions of leadership in academic medicine. Design The authors conducted a qualitative interview study in 2006–2007 of faculty in five US medical schools chosen for their diverse regional and organizational attributes. Participants Using purposeful sampling of medical faculty, 96 faculty were interviewed from four different career stages (early, plateaued, leaders and left academic medicine) and diverse specialties with an oversampling of URM faculty. Approach We identified patterns and themes emergent in the coded data. Analysis was inductive and data driven. Results Predominant themes underscored during analyses regarding the experience of URM faculty were: difficulty of cross-cultural relationships; isolation and feeling invisible; lack of mentoring, role models and social capital; disrespect, overt and covert bias/discrimination; different performance expectations related to race/ethnicity; devaluing of research on community health care and health disparities; the unfair burden of being identified with affirmative action and responsibility for diversity efforts; leadership’s role in diversity goals; and financial hardship. Conclusions Achieving an inclusive culture for diverse medical school faculty would help meet the mission of academic medicine to train a physician and research workforce that meets the disparate needs of our multicultural society. Medical school leaders need to value the inclusion of URM faculty. Failure to fully engage the skills and insights of URM faculty impairs our ability to provide the best science

  10. Computer Technology-Infused Learning Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared; Anyanwu, Longy O.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine students' perception of instructional integration of computer technology to improve learning. Two key questions were investigated in this study: (a) What is the students' perception of faculty integration of computer technology into classroom instruction? (b) To what extent does the students' perception of…

  11. Resistance to Technological Change in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moerschell, Linda

    2009-01-01

    Initiating changes in technology, promoting utilization, and managing resistance by faculty may be among the most pressing challenges for academic leadership. Change that involves new technology is an ideal example of the systemic nature of organizational change because it includes infrastructure, expert knowledge, training, long-term vision,…

  12. First-Year Faculty of Color: Narratives about Entering the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Eddie R.; McGowan, Brian L.; Zerquera, Desiree D.

    2017-01-01

    The experiences of first-year, tenure-track faculty have been missing in the literature about new or junior faculty. Furthermore, the extant literature about new faculty does not offer a critical outlook on how oppressive institutional structures shape how first-year faculty of color approach faculty work. Drawing from analytical narratives, the…

  13. An exploration of undergraduate medical students' satisfaction with faculty support supervision during community placements in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubuuke, Aloysius G; Oria, Hussein; Dhabangi, Aggrey; Kiguli, Sarah; Sewankambo, Nelson K

    2015-01-01

    To produce health professionals who are oriented towards addressing community priority health needs, the training in medical schools has been transformed to include a component of community-based training. During this period, students spend a part of their training in the communities they are likely to serve upon graduation. They engage and empower local people in the communities to address their health needs during their placements, and at the same time learn from the people. During the community-based component, students are constantly supervised by faculty from the university to ensure that the intended objectives are achieved. The purpose of the present study was to explore student experiences of support supervision from university faculty during their community-based education, research and service (COBERS placements) and to identify ways in which the student learning can be improved through improved faculty supervision. This was a cross-sectional study involving students at the College of Health Sciences, Makerere University, Uganda, who had a community-based component during their training. Data were collected using both questionnaires and focus group discussions. Quantitative data were analyzed using statistical software and thematic approaches were used for the analysis of qualitative data. Most students reported satisfaction with the COBERS supervision; however, junior students were less satisfied with the supervision than the more senior students with more experience of community-based training. Although many supervisors assisted students before departure to COBERS sites, a significant number of supervisors made little follow-up while students were in the community. Incorporating the use of information technology avenues such as emails and skype sessions was suggested as a potential way of enhancing supervision amidst resource constraints without faculty physically visiting the sites. Although many students were satisfied with COBERS supervision, there

  14. Private Cloud Communities for Faculty and Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Tomal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Massive open online courses (MOOCs and public and private cloud communities continue to flourish in the field of higher education. However, MOOCs have received criticism in recent years and offer little benefit to students already enrolled at an institution. This article advocates for the collaborative creation and use of institutional, program or student-specific private cloud communities developed as a way to promote academic identity, information dissemination, social discourse, and to form a bridge between faculty, administration and students. Concrete steps to build a private cloud are described. Placing a greater emphasis on meeting the needs of enrolled students versus engaging the masses in a MOOC for “edutainment” purposes is recommended.

  15. Medical faculty opinions of peer tutoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudland, Joy R; Rennie, Sarah C

    2014-01-01

    Peer tutoring is a well-researched and established method of learning defined as 'a medical student facilitating the learning of another medical student'. While it has been adopted in many medical schools, other schools may be reluctant to embrace this approach. The attitude of the teaching staff, responsible for organizing and or teaching students in an undergraduate medical course to formal peer teaching will affect how it is introduced and operationalized. This study elicits faculty opinions on how best to introduce peer tutoring for medical students. Structured telephone interviews were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis. The interviews were with medically qualified staff responsible for organizing or teaching undergraduate medical students at a New Zealand medical school. Six questions were posed regarding perceived advantages and disadvantages of peer tutoring and how the school and staff could support a peer-tutoring scheme if one was introduced. Staff generally supported the peer tutoring concept, offering a safe environment for learning with its teachers being so close in career stage to the learners. They also say disadvantages when the student-teachers imparted wrong information and when schools used peer tutoring to justify a reduction in teaching staff. Subjects felt that faculty would be more accepting of peer tutoring if efforts were made to build staff 'buy in' and empowerment, train peer tutors and introduce a solid evaluation process. Staff of our school expressed some concerns about peer tutoring that are not supported in the literature, signaling a need for better communication about the benefits and disadvantages of peer tutoring.

  16. Faculty Acceptance of a Workload Survey in One Major University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.

    1978-01-01

    Faculty at a state university were asked how they felt about the workload survey administered on campus and whether the NCHEMS' factors were related to their acceptance of the survey. Results upheld one NCHEMS relationship: that a positive attitude toward a survey is related to perceived value of the data for allocating faculty resources and…

  17. How Chairpersons Enhance Faculty Research: A Grounded Theory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Brown, Martha L.

    1992-01-01

    A study examined how department chairpersons enhanced research performance of college and university faculty. By applying grounded theory methods to a corpus of 33 interviews with chairpersons, the study resulted in a typology of chair roles (administrative, advocacy, interpersonal), then assessed the process of assistance for faculty at four…

  18. What Faculty Interviews Reveal about Meaningful Learning in the

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Fay, Michael; Bruck, Laura B.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2013-01-01

    Forty chemistry faculty from American Chemical Society-approved departments were interviewed to determine their goals for undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Faculty were stratified by type of institution, departmental success with regard to National Science Foundation funding for laboratory reform, and level of laboratory course. Interview…

  19. New Faculty Members' Emotions: A Mixed-Method Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupnisky, Robert H.; Pekrun, Reinhard; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    The current study developed when new faculty members spontaneously reported discrete emotions during focus groups exploring the factors affecting their success. Qualitative analysis using the framework of Pekrun's control-value theory of emotions revealed 18 different emotions with varying frequencies. A follow-up survey of 79 new faculty members…

  20. A Practical Application to Training Instructional Television Faculty and Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromholz, Susan Foster; Johnstone, Sally M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors describe the University of Maryland's response to the training needs of instructional television faculty and students. The faculty training program consists of a orientation program featuring a videotape. The student training program is a package including a videotape and a student handbook to be used by off-campus students. (CH)